Science.gov

Sample records for actual experimental measurements

  1. Experimental study on the regenerator under actual operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2002-05-01

    An experimental apparatus was prepared to investigate thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of the regenerator under its actual operating conditions. The apparatus included a compressor to pressurize and depressurize regenerator with various operating frequencies. Cold end of the regenerator was maintained around 100 K by means of liquid nitrogen container and heat exchanger. Instantaneous gas temperature and mass flow rate were measured at both ends of the regenerator during the whole pressure cycle. Pulsating pressure and pressure drop across the regenerator were also measured. The operating frequency of the pressure cycle was varied between 3 and 60 Hz, which are typical operating frequencies of Gifford-McMahon, pulse tube, and Stirling cryocoolers. First, friction factor for the wire screen mesh was directly determined from room temperature experiments. When the operating frequency was less than 9 Hz, the oscillating flow friction factor was nearly same as the steady flow friction factor for Reynolds number up to 100. For 60 Hz operations, the ratio of oscillating flow friction factor to steady flow one was increased as hydraulic Reynolds number became high. When the Reynolds number was 100, this ratio was about 1.6. Second, ineffectiveness of the regenerator was obtained when the cold-end was maintained around 100 K and the warm-end at 300 K to simulate the actual operating condition of the regenerator in cryocooler. Effect of the operating frequency on ineffectiveness of regenerator was discussed at low frequency range.

  2. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  3. What do tests of formal reasoning actually measure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    Tests of formal operational reasoning derived from Piagetian theory have been found to be effective predictors of academic achievement. Yet Piaget's theory regarding the underlying nature of formal operations and their employment in specific contexts has run into considerable empirical difficulty. The primary purpose of this study was to present the core of an alternative theory of the nature of advanced scientific reasoning. That theory, referred to as the multiple-hypothesis theory, argues that tests of formal operational reasoning actually measure the extent to which persons have acquired the ability to initiate reasoning with more than one specific antecedent condition, or if they are unable to imagine more than one antecedent condition, they are aware that more than one is possible; therefore conclusions that are drawn are tempered by this possibility. As a test of this multiple-hypothesis theory of advanced reasoning and the contrasting Piagetian theory of formal operations, a sample of 922 college students were first classified as concrete operational, transitional, or formal operational, based upon responses to standard Piagetian measures of formal operational reasoning. They were then administered seven logic tasks. Actual response patterns to the tasks were analyzed and found to be similar to predicted response patterns derived from the multiple-hypothesis theory and were different from those predicted by Piagetian theory. Therefore, support was obtained for the multiple-hypothesis theory. The terms intuitive and reflective were suggested to replace the terms concrete operational and formal operational to refer to persons at varying levels of intellectual development.

  4. Construction and Validation of a Scale to Measure Maslow's Concept of Self-Actualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kenneth Melvin; Randolph, Daniel Lee

    1978-01-01

    Designed to measure self-actualization as defined by Abraham Maslow, the Jones Self Actualizing Scale, as assessed in this study, possesses content validity, reliability, and a number of other positive characteristics. (JC)

  5. Actual Minds of Two Halves: Measurement, Metaphor and the Message

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Georgina

    2015-01-01

    This article takes "measurement" as a will to determine or fix space and time, which allows for a comparison of ontological models of space and time from Western and Maori traditions. The spirit of "measurement" is concomitantly one of fixing meaning, which is suggested as the essence of the growth of the scientific genre of…

  6. Experimental study of environmental tobacco smoke particles under actual indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Ning, Z; Cheung, C S; Fu, J; Liu, M A; Schnell, M A

    2006-08-31

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is a major source of human exposure to airborne particles. In order to provide more information necessary for human exposure investigations, the aim of the work presented here is to investigate experimentally the variation of the ETS particle concentration and size distribution under an actual indoor environment, in a room of 30 m3, using human smokers. The effect of number of cigarettes and brands of cigarettes, the effect of sampling location and the effect of ventilation rates were investigated. The results indicated little difference in the geometric mean diameter (GMD) of the ETS particles from those in background air. Under a ventilation rate of 0.03 m3/s, the concentration of the ETS particles reached a peak value at the sampling point shortly after completing the smoking process. The GMD first increased due to coagulation and diffusion deposition, and finalize decreased due to the effect of ventilation. Smoking two cigarettes at the same time would increase the initial concentration and led to an increase in GMD of the ETS particles. Two different brands of cigarette with different tar contents released ETS particles of different GMDs but similar particle concentrations. Spatial variation in particle concentration was obvious only in the first 600 s of the tests and tended to fade out subsequently. Stronger ventilation would reduce the concentration and GMD of the particles.

  7. Experimental investigation of panel radiator heat output enhancement for efficient thermal use under actual operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisir, Tamer; Baskaya, Senol; Onur Yazar, Hakan; Yucedag, Sinan

    2015-05-01

    In this study the heat output of a panel-convector-convector-panel radiator (PCCP) under controlled laboratory conditions under Turkish household and especially Ankara conditions was investigated experimentally. In this sense, investigations were performed for different heating water mass flow rates, water inlet temperatures and radiator inlet and outlet connection positions, which are most commonly used in Turkey. An experimental setup was built for this purpose in a test room where temperature was controlled and held constant during the experiments. Inlet and outlet water temperatures and mass flow rates were measured and heat output of the radiator was calculated. Infrared thermal camera visualizations of the steel panel radiator front surface were also performed.

  8. Relative Proximity Theory: Measuring the Gap between Actual and Ideal Online Course Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swart, William; MacLeod, Kenneth; Paul, Ravi; Zhang, Aixiu; Gagulic, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Theory of Transactional Distance and Needs Assessment, this article reports a procedure for quantitatively measuring how close the actual delivery of a course was to ideal, as perceived by students. It extends Zhang's instrument and prescribes the computational steps to calculate relative proximity at the element and construct…

  9. Measuring the Disparities between Biology Undergraduates' Perceptions and Their Actual Knowledge of Scientific Literature with Clickers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandyopadhyay, Aditi

    2013-01-01

    This article demonstrates an innovative method used to determine the need for information literacy among science undergraduate students at Adelphi University. Using clickers technology, this study measured the disconnect between biology undergraduates' perceived and actual knowledge of scientific literature. The quantitative data collected in the…

  10. Direct and Indirect Measures of Learning Outcomes in an MSW Program: What Do We Actually Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderon, Orly

    2013-01-01

    This study offers a unique perspective on assessment of learning by comparing results from direct and indirect measures in a social work graduate program across two campuses of a single university. The findings suggest that students' perceptions of learning are not necessarily reflective of content and applied skills mastery. Perception of…

  11. A Conventional Method for Valid "Actual Soil pH" Measurement.

    PubMed

    Oman, Srečko F

    2012-12-01

    After recognition of the Suspension Effect problem in potentiometric measurements in aqueous suspensions, no scientific consensus about its cause and nature was obtained. Numerous conventional methods of soil pH measurement were therefore introduced for practical soil pH determination. Most of the results of these methods are not valid with regard to the international pH scale. The method proposed in the present work rejects improper procedures and introduces correct soil sampling and a suitable pH measuring technique, as follows: the indicator glass electrode, substituting for roots in the soil, is inserted in a partly diluted sample suspension of the original soil and the modified reference electrode contacts the sample in a manner that eliminates the abnormal liquid junction potential. "Actual soil pH values" measured in this way are valid but the method used is a conventional one. Namely, the irreversible potential of the glass electrode includes the suspension effect of the first kind (SE1) and is a mixed steady-state potential. It is considered by convention as a substitute for and equivalent to the equilibrium potential which as a rule does not exist in a suspension. The soil pH values measured by the proposed conventional method are reproducible and valid with regard to the international hpH scale. They could be considered as the pH values, with uncertainty of +/- 0.1 pH unit, to which the roots are exposed.

  12. Personality Trait Differences Between Young and Middle-Aged Adults: Measurement Artifacts or Actual Trends?

    PubMed

    Nye, Christopher D; Allemand, Mathias; Gosling, Samuel D; Potter, Jeff; Roberts, Brent W

    2016-08-01

    A growing body of research demonstrates that older individuals tend to score differently on personality measures than younger adults. However, recent research using item response theory (IRT) has questioned these findings, suggesting that apparent age differences in personality traits merely reflect artifacts of the response process rather than true differences in the latent constructs. Conversely, other studies have found the opposite-age differences appear to be true differences rather than response artifacts. Given these contradictory findings, the goal of the present study was to examine the measurement equivalence of personality ratings drawn from large groups of young and middle-aged adults (a) to examine whether age differences in personality traits could be completely explained by measurement nonequivalence and (b) to illustrate the comparability of IRT and confirmatory factor analysis approaches to testing equivalence in this context. Self-ratings of personality traits were analyzed in two groups of Internet respondents aged 20 and 50 (n = 15,726 in each age group). Measurement nonequivalence across these groups was negligible. The effect sizes of the mean differences due to nonequivalence ranged from -.16 to .15. Results indicate that personality trait differences across age groups reflect actual differences rather than merely response artifacts.

  13. Testing data evaluation strategies for estimating precipitation and actual evaporation from precision lysimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Frederik; Durner, Wolfgang; Fank, Johann; Pütz, Thomas; Wollschläger, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Weighing lysimeters have long been recognized as valuable tools not only for monitoring of groundwater recharge and solute transport, but also for the determination of the soil water balance and quantification of water exchange processes at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. If well embedded into an equally-vegetated environment, they reach a hitherto unprecedented accuracy in estimating precipitation (P) by rain, dew, fog, rime and snow, as well as actual evapotranspiration (ET). At the same time, they largely avoid errors made by traditional micrometeorological instruments, such as the wind error of Hellman rain samplers or the influence of subsurface heterogeneity on readings from in situ instrumentation of soil water state variables. Beginning in 2008, the Helmholtz Association established a network of terrestrial environmental observatories (TERENO) that aim at long-term monitoring of climate and land-use change consequences. A total of 126 identically designed large weighing lysimeters, operating at a sampling frequency of 1 min-1, were installed for this purpose, which raises the demand for standardized data processing methods. In theory, estimating P and ET from these measurements is straightforward: An increase in the combined mass of the soil monolith and the collected seepage water indicates P, while a decrease indicates ET. However, in practice, lysimeter data are prone to numerous sources of error, including, but not limited to, outliers, systematic errors due to plant growth and removal, data gaps, and stochastic fluctuations. The latter pose a particularly challenging problem - if we would directly calculate P and ET from a time-series that is affected by random noise, every positive fluctuation would be interpreted as P and every negative one as ET. Consequently, we would overestimate both quantities by far. The aim of this study was to evaluate algorithms that focus on eliminating the effect of these fluctuations and to estimate actual fluxes

  14. Actual light deflections in regions of crack tips and their influence on measurements in photomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Friedrich W.; Pindera, Jerzy T.; Wen, Baicheng

    Crack-tip photomechanics procedures are based on certain simplifying assumptions that are seldom discussed. In a recent paper the theoretical bases of the shadow optical methods of caustics have been analysed and tested using the results obtained by three analytical-experimental procedures, namely classical strain gage techniques, isodynes, and strain-gradient index method. It has been concluded that the straing-radient index method appears to be a suitable tool for analysis of stress states near crack tips and notches and, in particular, for testing the predictive power of the pertinent singular solutions of the linear elastic fracture mechanics and the ranges of their applicability. In the present paper, a more detailed analysis of all results obtained in light deflection experiments allows to quantify the contribution of both involved effects and to determine the distortion of the faces of the investigated plates along their crack planes. The ability of the strain-gradient light bending method to analyse some features of the three-dimensional stress-state is reported. Finally, the presented experimental evidence allows to draw conclusions related to limits of applicability of certain photomechanical measurements near crack tips. An extensive summary of this paper is published in the Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Photomechanics and Speckle Metrology, Vol. 1554A, part of SPIE's 1991 International Symposium on Optical Applied Science and Engineering, 22-26 July 1991, San Diego, CA, USA. 1

  15. Bowen ratio measurements above various vegetation covers and its comparison with actual evapotranspiration estimated by SoilClim model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavinka, P.; Trnka, M.; Fischer, M.; Kucera, J.; Mozny, M.; Zalud, Z.

    2010-09-01

    The principle of Bowen ratio is one of the available techniques for measurements of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) as one of essential water balance fractions. The main aims of submitted study were: (i) to compare the water balance of selected crops, (ii) to compare outputs of SoilClim model with observed parameters (including ETa on Bowen ratio basis). The measurements were conducted at two experimental stations in the Czech Republic (Polkovice 49°23´ (N), 17°17´ (E), 205 m a.s.l.; Domanínek 49°32´ (N), 16°15´ (E), 544 m a.s.l.) during the years 2009 and 2010. Together with Bowen ratio the global solar radiation, radiation balance, soil heat flux, volumetric soil moisture and temperature within selected depths, precipitation and wind speed were measured. The measurements were conducted simultaneously above various covers within the same soil conditions: spring barley vs. winter wheat, spring barley vs. winter rape; grass vs. poplars; harvested field after tillage vs. harvested field after cereals without any tillage. The observed parameters from different covers were compared with SoilClim estimates. SoilClim model is modular software for water balance and soil temperature modelling and finally could be used for soil Hydric and Thermic regimes (according to USDA classification) identification. The core of SoilClim is based on modified FAO Penman-Monteith methodology. Submitted study proved the applicability of SoilClim model for ETa, soil moisture within two defined layers and soil temperature (in 0.5 m depth) estimates for various crops, covers, selected soil types and climatic conditions. Acknowledgement: We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic (no. 521/09/P479) and the project NAZV QI91C054. The study was also supported by Research plan No. MSM6215648905 "Biological and technological aspects of sustainability of controlled ecosystems and their adaptability to climate change".

  16. Recent achievements for In-situ measurement: applications to an actual decommissioning project

    SciTech Connect

    Lamadie, F.; Girones, P.; Le Goaller, C.; Mahe, C.; Kohler, J.Y.; Risser, M.A.

    2007-07-01

    Decommissioning a nuclear facility implies a policy of limiting the waste volume and its chemical - and especially radiological - toxicity. It is therefore important to determine the activity level contained in each component that will be dismantled. A variety of methods and analysis techniques are used for this purpose, ranging from simple dose rate measurements to {gamma} spectrometry and {gamma} imaging. The results of several measurement campaigns in a reactor currently in operation but for which decommissioning studies have now been undertaken are discussed. The measurements provide additional radiological data for the waste inventory, which is one of the first issues to be examined. This discussion focuses on the methods used ({gamma} imaging, in situ {gamma} spectrometry, etc.), the results obtained, and their implications for the project, as well as the technological and methodological innovations implemented during these campaigns. (authors)

  17. A user-study measuring the effects of lexical simplification and coherence enhancement on perceived and actual text difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Gondy; Kauchak, David; Mouradi, Obay

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Low patient health literacy has been associated with cost increases in medicine because it contributes to inadequate care. Providing explanatory text is a convenient approach to distribute medical information and increase health literacy. Unfortunately, writing text that is easily understood is challenging. This work tests two text features for their impact on understanding: lexical simplification and coherence enhancement. Methods A user study was conducted to test the features’ effect on perceived and actual text difficulty. Individual sentences were used to test perceived difficulty. Using a 5-point Likert scale, participants compared eight pairs of original and simplified sentences. Abstracts were used to test actual difficulty. For each abstract, four versions were created: original, lexically simplified, coherence enhanced, and lexically simplified and coherence enhanced. Using a mixed design, one group of participants worked with the original and lexically simplified documents (no coherence enhancement) while a second group worked with the coherence enhanced versions. Actual difficulty was measured using a Cloze measure and multiple-choice questions. Results Using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, 200 people participated of which 187 qualified based on our data qualification tests. A paired-samples t-test for the sentence ratings showed a significant reduction in difficulty after lexical simplification (p < .001). Results for actual difficulty are based on the abstracts and associated tasks. A two-way ANOVA for the Cloze test showed no effect of coherence enhancement but a main effect for lexical simplification, with the simplification leading to worse scores (p = .004). A follow-up ANOVA showed this effect exists only for function words when coherence was not enhanced (p = .008). In contrast, a two-way ANOVA for answering multiple-choice questions showed a significant beneficial effect of coherence enhancement (p = .003) but no effect of lexical

  18. Measuring the Actual Levels and Patterns of Physical Activity/Inactivity of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Janet; Turner, Angela; Granat, Malcolm H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Lack of regular physical activity is a significant risk to health. The aim of this study was to objectively measure the levels and patterns of activity of adults with intellectual disabilities, to inform the design of studies aimed at increasing activity and health in this population. Materials and Methods: Interviews were conducted…

  19. Metabolic rate control during extravehicular activity simulations and measurement techniques during actual EVAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A description of the methods used to control and measure metabolic rate during ground simulations is given. Work levels attained at the Space Environment Simulation Laboratory are presented. The techniques and data acquired during ground simulations are described and compared with inflight procedures. Data from both the Skylab and Apollo Program were utilized and emphasis is given to the methodology, both in simulation and during flight. The basic techniques of work rate assessment are described. They include oxygen consumption, which was useful for averages over long time periods, heart rate correlations based on laboratory calibrations, and liquid cooling garment temperature changes. The relative accuracy of these methods as well as the methods of real-time monitoring at the Mission Control Center are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the metabolic measurement techniques are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to the problem of utilizing oxygen decrement for short time periods and heart rate at low work levels. A summary is given of the effectiveness of work rate control and measurements; and current plans for future EVA monitoring are discussed.

  20. Experimental comparison of exchange bias measurement methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas; Friedman, Gary

    2007-05-01

    Measurements performed on all-ferromagnetic bilayer systems and supported by model calculation results are used to compare different exchange bias characterization methods. We demonstrate that the accuracy of the conventional two-point technique based on measuring the sum of the coercive fields depends on the symmetry properties of hysteresis loops. On the other hand, the recently proposed center of mass method yields results independent of the hysteresis loop type and coincides with the two-point measurement only if the loops are symmetric. Our experimental and simulation results clearly demonstrate a strong correlation between loop asymmetry and the difference between these methods.

  1. Designed microtremor array based actual measurement and analysis of strong ground motion at Palu city, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Thein, Pyi Soe; Pramumijoyo, Subagyo; Wilopo, Wahyu; Setianto, Agung; Brotopuspito, Kirbani Sri; Kiyono, Junji; Putra, Rusnardi Rahmat

    2015-04-24

    In this study, we investigated the strong ground motion characteristics under Palu City, Indonesia. The shear wave velocity structures evaluated by eight microtremors measurement are the most applicable to determine the thickness of sediments and average shear wave velocity with Vs ≤ 300 m/s. Based on subsurface underground structure models identified, earthquake ground motion was estimated in the future Palu-Koro earthquake by using statistical green’s function method. The seismic microzonation parameters were carried out by considering several significant controlling factors on ground response at January 23, 2005 earthquake.

  2. Maximal aerobic capacity in ageing subjects: actual measurements versus predicted values.

    PubMed

    Pistea, Cristina; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Oswald, Monique; Enache, Irina; Charloux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of selection of reference values on the categorisation of measured maximal oxygen consumption (V'O2peak) as "normal" or "abnormal" in an ageing population. We compared measured V'O2peak with predicted values and the lower limit of normal (LLN) calculated with five equations. 99 (58 males and 41 females) disease-free subjects aged ≥70 years completed an incremental maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Mean V'O2peak was 1.88 L·min(-1) in men and 1.26 L·min(-1) in women. V'O2peak ranged from 89% to 108% of predicted in men, and from 88% to 164% of predicted in women, depending on the reference equation used. The proportion of subjects below the LLN ranged from 5% to 14% in men and 0-22% in women, depending on the reference equation. The LLN was lacking in one study, and was unsuitable for women in another. Most LLNs ranged between 53% and 73% of predicted. Therefore, choosing an 80% cut-off leads to overestimation of the proportion of "abnormal" subjects. To conclude, the proportion of subjects aged ≥70 years with a "low" V'O2peak differs markedly according to the chosen reference equations. In clinical practice, it is still relevant to test a sample of healthy volunteers and select the reference equations that better characterise this sample.

  3. Maximal aerobic capacity in ageing subjects: actual measurements versus predicted values

    PubMed Central

    Pistea, Cristina; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Oswald, Monique; Enache, Irina

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of selection of reference values on the categorisation of measured maximal oxygen consumption (V′O2peak) as “normal” or “abnormal” in an ageing population. We compared measured V′O2peak with predicted values and the lower limit of normal (LLN) calculated with five equations. 99 (58 males and 41 females) disease-free subjects aged ≥70 years completed an incremental maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Mean V′O2peak was 1.88 L·min−1 in men and 1.26 L·min−1 in women. V′O2peak ranged from 89% to 108% of predicted in men, and from 88% to 164% of predicted in women, depending on the reference equation used. The proportion of subjects below the LLN ranged from 5% to 14% in men and 0–22% in women, depending on the reference equation. The LLN was lacking in one study, and was unsuitable for women in another. Most LLNs ranged between 53% and 73% of predicted. Therefore, choosing an 80% cut-off leads to overestimation of the proportion of “abnormal” subjects. To conclude, the proportion of subjects aged ≥70 years with a “low” V′O2peak differs markedly according to the chosen reference equations. In clinical practice, it is still relevant to test a sample of healthy volunteers and select the reference equations that better characterise this sample. PMID:27730176

  4. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Alex S; Baker, Daniel H; Hess, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system's input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple "linear amplifier" model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer's detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system's internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity). Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF). We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies.

  5. What Do Contrast Threshold Equivalent Noise Studies Actually Measure? Noise vs. Nonlinearity in Different Masking Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Alex S.; Baker, Daniel H.; Hess, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The internal noise present in a linear system can be quantified by the equivalent noise method. By measuring the effect that applying external noise to the system’s input has on its output one can estimate the variance of this internal noise. By applying this simple “linear amplifier” model to the human visual system, one can entirely explain an observer’s detection performance by a combination of the internal noise variance and their efficiency relative to an ideal observer. Studies using this method rely on two crucial factors: firstly that the external noise in their stimuli behaves like the visual system’s internal noise in the dimension of interest, and secondly that the assumptions underlying their model are correct (e.g. linearity). Here we explore the effects of these two factors while applying the equivalent noise method to investigate the contrast sensitivity function (CSF). We compare the results at 0.5 and 6 c/deg from the equivalent noise method against those we would expect based on pedestal masking data collected from the same observers. We find that the loss of sensitivity with increasing spatial frequency results from changes in the saturation constant of the gain control nonlinearity, and that this only masquerades as a change in internal noise under the equivalent noise method. Part of the effect we find can be attributed to the optical transfer function of the eye. The remainder can be explained by either changes in effective input gain, divisive suppression, or a combination of the two. Given these effects the efficiency of our observers approaches the ideal level. We show the importance of considering these factors in equivalent noise studies. PMID:26953796

  6. Measuring Peer Socialization for Adolescent Substance Use: A Comparison of Perceived and Actual Friends’ Substance Use Effects

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Arielle R.; Chernyavskiy, Pavel; Steinley, Douglas; Slutske, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: There has been an increase in the use of social network analysis in studies of peer socialization effects on adolescent substance use. Some researchers argue that social network analyses provide more accurate measures of peer substance use, that the alternate strategy of assessing perceptions of friends’ drug use is biased, and that perceptions of peer use and actual peer use represent different constructs. However, there has been little research directly comparing the two effects, and little is known about the extent to which the measures differ in the magnitude of their influence on adolescent substance use, as well as how these two effects may be redundant or separate constructs. Method: Using Waves I and II of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) saturated subsample, we directly compared effects of perception of friends’ use (PFU) and actual friends’ use (AFU) on alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana initiation and persistence of use 1 year later. We also examined potential moderating effects of friendship quality and individual use on the relationship between perceived and actual friends’ substance use and outcomes. Results: Results indicated that, overall, PFU effects were larger than AFU effects; however, these effects did not significantly differ in magnitude for most models. In addition, interaction effects differed for different substances and usage outcomes, indicating the meaning of PFU and AFU constructs (and thus, different types of peer socialization) may change based on substance and type of use. Conclusions: These results highlight the multifaceted nature of peer influence on substance use and the importance of assessing multiple aspects of peer socialization while accounting for distinct contexts related to specific substances and use outcomes. PMID:25785802

  7. Double-blind photo lineups using actual eyewitnesses: an experimental test of a sequential versus simultaneous lineup procedure.

    PubMed

    Wells, Gary L; Steblay, Nancy K; Dysart, Jennifer E

    2015-02-01

    Eyewitnesses (494) to actual crimes in 4 police jurisdictions were randomly assigned to view simultaneous or sequential photo lineups using laptop computers and double-blind administration. The sequential procedure used in the field experiment mimicked how it is conducted in actual practice (e.g., using a continuation rule, witness does not know how many photos are to be viewed, witnesses resolve any multiple identifications), which is not how most lab experiments have tested the sequential lineup. No significant differences emerged in rates of identifying lineup suspects (25% overall) but the sequential procedure produced a significantly lower rate (11%) of identifying known-innocent lineup fillers than did the simultaneous procedure (18%). The simultaneous/sequential pattern did not significantly interact with estimator variables and no lineup-position effects were observed for either the simultaneous or sequential procedures. Rates of nonidentification were not significantly different for simultaneous and sequential but nonidentifiers from the sequential procedure were more likely to use the "not sure" response option than were nonidentifiers from the simultaneous procedure. Among witnesses who made an identification, 36% (41% of simultaneous and 32% of sequential) identified a known-innocent filler rather than a suspect, indicating that eyewitness performance overall was very poor. The results suggest that the sequential procedure that is used in the field reduces the identification of known-innocent fillers, but the differences are relatively small.

  8. Experimental noiseless linear amplification using weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Joseph; Boston, Allen; Palsson, Matthew; Pryde, Geoff

    2016-09-01

    The viability of quantum communication schemes rely on sending quantum states of light over long distances. However, transmission loss can degrade the signal strength, adding noise. Heralded noiseless amplification of a quantum signal can provide a solution by enabling longer direct transmission distances and by enabling entanglement distillation. The central idea of heralded noiseless amplification—a conditional modification of the probability distribution over photon number of an optical quantum state—is suggestive of a parallel with weak measurement: in a weak measurement, learning partial information about an observable leads to a conditional back-action of a commensurate size. Here we experimentally investigate the application of weak, or variable-strength, measurements to the task of heralded amplification, by using a quantum logic gate to weakly couple a small single-optical-mode quantum state (the signal) to an ancilla photon (the meter). The weak measurement is carried out by choosing the measurement basis of the meter photon and, by conditioning on the meter outcomes, the signal is amplified. We characterise the gain of the amplifier as a function of the measurement strength, and use interferometric methods to show that the operation preserves the coherence of the signal.

  9. Experimental research of digital holographic microscopic measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xueliang; Chen, Feifei; Li, Jicheng

    2013-06-01

    Digital holography is a new imaging technique, which is developed on the base of optical holography, Digital processing, and Computer techniques. It is using CCD instead of the conventional silver to record hologram, and then reproducing the 3D contour of the object by the way of computer simulation. Compared with the traditional optical holographic, the whole process is of simple measuring, lower production cost, faster the imaging speed, and with the advantages of non-contact real-time measurement. At present, it can be used in the fields of the morphology detection of tiny objects, micro deformation analysis, and biological cells shape measurement. It is one of the research hot spot at home and abroad. This paper introduced the basic principles and relevant theories about the optical holography and Digital holography, and researched the basic questions which influence the reproduce images in the process of recording and reconstructing of the digital holographic microcopy. In order to get a clear digital hologram, by analyzing the optical system structure, we discussed the recording distance and of the hologram. On the base of the theoretical studies, we established a measurement and analyzed the experimental conditions, then adjusted them to the system. To achieve a precise measurement of tiny object in three-dimension, we measured MEMS micro device for example, and obtained the reproduction three-dimensional contour, realized the three dimensional profile measurement of tiny object. According to the experiment results consider: analysis the reference factors between the zero-order term and a pair of twin-images by the choice of the object light and the reference light and the distance of the recording and reconstructing and the characteristics of reconstruction light on the measurement, the measurement errors were analyzed. The research result shows that the device owns certain reliability.

  10. Experimental Techniques for Thermodynamic Measurements of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Putnam, Robert L.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1999-01-01

    Experimental techniques for thermodynamic measurements on ceramic materials are reviewed. For total molar quantities, calorimetry is used. Total enthalpies are determined with combustion calorimetry or solution calorimetry. Heat capacities and entropies are determined with drop calorimetry, differential thermal methods, and adiabatic calorimetry . Three major techniques for determining partial molar quantities are discussed. These are gas equilibration techniques, Knudsen cell methods, and electrochemical techniques. Throughout this report, issues unique to ceramics are emphasized. Ceramic materials encompass a wide range of stabilities and this must be considered. In general data at high temperatures is required and the need for inert container materials presents a particular challenge.

  11. Actual measurement, hygrothermal response experiment and growth prediction analysis of microbial contamination of central air conditioning system in Dalian, China

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yang; Hu, Guangyao; Wang, Chunyang; Yuan, Wenjie; Wei, Shanshan; Gao, Jiaoqi; Wang, Boyuan; Song, Fangchao

    2017-01-01

    The microbial contamination of central air conditioning system is one of the important factors that affect the indoor air quality. Actual measurement and analysis were carried out on microbial contamination in central air conditioning system at a venue in Dalian, China. Illumina miseq method was used and three fungal samples of two units were analysed by high throughput sequencing. Results showed that the predominant fungus in air conditioning unit A and B were Candida spp. and Cladosporium spp., and two fungus were further used in the hygrothermal response experiment. Based on the data of Cladosporium in hygrothermal response experiment, this paper used the logistic equation and the Gompertz equation to fit the growth predictive model of Cladosporium genera in different temperature and relative humidity conditions, and the square root model was fitted based on the two environmental factors. In addition, the models were carried on the analysis to verify the accuracy and feasibility of the established model equation. PMID:28367963

  12. Comparison of first-order-decay modeled and actual field measured municipal solid waste landfill methane data.

    PubMed

    Amini, Hamid R; Reinhart, Debra R; Niskanen, Antti

    2013-12-01

    The first-order decay (FOD) model is widely used to estimate landfill gas generation for emissions inventories, life cycle assessments, and regulation. The FOD model has inherent uncertainty due to underlying uncertainty in model parameters and a lack of opportunities to validate it with complete field-scale landfill data sets. The objectives of this paper were to estimate methane generation, fugitive methane emissions, and aggregated collection efficiency for landfills through a mass balance approach using the FOD model for gas generation coupled with literature values for cover-specific collection efficiency and methane oxidation. This study is unique and valuable because actual field data were used in comparison with modeled data. The magnitude and variation of emissions were estimated for three landfills using site-specific model parameters and gas collection data, and compared to vertical radial plume mapping emissions measurements. For the three landfills, the modeling approach slightly under-predicted measured emissions and over-estimated aggregated collection efficiency, but the two approaches yielded statistically equivalent uncertainties expressed as coefficients of variation. Sources of uncertainty include challenges in large-scale field measurement of emissions and spatial and temporal fluctuations in methane flow balance components (generated, collected, oxidized, and emitted methane). Additional publication of sets of field-scale measurement data and methane flow balance components will reduce the uncertainty in future estimates of fugitive emissions.

  13. Exposure to alcohol commercials in movie theaters affects actual alcohol consumption in young adult high weekly drinkers: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Koordeman, Renske; Anschutz, Doeschka J; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2011-01-01

    The present pilot study examined the effects of alcohol commercials shown in movie theaters on the alcohol consumption of young adults who see these commercials. A two (alcohol commercials vs. nonalcohol commercials) by two (high weekly alcohol consumption vs. low weekly alcohol consumption) between-participant design was used, in which 184 young adults (age: 16-28 years) were exposed to a movie that was preceded by either alcohol commercials or nonalcohol commercials. Participants' actual alcohol consumption while watching the movie ("Watchmen") was examined. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to examine the effects of the commercial condition on alcohol consumption. An interaction effect was found between commercial condition and weekly alcohol consumption (p < .001). Alcohol consumption among high weekly alcohol drinkers was higher in the alcohol commercial condition than in the nonalcohol commercial condition, whereas no differences were found in alcohol consumption between commercial conditions among low weekly alcohol drinkers. No gender differences were found in the association between exposure to alcohol commercials, weekly drinking, and alcohol use. Thus, exposure to alcohol commercials prior to a movie in a movie theater can directly influence alcohol consumption among high weekly alcohol consumers.

  14. Experimental Measurement of Micrometeoroid-Produced Neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Munsat, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    We describe the first laboratory measurement of vapor produced by simulated micrometeoroid bombardment. Exospheric gas measurements remain one of the outstanding accomplishments of the Apollo era, and are a clear scientific goal for future exploration of airless objects. New in-situ observations of the surface-bounded exosphere (SBE) at Mercury by MESSENGER, and the Moon by LRO/LAMP, have highlighted the uncertainty surrounding the role of micrometeoroid impacts in sustaining planetary SBEs. In a recent series of experiments, the quantity of neutral molecules generated by impacts of simulated micrometeoroids (0.1-1 micron radius, 1-10 km/s speed) was measured in the lab using a fast ionization gauge inside an ultrahigh-vacuum system. The quantity of neutrals released was found to be consistent with a power law N = mv^a in projectile speed v, mass m and exponent a ~ 2.4 We present these experimental results and discuss their implications for the upcoming LADEE mission, which carries both neutral mass and optical spectrometers for exospheric measurements, capable of identifying micrometeoroid-sourced gases.

  15. Experimental Measurement of In Situ Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbo, Maria; Milkereit, Bernd; Nasseri, Farzine; Schmitt, Douglas; Young, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The World Stress Map data is determined by stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanisms, in situ measurement in mining, oil and gas boreholes as well as the borehole cores, and geologic data. Unfortunately, these measurements are not only infrequent but sometimes infeasible, and do not provide nearly enough data points with high accuracy to correctly infer stress fields in deep mines around the world. Improvements in stress measurements of Earth's crust is fundamental to several industries such as oil and gas, mining, nuclear waste management, and enhanced geothermal systems. Quantifying the state of stress and the geophysical properties of different rock types is a major complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines. Most stress measurement techniques involve either the boreholes or their cores, however these measurements usually only give stress along one axis, not the complete stress tensor. The goal of this project is to investigate a new method of acquiring a complete stress tensor of the in situ stress in the Earth's crust. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and focuses on two boreholes located in this mine. These boreholes are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and are located at depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples of varying geologies from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. The apparatus' used for this project are geophysical imaging cells capable

  16. Actual evapotranspiration for a reference crop within measured and future changing climate periods in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katerji, Nader; Rana, Gianfranco; Ferrara, Rossana Monica

    2016-05-01

    The study compares two formulas for calculating the daily evapotranspiration ET0 for a reference crop. The first formula was proposed by Allen et al. (AL), while the second one was proposed by Katerji and Perrier with the addition of the carbon dioxide (CO2) effect on evapotranspiration (KP). The study analyses the impact of the calculation by the two formulas on the irrigation requirement (IR). Both formulas are based on the Penman-Monteith equation but adopt different approaches for parameterising the canopy resistance r c . In the AL formula, r c is assumed constant and not sensitive to climate change, whereas in the KP formula, r c is first parameterised as a function of climatic variables, then ET0 is corrected for the air CO2 concentration. The two formulas were compared in two periods. The first period involves data from two sites in the Mediterranean region within a measured climate change period (1981-2006) when all the input climatic variables were measured. The second period (2070-2100) involves data from a future climate change period at one site when the input climatic variables were forecasted for two future climate scenarios (A2 and B2). The annual cumulated values of ET0 calculated by the AL formula are systematically lower than those determined by the KP formula. The differences between the ET0 estimation with the AL and KP formulas have a strong impact on the determination of the IR for the reference crop. In fact, for the two periods, the annual values of IR when ET0 is calculated by the AL formula are systematically lower than those calculated by the KP formula. For the actual measured climate change period, this reduction varied from 26 to 28 %, while for the future climate change period, it varied based on the scenario from 16 % (A2) to 20 % (B2).

  17. Experimental measurement of the Melnikov function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Patrice; Huck, Peter; Nobili, Clément; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-07-01

    We study the transport properties of a genuine two-dimensional flow with a large mean velocity perturbed periodically in time by means of an original experimental technique. The flow generated by the co-rotation of two cylinders is both stratified with a linear density gradient using salted water and viscous in order to prevent Ekman pumping and centrifugal instabilities. Thus, the mean flow contains a hyperbolic point with a homoclinic streamline, which we perturb periodically by an extra oscillation. A blob of scalar injected close to the stagnation point contracts on the stable manifold and stretches in the unstable direction. The distance between the stable and the unstable manifolds is measured as the distance between the maximum and the minimum of the dye undulating pattern and is recorded as a function of the perturbation frequency. This distance, also called the Melnikov function, presents a maximum when the residence time of a fluid particle in the mean flow is about half a perturbation period. This resonance criterion is recovered with good quantitative agreement by the theoretical prediction of the Melnikov function computed for this flow.

  18. Comparison of scar thickness measurements using trans-vaginal sonography and MRI in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section. Do they correlate with actual scar thickness?

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Tripathi, R; Mala, Y M; Dixit, R; Tyagi, S; Batra, A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate scar thickness in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section, by trans-vaginal sonography (TVS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to correlate precision of radiologically-measured scar thickness with actual measurement of scar thickness. A total of 35 pregnant patients with previous caesarean section planned for elective caesarean section, were evaluated prospectively. Their scar thickness was measured by TVS and MRI on the day of elective repeat caesarean section. These measurements were correlated with each other and with scar thickness measured during elective repeat caesarean section by using a caliper. The correlation coefficients between scar thickness measured by TVS and MRI with peroperative evaluation with a caliper, were +0.72 and +0.59, respectively. The study concluded that as MRI is a costlier modality and TVS has better correlation coefficient with actual scar thickness, TVS can be considered to be the better modality for antenatal scar thickness measurement.

  19. Experimental measurements on a single sweeping jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Damian; Graff, Emilio; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    ``Sweeping jets'' proved their effectiveness as Active Flow Control (AFC) actuators in improving the performance of vertical tails of generic and full-scale models. To gain further knowledge about the fundamental flow physics, the jets were investigated experimentally. The influence of a single jet on its surroundings was studied, especially the entrainment region. The results were compared to previous experiments to study the difference between a single isolated jet and multiple jets mounted on a vertical tail. Supported by the Boeing Company.

  20. Experimental Fracture Measurements of Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Ray Douglas

    The primary objective of this research was to extend established fracture toughness testing methods to a new class of engineering materials known as functionally graded materials (FGMs). Secondary goals were to compare experimental results to those predicted by finite element models and to provide fracture test results as feedback toward optimizing processing parameters for the in-house synthesis of a MoSi2/SiC FGM. Preliminary experiments were performed on commercially pure (CP) Ti and uniform axial tensile tests resulted in mechanical property data including yield strength, 268 MPa, ultimate tensile strength, 470 MPa and Young's modulus, 110 GPa. Results from 3-point bending fracture experiments on CP Ti demonstrated rising R-curve behavior and experimentally determined JQ fracture toughness values ranged between 153 N/mm and 254 N/mm. Similar experimental protocols were used for fracture experiments on a 7- layered Ti/TiB FGM material obtained from Cercom in Vista, California. A novel technique for pre-cracking in reverse 4-point bending was developed for this ductile/brittle FGM material. Fracture test results exhibited rising R-curve behavior and estimated JQ fracture toughness values ranged from 0.49 N/mm to 2.63 N/mm. A 5- layered MoSi2/SiC FGM was synthesized using spark plasma sintering (SPS). Samples of this material were fracture tested and the results again exhibited a rising R-curve with KIC fracture toughness values ranging from 2.7 MPa-m1/2 to 6.0 MPa-m1/2. Finite Element Models predicted rising R-curve behavior for both of the FGM materials tested. Model results were in close agreement for the brittle MoSi2/SiC FGM. For the relatively more ductile Ti/TiB material, results were in close agreement at short crack lengths but diverged at longer crack lengths because the models accounted for fracture toughening mechanisms at the crack tip but not those acting in the crack wake.

  1. An experimental apparatus for Casimir torque measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, David A. T.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    We have developed an experiment to measure the Casimir torque. In our experiment, a solid birefringent crystal causes a nematic liquid crystal director to rotate such that the extraordinary axes are aligned. A transparent and isotropic dielectric spacer layer is used to separate the two birefringent materials and an all-optical technique is used for detection. In this talk, we report on the progress of this experiment. Department of Physics, Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics.

  2. Measures of Situation Awareness: An Experimental Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    occurrence from non- occurrence of the target event, referred to as sensitivity (Macmillan and Creelman , 1990). Because sensitivity declines if pilots are...Pollack and Norman, 1964; see also Craig, 1979; Macmillan and Creelman , 1990). Finally, avoidance failures were measured simply as the number of times...Wesley. Macmillan, N. A., & Creelman , C. D. (1990). Response bias: Characteristics of detection theory, threshold theory, and "non- parametric" indexes

  3. Experimental flux measurements on a network scale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwender, J.

    2011-10-11

    Metabolic flux is a fundamental property of living organisms. In recent years, methods for measuring metabolic flux in plants on a network scale have evolved further. One major challenge in studying flux in plants is the complexity of the plant's metabolism. In particular, in the presence of parallel pathways in multiple cellular compartments, the core of plant central metabolism constitutes a complex network. Hence, a common problem with the reliability of the contemporary results of {sup 13}C-Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is the substantial reduction in complexity that must be included in the simulated networks; this omission partly is due to limitations in computational simulations. Here, I discuss recent emerging strategies that will better address these shortcomings.

  4. Experimental measurements of shock properties of stishovite

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Ito, E.

    1995-10-01

    We have synthesized, characterized and performed Hugoniot measurements on monolithic samples of stishovite, a high pressure polymorph of silica. Synthesis was accomplished in a multianvil press with pyrophyllite gaskets and carbon heaters. The samples had densities ranging from 3.80 to 4.07, corresponding to stishovite volume fractions of 0.7 to 0.87, a range confirmed by NMR analysis. They had no significant impurities except less than 1% carbon. Samples {approximately} 1 mm thick and 3 mm diameter were tested in reverse- and forward-ballistics modes on a two-stage light gas gun, using velocity interferometry diagnostics. Impact velocities ranged from 4.0 to 6.5 km/sec. Hugoniot stresses for the four successful tests ranged from 65 to 225GPa. At higher stresses significant uncertainties arise due to impact tilt/nonplanariy issues. Results are consistent with earlier predictions of the stishovite Hugoniot based on quartz-centered Hugoniot data, static-compression (diamond-anvil cell) data and hydrostatic multianvil cell data. Release behavior appears to be frozen. These results are remarkable in view of the small size of the samples used.

  5. Experimental measurements of the Hugoniot of stishovite

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Ito, Eichi

    1995-10-01

    The crust and mantle of the Earth are primarily composed of silicates. The properties of these materials under compression are of interest for deducing deep-earth composition. As well, the properties of these materials under shock compression are of interest for calculating groundshock propagation. The authors have synthesized, characterized, and performed Hugoniot measurements on monolithic polycrystalline SiO{sub 2} samples which were predominantly stishovite (a high-pressure polymorph). Synthesis was accomplished in a multianvil press with pyrophyllite gaskets and carbon heaters. The samples had densities ranging from 3.80 to 4.07, corresponding to stishovite volume fractions of 0.7 to 0.87, a range confirmed by NMR analysis. Electron microprobe and X-ray fluorescence characterizations showed minor carbon contamination (< 1%), with no other significant impurities. Samples {approximately} 1 mm thick and 3 mm diameter were tested in reverse and forward-ballistics modes on a two-stage light gas gun, using velocity interferometry diagnostics. Impact velocities ranged from 4.0 to 6.5 km/sec. Hugoniot stresses for four tests ranged from 65 to 225 GPa. At higher stresses significant uncertainties arise due to impact tilt/nonplanarity issues. Results are consistent with earlier predictions of the stishovite Hugoniot based on quartz-centered Hugoniot data, static-compression (diamond-anvil cell) data and hydrostatic multianvil cell data. Release behavior appears to be frozen. These results are remarkable in view of the small size of the samples used. Results are compared with current EOS models.

  6. Simultaneous measurements of on-road/in-vehicle nanoparticles and NOx while driving: Actual situations, passenger exposure and secondary formations.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Rumiko; Tonokura, Kenichi

    2016-09-01

    Simultaneous measurements of on-road and in-vehicle NO and NO2 levels, particle number concentrations (PNCs), and particles size distributions were performed while driving using a test vehicle equipped with real-time sensors. The results obtained on regional roads showed that heavy-duty vehicles in traffic seem to have a major impact on on-road air quality. Measurements on highways that included a 10km tunnel and a 2km uphill section of road indicated that sub-50nm particles have different features from the other species because of their higher volatility. The other species showed quite high on-road concentrations in the tunnel. In-vehicle conditions were made similar to the on-road ones by setting the air conditioning (AC) mode to the fresh air mode. The in-vehicle NO2 concentration in the tunnel was over 0.50ppmV, which is almost five times higher than the 1-hour ambient air quality standard proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO). In sections other than the tunnel, the in-vehicle NO2 concentration was almost the same as the 1-hour WHO standard. Higher on-road NO2/NOx ratios than those of exhaust gases and different behavior of sub-50nm particles from other species suggested that NO2 and sub-50nm particles were mainly due to secondary products formed by atmospheric reactions.

  7. Characterization of differences in calculated and actual measured skin doses to canine limbs during stereotactic radiosurgery using Gafchromic film

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jerri; Ryan, Stewart; Harmon, Joseph F.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate calculation of absorbed dose to the skin, especially the superficial and radiosensitive basal cell layer, is difficult for many reasons including, but not limited to, the build-up effect of megavoltage photons, tangential beam effects, mixed energy scatter from support devices, and dose interpolation caused by a finite resolution calculation matrix. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been developed as an alternative limb salvage treatment option at Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for dogs with extremity bone tumors. Optimal dose delivery to the tumor during SBRT treatment can be limited by uncertainty in skin dose calculation. The aim of this study was to characterize the difference between measured and calculated radiation dose by the Varian Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) AAA treatment planning algorithm (for 1-mm, 2-mm, and 5-mm calculation voxel dimensions) as a function of distance from the skin surface. The study used Gafchromic EBT film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ), FilmQA analysis software, a limb phantom constructed from plastic water Trade-Mark-Sign (fluke Biomedical, Everett, WA) and a canine cadaver forelimb. The limb phantom was exposed to 6-MV treatments consisting of a single-beam, a pair of parallel opposed beams, and a 7-beam coplanar treatment plan. The canine forelimb was exposed to the 7-beam coplanar plan. Radiation dose to the forelimb skin at the surface and at depths of 1.65 mm and 1.35 mm below the skin surface were also measured with the Gafchromic film. The calculation algorithm estimated the dose well at depths beyond buildup for all calculation voxel sizes. The calculation algorithm underestimated the dose in portions of the buildup region of tissue for all comparisons, with the most significant differences observed in the 5-mm calculation voxel and the least difference in the 1-mm voxel. Results indicate a significant difference between measured and calculated data

  8. Experimental Measurement of the Second-Order Coherence of Supercontinuum.

    PubMed

    Närhi, Mikko; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T; Genty, Goëry

    2016-06-17

    We measure experimentally the second-order coherence properties of supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Our approach is based on measuring separately the quasicoherent and quasistationary contributions to the cross-spectral density and mutual coherence functions using a combination of interferometric and nonlinear gating techniques. This allows us to introduce two-dimensional coherence spectrograms which provide a direct characterization and convenient visualization of the spectrotemporal coherence properties. The measured second-order coherence functions are in very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Our results pave the way towards the full experimental characterization of supercontinuum coherence properties. More generally, they provide a generic approach for the complete experimental measurement of the coherence of broadband sources.

  9. Experimental Measurement of the Second-Order Coherence of Supercontinuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Närhi, Mikko; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T.; Genty, Goëry

    2016-06-01

    We measure experimentally the second-order coherence properties of supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Our approach is based on measuring separately the quasicoherent and quasistationary contributions to the cross-spectral density and mutual coherence functions using a combination of interferometric and nonlinear gating techniques. This allows us to introduce two-dimensional coherence spectrograms which provide a direct characterization and convenient visualization of the spectrotemporal coherence properties. The measured second-order coherence functions are in very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Our results pave the way towards the full experimental characterization of supercontinuum coherence properties. More generally, they provide a generic approach for the complete experimental measurement of the coherence of broadband sources.

  10. Experimental Validation of Simulations Using Full-field Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Erwin

    2010-05-28

    The calibration by reference materials of dynamic full-field measurement systems is discussed together with their use to validate numerical simulations of structural mechanics. The discussion addresses three challenges that are faced in these processes, i.e. how to calibrate a measuring instrument that (i) provides full-field data, and (ii) is dynamic; (iii) how to compare data from simulation and experimentation.

  11. Unreliability of global temperature trends: the circular logic of comparing models with models or with models inspired reconstructions to circumvent lack of validation versus actual measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A.; Ollier, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    This recent paper by Marotzke and Forster [1] has received media attention because it claims to have shown that the recent pause in surface temperature rise was the result of natural variability, and that climate models are not systematically overestimating the global warming. Nicholas Lewis [2] has already commented about the serious statistical errors in the paper that make the conclusion unsustainable.We note here that their supporting evidence is actually alteration of pre-selected data to sustain the global warming narrative. The "observed trends" of Marotzke and Forster are not based on the truly measured temperatures in every world gridded cell of the land and sea since the 1860s, but only on a reconstruction based on selected, scattered data that are continuously recalculated to resemble the climate model outputs.

  12. Contact Angle Measurements Using a Simplified Experimental Setup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamour, Guillaume; Hamraoui, Ahmed; Buvailo, Andrii; Xing, Yangjun; Keuleyan, Sean; Prakash, Vivek; Eftekhari-Bafrooei, Ali; Borguet, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A basic and affordable experimental apparatus is described that measures the static contact angle of a liquid drop in contact with a solid. The image of the drop is made with a simple digital camera by taking a picture that is magnified by an optical lens. The profile of the drop is then processed with ImageJ free software. The ImageJ contact…

  13. Control of experimental uncertainties in filtered Rayleigh scattering measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forkey, Joseph N.; Finkelstein, N. D.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1995-01-01

    Filtered Rayleigh Scattering is a technique which allows for measurement of velocity, temperature, and pressure in unseeded flows, spatially resolved in 2-dimensions. We present an overview of the major components of a Filtered Rayleigh Scattering system. In particular, we develop and discuss a detailed theoretical model along with associated model parameters and related uncertainties. Based on this model, we then present experimental results for ambient room air and for a Mach 2 free jet, including spatially resolved measurements of velocity, temperature, and pressure.

  14. Experimental studies on near-field holographic antenna measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yingxi; Xu, Linfen; An, Hongye; Sun, Jixian; Lou, Zheng; Yang, Ji; Zhang, Xuguo; Li, Zhenqiang; Lu, Dengrong; Pang, Xinghai; Li, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A near-field millimeter-wave holography system operating in the 3-mm waveband have been developed as a prototype for DATE5, a 5-m terahertz telescope proposed to be deployed at Dome A, Antarctica. Experimental measurements at 92 GHz have been made on a 1.45-m test antenna. During the night time at which the ambient temperature doesn't vary rapidly, a 75-minute repeatability (repeating measurement 3 times) of 2.3 μm rms has been achieved with an aperture resolution of 46 mm. A local surface change of known value is correctly detected. After long-time repeating measurements, thermal-induced feed displacement is also detected with an accuracy of approximately 20 μm. Random error factors of the experiment system are evaluated and their contributions to the derived surface error are also simulated, showing that relative poor pointing of the test antenna is the major factor limiting the measurement repeatability.

  15. Effect of soil type patterns on the variability of bare soil evaporation within a field: comparison of eddy covariance measurements with potential and actual evaporation calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderborght, J.; Graf, A.; Steenpass, C.; Scharnagl, B.; Prolingheuer, N.; Herbst, M.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation was measured with the eddy-covariance method at the Selhausen field site. The site has a distinct gradient in soil texture with a considerably higher stone content at the upper part of the field. Because of this gradient, a spatial variation in evaporation fluxes in the field is expected. Because of the higher stone content at the upper part of the field, it is expected that the water that is stored in the soil surface layer and can be evaporated at a maximal evaporation rate, which is determined by the energy that is available for evaporation, is considerable smaller in the upper than in the lower part of the field. We investigated whether this hypothesis is supported by eddy covariance (EC) measurements of the evaporation fluxes at the field site. The EC measurements were combined with a footprint model that predicts the location of the soil surface that contributes to the measured evaporation flux. In this way, evaporation measurements of the two parts of the field site could be distinguished. However, since only one EC station was available, simultaneous evaporation measurements for the two field parts were not available. As a consequence, the datasets of measurements had to be interpreted and put into context of the meteorological and soil hydrological conditions. The potential evapotranspiration was calculated using the FAO method (Allen et al., 1998) to represent the meteorological conditions whereas a simple soil evaporation model (Boesten and Stroosnijder, 1986) was used to represent the influence of the precipitation and soil hydrological conditions on the actual evaporation rate. Since different soil parameters were required to describe the evaporation measurements for the upper and lower part of the plot, our starting hypothesis that more water is evaporated in the lower part of the field could be confirmed. Allen, R. G., L. S. Pereira, D. Raes, and M. Smith (1998), Crop evapotranspiration: Guidelines for computing crop water

  16. Single particle refuse-derived fuel devolatilization: Experimental measurements of reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Weichuan; Krieger-Brockett, B. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The authors present experimentally measured devolatilization product yields from single particles of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), a more uniform, transportable municipal solid waste. Disposal costs and environmental concerns have stimulated interest in thermochemical conversion of this material to chemicals and fuels. The composition, reaction conditions, and particle properties were systematically varied over the range found in practice to develop quantitative measures that rank the process controllables' influence on altering the product slate. Specialized regression methods and experimental designs enhanced the accuracy in view of the feed heterogeneity and offer a general method to extract real effects from experimental and sample noise''. The results have been verified successfully using actual commercial RDF and fabricated compositions that surpass those normally found in municipal waste to anticipate the influence of trends in recycling. The results show that the reaction conditions have a greater influence on altering fuel utilization and the relative yields of char, condensibles, and gases than does the composition over the range found in MSW and RDF.

  17. Uncertainty principle for experimental measurements: Fast versus slow probes

    PubMed Central

    Hansmann, P.; Ayral, T.; Tejeda, A.; Biermann, S.

    2016-01-01

    The result of a physical measurement depends on the time scale of the experimental probe. In solid-state systems, this simple quantum mechanical principle has far-reaching consequences: the interplay of several degrees of freedom close to charge, spin or orbital instabilities combined with the disparity of the time scales associated to their fluctuations can lead to seemingly contradictory experimental findings. A particularly striking example is provided by systems of adatoms adsorbed on semiconductor surfaces where different experiments – angle-resolved photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy and core-level spectroscopy – suggest different ordering phenomena. Using most recent first principles many-body techniques, we resolve this puzzle by invoking the time scales of fluctuations when approaching the different instabilities. These findings suggest a re-interpretation of ordering phenomena and their fluctuations in a wide class of solid-state systems ranging from organic materials to high-temperature superconducting cuprates. PMID:26829902

  18. Regression with repeated measures in the experimental units.

    PubMed

    Garsd, A

    1999-01-01

    The most satisfactory solution to the problem of modeling a family of regressions with repeated measures in the experimental units is multivariate in nature. However, multivariate methods are difficult to follow and implement. Furthermore, by keeping the focus on the experimental unit, a family of simple univariate linear models will often parallel both the investigator's intuitive grasp of the statistical task at hand. We present two examples based on data from a study of the suckling stimulus during breastfeeding in newborn infants. We show how a family of regression lines can provide useful, if approximate, answers to the questions of interest. One example involves a regression setting proper and the other a typical case of correlation. We discuss alternative univariate models that may be useful for this type of problems.

  19. Uncertainty principle for experimental measurements: Fast versus slow probes.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, P; Ayral, T; Tejeda, A; Biermann, S

    2016-02-01

    The result of a physical measurement depends on the time scale of the experimental probe. In solid-state systems, this simple quantum mechanical principle has far-reaching consequences: the interplay of several degrees of freedom close to charge, spin or orbital instabilities combined with the disparity of the time scales associated to their fluctuations can lead to seemingly contradictory experimental findings. A particularly striking example is provided by systems of adatoms adsorbed on semiconductor surfaces where different experiments--angle-resolved photoemission, scanning tunneling microscopy and core-level spectroscopy--suggest different ordering phenomena. Using most recent first principles many-body techniques, we resolve this puzzle by invoking the time scales of fluctuations when approaching the different instabilities. These findings suggest a re-interpretation of ordering phenomena and their fluctuations in a wide class of solid-state systems ranging from organic materials to high-temperature superconducting cuprates.

  20. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, S. M.; Woods, S. I.; Jung, T. M.; Carter, A. C.; Datla, R. U.

    2014-07-15

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/√(Hz) for the measured experimental parameters.

  1. The experimental technique of the G^0 measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Julie

    2001-10-01

    The G^0 experiment(JLab experiment E00-006, D.H. Beck, spokesperson.) will measure the parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron-nucleon scattering. The experiment will be performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab using a dedicated apparatus. In order to achieve the required statistical accuracy of the measurements, a super-conducting toroidal spectrometer, with azimuthally symmetric angular acceptance, and an associated cryogenic target have been constructed. The Focal Plane Detectors are arranged in 8 arrays of 16 arc-shaped scintillator pairs providing a fast signal compatible with the high rates of this counting experiment. For the forward angle measurement, custom built electronics will provide a time-of-flight measurement discriminating elastic recoil protons from pions and inelastic protons. For the backward angle measurements, additional scintillators and Cerenkov counters will provide separation of the elastic electrons from inelastic electrons and pions. An overview of the experimental apparatus and method for the G^0 measurement will be presented.

  2. Reflectance spectroscopy of gold nanoshells: computational predictions and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alex W. H.; Lewinski, Nastassja A.; Lee, Min-Ho; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2006-10-01

    Gold nanoshells are concentric spherical constructs that possess highly desirable optical responses in the near infrared. Gold nanoshells consist of a thin outer gold shell and a silica core and can be used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes by tuning the optical response through changing the core-shell ratio as well as the overall size. Although optical properties of gold nanoshells have already been well documented, the reflectance characteristics are not well understood and have not yet been elucidated by experimental measurements. Yet, in order to use gold nanoshells as an optical contrast agent for scattering-based optical methods such as reflectance spectroscopy, it is critical to characterize the reflectance behavior. With this in mind, we used a fiber-optic-based spectrometer to measure diffuse reflectance of gold nanoshell suspensions from 500 nm to 900 nm. Experimental results show that gold nanoshells cause a significant increase in the measured reflectance. Spectral features associated with scattering from large angles ( 180°) were observed at low nanoshell concentrations. Monte Carlo modeling of gold nanoshells reflectance demonstrated the efficacy of using such methods to predict diffuse reflectance. Our studies suggest that gold nanoshells are an excellent candidate as optical contrast agents and that Monte Carlo methods are a useful tool for optimizing nanoshells best suited for scattering-based optical methods.

  3. Simultaneous Variable Flip Angle – Actual Flip Angle Imaging (VAFI) Method for Improved Accuracy and Precision of Three-dimensional T1 and B1 Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Samuel A.; Yarnykh, Vasily L.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Field, Aaron S.; Alexander, Andrew L.; Samsonov, Alexey A.

    2011-01-01

    A new time-efficient and accurate technique for simultaneous mapping of T1 and B1 is proposed based on a combination of the Actual Flip angle Imaging (AFI) and Variable Flip Angle (VFA) methods: VAFI. VAFI utilizes a single AFI and one or more spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) acquisitions with a simultaneous non-linear fitting procedure to yield accurate T1/B1 maps. The advantage of VAFI is high accuracy at either short T1 times or long TR in the AFI sequence. Simulations show this method is accurate to 0.03% in FA and 0.07% in T1 for TR/T1 times over the range of 0.01 to 0.45. We show for the case of brain imaging that it is sufficient to use only one small flip angle SPGR acquisition, which results in reduced spoiling requirements and a significant scan time reduction compared to the original VFA. In-vivo validation yielded high-quality 3D T1 maps and T1 measurements within 10% of previously published values, and within a clinically acceptable scan time. The VAFI method will increase the accuracy and clinical feasibility of many quantitative MRI methods requiring T1/B1 mapping such as DCE perfusion and quantitative MTI. PMID:22139819

  4. Measuring and Test Workbenches of Experimental Complex NEVOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompaniets, K. G.; Amelchakov, M. B.; Ampilogov, N. V.; Chernov, D. V.; Khokhlov, S. S.; Kindin, V. V.; Likiy, O. I.; Shulzhenko, I. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Yashin, I. I.; Zadeba, E. A.

    The measuring and test automated workbenches used to maintain the health of existing and commissioning of new detectors of the unique scientific facility "Experimental complex NEVOD" are described. The structure of workbenches and their main characteristics are presented. Workbenches include standard high-precision instruments manufactured by Tektronix, CAEN, Aktakom, and specially designed components and modules. Procedures of measurements and tests are carried out in automatic mode under control of computer. Management programs of workbenches are written on the basis of original methods, allowing to obtain reliable and complete information on the status and characteristics of the components of physical systems. Calibration of equipment is carried out through registration of various components of cosmic rays.

  5. Experimental difficulties in measuring the scattering of sound by sound

    SciTech Connect

    TenCate, J.A. )

    1994-11-01

    The question of whether one sound beam can interact with another at nonzero angle and scatter nonlinearly generated sound outside the mutual interaction region has been debated since the 1950s. Experimental work on this problem has left the question unresolved. This presentation describes experimental difficulties associated with measuring scattered sound produced by real diffracting primary beams. Optimal conditions for observing scattered sound, as outlined by Berntsen [ital et] [ital al]. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. [bold 86], 1968 (1989)] and by Darvennes and Hamilton [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. [bold 87], 1955 (1990)], are reviewed in relation to the design of our own experiments. Our experiments were performed with either two uniform circular sources in water (megahertz frequencies), or with one circular source and the other a shaded source with lower sidelobes. A variety of primary frequency ratios, interaction angles, and other parameters were considered. Comparison of the primary beam patterns with measured sum and difference frequency field patterns reveals the difficulty in identifying which components of the latter correspond to scattered'' sound. It is concluded that two Gaussian-type sources with exceedingly good sidelobe suppression are needed to perform a reasonable experiment. [Work supported by the Packard Foundation and ONR.] [sup a]Present address: Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Mail Stop D443, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545.

  6. Deriving Structural Information from Experimentally Measured Data on Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    van Gunsteren, Wilfred F; Allison, Jane R; Daura, Xavier; Dolenc, Jožica; Hansen, Niels; Mark, Alan E; Oostenbrink, Chris; Rusu, Victor H; Smith, Lorna J

    2016-12-23

    During the past half century, the number and accuracy of experimental techniques that can deliver values of observables for biomolecular systems have been steadily increasing. The conversion of a measured value Q(exp) of an observable quantity Q into structural information is, however, a task beset with theoretical and practical problems: 1) insufficient or inaccurate values of Q(exp) , 2) inaccuracies in the function Q(r→) used to relate the quantity Q to structure r→ , 3) how to account for the averaging inherent in the measurement of Q(exp) , 4) how to handle the possible multiple-valuedness of the inverse r→(Q) of the function Q(r→) , to mention a few. These apply to a variety of observable quantities Q and measurement techniques such as X-ray and neutron diffraction, small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering, free-electron laser imaging, cryo-electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, circular dichroism, Förster resonance energy transfer, atomic force microscopy and ion-mobility mass spectrometry. The process of deriving structural information from measured data is reviewed with an eye to non-experts and newcomers in the field using examples from the literature of the effect of the various choices and approximations involved in the process. A list of choices to be avoided is provided.

  7. Estimation of Actual Crop ET of Paddy Using the Energy Balance Model SMARET and Validation with Field Water Balance Measurements and a Crop Growth Model (ORYZA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallasamy, N. D.; Muraleedharan, B. V.; Kathirvel, K.; Narasimhan, B.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainable management of water resources requires reliable estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ET) at fine spatial and temporal resolution. This is significant in the case of rice based irrigation systems, one of the major consumers of surface water resources and where ET forms a major component of water consumption. However huge tradeoff in the spatial and temporal resolution of satellite images coupled with lack of adequate number of cloud free images within a growing season act as major constraints in deriving ET at fine spatial and temporal resolution using remote sensing based energy balance models. The scale at which ET is determined is decided by the spatial and temporal scale of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which form inputs to energy balance models. In this context, the current study employed disaggregation algorithms (NL-DisTrad and DisNDVI) to generate time series of LST and NDVI images at fine resolution. The disaggregation algorithms aimed at generating LST and NDVI at finer scale by integrating temporal information from concurrent coarse resolution data and spatial information from a single fine resolution image. The temporal frequency of the disaggregated images is further improved by employing composite images of NDVI and LST in the spatio-temporal disaggregation method. The study further employed half-hourly incoming surface insolation and outgoing long wave radiation obtained from the Indian geostationary satellite (Kalpana-1) to convert the instantaneous ET into daily ET and subsequently to the seasonal ET, thereby improving the accuracy of ET estimates. The estimates of ET were validated with field based water balance measurements carried out in Gadana, a subbasin predominated by rice paddy fields, located in Tamil Nadu, India.

  8. An experimental assembly for precise measurement of thermal accommodation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Wayne M.; Castañeda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John R.; Gallis, Michael A.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    An experimental apparatus has been developed to determine thermal accommodation coefficients for a variety of gas-surface combinations. Results are obtained primarily through measurement of the pressure dependence of the conductive heat flux between parallel plates separated by a gas-filled gap. Measured heat-flux data are used in a formula based on Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations to determine the coefficients. The assembly also features a complementary capability for measuring the variation in gas density between the plates using electron-beam fluorescence. Surface materials examined include 304 stainless steel, gold, aluminum, platinum, silicon, silicon nitride, and polysilicon. Effects of gas composition, surface roughness, and surface contamination have been investigated with this system; the behavior of gas mixtures has also been explored. Without special cleaning procedures, thermal accommodation coefficients for most materials and surface finishes were determined to be near 0.95, 0.85, and 0.45 for argon, nitrogen, and helium, respectively. Surface cleaning by in situ argon-plasma treatment reduced coefficient values by up to 0.10 for helium and by ˜0.05 for nitrogen and argon. Results for both single-species and gas-mixture experiments compare favorably to DSMC simulations.

  9. Measurement of segregating behaviors in experimental silver fox pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Kukekova, Anna V; Trut, L N; Chase, K; Shepeleva, D V; Vladimirova, A V; Kharlamova, A V; Oskina, I N; Stepika, A; Klebanov, S; Erb, H N; Acland, G M

    2008-03-01

    Strains of silver foxes, selectively bred at the Institute of Cytology and Genetics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, are a well established, novel model for studying the genetic basis of behavior, and the processes involved in canine domestication. Here we describe a method to measure fox behavior as quantitative phenotypes which distinguish populations and resegregate in experimental pedigrees. We defined 50 binary observations that nonredundantly and accurately distinguished behaviors in reference populations and cross-bred pedigrees. Principal-component analysis dissected out the independent elements underlying these behaviors. PC1 accounted for >44% of the total variance in measured traits. This system clearly distinguished tame foxes from aggressive and wildtype foxes. F1 foxes yield intermediate values that extend into the ranges of both the tame and aggressive foxes, while the scores of the backcross generation resegregate. These measures can thus be used for QTL mapping to explore the genetic basis of tame and aggressive behavior in foxes, which should provide new insights into the mechanisms of mammalian behavior and canine domestication.

  10. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum random-number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, You-Qi; Guan, Jian-Yu; Zhou, Hongyi; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-12-01

    The randomness from a quantum random-number generator (QRNG) relies on the accurate characterization of its devices. However, device imperfections and inaccurate characterizations can result in wrong entropy estimation and bias in practice, which highly affects the genuine randomness generation and may even induce the disappearance of quantum randomness in an extreme case. Here we experimentally demonstrate a measurement-device-independent (MDI) QRNG based on time-bin encoding to achieve certified quantum randomness even when the measurement devices are uncharacterized and untrusted. The MDI-QRNG is randomly switched between the regular randomness generation mode and a test mode, in which four quantum states are randomly prepared to perform measurement tomography in real time. With a clock rate of 25 MHz, the MDI-QRNG generates a final random bit rate of 5.7 kbps. Such implementation with an all-fiber setup provides an approach to construct a fully integrated MDI-QRNG with trusted but error-prone devices in practice.

  11. Experimental evaluation of tachistoscopic measurement: a step beyond Wundt's criticism.

    PubMed

    Voboril, Dalibor; Jelínek, Martin; Kvĕton, Petr

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the possible systematic bias in measurements obtained using tachistoscopic devices from different historical periods of psychological research. Four different tachistoscopic devices were used for brief presentations of stimuli in a letter recognition task. The research sample consisted of 24 participants (12 female, 12 male) in a within-subject experimental design with complete counterbalancing of 4 conditions defined by 4 instrument types: fall tachistoscope, tachistoscope with camera-like shutter, and computer-based tachistoscopes with cathode ray tube and liquid crystal diode display screens. The effects of experimental conditions were examined using a linear mixed model analysis. Our experiment demonstrated that even in standardized settings the type of tachistoscope used for stimulus presentation systematically influenced the participants' performance. We found that the lowest number of correctly recalled stimuli, as well as the highest number of erroneously recalled stimuli, was produced in the camera-like tachistoscope condition. Together, these findings suggest that when results from studies involving tachistoscopic experiments are reviewed, the unique characteristics of each particular instrument used must be considered carefully.

  12. Effect of Electron Seeding on Experimentally Measured Multipactor Discharge Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noland, Jonathan; Graves, Timothy; Lemon, Colby; Looper, Mark; Farkas, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Multipactor is a vacuum phenomenon in which electrons, moving in resonance with an externally applied electric field, impact material surfaces. If the number of secondary electrons created per primary electron impact averages more than unity, the resonant interaction can lead to an electron avalanche. Multipactor is a generally undesirable phenomenon, as it can cause local heating, absorb power, or cause detuning of RF circuits. In order to increase the probability of multipactor initiation, test facilities often employ various seeding sources such as radioactive sources (Cesium 137, Strontium 90), electron guns, or photon sources. Even with these sources, the voltage for multipactor initiation is not certain as parameters such as material type, RF pulse length, and device wall thickness can all affect seed electron flux and energy in critical gap regions, and hence the measured voltage threshold. This study investigates the effects of seed electron source type (e.g., photons versus beta particles), material type, gap size, and RF pulse length variation on multipactor threshold. In addition to the experimental work, GEANT4 simulations will be used to estimate the production rate of low energy electrons (< 5 keV) by high energy electrons and photons. A comparison of the experimental fluxes to the typical energetic photon and particle fluxes experienced by spacecraft in various orbits will also be made. Initial results indicate that for a simple, parallel plate device made of aluminum, there is no threshold variation (with seed electrons versus with no seed electrons) under continuous-wave RF exposure.

  13. Experimental measurements of motion cue effects on STOL approach tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.; Stapleford, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental program to investigate the effects of motion cues on STOL approach is presented. The simulator used was the Six-Degrees-of-Freedom Motion Simulator (S.01) at Ames Research Center of NASA which has ?2.7 m travel longitudinally and laterally and ?2.5 m travel vertically. Three major experiments, characterized as tracking tasks, were conducted under fixed and moving base conditions: (1) A simulated IFR approach of the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft (AWJSRA), (2) a simulated VFR task with the same aircraft, and (3) a single-axis task having only linear acceleration as the motion cue. Tracking performance was measured in terms of the variances of several motion variables, pilot vehicle describing functions, and pilot commentary.

  14. Experimental measurement on movement of spiral-type capsule endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanan; Dai, Houde; He, Yong; Qin, Fengqing

    2016-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscope achieved great success, however, the maneuvering of wireless capsule endoscope is challenging at present. A magnetic driving instrument, including two bar magnets, a stepper motor, a motor driver, a motor controller, and a power supplier, was developed to generate rotational magnetic fields. Permanent magnet ring, magnetized as S and N poles radially and mounted spiral structure on the surface, acted as a capsule. The maximum torque passing to the capsule, rotational synchronization of capsule and motor, and the translational speed of capsule, were measured in ex vivo porcine large intestine. The experimental results illustrate that the rotational movement of the spiral-type capsule in the intestine is feasible and the cost of the magnetic driving equipment is low. As a result, the solution is promising in the future controllability. PMID:26848279

  15. Experimental Measurements of Spreading of Volatile Liquid Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the laser shadowgraphic system used by the first author of the present paper, a simple optical system, which combined the laser shadowgraphy and the direct magnified-photography, has been developed to measure the contact angle, the spreading speed, and the evaporation rate. Additionally, the system can also visualize thermocapillary convection inside of a sessile drop simultaneously. The experimental results show that evaporation/condensation and thermocapillary convection in the sessile drop induced by the evaporation strongly affects the wetting and spreading of the drop. Condensation always promotes the wetting and spreading of the drop. Evaporation may increase or decrease the contact angle of the evaporating sessile drops, depending on the evaporation rate. The thermocapillary convection in the drop induced by the evaporation enhances the effects of evaporation to suppress the spreading.

  16. Experimental measurement on movement of spiral-type capsule endoscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanan; Dai, Houde; He, Yong; Qin, Fengqing

    2016-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscope achieved great success, however, the maneuvering of wireless capsule endoscope is challenging at present. A magnetic driving instrument, including two bar magnets, a stepper motor, a motor driver, a motor controller, and a power supplier, was developed to generate rotational magnetic fields. Permanent magnet ring, magnetized as S and N poles radially and mounted spiral structure on the surface, acted as a capsule. The maximum torque passing to the capsule, rotational synchronization of capsule and motor, and the translational speed of capsule, were measured in ex vivo porcine large intestine. The experimental results illustrate that the rotational movement of the spiral-type capsule in the intestine is feasible and the cost of the magnetic driving equipment is low. As a result, the solution is promising in the future controllability.

  17. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on the Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, M.E. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A ten-channel grating polychromator was designed, constructed, and installed on the Texas Experimental Tokamak to monitor the second harmonic electron cyclotron emission. Electron temperature profiles were derived from measurements of the optically thick radiation for a variety of plasma confinement experiments. The radial and temporal evolution of T[sub e] has been characterized for electron cyclotron heated discharges with 150 kW of 60 GHz power. Comparisons were made of the heating efficiency of two type of ECH launchers. A focussed launcher was shown to have slightly better heating efficiency than an unfocussed launcher; however, the focussed antenna did not yield significantly higher electron temperatures as expected. A study of the time evolution of the electron temperature indicated that increased sawtooth activity limited the effectiveness of the focussed launcher. A focussing hog-horn antenna was fabricated and installed on the inboard side of the tokamak to measure emission directed towards the high-field side during ECH. Comparison of the radiation temperature profiles from low-field side and high-field side antennas indicates the creation of a nonthermal electron distribution by the heating. The results of the experiment compare favorably with theoretical predictions from a quasi-linear Fokker-Planck code of a 6 keV nonthermal population with a density about 1 percent of the thermal density.

  18. Integration of Error Compensation of Coordinate Measuring Machines into Feature Measurement: Part II—Experimental Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Roque; D’Amato, Roberto; Gómez, Emilio; Domingo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Coordinate measuring machines (CMM) are main instruments of measurement in laboratories and in industrial quality control. A compensation error model has been formulated (Part I). It integrates error and uncertainty in the feature measurement model. Experimental implementation for the verification of this model is carried out based on the direct testing on a moving bridge CMM. The regression results by axis are quantified and compared to CMM indication with respect to the assigned values of the measurand. Next, testing of selected measurements of length, flatness, dihedral angle, and roundness features are accomplished. The measurement of calibrated gauge blocks for length or angle, flatness verification of the CMM granite table and roundness of a precision glass hemisphere are presented under a setup of repeatability conditions. The results are analysed and compared with alternative methods of estimation. The overall performance of the model is endorsed through experimental verification, as well as the practical use and the model capability to contribute in the improvement of current standard CMM measuring capabilities. PMID:27754441

  19. Experimental measurements of the energetics of surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles T.; Lytken, Ole

    2009-06-01

    Microcalorimetric measurements of the adsorption energies of well-defined surface species are reviewed, using selected examples mainly from our own group to demonstrate the types of information that can be achieved with this technique. The adsorption energies of molecules on single crystal transition metal surfaces to produce well-characterized molecular or dissociated adsorbates allow determination of the standard enthalpies of formation of key catalytic reaction intermediates. The adsorption energies for metal atoms during metal thin-film growth allow quantitative estimates of metal-substrate bond energies, metal film/substrate adhesion energies and the energetic costs associated with lattice mismatch during thin film growth. Results for several metals on MgO(1 0 0) reveal that they bind weakly to terrace sites. Metals from the right side of the periodic table also bind weakly to step and kink sites (although more strongly than on terraces), whereas alkali and alkaline earth metals bind very strongly to these defects. At 300 K, metals tend to form 2D or 3D clusters nucleated on MgO(1 0 0) defects, via a transiently adsorbed precursor (mobile adatoms on terraces). Calorimetric measurement of the energy of metal atoms in supported 3D metal nanoparticles as a function of particle size reveals a very strong size dependence below 6 nm diameter. Metal atoms also adsorb weakly on polymer surfaces and nucleate 3D metal particles, sometimes in kinetic competition with migration to and strong reaction with the more reactive, subsurface organic functional groups. Measurements of the energies for adsorbed proteins on calcium phosphate crystals, which have been structurally characterized by NMR, reveal extremely weak binding dominated by the entropy gained from release of organized water. These experimental measurements of the energies of well-defined adsorbates serve as benchmarks against which to compare theoretical computations for accuracy, thus enabling improvement upon

  20. The Course of Actualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smet, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Actualization is traditionally seen as the process following syntactic reanalysis whereby an item's new syntactic status manifests itself in new syntactic behavior. The process is gradual in that some new uses of the reanalyzed item appear earlier or more readily than others. This article accounts for the order in which new uses appear during…

  1. Experimental techniques for ballistic pressure measurements and recent development in means of calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkarous, L.; Coghe, F.; Pirlot, M.; Golinval, J. C.

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a study carried out with the commonly used experimental techniques of ballistic pressure measurement. The comparison criteria were the peak chamber pressure and its standard deviation inside specific weapon/ammunition system configurations. It is impossible to determine exactly how precise either crusher, direct or conformal transducer methods are, as there is no way to know exactly what the actual pressure is; Nevertheless, the combined use of these measuring techniques could improve accuracy. Furthermore, a particular attention has been devoted to the problem of calibration. Calibration of crusher gauges and piezoelectric transducers is paramount and an essential task for a correct determination of the pressure inside a weapon. This topic has not been completely addressed yet and still requires further investigation. In this work, state of the art calibration methods are presented together with their specific aspects. Many solutions have been developed to satisfy this demand; nevertheless current systems do not cover the whole range of needs, calling for further development effort. In this work, research being carried out for the development of suitable practical calibration methods will be presented. The behavior of copper crushers under different high strain rates by the use of the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars (SHPB) technique is investigated in particular. The Johnson-Cook model was employed as suitable model for the numerical study using FEM code

  2. Experimental measurement of ablation effects in plasma armature railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Parsons, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental evidence supporting the importance of ablation in plasma armature railguns is presented. Experiments conducted using the HYVAX and MIDI-2 railguns are described. Several indirect effects of ablation are identified from the experimental results. An improved ablation model of plasma armature dynamics is proposed which incorporates the restrike process.

  3. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

  4. Atmospheric Spray Freeze-Drying: Numerical Modeling and Comparison With Experimental Measurements.

    PubMed

    Borges Sebastião, Israel; Robinson, Thomas D; Alexeenko, Alina

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric spray freeze-drying (ASFD) represents a novel approach to dry thermosensitive solutions via sublimation. Tests conducted with a second-generation ASFD equipment, developed for pharmaceutical applications, have focused initially on producing a light, fine, high-grade powder consistently and reliably. To better understand the heat and mass transfer physics and drying dynamics taking place within the ASFD chamber, 3 analytical models describing the key processes are developed and validated. First, by coupling the dynamics and heat transfer of single droplets sprayed into the chamber, the velocity, temperature, and phase change evolutions of these droplets are estimated for actual operational conditions. This model reveals that, under typical operational conditions, the sprayed droplets require less than 100 ms to freeze. Second, because understanding the heat transfer throughout the entire freeze-drying process is so important, a theoretical model is proposed to predict the time evolution of the chamber gas temperature. Finally, a drying model, calibrated with hygrometer measurements, is used to estimate the total time required to achieve a predefined final moisture content. Results from these models are compared with experimental data.

  5. Performance changes and relationship between vertical jump measures and actual sprint performance in elite sprinters with visual impairment throughout a Parapan American games training season.

    PubMed

    Loturco, Irineu; Winckler, Ciro; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar C; Kitamura, Katia; Veríssimo, Amaury W; Pereira, Lucas A; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the magnitude of variability and progression in actual competitive and field vertical jump test performances in elite Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment in the year leading up to the 2015 Parapan American Games, and to investigate the relationships between loaded and unloaded vertical jumping test results and actual competitive sprinting performance. Fifteen Brazilian Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment attended seven official competitions (four national, two international and the Parapan American Games 2015) between April 2014 and August 2015, in the 100- and 200-m dash. In addition, they were tested in five different periods using loaded (mean propulsive power [MPP] in jump squat [JS] exercise) and unloaded (squat jump [SJ] height) vertical jumps within the 3 weeks immediately prior to the main competitions. The smallest important effect on performances was calculated as half of the within-athlete race-to-race (or test-to-test) variability and a multiple regression analysis was performed to predict the 100- and 200-m dash performances using the vertical jump test results. Competitive performance was enhanced during the Parapan American Games in comparison to the previous competition averages, overcoming the smallest worthwhile enhancement in both the 100- (0.9%) and 200-m dash (1.43%). In addition, The SJ and JS explained 66% of the performance variance in the competitive results. This study showed that vertical jump tests, in loaded and unloaded conditions, could be good predictors of the athletes' sprinting performance, and that during the Parapan American Games the Brazilian team reached its peak competitive performance.

  6. Performance changes and relationship between vertical jump measures and actual sprint performance in elite sprinters with visual impairment throughout a Parapan American games training season

    PubMed Central

    Loturco, Irineu; Winckler, Ciro; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar C.; Kitamura, Katia; Veríssimo, Amaury W.; Pereira, Lucas A.; Nakamura, Fábio Y.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the magnitude of variability and progression in actual competitive and field vertical jump test performances in elite Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment in the year leading up to the 2015 Parapan American Games, and to investigate the relationships between loaded and unloaded vertical jumping test results and actual competitive sprinting performance. Fifteen Brazilian Paralympic sprinters with visual impairment attended seven official competitions (four national, two international and the Parapan American Games 2015) between April 2014 and August 2015, in the 100- and 200-m dash. In addition, they were tested in five different periods using loaded (mean propulsive power [MPP] in jump squat [JS] exercise) and unloaded (squat jump [SJ] height) vertical jumps within the 3 weeks immediately prior to the main competitions. The smallest important effect on performances was calculated as half of the within-athlete race-to-race (or test-to-test) variability and a multiple regression analysis was performed to predict the 100- and 200-m dash performances using the vertical jump test results. Competitive performance was enhanced during the Parapan American Games in comparison to the previous competition averages, overcoming the smallest worthwhile enhancement in both the 100- (0.9%) and 200-m dash (1.43%). In addition, The SJ and JS explained 66% of the performance variance in the competitive results. This study showed that vertical jump tests, in loaded and unloaded conditions, could be good predictors of the athletes' sprinting performance, and that during the Parapan American Games the Brazilian team reached its peak competitive performance. PMID:26594181

  7. Experimental Measurements And Evaluation Of Indoor Microclimate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraliková, Ružena; Sokolová, Hana

    2015-07-01

    The paper deals with monitoring of workplace where technological equipment produces heat during hot summer days. The thermo-hygric microclimate measurement took place during daily work shift, and was carried out at 5 choosen measuring points. Since there was radiation heat presented in workplace and workers worked at different places, the thermal environment was classified as a heterogeneous and unstationary area. The measurement, result processing and interpretation was carried out according to the valid legislation of Slovak Republic.

  8. Quantum Dynamics Simulations for Modeling Experimental Pump-Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Brett; Nayyar, Sahil; Liss, Kyle; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved studies of quantum dynamics have benefited greatly from developments in ultrafast table-top and free electron lasers. Advances in computer software and hardware have lowered the barrier for performing calculations such that relatively simple simulations allow for direct comparison with experimental results. We describe here a set of quantum dynamics calculations in low-dimensional molecular systems. The calculations incorporate coupled electronic-nuclear dynamics, including two interactions with an applied field and nuclear wave packet propagation. The simulations were written and carried out by undergraduates as part of a senior research project, with the specific goal of allowing for detailed interpretation of experimental pump-probe data (in additional to the pedagogical value).

  9. Experimental techniques for cross-section measurements. [for electron impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.; Register, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to electron collision phenomena which can be studied under single-collision conditions at low and intermediate electron impact energies, ranging from threshold to a few hundred eV, using gas phase molecular targets. Several of the experimental methods discussed were first developed and applied to atoms, but are equally applicable to molecules with minor modifications in the interpretation of the data, due to the greater complexity of molecular systems.

  10. Problems in Measuring Racial Attitudes: An Experimental Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, William E.; And Others

    Problems in measuring the attitudes of whites toward blacks have included: (1) Lack of contemporary content in existing measures; (2) Difficulty of determining scale validity; and, (3) The strong social reinforcement for being "tolerant" toward blacks making the assessment of "true" racial attitudes more difficult. The…

  11. Operational measure of entanglement based on experimental consequences.

    SciTech Connect

    Grondalski, J. P.; James, D. F.

    2002-01-01

    The maximum eigenvalue of the real part of the density matrix expressed in a maximally entangled basis with a particular phase relationship can be used as an operational measure of entanglement. This measure is related to the fidelity, maximized with a local unitary operating on either subsystem, of a standard dense coding, teleportation, or entanglement swapping protocol.

  12. Race as an Experimenter Effect In Racial Attitude Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedlacek, William E.; Brooks, Glenwood C., Jr.

    Sedlacek and Brooks in measuring the attitudes of whites toward blacks with the Situational Attitude Scale (SAS) have used trained white administrators in all previous studies. The purpose of white administrators was to avoid calling attention to the racial variable being measured. However the instrument is not the entire simulus presented to…

  13. Experimental clean combustor program noise measurement addendum, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmerling, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The test results of combustor noise measurements taken with waveguide probes are presented. Waveguide probes were shown to be a viable measurement technique for determining high sound pressure level broadband noise. A total of six full-scale annular combustors were tested and included the three advanced combustor designs: swirl-can, radial/axial, and double annular.

  14. Use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance as an Experimental Probe in Multiphase Systems: Determination of the Instrument Weight Function for Measurements of Liquid-Phase Volume Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneval, J. E.; McCarthy, M. J.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-11-01

    The relativist approach (Baveye and Sposito (1984)) to the interpretation of measurements in multiphase systems was proposed in order to incorporate the details of measurements into theoretical analyses of multiphase transport processes. To help establish the utility of this approach, the weight functions for actual experimental probes must be determined. In this paper we analyze the measurement of liquid-phase porosity in a model system by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. We show how both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) physics and experimental technique combine to determine the weight function for the spin-warp spin-echo sequence. The analysis shows clearly what aspects of the weight function are determined by the experimental method and what aspects are determined by the system being studied. The results will help establish the utility of the relativist approach as well as improve understanding NMR measurements in multiphase systems.

  15. The role of visual perception measures used in sports vision programmes in predicting actual game performance in Division I collegiate hockey players.

    PubMed

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Biberdorf, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the growing field of sports vision little is still known about unique attributes of visual processing in ice hockey and what role visual processing plays in the overall athlete's performance. In the present study we evaluated whether visual, perceptual and cognitive/motor variables collected using the Nike SPARQ Sensory Training Station have significant relevance to the real game statistics of 38 Division I collegiate male and female hockey players. The results demonstrated that 69% of variance in the goals made by forwards in 2011-2013 could be predicted by their faster reaction time to a visual stimulus, better visual memory, better visual discrimination and a faster ability to shift focus between near and far objects. Approximately 33% of variance in game points was significantly related to better discrimination among competing visual stimuli. In addition, reaction time to a visual stimulus as well as stereoptic quickness significantly accounted for 24% of variance in the mean duration of the player's penalty time. This is one of the first studies to show that some of the visual skills that state-of-the-art generalised sports vision programmes are purported to target may indeed be important for hockey players' actual performance on the ice.

  16. Measurement of neutron spectra in the experimental reactor LR-0

    SciTech Connect

    Prenosil, Vaclav; Mravec, Filip; Veskrna, Martin; Kostal, Michal; Matej, Zdenek; Cvachovec, Frantisek

    2015-07-01

    The measurement of fast neutron fluxes is important in many areas of nuclear technology. It affects the stability of the reactor structural components, performance of fuel, and also the fuel manner. The experiments performed at the LR-0 reactor were in the past focused on the measurement of neutron field far from the core, in reactor pressure vessel simulator or in biological shielding simulator. In the present the measurement in closer regions to core became more important, especially measurements in structural components like reactor baffle. This importance increases with both reactor power increase and also long term operation. Other important task is an increasing need for the measurement close to the fuel. The spectra near the fuel are aimed due to the planned measurements with the FLIBE salt, in FHR / MSR research, where one of the task is the measurement of the neutron spectra in it. In both types of experiments there is strong demand for high working count rate. The high count rate is caused mainly by high gamma background and by high fluxes. The fluxes in core or in its vicinity are relatively high to ensure safe reactor operation. This request is met in the digital spectroscopic apparatus. All experiments were realized in the LR-0 reactor. It is an extremely flexible light water zero-power research reactor, operated by the Research Center Rez (Czech Republic). (authors)

  17. Dynamic Measurement of the J Integral in Ductile Metals: Comparison of Experimental and Numerical Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    proven experimental techniques for measruing J under static loading, few proven experimental techniques exist for measurement of the time history of J...Freund[9], who estimate jd by measuring the tran- sient load displacement records and by using the quasi-static formula for deeply notched round bars...HY-100 steel, loaded by a projectile, are compared to experimental measurements performed by means of the interferometric strain- displacement gauge

  18. Science Experimenter: How to Measure the Solar Constant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Forrest M., III

    1991-01-01

    Presented is a way to measure the sun's radiation by using a radiometer. Directions for building both simple and complex radiometers, circuit diagrams, and an explanation on how they work are included. (KR)

  19. Survey and Experimental Testing of Nongravimetric Mass Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakey, W. E.; Lorenz, R.

    1977-01-01

    Documentation presented describes the design, testing, and evaluation of an accelerated gravimetric balance, a low mass air bearing oscillator of the spring-mass type, and a centrifugal device for liquid mass measurement. A direct mass readout method was developed to replace the oscillation period readout method which required manual calculations to determine mass. A protoype 25 gram capacity micro mass measurement device was developed and tested.

  20. Experimental apparatus for measurements of electron impact excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafyatis, G. P.; Kohl, J. L.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    An ion beam apparatus for the absolute measurement of collision cross sections in singly and multiply charged ions is described. An inclined electron and ion beams arrangement is used. Emitted photons from the decay of collision produced excited states are collected by a mirror and imaged onto a photomultiplier. Absolute measurements of the electron impact excitation of the 2s-2p transition in C(3+) were used to demonstrate the reliability of the apparatus.

  1. Experimental proposal for measuring the Gouy phase of matter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Paz, I. G.; Saldanha, P. L.; Nemes, M. C.; Peixoto de Faria, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Schrödinger equation for an atomic beam predicts that it must have a phase anomaly near the beam waist analogous to the Gouy phase of an electromagnetic beam. We propose here a feasible experiment that allows for direct determination of this anomalous phase using Ramsey interferometry with Rydberg atoms. Possible experimental limitations are discussed, and shown to be completely under control within present-day technology. We also discuss how this finding can open the possibility of using the spatial mode wavefunctions of atoms as q-dits, since the Gouy phase is an essential ingredient for making rotations in the quantum states.

  2. Experimental study of coaxial nozzle exhaust noise. [acoustic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.; Stone, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for static acoustic model tests of various geometrical configurations of coaxial nozzles operating over a range of flow conditions. The geometrical configurations consisted of nozzles with coplanar and non-coplanar exit planes and various exhaust area ratios. Primary and secondary nozzle flows were varied independently over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.4 to 3.0 and gas temperatures from 280 to 1100 K. Acoustic data are presented for the conventional mode of coaxial nozzle operation as well as for the inverted velocity profile mode. Comparisons are presented to show the effect of configuration and flow changes on the acoustic characteristics of the nozzles.

  3. Atom probe trajectory mapping using experimental tip shape measurements.

    PubMed

    Haley, D; Petersen, T; Ringer, S P; Smith, G D W

    2011-11-01

    Atom probe tomography is an accurate analytical and imaging technique which can reconstruct the complex structure and composition of a specimen in three dimensions. Despite providing locally high spatial resolution, atom probe tomography suffers from global distortions due to a complex projection function between the specimen and detector which is different for each experiment and can change during a single run. To aid characterization of this projection function, this work demonstrates a method for the reverse projection of ions from an arbitrary projection surface in 3D space back to an atom probe tomography specimen surface. Experimental data from transmission electron microscopy tilt tomography are combined with point cloud surface reconstruction algorithms and finite element modelling to generate a mapping back to the original tip surface in a physically and experimentally motivated manner. As a case study, aluminium tips are imaged using transmission electron microscopy before and after atom probe tomography, and the specimen profiles used as input in surface reconstruction methods. This reconstruction method is a general procedure that can be used to generate mappings between a selected surface and a known tip shape using numerical solutions to the electrostatic equation, with quantitative solutions to the projection problem readily achievable in tens of minutes on a contemporary workstation.

  4. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  5. Experimental Measurement of RCS Jet Interaction Effects on a Capsule Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Watkins, A. Neal; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Dyakonov, Artem A.

    2008-01-01

    An investigation was made in NASA Langley Research Center s 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel to determine the effects of reaction-control system (RCS) jet interactions on the aft-body of a capsule entry vehicle. The test focused on demonstrating and improving advanced measurement techniques that would aid in the rapid measurement and visualization of jet interaction effects for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle while providing data useful for developing engineering models or validation of computational tools used to assess actual flight environments. Measurements included global surface imaging with pressure and temperature sensitive paints and three-dimensional flow visualization with a scanning planar laser induced fluorescence technique. The wind tunnel model was fabricated with interchangeable parts for two different aft-body configurations. The first, an Apollo-like configuration, was used to focus primarily on the forward facing roll and yaw jet interactions which are known to have significant aft-body heating augmentation. The second, an early Orion Crew Module configuration (4-cluster jets), was tested blowing only out of the most windward yaw jet, which was expected to have the maximum heating augmentation for that configuration. Jet chamber pressures and tunnel flow conditions were chosen to approximate early Apollo wind tunnel test conditions. Maximum heating augmentation values measured for the Apollo-like configuration (>10 for forward facing roll jet and 4 for yaw jet) using temperature sensitive paint were shown to be similar to earlier experimental results (Jones and Hunt, 1965) using a phase change paint technique, but were acquired with much higher surface resolution. Heating results for the windward yaw jet on the Orion configuration had similar augmentation levels, but affected much less surface area. Numerical modeling for the Apollo-like yaw jet configuration with laminar flow and uniform jet outflow conditions showed similar heating patterns

  6. Experimental Methods Using Photogrammetric Techniques for Parachute Canopy Shape Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas W.; Downey, James M.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Desabrais, Kenneth J.; Noetscher, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in partnership with the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Center has collaborated on the development of a payload instrumentation package to record the physical parameters observed during parachute air drop tests. The instrumentation package records a variety of parameters including canopy shape, suspension line loads, payload 3-axis acceleration, and payload velocity. This report discusses the instrumentation design and development process, as well as the photogrammetric measurement technique used to provide shape measurements. The scaled model tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Plum Brook Space Propulsion Facility, OH.

  7. Z/sup 0/ decay modes - experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfan, J.M.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes three lectures given at the Theoretical Advanced Study Institute at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. The lectures begin with an introduction to storage rings and linear colliders with special reference to the parameters of the SLC and LEP. The rigors of the Z/sup 0/ environment are presented along with the requirements for SLC and LEP detectors. The pedagogy needed for testing the Standard Model is developed, and some experimental tests of the Standard Model are discussed. Tests which involve extensions of the Standard Model (charged Higgs particles, more generations) as well as a few examples of how supersymmetry may show up at the Z/sup 0/ are discussed. 25 references, 34 figures. (WHK)

  8. Experimental Acoustic Velocity Measurements in a Tidally Affected Stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storm, J.B.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) constructed a continuous steamgaging station on the tidally affected Escatawpa River at Interstate 10 near Orange Grove, Mississippi, in August 2001. The gage collects water quantity parameters of stage and stream velocity, and water quality parameters of water temperature, specific conductance, and salinity. Data are transmitted to the local USGS office via the GOES satellite and are presented on a near real-time web page. Due to tidal effects, the stream has multiple flow regimes which include downstream, bi-directional, and reverse flows. Advances in acoustic technology have made it possible to gage streams of this nature where conventional methods have been unsuccessful. An experimental mount was designed in an attempt to recognize, describe, and quantify these flow regimes by using acoustic Doppler equipment.

  9. Electromagnetic flowmetry--an experimental method for continuous blood flow measurement using a new island flap model.

    PubMed

    Banis, J C; Schwartz, K S; Acland, R D

    1980-10-01

    We describe a reliable experimental method for direct, continuous measurement of the rate of blood flow in an island skin flap, using an electromagnetic flowmeter applied to the artery of the flap. The canine saphenous island flap model, developed as part of this study, is a large (11 x 14 cm) island flap, based solely on the saphenous artery (2 mm in diameter). We describe the anatomy of the flap and the method of raising it. Electromagnetic flowmetry is the only method of blood flow determination that provides immediate, continuous, and quantitative measurement of flow. We describe the principles and pitfalls of the electromagnetic flowmeter and the numerous rules of practice that must be observed to obtain consistent results. A validation study was carried out, in which we simultaneously measured arterial inflow with the flowmeter and venous outflow from the flap using direct collection. This study was based on the assumption that at any point in time the arterial and venous rate of flow were equal. We present the results of the study, which show an extremely close linear relationship between the measured and actual rates of flow. We intend to use this experimental method to study the factors that affect the rate of blood flow in free skin flap transfer.

  10. Experimental measurements of unsteady turbulent boundary layers near separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations conducted to document the behavior of turbulent boundary layers on flat surfaces that separate due to adverse pressure gradients are reported. Laser and hot wire anemometers measured turbulence and flow structure of a steady free stream separating turbulent boundary layer produced on the flow of a wind tunnel section. The effects of sinusoidal and unsteadiness of the free stream velocity on this separating turbulent boundary layer at a reduced frequency were determined. A friction gage and a thermal tuft were developed and used to measure the surface skin friction and the near wall fraction of time the flow moves downstream for several cases. Abstracts are provided of several articles which discuss the effects of the periodic free stream unsteadiness on the structure or separating turbulent boundary layers.

  11. Experimental validation of a high voltage pulse measurement method.

    SciTech Connect

    Cular, Stefan; Patel, Nishant Bhupendra; Branch, Darren W.

    2013-09-01

    This report describes X-cut lithium niobates (LiNbO3) utilization for voltage sensing by monitoring the acoustic wave propagation changes through LiNbO3 resulting from applied voltage. Direct current (DC), alternating current (AC) and pulsed voltage signals were applied to the crystal. Voltage induced shift in acoustic wave propagation time scaled quadratically for DC and AC voltages and linearly for pulsed voltages. The measured values ranged from 10 - 273 ps and 189 ps 2 ns for DC and non-DC voltages, respectively. Data suggests LiNbO3 has a frequency sensitive response to voltage. If voltage source error is eliminated through physical modeling from the uncertainty budget, the sensors U95 estimated combined uncertainty could decrease to ~0.025% for DC, AC, and pulsed voltage measurements.

  12. Multicolor laser altimeter for barometric measurements over the ocean - Experimental

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement theory and results from testing a breadboard multiwavelength (355-, 532- and 1064-nm) laser altimeter over horizontal paths are presented. They show that pressure accuracies of 3 mbar can be achieved when ranging at nadir to cube corner targets when using a 500-psec resolution waveform digitizer and utilizing new calibration techniques. Streak camera-based receivers will be required for the same or higher accuracies when ranging to the ocean surface. System design calculations for aircraft and spaceborne experiments are presented.

  13. Experimental determination of storage ring optics using orbit response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranek, J.

    1997-02-01

    The measured response matrix giving the change in orbit at beam position monitors (BPMs) with changes in steering magnet excitation can be used to accurately calibrate the linear optics in an electron storage ring [1-8]. A computer code called LOCO (Linear Optics from Closed Orbits) was developed to analyze the NSLS X-Ray Ring measured response matrix to determine: the gradients in all 56 quadrupole magnets; the calibration of the steering magnets and BPMs; the roll of the quadrupoles, steering magnets, and BPMs about the electron beam direction; the longitudinal magnetic centers of the orbit steering magnets; the horizontal dispersion at the orbit steering magnets; and the transverse mis-alignment of the electron orbit in each of the sextupoles. Random orbit measurement error from the BPMs propagated to give only 0.04% rms error in the determination of individual quadrupole gradients and 0.4 mrad rms error in the determination of individual quadrupole rolls. Small variations of a few parts in a thousand in the quadrupole gradients within an individual family were resolved. The optics derived by LOCO gave accurate predictions of the horizontal dispersion, the beta functions, and the horizontal and vertical emittances, and it gave good qualitative agreement with the measured vertical dispersion. The improved understanding of the X-Ray Ring has enabled us to increase the synchrotron radiation brightness. The LOCO code can also be used to find the quadrupole family gradients that best correct for gradient errors in quadrupoles, in sextupoles, and from synchrotron radiation insertion devices. In this way the design periodicity of a storage ring's optics can be restored. An example of periodicity restoration will be presented for the NSLS VUV Ring. LOCO has also produced useful results when applied to the ALS storage ring [8].

  14. Reconstruction of multiple cracks from experimental electrostatic boundary measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt; Liepa, Valdis; Vogelius, Michael

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm for recovering a collection of linear cracks in a homogeneous electrical conductor from boundary measurements of voltages induced by specified current fluxes is described. The technique is a variation of Newton's method and is based on taking weighted averages of the boundary data. An apparatus that was constructed specifically for generating laboratory data on which to test the algorithm is also described. The algorithm is applied to a number of different test cases and the results are discussed.

  15. Experimental evidence of interhemispheric transport from airborne carbon monoxide measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, R. E.; Gauntner, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    During the period 28-30 October 1977, a Pan American 747-SP aircraft flew around the world with an automated instrument package that included measurements of atmospheric CO made every 4 sec. The flight path extended from San Francisco, over the North Pole to London, south to Capetown, over the South Pole to Auckland, and back to San Francisco. The data collected show large changes with longitude, which are interpreted as direct evidence of interhemispheric mixing. Possible sources for CO are discussed.

  16. Experimentally Measured Radiative Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths in Neutral Vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, C. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Belmonte, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new study of the V i atom using a combination of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform spectroscopy that contains newly measured radiative lifetimes for 25 levels between 24,648 cm-1 and 37,518 cm-1 and oscillator strengths for 208 lines between 3040 and 20000 Å from 39 upper energy levels. Thirteen of these oscillator strengths have not been reported previously. This work was conducted independently of the recent studies of neutral vanadium lifetimes and oscillator strengths carried out by Den Hartog et al. and Lawler et al., and thus serves as a means to verify those measurements. Where our data overlap with their data, we generally find extremely good agreement in both level lifetimes and oscillator strengths. However, we also find evidence that Lawler et al. have systematically underestimated oscillator strengths for lines in the region of 9000 ± 100 Å. We suggest a correction of 0.18 ± 0.03 dex for these values to bring them into agreement with our results and those of Whaling et al. We also report new measurements of hyperfine structure splitting factors for three odd levels of V i lying between 24,700 and 28,400 cm-1.

  17. Experimental measurement of boron isotope fractionation in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, Kateryna; Kaufman, Alan J.; Yao, Wengsheng; Byrne, Robert H.; Tossell, John A.

    2006-08-01

    The boron isotopic composition of marine carbonates is considered to be a tracer of seawater pH. Use of this proxy benefits from an intimate understanding of chemical kinetics and thermodynamic isotope exchange reactions between the two dominant boron-bearing species in seawater: boric acid B(OH) 3 and borate ion B(OH) 4-. However, because of our inability to quantitatively separate these species in solution, the degree of boron isotope exchange has only been known through theoretical estimates. In this study, we present results of a spectrophotometric procedure wherein the boron isotope equilibrium constant ( 11-10KB) is determined empirically from the difference in the dissociation constants of 11B(OH) 3 and 10B(OH) 3 in pure water, 0.6 mol kg - 1 H 2O KCl and artificial seawater. Within experimental uncertainty, our results show no dependence of 11-10KB on temperature, but 11-10KB at 25 °C in pure water was statistically different than results obtained in solutions at high ionic strength. 11-10KB of the seawater ( S = 35, B T = 0.01 mol kg - 1 H 2O) at 25 °C is 1.0272 ± 0.0006. This result is significantly larger than the theoretical value used in numerous paleo-pH studies ( 11-10KB = 1.0194).

  18. Experimental measurement of the reflection behavior of contaminant molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Susumu; Miyazaki, Eiji; Miura, Yuka; Yamanaka, Riyo; Numata, Osamu; Ishizawa, Junichiro; Kimoto, Yugo; Tamura, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    JAXA is developing a contamination analysis tool "J-SPICE" (Japanese Spacecraft Induced Contamination analysis software). Generally speaking, contamination analysis tools predict based on various input data and mathematical models of contaminant behavior, which means prediction accuracy depends on the validity of mathematical models as well as of input data. We investigated the validity of a diffuse reflection model applied in J-SPICE by comparing the reflection flux of contaminant molecules measured by the ground experiment and the analytical result of the J-SPICE. The result showed that the diffuse reflection model of J-SPICE reasonably explains molecule distribution reflected by a flat surface.

  19. Measurements of experimental plasma brush behavior in hybrid armatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, R. S.; Morrison, J. J.; Susoeff, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid armatures used in railguns, consist of a conducting link which is commutated to the rails by plasma brushes. The formation, properties and stability of plasma brushes is important to the performance of the armature. This paper describes a set of experiments in which the effects of varying plasma brush parameters including the initial mass of metal foil used to form the plasma as well as the current were studied. The evolution of the plasma brush from a solid metal foil through its melt, vapor and plasma phase were observed. The resulting brush length and voltage drop were measured. The results of these tests are presented, discussed and compared to numerical simulations.

  20. Increasing of MERARG experimental performances: on-line fission gas release measurement by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pontillon, Y.; Capdevila, H.; Clement, S.; Guigues, E.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J.

    2015-07-01

    The MERARG device - implemented at the LECASTAR Hot Laboratory, at the CEA Cadarache - allows characterizing nuclear fuels with respect to the behaviour of fission gases during thermal transients representative of normal or off normal operating nuclear power plant conditions. The fuel is heated in order to extract a part or the total gas inventory it contains. Fission Gas Release (FGR) is actually recorded by mean of both on-line gamma spectrometry station and micro gas chromatography. These two devices monitor the quantity and kinetics of fission gas release rate. They only address {sup 85}Kr radioactive isotope and the elemental quantification of Kr, Xe and He (with a relatively low detection limit in the latter case, typically 5-10 ppm). In order to better estimate the basic mechanisms that promote fission gas release from irradiated nuclear fuels, the CEA fuel study department decided to improve its experimental facility by modifying MERARG to extend the studies of gamma emitter fission gases to all gases (including Helium) with a complete isotopic distribution capability. To match these specifications, a Residual Gas Analyser (RGA) has been chosen as mass spectrometer. This paper presents a review of the main aspects of the qualification/calibration phase of the RGA type analyser. In particular, results recorded over three mass ranges 1-10 u, 80-90 u and 120-140 u in the two classical modes of MERARG, i.e. on-line and off-line measurements are discussed. Results obtained from a standard gas bottle show that the quantitative analysis at a few ppm levels can be achieved for all isotopes of Kr and Xe, as well as masses 2 and 4 u. (authors)

  1. Deriving the microstructural parameters of sea foam from experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wai Soen; Lee, Hon Ping; Yu, Kin Wah

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the effective dielectric constant of sea foam by exploiting its spectral structure. We have considered sea foam as a two-phase composite containing air and sea water, at scale where the quasi-static limit is valid. McPhedran and co-workers derived tight bounds of the structural parameters of such composite when a set of measured data is given. However, determining the exact structural parameters have not been successful. We have performed an inverse algorithm, attempted to determine the structure of the foam given measured data of dielectric constant. We model the sea foam by a multilayered Hashin-Shtrikman structure consisting of air embedded in sea water with decreasing air volume fraction from the top to bottom. We first express the effective permittivity of the foam using spectral representation as proposed by Bergman and Milton. Then, by an optimization approach, we determine the spectral parameters, namely the zeros and poles. Next, we convert these spectral parameters into structural parameters by an algorithm proposed by Sun and Yu. Hence the structure of foam could be determined. The inverse problem of determining the sea foam structure is important in marine science. Sea surface wind speed and salinity could be determined from properties of sea foam.

  2. Experimental Time Resolved Electron Beam Temperature Measurements Using Bremsstrahlung Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Menge, P.R.; Maenchen, J.E.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Rosenthal, S.E.

    1999-06-25

    Electron beam temperature, {beta}{perpendicular} (= v{perpendicular}/v), is important to control for the development of high dose flash radiographic bremsstrahlung sources. At high voltage (> 5 MV) increasing electron beam temperature has a serious deleterious effect on dose production. The average and time resolved behavior of beam temperature was measured during radiographic experiments on the HERMES III accelerator (10 MV, 50 kA, 70 ns). A linear array of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to estimate the time integrated average of beam temperature. On and off-axis photoconducting diamond (PCD) detectors were used to measure the time resolved bremsstrahlung dose rate, which is dependent on beam energy and temperature. The beam temperature can be determined by correlating PCD response with accelerator voltage and current and also by analyzing the ratio of PCD amplitudes on and off axis. This ratio is insensitive to voltage and current and thus, is more reliable than utilizing absolute dose rate. The data is unfolded using comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations to obtain absolute beam temperatures. The data taken on HERMES III show abrupt increases in {beta}{perpendicular} midway through the pulse indicating rapid onset of beam instability.

  3. Experimentally measured MTF's associated with imaging through turbid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, N.; Strand, M.; Holloway, J., Jr.; Price, B.; Brown, D.

    1988-01-01

    One factor which affects the ability to image an underwater object from the atmosphere is water turbidity. The performance of an imaging system is often expressed by the limiting resolution which is determined from the contrast transfer function (CTF). The image quality is usually expressed in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). This paper presents the results from carefully controlled laboratory experiments to determine the CTFs and the MTFs of a turbid water medium for Jackson turbidity units (JTUs) ranging from 0 to 24. MTFs are generated from a narrow strip target and CTFs are generated from standard resolution bar targets. MTF results are compared with earlier work and CTFs calculated from MTFs are compared with measured CTFs.

  4. Experimental clean combustor program; noise measurement addendum, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emmerling, J. J.; Bekofske, K. L.

    1976-01-01

    Combustor noise measurements were performed using wave guide probes. Test results from two full scale annular combustor configurations in a combustor test rig are presented. A CF6-50 combustor represented a current design, and a double annular combustor represented the advanced clean combustor configuration. The overall acoustic power levels were found to correlate with the steady state heat release rate and inlet temperature. A theoretical analysis for the attenuation of combustor noise propagating through a turbine was extended from a subsonic relative flow condition to include the case of supersonic flow at the discharge side. The predicted attenuation from this analysis was compared to both engine data and extrapolated component combustor data. The attenuation of combustor noise through the CF6-50 turbine was found to be greater than 14 dB by both the analysis and the data.

  5. Isotopic Resonance Hypothesis: Experimental Verification by Escherichia coli Growth Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xueshu; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2015-03-01

    Isotopic composition of reactants affects the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. As a rule, enrichment of heavy stable isotopes leads to progressively slower reactions. But the recent isotopic resonance hypothesis suggests that the dependence of the reaction rate upon the enrichment degree is not monotonous. Instead, at some ``resonance'' isotopic compositions, the kinetics increases, while at ``off-resonance'' compositions the same reactions progress slower. To test the predictions of this hypothesis for the elements C, H, N and O, we designed a precise (standard error +/-0.05%) experiment that measures the parameters of bacterial growth in minimal media with varying isotopic composition. A number of predicted resonance conditions were tested, with significant enhancements in kinetics discovered at these conditions. The combined statistics extremely strongly supports the validity of the isotopic resonance phenomenon (p << 10-15). This phenomenon has numerous implications for the origin of life studies and astrobiology, and possible applications in agriculture, biotechnology, medicine, chemistry and other areas.

  6. Experimental uncertainty and drag measurements in the national transonic facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batill, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study which was conducted in order to establish a framework for the quantitative description of the uncertainty in measurements conducted in the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The importance of uncertainty analysis in both experiment planning and reporting results has grown significantly in the past few years. Various methodologies have been proposed and the engineering community appears to be 'converging' on certain accepted practices. The practical application of these methods to the complex wind tunnel testing environment at the NASA Langley Research Center was based upon terminology and methods established in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) standards. The report overviews this methodology.

  7. Experimental measures of pathogen competition and relative fitness.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jiasui; McDonald, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    Competition among pathogen strains for limited host resources can have a profound effect on pathogen evolution. A better understanding of the principles and consequences of competition can be useful in designing more sustainable disease management strategies. The competitive ability and relative fitness of a pathogen strain are determined by its intrinsic biological properties, the resistance and heterogeneity of the corresponding host population, the population density and genetic relatedness of the competing strains, and the physical environment. Competitive ability can be inferred indirectly from fitness components, such as basic reproduction rate or transmission rate. However, pathogen strains that exhibit higher fitness components when they infect a host alone may not exhibit a competitive advantage when they co-infect the same host. The most comprehensive measures of competitive ability and relative fitness come from calculating selection coefficients in a mixed infection in a field setting. Mark-release-recapture experiments can be used to estimate fitness costs associated with unnecessary virulence and fungicide resistance.

  8. Experimental Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Liu-Jun; Liang, Hao; Shentu, Guo-Liang; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Yin, Hua-Lei; Liu, Nai-Le; Li, Li; Ma, Xiongfeng; Pelc, Jason S.; Fejer, M. M.; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Quantum key distribution is proven to offer unconditional security in communication between two remote users with ideal source and detection. Unfortunately, ideal devices never exist in practice and device imperfections have become the targets of various attacks. By developing up-conversion single-photon detectors with high efficiency and low noise, we faithfully demonstrate the measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol, which is immune to all hacking strategies on detection. Meanwhile, we employ the decoy-state method to defend attacks on a nonideal source. By assuming a trusted source scenario, our practical system, which generates more than a 25 kbit secure key over a 50 km fiber link, serves as a stepping stone in the quest for unconditionally secure communications with realistic devices.

  9. Electrostatic effects in asbestos sampling. I: Experimental measurements.

    PubMed

    Baron, P A; Deye, G J

    1990-02-01

    Electrostatic charge can cause errors during sampling of airborne asbestos fibers and other particles. The change in particle trajectories caused by charge effects during sampling can result in nonuniform deposits on the collecting filter surface and net loss of sample. The degree of these electrostatic effects depends on particle charge, sampler charge, sampler conductivity, and sampling flow rate and direction. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the dependence of sampling efficiency and sample uniformity on these variables. Humidity has been postulated as a primary determinant of particle charge during aerosol generation. Measurements of particle charge and concentration were made as a function of relative humidity with chrysotile fibers generated from a fluidized bed. A strong increase in charge and a decrease in concentration of fibers was noted as the relative humidity was decreased below 15%. The effects of conductive versus nonconductive samplers and sampling flow rate were measured as a function of particle and sampler charge levels. Nonconductive samplers can carry a large and variable charge distribution on their surfaces. This can result in a biased and highly variable particle deposit on the filter when sampling charged particles. Conductive cowls spread any acquired charge over the entire surface and produce a more symmetrical and less biased charged particle deposit. Increasing the sampling flow rate will improve sampling efficiency and decrease deposit variability because the charged particle has less time to interact with the field produced by the sampler. These results suggest that sampling problems caused by electrostatic charge interactions are most likely to occur under low humidity conditions of dust generation, that sampling should be done at as high a flow rate as possible to reduce these effects, and that analysts should select fields toward the center of the filter to minimize bias and variability.

  10. Experimental measurement of solid solutes solubility in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Manouchehr Manouchehrian; Beiki, Hossein

    2016-08-01

    The solubility of benzoic and salicylic acids was measured at a temperature range from 293 to 333 K in two types of water based nanofluids employed as the solvent. Silica and γ-alumina nanoparticles with volume concentrations of 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 % were dispersed into de-ionized water as the based fluid. The results revealed that the solubility of nanofluid followed the same trend as pure water solubility with increasing temperature. At low temperatures, below 330 K for γ-Al2O3 nanofluids and 323 K for SiO2 nanofluids, nanoparticles had no effect on solubility, but by increasing the temperature, nanofluid solubility decreased. The maximum reduction in the solubility of compounds was observed at the temperature of 333 K and in 0.1 % γ-Alumina nanofluid and 0.025 % Silica nanofluids. Nanofluids solubility decreased up to a critical nanoparticles concentration while increased by increasing nanoparticles concentration further. The maximum reduction of nanofluids solubility at critical concentration was about 12.43 % for salicylic acid and 10.24 % for benzoic acid in 0.025 % SiO2 nanofluid. Nanofluids solubility was found to be strongly dependent on nanoparticles size. Bigger nanoparticles were more effective than smaller ones on nanofluids solubility.

  11. Isotopic Resonance Hypothesis: Experimental Verification by Escherichia coli Growth Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zubarev, Roman A.

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic composition of reactants affects the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. As a rule, enrichment of heavy stable isotopes leads to progressively slower reactions. But the recent isotopic resonance hypothesis suggests that the dependence of the reaction rate upon the enrichment degree is not monotonous. Instead, at some “resonance” isotopic compositions, the kinetics increases, while at “off-resonance” compositions the same reactions progress slower. To test the predictions of this hypothesis for the elements C, H, N and O, we designed a precise (standard error ±0.05%) experiment that measures the parameters of bacterial growth in minimal media with varying isotopic composition. A number of predicted resonance conditions were tested, with significant enhancements in kinetics discovered at these conditions. The combined statistics extremely strongly supports the validity of the isotopic resonance phenomenon (p ≪ 10−15). This phenomenon has numerous implications for the origin of life studies and astrobiology, and possible applications in agriculture, biotechnology, medicine, chemistry and other areas. PMID:25782666

  12. Task committee on experimental uncertainty and measurement errors in hydraulic engineering: An update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlin, B.; Wahl, T.; Gonzalez-Castro, J. A.; Fulford, J.; Robeson, M.

    2005-01-01

    As part of their long range goals for disseminating information on measurement techniques, instrumentation, and experimentation in the field of hydraulics, the Technical Committee on Hydraulic Measurements and Experimentation formed the Task Committee on Experimental Uncertainty and Measurement Errors in Hydraulic Engineering in January 2003. The overall mission of this Task Committee is to provide information and guidance on the current practices used for describing and quantifying measurement errors and experimental uncertainty in hydraulic engineering and experimental hydraulics. The final goal of the Task Committee on Experimental Uncertainty and Measurement Errors in Hydraulic Engineering is to produce a report on the subject that will cover: (1) sources of error in hydraulic measurements, (2) types of experimental uncertainty, (3) procedures for quantifying error and uncertainty, and (4) special practical applications that range from uncertainty analysis for planning an experiment to estimating uncertainty in flow monitoring at gaging sites and hydraulic structures. Currently, the Task Committee has adopted the first order variance estimation method outlined by Coleman and Steele as the basic methodology to follow when assessing the uncertainty in hydraulic measurements. In addition, the Task Committee has begun to develop its report on uncertainty in hydraulic engineering. This paper is intended as an update on the Task Committee's overall progress. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  13. Experimental Measurement of the Flow Field of Heavy Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Browand; Charles Radovich

    2005-05-31

    tests were performed at the same Crows Landing testsite. In the tests, two identical trucks are operated at headways in the range 3-10 meters. The trucks are steered by hand, but longitudinal control is provided by a closed-loop control system. Laser ranging measures truck-to-truck distance, and the control system maintains a truck separation to within about {+-} 3 centimeters. From these tests it is concluded that both trucks save fuel by close-following, that the fuel saving increases with decreasing spacing, and that the trail truck saves more fuel. An average value of fuel saving for each of the two trucks at spacings of 6-10 meters can be taken to be 3.0 liters/100 km.

  14. Detectability of underground electrical cables junction with a ground penetrating radar: electromagnetic simulation and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; serhir, mohammed; kameni, abelin; lambert, marc; pichon, lionel

    2016-04-01

    For a company like Electricity De France (EDF), being able to detect accurately using non-destructive methods the position of the buried junction between two underground cables is a crucial issue. The junction is the linking part where most maintenance operations are carried out. The challenge of this work is to conduct a feasibility study to confirm or deny the relevance of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to detect these buried junctions in their actual environment against clutter. Indeed, the cables are buried in inhomogeneous medium at around 80cm deep. To do this, the study is conducted in a numerical environment. We use the 3D simulation software CST MWS to model a GPR scenario. In this simulation, we place the already optimized bowtie antennas operating in the frequency band [0.5 GHz - 3 GHz] in front of wet soil (dispersive) and dry soil where the underground cable is placed at 80cm deep. We collect the amplitude and phase of the reflected waves in order to detect the contrast provoked by the geometric dimensions variation of the cable [1] (diameter of the cable is 48mm and the diameter of the junction 74mm). The use of an ultra-wideband antenna is necessary to reconcile resolution and penetration of electromagnetic waves in the medium to be characterized. We focus on the performance of the GPR method according to the characteristics of the surrounding medium in which the electric cables are buried, the polarization of the Tx and Rx antennas. The experimental measurement collected in the EDF site will be presented. The measured data are processed using the clutter reduction method based on digital filtering [2]. We aim at showing that using the developed bowtie antennas that the GPR technique is well adapted for the cable junction localization even in cluttered environment. References [1] D. J. Daniels, "Surface-Penetrating Radar", London, IEE 1996. [2] Potin, D.; Duflos, E.; Vanheeghe, P., "Landmines Ground-Penetrating Radar Signal Enhancement by Digital

  15. Experimental Test of Error-Disturbance Uncertainty Relations by Weak Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, Fumihiro; Baek, So-Young; Ozawa, Masanao; Edamatsu, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally test the error-disturbance uncertainty relation (EDR) in generalized, strength-variable measurement of a single photon polarization qubit, making use of weak measurement that keeps the initial signal state practically unchanged. We demonstrate that the Heisenberg EDR is violated, yet the Ozawa and Branciard EDRs are valid throughout the range of our measurement strength.

  16. Experimental evaluation of nonclassical correlations between measurement outcomes and target observable in a quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Masataka; Suzuki, Yutaro; Nii, Taiki; Kinoshita, Ryuji; Hofmann, Holger F.

    2016-03-01

    In general, it is difficult to evaluate measurement errors when the initial and final conditions of the measurement make it impossible to identify the correct value of the target observable. Ozawa proposed a solution based on the operator algebra of observables which has recently been used in experiments investigating the error-disturbance trade-off of quantum measurements. Importantly, this solution makes surprisingly detailed statements about the relations between measurement outcomes and the unknown target observable. In the present paper, we investigate this relation by performing a sequence of two measurements on the polarization of a photon, so that the first measurement commutes with the target observable and the second measurement is sensitive to a complementary observable. While the initial measurement can be evaluated using classical statistics, the second measurement introduces the effects of quantum correlations between the noncommuting physical properties. By varying the resolution of the initial measurement, we can change the relative contribution of the nonclassical correlations and identify their role in the evaluation of the quantum measurement. It is shown that the most striking deviation from classical expectations is obtained at the transition between weak and strong measurements, where the competition between different statistical effects results in measurement values well outside the range of possible eigenvalues.

  17. Quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation.

    PubMed

    D'Ariano, G M; Lo Presti, P

    2001-05-07

    Quantum operations describe any state change allowed in quantum mechanics, including the evolution of an open system or the state change due to a measurement. We present a general method based on quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation. As input the method needs only a single entangled state. The feasibility of the technique for the electromagnetic field is shown, and the experimental setup is illustrated based on homodyne tomography of a twin beam.

  18. Laser induced deflection technique for absolute thin film absorption measurement: optimized concepts and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlig, Christian; Kufert, Siegfried; Bublitz, Simon; Speck, Uwe

    2011-03-20

    Using experimental results and numerical simulations, two measuring concepts of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique are introduced and optimized for absolute thin film absorption measurements from deep ultraviolet to IR wavelengths. For transparent optical coatings, a particular probe beam deflection direction allows the absorption measurement with virtually no influence of the substrate absorption, yielding improved accuracy compared to the common techniques of separating bulk and coating absorption. For high-reflection coatings, where substrate absorption contributions are negligible, a different probe beam deflection is chosen to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. Various experimental results for the two different measurement concepts are presented.

  19. On the measurement of a weak classical force coupled to a harmonic oscillator: experimental progress

    SciTech Connect

    Bocko, M.F.; Onofrio, R.

    1996-07-01

    Several high-precision physics experiments are approaching a level of sensitivity at which the intrinsic quantum nature of the experimental apparatus is the dominant source of fluctuations limiting the sensitivity of the measurements. This quantum limit is embodied by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which prohibits arbitrarily precise simultaneous measurements of two conjugate observables of a system but allows one-time measurements of a single observable with any precision. The dynamical evolution of a system immediately following a measurement limits the class of observables that may be measured repeatedly with arbitrary precision, with the influence of the measurement apparatus on the system being confined strictly to the conjugate observables. Observables having this feature, and the corresponding measurements performed on them, have been named quantum nondemolition or back-action evasion observables. In a previous review (Caves {ital et} {ital al}., 1980, Rev. Mod. Phys. {bold 52}, 341) a quantum-mechanical analysis of quantum nondemolition measurements of a harmonic oscillator was presented. The present review summarizes the experimental progress on quantum nondemolition measurements and the classical models developed to describe and guide the development of practical implementations of quantum nondemolition measurements. The relationship between the classical and quantum theoretical models is also reviewed. The concept of quantum nondemolition and back-action evasion measurements originated in the context of measurements on a macroscopic mechanical harmonic oscillator, though these techniques may be useful in other experimental contexts as well, as is discussed in the last part of this review. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  20. Experimental measurement of investment shell properties and use of the data in casting simulation software

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, D.J.; Sayers, K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development of a systematic program of experimental measurement of relevant properties of mould materials, conducted with the express purpose of generating data for use in casting (filling and solidification) simulation software. In particular the thermophysical properties of the ceramic shell built up for the investment casting process are measured. These properties include specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, gas permeability, density and surface emissivity. Much of the experimental measurements are taken as a function of temperature, up to the temperature at which moulds are typically fired or preheated. Typical results are presented. The data so generated is then used in a casting simulation model to simulate the investment casting of a prosthetic device. The results of the simulation are presented, and comparisons are made with measurements and observations from an experimental casting of the same part. In this way both the reliability of the data and the accuracy of the filling and solidification model are validated.

  1. Development and experimental validation of a versatile prototype Swing Arm Profilometer for measuring optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, H.; Lin, Z.; Ma, L.; Wu, S.; Wu, F.

    2011-11-01

    A versatile prototype Swing Arm Profilometer (SAP) is developed and experimentally validated in the Institute of Optics and Electronics (IOE), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The configurations for the SAP are introduced. The measurement principles for measuring plano, spherical and aspherical mirrors are given. Four validation experiments are performed on the prototype SAP using plano, spherical and aspherical mirror samples. The measurement uncertainty for the current prototype SAP is 0.5micro

  2. A proposed experimental method for interpreting Doppler effect measurements and determining their precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    The principal problem in the measurement of the Doppler reactivity effect is separating it from the thermal reactivity effects of the expansion of the heated sample. It is shown in this proposal that the thermal effects of sample expansion can be experimentally determined by making additional measurements with porous samples having the same mass and/or volume as the primary sample. By combining these results with independent measurements of the linear temperature coefficient and the computed temperature dependence of the Doppler coefficient the magnitude of the Doppler coefficient may be extracted from the data. These addiational measurements are also useful to experimentally determine the precision of the reactivity oscillator technique used to measure the reactivity effects of the heated sample.

  3. Heat Transfer in a Complex Trailing Edge Passage for a High Pressure Turbine Blade - Part 1: Experimental Measurements. Part 1; Experimental Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Ronald S.; Wetzel, Todd G.; Rigby, David L.; Reddy, D. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study has been performed to investigate the detailed heat transfer coefficient distributions within a complex blade trailing edge passage. The experimental measurements are made using a steady liquid crystal thermography technique applied to one major side of the passage. The geometry of the trailing edge passage is that of a two-pass serpentine circuit with a sharp 180-degree turning region at the tip. The upflow channel is split by interrupted ribs into two major subchannels, one of which is turbulated. This channel has an average aspect ratio of roughly 14:1. The spanwise extent of the channel geometry includes both area convergence from root to tip, as well as taper towards the trailing edge apex. The average section Reynolds numbers tested in this upflow channel range from 55,000 to 98,000. The tip section contains a turning vane near the extreme comer. The downflow channel has an aspect ratio of about 5:1, and also includes convergence and taper. Turbulators of varying sizes are included in this channel also. Both detailed heat transfer and pressure distribution measurements are presented. The pressure measurements are incorporated into a flow network model illustrating the major loss contributors.

  4. Experimental and Measurement Uncertainty Associated with Characterizing Slurry Mixing Performance of Pulsating Jets at Multiple Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2015-09-10

    Understanding how uncertainty manifests itself in complex experiments is important for developing the testing protocol and interpreting the experimental results. This paper describes experimental and measurement uncertainties, and how they can depend on the order of performing experimental tests. Experiments with pulse-jet mixers in tanks at three scales were conducted to characterize the performance of transient-developing periodic flows in Newtonian slurries. Other test parameters included the simulant, solids concentration, and nozzle exit velocity. Critical suspension velocity and cloud height were the metrics used to characterize Newtonian slurry flow associated with mobilization and mixing. During testing, near-replicate and near-repeat tests were conducted. The experimental results were used to quantify the combined experimental and measurement uncertainties using standard deviations and percent relative standard deviations (%RSD) The uncertainties in critical suspension velocity and cloud height tend to increase with the values of these responses. Hence, the %RSD values are the more appropriate summary measure of near-replicate testing and measurement uncertainty.

  5. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisian, C. T.; Presser, Cary; DesJardin, Paul Edward; Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  6. Performance of current measurement system in poloidal field power supply for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. M.; Li, J.; Wan, B. N.; Lu, Z.; Wang, L. S.; Jiang, L.; Lu, C. H.; Huang, J.

    2016-11-01

    As one of the core subsystems of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), the poloidal field power system supplies energy to EAST's superconducting coils. To measure the converter current in the poloidal field power system, a current measurement system has been designed. The proposed measurement system is composed of a Rogowski coil and a newly designed integrator. The results of the resistor-inductor-capacitor discharge test and the converter equal current test show that the current measurement system provides good reliability and stability, and the maximum error of the proposed system is less than 1%.

  7. Performance of current measurement system in poloidal field power supply for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Liu, D M; Li, J; Wan, B N; Lu, Z; Wang, L S; Jiang, L; Lu, C H; Huang, J

    2016-11-01

    As one of the core subsystems of the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), the poloidal field power system supplies energy to EAST's superconducting coils. To measure the converter current in the poloidal field power system, a current measurement system has been designed. The proposed measurement system is composed of a Rogowski coil and a newly designed integrator. The results of the resistor-inductor-capacitor discharge test and the converter equal current test show that the current measurement system provides good reliability and stability, and the maximum error of the proposed system is less than 1%.

  8. Actual evapotranspiration estimation in a Mediterranean mountain region by means of Landsat-5 TM and TERRA/AQUA MODIS imagery and Sap Flow measurements in Pinus sylvestris forest stands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristóbal, J.; Poyatos, R.; Ninyerola, M.; Pons, X.; Llorens, P.

    2009-04-01

    Evapotranspiration monitoring has important implications on global and regional climate modelling, as well as in the knowledge of the hydrological cycle and in the assessment of environmental stress that affects forest and agricultural ecosystems. An increase of evapotranspiration while precipitation remains constant, or is reduced, could decrease water availability for natural and agricultural systems and human needs. Consequently, water balance methods, as the evapotranspiration modelling, have been widely used to estimate crop and forest water needs, as well as the global change effects. Nowadays, radiometric measurements provided by Remote Sensing and GIS analysis are the technologies used to compute evapotranspiration at regional scales in a feasible way. Currently, the 38% of Catalonia (NE of the Iberian Peninsula) is covered by forests, and one of the most important forest species is Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris) which represents the 18.4% of the area occupied by forests. The aim of this work is to model actual evapotranspiration in Pinus sylvestris forest stands, in a Mediterranean mountain region, using remote sensing data, and compare it with stand-scale sap flow measurements measured in the Vallcebre research area (42° 12' N, 1° 49' E), in the Eastern Pyrenees. To perform this study a set of 30 cloud-free TERRA-MODIS images and 10 Landsat-5 TM images of path 198 and rows 31 and 32 from June 2003 to January 2005 have been selected to perform evapotranspiration modelling in Pinus sylvestris forest stands. TERRA/AQUA MODIS images have been downloaded by means of the EOS Gateway. We have selected two different types of products which contain the remote sensing data we have used to model daily evapotranspiration, daily LST product and daily calibrated reflectances product. Landsat-5 TM images have been corrected by means of conventional techniques based on first order polynomials taking into account the effect of land surface relief using a Digital

  9. Online and offline experimental techniques for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons recovery and measurement.

    PubMed

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-01

    The implementation of techniques aimed at improving engine performance and reducing particulate matter (PM) pollutant emissions is strongly influenced by the limited understanding of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formation chemistry, in combustion devices, that produces the PM emissions. New experimental results which examine the formation of multi-ring compounds are required. The present investigation focuses on two techniques for such an experimental examination by recovery of PAH compounds from a typical combustion oriented experimental apparatus. The online technique discussed constitutes an optimal solution but not always feasible approach. Nevertheless, a detailed description of a new online sampling system is provided which can serve as reference for future applications to different experimental set-ups. In comparison, an offline technique, which is sometimes more experimentally feasible but not necessarily optimal, has been studied in detail for the recovery of a variety of compounds with different properties, including naphthalene, biphenyl, and iodobenzene. The recovery results from both techniques were excellent with an error in the total carbon balance of around 10% for the online technique and an uncertainty in the measurement of the single species of around 7% for the offline technique. Although both techniques proved to be suitable for measurement of large PAH compounds, the online technique represents the optimal solution in view of the simplicity of the corresponding experimental procedure. On the other hand, the offline technique represents a valuable solution in those cases where the online technique cannot be implemented.

  10. Experimental violation of a Bell-Leggett-Garg inequality using weak measurements, Part II: The Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, T. C.; Mutus, J.; Dressel, J.; Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Megrant, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Sank, D.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Korotkov, A. N.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the violation of a hybrid Bell-Leggett-Garg inequality that avoids both the disjoint sampling and fair sampling loopholes that are common to traditional Bell inequalities. Our algorithm uses sequential weak measurements of a Bell state that are implemented with four superconducting Xmon qubits. In this second of two talks, we present experimental detail on the measurement of the CHSH correlator and the analysis of error mechanisms. We find that the dependence of the correlations on the measurement strength shows excellent agreement with theoretical predictions, but the magnitude of the correlator varies greatly with system fidelity. For sufficiently weak and high fidelity measurements, we achieve a violation that is many standard deviations above the classical limit.

  11. Measurements of experimental precision for trials with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, P E; Torres, F E; Santos, A D; Corrêa, A M; Nascimento, M; Barroso, L M A; Ceccon, G

    2016-05-09

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of statistics as experimental precision degree measures for trials with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) genotypes. Cowpea genotype yields were evaluated in 29 trials conducted in Brazil between 2005 and 2012. The genotypes were evaluated with a randomized block design with four replications. Ten statistics that were estimated for each trial were compared using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations, and path analysis. According to the class limits established, selective accuracy and F-test values for genotype, heritability, and the coefficient of determination adequately estimated the degree of experimental precision. Using these statistics, 86.21% of the trials had adequate experimental precision. Selective accuracy and the F-test values for genotype, heritability, and the coefficient of determination were directly related to each other, and were more suitable than the coefficient of variation and the least significant difference (by the Tukey test) to evaluate experimental precision in trials with cowpea genotypes.

  12. In-situ measurement of dust devil activity at La Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Neakrase, Lynn D.; Anderson, John D.

    2015-12-01

    We document observations of dust devil vortices using a linear array of 10 miniature pressure- and sunlight-logging stations in summer 2013 at La Jornada Experimental Range in the southwestern USA. These data provide a census of vortex and dust-devil activity at this site. The simultaneous spatially-distributed measurements resolve the horizontal pressure structure of several dust devil encounters, and the data can be fit well with an analytic model, giving independent measures of vortex size and intensity.

  13. Air fluorescence efficiency measurements for AIRWATCH based mission: Experimental set-up

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, B.; Catalano, O.; Celi, F.; Fazio, G.; Giarrusso, S.; La Rosa, G.; Mangano, A.; Bonanno, G.; Cosentino, R.; Di Benedetto, R.; Scuderi, S.; Richiusa, G.; Gregorio, A.

    1998-06-15

    In the framework of the AIRWATCH project we present an experimental set-up to measure the efficiency of the UV fluorescence production of the air using hard X-ray stimulus. The measures will be carried out at different pressure and temperature to emulate the same condition of the upper layers of the atmosphere where X-ray and gamma ray photons of Gamma Ray Bursts are absorbed.

  14. Experimental measurement of dolphin thrust generated during a tail stand using DPIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Fish, Frank; Williams, Terrie; Wu, Vicki; Sherman, Erica; Misfeldt, Mitchel; Ringenberg, Hunter; Rogers, Dylan

    2016-11-01

    The thrust generated by dolphins doing tail stands was measured using DPIV. The technique entailed measuring vortex strength associated with the tail motion and correlating it to above water video sequences showing the amount of the dolphin's body that was being lifted out of the water. The underlying drivers for this research included: i) understanding the physiology, hydrodynamics and efficiency of dolphin locomotion, ii) developing non-invasive measurement techniques for studying marine swimming and iii) quantifying the actual propulsive capabilities of these animals. Two different bottlenose dolphins at the Long Marine Lab at UC-Santa Cruz were used as test subjects. Application of the Kutta-Joukowski Theorem on measured vortex circulations yielded thrust values that were well correlated with estimates of dolphin body weight being supported above water. This demonstrates that the tail motion can be interpreted as a flapping hydrofoil that can generate a sustained thrust roughly equal to the dolphin's weight. Videos of DPIV measurements overlaid with the dolphins will be presented along with thrust/weight data.

  15. Experimentally Measured Susceptibility to Peer Influence and Adolescent Sexual Behavior Trajectories: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choukas-Bradley, Sophia; Giletta, Matteo; Widman, Laura; Cohen, Geoffrey L.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    A performance-based measure of peer influence susceptibility was examined as a moderator of the longitudinal association between peer norms and trajectories of adolescents' number of sexual intercourse partners. Seventy-one 9th grade adolescents (52% female) participated in an experimental "chat room" paradigm involving…

  16. On the Dielectric Constant for Acetanilide: Experimental Measurements and Effect on Energy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Compatangelo, E.; Christiansen, P. L.; Halding, J.; Skovgaard, O.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the dielectric constant for crystalline acetanilide powder for temperatures ranging from - 140°C to 20°C and for different hydration levels are presented. A Davydov-soliton computer model predicts dramatic changes in the energy transport and storage for typically increased values of the dielectric constant.

  17. Predictive and Construct Validity of Six Experimental Measures of Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Investigated the predictive and construct validity of six experimental measures of career maturity among high school students. Data provide some support for the construct and predictive validity of four of the six career maturity scales. Some technical issues and possible sources of invalidity are discussed, and recommedations are made for future…

  18. Development of the Neuron Assessment for Measuring Biology Students' Use of Experimental Design Concepts and Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dasgupta, Annwesa P.; Anderson, Trevor R.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers, instructors, and funding bodies in biology education are unanimous about the importance of developing students' competence in experimental design. Despite this, only limited measures are available for assessing such competence development, especially in the areas of molecular and cellular biology. Also, existing assessments do not…

  19. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central…

  20. Experimental Test of Heisenberg's Measurement Uncertainty Relation Based on Statistical Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenchao; Ma, Zhihao; Wang, Hengyan; Chen, Zhihua; Liu, Ying; Kong, Fei; Li, Zhaokai; Peng, Xinhua; Shi, Mingjun; Shi, Fazhan; Fei, Shao-Ming; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-04-01

    Incompatible observables can be approximated by compatible observables in joint measurement or measured sequentially, with constrained accuracy as implied by Heisenberg's original formulation of the uncertainty principle. Recently, Busch, Lahti, and Werner proposed inaccuracy trade-off relations based on statistical distances between probability distributions of measurement outcomes [P. Busch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 160405 (2013); P. Busch et al., Phys. Rev. A 89, 012129 (2014)]. Here we reformulate their theoretical framework, derive an improved relation for qubit measurement, and perform an experimental test on a spin system. The relation reveals that the worst-case inaccuracy is tightly bounded from below by the incompatibility of target observables, and is verified by the experiment employing joint measurement in which two compatible observables designed to approximate two incompatible observables on one qubit are measured simultaneously.

  1. Development of the Neuron Assessment for Measuring Biology Students’ Use of Experimental Design Concepts and Representations

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Annwesa P.; Anderson, Trevor R.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers, instructors, and funding bodies in biology education are unanimous about the importance of developing students’ competence in experimental design. Despite this, only limited measures are available for assessing such competence development, especially in the areas of molecular and cellular biology. Also, existing assessments do not measure how well students use standard symbolism to visualize biological experiments. We propose an assessment-design process that 1) provides background knowledge and questions for developers of new “experimentation assessments,” 2) elicits practices of representing experiments with conventional symbol systems, 3) determines how well the assessment reveals expert knowledge, and 4) determines how well the instrument exposes student knowledge and difficulties. To illustrate this process, we developed the Neuron Assessment and coded responses from a scientist and four undergraduate students using the Rubric for Experimental Design and the Concept-Reasoning Mode of representation (CRM) model. Some students demonstrated sound knowledge of concepts and representations. Other students demonstrated difficulty with depicting treatment and control group data or variability in experimental outcomes. Our process, which incorporates an authentic research situation that discriminates levels of visualization and experimentation abilities, shows potential for informing assessment design in other disciplines. PMID:27146159

  2. Development of the Neuron Assessment for Measuring Biology Students' Use of Experimental Design Concepts and Representations.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Annwesa P; Anderson, Trevor R; Pelaez, Nancy J

    2016-01-01

    Researchers, instructors, and funding bodies in biology education are unanimous about the importance of developing students' competence in experimental design. Despite this, only limited measures are available for assessing such competence development, especially in the areas of molecular and cellular biology. Also, existing assessments do not measure how well students use standard symbolism to visualize biological experiments. We propose an assessment-design process that 1) provides background knowledge and questions for developers of new "experimentation assessments," 2) elicits practices of representing experiments with conventional symbol systems, 3) determines how well the assessment reveals expert knowledge, and 4) determines how well the instrument exposes student knowledge and difficulties. To illustrate this process, we developed the Neuron Assessment and coded responses from a scientist and four undergraduate students using the Rubric for Experimental Design and the Concept-Reasoning Mode of representation (CRM) model. Some students demonstrated sound knowledge of concepts and representations. Other students demonstrated difficulty with depicting treatment and control group data or variability in experimental outcomes. Our process, which incorporates an authentic research situation that discriminates levels of visualization and experimentation abilities, shows potential for informing assessment design in other disciplines.

  3. Experimental sources of variation in avian energetics: estimated basal metabolic rate decreases with successive measurements.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Paul J; McKechnie, Andrew E

    2014-01-01

    Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is one of the most widely used metabolic variables in endotherm ecological and evolutionary physiology. Surprisingly few studies have investigated how BMR is influenced by experimental and analytical variables over and above the standardized conditions required for minimum normothermic resting metabolism. We tested whether avian BMR is affected by habituation to the conditions experienced during laboratory gas exchange measurements by measuring BMR five times in succession in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) housed under constant temperature and photoperiod. Both the magnitude and the variability of BMR decreased significantly with repeated measurements, from 0.410 ± 0.092 W (n = 9) during the first measurement to 0.285 ± 0.042 W (n = 9) during the fifth measurement. Thus, estimated BMR decreased by ∼30% within individuals solely on account of the number of times they had previously experienced the experimental conditions. The most likely explanation for these results is an attenuation with repeated exposure of the acute stress response induced by birds being handled and placed in respirometry chambers. Our data suggest that habituation to experimental conditions is potentially an important determinant of observed BMR, and this source of variation needs to be taken into account in future studies of metabolic variation among individuals, populations, and species.

  4. An experimental method for measuring the moment of inertia of an electric power wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwu; Grindle, Garrett G; Connor, Samuel; Cooper, Rory A

    2007-01-01

    This study describe an experiment measuring the moment of inertia of an electric powered wheelchair (EPW) using a torsional pendulum method. Inertia of the wheelchair is an important factor for control, which is a key issue in wheelchair driving. The experimental test platform consisted of a bottom circular wood plate, an upper metal plate, and four ropes. Materials with known moments of inertia such as the metal disk and cylinder were used to test the accuracy of the system. The EPW used in the experiment was Invacare G3 Torque SP Storm Series. The measured result of the moment inertia of the wheelchair was 5.2280 kg.m(2) and the errors of the system are less than 10% even when the object is only 25lbs. The results are consistent when compared with other approximate methods. In addition, the experimental method could be used to measure the moment of inertia of manual wheelchairs and other irregular objects.

  5. Experimental optical phase measurement at the exact Heisenberg limit (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daryanoosh, Shakib; Slussarenko, Sergei; Wiseman, Howard M.; Pryde, Geoff J.

    2016-10-01

    Optical phase measurement through its application in quantum metrology has pushed the precision limit with which some physical quantities can be measured accurately. At the very fundamental level, the laws of quantum mechanics dictate that the uncertainty in phase estimations scales as 1/N, where N is the number of quantum resources employed in the protocol [1]. This is the well known Heisenberg limit (HL) which is quadratically better than the traditional precision limit known as the standard quantum limit (SQL) with uncertainty asymptotically scaling as 1/&sqrt{N} [1]. Several experiments have demonstrated that the SQL can be beaten by using an entangled state as the probe and a specific measurement scheme for ab initio estimation of unknown phases [2,3]. It has also been shown experimentally that even in the absence of the entanglement one can measure an unknown phase with imprecision scaling at the HL [4]. In this work we first present a new protocol able to estimate an optical phase at the Heisenberg limit, and then experimentally explore fundamental and practical issues in generating high-quality novel entangled states, for use in this protocol and beyond. Our aim in this study is to measure an unknown phase in the interval [0,2π) with uncertainty attaining the exact HL. There is a condition that should be met to address this objective: preparation of an optimal state [5]. This would cover part of the presentation through which we explain how to experimentally realise such an optimal state with the current technological limitations and the feasibility of the scheme. In particular, we generate an entangled 3-photon (2-photon) state of specific superposition of GHZ (Bell) states. Our numerical simulation of the phase measurement gate together with the experimental outcomes show that the created state should have a high fidelity and purity to be able to have the phase uncertainty achieving the exact HL. Therefore, we briefly explain the modelling for

  6. Experimental measurement of the principal isentrope for aluminum 6061-T6 to 240 GPa.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jean-Paul

    2005-02-01

    Using a magnetic pressure drive, an absolute measurement of stress and density along the principal compression isentrope is obtained for solid aluminum to 240 GPa. Reduction of the free-surface velocity data relies on a backward integration technique, with approximate accounting for unknown systematic errors in experimental timing. Maximum experimental uncertainties are {+-}4.7% in stress and {+-}1.4% in density, small enough to distinguish between different equation-of-state (EOS) models. The result agrees well with a tabular EOS that uses an empirical universal zero-temperature isotherm.

  7. Experimental measurement of the principal isentrope for aluminum 6061-T6 to 240 GPa.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    Using a magnetic pressure drive, an absolute measurement of stress and density along the principal compression isentrope is obtained for solid aluminum to 240 GPa. Reduction of the free-surface velocity data relies on a backward integration technique, with approximate accounting for unknown systematic errors in experimental timing. Maximum experimental uncertainties are +/-4.7% in stress and +/-1.4% in density, small enough to distinguish between different equation-of-state (EOS) models. The result agrees well with a tabular EOS that uses an empirical universal zero-temperature isotherm.

  8. Experimental benchmark of MCNPX calculations against self-interrogation neutron resonance densitometry (SINRD) fresh fuel measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard O; Swinhoe, Martyn T; La Fleur, Adrienne M; Charlton, William S; Lee, S Y; Tobin, S J

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the use of Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) to measure the {sup 235}U concentration in a PWR 15 x 15 fresh LEU fuel assembly in air. Different measurement configurations were simulated in Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended transport code (MCNPX) and benchmarked against experimental results. The sensitivity of SINRD is based on using the same fissile materials in the fission chambers as are present in the fuel because the effect of resonance absorption lines in the transmitted flux is amplified by the corresponding (n,j) reaction peaks in fission chamber. Due to the low spontaneous fission rate of {sup 238}U (i.e. no curium in the fresh fuel), {sup 252}Cf sources were used to self-interrogate the fresh fuel pins. The resonance absorption of these neutrons in the fresh fuel pins can be measured using {sup 235}U fission chambers placed adjacent to the assembly. We used ratios of different fission chambers to reduce the number of unknowns we are trying measure because the neutron source strength and detector-fuel assembly coupling cancel in the ratios. The agreement between MCNPX results and experimental measurements confirms the accuracy of the MCNPX models used. The development of SINRD to measure the fissile content in spent fuel is important to the improvement of nuclear safeguards and material accountability. Future work includes the use of this technique to measure the fissile content in LWR spent fuel in water.

  9. Photon spectra calculation for an Elekta linac beam using experimental scatter measurements and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miro, R; Campayo, J M; Diez, S; Verdu, G

    2008-01-01

    The present work is centered in reconstructing by means of a scatter analysis method the primary beam photon spectrum of a linear accelerator. This technique is based on irradiating the isocenter of a rectangular block made of methacrylate placed at 100 cm distance from surface and measuring scattered particles around the plastic at several specific positions with different scatter angles. The MCNP5 Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate the particles transport of mono-energetic beams to register the scatter measurement after contact the attenuator. Measured ionization values allow calculating the spectrum as the sum of mono-energetic individual energy bins using the Schiff Bremsstrahlung model. The measurements have been made in an Elekta Precise linac using a 6 MeV photon beam. Relative depth and profile dose curves calculated in a water phantom using the reconstructed spectrum agree with experimentally measured dose data to within 3%.

  10. Procedures for experimental measurement and theoretical analysis of large plastic deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Theoretical equations are derived and analytical procedures are presented for the interpretation of experimental measurements of large plastic strains in the surface of a plate. Orthogonal gage lengths established on the metal surface are measured before and after deformation. The change in orthogonality after deformation is also measured. Equations yield the principal strains, deviatoric stresses in the absence of surface friction forces, true stresses if the stress normal to the surface is known, and the orientation angle between the deformed gage line and the principal stress-strain axes. Errors in the measurement of nominal strains greater than 3 percent are within engineering accuracy. Applications suggested for this strain measurement system include the large-strain-stress analysis of impact test models, burst tests of spherical or cylindrical pressure vessels, and to augment small-strain instrumentation tests where large strains are anticipated.

  11. Mode Content Determination of Terahertz Corrugated Waveguides Using Experimentally Measured Radiated Field Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer K.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on the accuracy of the mode content measurements in an overmoded corrugated waveguide using measured radiated field patterns. Experimental results were obtained at 250 GHz using a vector network analyzer with over 70 dB of dynamic range. The intensity and phase profiles of the fields radiated from the end of the 19 mm diameter helically tapped brass waveguide were measured on planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm from the waveguide end. The measured fields were back propagated to the waveguide aperture to provide three independent estimates of the field at the waveguide exit aperture. Projecting that field onto the modes of the guide determined the waveguide mode content. The three independent mode content estimates were found to agree with one another to an accuracy of better than ±0.3%. These direct determinations of the mode content were compared with indirect measurements using the experimentally measured amplitude in three planes, with the phase determined by a phase retrieval algorithm. The phase retrieval technique using the planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm yielded a mode content estimate in excellent agreement, within 0.3%, of the direct measurements. Phase retrieval results using planes at 10, 20, and 30 cm were less accurate due to truncation of the measurement in the transverse plane. The reported measurements benefited greatly from a precise mechanical alignment of the scanner with respect to the waveguide axis. These results will help to understand the accuracy of mode content measurements made directly in cold test and indirectly in hot test using the phase retrieval technique. PMID:25264391

  12. Experimental Measurements of Temporal Dispersion for Underwater Laser Communications and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochenour, Brandon Michael

    The challenge in implementing optical sensors underwater lies in the high variability of the ocean environment where propagation of light in the ocean is complicated by absorption and scattering. Most underwater optical sensors operate in the blue/green portion of the electromagnetic spectrum where seawater exhibits an absorption minimum. Mitigating scattering however is a greater challenge. In particular, scattering causes both spatial distortion (beam spreading) and temporal dispersion (pulse spreading or distortion). Each of type of dispersion decreases sensor performance (operating range, image resolution, data bandwidth, etc.). While spatial dispersion has received a great deal of attention in previous decades, technological limitations of sensor hardware have made experimental measurements of temporal dispersion underwater difficult until now. The main contribution of this thesis are experimental measurements of temporal dispersion of optical beams in turbid water, made with a high sensitivity/high dynamic range experimental technique. Measurements are performed as a function of water clarity (0-20 attenuation lengths), transmitter/receiver alignment (0-30 degrees, half angle), receiver field of view (1-7 degrees, full angle), and transmitter beam divergence (collimated and diffuse). Special attention is paid to the interdependency between spatial and temporal dispersion. This work provides severable notable contributions: 1. While experimental characterization of spatial dispersion has received significant attention underwater, there has been a lack of measurements characterizing temporal dispersion underwater. This work provides the most comprehensive set of experimental measurements to date regarding the temporal dispersion of optical beams underwater. 2. An experimental analysis of the influence of scattering phase function on temporal dispersion. Coarse estimates of the scattering phase function are used to determine the ranges (or attenuation lengths

  13. Detailed high-accuracy megavoltage transmission measurements: A sensitive experimental benchmark of EGSnrc

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: There are three goals for this study: (a) to perform detailed megavoltage transmission measurements in order to identify the factors that affect the measurement accuracy, (b) to use the measured data as a benchmark for the EGSnrc system in order to identify the computational limiting factors, and (c) to provide data for others to benchmark Monte Carlo codes. Methods: Transmission measurements are performed at the National Research Council Canada on a research linac whose incident electron parameters are independently known. Automated transmission measurements are made on-axis, down to a transmission value of {approx}1.7%, for eight beams between 10 MV (the lowest stable MV beam on the linac) and 30 MV, using fully stopping Be, Al, and Pb bremsstrahlung targets and no fattening filters. To diversify energy differentiation, data are acquired for each beam using low-Z and high-Z attenuators (C and Pb) and Farmer chambers with low-Z and high-Z buildup caps. Experimental corrections are applied for beam drifts (2%), polarity (2.5% typical maximum, 6% extreme), ion recombination (0.2%), leakage (0.3%), and room scatter (0.8%)-the values in parentheses are the largest corrections applied. The experimental setup and the detectors are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included (up to a 5.6% effect). A detailed sensitivity analysis is carried out for the measured and calculated transmission data. Results: The developed experimental protocol allows for transmission measurements with 0.4% uncertainty on the smallest signals. Suggestions for accurate transmission measurements are provided. Measurements and EGSnrc calculations agree typically within 0.2% for the sensitivity of the transmission values to the detector details, to the bremsstrahlung target material, and to the incident electron energy. Direct comparison of the measured and calculated transmission data shows agreement better than 2% for C (3.4% for the 10 MV beam) and

  14. Electrosurgical vessel sealing tissue temperature: experimental measurement and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Roland K; Chastagner, Matthew W; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J

    2013-02-01

    The temporal and spatial tissue temperature profile in electrosurgical vessel sealing was experimentally measured and modeled using finite element modeling (FEM). Vessel sealing procedures are often performed near the neurovascular bundle and may cause collateral neural thermal damage. Therefore, the heat generated during electrosurgical vessel sealing is of concern among surgeons. Tissue temperature in an in vivo porcine femoral artery sealed using a bipolar electrosurgical device was studied. Three FEM techniques were incorporated to model the tissue evaporation, water loss, and fusion by manipulating the specific heat, electrical conductivity, and electrical contact resistance, respectively. These three techniques enable the FEM to accurately predict the vessel sealing tissue temperature profile. The averaged discrepancy between the experimentally measured temperature and the FEM predicted temperature at three thermistor locations is less than 7%. The maximum error is 23.9%. Effects of the three FEM techniques are also quantified.

  15. Experimental measurements in a large separation bubble due to a simulated glaze ice shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Khodadoust, A.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a simulated glaze ice accretion on the aerodynamic performance of a NACA 0012 airfoil was studied experimentally. Two ice shapes were tested, one from an experimentally measured accretion and one from an accretion predicted using a computer model given the same icing conditions. Lift, drag and moment coefficients were measured for the airfoil with both ice shapes, smooth and rough. The aerodynamic performance of the two shapes compared well at positive, but not negative, angles of attack. Split hot-film probe velocity data were presented in the upper surface boundary layer and in the wake. Boundary layer parameters were presented for the separation bubble and in the reattached turbulent boundary layer.

  16. Experimental measurement and numerical simulation of residual stresses in a carburized layer of a 5120 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaswamy, P.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Shipley, J.C.; Goldstone, J.A.

    1995-09-01

    A combined experimental and numerical study of residual stress and microstructure has been performed for a carburized steel 5120 specimen. Specimens were cut from 5120 steel bar stock, in the shape of hockey pucks and were subsequently carburized and quenched. X-ray diffraction was used to record stress profiles through the case for the martensite and retained austenite on the two flat surfaces oriented up and down during the quench. Layer removal was performed by electropolishing. Rietveld analysis was used to determine the lattice parameters of the phases at each depth varying with both carbon content and stress. The experimental measurements are compared with a numerical simulation of the phase transformation and the metallurgical changes following the carburization and quench. Results am discussed in the context of the microstructure and the role played by the retained austenite in interpretation. In addition the carbon profile obtained from the lattice parameters is compared with profiles measured using burnout.

  17. Measuring experimental cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients for the SAMPL5 challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustenburg, Ariën S.; Dancer, Justin; Lin, Baiwei; Feng, Jianwen A.; Ortwine, Daniel F.; Mobley, David L.; Chodera, John D.

    2016-11-01

    Small molecule distribution coefficients between immiscible nonaqueuous and aqueous phases—such as cyclohexane and water—measure the degree to which small molecules prefer one phase over another at a given pH. As distribution coefficients capture both thermodynamic effects (the free energy of transfer between phases) and chemical effects (protonation state and tautomer effects in aqueous solution), they provide an exacting test of the thermodynamic and chemical accuracy of physical models without the long correlation times inherent to the prediction of more complex properties of relevance to drug discovery, such as protein-ligand binding affinities. For the SAMPL5 challenge, we carried out a blind prediction exercise in which participants were tasked with the prediction of distribution coefficients to assess its potential as a new route for the evaluation and systematic improvement of predictive physical models. These measurements are typically performed for octanol-water, but we opted to utilize cyclohexane for the nonpolar phase. Cyclohexane was suggested to avoid issues with the high water content and persistent heterogeneous structure of water-saturated octanol phases, since it has greatly reduced water content and a homogeneous liquid structure. Using a modified shake-flask LC-MS/MS protocol, we collected cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients for a set of 53 druglike compounds at pH 7.4. These measurements were used as the basis for the SAMPL5 Distribution Coefficient Challenge, where 18 research groups predicted these measurements before the experimental values reported here were released. In this work, we describe the experimental protocol we utilized for measurement of cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients, report the measured data, propose a new bootstrap-based data analysis procedure to incorporate multiple sources of experimental error, and provide insights to help guide future iterations of this valuable exercise in predictive modeling.

  18. Measuring experimental cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients for the SAMPL5 challenge.

    PubMed

    Rustenburg, Ariën S; Dancer, Justin; Lin, Baiwei; Feng, Jianwen A; Ortwine, Daniel F; Mobley, David L; Chodera, John D

    2016-11-01

    Small molecule distribution coefficients between immiscible nonaqueuous and aqueous phases-such as cyclohexane and water-measure the degree to which small molecules prefer one phase over another at a given pH. As distribution coefficients capture both thermodynamic effects (the free energy of transfer between phases) and chemical effects (protonation state and tautomer effects in aqueous solution), they provide an exacting test of the thermodynamic and chemical accuracy of physical models without the long correlation times inherent to the prediction of more complex properties of relevance to drug discovery, such as protein-ligand binding affinities. For the SAMPL5 challenge, we carried out a blind prediction exercise in which participants were tasked with the prediction of distribution coefficients to assess its potential as a new route for the evaluation and systematic improvement of predictive physical models. These measurements are typically performed for octanol-water, but we opted to utilize cyclohexane for the nonpolar phase. Cyclohexane was suggested to avoid issues with the high water content and persistent heterogeneous structure of water-saturated octanol phases, since it has greatly reduced water content and a homogeneous liquid structure. Using a modified shake-flask LC-MS/MS protocol, we collected cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients for a set of 53 druglike compounds at pH 7.4. These measurements were used as the basis for the SAMPL5 Distribution Coefficient Challenge, where 18 research groups predicted these measurements before the experimental values reported here were released. In this work, we describe the experimental protocol we utilized for measurement of cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients, report the measured data, propose a new bootstrap-based data analysis procedure to incorporate multiple sources of experimental error, and provide insights to help guide future iterations of this valuable exercise in predictive modeling.

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Measurements of Concentration Distributions in Acoustic Focusing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, K A; Fisher, K; Jung, B; Ness, K; Mariella Jr., R P

    2008-06-16

    We describe a modeling approach to capture the particle motion within an acoustic focusing microfluidic device. Our approach combines finite element models for the acoustic forces with analytical models for the fluid motion and uses these force fields to calculate the particle motion in a Brownian dynamics simulation. We compare results for the model with experimental measurements of the focusing efficiency within a microfabricated device. The results show good qualitative agreement over a range of acoustic driving voltages and particle sizes.

  20. Experimental measurement of time-dependant photon scatter for diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valim, Niksa; Brock, James; Niedre, Mark

    2010-11-01

    Time-resolved measurement of early arriving photons through diffusive media has been shown to effectively reduce the high degree of light scatter in biological tissue. However, the experimentally achievable reduction in photon scatter and the impact of time-gated detection on instrument noise performance is not well understood. We measure time-dependent photon density sensitivity functions (PDSFs) between a pulsed laser source and a photomultiplier tube operating in time-correlated single-photon-counting mode. Our data show that with our system, measurement of early arriving photons reduces the full width half maximum of PDSFs on average by about 40 to 60% versus quasicontinuous wave photons over a range of experimental conditions similar to those encountered in small animal tomography, corresponding to a 64 to 84% reduction in PDSF volume. Factoring in noise considerations, the optimal operating point of our instrument is determined to be about the 10% point on the rising edge of the transmitted intensity curve. Time-dependant Monte Carlo simulations and the time-resolved diffusion approximation are used to model photon propagation and are evaluated for agreement with experimental data.

  1. Measurement and applications of long-range heteronuclear scalar couplings: recent experimental and theoretical developments.

    PubMed

    Nath, Nilamoni; Lokesh; Suryaprakash, Nagarajarao

    2012-02-01

    The use of long-range heteronuclear couplings, in association with (1)H-(1)H scalar couplings and NOE restraints, has acquired growing importance for the determination of the relative stereochemistry, and structural and conformational information of organic and biological molecules. However, the routine use of such couplings is hindered by the inherent difficulties in their measurement. Prior to the advancement in experimental techniques, both long-range homo- and heteronuclear scalar couplings were not easily accessible, especially for very large molecules. The development of a large number of multidimensional NMR experimental methodologies has alleviated the complications associated with the measurement of couplings of smaller strengths. Subsequent application of these methods and the utilization of determined J-couplings for structure calculations have revolutionized this area of research. Problems in organic, inorganic and biophysical chemistry have also been solved by utilizing the short- and long-range heteronuclear couplings. In this minireview, we discuss the advantages and limitations of a number of experimental techniques reported in recent times for the measurement of long-range heteronuclear couplings and a few selected applications of such couplings. This includes the study of medium- to larger-sized molecules in a variety of applications, especially in the study of hydrogen bonding in biological systems. The utilization of these couplings in conjunction with theoretical calculations to arrive at conclusions on the hyperconjugation, configurational analysis and the effect of the electronegativity of the substituents is also discussed.

  2. Thermophysical properties of medium density fiberboards measured by quasi-stationary method: experimental and numerical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troppová, Eva; Tippner, Jan; Hrčka, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental measurement of thermal properties of medium density fiberboards with different thicknesses (12, 18 and 25 mm) and sample sizes (50 × 50 mm and 100 × 100 mm) by quasi-stationary method. The quasi-stationary method is a transient method which allows measurement of three thermal parameters (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and heat capacity). The experimentally gained values were used to verify a numerical model and furthermore served as input parameters for the numerical probabilistic analysis. The sensitivity of measured outputs (time course of temperature) to influential factors (density, heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivities) was established and described by the Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The dependence of thermal properties on density was confirmed by the data measured. Density was also proved to be an important factor for sensitivity analyses as it highly correlated with all output parameters. The accuracy of the measurement method can be improved based on the results of the probabilistic analysis. The relevancy of the experiment is mainly influenced by the choice of a proper ratio between thickness and width of samples.

  3. Quantitative comparisons between experimentally measured 2-D carbon radiation and Monte Carlo impurity (MCI) code simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Leonard, A.W.; West, W.P.; Finkenthal, D.F.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Porter, G.D.

    1998-08-01

    Experimentally measured carbon line emissions and total radiated power distributions from the DIII-D divertor and Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) are compared to those calculated with the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) model. A UEDGE background plasma is used in MCI with the Roth and Garcia-Rosales (RG-R) chemical sputtering model and/or one of six physical sputtering models. While results from these simulations do not reproduce all of the features seen in the experimentally measured radiation patterns, the total radiated power calculated in MCI is in relatively good agreement with that measured by the DIII-D bolometric system when the Smith78 physical sputtering model is coupled to RG-R chemical sputtering in an unaltered UEDGE plasma. Alternatively, MCI simulations done with UEDGE background ion temperatures along the divertor target plates adjusted to better match those measured in the experiment resulted in three physical sputtering models which when coupled to the RG-R model gave a total radiated power that was within 10% of measured value.

  4. Numerical and experimental demonstration of shear stress measurement at thick steel plates using acoustoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Zeynab; Ozevin, Didem

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to numerically quantify the stress state of complex loaded thick steel plates using the fundamental theory of acoustoelasticity, which is the relationship with stress and ultrasonic velocity in the nonlinear regime. The normal and shear stresses of a thick plate can be measured using a phased array placement of ultrasonic sensors and Rayleigh ultrasonic waves. Three measurement angles (i.e., 0 45 and 90 degrees) are selected since three measurements are needed to solve the stress tensor in an isotropic plate. The ultrasonic data is influenced significantly by the frequency of the Rayleigh waves as well as the thickness of the plate being examined; consequently the overall experimental process is influenced by the measurement parameters. In this study, a numerical demonstration is implemented to extract the nonlinearity coefficients using a 3D structural geometry and Murnaghan material model capable of examining the effects of various plate thicknesses and ultrasonic frequencies on the shear stress measurement. The purpose is that as the thickness becomes smaller, the shear stress becomes negligible at the angled measurement. For thicker cross section, shear stress becomes influential if the depth of penetration of Rayleigh wave is greater than the half of the thickness. The correlation between the depth of penetration and shear stress is then obtained. The numerical results are compared with 1 MHz ultrasonic frequency and a 3/8 inch thick steel plate loaded uniaxially while the measurement direction is angled to have the presence of shear stress in the measurement direction.

  5. Nuclear Heating Measurement in Critical Facilities and Experimental Validation of Code and Libraries - An Application to Prompt and Delayed γ Nuclear Data Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, P.; Di Salvo, J.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Bernard, D.; Amharrak, H.; Lemaire, M.; Ravaux, S.

    Energy from prompt and delayed gammas in actual and future nuclear systems are more and more taken into account into design studies as they play an important role in the assessment of performance and safety concerns. Their incomplete knowledge (both prompt and delayed) require to take conservative design margins on local dimensioning parameters, thus reducing the awaited performances or flexibility of these facilities, with costs that are far from being negligible. The local energy photon deposit must be accurately known for Generation-III (Gen-III), Generation-IV (Gen-IV) or the new MTR Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The last 2 decades has seen the realization, in Zero Power Reactors (ZPR), of several programs partially devoted to γ-heating measurements. Experimental programs were and are still conducted in different Cadarache facilities such as MASURCA (for SFR), and later in MINERVE and EOLE (for JHR and Gen-III reactors). The adequacy of the γ-heating calculation was compared to experimental data using thermo-luminescent (TL) detectors and γ-fission chambers. Inconsistencies in C/E and associated uncertainties led to improvement of both libraries and experimental techniques. For these last one, characterization for TL and optically stimulated (OSL) detectors (calibration, individual response), and Monte Carlo calculation of charge repartition in those detectors and their environment were carefully checked and optimized. This step enabled to reduce the associated experimental uncertainty by a factor of 2 (8% at 2σ). Nevertheless, interpretation of integral experiment with updated calculation schemes and improved experimental techniques still tend to prove that there are some nuclei for which there are missing or erroneous data, mainly in structural and absorbing materials. New integral and differential measurements are needed to guide new evaluation efforts, which could benefit from consolidated theoretical and experimental modeling techniques.

  6. Experimental measurement and modeling of snow accumulation and snowmelt in a mountain microcatchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danko, Michal; Krajčí, Pavel; Hlavčo, Jozef; Kostka, Zdeněk; Holko, Ladislav

    2016-04-01

    Fieldwork is a very useful source of data in all geosciences. This naturally applies also to the snow hydrology. Snow accumulation and snowmelt are spatially very heterogeneous especially in non-forested, mountain environments. Direct field measurements provide the most accurate information about it. Quantification and understanding of processes, that cause these spatial differences are crucial in prediction and modelling of runoff volumes in spring snowmelt period. This study presents possibilities of detailed measurement and modeling of snow cover characteristics in a mountain experimental microcatchment located in northern part of Slovakia in Western Tatra mountains. Catchment area is 0.059 km2 and mean altitude is 1500 m a.s.l. Measurement network consists of 27 snow poles, 3 small snow lysimeters, discharge measurement device and standard automatic weather station. Snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE) were measured twice a month near the snow poles. These measurements were used to estimate spatial differences in accumulation of SWE. Snowmelt outflow was measured by small snow lysimeters. Measurements were performed in winter 2014/2015. Snow water equivalent variability was very high in such a small area. Differences between particular measuring points reached 600 mm in time of maximum SWE. The results indicated good performance of a snow lysimeter in case of snowmelt timing identification. Increase of snowmelt measured by the snow lysimeter had the same timing as increase in discharge at catchment's outlet and the same timing as the increase in air temperature above the freezing point. Measured data were afterwards used in distributed rainfall-runoff model MIKE-SHE. Several methods were used for spatial distribution of precipitation and snow water equivalent. The model was able to simulate snow water equivalent and snowmelt timing in daily step reasonably well. Simulated discharges were slightly overestimated in later spring.

  7. An experimental comparative study of 20 Italian opera houses: Measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Angelo; Armelloni, Enrico; Martignon, Paolo

    2004-05-01

    For ``acoustical photography'' we mean a set of measured impulse responses, which enable us to ``listen'' at the measured room by means of advanced auralization methods. Once these data sets have been measured, they can be employed in two different ways: objective analysis and listening test. In fact, it is possible to compute dozens of acoustical objective parameters, describing the temporal texture, the spatial effect and the frequency-domain coloring of each opera house. On the other hand, by means of the auralization technique, it becomes easy to conduct listening experiments with human subjects. This paper focuses principally on the development and specification of the measurement technique, which is the topic assigned to the research unit of Parma, to which the authors belong. It describes the hardware equipment, the software, the electro-acoustic transducers (microphones and loudspeakers), the measurement positions, the system for automatic displacement of the microphones and the conditions of the room during the measurements. Experimental results are reported about a couple of opera houses which were employed for testing the measurement procedure and showing the benefits of the new method against the previously employed ones.

  8. Measurement of acoustic dissipation in an experimental combustor under representative conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Samuel; Hardi, Justin; Oschwald, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The present paper is concerned with experimental estimation of acoustic dissipation under conditions representative of those in a rocket engine combustion chamber. Specifically, the influence of operating and injection conditions on acoustic dissipation is considered. Two experimental and analytical techniques are applied to measure and then compare dissipation rates of the first longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes in an experimental combustion chamber. Comparison between non-combustion and combustion tests showed that combustion chamber damping for the first transverse mode is far greater under combustion conditions. A lesser difference between non-combustion and combustion tests for the first longitudinal mode was found although the damping rates during combustion tests were still higher. A strong relationship between primary injection velocity and dissipation rate was observed, with lower injection velocities leading to decreased damping rates of the first transverse mode. Furthermore, increased film cooling injection rate decreased dissipation rate. The significant influence of representative conditions, specifically injection conditions, on dissipation rate has strong implications for both combustor design and experimental approaches aimed at quantifying dissipation in rocket combustion chambers.

  9. Resolving small signal measurements in experimental plasma environments using calibrated subtraction of noise signals

    SciTech Connect

    Fimognari, P. J. Demers, D. R.; Chen, X.; Schoch, P. M.

    2014-11-15

    The performance of many diagnostic and control systems within fusion and other fields of research are often detrimentally affected by spurious noise signals. This is particularly true for those (such as radiation or particle detectors) working with very small signals. Common sources of radiated and conducted noise in experimental fusion environments include the plasma itself and instrumentation. The noise complicates data analysis, as illustrated by noise on signals measured with the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The noise is time-varying and often exceeds the secondary ion beam current (in contrast with previous applications). Analysis of the noise identifies the dominant source as photoelectric emission from the detectors induced by ultraviolet light from the plasma. This has led to the development of a calibrated subtraction technique, which largely removes the undesired temporal noise signals from data. The advantages of the technique for small signal measurement applications are demonstrated through improvements realized on HIBP fluctuation measurements.

  10. Experimental Air Embolism: Measurement of Microbubbles Using the Coulter Counter®

    PubMed Central

    Grulke, D. C.; Marsh, N. A.; Hills, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    Microbubbles in the range 20-250 μm were produced with fine hypodermic needles (0·001, 0·002 and 0·003 inch internal diameter) and were measured using a conventional Coulter Counter. Various bubble sizes could be obtained by varying combinations of needle size, gas pressure, liquid surfactant content and liquid flow rate. Bubbles produced and measured in this way were found to have a very narrow size distribution (80% of the bubbles falling within ± 2 μm of the mean radius) and could be generated at relatively constant frequencies. Over the entire bubble size range, the Coulter Counter method correlated well with two other bubble measuring methods: terminal rise velocity and volume flow rate of gas divided by bubble frequency. It is suggested that this method will enable the introduction of a known number of accurately sized microbubbles into the circulation for the purpose of studying experimental gas embolism. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4783166

  11. Experimental validation of the MODTRAN 5.3 sea surface radiance model using MIRAMER campaign measurements.

    PubMed

    Ross, Vincent; Dion, Denis; St-Germain, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Radiometric images taken in mid-wave and long-wave infrared bands are used as a basis for validating a sea surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) being implemented into MODTRAN 5 (Berk et al. [Proc. SPIE5806, 662 (2005)]). The images were obtained during the MIRAMER campaign that took place in May 2008 in the Mediterranean Sea near Toulon, France. When atmosphere radiances are matched at the horizon to remove possible calibration offsets, the implementation of the BRDF in MODTRAN produces good sea surface radiance agreement, usually within 2% and at worst 4% from off-glint azimuthally averaged measurements. Simulations also compare quite favorably to glint measurements. The observed sea radiance deviations between model and measurements are not systematic, and are well within expected experimental uncertainties. This is largely attributed to proper radiative coupling between the surface and the atmosphere implemented using the DISORT multiple scattering algorithm.

  12. An experimental technique for performing 3-D LDA measurements inside whirling annular seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Johnson, Mark C.; Deotte, Robert E., Jr.; Thames, H. Davis, III.; Wiedner, Brian G.

    1992-01-01

    During the last several years, the Fluid Mechanics Division of the Turbomachinery Laboratory at Texas A&M University has developed a rather unique facility with the experimental capability for measuring the flow field inside journal bearings, labyrinth seals, and annular seals. The facility consists of a specially designed 3-D LDA system which is capable of measuring the instantaneous velocity vector within 0.2 mm of a wall while the laser beams are aligned almost perpendicular to the wall. This capability was required to measure the flow field inside journal bearings, labyrinth seals, and annular seals. A detailed description of this facility along with some representative results obtained for a whirling annular seal are presented.

  13. The experimental evaluation of FBG sensors for strain measurement of prestressed steel strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enbang; Xi, Jiangtao; Chicharo, Joe F.; Liu, Tiegen; Li, Xin; Jiang, Junfeng; Li, Lina; Wang, Yunxin; Zhang, Yimo

    2005-02-01

    Multi-wire steel strands have been widely used in various prestressed concrete structures. In this study, experimental evaluation of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors for strain measurements in a seven-wire prestressed steel strand has been carried out. An installation technique of FBG sensors has been developed to fulfill the special requirements of the prestressed steel strand. The experiment results show that fiber Bragg gratings can represent the overall stress of the prestressed steel strand without being affected by the specific structure of the strand when it is only fixed on one wire. It is also demonstrated that the maximum strain that the FBG sensor can measure is 6260 μɛ, while the prestressed steel strand usually endures the strain greater than 10000 μɛ. This means that an offset of about 4000 μɛ is necessary to measure the maximum strain that the strand could experience in its applications.

  14. A novel experimental setup for simultaneous adsorption and induced deformation measurements in microporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, L.; Plantier, F.; Grégoire, D.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental setup is presented allowing the simultaneous measurement of adsorption isotherms and adsorption-induced deformations. It is composed of a manometric technique coupled with a digital image correlation setup for full-field displacement measurements. The manometric part is validated by comparing adsorption isotherms with those obtained by a gravimetric method. The principles and methods of both adsorption isotherm and induced deformation measurements are presented in detail. As a first application of this new apparatus, the coupling between adsorption and induced deformation is characterised for a microporous media (activated carbon) saturated by pure CO2 (318.15 K, [0-60] bars) and pure CH4 (303.15 K, [0-130] bars). For this very homogeneous porous material, the induced deformation is characteristic of a pure volumetric swelling but the full-field setup may allow the characterisation of the localised pattern of deformation for heterogenous or cracked microporous media.

  15. Quantum Steering Inequality with Tolerance for Measurement-Setting Errors: Experimentally Feasible Signature of Unbounded Violation.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Adam; Buraczewski, Adam; Horodecki, Paweł; Stobińska, Magdalena

    2017-01-13

    Quantum steering is a relatively simple test for proving that the values of quantum-mechanical measurement outcomes come into being only in the act of measurement. By exploiting quantum correlations, Alice can influence-steer-Bob's physical system in a way that is impossible in classical mechanics, as shown by the violation of steering inequalities. Demonstrating this and similar quantum effects for systems of increasing size, approaching even the classical limit, is a long-standing challenging problem. Here, we prove an experimentally feasible unbounded violation of a steering inequality. We derive its universal form where tolerance for measurement-setting errors is explicitly built in by means of the Deutsch-Maassen-Uffink entropic uncertainty relation. Then, generalizing the mutual unbiasedness, we apply the inequality to the multisinglet and multiparticle bipartite Bell state. However, the method is general and opens the possibility of employing multiparticle bipartite steering for randomness certification and development of quantum technologies, e.g., random access codes.

  16. Quantum Steering Inequality with Tolerance for Measurement-Setting Errors: Experimentally Feasible Signature of Unbounded Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Adam; Buraczewski, Adam; Horodecki, Paweł; Stobińska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Quantum steering is a relatively simple test for proving that the values of quantum-mechanical measurement outcomes come into being only in the act of measurement. By exploiting quantum correlations, Alice can influence—steer—Bob's physical system in a way that is impossible in classical mechanics, as shown by the violation of steering inequalities. Demonstrating this and similar quantum effects for systems of increasing size, approaching even the classical limit, is a long-standing challenging problem. Here, we prove an experimentally feasible unbounded violation of a steering inequality. We derive its universal form where tolerance for measurement-setting errors is explicitly built in by means of the Deutsch-Maassen-Uffink entropic uncertainty relation. Then, generalizing the mutual unbiasedness, we apply the inequality to the multisinglet and multiparticle bipartite Bell state. However, the method is general and opens the possibility of employing multiparticle bipartite steering for randomness certification and development of quantum technologies, e.g., random access codes.

  17. Edge Length and Surface Area of a Blank: Experimental Assessment of Measures, Size Predictions and Utility.

    PubMed

    Dogandžić, Tamara; Braun, David R; McPherron, Shannon P

    2015-01-01

    Blank size and form represent one of the main sources of variation in lithic assemblages. They reflect economic properties of blanks and factors such as efficiency and use life. These properties require reliable measures of size, namely edge length and surface area. These measures, however, are not easily captured with calipers. Most attempts to quantify these features employ estimates; however, the efficacy of these estimations for measuring critical features such as blank surface area and edge length has never been properly evaluated. In addition, these parameters are even more difficult to acquire for retouched implements as their original size and hence indication of their previous utility have been lost. It has been suggested, in controlled experimental conditions, that two platform variables, platform thickness and exterior platform angle, are crucial in determining blank size and shape meaning that knappers can control the interaction between size and efficiency by selecting specific core angles and controlling where fracture is initiated. The robustness of these models has rarely been tested and confirmed in context other than controlled experiments. In this paper, we evaluate which currently employed caliper measurement methods result in the highest accuracy of size estimations of blanks, and we evaluate how platform variables can be used to indirectly infer aspects of size on retouched artifacts. Furthermore, we investigate measures of different platform management strategies that control the shape and size of artifacts. To investigate these questions, we created an experimental lithic assemblage, we digitized images to calculate 2D surface area and edge length, which are used as a point of comparison for the caliper measurements and additional analyses. The analysis of aspects of size determinations and the utility of blanks contributes to our understanding of the technological strategies of prehistoric knappers and what economic decisions they made

  18. Edge Length and Surface Area of a Blank: Experimental Assessment of Measures, Size Predictions and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Dogandžić, Tamara; Braun, David R.; McPherron, Shannon P.

    2015-01-01

    Blank size and form represent one of the main sources of variation in lithic assemblages. They reflect economic properties of blanks and factors such as efficiency and use life. These properties require reliable measures of size, namely edge length and surface area. These measures, however, are not easily captured with calipers. Most attempts to quantify these features employ estimates; however, the efficacy of these estimations for measuring critical features such as blank surface area and edge length has never been properly evaluated. In addition, these parameters are even more difficult to acquire for retouched implements as their original size and hence indication of their previous utility have been lost. It has been suggested, in controlled experimental conditions, that two platform variables, platform thickness and exterior platform angle, are crucial in determining blank size and shape meaning that knappers can control the interaction between size and efficiency by selecting specific core angles and controlling where fracture is initiated. The robustness of these models has rarely been tested and confirmed in context other than controlled experiments. In this paper, we evaluate which currently employed caliper measurement methods result in the highest accuracy of size estimations of blanks, and we evaluate how platform variables can be used to indirectly infer aspects of size on retouched artifacts. Furthermore, we investigate measures of different platform management strategies that control the shape and size of artifacts. To investigate these questions, we created an experimental lithic assemblage, we digitized images to calculate 2D surface area and edge length, which are used as a point of comparison for the caliper measurements and additional analyses. The analysis of aspects of size determinations and the utility of blanks contributes to our understanding of the technological strategies of prehistoric knappers and what economic decisions they made

  19. Experimental measurement and calculation of losses in planar radial magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasarda, M. E. F.; Allaire, P. E.; Hope, R. W.; Humphris, R. R.

    1994-05-01

    The loss mechanisms associated with magnetic bearings have yet to be adequately characterized or modeled analytically and thus pose a problem for the designer of magnetic bearings. This problem is particularly important for aerospace applications where low power consumption of components is critical. Also, losses are expected to be large for high speed operation. The iron losses in magnetic bearings can be divided into eddy current losses and hysteresis losses. While theoretical models for these losses exist for transformer and electric motor applications, they have not been verified for magnetic bearings. This paper presents the results from a low speed experimental test rig and compares them to calculated values from existing theory. Experimental data was taken over a range of 90 to 2,800 rpm for several bias currents and two different pole configurations. With certain assumptions agreement between measured and calculated power losses was within 16 percent for a number of test configurations.

  20. Experimental measurement and calculation of losses in planar radial magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasarda, M. E. F.; Allaire, P. E.; Hope, R. W.; Humphris, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The loss mechanisms associated with magnetic bearings have yet to be adequately characterized or modeled analytically and thus pose a problem for the designer of magnetic bearings. This problem is particularly important for aerospace applications where low power consumption of components is critical. Also, losses are expected to be large for high speed operation. The iron losses in magnetic bearings can be divided into eddy current losses and hysteresis losses. While theoretical models for these losses exist for transformer and electric motor applications, they have not been verified for magnetic bearings. This paper presents the results from a low speed experimental test rig and compares them to calculated values from existing theory. Experimental data was taken over a range of 90 to 2,800 rpm for several bias currents and two different pole configurations. With certain assumptions agreement between measured and calculated power losses was within 16 percent for a number of test configurations.

  1. Experimental and theoretical comparison of NIR spectroscopy measurements of cerebral hemoglobin changes.

    PubMed

    Firbank, M; Elwell, C E; Cooper, C E; Delpy, D T

    1998-11-01

    Two near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) methods are available for measuring changes (Delta) in total cerebral hemoglobin concentration (CHC): 1) a continuous measurement of the changes in total hemoglobin concentration (Delta[Hb]tot) and 2) the difference between two absolute measurements of CHC, each derived from a small, controlled change in inspired O2 fraction. This paper investigates the internal consistency of these two methods by using an experimental and theoretical comparison. NIRS was used to measure [Hb]tot in five newborn piglets before and after a change in arterial PCO2. Delta[Hb]tot demonstrated a low coefficient of variation of 2.8 +/- 2.8 (SD) % which allowed changes in CO2-cerebral blood volume reactivity to be clearly discriminated. However, a high coefficient of variation of 22.8 +/- 3.5% on the DeltaCHC measurements obscured any CO2 reactivity changes. A theoretical analysis demonstrates the effects of optical pathlength, background absorption, scatter, and blood vessel diameter on both methods. For more accurate monitoring of CHC, individual measurements of optical pathlength and more accurate pulse oximetry are required.

  2. Pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy: A comparison of experimental measurement and simulation prediction.

    PubMed

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Almualimi, Majdi A; Langton, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Considering ultrasound propagation through complex composite media as an array of parallel sonic rays, a comparison of computer-simulated prediction with experimental data has previously been reported for transmission mode (where one transducer serves as transmitter, the other as receiver) in a series of 10 acrylic step-wedge samples, immersed in water, exhibiting varying degrees of transit time inhomogeneity. In this study, the same samples were used but in pulse-echo mode, where the same ultrasound transducer served as both transmitter and receiver, detecting both 'primary' (internal sample interface) and 'secondary' (external sample interface) echoes. A transit time spectrum was derived, describing the proportion of sonic rays with a particular transit time. A computer simulation was performed to predict the transit time and amplitude of various echoes created, and compared with experimental data. Applying an amplitude-tolerance analysis, 91.7% ± 3.7% of the simulated data were within ±1 standard deviation of the experimentally measured amplitude-time data. Correlation of predicted and experimental transit time spectra provided coefficients of determination (R(2)%) ranging from 100.0% to 96.8% for the various samples tested. The results acquired from this study provide good evidence for the concept of parallel sonic rays. Furthermore, deconvolution of experimental input and output signals has been shown to provide an effective method to identify echoes otherwise lost due to phase cancellation. Potential applications of pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy include improvement of ultrasound image fidelity by improving spatial resolution and reducing phase interference artefacts.

  3. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  4. An experimental concept to measure opacities under solar-relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, Paul A.; Mussack, Katie; Klein, Sallee R.

    2013-06-01

    Recent solar abundance models (Asplund 2009) use a significantly lower abundance for C, N, O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. Although the models used now are much more sophisticated than before, a discrepancy still exists between the abundances in the models and the abundances determined by helioseismic measurements. Agreement can be obtained by ad hoc adjustments to the opacity of high-Z (Z > 2) elements ranging from a few percent in the solar interior to as much as 30 just below the convection zone (CZ). Although many of the opacity models are thought to agree within a few percent, a recent element-by-element study (Blancard 2012) indicates a larger disagreement between models for certain elements. Experimental opacity measurements for these elements in the regimes of interest will provide valuable information to help resolve these discrepancies. We will present an experimental platform designed to measure the opacity of C, N, and O and discuss the achievable parameter regime. We will also briefly discuss how this platform can be extended to include other high-Z elements.

  5. Measuring saliency in images: which experimental parameters for the assessment of image quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredembach, Clement; Woolfe, Geoff; Wang, Jue

    2012-01-01

    Predicting which areas of an image are perceptually salient or attended to has become an essential pre-requisite of many computer vision applications. Because observers are notoriously unreliable in remembering where they look a posteriori, and because asking where they look while observing the image necessarily in uences the results, ground truth about saliency and visual attention has to be obtained by gaze tracking methods. From the early work of Buswell and Yarbus to the most recent forays in computer vision there has been, perhaps unfortunately, little agreement on standardisation of eye tracking protocols for measuring visual attention. As the number of parameters involved in experimental methodology can be large, their individual in uence on the nal results is not well understood. Consequently, the performance of saliency algorithms, when assessed by correlation techniques, varies greatly across the literature. In this paper, we concern ourselves with the problem of image quality. Specically: where people look when judging images. We show that in this case, the performance gap between existing saliency prediction algorithms and experimental results is signicantly larger than otherwise reported. To understand this discrepancy, we rst devise an experimental protocol that is adapted to the task of measuring image quality. In a second step, we compare our experimental parameters with the ones of existing methods and show that a lot of the variability can directly be ascribed to these dierences in experimental methodology and choice of variables. In particular, the choice of a task, e.g., judging image quality vs. free viewing, has a great impact on measured saliency maps, suggesting that even for a mildly cognitive task, ground truth obtained by free viewing does not adapt well. Careful analysis of the prior art also reveals that systematic bias can occur depending on instrumental calibration and the choice of test images. We conclude this work by proposing a

  6. Experimental Violation of Two-Party Leggett-Garg Inequalities with Semiweak Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, J.; Broadbent, C. J.; Howell, J. C.; Jordan, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    We generalize the derivation of Leggett-Garg inequalities to systematically treat a larger class of experimental situations by allowing multiparticle correlations, invasive detection, and ambiguous detector results. Furthermore, we show how many such inequalities may be tested simultaneously with a single setup. As a proof of principle, we violate several such two-particle inequalities with data obtained from a polarization-entangled biphoton state and a semiweak polarization measurement based on Fresnel reflection. We also point out a nontrivial connection between specific two-party Leggett-Garg inequality violations and convex sums of strange weak values.

  7. Experimental Violation of Two-Party Leggett-Garg Inequalities with Semi-weak Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Justin; Broadbent, Curtis; Howell, John; Jordan, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    We generalize the derivation of Leggett-Garg inequalities to systematically treat a larger class of experimental situations by allowing multi-particle correlations, invasive detection, and ambiguous detector results. Furthermore, we show how many such inequalities may be tested simultaneously with a single setup. As a proof of principle, we violate several such two-particle inequalities with data obtained from a polarization-entangled biphoton state and a semi-weak polarization measurement based on Fresnel reflection. We also point out a non-trivial connection between specific two-party Leggett-Garg inequality violations and convex sums of strange weak values.

  8. Experimental measure of the tensile strength of biological sealant-collagen association after hepatectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Scotté, M; Dujardin, F; Amelot, A; Azema, P; Leblanc, I; Bouvier, P; Michot, F; Ténière, P

    1996-01-01

    Fibrin sealants are commonly used in liver surgery. The aim of this study was to test the adhesive properties of a biological sealant-collagen bonding, using an experimental model. After hepatectomy in dogs, we measured the rupture stress point of a fibrin clot on the liver cross-section. The tensile strength was 0.28 N, 5 times higher than the force of arterial pressure in a 2-mm-diameter vessel. These results indicate that the adhesion of fibrin sealants is effective to prevent hemorrhage from the liver cross-section after hepatectomy.

  9. The Experimental Measurement of Aerodynamic Heating About Complex Shapes at Supersonic Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Richard D.; Freeman, Delma C.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008 a wind tunnel test program was implemented to update the experimental data available for predicting protuberance heating at supersonic Mach numbers. For this test the Langley Unitary Wind Tunnel was also used. The significant differences for this current test were the advances in the state-of-the-art in model design, fabrication techniques, instrumentation and data acquisition capabilities. This current paper provides a focused discussion of the results of an in depth analysis of unique measurements of recovery temperature obtained during the test.

  10. Experimental determination of the spring constant of an individual multiwalled carbon nanotube cantilever using fluorescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Soongeun; Park, Hyojun; Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Lee, Hyung Woo; Kwak, Yoon Keun; Kim, Soohyun

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental method to determine the spring constant of a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) cantilever as a mechanical piconewton force transducer. Electrostatic actuation was employed to investigate the mechanical properties of a MWNT cantilever. In order to measure nanotube's deflection during actuation, fluorescent dyes were noncovalently attached to the end of the nanotubes. Also, the length dependence of the spring constant is studied by adjusting the length of MWNT via electrochemical etching. The results show that the spring constant of a MWNT cantilever is as small as 0.001 N/m and tunable in the range of 0.001-0.05 N/m.

  11. Synchrotron radiation measurement of multiphase fluid saturations in porous media: Experimental technique and error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuck, David M.; Bierck, Barnes R.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    1998-06-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is an important research topic. In situ, nondestructive experimental methods for studying multiphase flow are important for improving our understanding and the theory. Rapid changes in fluid saturation, characteristic of immiscible displacement, are difficult to measure accurately using gamma rays due to practical restrictions on source strength. Our objective is to describe a synchrotron radiation technique for rapid, nondestructive saturation measurements of multiple fluids in porous media, and to present a precision and accuracy analysis of the technique. Synchrotron radiation provides a high intensity, inherently collimated photon beam of tunable energy which can yield accurate measurements of fluid saturation in just one second. Measurements were obtained with precision of ±0.01 or better for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in a 2.5 cm thick glass-bead porous medium using a counting time of 1 s. The normal distribution was shown to provide acceptable confidence limits for PCE saturation changes. Sources of error include heat load on the monochromator, periodic movement of the source beam, and errors in stepping-motor positioning system. Hypodermic needles pushed into the medium to inject PCE changed porosity in a region approximately ±1 mm of the injection point. Improved mass balance between the known and measured PCE injection volumes was obtained when appropriate corrections were applied to calibration values near the injection point.

  12. Ultrasonic scattering from a hemispherical pit theory and experimental measurement precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, Thomas J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lozev, Mark G.

    2017-02-01

    The accuracy and precision of pulse-echo ultrasonic thickness measurement systems are influenced by systematic and environmental factors including the topographic profile of the back-wall surface. For the case of thickness measurement from the outside surface of a pipe, the back-wall surface can vary in roughness as a result of internal corrosion. A single corrosive pit can be geometrically represented by a hemisphere in a half-space to model the initiation point of rough surface corrosion, or to model isolated pitting degradation as is possible with naphthenic acid corrosion in oil refineries. The elastic wave scattering from a single hemispherical pit has been studied in the Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) community, as well as scattering from a hemispherical canyon in the seismology community for various incident and reflected wave angles, modes, and frequency ranges with both analytical and discretized numerical methods. This paper looks to first review recent scattering theory (developed in the seismology community) on a full frequency range analytical solution for a normal incident longitudinal wave at a normal reflection angle from a hemispherical canyon, and then extend this theory to NDE applications with the introduction of a new far-field scattering amplitude term. Next, a selection of new theoretical scattering amplitude solutions are presented along with semi-analytical simulation and experimental measurement results. Finally, a statistical methodology to determine thickness measurement accuracy and precision taking into consideration asymmetric measurement uncertainty is referenced.

  13. Experimental Results of Site Calibration and Sensitivity Measurements in OTR for UWB Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanadham, Chandana; Rao, P. Mallikrajuna

    2016-08-01

    System calibration and parameter accuracy measurement of electronic support measures (ESM) systems is a major activity, carried out by electronic warfare (EW) engineers. These activities are very critical and needs good understanding in the field of microwaves, antennas, wave propagation, digital and communication domains. EW systems are broad band, built with state-of-the art electronic hardware, installed on different varieties of military platforms to guard country's security from time to time. EW systems operate in wide frequency ranges, typically in the order of thousands of MHz, hence these are ultra wide band (UWB) systems. Few calibration activities are carried within the system and in the test sites, to meet the accuracies of final specifications. After calibration, parameters are measured for their accuracies either in feed mode by injecting the RF signals into the front end or in radiation mode by transmitting the RF signals on to system antenna. To carry out these activities in radiation mode, a calibrated open test range (OTR) is necessary in the frequency band of interest. Thus site calibration of OTR is necessary to be carried out before taking up system calibration and parameter measurements. This paper presents the experimental results of OTR site calibration and sensitivity measurements of UWB systems in radiation mode.

  14. Polynomial chaos representation of spatio-temporal random fields from experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sonjoy Ghanem, Roger Finette, Steven

    2009-12-10

    Two numerical techniques are proposed to construct a polynomial chaos (PC) representation of an arbitrary second-order random vector. In the first approach, a PC representation is constructed by matching a target joint probability density function (pdf) based on sequential conditioning (a sequence of conditional probability relations) in conjunction with the Rosenblatt transformation. In the second approach, the PC representation is obtained by having recourse to the Rosenblatt transformation and simultaneously matching a set of target marginal pdfs and target Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (SRCC) matrix. Both techniques are applied to model an experimental spatio-temporal data set, exhibiting strong non-stationary and non-Gaussian features. The data consists of a set of oceanographic temperature records obtained from a shallow-water acoustics transmission experiment. The measurement data, observed over a finite denumerable subset of the indexing set of the random process, is treated as a collection of observed samples of a second-order random vector that can be treated as a finite-dimensional approximation of the original random field. A set of properly ordered conditional pdfs, that uniquely characterizes the target joint pdf, in the first approach and a set of target marginal pdfs and a target SRCC matrix, in the second approach, are estimated from available experimental data. Digital realizations sampled from the constructed PC representations based on both schemes capture the observed statistical characteristics of the experimental data with sufficient accuracy. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the two proposed techniques are also highlighted.

  15. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-15

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  16. Experimental measurements of hydrodynamic stiffness matrices for a centrifugal pump impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamieh, D. S.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.; Franz, R.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the Rotor Force Test Facility at the California Institute of Technology is to artificially orbit the center of rotation of an impeller enclosed within a volute over a range of frequencies from zero to synchronous and to measure the resulting forces on the impeller. Preliminary data from the first stage experiments in which the shaft is orbited at low frequency is reported. Steady volute forces along with stiffness matrices due to the change in position of the rotor center are measured. Static pressure taps around the volute are used to obtain volute pressure distributions for various fixed positions of the impeller center and for various flow rates. Static pressure forces are calculated from these pressure distributions allowing a more complete analysis of the components of the impeller forces. Comparison is made with various existing theoretical and experimental results.

  17. Spectral radiance measurements and calculated soot concentrations along the length of an experimental combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Radiometric data were obtained over a range of parametric test conditions at three positions along the length of an experimental combustor segment corresponding to the primary, intermediate, and dilution zones. The concentration of soot entrained in the combustion gases was calculated by a technique using spectral radiance measurements. Tests were conducted primarily with Jet A fuel, although limited data were taken with two fuels having higher aromatic content, diesel oil number 2 and a blend of 40 percent tetralin in Jet A fuel. Radiometric observation of the combustion gases indicated that the maximum total radiance peaked at the intermediate zone, which was located immediately upstream of the dilution holes. Soot concentrations calculated from optical measurements in the dilution zone compared favorably with those obtained by in situ gas sampling at the exhaust. The total radiance increased with the higher aromatic content fuels.

  18. Application of visible bremsstrahlung to Z{sub eff} measurement on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yingjie; Wu, Zhenwei; Gao, Wei; Ti, Ang; Zhang, Ling; Jie, Yinxian; Zhang, Jizong; Huang, Juan; Xu, Zong; Zhao, Junyu

    2015-02-15

    The multi-channel visible bremsstrahlung measurement system has been developed on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). In addition to providing effective ion charge Z{sub eff} as a routine diagnostic, this diagnostic can also be used to estimate other parameters. With the assumption that Z{sub eff} can be seen as constant across the radius and does not change significantly during steady state discharges, central electron temperature, averaged electron density, electron density profile, and plasma current density profile have been obtained based on the scaling of Z{sub eff} with electron density and the relations between Z{sub eff} and these parameters. The estimated results are in good coincidence with measured values, providing an effective and convenient method to estimate other plasma parameters.

  19. Simulation and Experimental Measurements of Inductively Coupled CF4 and CF4/Ar Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The recently developed code SEMS (semiconductor equipment modeling software)is applied to the simulation of CF4 and CF4/Ar inductively coupled plasmas (ICP). This work builds upon the earlier nitrogen, transformer coupled plasma (TCP) SEMS research by demonstrating its accuracy for more complex reactive mixtures, moving closer to the realization of a virtual plasma reactor. Attention is given to the etching of and/or formation of carbonaceous films on the quartz dielectric window and diagnostic aperatures. The simulations are validated through comparisons with experimental measurements using FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) and UV absorption spectroscopy for CFx and SiFx neutral radicals, QMS (quadrupole mass spectrometry) for the ions, and Langmuir probe measurements of electron number density and temperature in an ICP GEC reference cell.

  20. Experimental measurement of the plasma conductivity of Z93 and Z93P thermal control paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. Barry

    1993-01-01

    Two samples each of Z93 and Z93P thermal control paint were exposed to a simulated space environment in a plasma chamber. The samples were biased through a series of voltages ranging from -200 volts to +300 volts and electron and ion currents measured. By comparing the currents to those of pure metal samples of the same size and shape, the conductivity of the samples was calculated. Measured conductivity was dependent on the bias potential in all cases. For Z93P, conductivity was approximately constant over much of the bias range and we find a value of 0.5 micro-mhos per square meter for both electron and ion current. For Z93, the dependence on bias was much more pronounced but conductivity can be said to be approximately one order of magnitude larger. In addition to presenting these results, this report documents all of the experimental data as well as the statistical analyses performed.

  1. Experimental Assessment and Enhancement of Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements of Nitric Oxide in an Inverse Diffusion Flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, William P.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    1997-01-01

    We have experimentally assessed the quantitative nature of planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements of NO concentration in a unique atmospheric pressure, laminar, axial inverse diffusion flame (IDF). The PLIF measurements were assessed relative to a two-dimensional array of separate laser saturated fluorescence (LSF) measurements. We demonstrated and evaluated several experimentally-based procedures for enhancing the quantitative nature of PLIF concentration images. Because these experimentally-based PLIF correction schemes require only the ability to make PLIF and LSF measurements, they produce a more broadly applicable PLIF diagnostic compared to numerically-based correction schemes. We experimentally assessed the influence of interferences on both narrow-band and broad-band fluorescence measurements at atmospheric and high pressures. Optimum excitation and detection schemes were determined for the LSF and PLIF measurements. Single-input and multiple-input, experimentally-based PLIF enhancement procedures were developed for application in test environments with both negligible and significant quench-dependent error gradients. Each experimentally-based procedure provides an enhancement of approximately 50% in the quantitative nature of the PLIF measurements, and results in concentration images nominally as quantitative as LSF point measurements. These correction procedures can be applied to other species, including radicals, for which no experimental data are available from which to implement numerically-based PLIF enhancement procedures.

  2. New experimental technique for the measurement of the velocity field in thin films falling over obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landel, Julien R.; Daglis, Ana; McEvoy, Harry; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2014-11-01

    We present a new experimental technique to measure the surface velocity of a thin falling film. Thin falling films are important in various processes such as cooling in heat exchangers or cleaning processes. For instance, in a household dishwasher cleaning depends on the ability of a thin draining film to remove material from a substrate. We are interested in the impact of obstacles attached to a substrate on the velocity field of a thin film flowing over them. Measuring the velocity field of thin falling films is a challenging experimental problem due to the small depth of the flow and the large velocity gradient across its depth. We propose a new technique based on PIV to measure the plane components of the velocity at the surface of the film over an arbitrarily large area and an arbitrarily large resolution, depending mostly on the image acquisition technique. We perform experiments with thin films of water flowing on a flat inclined surface, made of glass or stainless steel. The typical Reynolds number of the film is of the order of 100 to 1000, computed using the surface velocity, the film thickness and the kinematic viscosity of the film. We measure the modification to the flow field, from a viscous-gravity regime, caused by small solid obstacles, such as three-dimensional hemispherical obstacles and two-dimensional steps. We compare our results with past theoretical and numerical studies. This material is based upon work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-12-D-0003-0001.

  3. Experimental measurement and Monte Carlo assessment of Argon-41 production in a PET cyclotron facility.

    PubMed

    Infantino, Angelo; Valtieri, Lorenzo; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Pancaldi, Davide; Mostacci, Domiziano; Marengo, Mario

    2015-12-01

    In a medical cyclotron facility, (41)Ar (t1/2 = 109.34 m) is produced by the activation of air due to the neutron flux during irradiation, according to the (40)Ar(n,γ)(41)Ar reaction; this is particularly relevant in widely diffused high beam current cyclotrons for the production of PET radionuclides. While theoretical estimations of the (41)Ar production have been published, no data are available on direct experimental measurements for a biomedical cyclotron. In this work, we describe a sampling methodology and report the results of an extensive measurement campaign. Furthermore, the experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations performed with the FLUKA code. To measure (41)Ar activity, air samples were taken inside the cyclotron bunker in sealed Marinelli beakers, during the routine production of (18)F with a 16.5 MeV GE-PETtrace cyclotron; this sampling thus reproduces a situation of absence of air changes. Samples analysis was performed in a gamma-ray spectrometry system equipped with HPGe detector. Monte Carlo assessment of the (41)Ar saturation yield was performed directly using the standard FLUKA score RESNUCLE, and off-line by the convolution of neutron fluence with cross section data. The average (41)Ar saturation yield per one liter of air of (41)Ar, measured in gamma-ray spectrometry, resulted to be 3.0 ± 0.6 Bq/µA*dm(3) while simulations gave a result of 6.9 ± 0.3 Bq/µA*dm(3) in the direct assessment and 6.92 ± 0.22 Bq/µA*dm(3) by the convolution neutron fluence-to-cross section.

  4. Investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and mixing using direct numerical simulation with experimentally-measured initial conditions. I. Comparison to experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N; Schilling, O

    2008-07-23

    A 1152 x 760 x 1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) using initial conditions, geometry, and physical parameters chosen to approximate those of a transitional, small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment [Mueschke, Andrews and Schilling, J. Fluid Mech. 567, 27 (2006)] is presented. The density and velocity fluctuations measured just off of the splitter plate in this buoyantly unstable water channel experiment were parameterized to provide physically-realistic, anisotropic initial conditions for the DNS. The methodology for parameterizing the measured data and numerically implementing the resulting perturbation spectra in the simulation is discussed in detail. The DNS model of the experiment is then validated by comparing quantities from the simulation to experimental measurements. In particular, large-scale quantities (such as the bubble front penetration hb and the mixing layer growth parameter {alpha}{sub b}), higher-order statistics (such as velocity variances and the molecular mixing parameter {theta}), and vertical velocity and density variance spectra from the DNS are shown to be in favorable agreement with the experimental data. Differences between the quantities obtained from the DNS and from experimental measurements are related to limitations in the dynamic range of scales resolved in the simulation and other idealizations of the simulation model. This work demonstrates that a parameterization of experimentally-measured initial conditions can yield simulation data that quantitatively agrees well with experimentally-measured low- and higher-order statistics in a Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. This study also provides resolution and initial conditions implementation requirements needed to simulate a physical Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment. In Part II [Mueschke and Schilling, Phys. Fluids (2008)], other quantities not measured in the experiment are obtained from the DNS and discussed, such as the integral- and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers

  5. Experimental Measurement and Numerical Modeling of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of TRISO Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, Charles; Xing, Changhu; Jensen, Colby; Ban, Heng; Marshall, Douglas W.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate modeling capability of thermal conductivity of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts is important to fuel performance modeling and safety of Generation IV reactors. To date, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts has not been measured directly. The composite fuel is a complicated structure comprised of layered particles in a graphite matrix. In this work, finite element modeling is used to validate an analytic ETC model for application to the composite fuel material for particle-volume fractions up to 40%. The effect of each individual layer of a TRISO particle is analyzed showing that the overall ETC of the compact is most sensitive to the outer layer constituent. In conjunction with the modeling results, the thermal conductivity of matrix-graphite compacts and the ETC of surrogate TRISO fuel compacts have been successfully measured using a previously developed measurement system. The ETC of the surrogate fuel compacts varies between 50 and 30 W m-1 K-1 over a temperature range of 50-600°C. As a result of the numerical modeling and experimental measurements of the fuel compacts, a new model and approach for analyzing the effect of compact constituent materials on ETC is proposed that can estimate the fuel compact ETC with approximately 15-20% more accuracy than the old method. Using the ETC model with measured thermal conductivity of the graphite matrix-only material indicate that, in the composite form, the matrix material has a much greater thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the high anisotropy of graphite thermal conductivity. Therefore, simpler measurements of individual TRISO compact constituents combined with an analytic ETC model, will not provide accurate predictions of overall ETC of the compacts emphasizing the need for measurements of composite, surrogate compacts.

  6. Experimental study designs to improve the evaluation of road mitigation measures for wildlife.

    PubMed

    Rytwinski, Trina; van der Ree, Rodney; Cunnington, Glenn M; Fahrig, Lenore; Findlay, C Scott; Houlahan, Jeff; Jaeger, Jochen A G; Soanes, Kylie; van der Grift, Edgar A

    2015-05-01

    An experimental approach to road mitigation that maximizes inferential power is essential to ensure that mitigation is both ecologically-effective and cost-effective. Here, we set out the need for and standards of using an experimental approach to road mitigation, in order to improve knowledge of the influence of mitigation measures on wildlife populations. We point out two key areas that need to be considered when conducting mitigation experiments. First, researchers need to get involved at the earliest stage of the road or mitigation project to ensure the necessary planning and funds are available for conducting a high quality experiment. Second, experimentation will generate new knowledge about the parameters that influence mitigation effectiveness, which ultimately allows better prediction for future road mitigation projects. We identify seven key questions about mitigation structures (i.e., wildlife crossing structures and fencing) that remain largely or entirely unanswered at the population-level: (1) Does a given crossing structure work? What type and size of crossing structures should we use? (2) How many crossing structures should we build? (3) Is it more effective to install a small number of large-sized crossing structures or a large number of small-sized crossing structures? (4) How much barrier fencing is needed for a given length of road? (5) Do we need funnel fencing to lead animals to crossing structures, and how long does such fencing have to be? (6) How should we manage/manipulate the environment in the area around the crossing structures and fencing? (7) Where should we place crossing structures and barrier fencing? We provide experimental approaches to answering each of them using example Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) study designs for two stages in the road/mitigation project where researchers may become involved: (1) at the beginning of a road/mitigation project, and (2) after the mitigation has been constructed; highlighting real case

  7. Experimental measurements and modeling of convective heat transfer in the transitional rarefied regime

    SciTech Connect

    Strongrich, Andrew D.; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2014-12-09

    We present experimental measurements and numerical simulations of convective heat transfer performance in the transitional rarefied regime for an isolated rectangular beam geometry. Experiments were performed using single crystalline silicon beam elements having width-to-thickness aspect ratios of 8.5 and 17.4. Devices were enclosed in a vacuum chamber and heated resistively using a DC power supply. A range of pressures corresponding to Knudsen numbers between 0.096 and 43.2 in terms of device thickness were swept, adjusting applied power to maintain a constant temperature of 50 K above the ambient temperature. Both parasitic electrical resistance associated with the hardware and radiative exchange with the environment were removed from measured data, allowing purely convective heat flux to be extracted. Numerical simulations were carried out deterministically through solution of the Ellipsoidal Statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model of the Boltzmann equation. Results agree with experimental data, revealing a strong coupling between dissipated heat flux and thermal stresses within the flowfield as well as a nonlinear transition between the free-molecule and continuum regimes.

  8. Experimental Investigations of Non-Stationary Properties In Radiometer Receivers Using Measurements of Multiple Calibration References

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, Paul; Lang, Roger; Zhang, Zhao-Nan; Zacharias, David; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Radiometers must be periodically calibrated because the receiver response fluctuates. Many techniques exist to correct for the time varying response of a radiometer receiver. An analytical technique has been developed that uses generalized least squares regression (LSR) to predict the performance of a wide variety of calibration algorithms. The total measurement uncertainty including the uncertainty of the calibration can be computed using LSR. The uncertainties of the calibration samples used in the regression are based upon treating the receiver fluctuations as non-stationary processes. Signals originating from the different sources of emission are treated as simultaneously existing random processes. Thus, the radiometer output is a series of samples obtained from these random processes. The samples are treated as random variables but because the underlying processes are non-stationary the statistics of the samples are treated as non-stationary. The statistics of the calibration samples depend upon the time for which the samples are to be applied. The statistics of the random variables are equated to the mean statistics of the non-stationary processes over the interval defined by the time of calibration sample and when it is applied. This analysis opens the opportunity for experimental investigation into the underlying properties of receiver non stationarity through the use of multiple calibration references. In this presentation we will discuss the application of LSR to the analysis of various calibration algorithms, requirements for experimental verification of the theory, and preliminary results from analyzing experiment measurements.

  9. An Experimental Concept to Measure Opacities Under Solar-relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, Paul; Mussack, K.; Klein, S.

    2013-06-01

    Recent solar abundance models (Asplund 2009) use a significantly lower abundance for C, N, O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. Although the models used now are much more sophisticated than before, a discrepancy still exists between the abundances in the models and the abundances determined by helioseismic inferences. Agreement can be obtained by ad hoc adjustments to the opacity of high-Z (Z > 2) elements ranging from a few percent in the solar interior to as much as 30% just below the convection zone (CZ). Although many of the opacity models are thought to agree within a few percent, a recent element-by-element study (Blancard 2012) indicates a larger disagreement between models for certain elements. Experimental opacity measurements for these elements in the regimes of interest will provide valuable information to help resolve these discrepancies. We will present an experimental platform designed to measure the opacity of C, N, and O and discuss the achievable parameter regime. We will also briefly discuss how this platform can be extended to include other high-Z elements.

  10. Alfvénic oscillations of the electron distribution function: Linear theory and experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J. W. R. Skiff, F.; Howes, G. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Carter, T. A.; Dorfman, S.

    2015-12-10

    Wave propagation can be an accurate method for determining material properties. High frequency whistler mode waves (0.7 < ω/|Ω{sub ce}| < 1) in an overdense plasma (ω{sub pe} > |Ω{sub ce}|) are damped primarily by Doppler-shifted electron cyclotron resonance. A kinetic description of whistler mode propagation parallel to the background magnetic field shows that damping is proportional to the parallel electron distribution function. This property enables an experimental determination of the parallel electron distribution function using a measurement of whistler mode wave absorption. The whistler mode wave absorption diagnostic uses this technique on UCLA’s Large Plasma Device (LaPD) to measure the distribution of high energy electrons (5 − 10v{sub te}) with 0.1% precision. The accuracy is limited by systematic effects that need to be considered carefully. Ongoing research uses this diagnostic to investigate the effect of inertial Alfvén waves on the electron distribution function. Results presented here verify experimentally the linear effects of inertial Alfvén waves on the reduced electron distribution function, a necessary step before nonlinear physics can be tested. Ongoing experiments with the whistler mode wave absorption diagnostic are making progress toward the first direct detection of electrons nonlinearly accelerated by inertial Alfvén waves, a process believed to play an important role in auroral generation.

  11. Effect of experimental conditions on surface hardness measurements of calcified tissues via LIBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Salam, Z. A.; Nanjing, Z.; Anglos, D.; Harith, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the effects of LIBS experimental conditions on the measurement of the surface hardness of calcified tissues. The technique mainly depends on a previously demonstrated correlation between the intensity ratio of ionic to atomic spectral lines and the hardness of the target material. Three types of calcified tissues have been examined, namely enamel of human teeth, shells, and eggshells. Laser-induced breakdown spectra were obtained under two different experimental conditions. In the first nano and picoseconds, laser pulses were used in a single-pulse arrangement, while in the second, single- and double-pulse regimes with nanosecond laser excitation were utilized. The results show that the ionic to atomic spectral line intensity ratios are higher in the case of picosecond laser pulse for both Ca and Mg spectral lines. This effect has been justified in view of the repulsive force of the laser-induced shock waves which depends clearly on the target surface hardness and on the laser irradiance. The electron densities ratio (pico/nano) is shown to be strongly depending on the laser irradiance too. In the case of calcium, single-pulse ratios are higher than the double-pulse ratios, while there is no appreciable difference between both in the case of magnesium. The results obtained herein suggest that double-pulse nanosecond arrangement and the choice of a minor element such as Mg furnishes the best experimental conditions for estimating the surface hardness via LIBS spectra. To validate this method, it has been applied on two previously measured groups of teeth enamel, the first is of ancient Egyptians, and the second from Nubians and Ugandans. The results support the usefulness of this method for similar real-life applications.

  12. Experimental measurement of dynamic fluid shear stress on the ventricular surface of the aortic valve leaflet

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve (AV) calcification is a highly prevalent disease with serious impact on mortality and morbidity. The exact causes and mechanisms of AV calcification are unclear, although previous studies suggest that mechanical forces play a role. It has been clinically demonstrated that calcification preferentially occurs on the aortic surface of the AV. This is hypothesized to be due to differences in the mechanical environments on the two sides of the valve. It is thus necessary to characterize fluid shear forces acting on both sides of the leaflet to test this hypothesis. The current study is one of two studies characterizing dynamic shear stress on both sides of the AV leaflets. In the current study, shear stresses on the ventricular surface of the AV leaflets were measured experimentally on two prosthetic AV models with transparent leaflets in an in vitro pulsatile flow loop using two-component Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). Experimental measurements were utilized to validate a theoretical model of AV ventricular surface shear stress based on the Womersley profile in a straight tube, with corrections for the opening angle of the valve leaflets. This theoretical model was applied to in vivo data based on MRI-derived volumetric flow rates and valve dimension obtained from the literature. Experimental results showed that ventricular surface shear stress was dominated by the streamwise component. The systolic shear stress waveform resembled a half-sinusoid during systole and peaks at 64–71 dyn/cm2, and reversed in direction at the end of systole for 15–25 ms, and reached a significant negative magnitude of 40–51 dyn/cm2. Shear stresses from the theoretical model applied to in vivo data showed that shear stresses peaked at 77–92 dyn/cm2 and reversed in direction for substantial period of time (108–110 ms) during late systole with peak negative shear stress of 35–38 dyn/cm2. PMID:21465260

  13. Design of an experimental apparatus for measurement of the surface tension of metastable fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinš, V.; Hrubý, J.; Hykl, J.; Blaha, J.; Šmíd, B.

    2013-04-01

    A unique experimental apparatus for measurement of the surface tension of aqueous mixtures has been designed, manufactured, and tested in our laboratory. The novelty of the setup is that it allows measurement of surface tension by two different methods: a modified capillary elevation method in a long vertical capillary tube and a method inspired by the approach of Hacker (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Technical Note 2510, 1-20, 1951), i.e. in a short horizontal capillary tube. Functionality of all main components of the apparatus, e.g., glass chamber with the capillary tube, temperature control unit consisting of two thermostatic baths with special valves for rapid temperature jumps, helium distribution setup allowing pressure variation above the liquid meniscus inside the capillary tube, has been successfully tested. Preliminary results for the surface tension of the stable and metastable supercooled water measured by the capillary elevation method at atmospheric pressure are provided. The surface tension of water measured at temperatures between +26 °C and -11 °C is in good agreement with the extrapolated IAPWS correlation (IAPWS Release on Surface Tension of Ordinary Water Substance, September 1994); however it disagrees with data by Hacker.

  14. A Wearable Thermometry for Core Body Temperature Measurement and Its Experimental Verification.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming; Tamura, Toshiyo; Tang, Zunyi; Chen, Wenxi; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2016-02-23

    A wearable thermometry for core body temperature (CBT) measurement has both healthcare and clinical applications. On the basis of the mechanism of bioheat transfer, we earlier designed and improved a wearable thermometry using the dualheat- flux method for CBT measurement. In this study, this thermometry is examined experimentally. We studied a fastchanging CBT measurement (FCCM, 55 min, 12 subjects) inside a thermostatic chamber and performed long-term monitoring of CBT (LTM, 24 h, 6 subjects). When compared with a reference, the CoreTemp CM-210 by Terumo, FCCM shows 0.07 °C average difference and a 95% CI of [-0.27, 0.12] °C. LTM shows no significant difference in parameters for the inference of circadian rhythm. The FCCM and LTM both simulated scenarios in which this thermometry could be used for intensive monitoring and daily healthcare, respectively. The results suggest that because of its convenient design, this thermometry may be an ideal choice for conventional CBT measurements.

  15. Experimental measurement of tympanic membrane response for finite element model validation of a human middle ear.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Tae-Soo; Baek, Moo-Jin; Lee, Dooho

    2013-01-01

    The middle ear consists of a tympanic membrane, ligaments, tendons, and three ossicles. An important function of the tympanic membrane is to deliver exterior sound stimulus to the ossicles and inner ear. In this study, the responses of the tympanic membrane in a human ear were measured and compared with those of a finite element model of the middle ear. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to measure the dynamic responses of the tympanic membrane, which had the measurement point on the cone of light of the tympanic membrane. The measured subjects were five Korean male adults and a cadaver. The tympanic membranes were stimulated using pure-tone sine waves at 18 center frequencies of one-third octave band over a frequency range of 200 Hz ~10 kHz with 60 and 80 dB sound pressure levels. The measured responses were converted into the umbo displacement transfer function (UDTF) with a linearity assumption. The measured UDTFs were compared with the calculated UDTFs using a finite element model for the Korean human middle ear. The finite element model of the middle ear consists of three ossicles, a tympanic membrane, ligaments, and tendons. In the finite element model, the umbo displacements were calculated under a unit sound pressure on the tympanic membrane. The UDTF of the finite element model exhibited good agreement with that of the experimental one in low frequency range, whereas in higher frequency band, the two response functions deviated from each other, which demonstrates that the finite element model should be updated with more accurate material properties and/or a frequency dependent material model.

  16. Experimental measurement of the near tip strain field in an iron-silicon single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shield, T. W.; Kim, K.-S.

    1994-05-01

    EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS are presented for the plastic deformation field near a crack (200 μm wide notch) tip in an iron-3% silicon single crystal. The specimen was loaded in four point bending and the measurements were made at zero load after extensive plastic deformation had occurred. Results are given for a crack on the (011) plane with its tip along the [01|T] direction. The surface deformation field was measured using moire microscopy and a grating on the specimen surface. The in-plane Almansi strain components have been obtained by digitally processing the moire fringes. A well-structured asymptotic field has been found at a distance of 350-500 μm from the notch tip, where the maximum plastic strain is about 9%. The asymptotic field is observed to be composed of many distinct angular sectors. Three (six symmetric) of these sectors are found to have approximately constant strains. In a fourth (two symmetric) sector, the surface strains are approximately 1/ r singular. Between these sectors there are interconnecting transition sectors. The location of the stress state on the yield surface and the active slip systems in each sector are identified by assuming that the plastic strain rates are normal to a Schmid law yield surface. The slip systems identified in this manner show excellent agreement with direct observations of the slip texture on the surface and dislocation etch pits in the interior of the specimen. The experimental strain measurements also show that the constant strain sectors are regions in which unloading occurs. Because of this unloading, the crack tip stress and deformation state is substantially different from an HRR type field which assumes proportional loading. This strong nonproportional loading is thought to be caused by the presence of material anisotropy. The nonproportional loading also provides a large amount of crack tip shielding that is evidence of a toughening mechanism that results from the presence of material anisotropy.

  17. Angular-divergence calculation for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak neutral beam injection ion source based on spectroscopic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Yuan; Hu, Chundong; Zhuang, Ge

    2014-02-15

    Calorimetric method has been primarily applied for several experimental campaigns to determine the angular divergence of high-current ion source for the neutral beam injection system on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). A Doppler shift spectroscopy has been developed to provide the secondary measurement of the angular divergence to improve the divergence measurement accuracy and for real-time and non-perturbing measurement. The modified calculation model based on the W7AS neutral beam injectors is adopted to accommodate the slot-type accelerating grids used in the EAST's ion source. Preliminary spectroscopic experimental results are presented comparable to the calorimetrically determined value of theoretical calculation.

  18. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  19. Fluid dynamic design and experimental study of an aspirated temperature measurement platform used in climate observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Qingquan; Dai, Wei; Ding, Renhui

    2016-08-01

    Due to the solar radiation effect, current air temperature sensors inside a thermometer screen or radiation shield may produce measurement errors that are 0.8 °C or higher. To improve the observation accuracy, an aspirated temperature measurement platform is designed. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is implemented to analyze and calculate the radiation error of the aspirated temperature measurement platform under various environmental conditions. Then, a radiation error correction equation is obtained by fitting the CFD results using a genetic algorithm (GA) method. In order to verify the performance of the temperature sensor, the aspirated temperature measurement platform, temperature sensors with a naturally ventilated radiation shield, and a thermometer screen are characterized in the same environment to conduct the intercomparison. The average radiation errors of the sensors in the naturally ventilated radiation shield and the thermometer screen are 0.44 °C and 0.25 °C, respectively. In contrast, the radiation error of the aspirated temperature measurement platform is as low as 0.05 °C. This aspirated temperature sensor allows the radiation error to be reduced by approximately 88.6% compared to the naturally ventilated radiation shield, and allows the error to be reduced by a percentage of approximately 80% compared to the thermometer screen. The mean absolute error and root mean square error between the correction equation and experimental results are 0.032 °C and 0.036 °C, respectively, which demonstrates the accuracy of the CFD and GA methods proposed in this research.

  20. Fluid dynamic design and experimental study of an aspirated temperature measurement platform used in climate observation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Qingquan; Dai, Wei; Ding, Renhui

    2016-08-01

    Due to the solar radiation effect, current air temperature sensors inside a thermometer screen or radiation shield may produce measurement errors that are 0.8 °C or higher. To improve the observation accuracy, an aspirated temperature measurement platform is designed. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is implemented to analyze and calculate the radiation error of the aspirated temperature measurement platform under various environmental conditions. Then, a radiation error correction equation is obtained by fitting the CFD results using a genetic algorithm (GA) method. In order to verify the performance of the temperature sensor, the aspirated temperature measurement platform, temperature sensors with a naturally ventilated radiation shield, and a thermometer screen are characterized in the same environment to conduct the intercomparison. The average radiation errors of the sensors in the naturally ventilated radiation shield and the thermometer screen are 0.44 °C and 0.25 °C, respectively. In contrast, the radiation error of the aspirated temperature measurement platform is as low as 0.05 °C. This aspirated temperature sensor allows the radiation error to be reduced by approximately 88.6% compared to the naturally ventilated radiation shield, and allows the error to be reduced by a percentage of approximately 80% compared to the thermometer screen. The mean absolute error and root mean square error between the correction equation and experimental results are 0.032 °C and 0.036 °C, respectively, which demonstrates the accuracy of the CFD and GA methods proposed in this research.

  1. Experimental measurement of Au M-band flux in indirectly-driven double-shell implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H F; Perry, T S; Park, H S; Amendt, P; Sorce, C M; Compton, S M; Campbell, K M; Knauer, J P

    2004-09-17

    Indirectly-driven double-shell implosions are being investigated as a possible noncryogenic path to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In recent double-shell implosions, the inner shell trajectory was shown to exhibit a strong sensitivity to the temporal history of the M-band (2-5 keV) radiation emitted from the Au hohlraum wall. A large time-dependent discrepancy was observed between measurement and simulation of the x-ray flux in this range. In order to better characterize the radiation environment seen in these implosions, an experimental campaign was conducted on the Omega Laser. A number of diagnostics were used to measure both the temporal and spectral nature of the M-band flux. Results were obtained from an absolutely calibrated 12 channel filtered x-ray diode array (Dante) as well as two streaked crystal spectrometers and an absolutely calibrated time-integrated spectrometer (Henway). X-ray backlighting was also used to directly measure the effect of M-band radiation on the trajectory of the inner shell. The data from all diagnostics are shown to be in excellent agreement and provide a consistent picture of the M-band flux. These results are being used to improve the simulation of hohlraum-generated M-band radiation that will be necessary for the design of future double-shell implosions employing higher Z inner shells.

  2. Experimental measurement of Au M-band flux in indirectly-driven double-shell implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H F; Perry, T S; Park, H S; Amendt, P; Sorce, C M; Compton, S M; Campbell, K M; Knauer, J P

    2005-03-24

    Indirectly-driven double-shell implosions are being investigated as a possible noncryogenic path to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In recent double-shell experiments, the inner shell trajectory was shown to exhibit a strong sensitivity to the temporal history of the M-band (2-5 keV) radiation emitted from the Au hohlraum wall. A large time-dependent discrepancy was observed between measurement and simulation of the x-ray flux in this range. In order to better characterize the radiation environment seen in these implosions, an experimental campaign was conducted on the Omega Laser. A number of diagnostics were used to measure both the temporal and spectral nature of the M-band flux. Results were obtained from an absolutely calibrated 12 channel filtered x-ray diode array (Dante) as well as two streaked crystal spectrometers and an absolutely calibrated time-integrated spectrometer (Henway). X-ray backlighting was also used to directly measure the effect of M-band radiation on the trajectory of the inner shell. The data from all diagnostics are shown to be in excellent agreement and provide a consistent picture of the M-band flux. These results are being used to constrain and improve the simulation of hohlraum-generated M-band radiation that will be necessary for the design of future double-shell implosions employing higher-Z inner shells.

  3. Comparison of Experimentally Measured Rayleigh-Taylor Growth to Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauer, J. P.; Verdon, C. P.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    1997-11-01

    Experimental measurements of perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability at the ablation interface have been used to try to understand the physical processes involved in ablative stabilization. The growth rate calculated from a dispersion relation and values for the acceleration and ablation velocity determined by a numerical simulation are compared to a growth rate from an experiment where the numerical simulation includes the correct ablation interface physics. Planar targets with initial perturbations of 20-, 31-, and 60- μ*m wavelengths and initial amplitudes of 0.5 μ*m have been accelerated. The analysis shows that the growth rate determined from an x-ray radiograph of the planar foil should not be compared with the results from a dispersion formula that calculates the spatial development of the perturbation. The ORCHID* simulation indicates a significant modification to the density distribution so that the measurement of ρΔ*x* does not reflect the evolution of Δ*x*. The amplitude of a perturbation measured as ρΔ*x* can be characterized as a=a0 ^**e^γ*^t*+c*, where a_0* is the initial amplitude, γ* is the growth rate, and c is a slowly varying function of time. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  4. Experimental investigation on mass flow rate measurements using fibre Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thekkethil, S. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Neumann, H.; Ramalingam, R.

    2017-02-01

    Flow measurement and control of cryogens is one of the major requirements of systems such as superconductor magnets for fusion reactors, MRI magnets etc. They can act as an early diagnostic tool for detection of any faults and ensure correct distribution of cooling load while also accessing thermal performance of the devices. Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors provide compact and accurate measurement systems which have added advantages such as immunity towards electrical and magnetic interference, low attenuation losses and remote sensing. This paper summarizes the initial experimental investigations and calibration of a novel FBG based mass flow meter. This design utilizes the viscous drag due to the flow to induce a bending strain on the fibre. The strain experienced by the fibre will be proportional to the flowrate and can be measured in terms of Bragg wavelength shift. The flowmeter is initially tested at atmospheric conditions using helium. The results are summarized and the performance parameters of the sensor are estimated. The results were also compared to a numerical model and further results for liquid helium is also reported. An overall sensitivity of 29 pm.(g.s-1)-1 was obtained for a helium flow, with a resolution of 0.2 g.s-1. A hysteresis error of 8 pm was also observed during load-unload cycles. The sensor is suitable for further tests using cryogens.

  5. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; ...

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, andmore » presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.« less

  6. Advanced Experimental Methods for Low-temperature Magnetotransport Measurement of Novel Materials.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Joseph A; Le, Son T; Richter, Curt A; Seiler, David G

    2016-01-21

    Novel electronic materials are often produced for the first time by synthesis processes that yield bulk crystals (in contrast to single crystal thin film synthesis) for the purpose of exploratory materials research. Certain materials pose a challenge wherein the traditional bulk Hall bar device fabrication method is insufficient to produce a measureable device for sample transport measurement, principally because the single crystal size is too small to attach wire leads to the sample in a Hall bar configuration. This can be, for example, because the first batch of a new material synthesized yields very small single crystals or because flakes of samples of one to very few monolayers are desired. In order to enable rapid characterization of materials that may be carried out in parallel with improvements to their growth methodology, a method of device fabrication for very small samples has been devised to permit the characterization of novel materials as soon as a preliminary batch has been produced. A slight variation of this methodology is applicable to producing devices using exfoliated samples of two-dimensional materials such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), as well as multilayer heterostructures of such materials. Here we present detailed protocols for the experimental device fabrication of fragments and flakes of novel materials with micron-sized dimensions onto substrate and subsequent measurement in a commercial superconducting magnet, dry helium close-cycle cryostat magnetotransport system at temperatures down to 0.300 K and magnetic fields up to 12 T.

  7. Time-Resolved In Situ Measurements During Rapid Alloy Solidification: Experimental Insight for Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Zweiacker, Kai; Liu, Can; Coughlin, Daniel R.; Clarke, Amy J.; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Gibbs, John W.; Roehling, John D.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Tourret, Damien; Wiezorek, Jörg M. K.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2016-01-27

    In research and industrial environments, additive manufacturing (AM) of metals and alloys is becoming a pervasive technology, though significant challenges remain before widespread implementation of AM can be realized. In situ investigations of rapid alloy solidification with high spatial and temporal resolutions can provide unique experimental insight into microstructure evolution and kinetics that are relevant for AM processing. Hypoeutectic thin-film Al–Cu and Al–Si alloys were investigated using dynamic transmission electron microscopy to monitor pulsed-laser-induced rapid solidification across microsecond timescales. Solid–liquid interface velocities measured from time-resolved images revealed accelerating solidification fronts in both alloys. We observed microstructure evolution, solidification product, and presence of a morphological instability at the solid–liquid interface in the Al–4 at.%Cu alloy are related to the measured interface velocities and small differences in composition that affect the thermophysical properties of the alloys. These time-resolved in situ measurements can inform and validate predictive modeling efforts for AM.

  8. Measurement of the ratio of hydrogen to deuterium at the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Jong-Gu; Wang, Son Jong; Kim, Sun Ho; Park, Jae Min; Na, Hoon Kyun

    2010-10-15

    The control of the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is one of the very important issues for ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) minority heating as well as the plasma wall interaction in the tokamak. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium during the tokamak shot was deduced from the emission spectroscopy measurements during the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign. Graphite tiles were used for the plasma facing components (PFCs) at KSTAR and its surface area exposed to the plasma was about 11 m{sup 2}. The data showed that it remained as high as around 50% during the campaign period because graphite tiles were exposed to the air for about two months and the hydrogen contents at the tiles are not fully pumped out due to the lack of baking on the PFC in the 2009 campaign. The validation of the spectroscopy method was checked by using the Zeeman effects and the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is compared with results from the residual gas analysis. During the tokamak shot, the ratio is low below 10% initially and saturated after around 1 s. When there is a hydrogen injection to the vessel via ion cyclotron wall conditioning and the boronization process where the carbone is used, the ratio of the hydrogen to the deuterium is increased by up to 100% and it recovers to around 50% after one day of operation. However it does not decrease below 50% at the end of the experimental campaign. It was found that the full baking on the PFC (with a high temperature and sufficient vacuum pumping) is required for the ratio control which guarantees the efficient ICRF heating at the KSTAR 2010 experimental campaign.

  9. Measurement of the ratio of hydrogen to deuterium at the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jong-Gu; Wang, Son Jong; Kim, Sun Ho; Park, Jae Min; Na, Hoon Kyun

    2010-10-01

    The control of the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is one of the very important issues for ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) minority heating as well as the plasma wall interaction in the tokamak. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium during the tokamak shot was deduced from the emission spectroscopy measurements during the KSTAR 2009 experimental campaign. Graphite tiles were used for the plasma facing components (PFCs) at KSTAR and its surface area exposed to the plasma was about 11 m(2). The data showed that it remained as high as around 50% during the campaign period because graphite tiles were exposed to the air for about two months and the hydrogen contents at the tiles are not fully pumped out due to the lack of baking on the PFC in the 2009 campaign. The validation of the spectroscopy method was checked by using the Zeeman effects and the ratio of hydrogen to the deuterium is compared with results from the residual gas analysis. During the tokamak shot, the ratio is low below 10% initially and saturated after around 1 s. When there is a hydrogen injection to the vessel via ion cyclotron wall conditioning and the boronization process where the carbone is used, the ratio of the hydrogen to the deuterium is increased by up to 100% and it recovers to around 50% after one day of operation. However it does not decrease below 50% at the end of the experimental campaign. It was found that the full baking on the PFC (with a high temperature and sufficient vacuum pumping) is required for the ratio control which guarantees the efficient ICRF heating at the KSTAR 2010 experimental campaign.

  10. Improved experimental model for measuring skin degerming activity on the human hand.

    PubMed

    Michaud, R N; McGrath, M B; Goss, W A

    1972-07-01

    A gloved-hand method is presented for evaluating the interaction of antimicrobial agents with the normal resident bacterial flora of human skin. One of the key features of the experimental model is a simplified technique for sampling the skin, which involves the addition of eluting fluid to the gloved hand. As with other skin sampling techniques, the number of bacteria recovered from the hands showed considerable variation from subject to subject. However, no significant differences were observed between the numbers of bacteria recovered from the right and left hands of individual subjects. The mean number of bacteria recovered from the hand before and after washing with nonmedicated soap was consistent and reproducible over a period of at least 5 consecutive days. The number of recoverable bacteria from the hand was greatly reduced by a single treatment with a surgical scrub preparation containing hexachlorophene. The extent of skin degerming achieved was little affected by the use of a surgical brush, and was maximal at approximately 30 min after contact with the hexachlorophene-containing formulation. It was determined that the level of transient bacteria on the hands could be controlled by a simple wash with nonmedicated soap, resulting in a stabilized base-line level from which treatment interactions with the resident microflora could be measured more precisely. The basic elements of the method presented fulfill the requirements of a satisfactory experimental model for the in vivo evaluation of skin-degerming agents on the hand. The selection of appropriate experimental designs allows treatment comparisons to be made with a high degree of statistical confidence.

  11. Analysis of the laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process through experimental measurement and finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Alexander Jay

    The objective in this work is to provide rigourous experimental measurements to aid in the development of laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) additive manufacturing (AM). A specialized enclosed instrumented measurement system is designed to provide in situ experimental measurements of temperature and distortion. Experiments include comparisons of process parameters, materials and LPBF machines. In situ measurements of distortion and temperature made throughout the build process highlight inter-layer distortion effects previously undocumented for laser powder bed fusion. Results from these experiments are also be implemented in the development and validation of finite element models of the powder bed build process. Experimental analysis is extended from small-scale to larger part-scale builds where experimental post-build measurements are used in analysis of distortion profiles. Experimental results provided from this study are utilized in the validation of a finite element model capable of simulating production scale parts. The validated finite element model is then implemented in the analysis of the part to provide information regarding the distortion evolution process. A combination of experimental measurements and simulation results are used to identify the mechanism that results in the measured distortion profile for this geometry. Optimization of support structure primarily focuses on the minimization of material use and scan time, but no information regarding failure criteria for support structure is available. Tensile test samples of LPBF built support structure are designed, built, and tested to provide measurements of mechanical properties of the support structure. Experimental tests show that LPBF built support structure has only 30-40% of the ultimate tensile strength of solid material built in the same machine. Experimental measurement of LPBF built support structure provides clear failure criteria to be utilized in the future design and implementation of

  12. Experimental Measurements and Density Functional Theory Calculations of Continuum Lowering in Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, Sam

    2014-10-01

    An accurate description of the ionization potential depression (IPD) of ions in plasmas due to their interaction with the environment is a fundamental problem in plasma physics, playing a key role in determining the ionization balance, charge state distribution, opacity and plasma equation of state. Here I present the first experimental investigation of the IPD as a function of ionic charge state in a range of dense Mg, Al and Si plasmas, using the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. The measurements show significantly larger IPDs than are predicted by the most commonly used models, such as that of Stewart-Pyatt, or the ion-sphere model of Zimmerman-More. Instead, plasma simulations using finite-temperature density functional theory with excited-state projector augmented-wave potentials show excellent agreement with the experimental results and explain the stronger-than-expected continuum lowering through the electronic structure of the valence states in these strong-coupling conditions, which retain much of their atomic characteristics close to the ion core regions. These results have a profound impact on the understanding and modelling of plasmas over a wide range of warm- and hot-dense matter conditions.

  13. Characterizing Molecular Structure by Combining Experimental Measurements with Density Functional Theory Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Encarnacion, Juan M.

    2016-06-01

    In this talk, the power and synergy of combining experimental measurements with density functional theory computations as a single tool to unambiguously characterize the molecular structure of complex atomic systems is shown. Here, we bring three beautiful cases where the interaction between the experiment and theory is in very good agreement for both finite and extended systems: 1) Characterizing Metal Coordination Environments in Porous Organic Polymers: A Joint Density Functional Theory and Experimental Infrared Spectroscopy Study 2) Characterization of Rhenium Compounds Obtained by Electrochemical Synthesis After Aging Process and 3) Infrared Study of H(D)2 + Co4+ Chemical Reaction: Characterizing Molecular Structures. J.M. López-Encarnación, K.K. Tanabe, M.J.A. Johnson, J. Jellinek, Chemistry-A European Journal 19 (41), 13646-13651 A. Vargas-Uscategui, E. Mosquera, J.M. López-Encarnación, B. Chornik, R. S. Katiyar, L. Cifuentes, Journal of Solid State Chemistry 220, 17-21

  14. Experimental Sonic Boom Measurements on a Mach 1.6 Cruise Low-Boom Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Elmiligui, Alaa, A.; Wayman, Thomas R.; Waithe, Kenrick A.; Howe, Donald C.; Bangert, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    A wind tunnel test has been conducted by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation (GAC) to measure the sonic boom pressure signature of a low boom Mach 1.6 cruise business jet in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers 1.60 and 1.80. Through a cooperative agreement between GAC and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), GAC provided NASA access to some of the experimental data and NASA is publishing these data for the sonic boom research community. On-track and off-track near field sonic boom pressure signatures were acquired at three separation distances (0.5, 1.2, and 1.7 reference body lengths) and three angles of attack (-0.26deg, 0.26deg, and 0.68deg). The model was blade mounted to minimize the sting effects on the sonic boom signatures. Although no extensive data analysis is provided, selected data are plotted to illustrate salient features of the data. All of the experimental sonic boom pressure data are tabulated. Schlieren images of the configuration are also included.

  15. Decreased measures of experimental anxiety in rats bred for high alcohol preference.

    PubMed

    Möller, C; Wiklund, L; Thorsell, A; Hyytiä, P; Heilig, M

    1997-06-01

    A prevalent notion holds that acute anti-anxiety actions of ethanol are important for the reinforcing properties of this drug, and might predispose individuals with pre-existing anxiety disorders for developing ethanol dependence. This notion remains controversial, and human studies have yielded conflicting results. Ethanol dependence is likely a heterogenous disorder, and the discrepancies might be explained by a different relationship between anxiety and alcohol reinforcement in different subtypes of alcoholism. Recent results in experimental animals suggest that antianxiety actions of ethanol are important reinforcers of voluntary ethanol consumption in heterogeneous rats. Here, we examined whether the relationship is different in the AA line of rats bred for high voluntary ethanol intake. Behavior was studied in two established animal models of anxiety, a punished drinking conflict test, and the elevated plus maze. In the conflict test, the AA line displayed a markedly disinhibited behavior over a range of shock intensities, compared both with their counterpart, the ANA line, and with regular Wistar rats. On the plus maze, both AA and Wistar rats showed lower measures of experimental anxiety than ANA subjects. The phenotype of the animals was confirmed using a two-bottle free choice alcohol drinking procedure. The disinhibited behavior and spontaneous ethanol preference of the AA line differs from what has been found in heterogeneous rats, and displays similarities to genetically transmitted type II alcoholism according to the nomenclature of Cloninger.

  16. An Experimental Method for Measuring Water Droplet Impingement Efficiency on Two- and Three-dimensional Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Zumwalt, G. W.; Elangonan, R.; Freund, G. A., Jr.; Breer, M.; Whitmer, L.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental method was developed to determine the droplet impingement characteristics on 2-D and 3-D bodies. The experimental results provide the essential droplet impingement data required to validate water droplet trajectory codes, which are used in the analysis of aircraft icing. A body, whose water droplet impingement characteristics are required, is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper, and is exposed to an air stream containing a water dye solution spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips, using an automated reflectometer. Models tested include a 4-inch diameter cylinder, a NACA 652015 airfoil section, a MS(1)-0317 supercritical airfoil section, three simulated ice shapes, an axisymmetric inlet and a Boeing 737-300 inlet model. Detailed descriptions of the dye tracer technique, instrumentation, data reduction method and the results obtained are presented. Analytical predictions of collection efficiency characteristics for most test configurations are included for comparison.

  17. A New Differential Pressure Flow Meter for Measurement of Human Breath Flow: Simulation and Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, Devon; Tsow, Francis; Xian, Xiaojun; Forzani, Erica

    2016-03-01

    The development and performance characterization of a new differential pressure-based flow meter for human breath measurements is presented in this article. The device, called a "Confined Pitot Tube," is comprised of a pipe with an elliptically shaped expansion cavity located in the pipe center, and an elliptical disk inside the expansion cavity. The elliptical disk, named Pitot Tube, is exchangeable, and has different diameters, which are smaller than the diameter of the elliptical cavity. The gap between the disk and the cavity allows the flow of human breath to pass through. The disk causes an obstruction in the flow inside the pipe, but the elliptical cavity provides an expansion for the flow to circulate around the disk, decreasing the overall flow resistance. We characterize the new sensor flow experimentally and theoretically, using Comsol Multiphysics(®) software with laminar and turbulent models. We also validate the sensor, using inhalation and exhalation tests and a reference method.

  18. Schottky Mass Measurements of Cooled Proton-Rich Nuclei at the GSI Experimental Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Radon, T.; Schlitt, B.; Beckert, K.; Bosch, F.; Eickhoff, H.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Hausmann, M.; Irnich, H.; Klepper, O.; Kluge, H.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kraus, G.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nickel, F.; Nolden, F.; Patyk, Z.; Reich, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schwab, W.; Steck, M.; Suemmerer, K.; Kerscher, T.; Beha, T.; Loebner, K.E.; Fujita, Y.; Jung, H.C.; Wollnik, H.; Novikov, Y.

    1997-06-01

    High-precision mass measurements of proton-rich isotopes in the range of 60{le}Z{le}84 were performed using the novel technique of Schottky spectrometry. Projectile fragments produced by {sup 209}Bi ions at 930{ital A} MeV were separated with the magnetic spectrometer FRS and stored and cooled in the experimental storage ring (ESR). A typical mass resolving power of 350000 and a precision of 100keV were achieved in the region A{approx}200 . Masses of members of {alpha} chains linked by precise Q{sub {alpha}} values but not yet connected to the known masses were determined. In this way it is concluded that {sup 201}Fr and {sup 197}At are proton unbound. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Prediction and experimental measurement of the electromagnetic thrust generated by a microwave thruster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Wang, Yu-Quan; Ma, Yan-Jie; Li, Peng-Fei; Yang, Le; Wang, Yang; He, Guo-Qiang

    2013-05-01

    A microwave thruster system that can convert microwave power directly to thrust without a gas propellant is developed. In the system, a cylindrical tapered resonance cavity and a magnetron microwave source are used respectively as the thruster cavity and the energy source to generate the electromagnetic wave. The wave is radiated into and then reflected from the cavity to form a pure standing wave with non-uniform electromagnetic pressure distribution. Consequently, a net electromagnetic thrust exerted on the axis of the thruster cavity appears, which is demonstrated through theoretical calculation based on the electromagnetic theory. The net electromagnetic thrust is also experimentally measured in the range from 70 mN to 720 mN when the microwave output power is from 80 W to 2500 W.

  20. Comparison of Numerically Simulated and Experimentally Measured Performance of a Rotating Detonation Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Fotia, Matthew L.; Hoke, John; Schauer, Fred

    2015-01-01

    A quasi-two-dimensional, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation of a rotating detonation engine (RDE) is described. The simulation operates in the detonation frame of reference and utilizes a relatively coarse grid such that only the essential primary flow field structure is captured. This construction and other simplifications yield rapidly converging, steady solutions. Viscous effects, and heat transfer effects are modeled using source terms. The effects of potential inlet flow reversals are modeled using boundary conditions. Results from the simulation are compared to measured data from an experimental RDE rig with a converging-diverging nozzle added. The comparison is favorable for the two operating points examined. The utility of the code as a performance optimization tool and a diagnostic tool are discussed.

  1. Experimental asymmetric plug-and-play measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guang-Zhao; Sun, Shi-Hai; Xu, Feihu; Chen, Huan; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2016-09-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) is immune to all security loopholes on detection. Previous experiments on MDI-QKD required spatially separated signal lasers and complicated stabilization systems. In this paper, we perform a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of plug-and-play MDI-QKD over an asymmetric channel setting with a single signal laser in which the whole system is automatically stabilized in spectrum, polarization, arrival time, and phase reference. Both the signal laser and the single-photon detectors are in the possession of a common server. A passive timing-calibration technique is applied to ensure the precise and stable overlap of signal pulses. The results pave the way for the realization of a quantum network in which the users only need the encoding devices.

  2. Real-time measurements of D/log-E curves in holographic emulsions: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fimia, Antonio; Blaya-Escarre, Salvador; Carretero-Lopez, Luis; Madrigal, Roque F.; Mallavia, Ricardo M.

    1999-03-01

    The response curve D-Log E is the most important method to characterize photographic emulsions. In this work we present the experimental study using a real time technique that can be applied to the improvement of the holographic properties of emulsions. We have exposured an Agfa Gevaert 8E56HD emulsion with an Argon laser tuned at 514 nm. After it, we measured the transmittance curve when the emulsion was into the developer bath function of time at 20 degrees Celsius. This method gives us the possibility of study the dynamics of different developers as a function of the storage energy. It also provides a way to optimize the composition of developers function of the chemical composition, temperature and other secondary factors as superaditivity and non-linear processes.

  3. Experimental measurement of binding energy, selectivity, and allostery using fluctuation theorems.

    PubMed

    Camunas-Soler, Joan; Alemany, Anna; Ritort, Felix

    2017-01-27

    Thermodynamic bulk measurements of binding reactions rely on the validity of the law of mass action and the assumption of a dilute solution. Yet, important biological systems such as allosteric ligand-receptor binding, macromolecular crowding, or misfolded molecules may not follow these assumptions and may require a particular reaction model. Here we introduce a fluctuation theorem for ligand binding and an experimental approach using single-molecule force spectroscopy to determine binding energies, selectivity, and allostery of nucleic acids and peptides in a model-independent fashion. A similar approach could be used for proteins. This work extends the use of fluctuation theorems beyond unimolecular folding reactions, bridging the thermodynamics of small systems and the basic laws of chemical equilibrium.

  4. Experimental measurements of ultrasonic propagation velocity and attenuation in a magnetic fluid.

    PubMed

    Motozawa, M; Iizuka, Y; Sawada, T

    2008-05-21

    The ultrasonic propagation velocity and attenuation in a magnetic fluid subjected to magnetic field are measured precisely. Various characteristic properties of ultrasonic propagation in magnetic fluid such as hysteresis and anisotropy are observed. These results show that the ultrasonic propagation velocity and attenuation are dependent upon the intensity and the length of time for which the magnetic field is applied. When the magnetic field is applied, some of the magnetic particles in the magnetic fluid form clustering structures that influence ultrasonic propagation in a magnetic fluid. Our results indicate that the inner structure of a magnetic fluid can be analysed experimentally and we discuss the application of this non-contact inspection of the clustering structures in a magnetic fluid by ultrasonic techniques.

  5. Experimental measurement of cooling tower emissions using image processing of sensitive papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, J.; Kaiser, A. S.; Ballesta, M.; Gil, A.; Lucas, M.

    2013-04-01

    Cooling tower emissions are harmful for several reasons such as air polluting, wetting, icing and solid particle deposition, but mainly due to human health hazards (i.e. Legionella). There are several methods for measuring drift drops. This paper is focussed on the sensitive paper technique, which is suitable in low drift scenarios and real conditions. The lack of an automatic classification method motivated the development of a digital image process algorithm for the Sensitive Paper method. This paper presents a detailed description of this method, in which, drop-like elements are identified by means of the Canny edge detector combined with some morphological operations. Afterwards, the application of a J48 decision tree is proposed as one of the most relevant contributions. This classification method allows us to discern between stains whose origin is a drop and stains whose origin is not a drop. The method is applied to a real case and results are presented in terms of drift and PM10 emissions. This involves the calculation of the main features of the droplet distribution at the cooling tower exit surface in terms of drop size distribution data, cumulative mass distribution curve and characteristic drop diameters. The Log-normal and the Rosin-Rammler distribution functions have been fitted to the experimental data collected in the tests and it can been concluded that the first one is the most suitable for experimental data among the functions tested (whereas the second one is less suitable). Realistic PM10 calculations include the measurement of drift emissions and Total Dissolved Solids as well as the size and number of drops. Results are compared to the method proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency assessing its overestimation. Drift emissions have found to be 0.0517% of the recirculating water, which is over the Spanish standards limit (0.05%).

  6. Electrodermal responses to implied versus actual violence on television.

    PubMed

    Kalamas, A D; Gruber, M L

    1998-01-01

    The electrodermal response (EDR) of children watching a violent show was measured. Particular attention was paid to the type of violence (actual or implied) that prompted an EDR. In addition, the impact of the auditory component (sounds associated with violence) of the show was evaluated. Implied violent stimuli, such as the villain's face, elicited the strongest EDR. The elements that elicited the weakest responses were the actual violent stimuli, such as stabbing. The background noise and voices of the sound track enhanced the total number of EDRs. The results suggest that implied violence may elicit more fear (as measured by EDRs) than actual violence does and that sounds alone contribute significantly to the emotional response to television violence. One should not, therefore, categorically assume that a show with mostly actual violence evokes less fear than one with mostly implied violence.

  7. Numerical modeling and experimental measurement of the thermal and mechanical properties of packed beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zi

    2000-10-01

    The goal of this work is to understand and obtain fundamental data on the thermal and mechanical behavior of a packed bed in the solid breeder blanket configuration. This is fulfilled through the following separate, but related efforts: First, a 3D micro-mechanics model was developed to simulate the mechanical behavior of packed beds for different initial packing, particle size, normal stiffness, shear stiffness, friction coefficient, and coefficient of thermal expansion. The simulations indicate the following: (1) The stress-strain relationships of packed beds are non-linear. A portion of the deformation comes from the rearrangement of particles. (2) With a large friction coefficient, the packed bed behaves more like a solid. Conversely, for a small friction coefficient, the packed bed behaves more like a fluid. (3) An increase in the range of particle sizes leads to a decrease in stress and a lower effective deformation modulus. (4) The calculated deformation modulus is 2--3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of solid material and compares reasonably well with experimental data. Second, a 3D micro-scale model was developed to predict the effective thermal conductivity of a packed bed based on the information of the bed microstructure, contact force, contact area, solid phase, gas phase, and radiation effects. The results indicate the following: (1) The effective thermal conductivity of metal beds could increase by a factor of 2--4 over a relatively small range of applied load (˜1MPa), which is mainly due to the increased interface contact conductance. (2) Under anisotropic load, a packed bed displays anisotropic behavior---different thermal conductivity along different directions, despite the initial packing being isotropic. (3) Good agreement was achieved between the model predictions and the experimental results that the author found in the literature. Finally, a benchmark test article was constructed to measure the thermal stress induced by the thermal

  8. Experimental flight test vibration measurements and nondestructive inspection on a USCG HC-130H aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. G.; Jones, C. R.; Mihelic, J. E.; Barnes, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents results of experimental flight test vibration measurements and structural inspections performed by the Federal Aviation Administration's Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) at Sandia National Laboratories and the US Coast Guard Aircraft Repair and Supply Center (ARSC). Structural and aerodynamic changes induced by mounting a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) system on a USCG HC-130H aircraft are described. The FLIR adversely affected the air flow characteristics and structural vibration on the external skin of the aircraft's right main wheel well fairing. Upon initial discovery of skin cracking and visual observation of skin vibration in flight by the FLIR, a baseline flight without the FLIR was conducted and compared to other measurements with the FLIR installed. Nondestructive inspection procedures were developed to detect cracks in the skin and supporting structural elements and document the initial structural condition of the aircraft. Inspection results and flight test vibration data revealed that the FLIR created higher than expected flight loading and was the possible source of the skin cracking. The Coast Guard performed significant structural repair and enhancement on this aircraft, and additional in-flight vibration measurements were collected on the strengthened area both with and without the FLIR installed. After three months of further operational FLIR usage, the new aircraft skin with the enhanced structural modification was reinspected and found to be free of flaws. Additional US Coast Guard HC-130H aircraft are now being similarly modified to accommodate this FLIR system. Measurements of in- flight vibration levels with and without the FLIR installed, and both before and after the structural enhancement and repair were conducted on the skin and supporting structure in the aircraft's right main wheel fairing. Inspection results and techniques developed to verify the aircraft's structural integrity are discussed.

  9. Experimental flight test vibration measurements and nondestructive inspection on a USCG HC-130H aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.G.; Jones, C.R.; Mihelic, J.E.; Barnes, J.D.

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents results of experimental flight test vibration measurements and structural inspections performed by the Federal Aviation Administration`s Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) at Sandia National Laboratories and the US Coast Guard Aircraft Repair and Supply Center (ARSC). Structural and aerodynamic changes induced by mounting a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) system on a USCG HC-130H aircraft are described. The FLIR adversely affected the air flow characteristics and structural vibration on the external skin of the aircraft`s right main wheel well fairing. Upon initial discovery of skin cracking and visual observation of skin vibration in flight by the FLIR, a baseline flight without the FLIR was conducted and compared to other measurements with the FLIR installed. Nondestructive inspection procedures were developed to detect cracks in the skin and supporting structural elements and document the initial structural condition of the aircraft. Inspection results and flight test vibration data revealed that the FLIR created higher than expected flight loading and was the possible source of the skin cracking. The Coast Guard performed significant structural repair and enhancement on this aircraft, and additional in-flight vibration measurements were collected on the strengthened area both with and without the FLIR installed. After three months of further operational FLIR usage, the new aircraft skin with the enhanced structural modification was reinspected and found to be free of flaws. Additional US Coast Guard HC-130H aircraft are now being similarly modified to accommodate this FLIR system. Measurements of in-flight vibration levels with and without the FLIR installed, and both before and after the structural enhancement and repair were conducted on the skin and supporting structure in the aircraft`s right main wheel fairing. Inspection results and techniques developed to verify the aircraft`s structural integrity are discussed.

  10. Modeling and experimental measurements of thermodynamic properties of natural gas mixtures and their components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Osorio, Martin Alonso

    Chemical process design requires mathematical models for predicting thermophysical properties. Those models, called equations of state (EoS), need experimental data for parameter estimation and validation. This work presents a detailed description of a vibrating tube densimeter, which is an alternative technique for measurement of p-rho-T data in gases at critical conditions. This apparatus can measure fluids in a temperature range of 300 K to 470 K and pressures up to 140 MPa. This work calibrates the vibrating tube using a physical-based methodology with nitrogen, methane and argon measurements. Carbon dioxide and ethane p-rho-T data validate calibration procedures covering a wide range in density and pressure. The vibrating tube densimeter performs density measurements for nitrogen + methane mixtures for pressures up to 140 MPa. This work also presents a new equation of state (EoS) having a rational form that can describe properties with accuracy comparable to the best multi-parametric equations with less mathematical complexity. This EoS presents the Helmholtz residual energy as a ratio of two polynomial functions in density (no exponential terms in density are included), which can describe the behavior of pure components. The EoS can be transformed to describe other thermophysical properties as pressure, compressibility factor, heat capacity and speed of sound. Also this equation can calculate saturated liquid-vapor properties with 20 times less computational time. This work presents rational EoS for nitrogen, argon and methane applicable in wide ranges of pressure and temperature. Finally, this work proposes a new mixing rule for binary mixtures of gases based upon a quadratic combination of residual Helmholtz energy. This approach divides the energy contribution between interactions of same species and interaction of different species molecules. A rational form is proposed for description of energy interaction between molecules of different species. The

  11. Calibration of aero-structural reduced order models using full-field experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, R.; Bartram, G.; Beberniss, T.; Wiebe, R.; Spottswood, S. M.

    2017-03-01

    The structural response of hypersonic aircraft panels is a multi-disciplinary problem, where the nonlinear structural dynamics, aerodynamics, and heat transfer models are coupled. A clear understanding of the impact of high-speed flow effects on the structural response, and the potential influence of the structure on the local environment, is needed in order to prevent the design of overly-conservative structures, a common problem in past hypersonic programs. The current work investigates these challenges from a structures perspective. To this end, the first part of this investigation looks at the modeling of the response of a rectangular panel to an external heating source (thermo-structural coupling) where the temperature effect on the structure is obtained from forward looking infrared (FLIR) measurements and the displacement via 3D-digital image correlation (DIC). The second part of the study uses data from a previous series of wind-tunnel experiments, performed to investigate the response of a compliant panel to the effects of high-speed flow, to train a pressure surrogate model. In this case, the panel aero-loading is obtained from fast-response pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurements, both directly and from the pressure surrogate model. The result of this investigation is the use of full-field experimental measurements to update the structural model and train a computational efficient model of the loading environment. The use of reduced order models, informed by these full-field physical measurements, is a significant step toward the development of accurate simulation models of complex structures that are computationally tractable.

  12. Determination of calibration constants for the hole-drilling residual stress measurement technique applied to orthotropic composites. II - Experimental evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, C. B.; Prabhakaran, R.; Tompkins, S.

    1987-01-01

    The first step in the extension of the semidestructive hole-drilling technique for residual stress measurement to orthotropic composite materials is the determination of the three calibration constants. Attention is presently given to an experimental determination of these calibration constants for a highly orthotropic, unidirectionally-reinforced graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide composite. A comparison of the measured values with theoretically obtained ones shows agreement to be good, in view of the many possible sources of experimental variation.

  13. Experimental evaluation of the uncertainty associated with the result of feature-of-size measurements through computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, T. L.; Donatelli, G. D.; Baldo, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Computed tomography for dimensional metrology has been introduced in quality control loop for about a decade. Due to the complex measurement-error cause system, generally no consistent measurement uncertainty reporting has been made. The ISO 15530-3 experimental approach, which makes use of calibrated parts, has been tested for estimating the uncertainty of CT-based measurements of features of size of a test object made of POM. Particular attention is given to the design of experiment and to the measurement uncertainty components. The most significant experimental findings are outlined and discussed in this paper.

  14. Calibrated simulations of Z opacity experiments that reproduce the experimentally measured plasma conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Rochau, G. A.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, frequency-resolved iron opacity measurements at electron temperatures of 170-200 eV and electron densities of (0.7 - 4.0 )× 1022cm-3 revealed a 30 - 400 % disagreement with the calculated opacities [J. E. Bailey et al., Nature (London) 517, 56 (2015), 10.1038/nature14048]. The discrepancies have a high impact on astrophysics, atomic physics, and high-energy density physics, and it is important to verify our understanding of the experimental platform with simulations. Reliable simulations are challenging because the temporal and spatial evolution of the source radiation and of the sample plasma are both complex and incompletely diagnosed. In this article, we describe simulations that reproduce the measured temperature and density in recent iron opacity experiments performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility. The time-dependent spectral irradiance at the sample is estimated using the measured time- and space-dependent source radiation distribution, in situ source-to-sample distance measurements, and a three-dimensional (3D) view-factor code. The inferred spectral irradiance is used to drive 1D sample radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The images recorded by slit-imaged space-resolved spectrometers are modeled by solving radiation transport of the source radiation through the sample. We find that the same drive radiation time history successfully reproduces the measured plasma conditions for eight different opacity experiments. These results provide a quantitative physical explanation for the observed dependence of both temperature and density on the sample configuration. Simulated spectral images for the experiments without the FeMg sample show quantitative agreement with the measured spectral images. The agreement in spectral profile, spatial profile, and brightness provides further confidence in our understanding of the backlight-radiation time history and image formation. These simulations bridge the static-uniform picture of the data

  15. Calibrated simulations of Z opacity experiments that reproduce the experimentally measured plasma conditions.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, T; Bailey, J E; Loisel, G; Rochau, G A; MacFarlane, J J; Golovkin, I

    2016-02-01

    Recently, frequency-resolved iron opacity measurements at electron temperatures of 170-200 eV and electron densities of (0.7-4.0)×10(22)cm(-3) revealed a 30-400% disagreement with the calculated opacities [J. E. Bailey et al., Nature (London) 517, 56 (2015)]. The discrepancies have a high impact on astrophysics, atomic physics, and high-energy density physics, and it is important to verify our understanding of the experimental platform with simulations. Reliable simulations are challenging because the temporal and spatial evolution of the source radiation and of the sample plasma are both complex and incompletely diagnosed. In this article, we describe simulations that reproduce the measured temperature and density in recent iron opacity experiments performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility. The time-dependent spectral irradiance at the sample is estimated using the measured time- and space-dependent source radiation distribution, in situ source-to-sample distance measurements, and a three-dimensional (3D) view-factor code. The inferred spectral irradiance is used to drive 1D sample radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The images recorded by slit-imaged space-resolved spectrometers are modeled by solving radiation transport of the source radiation through the sample. We find that the same drive radiation time history successfully reproduces the measured plasma conditions for eight different opacity experiments. These results provide a quantitative physical explanation for the observed dependence of both temperature and density on the sample configuration. Simulated spectral images for the experiments without the FeMg sample show quantitative agreement with the measured spectral images. The agreement in spectral profile, spatial profile, and brightness provides further confidence in our understanding of the backlight-radiation time history and image formation. These simulations bridge the static-uniform picture of the data interpretation and the

  16. Calibrated simulations of Z opacity experiments that reproduce the experimentally measured plasma conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; ...

    2016-02-05

    Recently, frequency-resolved iron opacity measurements at electron temperatures of 170–200 eV and electron densities of (0.7 – 4.0) × 1022 cm–3 revealed a 30–400% disagreement with the calculated opacities [J. E. Bailey et al., Nature (London) 517, 56 (2015)]. The discrepancies have a high impact on astrophysics, atomic physics, and high-energy density physics, and it is important to verify our understanding of the experimental platform with simulations. Reliable simulations are challenging because the temporal and spatial evolution of the source radiation and of the sample plasma are both complex and incompletely diagnosed. In this article, we describe simulations that reproducemore » the measured temperature and density in recent iron opacity experiments performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility. The time-dependent spectral irradiance at the sample is estimated using the measured time- and space-dependent source radiation distribution, in situ source-to-sample distance measurements, and a three-dimensional (3D) view-factor code. The inferred spectral irradiance is used to drive 1D sample radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The images recorded by slit-imaged space-resolved spectrometers are modeled by solving radiation transport of the source radiation through the sample. We find that the same drive radiation time history successfully reproduces the measured plasma conditions for eight different opacity experiments. These results provide a quantitative physical explanation for the observed dependence of both temperature and density on the sample configuration. Simulated spectral images for the experiments without the FeMg sample show quantitative agreement with the measured spectral images. The agreement in spectral profile, spatial profile, and brightness provides further confidence in our understanding of the backlight-radiation time history and image formation. Furthermore, these simulations bridge the static-uniform picture of the

  17. Experimental Measurements for Numerical Simulation of Macrosegregation in a 36-Ton Steel Ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhenhu; Tu, Wutao; Shen, Bingzhen; Shen, Houfa; Liu, Baicheng

    2016-07-01

    In order to cognize the macrosegregation formation with solidification conditions, a 36-ton steel ingot has been experimentally investigated. Temperature variations of fourteen specified positions, for both the mold and ingot, were monitored to acquire the thermal conditions during solidification. Calibrated heat transfer coefficients between the ingot and mold were determined based on the temperature measurements and the empirical formula. Besides, concentration distributions of both carbon and sulfur in the ingot longitudinal section were mapped by 1800 drilled samples. Macrosegregation patterns were obtained, and notable negative segregations along the side walls of hot-top as well as typical segregation characteristics were presented in the maps. Segregation extent of sulfur was greater than that of carbon, and the segregated sulfur was relevant to the segregated carbon in a certain extent on statistical analysis with a standard correlation coefficient r = 0.68872. Finally, a two-phase multiscale multicomponent solidification model was preliminarily utilized to predict the species segregation. General good agreements are exhibited for the comparisons between the prediction and measurement of concentration profiles of carbon and sulfur in ingot.

  18. Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements of dosimetric parameters of the IRA-103Pd brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hosseini, S Hamed; Shavar, Arzhang

    2008-04-01

    This article presents a brachytherapy source having 103Pd adsorbed onto a cylindrical silver rod that has been developed by the Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School for permanent implant applications. Dosimetric characteristics (radial dose function, anisotropy function, and anisotropy factor) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined in terms of the updated AAPM Task group 43 (TG-43U1) recommendations. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the dose rate constant. Measurements were performed using TLD-GR200A circular chip dosimeters using standard methods employing thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Perspex phantom. Precision machined bores in the phantom located the dosimeters and the source in a reproducible fixed geometry, providing for transverse-axis and angular dose profiles over a range of distances from 0.5 to 5 cm. The Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code, version 4C simulation techniques have been used to evaluate the dose-rate distributions around this model 103Pd source in water and Perspex phantoms. The Monte Carlo calculated dose rate constant of the IRA-103Pd source in water was found to be 0.678 cGy h(-1) U(-1) with an approximate uncertainty of +/-0.1%. The anisotropy function, F(r, theta), and the radial dose function, g(r), of the IRA- 103Pd source were also measured in a Perspex phantom and calculated in both Perspex and liquid water phantoms.

  19. Aerodynamically induced radial forces in a centrifugal gas compressor. Part 1: Experimental measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Flathers, M.B.

    1998-04-01

    Net radial loading arising from asymmetric pressure fields in the volutes of centrifugal pumps during off-design operation is well known and has been studied extensively. In order to achieve a marked improvement in overall efficiency in centrifugal gas compressors, vaneless volute diffusers are matched to specific impellers to yield improved performance over a wide application envelope. As observed in centrifugal pumps, nonuniform pressure distributions that develop during operation above and below the design flow create static radial loads on the rotor. In order to characterize these radial forces, a novel experimental measurement and post-processing technique is employed that yields both the magnitude and direction of the load by measuring the shaft centerline locus in the tilt-pad bearings. The method is applicable to any turbomachinery operating on fluid film radial bearings equipped with proximity probes. The forces are found to be a maximum near surge and increase with higher pressures and speeds. The results are nondimensionalized, allowing the radial loading for different operating conditions to be predicted.

  20. Investigation and experimental measurement of scissor blade cutting forces using fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, D. J.; Rajan, G.; McGrath, M. M.; Coyle, E.; Semenova, Y.; Farrell, G.

    2011-10-01

    This paper reports on unique and scalable sensorized medical scissor blades for application in minimally invasive robotic surgery. The blades exploit the strain sensing capabilities of a single fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor bonded to the blade surface. This smart sensing structure allows detection of friction and material fracture forces during cutting and subsequently enables accurate estimation of the blade kinetic friction coefficient and fracture toughness values of the material being cut. We present theory on the determination of strain variation along the blade length during combined direct and lateral loading of the blade element during operation. Demonstration of the sensorized instrument is realized on an application specific experimental test-bed employing a commercial interrogation system for signal demodulation. Friction and cutting forces measured using the FBG are validated against load cell force data from the test-bed. Characterization tests showed that the sensorized blade has an unfiltered force sensing resolution of 0.5 N over a 30 N load range. This work demonstrates that a single optical fiber placed onto cutting instrument blades can, in an unobtrusive manner, reliably measure friction forces and material fracture properties during surgical cutting.

  1. Experimental measurement of local displacement and chemical pair correlations in crystalline solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, C.L.; Ice, G.E.; Robertson, J.L.; Shaffer, L.B.

    1993-10-01

    Measurement of near-neighbor atomic arrangements in crystalline solid solutions is well established and provides meaningful values for chemical preference of atoms for their near neighbors to beyond the first ten neighboring shells. Static displacements (atomic size) between these atom pairs have mostly been either ignored in the recovery of the local pair preferences or removed by making use of the displacement scattering dependence on momentum transfer. With intense and energy tunable x-ray synchrotron sources, our ability to recover these static displacements between atoms has greatly improved. Data taken with multiple x-ray energies to obtain the contrast necessary to separate like from unlike neighbor pair distances are discussed for the two cases studied to date: A locally ordered Ni{sub 77.5}Fe{sub 22.5} crystal and a locally clustered Fe{sub 53}Cr{sub 47} crystal. Analysis of experimental parameters and data gives the systematic and statistical errors on the recovered parameters. Meaningful atomic displacements from the mean lattice can be measured and recovered. These displacements help us understand material properties and will provide theorists with tests for their calculations.

  2. Continuous in-situ measurements of volcanic gases at Pisciarelli-Phelgrean Field (Italy): a new experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersberg, T.; Somma, R.; Rocco, A.; Quattrocchi, F.; Zimmer, M.; de Natale, G.; de Natale, P.; Boschi, E.

    2009-04-01

    We present a new experimental approach for continuous real-time monitoring of volcanic gases. The realization of this new set-up based on the experience derived from several earlier short-time gas monitoring campaigns carried out in 2006, 2007 and 2008 at different sites (Tor Caldara, Latium Region, Central Italy; Solfatara and Pisciarelli, Campania Region, Souther Italy). The monitoring station is now implemented at a fumarole field in Pisciarelli, about 1 km SE of the Solfatara volcano. Fumarolic gas is continuously pumped through 200m Teflon © tube with a membrane pump (pumping rate 400cc/min) into a small field laboratory, where the gas phase is analyzed minutely by means of a quadrupole mass spectrometer for H2, H2S, CH4, N2, O2, Ar, He, and CO2 and with a tuneable diode laser spectrometer. Further analytical devices may be added in the future. Off-line gas samples are taken regularly to crosscheck the gas composition with a gas chromatograph and for noble gas analysis. Prior to gas analysis, gaseous water is condensed in a water trap placed in a cooling box in close vicinity to the fumarole. The water is removed from the trap in regular intervals (2 h) by a peristaltic pump. The amount of water is determined directly in the trap by measuring the rise of the water level in intervals of 5 minutes. Knowledge of the gas flow and the amount of water would enables us to determine the gas/water ratio of fumarolic gases, however, the actual fumarole temperature (December 2008) at Pisciarelli is 95.8°C, thus water condensation has already occurred prior to gas sampling. The gas from the Pisciarelli fumarole is dominated by CO2 (>98.5 vol.-%), followed by N2, H2S, O2, H2, Ar, CH4 and He. O2 and partly N2 and Ar are due to atmospheric contamination of the system. The air-free calculated gas composition is in good agreement with already published gas composition data. Within the time of investigation, no significant variations were detected in the composition of the

  3. Experimental techniques for measuring Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V A

    2012-06-07

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is one of the major concerns in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) because it amplifies target modulations in both acceleration and deceleration phases of implosion, which leads to shell disruption and performance degradation of imploding targets. This article reviews experimental results of the RT growth experiments performed on OMEGA laser system, where targets were driven directly with laser light. RT instability was studied in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The experiments were performed in acceleration phase, using planar and spherical targets, and in deceleration phase of spherical implosions, using spherical shells. Initial target modulations consisted of 2-D pre-imposed modulations, and 2-D and 3-D modulations imprinted on targets by the non-uniformities in laser drive. In planar geometry, the nonlinear regime was studied using 3-D modulations with broadband spectra near nonlinear saturation levels. In acceleration-phase, the measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in good agreement with those predicted by Haan's model [Haan S W 1989 Phys. Rev. A 39 5812]. In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions [Oron D et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8, 2883]. The 3-D, inner-surface modulations were measured to grow throughout the deceleration phase of spherical implosions. RT growth rates are very sensitive to the drive conditions, therefore they can be used to test and validate drive physics in hydrodynamic codes used to design ICF implosions. Measured growth rates of pre-imposed 2-D target modulations below nonlinear saturation levels were used to validate non-local thermal electron transport model in laser-driven experiments.

  4. Experimental measurements of charge carrier mobility: lifetime products for large sample of pixilated CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadawale, S. V.; Shanmugam, M.; Purohit, Shishir; Acharya, Y. B.; Sudhakar, Manju

    2012-07-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) is thought to be a primary work horse for hard X-ray astronomy in future. Due to the relatively large band-gap, it offers near room temperature operation while maintaining much better energy resolution then scintillator detectors operating in similar energy range. Further, CZT detectors are available in the form of pixilated detectors with area up to few cm2 and hence it is possible to realize very large detector area by having an array of such pixilated CZT detectors. However, it is well known that the energy spectrum of mono-energetic X-ray measured by CZT detectors does not have a Gaussian shape but has significant low-energy tail. This is mainly due to relatively poor mobility and small life time of the charge carriers, particularly of holes, in the CZT crystals. Thus, in order to understand spectral response for a large array of CZT detectors consisting of multiple elements / pixels, it is essential to characterize the mobility-lifetime products of charge carriers for each individual elements / pixels. Here we present experimental measurements of charge carrier mobility-lifetime products for large sample of multi-pixel CZT detectors. The mobility-lifetime products are measured by simultaneously fitting a ‘CZT line’ model to pixel wise spectra of 122 keV X-rays from 57Co at three different bias voltages. These were carried out as a part of selection of CZT detector modules for the “High Energy X-ray spectrometer (HEX)” onboard Indian moon mission - Chandrayaan-1.

  5. Measuring reinforcement learning and motivation constructs in experimental animals: relevance to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Markou, Athina; Salamone, John D.; Bussey, Timothy; Mar, Adam; Brunner, Daniela; Gilmour, Gary; Balsam, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The present review article summarizes and expands upon the discussions that were initiated during a meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS; http://cntrics.ucdavis.edu). A major goal of the CNTRICS meeting was to identify experimental procedures and measures that can be used in laboratory animals to assess psychological constructs that are related to the psychopathology of schizophrenia. The issues discussed in this review reflect the deliberations of the Motivation Working Group of the CNTRICS meeting, which included most of the authors of this article as well as additional participants. After receiving task nominations from the general research community, this working group was asked to identify experimental procedures in laboratory animals that can assess aspects of reinforcement learning and motivation that may be relevant for research on the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as well as other disorders characterized by deficits in reinforcement learning and motivation. The tasks described here that assess reinforcement learning are the Autoshaping Task, Probabilistic Reward Learning Tasks, and the Response Bias Probabilistic Reward Task. The tasks described here that assess motivation are Outcome Devaluation and Contingency Degradation Tasks and Effort-Based Tasks. In addition to describing such methods and procedures, the present article provides a working vocabulary for research and theory in this field, as well as an industry perspective about how such tasks may be used in drug discovery. It is hoped that this review can aid investigators who are conducting research in this complex area, promote translational studies by highlighting shared research goals and fostering a common vocabulary across basic and clinical fields, and facilitate the development of medications for the treatment of symptoms mediated by reinforcement learning and motivational deficits. PMID:23994273

  6. Measuring reinforcement learning and motivation constructs in experimental animals: relevance to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Markou, Athina; Salamone, John D; Bussey, Timothy J; Mar, Adam C; Brunner, Daniela; Gilmour, Gary; Balsam, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The present review article summarizes and expands upon the discussions that were initiated during a meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (CNTRICS; http://cntrics.ucdavis.edu) meeting. A major goal of the CNTRICS meeting was to identify experimental procedures and measures that can be used in laboratory animals to assess psychological constructs that are related to the psychopathology of schizophrenia. The issues discussed in this review reflect the deliberations of the Motivation Working Group of the CNTRICS meeting, which included most of the authors of this article as well as additional participants. After receiving task nominations from the general research community, this working group was asked to identify experimental procedures in laboratory animals that can assess aspects of reinforcement learning and motivation that may be relevant for research on the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as well as other disorders characterized by deficits in reinforcement learning and motivation. The tasks described here that assess reinforcement learning are the Autoshaping Task, Probabilistic Reward Learning Tasks, and the Response Bias Probabilistic Reward Task. The tasks described here that assess motivation are Outcome Devaluation and Contingency Degradation Tasks and Effort-Based Tasks. In addition to describing such methods and procedures, the present article provides a working vocabulary for research and theory in this field, as well as an industry perspective about how such tasks may be used in drug discovery. It is hoped that this review can aid investigators who are conducting research in this complex area, promote translational studies by highlighting shared research goals and fostering a common vocabulary across basic and clinical fields, and facilitate the development of medications for the treatment of symptoms mediated by reinforcement learning and motivational deficits.

  7. Inflammation measurement and immunocharacterization of cell proliferation in an experimental model of proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, C; Khosravi, E; Pisella, P J; Ettaiche, M; Elena, P P

    1998-01-01

    An experimental model of proliferative vitreoretinopathy was developed in the rabbit eye by injecting a solution of human platelet-rich plasma. In this model we evaluated the progression with time of intraocular inflammation and the rate and origin of cell proliferation. A sterile solution adjusted to 107 platelets was injected into the right eye of a total of 46 pigmented and 14 albino rabbits. Animals were sequentially sacrificed at days 7, 14, 21 and 1 month after injection. Clinical evaluation of vitreoretinal proliferation, using a classification in six grades, and of anterior segment inflammation assessed by a Laser Flare Meter, were done for 1 month after injection, before histopathological analysis. Eighty percent of eyes developed tractional retinal detachment in 1 month. Histopathology showed intense cell migration and proliferation in the area of the ciliary body, as early as the seventh day, then further increasing rapidly. Infiltrates were composed of cytokeratin- and vimentin-expressing cells. Abnormal expression of vimentin was also found in ciliary and retinal epithelia and in M¿ller cells. Inflammation measured by the Laser Flare Meter was maximal at day 11 and then reached a plateau at significantly higher levels than controls. Albino rabbits showed significantly lower grades of proliferation, as compared to pigmented rabbits. This study thus clarified some characteristics of experimental vitreoretinal proliferations that that proved similar to those in human diseases, such as the involvement of ciliary body and retinal pigment epithelium, the existence of inflammatory reactions preceding cell proliferation and strong changes in intermediate filaments. This may provide a simple and valuable model for antiproliferative assays and shed some light on the pathogenesis of intraocular proliferative disorders.

  8. An innovative experimental setup for Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry measurements in riverine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Olivieri, Giorgio; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) is a powerful methodology to nonintrusively monitor surface flows. Its use has been beneficial to the development of rating curves in riverine environments and to map geomorphic features in natural waterways. Typical LSPIV experimental setups rely on the use of mast-mounted cameras for the acquisition of natural stream reaches. Such cameras are installed on stream banks and are angled with respect to the water surface to capture large scale fields of view. Despite its promise and the simplicity of the setup, the practical implementation of LSPIV is affected by several challenges, including the acquisition of ground reference points for image calibration and time-consuming and highly user-assisted procedures to orthorectify images. In this work, we perform LSPIV studies on stream sections in the Aniene and Tiber basins, Italy. To alleviate the limitations of traditional LSPIV implementations, we propose an improved video acquisition setup comprising a telescopic, an inexpensive GoPro Hero 3 video camera, and a system of two lasers. The setup allows for maintaining the camera axis perpendicular to the water surface, thus mitigating uncertainties related to image orthorectification. Further, the mast encases a laser system for remote image calibration, thus allowing for nonintrusively calibrating videos without acquiring ground reference points. We conduct measurements on two different water bodies to outline the performance of the methodology in case of varying flow regimes, illumination conditions, and distribution of surface tracers. Specifically, the Aniene river is characterized by high surface flow velocity, the presence of abundant, homogeneously distributed ripples and water reflections, and a meagre number of buoyant tracers. On the other hand, the Tiber river presents lower surface flows, isolated reflections, and several floating objects. Videos are processed through image-based analyses to correct for lens

  9. Computer/PERT technique monitors actual versus allocated costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houry, E.; Walker, J. D.

    1967-01-01

    A computer method measures the users performance in cost-type contracts utilizing the existing nasa program evaluation review technique without imposing any additional reporting requirements. progress is measured by comparing actual costs with a value of work performed in a specific period.

  10. Fluid-dependent anisotropy and experimental measurements in synthetic porous rocks with controlled fracture parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Pinbo; Di, Bangrang; Wei, Jianxin; Li, Xiangyang; Deng, Yinghua

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we analyse the influence of fluid on P- and S-wave anisotropy in a fractured medium. Equivalent medium theories are used to describe the relationship between the fluid properties and the rock physics characteristics in fractured rocks, and P-wave and S-wave velocities and anisotropy are considered to be influenced by fluid saturation. However, these theoretical predictions require experimental measurement results for calibration. A new construction method was used to create synthetic rock samples with controlled fracture parameters. The new construction process provides synthetic rocks that have a more realistic mineral composition, porous structure, cementation and pressure sensitivity than samples used in previous research on fractured media. The synthetic rock samples contain fractures which have a controlled distribution, diameter, thickness and fracture density. In this study, the fracture diameter was about 4 mm, the thickness of fractures was about 0.06 mm, and the fracture density in the two fractured rock samples was about 3.45%. SEM images show well-defined penny-shaped fractures of 4 mm in length and 0.06 mm in width. The rock samples were saturated with air, water and oil, and P- and S-wave velocities were measured in an ultrasonic measurement system. The laboratory measurement results show that the P-wave anisotropy is strongly influenced by saturated fluid, and the P-wave anisotropy parameter, ɛ, has a much larger value in air saturation than in water and oil saturations. The S-wave anisotropy decreases when the samples are saturated with oil, which can be caused by high fluid viscosity. In the direction perpendicular to the fractures (the 0° direction), shear-wave splitting is negligible, and is similar to the blank sample without fractures, as expected. In the direction parallel to the fractures (the 90° direction) shear-wave splitting is significant. The fractured rock samples show significant P- and S-wave anisotropy caused by

  11. Measuring temperature in the lens during experimental heat load indirectly as light scattering increase rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaohua; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Kronschläger, Martin; Söderberg, Per

    2017-01-01

    The current study aims to experimentally estimate the temperature in the lens due to heat load indirectly from the measurement of increases in the rate of temperature-induced light scattering. The lens was extracted from Sprague-Dawley rats and put into a temperature-controlled cuvette filled with a balanced salt solution. Altogether, 80 lenses were equally divided into four temperature groups. Each lens was exposed for 5 min to temperature depending on the group to which it belonged while the intensity of forward light scattering was recorded. The inclination coefficients of light scattering increase at the temperature of 37°C, 40°C, 43°C, and 46°C were estimated as a CI(0.95), 3.1±0.8, 4.4±0.8, 5.5±0.9, and 7.0±0.8×10-4 tEDC/s, respectively. The Arrhenius equation implies that the natural logarithm of the inclination coefficient is linearly dependent on the inverse of the temperature. The proportionality constant and the intercept were 9.6±2.4×10 K and 22.8±7.7, respectively. The activation energy was 8.0±2.0×101 kJ·mol-1. The current experiment implies that if averaging 20 measurements of inclination coefficients in a new experiment at constant heat load, the confidence limits for predicted temperature correspond to ± 1.9°C. With the proportionality constant and the intercept estimated in the current experiment, the in vivo temperature in the lens can be determined retrospectively with sufficient resolution.

  12. Experimental measurement of wind and water erosion in Aragón and Andalusia, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Iserloh, Thomas; Marzen, Miriam; Ries, Johannes B.; Schmidt, Reinhard-G.

    2010-05-01

    For more than 50 years rainfall simulators and wind tunnels are important tools for soil erosion studies in the field. Laboratory investigations in wind tunnels with the ability of simultaneous rainfall production showed that wind significantly alters drop sizes, drop fall velocities and impact angles of falling raindrops. Leading to higher kinetic energies and increased soil detachment in comparison to falling drops with no wind influence. In most simulators this combined effect of wind and water is either not taken into account or deliberately excluded from the system, because of increasing complexity of processes involved. Within the project Ri 835/3-1, founded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, a portable combined wind an rainfall simulator for in-situ soil erosion studies was developed and used in Spain (Aragón, Andalusia), Morocco (Souss valley), and Germany (Eifel). The main objective of these field experiments was to quantify the susceptibility of different soil surface conditions and soil surface treatments to soil erosion by wind, water, and the combined effect of wind and water. Here, an overview of the results of the experimental measurements in Spain is given. The results show that wind erosion in Aragón is more or less negligible on undisturbed, crusted soil surfaces, but it can reach high amounts of up to 50 g m-² on rolled and grazed fields. Measurements in Andalusia show mean erosion rates of 24 g m-² on crusted soil surfaces. The expected increase of soil detachment, due to the combined force of wind and water in comparison to solely rainfall simulations, is apparent in most of the simulated runs. In total, the results proof that this combined wind and rainfall simulator is a valuable tool for soil erosion studies in the field and that it can be used to investigate various research questions.

  13. Experimentally Measured Interfacial Area during Gas Injection into Saturated Porous Media: An Air Sparging Analogy

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    The amount of interfacial area (awn) between air and subsurface liquids during air-sparging can limit the rate of site remediation. Lateral movement within porous media could be encountered during air-sparging operations when air moves along the bottom of a low-permeability lens. This study was conducted to directly measure the amount of awn between air and water flowing within a bench-scale porous flow cell during the lateral movement of air along the upper edge of the cell during air injections into an initially water-saturated flow cell. Four different cell orientations were used to evaluate the effect of air injection rates and porous media geometries on the amount of awn between fluids. Air was injected at flow rates that varied by three orders of magnitude, and for each flow cellover this range of injection rates little change in awn was noted. A wider variation in awn was observed when air moved through different regions for the different flow cell orientations. These results are in good agreement with the experimental findings of Waduge et al. (2007), who performed experiments in a larger sand-pack flow cell, and determined that air-sparging efficiency is nearly independent of flow rate but highly dependent on the porous structure. By directly measuring the awn, and showing that awn does not vary greatly with changes in injection rate, we show that the lack of improvement to remediation rates is because there is a weak dependence of the awn on the air injection rate.

  14. Experimental measurements of plasma properties for Miller SG-100 torch with Mach I setting

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.L.T.; Heberlein, J.; Pfender, E. )

    1991-10-01

    In this work measurements of plasma properties, including the fields of temperature, velocity and plasma composition have been completed for the Miller SG-100 plasma torch using argon-helium mixtures with the Mach 1 nozzle at 1 atm pressure. A computer-controlled system combining both spectroscopic and enthalpy probe diagnostics has been developed to allow temperature measurements covering a range from 2000--16000K which includes the plasma flame region which is of interest. The experimental results expose the dominant effects in different spatial areas of argon-helium plasma jets. In the center near the nozzle exit the temperatures exceed 10,000K, and strong diffusion exists due to the steep radial gradients of temperature and particle number densities. In the jet tail region where the temperatures are well below 10,000K and decay in axial and radial direction, the dominant effects in this area are strong cold gas entrainment associated with turbulence. Substantial discrepancies between temperatures evaluated from spectroscopic and enthalpy probe data are particularly severe in the jet fringes indicating that strong deviations from LTE may exist in the jet fringes. In addition, entrainment of the cold surrounding gas into the plasma jet causes severe discrepancies between spectrometric and enthalpy probe data. The validity of the two diagnostic methods will be discussed. The temperature profiles in argon-helium plasma jets are flatter and wider, and the velocities are higher than in a pure argon plasma jet. These features of argon-helium plasma jets may be beneficial for obtaining better performance in the plasma spraying process. 26 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Development of a Model for Measuring Scientific Processing Skills Based on Brain-Imaging Technology: Focused on the Experimental Design Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Il-Sun; Byeon, Jung-Ho; Kim, Young-shin; Kwon, Yong-Ju

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for measuring experimental design ability based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during biological inquiry. More specifically, the researchers developed an experimental design task that measures experimental design ability. Using the developed experimental design task, they measured…

  16. Experimental measurements of Stark widths for Mn I lines in long laser spark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Andrey M.; Akhmetzhanov, Timur F.; Labutin, Timur A.; Zaytsev, Sergey M.; Zorov, Nikita B.; Chekalin, Nikolay V.

    2016-11-01

    We report the experimental Stark widths of Mn I lines belonging to multiplets z6P° → a6S and z6D° → a6D in long spark induced by laser. We have used aluminum alloy containing 80 ppm of manganese as a target to avoid strong self-absorption of Mn I lines. Its absence was proved by the comparison of observed intensities with relative strengths of lines within multiplets. Electron density of plasma estimated by Mg I (5172.68 Å) and Al II (2816.18 Å) lines was within the range of (4-30) × 1016 cm- 3. The shortest possible gate allowed the observation of symmetric atomic and ionic lines. The spatial profiles of plasma temperature and electron density along the axis of long spark demonstrated that both values were lower than for spherical plasma. Measured Stark widths of resonance multiplet z6P° → a6S decrease from 0.075 Å for its first component to 0.055 Å for the last one, while Stark widths of components of multiplet z6D° → a6D increase from 0.095 Å to 0.125 Å. No Stark shifting was observed for the studied multiplets.

  17. Improved Experimental and Mathematical Techniques for Measurement of Solvent Gas Diffusivity in Heavy Oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Ethan Robert

    This dissertation describes the first experimental measurement of the energy and interaction dependent shear viscosity eta and bulk viscosity zeta in the hydrodynamic expansion of a two-component Fermi gas near a broad collisional (Feshbach) resonance. This expansion also provides a precise test of scale invariance and an examination of local thermal equilibrium as a function of interaction strength. After release from an anisotropic optical trap, we observe that a resonantly interacting gas obeys scale-invariant hydrodynamics, where the mean square cloud size + + expands ballistically (like a noninteracting gas) and the energy-averaged bulk viscosity is consistent with zero, $0.00(0.04) ℎ n, with n the density. In contrast, the aspect ratios of the cloud exhibit anisotropic "elliptic"flow with an energy-dependent shear viscosity. Tuning away from resonance, we observe conformal symmetry breaking, where deviates from ballistic flow. We find that eta has both a quadratic and a linear dependence on the interaction strength 1/(kFIa ), where a is the s-wave scattering length and kFI is the Fermi wave vector for an ideal gas at the trap center. At low energy, the minimum is less than the resonant value and is significantly shifted toward the BEC side of resonance, to 1/(k FIa) = 0.2.

  18. Comparisons of dense-plasma-focus kinetic simulations with experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Welch, D.; Ellsworth, J.; Falabella, S.; Tang, V.

    2014-06-01

    Dense-plasma-focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high-energy electrons and ions, x rays, and neutrons. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high-energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously we reported on fully kinetic simulations of a DPF and compared them with hybrid and fluid simulations of the same device. Here we present detailed comparisons between fully kinetic simulations and experimental data on a 1.2 kJ DPF with two electrode geometries, including neutron yield and ion beam energy distributions. A more intensive third calculation is presented which examines the effects of a fully detailed pulsed power driver model. We also compare simulated electromagnetic fluctuations with direct measurement of radiofrequency electromagnetic fluctuations in a DPF plasma. These comparisons indicate that the fully kinetic model captures the essential physics of these plasmas with high fidelity, and provide further evidence that anomalous resistivity in the plasma arises due to a kinetic instability near the lower hybrid frequency.

  19. Simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with experimentally measured volumetric initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Kevin; Sewell, Everest; Krivets, Vitaliy; Greenough, Jeffrey; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    Initial conditions for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) are measured in three dimensions in the University of Arizona Vertical Shock Tube using a moving magnet galvanometer system. The resulting volumetric data is used as initial conditions for the simulation of the RMI using ARES at Lawrence-Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The heavy gas is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), and the light gas is air. The perturbations are generated by harmonically oscillating the gasses vertically using two loudspeakers mounted to the shock tube which cause Faraday resonance, producing a random short wavelength perturbation on the interface. Planar Mie scattering is used to illuminate the flow field through the addition of propylene glycol particles seeded in the heavy gas. An M=1.2 shock impulsively accelerates the interface, initiating instability growth. Images of the initial condition and instability growth are captured at a rate of 6 kHz using high speed cameras. Comparisons between experimental and simulation results, mixing diagnostics, and mixing zone growth are presented.

  20. Survey of the theory and experimental measurements of residual stress in Pd thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, F.; Nazarpour, S.; Cirera, A.

    2010-11-01

    Different thicknesses of Pd thin film were deposited over SrTiO3 by electron beam physical vapor deposition. Residual stress for each thickness of Pd film was computed by applying conventional x-ray diffraction method and taking into account Poisson's ratio and elastic module measured by Nanoindentation. We observed that Pd stress variation at 300 °C substrate temperature obeys the trend of type II metals with high adatom mobility. Several models alluded in the literature were compared to the stress variation of the Pd films. Two models, namely; Freund-Chason and Guisbiers-Van Overschelde-Wautelet were found to be in agreement with the experimental results in that for the thicknesses less than 30 nm, Guisbiers-Van Overschelde-Wautelet is dominant but for higher than 30 nm, variation in stress follows Freund-Chason model. Therefore, the thickness around 30 nm could be considered as coalescence thickness. Surprisingly, this transition thickness is the same thickness that Guisbiers-Van Overschelde-Wautelet and Freund-Chason models intersect. Negligible residual stress and high conductance of 30 nm Pd thin film reveal the importance of this transition thickness in microelectronic technology.

  1. Patient and staff doses in paediatric interventional cardiology derived from experimental measurements with phantoms.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Miranda, Patricia; Aguirre, Daniel; Riquelme, Nemorino; Dalmazzo, Dandaro; Galaz, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine experimentally the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and kerma-area product (KAP) levels to patients and scatter doses at the cardiologist's eyes during paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) procedures for Chile, on the basis of measurements taken from X-ray systems characterization for different thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate, together with the average values of fluoroscopy time and number of cine frames for ten paediatric IC procedures. The range of cumulative ESAK values when the different clinical procedures were simulated was from 2 to 1100 mGy. KAP values ranged from 0.30 to 150 Gy cm(2). Scatter doses at cardiologist's eyes for the simulated procedures ranged from 0.20 to 116 µSv per procedure. Large differences between the X-ray systems were found in our study. Standardized guidelines in terms of X-ray system setting and protocols should be developed for hospitals that perform paediatric IC procedures in Chile.

  2. Experimental model to measure the increase of dental pulp temperature in vivo during laser application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Ester M. D.; Junqueira, Silvio L. M.; Busato, Mara S.

    1994-09-01

    Carbon dioxide laser has been used in dental surgery. The existence of healthy teeth, which have pulp vitality needing to be preserved, is observed in a great number of cases. In this work we describe an experimental model which provides the measurement of temperature in pulp chamber `in vivo,' during oral surgeries in which the CO2 laser beam is applied to gingival tissue. The problems met during the search for the best way to place the thermal probe regarding the diameter and depth of pulp chamber and the thickness of the tissue layer formed by gum and maxillary bone are discussed. We use a thermocouple placed in the pulp chamber of superior canine teeth in dogs. After that, the probe was also placed between gum and dental root. Since the temperature at gingival surface was known, it was easy to determine the rise in temperature at pulp chamber and also to observe the thermal gradient from gum to tissue to bone, thus avoiding pulp damage during laser applications.

  3. A New Differential Pressure Flow Meter for Measurement of Human Breath Flow: Simulation and Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Bridgeman, Devon; Tsow, Francis; Xian, Xiaojun; Forzani, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The development and performance characterization of a new differential pressure-based flow meter for human breath measurements is presented in this article. The device, called a “Confined Pitot Tube,” is comprised of a pipe with an elliptically shaped expansion cavity located in the pipe center, and an elliptical disk inside the expansion cavity. The elliptical disk, named Pitot Tube, is exchangeable, and has different diameters, which are smaller than the diameter of the elliptical cavity. The gap between the disk and the cavity allows the flow of human breath to pass through. The disk causes an obstruction in the flow inside the pipe, but the elliptical cavity provides an expansion for the flow to circulate around the disk, decreasing the overall flow resistance. We characterize the new sensor flow experimentally and theoretically, using Comsol Multiphysics® software with laminar and turbulent models. We also validate the sensor, using inhalation and exhalation tests and a reference method. PMID:27818521

  4. Understanding and reducing the experimental variability of in vitro plasma protein binding measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiping; Zrada, Matt; Anderson, Ken; Katwaru, Ravi; Harradine, Paul; Choi, Bernard; Tong, Vince; Pajkovic, Natasa; Mazenko, Ralph; Cox, Kathy; Cohen, Lucinda H

    2014-10-01

    The experimental measurement of plasma protein binding is a useful in vitro Absorption Distribution Metabolism and Excretion(ADME) assay currently conducted in both screening and definitive early development candidate modes. The fraction unbound is utilized to calculate important pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters such as unbound clearance and unbound volume of distribution in animals that can be used to make human PK and dose predictions and estimate clinically relevant drug-drug interaction potential. Although these types of assays have been executed for decades, a rigorous statistical analysis of sources of variability has not been conducted because of the tedious nature of the manual experiment. Automated conduct of the incubations using a 96-well equilibrium dialysis device as well as high-throughput liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry quantitation has now made this level of rigor accessible and useful. Sources of variability were assessed including well position, day-to-day, and site-to-site reproducibility. Optimal pH conditions were determined using a design of experiments method interrogating buffer strength, CO2 % and device preparation conditions. Variability was minimized by implementing an in-well control that is concurrently analyzed with new chemical entity analytes. Data acceptance criteria have been set for both the in-well control and the range of analyte variability, with a sliding scale tied to analyte-binding characteristics. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 103:3302-3309, 2014.

  5. Biomechanical evaluation of heel elevation on load transfer — experimental measurement and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luximon, Yan; Luximon, Ameersing; Yu, Jia; Zhang, Ming

    2012-02-01

    In spite of ill-effects of high heel shoes, they are widely used for women. Hence, it is essential to understand the load transfer biomechanics in order to design better fit and comfortable shoes. In this study, both experimental measurement and finite element analysis were used to evaluate the biomechanical effects of heel height on foot load transfer. A controlled experiment was conducted using custom-designed platforms. Under different weight-bearing conditions, peak plantar pressure, contact area and center of pressure were analyzed. A three-dimensional finite element foot model was used to simulate the high-heel support and to predict the internal stress distributions and deformations for different heel heights. Results from both experiment and model indicated that heel elevations had significant effects on all variables. When heel elevation increased, the center of pressure shifted from the midfoot region to the forefoot region, the contact area was reduced by 26% from 0 to 10.2 cm heel and the internal stress of foot bones increased. Prediction results also showed that the strain and total tension force of plantar fascia was minimum at 5.1 cm heel condition. This study helps to better understand the biomechanical behavior of foot, and to provide better suggestions for design parameters of high heeled shoes.

  6. Three experimental approaches to measure the social context dependence of prejudice communication and discriminatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Heiko; Liebe, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Empirical research on discrimination is faced with crucial problems stemming from the specific character of its object of study. In democratic societies the communication of prejudices and other forms of discriminatory behavior is considered socially undesirable and depends on situational factors such as whether a situation is considered private or whether a discriminatory consensus can be assumed. Regular surveys thus can only offer a blurred picture of the phenomenon. But also survey experiments intended to decrease the social desirability bias (SDB) so far failed in systematically implementing situational variables. This paper introduces three experimental approaches to improve the study of discrimination and other topics of social (un-)desirability. First, we argue in favor of cognitive context framing in surveys in order to operationalize the salience of situational norms. Second, factorial surveys offer a way to take situational contexts and substitute behavior into account. And third, choice experiments - a rather new method in sociology - offer a more valid method of measuring behavioral characteristics compared to simple items in surveys. All three approaches - which may be combined - are easy to implement in large-scale surveys. Results of empirical studies demonstrate the fruitfulness of each of these approaches.

  7. Regional measurements of blood flow in experimental RG-2 rat gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Groothuis, D.R.; Pasternak, J.F.; Fischer, J.M.; Blasberg, R.G.; Bigner, D.D.; Vick, N.A.

    1983-07-01

    Regional measurements of blood flow (F) were performed in transplanted intracerebral RG-2 rat gliomas using (14C)iodoantipyrine, Kety-Schmidt blood flow equations, and quantitative autoradiography. Twenty-nine intracranial tumors in ten rats were analyzed by location; 18 intraparenchymal, seven meningeal, two third-ventricular, and two fourth-ventricular tumors were studied. For all tumors, averaged mean F was 91 +/- 33 (S.D.) ml/hg/min. In all but one tumor, mean F was intermediate between normal cortex and corpus callosum values. There was moderate regional variation: averaged mean F was lower in tumor center (78 +/- 47 ml/hg/min) than in tumor periphery (93 +/- 30 ml/hg/min). Within individual tumors, F showed moderate variation which correlated to some extent with histological features; a regional F of less than 10 ml/hg/min was observed in only one tumor within an area of necrosis. F in regions of brain immediately surrounding the tumor was higher than in tumor periphery. Blood flow to RG-2 tumors seems unlikely to limit drug delivery any more than to normal brain, and the consistent levels from tumor to tumor and within individual tumors make the RG-2 model an excellent one with which to study drug delivery in experimental brain tumors.

  8. Accurate modeling of antennas for radiating short pulses, FDTD analysis and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, James G.; Smith, Glenn S.

    1993-01-01

    Antennas used to radiate short pulses often require different design rules that those that are used to radiate essentially time-harmonic signals. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is a very flexible numerical approach that can be used to treat a variety of electromagnetic problems in the time domain. It is well suited to the analysis and design of antennas for radiating short pulses; however, several advances had to be made before the method could be applied to this problem. In this paper, we will illustrate the use of the FDTD method with two antennas designed for the radiation of short pulses. The first is a simple, two-dimensional geometry, and open-ended parallel-plate waveguide, while the second is a three-dimensional, rotationally symmetric geometry, a conical monopole fed through an image by a coaxial transmission line. Both antennas are 'optimized' according to given criteria by adjusting geometrical parameters and including resistive loading that varies continuously with position along the antenna. The predicted performance for the conical monopole antenna is compared with experimental measurements; this verifies the optimization and demonstrates the practicality of the design.

  9. [Study on the discharge properties of xeon flash lamp and experimental measurement].

    PubMed

    Zhao, You-Quan; Miao, Pei-Liang; He, Feng; Gu, Jian; Zhai, Rui-Wei

    2014-07-01

    The Xenon flash lamp is a new type of light source for analytical instrument. The present paper analyzed the discharge process of xenon flash lamp, presented the discharge test system, and conducted experimental measurement of the voltage, current and optical pulse signal in the process of discharge. The results show that in the preliminary discharge, the free electron concentration was at a low level, so the energy was at a low level, then following the gas discharge, numerous free electrons formed in the lamp, resultin in the increase in the concentration of free electrons, therefore discharge current rised rapidly and voltage reduced. The lamp released photons to generate light pulse in the moment of ionic recombination, The pulse xenon lamp light energy output and spectral characteristic is related to electron energy in recombination and combination level of xenon, if the input energy and the energy consumption of the xenon lamp is inconsistent, it will lead to repeated capacitor charging and discharging and produce oscillation waveform. This paper is very useful for understanding the process of xenon lamp discharge, optimizing the driver circuit and the production of xenon flash lamp.

  10. Actual status of veralipride use

    PubMed Central

    Carranza-Lira, Sebastián

    2010-01-01

    During the climacteric period, several symptoms exist that motivate women to seek medical advice; one of the most common is the hot flush, which presents in 75%–85% of these during a variable time span. For the treatment of hot flush, several non-hormonal treatments exist; among them, veralipride has shown to be a useful treatment of vasomotor symptoms during the climacteric period. In recent times, several medical societies have discredited its use. The purpose of this review, therefore, is to define a measured position in relation to the use of this drug. On completion of this review, it was possible to conclude that this drug has an antidopaminergic mechanism of action. The recommended schedule is: 100 mg/day for 20 days, with 10 days drug free. Since the risk of undesirable secondary effects such as galactorrhea, mastodynia, and extrapyramidal can increase with use, no more than 3 treatment cycles are recommended. This drug has a residual effect that can allow drug-free intervals, which permit a longer time between schedules. PMID:20852674

  11. Actualities and Perspectives in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Iencean, SM; Brehar, FM

    2008-01-01

    In the field of neurosurgery, like in other surgical specialties, the last decades have brought major achievements. The series of revolutionary discoveries has started during the last century in the fifties, with stereotactic radiosurgery, then continued with the implementation of operative microscope (during the seventies), the endovascular embolisation in the nineties and finally with the major improvement in robotic neurosurgery and molecular neurosurgery at the beginning of this century. The major innovation has been brought not only in the field of therapeutical measures but also in the field of neuro– imaging. Thus, the modern MRI with more than 3 Tesla, can reveal to the neurosurgeon the most intimate structures of the nervous system. Several important areas in neurosurgery like: vascular neurosurgery, functional neurosurgery and brain tumors pathology, benefit from the modern technology and from the latest discoveries from genetic and molecular biology. In conclusion, summarizing the discoveries of the last decade, we emphasize that the related areas like genetics, molecular biology, computer technology become more and more important in the future progress of the neurosurgery. PMID:20108475

  12. Measuring, using, and reducing experimental and computational uncertainty in reliability analysis of composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarslok, Benjamin P.

    The failure of the composite hydrogen tanks on the X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) from combined thermal and mechanical failure modes created a situation where the design weight was highly sensitive to uncertainties. Through previous research of sensitivity and reliability analysis on this problem, three areas of potential uncertainty reduction were recognized and became the focal points for this dissertation. The transverse elastic modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion were cited as being particularly sensitive input parameters with respect to weight. Measurement uncertainty analysis was performed on transverse modulus experiments, where the intermediate thickness measurements proved to be the greatest contributor to uncertainty. Data regarding correlations in the material properties of composite laminates is not always available, however the significance of correlated properties on probability of failure was detected. Therefore, a model was developed for correlations in composite properties based on micromechanics, specifically fiber volume fraction. The correlations from fiber volume fraction were combined with experimental data to give an estimate of the complete uncertainty, including material variability and measurement error. The probability of failure was compared for correlated material properties and independent random variables in an example pressure vessel problem. Including the correlations had a significant effect on the failure probability, however being unsafe or inefficient can depend on the material system. Reliability-based design simulations often use the traditional, crude Monte Carlo method as a sampling procedure for predicting failure. The combination of designing for very small failure probabilities and (˜10-8 - 10-6) and using computational expensive finite element models, makes traditional Monte Carlo very costly. The separable Monte Carlo method, which is an extension of conditional expectation, takes advantage of statistical

  13. Experimental validation of arthroscopic cartilage stiffness measurement using enzymatically degraded cartilage samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyyra, T.; Arokoski, J. P. A.; Oksala, N.; Vihko, A.; Hyttinen, M.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Kiviranta, I.

    1999-02-01

    In order to evaluate the ability of the arthroscopic indentation instrument, originally developed for the measurement of cartilage stiffness during arthroscopy, to detect cartilage degeneration, we compared changes in the stiffness with the structural and constitutional alterations induced by enzymes on the tissue in vitro. The culturing of osteochondral plugs on Petri dishes was initiated in Minimum Essential Medium with Earle's salts and the baseline stiffness was measured. Then, the experimental specimens were digested using trypsin for 24 h, chondroitinase ABC or purified collagenase (type VII) for 24 h or 48 h ( n = 8-15 per group). The control specimens were incubated in the medium. After the enzyme digestion, the end-point stiffness was measured and the specimens for the microscopic analyses were processed. The proteoglycan (PG) distribution was analysed using quantitative microspectrophotometry and the quantitative evaluation of the collagen network was made using a computer-based polarized light microscopy analysis. Decrease of cartilage stiffness was found after 24 h trypsin (36%) and 48 h chondroitinase ABC (24%) digestion corresponding to a decrease of up to 80% and up to 30% in the PG content respectively. Decrease of the superficial zone collagen content or arrangement (78%, ) after 48 h collagenase digestion also induced a decrease (30%, ) in cartilage stiffness. We conclude that our instrument is capable of

  14. Experimental study and finite element analysis based on equivalent load method for laser ultrasonic measurement of elastic constants.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yu; Liu, Changsheng; Zhang, Fengpeng; Qiu, Zhaoguo

    2016-07-01

    The laser ultrasonic generation of Rayleigh surface wave and longitudinal wave in an elastic plate is studied by experiment and finite element method. In order to eliminate the measurement error and the time delay of the experimental system, the linear fitting method of experimental data is applied. The finite element analysis software ABAQUS is used to simulate the propagation of Rayleigh surface wave and longitudinal wave caused by laser excitation on a sheet metal sample surface. The equivalent load method is proposed and applied. The pulsed laser is equivalent to the surface load in time and space domain to meet the Gaussian profile. The relationship between the physical parameters of the laser and the load is established by the correction factor. The numerical solution is in good agreement with the experimental result. The simple and effective numerical and experimental methods for laser ultrasonic measurement of the elastic constants are demonstrated.

  15. Fluid force predictions and experimental measurements for a magnetically levitated pediatric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Lim, D Scott; Wood, Houston G; Allaire, Paul E

    2007-05-01

    The latest generation of artificial blood pumps incorporates the use of magnetic bearings to levitate the rotating component of the pump, the impeller. A magnetic suspension prevents the rotating impeller from contacting the internal surfaces of the pump and reduces regions of stagnant and high shear flow that surround fluid or mechanical bearings. Applying this third-generation technology, the Virginia Artificial Heart Institute has developed a ventricular assist device (VAD) to support infants and children. In consideration of the suspension design, the axial and radial fluid forces exerted on the rotor of the pediatric VAD were estimated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) such that fluid perturbations would be counterbalanced. In addition, a prototype was built for experimental measurements of the axial fluid forces and estimations of the radial fluid forces during operation using a blood analog mixture. The axial fluid forces for a centered impeller position were found to range from 0.5 +/- 0.01 to 1 +/- 0.02 N in magnitude for 0.5 +/- 0.095 to 3.5 +/- 0.164 Lpm over rotational speeds of 6110 +/- 0.39 to 8030 +/- 0.57% rpm. The CFD predictions for the axial forces deviated from the experimental data by approximately 8.5% with a maximum difference of 18% at higher flow rates. Similarly for the off-centered impeller conditions, the maximum radial fluid force along the y-axis was found to be -0.57 +/- 0.17 N. The maximum cross-coupling force in the x direction was found to be larger with a maximum value of 0.74 +/- 0.22 N. This resulted in a 25-35% overestimate of the radial fluid force as compared to the CFD predictions; this overestimation will lead to a far more robust magnetic suspension design. The axial and radial forces estimated from the computational results are well within a range over which a compact magnetic suspension can compensate for flow perturbations. This study also serves as an effective and novel design methodology for blood pump

  16. Measurement capability of field portable organic vapor monitoring instruments under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Christopher C; Pearce, Terri A; Lawrence, Robert B; Hudnall, Judith B; Slaven, James E; Martin, Stephen B

    2009-01-01

    The performance of field portable direct-reading organic vapor monitors (DROVMs) was evaluated under a variety of experimental conditions. Four of the DROVMs had photoionization detectors (ppbRAE, IAQRAE, MultiRAE, and Century Toxic Vapor Analyzer), one had a flame ionization detector (Century Toxic Vapor Analyzer), and one was a single-beam infrared spectrophotometer (SapphIRe). Four of each DROVM (two Century Toxic Vapor Analyzers and SapphIRes) were tested. The DROVMs were evaluated at three temperatures (4 degrees C, 21 degrees C, and 38 degrees C), three relative humidities (30%, 60%, and 90%), and two hexane concentrations (5 ppm and 100 ppm). These conditions were selected to provide a range within the operational parameters of all the instruments. At least four replicate trials were performed across the 18 experimental conditions (3 temperatures x 3 relative humidities x 2 concentrations). To evaluate performance, the 4-hr time-weighted average readings from the DROVMs in a given trial were compared with the average of two charcoal tube concentrations using pairwise comparison. The pairwise comparison criterion was +/-25% measurement agreement between each individual DROVM and the DROVMs as a group and the average charcoal tube concentration. The ppbRAE group performed the best with 40% of all readings meeting the comparison criterion followed by the SapphIRe group at 39%. Among individual DROVMs, the best performer was a SapphIRe, with 57% of its readings meeting the criterion. The data was further analyzed by temperature, humidity, and concentration. The results indicated the performance of some DROVMs may be affected by temperature, humidity, and/or concentration. The ppbRAE group performed best at 21 degrees C with the percentage of readings meeting the criterion increasing to 63%. At the 5 ppm concentration, 44% of the ppbRAE group readings met the criterion, while at 100 ppm, only 35% did. The results indicate that monitors can be used as survey tools

  17. Experimental Measurements of the Secondary Electron Yield in the Experimental Measurement of the Secondary Electron Yield in the PEP-II Particle Accelerator Beam Line

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Collet, G.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Markiewicz, T.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seeman, J.; Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen

    2010-08-25

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of the positron Damping Ring (DR) of future Linear Colliders (LC) such as ILC and CLIC. To test a series of promising possible electron cloud mitigation techniques as surface coatings and grooves, in the Positron Low Energy Ring (LER) of the PEP-II accelerator, we have installed several test vacuum chambers including (i) a special chamber to monitor the variation of the secondary electron yield of technical surface materials and coatings under the effect of ion, electron and photon conditioning in situ in the beam line; (ii) chambers with grooves in a straight magnetic-free section; and (iii) coated chambers in a dedicated newly installed 4-magnet chicane to study mitigations in a magnetic field region. In this paper, we describe the ongoing R&D effort to mitigate the electron cloud effect for the LC damping ring, focusing on the first experimental area and on results of the reduction of the secondary electron yield due to in situ conditioning.

  18. Experimental Measurement and Computational Simulation of the Strains on a Single Yarn in a Kevlar Fabric During Stretching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    displacement and strain time histories matched reasonably well with the experimental data. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Photogrammetry strain measurements optical...and textile composites. For instance, Lomov et al. (1, 2) studied the in-plane deformation of yarns in a fabric that underwent shearing using two...sensitivity of the friction coefficient between yarns under a static stretching condition. 2. Experimental Method We used a 5x5 plain- weave Kevlar

  19. Matter from Outside Our Solar System -- New Insights, Part II. Experimental Measurements and Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wefel, John P.

    1982-01-01

    The second of two parts (part 1 in v20 n4, p222, Apr 1982) focuses on experimental techniques used to study cosmic-ray isotopic composition, experimental results, and comparison between cosmic-ray source matter and solar-system material. Several models for nucleosynthesis and evolution of cosmic-source matter are also discussed. (Author/JN)

  20. Experimental design to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, Paul; Turck-Chieze, S.; Colgan, J.; Ducret, J.-E.; Fontes, C. J.; Guzik, J. A.; Kilcrease, D. P.; La Pennec, M.; Mancini, R. C.; Mussack, K.; Orban, C.; Perry, T. S.; Poole, P. L.; Trantham, Matt

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. This discrepancy has led to an investigation of opacities through laboratory experiments and improved opacity models for many of the larger contributors to the sun's opacity, including iron and oxygen. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al., 2015]. Although these results are still controversial, repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for C, O and Fe to address the solar abundance issue [Colgan, 2013]. Armstrong et al. [2014] have also implemented changes in the ATOMIC code for low-Z elements. However, no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions. This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDPLP, Grant No. DE-NA0001840, and the NLUF Program, Grant No. DE-NA0000850, and through LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  1. A comparison between theoretical prediction and experimental measurement of the dynamic behavior of spur gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Forrester, B. David; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    A comparison was made between computer model predictions of gear dynamics behavior and experimental results. The experimental data were derived from the NASA gear noise rig, which was used to record dynamic tooth loads and vibration. The experimental results were compared with predictions from the DSTO Aeronautical Research Laboratory's gear dynamics code for a matrix of 28 load speed points. At high torque the peak dynamic load predictions agree with the experimental results with an average error of 5 percent in the speed range 800 to 6000 rpm. Tooth separation (or bounce), which was observed in the experimental data for light torque, high speed conditions, was simulated by the computer model. The model was also successful in simulating the degree of load sharing between gear teeth in the multiple tooth contact region.

  2. A comparison between theoretical prediction and experimental measurement of the dynamic behavior of spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Forrester, B. David; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison was made between computer model predictions of gear dynamics behavior and experimental results. The experimental data were derived from the NASA gear noise rig, which was used to record dynamic tooth loads and vibration. The experimental results were compared with predictions from the DSTO Aeronautical Research Laboratory's gear dynamics code for a matrix of 28 load speed points. At high torque the peak dynamic load predictions agree with the experimental results with an average error of 5 percent in the speed range 800 to 6000 rpm. Tooth separation (or bounce), which was observed in the experimental data for light torque, high speed conditions, was simulated by the computer model. The model was also successful in simulating the degree of load sharing between gear teeth in the multiple tooth contact region.

  3. Beaked Whales Respond to Simulated and Actual Navy Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Tyack, Peter L.; Zimmer, Walter M. X.; Moretti, David; Southall, Brandon L.; Claridge, Diane E.; Durban, John W.; Clark, Christopher W.; D'Amico, Angela; DiMarzio, Nancy; Jarvis, Susan; McCarthy, Elena; Morrissey, Ronald; Ward, Jessica; Boyd, Ian L.

    2011-01-01

    Beaked whales have mass stranded during some naval sonar exercises, but the cause is unknown. They are difficult to sight but can reliably be detected by listening for echolocation clicks produced during deep foraging dives. Listening for these clicks, we documented Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, in a naval underwater range where sonars are in regular use near Andros Island, Bahamas. An array of bottom-mounted hydrophones can detect beaked whales when they click anywhere within the range. We used two complementary methods to investigate behavioral responses of beaked whales to sonar: an opportunistic approach that monitored whale responses to multi-day naval exercises involving tactical mid-frequency sonars, and an experimental approach using playbacks of simulated sonar and control sounds to whales tagged with a device that records sound, movement, and orientation. Here we show that in both exposure conditions beaked whales stopped echolocating during deep foraging dives and moved away. During actual sonar exercises, beaked whales were primarily detected near the periphery of the range, on average 16 km away from the sonar transmissions. Once the exercise stopped, beaked whales gradually filled in the center of the range over 2–3 days. A satellite tagged whale moved outside the range during an exercise, returning over 2–3 days post-exercise. The experimental approach used tags to measure acoustic exposure and behavioral reactions of beaked whales to one controlled exposure each of simulated military sonar, killer whale calls, and band-limited noise. The beaked whales reacted to these three sound playbacks at sound pressure levels below 142 dB re 1 µPa by stopping echolocation followed by unusually long and slow ascents from their foraging dives. The combined results indicate similar disruption of foraging behavior and avoidance by beaked whales in the two different contexts, at exposures well below those used by regulators to define

  4. Beaked whales respond to simulated and actual navy sonar.

    PubMed

    Tyack, Peter L; Zimmer, Walter M X; Moretti, David; Southall, Brandon L; Claridge, Diane E; Durban, John W; Clark, Christopher W; D'Amico, Angela; DiMarzio, Nancy; Jarvis, Susan; McCarthy, Elena; Morrissey, Ronald; Ward, Jessica; Boyd, Ian L

    2011-03-14

    Beaked whales have mass stranded during some naval sonar exercises, but the cause is unknown. They are difficult to sight but can reliably be detected by listening for echolocation clicks produced during deep foraging dives. Listening for these clicks, we documented Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, in a naval underwater range where sonars are in regular use near Andros Island, Bahamas. An array of bottom-mounted hydrophones can detect beaked whales when they click anywhere within the range. We used two complementary methods to investigate behavioral responses of beaked whales to sonar: an opportunistic approach that monitored whale responses to multi-day naval exercises involving tactical mid-frequency sonars, and an experimental approach using playbacks of simulated sonar and control sounds to whales tagged with a device that records sound, movement, and orientation. Here we show that in both exposure conditions beaked whales stopped echolocating during deep foraging dives and moved away. During actual sonar exercises, beaked whales were primarily detected near the periphery of the range, on average 16 km away from the sonar transmissions. Once the exercise stopped, beaked whales gradually filled in the center of the range over 2-3 days. A satellite tagged whale moved outside the range during an exercise, returning over 2-3 days post-exercise. The experimental approach used tags to measure acoustic exposure and behavioral reactions of beaked whales to one controlled exposure each of simulated military sonar, killer whale calls, and band-limited noise. The beaked whales reacted to these three sound playbacks at sound pressure levels below 142 dB re 1 µPa by stopping echolocation followed by unusually long and slow ascents from their foraging dives. The combined results indicate similar disruption of foraging behavior and avoidance by beaked whales in the two different contexts, at exposures well below those used by regulators to define

  5. Experimental design for reflection measurements of highly reactive liquid or solid substances with application to liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Gossler, A.A.

    1980-06-30

    A versatile goniometer system with associated electronic components and mechanical instruments has been assembled. It is designed to measure spectral, specular reflectances of highly reactive liquid or solid substances over a spectral range of 0.3 to 9 ..mu.. and incidence angles of 12 to 30/sup 0/ off the normal direction. The capability of measuring reflectances of liquid substances clearly distinguishes this experimental design from conventional systems which are applicable only to solid substances. This design has been used to measure the spectral, specular reflectance of liquid sodium and preliminary results obtained are compared with those of solid sodium measured by other investigators.

  6. Two Temperature Modeling and Experimental Measurements of Laser Sustained Hydrogen Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    kinetic temperature model. At this level the species densities may be computed through a thermodynamic analysis using the law of mass action and an equation... Thermodynamic State .................................................................... 10 1.5 Plasma Composition...119 Appendix B. Experimental Data Error Analysis

  7. Experimental measurements of lung resonant frequencies in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and white whale (Delphinapterus leucas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, James J.

    2003-04-01

    An acoustic backscatter technique was used to estimate in vivo whole-lung resonant frequencies in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and a white whale (Delphinapterus leucas). Subjects were trained to submerge and position themselves near an underwater sound projector and a receiving hydrophone. Acoustic pressure measurements were made near the subjects' lungs while insonified with pure tones at frequencies from 16 to 100 Hz. Whole-lung resonant frequencies were estimated by comparing pressures measured near the subjects' lungs to those measured from the same location without the subject present. Experimentally measured resonant frequencies and damping ratios were much higher than those predicted using equivalent volume spherical air bubble models. The experimental technique, data analysis method, and discrepancy between the observed and predicted values will be discussed. The potential effects of depth on the resonance frequencies will also be discussed.

  8. Experimental Demonstration of Direct Path State Characterization by Strongly Measuring Weak Values in a Matter-Wave Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denkmayr, Tobias; Geppert, Hermann; Lemmel, Hartmut; Waegell, Mordecai; Dressel, Justin; Hasegawa, Yuji; Sponar, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    A method was recently proposed and experimentally realized for characterizing a quantum state by directly measuring its complex probability amplitudes in a particular basis using so-called weak values. Recently, Vallone and Dequal [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 040502 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.040502] showed theoretically that weak measurements are not a necessary condition to determine the weak value. Here, we report a measurement scheme used in a matter-wave interferometric experiment in which the neutron path system's quantum state was characterized via direct measurements, using both strong and weak interactions. Experimental evidence is given that strong interactions outperform weak ones for tomographic accuracy. Our results are not limited to neutron interferometry, but can be used in a wide range of quantum systems.

  9. Local Neutron Flux Distribution Measurements by Wire-Dosimetry in the AMMON Experimental Program in the EOLE Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruel, A.; Di Salvo, J.; Roche, A.; Girard, J.-M.; Philibert, H.; Bonora, J.; Ledoux, J.-F.; Morel, C.; Lecluze, A.; Foucras, A.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Colombier, A.-C.

    2016-02-01

    Dosimetry measurements were carried out during the AMMON experimental program, in the EOLE facility. Al-0.1 wt% Au wires were positioned along curved fuel plates of JHR-type assemblies to investigate the azimuthal and axial gold capture rate profiles, directly linked to the thermal and epithermal flux. After irradiation, wires were cut into small segments (a few mm), and the gold capture rate of each part was measured by gamma spectrometry on the MADERE platform. This paper presents results in the "hafnium" configuration, and more specifically the azimuthal flux profile characterization. The final uncertainty on each measured wire lies below 1% (at 2 standard deviations). Experimental profiles are in a good agreement against Monte Carlo calculations, and the 4% capture rate increase at the plate edge is well observed. The flux dissymmetry due to assembly position in the core is also measured, and shows a 10% discrepancy between the two edges of the plate.

  10. An Experimental Study on the Iso-Content-Based Angle Similarity Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin; Rasmussen, Edie M.

    2002-01-01

    Retrieval performance of the iso-content-based angle similarity measure within the angle, distance, conjunction, disjunction, and ellipse retrieval models is compared with retrieval performance of the distance similarity measure and the angle similarity measure. Results show the iso-content-based angle similarity measure achieves satisfactory…

  11. Adhesive measurements of polymer bonded explosive constituents using the JKR experimental technique with a viscoelastic contact description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, N. R.; Williamson, D. M.; Lewis, D.; Glauser, A.; Jardine, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown experimentally that under many circumstances the strength limiting factor of Polymer Bonded Explosives (PBXs) is the adhesion which exists between the filler crystals and the polymer matrix. Experimental measurements of the Work of Adhesion between different binders and glass have been conducted using the JKR experimental technique, a reversible axisymmetric fracture experiment, during which the area of contact and the applied force are both measured during loading and unloading of the interface. The data taken with this technique show a rate dependence not present in the analytical JKR theory which is normally used to describe the adhesive contact of two elastic bodies, and which arises from the viscoelastic properties of the bulk polymer. The data is intended to inform the development, and validate the predictions of, microstructural models of PBX deformation and failure.

  12. Experimental Measurement of Settling Velocity of Spherical Particles in Unconfined and Confined Surfactant-based Shear Thinning Viscoelastic Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Sahil; Sharma, Mukul M.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study is performed to measure the terminal settling velocities of spherical particles in surfactant based shear thinning viscoelastic (VES) fluids. The measurements are made for particles settling in unbounded fluids and fluids between parallel walls. VES fluids over a wide range of rheological properties are prepared and rheologically characterized. The rheological characterization involves steady shear-viscosity and dynamic oscillatory-shear measurements to quantify the viscous and elastic properties respectively. The settling velocities under unbounded conditions are measured in beakers having diameters at least 25x the diameter of particles. For measuring settling velocities between parallel walls, two experimental cells with different wall spacing are constructed. Spherical particles of varying sizes are gently dropped in the fluids and allowed to settle. The process is recorded with a high resolution video camera and the trajectory of the particle is recorded using image analysis software. Terminal settling velocities are calculated from the data. The impact of elasticity on settling velocity in unbounded fluids is quantified by comparing the experimental settling velocity to the settling velocity calculated by the inelastic drag predictions of Renaud et al.1 Results show that elasticity of fluids can increase or decrease the settling velocity. The magnitude of reduction/increase is a function of the rheological properties of the fluids and properties of particles. Confining walls are observed to cause a retardation effect on settling and the retardation is measured in terms of wall factors. PMID:24430257

  13. Experimental measurement of settling velocity of spherical particles in unconfined and confined surfactant-based shear thinning viscoelastic fluids.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sahil; Sharma, Mukul M

    2014-01-03

    An experimental study is performed to measure the terminal settling velocities of spherical particles in surfactant based shear thinning viscoelastic (VES) fluids. The measurements are made for particles settling in unbounded fluids and fluids between parallel walls. VES fluids over a wide range of rheological properties are prepared and rheologically characterized. The rheological characterization involves steady shear-viscosity and dynamic oscillatory-shear measurements to quantify the viscous and elastic properties respectively. The settling velocities under unbounded conditions are measured in beakers having diameters at least 25x the diameter of particles. For measuring settling velocities between parallel walls, two experimental cells with different wall spacing are constructed. Spherical particles of varying sizes are gently dropped in the fluids and allowed to settle. The process is recorded with a high resolution video camera and the trajectory of the particle is recorded using image analysis software. Terminal settling velocities are calculated from the data. The impact of elasticity on settling velocity in unbounded fluids is quantified by comparing the experimental settling velocity to the settling velocity calculated by the inelastic drag predictions of Renaud et al.(1) Results show that elasticity of fluids can increase or decrease the settling velocity. The magnitude of reduction/increase is a function of the rheological properties of the fluids and properties of particles. Confining walls are observed to cause a retardation effect on settling and the retardation is measured in terms of wall factors.

  14. 47 CFR 1.544 - Application for broadcast station to conduct field strength measurements and for experimental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application for broadcast station to conduct field strength measurements and for experimental operation. 1.544 Section 1.544 Telecommunication... General Filing Requirements § 1.544 Application for broadcast station to conduct field...

  15. An Evaluation of Four Experimental Methods for Measuring Mean Properties of a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nothwang, George J

    1957-01-01

    Surveys were made through a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate by means of a pitot probe, an x-ray densitometer, and hot-wire and cold-wire probes. Results from these surveys were analyzed to determine (a) the reliability of the basic data and hence the methods by which they were obtained, and (b) how well the actual distributions of properties in the boundary layer compare with those commonly assumed in semiempirical and theoretical analyses. All surveys were made at the same longitudinal station on the flat plate. The tests were conducted in a an 8- by 8-inch supersonic nozzle. The free-stream Mach number was 3.03 and the Reynolds number was approximately 210,000 based on boundary-layer thickness.

  16. Final report on an experimental evaluation of remote sensing based hydrocarbon measurements: A comparison to fid measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.D.; Mulawa, P.A.; Giles, M.T.; Kennedy, K.G.; Groblicki, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to intercompare hydrocarbon (HC) measurements performed by a number of different instruments: a gas chromatograph (GC), a flame ionizaton detector (FID), a fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), a commercially produced non-dispersive infrared analyzer (NDIR), and two remote sensors. These instruments were used to measure total HC concentrations in a variety of samples including (1) ten different individual HC species, (2) twelve different vehicle exhaust samples, and (3) three different volatilized fuel samples. The twelve exhaust samples were generated by operating two different vehicles on a dynamometer. Each vehicle was operated at different times with three different fuels.

  17. [The measurement of time and its instruments: the program of experimental psychology of Gabriele Buccola].

    PubMed

    Degni, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    Gabriele Buccola is remembered as the first Italian psychologist to have developed a rigorous program of laboratory research. The careful examination of the instruments and experimental planning of his psychochronometric investigations reveals the indissoluble bond between theory and experimentation that defines a scientific conception of psychology on the basis of a differential methodology. For Buccola it is important to demonstrate that there exist "laws" that govern the mental processes, and that there exists a time that regulates human reactions and behaviour, considering however the individual differences and various factors that can bear influence to increase or decrease it. The use of 'intelligent' instruments proves to be fundamental within a model of experimentation directed towards pointing out individual differences and not just identifying the general laws of mental functioning. Buccola in this way imparts a psychological characterization to the study of mental illness--placing him as an initiator of experimental psychopathology, which will have a significant development in Europe thanks precisely to the work of Kraepelin--along with a differential and clinical-experimental bent to the emerging Italian scientific psychology. Lastly, the attention directed to the study of complex mental processes leads Buccola to lay the foundation in Italy for the study of the subjective experience of time.

  18. Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosols: Experimental Methods and Results of Measurements off the East Coast of the United States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-19

    errors, depending oin the nuclei spectrum (size distribution) being measured. The accu - racy limitations of TG(DCCs in general, and (i" our chamber in...shelter can easily be removed from the tran- sporter for shipboard use. The 200- ampere service in the shelter is more than sufficient for air

  19. Comparison of Experimentally Measured and Computed Second-Mode Disturbances in Hypersonic Boundary-Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Stetson and Kimmel3 which used hot - wire anemometry to measure second-mode disturbances in a conventional wind tunnel. Additionally, measurements of...second- mode waves have been carried out in the past with hot wires in both noisy and quiet flow.4 Since these measurements are very difficult due to...the limited mechanical strength of small hot wires with sufficiently high frequency response, an appropriate non-intrusive measurement technique is

  20. Trigger - and heat-transfer times measured during experimental molten-fuel-interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Spitznagel, N.; Dürig, T.; Zimanowski, B.

    2013-10-15

    A modified setup featuring high speed high resolution data and video recording was developed to obtain detailed information on trigger and heat transfer times during explosive molten fuel-coolant-interaction (MFCI). MFCI occurs predominantly in configurations where water is entrapped by hot melt. The setup was modified to allow direct observation of the trigger and explosion onset. In addition the influences of experimental control and data acquisition can now be more clearly distinguished from the pure phenomena. More precise experimental studies will facilitate the description of MFCI thermodynamics.

  1. Flight Measurements of Helicopter Blade Motion with a Comparison between Theoretical and Experimental Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1947-04-01

    magnitudes and trends of the higher harmonica of flapping and the periodic in-plane motion are studied as a source of rotor vibration. Measurements of blade...affected by application of a correction to the measured flapping for the effect of this feathering. The measured third harmonica a-a and bo are

  2. An innovative method for coordinate measuring machine one-dimensional self-calibration with simplified experimental process.

    PubMed

    Fang, Cheng; Butler, David Lee

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, an innovative method for CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine) self-calibration is proposed. In contrast to conventional CMM calibration that relies heavily on a high precision reference standard such as a laser interferometer, the proposed calibration method is based on a low-cost artefact which is fabricated with commercially available precision ball bearings. By optimizing the mathematical model and rearranging the data sampling positions, the experimental process and data analysis can be simplified. In mathematical expression, the samples can be minimized by eliminating the redundant equations among those configured by the experimental data array. The section lengths of the artefact are measured at arranged positions, with which an equation set can be configured to determine the measurement errors at the corresponding positions. With the proposed method, the equation set is short of one equation, which can be supplemented by either measuring the total length of the artefact with a higher-precision CMM or calibrating the single point error at the extreme position with a laser interferometer. In this paper, the latter is selected. With spline interpolation, the error compensation curve can be determined. To verify the proposed method, a simple calibration system was set up on a commercial CMM. Experimental results showed that with the error compensation curve uncertainty of the measurement can be reduced to 50%.

  3. A Multibody Knee Model Corroborates Subject-Specific Experimental Measurements of Low Ligament Forces and Kinematic Coupling During Passive Flexion.

    PubMed

    Kia, Mohammad; Schafer, Kevin; Lipman, Joseph; Cross, Michael; Mayman, David; Pearle, Andrew; Wickiewicz, Thomas; Imhauser, Carl

    2016-05-01

    A multibody model of the knee was developed and the predicted ligament forces and kinematics during passive flexion corroborated subject-specific measurements obtained from a human cadaveric knee that was tested using a robotic manipulator. The model incorporated a novel strategy to estimate the slack length of ligament fibers based on experimentally measured ligament forces at full extension and included multifiber representations for the cruciates. The model captured experimentally measured ligament forces (≤ 5.7 N root mean square (RMS) difference), coupled internal rotation (≤ 1.6 deg RMS difference), and coupled anterior translation (≤ 0.4 mm RMS difference) through 130 deg of passive flexion. This integrated framework of model and experiment improves our understanding of how passive structures, such as ligaments and articular geometries, interact to generate knee kinematics and ligament forces.

  4. Parameterization of a process-based soil erosion model by means of experimental field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butzen, Verena; Seeger, Manuel; Scherer, Ulrike; Casper, Markus; Ries, Johannes B.

    2010-05-01

    The physically-based hydrological and soil erosion model CATFLOW-SED has been developed with data from a loess area in Germany (Maurer, 1997; Scherer, 2008) and covers the principal processes detachment, transport and deposition. The catchment is divided into slopes on the basis of topography as well as soil and land-use maps. The slopes are further divided into slope segments and the flow-routing is abstractly modeled as slope cross sections connected by a drainage network. In many process-based soil erosion models, soil erosion is calculated by an interaction of the forces of flowing water and rainfall. In CATFLOW-SED the detachment process is divided into the pulse current of precipitation and the sheer stress of flowing water. The most important parameter concerning detachment is the erosion resistance parameter fcrit. The described model is parameterized for a small catchment in the Central Spanish Pyrenees with experimental field data from this study area. The mean annual precipitation amount of 1120 mm is rather high but as it is typical of a Mediterranean climate the summer months show a deficit in water balance. Accordingly, a seasonal variation in dominating overland flow generation and soil erosion processes, can be observed particularly for wetland areas that regularly dry out in summer. The spatial and temporal pattern of overland-flow generation and erosion processes and their intensity in the study area is assessed by means of small plot-scale rainfall experiments in the field. The gained data are the amounts of overland flow and eroded material for intervals of five minutes duration. The gained results are used for the parameterization of the soil specific parameter fcrit in CATFLOW-SED. In order to cover the seasonal variation in dominating runoff processes, rainfall simulations that were carried out under dry soil moisture conditions in September as well as measurements that were done under moist conditions in March are used for parameterization

  5. Can Response Speed Be Fixed Experimentally, and Does This Lead to Unconfounded Measurement of Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolsinova, Maria; Tijmstra, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Goldhammer (this issue) proposes an interesting approach to dealing with the speededness of item responses. Rather than modeling speed as a latent variable that varies from person to person, he proposes to use experimental conditions that are expected to fix the speed, thereby eliminating individual differences on this dimension in order to make…

  6. Unbiased FIR Estimates vs. the Sawtooth-Corrected GPS-Based Measurements: Experimental Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION Y. S. Shmaliy, L. Arceo-Miquel, J. Munoz-Diaz, and O. Ibarra-Manzano Guanajuato University, FIMEE, Mexico E-mail: shmaliy...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Guanajuato University, FIMEE

  7. Does Negative Mood Influence Self-Report Assessment of Individual and Relational Measures? An Experimental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heene, Els; De Raedt, Rudi; Buysse, Ann; Van Oost, Paulette

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to test the influence of negative mood on the self-report of individual and relational correlates of depression and marital distress. The authors applied a combined experimental mood induction procedure, based on music, autobiographical recall, and environmental manipulation. Results showed that the mood manipulation…

  8. Experimental density measurements of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate at elevated temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bamgbade, Babatunde A; Wu, Yue; Baled, Hseen O; Enick, Robert M; Burgess, Ward A

    2013-08-01

    Experimental high-temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) density data for bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) are reported in this study. DEHP is a popular choice as a reference fluid for viscosity calibrations in the HTHP region. However, reliable HTHP density values are needed for accurate viscosity calculations for certain viscometers (e.g. rolling ball). HTHP densities are determined at T = (373, 424, 476, 492, and 524) K and P to 270 MPa using a variable-volume, high-pressure view cell. The experimental density data are satisfactorily correlated by the modified Tait equation with a mean absolute percent deviation (δ) of 0.15. The experimental data are modeled with the Peng–Robinson (PREoS), volume-translated PREoS (VT-PREoS), and perturbed chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT EoS) models. The required parameters for the two PREoS and the PC-SAFT EoS models are determined using group contribution methods. The PC-SAFT EoS performs the best of the three models with a δ of 2.12. The PC-SAFT EoS is also fit to the experimental data to obtain a new set of pure component parameters that yield a δ of 0.20 for these HTHP conditions.

  9. In-situ measurement of dust devil activity at La Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We document observations of dust devil vortices using a linear array of 10 miniature pressure- and sunlight-logging stations in summer 2013 at La Jornada Experimental Range in the southwestern USA. These data provide a census of vortex and dust-devil activity at this site. The simultaneous spatial...

  10. A convenient method for experimental determination of yields and isomeric ratios in photonuclear reactions measured by the activation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, D.; Dobreva, E.; Nenov, N.; Todorov, V.

    1995-02-01

    A generalized exact formula is derived for a determination of the experimental isomeric ratio in any incident particle activation. For the particular case, when the activity of the ground state results from the simultaneous decay of both states and can be conveniently measured, the appropriate modification of this formula is evaluated and applied to six photonuclear reactions induced by 43 MeV bremsstrahlung. The experimental isomeric yield ratios of (γ, 3n) 110m,gIn; (γ, p) (γ, pn), (γ, 2n2p) 117m,gIn; (γ, n) 164m,gHo and (γ, 3n) 162m,gHo are deduced.

  11. Experimental measurements with Monte Carlo corrections and theoretical calculations of neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Jun; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In has been measured by the activation technique at neutron energies of 2.95, 3.94, and 5.24 MeV with the neutron capture cross sections of 197Au as an internal standard. The effects of multiple scattering and flux attenuation were corrected using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. Based on the experimental values, the 115In neutron inelastic scattering cross sections data were theoretically calculated between the 1 and 15 MeV with the TALYS software code, the theoretical results of this study are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental results.

  12. Magnetic susceptibility measurements as proxy method to monitor soil pollution: development of experimental protocols for field surveys.

    PubMed

    D'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Chianese, Domenico; Coppola, Rosa; Macchiato, Maria; Ragosta, Maria

    2007-02-01

    In the framework of the development of new methods for measuring and monitoring soil pollution, this paper deals with the use of magnetic methodologies to monitor the heavy metals presence in soils. In particular it shows a procedure for collecting magnetic susceptibility measurements in order to interpret them as proxy variable for monitoring heavy metals in soils. Magnetic measurements are carried out using a magnetic susceptibility meter with two different probes for in situ field surveys. The experimental procedure is divided in two parts. In the first part we carry out laboratory tests aimed to evaluate, for both the probes, the effective investigation depth for soil, the measurement reproducibility under different conditions, and the influence of water content. We complete this part comparing in situ measurements obtained by means of two probes with different characteristics. In the second part we carry out tests to evaluate the relationships between heavy metal levels and magnetic susceptibility values of soil samples. We investigate the variability of the magnetic susceptibility measurements contaminating different soil samples with well known concentration of heavy metals. Moreover we study the correlation between magnetic susceptibility values and metal concentrations, determined by means of AAS, in soil samples collected during a field survey. Results suggest that a careful check of the experimental procedure play a crucial role for using magnetic susceptibility measurements for heavy metals in situ monitoring. This is very helpful both for improving the quality of data and for making simpler data interpretation.

  13. [Discussion of actual legal minimum requirements for feeder space and perch length in laying hen husbandry in the light of the body widths measured in Lohmann Selected Leghorn and Lohmann Brown laying hens].

    PubMed

    Briese, Andreas; Spindler, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Legal requirements on space and dimensions regarding furnished cages and alternative systems in laying hen husbandry are subject of constant discussion. Further knowledge about basic measures of the hens might help to come to reasonable results in the future. Digital images of Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL) and Lohmann Brown (LB) laying hens, housed at the Lehr- und Forschungsgut Ruthe, University for Veterinary Medicine Hanover, Foundation, in Big Dutchman Eurovent laying hen cages, were made at three stages (19th, 36th and 58th week) of production. All hens had been taken out of their cages by night and set on a perch in a special cage used to photograph the hens frontally under controlled conditions. Body widths were calculated by a python application Cdisto.py0 2009 Andreas Briese) to mark and measure the body width in the digital images of a total of 156 hens. Mean body widths of 133.77 mm in Lohmann-LSL hens (SD = 9.71; N = 64; mean weight: 1.73 kg) and of 152.55 mm in Lohmann-LB hens (SD = 10.31; N = 92; mean weight: 1.93 kg) respectively were found. Even slight changes in body weights had no effect on the body width. Nonetheless the differences between both hybrids were always statistically significant (Mann-Whitney p < 0,001). Using these preliminary results on body width in a mathematical model simultanious feeding behaviour becomes only possible if the number of animals is reduced by 10.3% to 89.7% in LSL and by 21.3% to 78.7% in LB breeds in relation to a calculated maximum on base of the minimum space requirements for furnished cages in the EU-Dir 74/1999/EC.

  14. Apparent and Actual Dynamic Contact Angles in Confined Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Takeshi; Kajishima, Takeo

    2016-11-01

    To accurately predict the fluid flow with moving contact lines, it has a crucial importance to use a model for the dynamic contact angle which gives contact angles on the length scale corresponding to the spacial resolution of the fluid solver. The angle which a moving fluid interface forms to a solid surface deviates from an actual (microscopic) dynamic contact angle depending on the distance from the contact line and should be called an apparent (macroscopic) dynamic contact angle. They were, however, often undistinguished especially in the experimental works, on which a number of empirical correlations between a contact angle and a contact line velocity have been proposed. The present study is the first attempt to measure both apparent and actual contact angles from the identical data sets to discuss the difference and the relationship between these two contact angles of difference length scales. The study is conducted by means of numerical simulation, solving the Navier-Stokes equation and the Cahn-Hilliard equation under the generalized Navier boundary condition for the immiscible two-phase flow in channels. The present study also illustrates how the system size and the physical properties of the adjoining fluid affect the apparent and the actual dynamic contact angles. JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 15K17974.

  15. Experimental apparatus for photon/ion coincidence measurements of dielectronic recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, L. D.; Kohl, J. L.; Lafyatis, G. P.; Young, A. R.; Chutjian, A.

    1986-01-01

    An inclined beams apparatus for the measurement of absolute cross sections for dielectronic recombination between free electrons and singly or multiply charged ions is described. The collision products, a photon and a lower-charge-state ion, are detected in delayed coincidence. Measurements of dielectronic recombination in C(3+) are described to illustrate the use of the apparatus and techniques. Verification of the calibrations and operation of the apparatus is demonstrated through measurements of charge transfer and electron impact excitation.

  16. The Synthesis of Structural Responses Using Experimentally Measured Frequency Response Functions and Field Test Data

    SciTech Connect

    CAP,JEROME S.; NELSON,CURTIS F.

    2000-11-17

    This paper presents an analysis technique used to generate the structural response at locations not measured during the ejection of a captive-carried store. The ejection shock event is complicated by the fact that forces may be imparted to the store at eight distinct locations. The technique derives forcing functions by combining the initial field test data for a limited number of measurement locations with Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) measured using a traditional modal-type impact (tap) test at the same locations. The derived forcing functions were then used with tap test FRFs measured at additional locations of interest to produce the desired response data.

  17. Experimental comparison of measurement techniques for drop size distributions in liquid/liquid dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaß, S.; Wollny, S.; Voigt, A.; Kraume, M.

    2011-02-01

    An online measurement technique for drop size distribution in stirred tank reactors is needed but has not yet been developed. Different approaches and different techniques have been published as the new standard during the last decade. Three of them (focus beam reflectance measurement, two-dimensional optical reflectance measurement techniques and a fiber optical FBR sensor) are tested, and their results are compared with trustful image analysis results from an in situ microscope. The measurement of drop sizes in liquid/liquid distribution is a major challenge for all tested measurement probes, and none provides exact results for the tested system of pure toluene/water compared to an endoscope. Not only the size analysis but also the change of the size over time gives unreasonable results. The influence of the power input on the drop size distribution was the only reasonable observation in this study. The FBR sensor was not applicable at all to the used system. While all three probes are based on laser back scattering, the general question of the usability of this principle for measuring evolving drop size distributions in liquid/liquid system is asked. The exterior smooth surface of droplets in such systems is leading to strong errors in the measurement of the size of the drops. That leads to widely divergent results. A different measurement principle should be used for online measurements of drop size distributions than laser back scattering.

  18. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. We illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound \\text{FeSi} over a wide range of temperature. Results agree well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials.

  19. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; ...

    2016-07-20

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. In this study, we illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound FeSi over a wide range of temperature. Our results agreemore » well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials.« less

  20. Modeling non-harmonic behavior of materials from experimental inelastic neutron scattering and thermal expansion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Dipanshu; Aref, Amjad; Dargush, Gary; Delaire, Olivier A.

    2016-07-20

    Based on thermodynamic principles, we derive expressions quantifying the non-harmonic vibrational behavior of materials, which are rigorous yet easily evaluated from experimentally available data for the thermal expansion coefficient and the phonon density of states. These experimentally-derived quantities are valuable to benchmark first-principles theoretical predictions of harmonic and non-harmonic thermal behaviors using perturbation theory, ab initio molecular-dynamics, or Monte-Carlo simulations. In this study, we illustrate this analysis by computing the harmonic, dilational, and anharmonic contributions to the entropy, internal energy, and free energy of elemental aluminum and the ordered compound FeSi over a wide range of temperature. Our results agree well with previous data in the literature and provide an efficient approach to estimate anharmonic effects in materials.

  1. Post-mortem measurements of fuel retention at JET in 2007-2009 experimental campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivuranta, S.; Likonen, J.; Hakola, A.; Coad, J. P.; Widdowson, A.; Hole, D. E.; Rubel, M.; JET-EFDA contributors

    2013-07-01

    The deuterium inventory at Joint European Torus (JET) after the 2007-2009 experimental campaign has been evaluated using Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). A full poloidal set of divertor tiles were analysed providing estimation for the total deuterium retention of about 48 g. Deuterium is trapped mainly at the inner divertor floor tile and outer divertor floor tile. The total deuterium retention is ˜2%.

  2. Experimental Measurement of the Magnetic Field Spectrum In HSX Using Passing Particle Drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, V.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Anderson, D. T.; Almagri, A. F.

    2000-10-01

    The fluorescent mesh and electron gun technique is used to map the drift surfaces produced by a moderate energy (450eV) electron beam in HSX. The drift surfaces are mapped at several toroidal locations for magnetic fields ranging from 60 to 1000 gauss in both co- and counter-clockwise directions. The deviation of the particle from a flux surface is obtained by comparing the 450 eV particle orbit to that of a 20 eV particle. The experimental data show very good agreement with the expected scaling of the drift with the square root of the energy. By analyzing the magnitude and phase of the particle excursion from a flux surface, an approximate magnetic field spectrum can be obtained. We apply this technique to analyzing particle motion in HSX at very low fields (60 gauss). The experimental results indicate that the toroidal curvature in HSX is small and that the drift orbit in HSX is reduced by the high effective transform compared to an equivalent tokamak-like device. Details of the implementation and experimental results are presented.

  3. Experimental Comparison of Lightning Simulation Techniques to CV-580 Airborne Lightning Strike Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    sensors for electric field measurements and EG&G cylindrical moebius loop (CML) B-dot sensors for magnetic field measurements. External magnetic field...sensors used. The sensor data sheets include the Cylindrical Moebius Loop (CML), Multi-Gap Loop (MGL), Hollow Spherical Dipole (HSD), Flush Plate Dipole

  4. Fiber-optic interferometric sensors for measurements of pressure fluctuations - Experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; Soderman, P. T.

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometric sensor that is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center for pressure fluctuation measurements in wind tunnels is considered. Preliminary evaluation indicates that the fiber optic interferometric sensor can be successfully used as an aeroacoustic sensor and is capable of providing a powerful instrument to solve complex acoustic measurement problems in wind tunnels.

  5. Experimental method for reactor-noise measurements of effective beta. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, E.F.

    1981-09-01

    A variance-to-mean noise technique, modified to eliminate systematic errors from drifting of reactor power, has been used to infer integral values of effective beta for uranium and plutonium fueled fast reactor modk-ups. The measurement technique, including corrections for a finite detector-electrometer time response, is described together with preliminary beta measurement results.

  6. Novel experimental design for high pressure-high temperature electrical resistance measurements in a "Paris-Edinburgh" large volume press.

    PubMed

    Matityahu, Shlomi; Emuna, Moran; Yahel, Eyal; Makov, Guy; Greenberg, Yaron

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel experimental design for high sensitivity measurements of the electrical resistance of samples at high pressures (0-6 GPa) and high temperatures (300-1000 K) in a "Paris-Edinburgh" type large volume press. Uniquely, the electrical measurements are carried out directly on a small sample, thus greatly increasing the sensitivity of the measurement. The sensitivity to even minor changes in electrical resistance can be used to clearly identify phase transitions in material samples. Electrical resistance measurements are relatively simple and rapid to execute and the efficacy of the present experimental design is demonstrated by measuring the electrical resistance of Pb, Sn, and Bi across a wide domain of temperature-pressure phase space and employing it to identify the loci of phase transitions. Based on these results, the phase diagrams of these elements are reconstructed to high accuracy and found to be in excellent agreement with previous studies. In particular, by mapping the locations of several well-studied reference points in the phase diagram of Sn and Bi, it is demonstrated that a standard calibration exists for the temperature and pressure, thus eliminating the need for direct or indirect temperature and pressure measurements. The present technique will allow simple and accurate mapping of phase diagrams under extreme conditions and may be of particular importance in advancing studies of liquid state anomalies.

  7. Novel experimental design for high pressure-high temperature electrical resistance measurements in a "Paris-Edinburgh" large volume press

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matityahu, Shlomi; Emuna, Moran; Yahel, Eyal; Makov, Guy; Greenberg, Yaron

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel experimental design for high sensitivity measurements of the electrical resistance of samples at high pressures (0-6 GPa) and high temperatures (300-1000 K) in a "Paris-Edinburgh" type large volume press. Uniquely, the electrical measurements are carried out directly on a small sample, thus greatly increasing the sensitivity of the measurement. The sensitivity to even minor changes in electrical resistance can be used to clearly identify phase transitions in material samples. Electrical resistance measurements are relatively simple and rapid to execute and the efficacy of the present experimental design is demonstrated by measuring the electrical resistance of Pb, Sn, and Bi across a wide domain of temperature-pressure phase space and employing it to identify the loci of phase transitions. Based on these results, the phase diagrams of these elements are reconstructed to high accuracy and found to be in excellent agreement with previous studies. In particular, by mapping the locations of several well-studied reference points in the phase diagram of Sn and Bi, it is demonstrated that a standard calibration exists for the temperature and pressure, thus eliminating the need for direct or indirect temperature and pressure measurements. The present technique will allow simple and accurate mapping of phase diagrams under extreme conditions and may be of particular importance in advancing studies of liquid state anomalies.

  8. Carbon Isotope Measurements of Experimentally-Derived Hydrothermal Mineral-Catalyzed Organic Products by Pyrolysis-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Fu, Qi; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of experiments to measure the C isotope composition of mineral catalyzed organic compounds derived from high temperature and high pressure synthesis. These experiments make use of an innovative pyrolysis technique designed to extract and measure C isotopes. To date, our experiments have focused on the pyrolysis and C isotope ratio measurements of low-molecular weight intermediary hydrocarbons (organic acids and alcohols) and serve as a proof of concept for making C and H isotope measurements on more complicated mixtures of solid-phase hydrocarbons and intermediary products produced during high temperature and high pressure synthesis on mineral-catalyzed surfaces. The impetus for this work stems from recently reported observations of methane detected within the Martian atmosphere [1-4], coupled with evidence showing extensive water-rock interaction during Martian history [5-7]. Methane production on Mars could be the result of synthesis by mineral surface-catalyzed reduction of CO2 and/or CO by Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) reactions during serpentization reactions [8,9]. Others have conducted experimental studies to show that FTT reactions are plausible mechanisms for low-molecular weight hydrocarbon formation in hydrothermal systems at mid-ocean ridges [10-12]. Further, recent experiments by Fu et al. [13] focus on examining detailed C isotope measurements of hydrocarbons produced by surface-catalyzed mineral reactions. Work described in this paper details the experimental techniques used to measure intermediary organic reaction products (alcohols and organic acids).

  9. Experimental Measurements of a High Reynolds Num- ber Adverse Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Callum; Amili, Omid; Stanislas, Michel; Cuvier, Christophe; Foucaut, Jean-Marc; Srinath, Sricharan; Laval, Jean-Philippe; Kaehler, Christian; Hain, Rainer; Scharnowski, Sven; Schroeder, Andreas; Geisler, Reinhard; Agocs, Janos; Roese, Anni; Willert, Christian; Klinner, Joachim; Soria, Julio

    2016-11-01

    The study of adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers is complicated by the need to characterise both the local pressure gradient and it's upstream flow history. It is therefore necessary to measure a significant streamwise domain at a resolution sufficient to resolve the small scales features. To achieve this collaborative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed in the large boundary layer wind-tunnel at the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille, including: planar measurements spanning a streamwise domain of 3.5m using 16 cameras covering 15 δ spanwise wall-normal stereo-PIV measurements, high-speed micro-PIV of the near wall region and wall shear stress; and streamwise wall-normal PIV in the viscous sub layer. Details of the measurements and preliminary results will be presented.

  10. Experimental modeling of laminar composites for multifrequency eddy current measurements. [Thickness and resistivity measurement on Al/Kapton or Al/polyimide

    SciTech Connect

    Heckman, R.V.

    1980-08-01

    This report describes a computer modeling program, originally developed by Dodd and Deeds of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, capable of calculating the experimental voltage amplitudes and phases which can be obtained with rectangular cross-section coils being operated at multiple frequencies. This program was applied to two multilayered composites in order to determine the feasibility of making thickness and resistivity measurements of the individual layers. The results of these calculations indicate that the thickness of the aluminum/Kapton composite layers could be measured to a precision of better than 1% and the resistivity of the conductive layers could be measured to a precision of better than 10%. The second composite, a structure consisting of alternating layers of aluminum and polyimide, a varnish, was found to be measureable also. A minimum of two frequency components were found to be necessary for the aluminum/Kapton composite while three frequencies were found to be necessary for the aluminum polyimide case.

  11. Experimental evaluation of bone quality using speed of sound measurement in cadaver mandibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Haffar, Iyad; Padilla, Frederic; Laugier, Pascal; Nefussi, Raphael; Kolta, Sami; Foucart, Jean-Michel

    2004-10-01

    This study is the first attempt to use speed of sound (SOS) as a new ultrasonic diagnostic tool for bone quality assessment before oral implant treatment. The objective is to demonstrate the in vitro feasibility of local SOS measurement at the mandible, and to investigate the relationships between mandibular SOS and local bone mineral density (BMD) and the ratio between the trabecular and cortical thickness (Tb.Th/Cort.Th). Fourteen excised human mandible were measured in transmission with a pair of flat 1.6-MHz central frequency transducers. Three regions of interest (ROIs) were selected in the specimens: incisor, premolar and molar regions. Ten measurements with repositioning were performed on each ROI to determine the short-term precision. Dual x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed on the samples for local BMD measurements. Computed tomography (CT) was used to determine mandibular cross-sectional morphological measurements. SOS measurements at different sites were significantly different, reflecting the heterogeneity between the different sites. A strong linear relationship was found between SOS and BMD (r2=0.68, p<0,0001) while a nonlinear relationship was found between SOS and Tb.Th/Cort.Th (r2=0.48, p<0,0001). This study demonstrates in vitro the feasibility of SOS measurement at the mandible. In vitro mandibular SOS reflects local BMD and Tb.Th/Cort.Th before implant.

  12. Experimental measurements and CFD simulation of convective boiling during subcooled developing flow of R-11 within vertical annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouaichaoui, Y.; Kibboua, R.; Matkovič, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper a convective flow boiling of refrigerant R-11 in a vertical annular channel has been investigated. Measurements were performed under various conditions of mass flux, heat flux, and inlet subcooling, which enabled to study the influence of different boundary conditions on the development of local flow parameters. Also, some measurements have been compared to the predictions by the three-dimensional two-fluid model of subcooled boiling flow carried out with the computer code ANSYS-CFX-13. Simulation results successfully predict the main experimental tendencies associated with the heat flux and Reynolds number variation. A sensitivity analysis of several modelling parameters on the radial distribution of flow quantities has highlighted the importance of correct description of the boiling boundary layer. In general a good quantitative and qualitative agreement with experimental data was obtained.

  13. Comparison of laser anemometer measurements and theory in an annular turbine cascade with experimental accuracy determined by parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Seasholtz, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the velocity components in the blade to blade (axial tangential) plane were obtained with an axial flow turbine stator passage and were compared with calculations from three turbomachinery computer programs. The theoretical results were calculated from a quasi three dimensional inviscid code, a three dimensional inviscid code, and a three dimensional viscous code. Parameter estimation techniques and a particle dynamics calculation were used to assess the accuracy of the laser measurements, which allow a rational basis for comparison of the experimenal and theoretical results. The general agreement of the experimental data with the results from the two inviscid computer codes indicates the usefulness of these calculation procedures for turbomachinery blading. The comparison with the viscous code, while generally reasonable, was not as good as for the inviscid codes.

  14. Correlation of theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of damage around a shaft in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Holcomb, D.J.; DeVries, K.L.; Brodsky, N.S.

    1994-12-31

    Cross-hole ultrasonic measurements were made in the immediate wall of the Air Intake Shaft of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant facility. These measurements show that compressional wave speed markedly decreases at the shaft wall and then increases with radial distance from the shaft to eventually become that of solid or undamaged salt. This behavior is indicative of deformation damage or microfractures in the salt. These in situ data are compared to both laboratory measurements of wave speed as a function of volume dilatancy and to calculations based on the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model, with reasonable agreement.

  15. Fiber-optic interferometric sensors for measurements of pressure fluctuations: Experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.; Soderman, P. T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses an anechoic chamber evaluation of a fiber-optic interferometric sensor (fiber-optic microphone), which is being developed at NASA Ames Research Center for measurements of pressure fluctuations in wind tunnels.

  16. A Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Procedures to Measure Passive Drag in Human Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Tiago M.; Morais, Jorge E.; Forte, Pedro; Neiva, Henrique; Garrido, Nuno D.; Marinho, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the swimming hydrodynamics assessed with experimental and analytical procedures, as well as, to learn about the relative contributions of the friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag. Sixty young talented swimmers (30 boys and 30 girls with 13.59±0.77 and 12.61±0.07 years-old, respectively) were assessed. Passive drag was assessed with inverse dynamics of the gliding decay speed. The theoretical modeling included a set of analytical procedures based on naval architecture adapted to human swimming. Linear regression models between experimental and analytical procedures showed a high correlation for both passive drag (Dp = 0.777*Df+pr; R2 = 0.90; R2a = 0.90; SEE = 8.528; P<0.001) and passive drag coefficient (CDp = 1.918*CDf+pr; R2 = 0.96; R2a = 0.96; SEE = 0.029; P<0.001). On average the difference between methods was -7.002N (95%CI: -40.480; 26.475) for the passive drag and 0.127 (95%CI: 0.007; 0.247) for the passive drag coefficient. The partial contribution of friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag was 14.12±9.33% and 85.88±9.33%, respectively. As a conclusion, there is a strong relationship between the passive drag and passive drag coefficient assessed with experimental and analytical procedures. The analytical method is a novel, feasible and valid way to gather insight about one’s passive drag during training and competition. Analytical methods can be selected not only to perform race analysis during official competitions but also to monitor the swimmer’s status on regular basis during training sessions without disrupting or time-consuming procedures. PMID:26207364

  17. A Comparison of Experimental and Analytical Procedures to Measure Passive Drag in Human Swimming.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Morais, Jorge E; Forte, Pedro; Neiva, Henrique; Garrido, Nuno D; Marinho, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the swimming hydrodynamics assessed with experimental and analytical procedures, as well as, to learn about the relative contributions of the friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag. Sixty young talented swimmers (30 boys and 30 girls with 13.59±0.77 and 12.61±0.07 years-old, respectively) were assessed. Passive drag was assessed with inverse dynamics of the gliding decay speed. The theoretical modeling included a set of analytical procedures based on naval architecture adapted to human swimming. Linear regression models between experimental and analytical procedures showed a high correlation for both passive drag (Dp = 0.777*Df+pr; R2 = 0.90; R2a = 0.90; SEE = 8.528; P<0.001) and passive drag coefficient (CDp = 1.918*CDf+pr; R2 = 0.96; R2a = 0.96; SEE = 0.029; P<0.001). On average the difference between methods was -7.002N (95%CI: -40.480; 26.475) for the passive drag and 0.127 (95%CI: 0.007; 0.247) for the passive drag coefficient. The partial contribution of friction drag and pressure drag to total passive drag was 14.12±9.33% and 85.88±9.33%, respectively. As a conclusion, there is a strong relationship between the passive drag and passive drag coefficient assessed with experimental and analytical procedures. The analytical method is a novel, feasible and valid way to gather insight about one's passive drag during training and competition. Analytical methods can be selected not only to perform race analysis during official competitions but also to monitor the swimmer's status on regular basis during training sessions without disrupting or time-consuming procedures.

  18. Experimental measurement of the flow field around a freely swimming microorganism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polin, Marco; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond; Michel, Nicolas; Tuval, Idan

    2010-03-01

    Despite their small size, the fluid flows produced by billions of microscopic swimmers in nature can have dramatic macroscopic effects (e.g. biogenic mixing in the ocean). Understanding the flow structure of a single swimming microorganism is essential to explain and model these macroscopic phenomena. Here we report the first detailed measurement of the flow field around an isolated, freely swimming microorganism, the spherical alga Volvox, and discuss the implications of this measurement for other species.

  19. Theoretical and experimental limitations of accelerometric measurements of vibrational intensity in beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniel, Xavier

    1988-06-01

    Error sources and their influence on the precision of bending wave measurements of beams are reviewed. Optimal transducer spacings for various wavelengths and structure geometries are presented. It is found that the accuracy of the transducers is limited primarily by phase mismatch, particularly in low-frequency regions where phase gradients are weak. Problems in the phase calibration of accelerometers are pointed out. The results allow spatial and frequency parameters to be determined for a given structure and required measurement precision.

  20. Application of the optical method in experimental cardiology: action potential and intracellular calcium concentration measurement.

    PubMed

    Ronzhina, M; Cmiel, V; Janoušek, O; Kolářová, J; Nováková, M; Babula, P; Provazník, I

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that, in addition to conventional contact electrode techniques, optical methods using fluorescent dyes can be successfully used for cardiac signal measurement. In this review, the physical and technical fundamentals of the method are described, as well as the properties of the most common systems for measuring action potentials and intracellular calcium concentration. Special attention is paid to summarizing limitations and trends in developing this method.

  1. Experimental Measurement to Determine Fine Dry-Bulb and Wet-Bulb Thermocouple Response Times

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-20

    constants were calculated by first using Statistica software to find the range of time during which the change in temperature takes place. After the...temperature before and after the change for both the dry-bulb and the wet-bulb were determined, the data were graphed and the initial and final temperatures...bias, B, and experimental standard error of the mean, Sz, was determined from: URSS = [B2 + (t95S•)2Y1 (20) where t95 = Student t statistic for a

  2. Experimental measurements and numerical modeling of a thermostress convection-based actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowee, Katherine; Ibrayeva, Aizhan; Strongrich, Andrew; Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-11-01

    The capability of gas actuation using thermal gradients in a rarefied gas flow is demonstrated for arrays of interdigitated hot and cold vanes. The force acting on the cold vane array is quantified using a microNewton torsional balance over a range of pressures between 3.8 mTorr to 900 mTorr. Simulations are carried out using the SPARTA direct simulation monte carlo software to elucidate the mechanisms governing force production. Both experimental and numerical results are non-dimensionalized and fitted using the linear least-squares method. These correlations facilitate prediction of performance for dynamically similar geometries.

  3. Estimation of transverse spin penetration length using second-harmonic measurement: Proposal of an experimental method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baláž, Pavel; Zwierzycki, Maciej; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe; Barnaś, Józef

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical description of spin current injection from a nonmagnetic layer into a magnetic one is presented, with the main emphasis on the description and determination of the penetration depth of spin current component transverse to the magnetization. This penetration depth also determines the depth of spin transfer torque generation. Physically, the spin current may be driven by an external electric field or by a temperature gradient. To determine the penetration depth we used ab initio calculations of channel and mixing conductances as well as of mixing transmission. The results are then used to determine the second harmonic voltage response, which in turn can be used to determine the penetration depth experimentally.

  4. Experimental measurements of a non-equilibrium thermal boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Drummond; Ebadi, Alireza; Whie, Chris

    2016-11-01

    Data from a newly constructed non-equilibrium and thermal boundary layer wind tunnel is presented. The bottom wall of the tunnel is a sectioned-wall design composed of twelve aluminum 6061 plates with resistive heaters adhered to their underside. Each section is heated and controlled using independent feedback loop controllers. The freestream temperature is controlled by an upstream array of resistive heaters and a feedback controller. Experimental data with strong perturbations that produce non-equilibrium boundary layer flow behaviors is presented. Data for ZPG conditions are provided for validation purposes, and the effects of non-equilibrium behaviors on the transport of momentum and heat are discussed.

  5. Shock-induced phase transition of Tin: Experimental study with velocity and temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, Camille; Bouchkour, Zakaria; Sinatti, Frédéric; Petit, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    To investigate polymorphic transition and melting on release of Tin, experiments under shock wave compression have been carried out from 10 GPa to 44 GPa with both velocity and temperature measurements. Interface Sn/LiF velocity has been recorded using Photon Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) measurement technique and interface Sn/LiF temperature has been performed thanks to an optical pyrometer appropriate to detect low and high temperatures (respectively <1000 K and > 1000 K). While PDV measurements are common and accurate, temperature remains often imprecise due to the lack of knowledge on the emissivity of the sample. The use of an emissive layer at the interface Sn/LiF helps to estimate an accurate temperature measurement which can be compared to our numerical simulations. The profiles of both velocity and radiance records are in good agreement and display the polymorphic transition and the melting on release of Tin. Besides, temperature profiles can show complementary singularities particularly during phase transition, not visible on velocity profiles. This paper will discuss the evidence of phase transitions on temperature measurements, the complementarity with velocity measurements and the advantages of an emissive layer.

  6. Experimental validation of bidirectional reflection and transmission distribution measurements of specular and scattering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobe, Lars O.; Wittkopf, Stephen; Apian-Bennewitz, Peter; Jonsson, Jacob C.; Rubin, Mike

    2010-05-01

    The development of advanced materials for facades aims to achieve higher energy efficiency of buildings. Successful application of these materials depends on the availability of reliable characterization data. While data derived from integrated measurements of transmission and reflection is widely available, it does not allow to characterize the angular dependence of the performance of such materials. The Bidirectional Reflection-Transmission Distribution (BRTD) can be measured by commercially available Gonio-Photometers and, complimenting integrated transmittance and reflectance, allows the assessment of facade materials and thus supports both their development and application. Validation of the obtained data is crucial to back these measurements. Integration of validation procedures into the operation of a characterization laboratory allowing a well-defined approach to quality control is presented for a range of typical material and sample types: * consistency checks of measurement data * cross-checking of integrated material properties derived from BRTD data with integrating sphere measurements * round-robin comparison between laboratories using comparable devices The results of of these first measurements are discussed. Potential to further improve the availability of reliable angular resolved characterization data for the building sector is identified.

  7. Experimental Measurements of Low Angle Ground Reflection Characteristics at L- and C-Bands for Irregular Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    significantly degraded by increasing the array beamwidth from 1° to 30. iv CONTENTS ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGMENTS vi I. INTRODUCTION 1-1 II. MEASUREMENT FACILITY 2-1...Camp Edwards 5-51 D. Summary 5-104 VI . EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FOR ELEVATION ANGLE ESTIMATION 6-1 A. Hanscom Airport 6-1 B. Fort Devens Golf Course 6-4 C...presented in this report. vi I. INTRODUCTION This report presents the results of an ongoing terrain multipath measurement program to obtain ground r’flec’ion

  8. Experimental study of an electromagnetic flow meter for liquid metals based on torque measurement during pumping process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikova, N.; Kolesnikov, Y.; Karcher, Ch

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a detailed experimental study on an electromagnetic flow measurement technique to measure the flow rate of liquid metals. The experimental setup consists of a contactless electromagnetic pump with a torque sensor mounted on the pump shaft. The electromagnetic pump is composed of two rotating steel discs having embedded permanent magnets with alternating poles. The rotation of the discs creates a travelling sinusoidal magnetic field and eddy currents within the liquid metal. The metal is contained inside the duct located between the discs of the pump. The interaction of the magnetic field and the induced eddy currents generates an electromagnetic Lorentz force providing the pumping effect. The flow rate is proportional to this force. The torque sensor measures the moment of the discs due to the Lorentz force, which is converted to a flow rate value. We name the method Lorentz torque velocimetry (LTV). The full calibration procedure and experimental investigation of the LTV are described. The method can be used as a non-contact flow rate control technique for liquid metals.

  9. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  10. Experimental Methodology for Determining Turbomachinery Blade Damping Using Magnetic Bearing Excitation and Non-Contacting Optical Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provenza, Andrew J.; Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments to determine the effects of turbomachinery fan blade damping concepts such as passively shunted piezoelectric materials on blade response are ongoing at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A vertical rotor is suspended and excited with active magnetic bearings (AMBs) usually in a vacuum chamber to eliminate aerodynamic forces. Electromagnetic rotor excitation is superimposed onto rotor PD-controlled support and can be fixed to either a stationary or rotating frame of reference. The rotor speed is controlled with an air turbine system. Blade vibrations are measured using optical probes as part of a Non-Contacting Stress Measurement System (NSMS). Damping is calculated from these measurements. It can be difficult to get accurate damping measurements using this experimental setup and some of the details of how to obtain quality results are seemingly nontrivial. The intent of this paper is to present those details.

  11. The Measurement of Radiative Lifetimes Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence: Experimental Review and Astrophysical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Sneden, C.

    2005-01-01

    One of the standard methods for determining atomic transition probabilities is to combine branching fractions measured using Fourier-transform spectrometry with radiative lifetimes measurements using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). This combination of techniques provides an efficient method for measuring large sets of accurate, absolute transition probabilities. The radiative lifetimes, which provide the overall scaling for the transition probabilities, can be measured routinely to ± 5% accuracy using time-resolved LIF. Although the time-resolved LIF technique we use does not achieve the accuracy of fast-beam LIF, the time-resolved technique does enable us to make measurements at a far greater rate (hundreds of level lifetimes per year). Care must be taken, however, to understand and control the systematic effects in time-resolved LIF measurements to maintain ± 5% accuracy over a wide dynamic range and hundreds of lifetime measurements. Over the last 25 years, we have measured lifetimes for 47 spectra using time-resolved LIF. Our atomic beam source can produce a slow beam of neutral and singly ionized atoms of nearly any element. Lifetimes from 2 ns to ~2 µs can be measured for energy levels ranging from 15,000 to ~60,000 cm-1. In this review we will describe our method of measuring radiative lifetimes with an emphasis on possible errors and techniques used for controlling them. The electronic bandwidth, linearity, and overall fidelity of the fast photomultiplier, cable connections, and transient waveform digitizer are concerns. Possible errors from atomic collisions, radiation trapping, Zeeman quantum beats, hyperfine quantum beats, atoms/ions escaping from the observation region before radiating, and from radiative cascade through lower levels must be understood and controlled. We will then present a recent example of the application of our transition probability data to abundance determinations in the sun and in metal-poor halo stars (Den Hartog E A et al

  12. Experimental measurements of the collisional absorption of XUV radiation in warm dense aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, B.; Dzelzainis, T.; White, S.; Li, L.; Dromey, B.; Zepf, M.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Williams, G.; Künzel, S.; Fajardo, M.; Dacasa, H.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Rigby, A.; Gregori, G.; Spindloe, C.; Heathcote, R.; Riley, D.

    2016-08-01

    The collisional (or free-free) absorption of soft x rays in warm dense aluminium remains an unsolved problem. Competing descriptions of the process exist, two of which we compare to our experimental data here. One of these is based on a weak scattering model, another uses a corrected classical approach. These two models show distinctly different behaviors with temperature. Here we describe experimental evidence for the absorption of 26-eV photons in solid density warm aluminium (Te≈1 eV). Radiative x-ray heating from palladium-coated CH foils was used to create the warm dense aluminium samples and a laser-driven high-harmonic beam from an argon gas jet provided the probe. The results indicate little or no change in absorption upon heating. This behavior is in agreement with the prediction of the corrected classical approach, although there is not agreement in absolute absorption value. Verifying the correct absorption mechanism is decisive in providing a better understanding of the complex behavior of the warm dense state.

  13. Experimental measurements of the collisional absorption of XUV radiation in warm dense aluminium.

    PubMed

    Kettle, B; Dzelzainis, T; White, S; Li, L; Dromey, B; Zepf, M; Lewis, C L S; Williams, G; Künzel, S; Fajardo, M; Dacasa, H; Zeitoun, Ph; Rigby, A; Gregori, G; Spindloe, C; Heathcote, R; Riley, D

    2016-08-01

    The collisional (or free-free) absorption of soft x rays in warm dense aluminium remains an unsolved problem. Competing descriptions of the process exist, two of which we compare to our experimental data here. One of these is based on a weak scattering model, another uses a corrected classical approach. These two models show distinctly different behaviors with temperature. Here we describe experimental evidence for the absorption of 26-eV photons in solid density warm aluminium (T_{e}≈1 eV). Radiative x-ray heating from palladium-coated CH foils was used to create the warm dense aluminium samples and a laser-driven high-harmonic beam from an argon gas jet provided the probe. The results indicate little or no change in absorption upon heating. This behavior is in agreement with the prediction of the corrected classical approach, although there is not agreement in absolute absorption value. Verifying the correct absorption mechanism is decisive in providing a better understanding of the complex behavior of the warm dense state.

  14. Development of an Experimental Setup for the Measurement of the Coefficient of Restitution under Vacuum Conditions.

    PubMed

    Drücker, Sven; Krautstrunk, Isabell; Paulick, Maria; Saleh, Khashayar; Morgeneyer, Martin; Kwade, Arno

    2016-03-29

    The Discrete Element Method is used for the simulation of particulate systems to describe and analyze them, to predict and afterwards optimize their behavior for single stages of a process or even an entire process. For the simulation with occurring particle-particle and particle-wall contacts, the value of the coefficient of restitution is required. It can be determined experimentally. The coefficient of restitution depends on several parameters like the impact velocity. Especially for fine particles the impact velocity depends on the air pressure and under atmospheric pressure high impact velocities cannot be reached. For this, a new experimental setup for free-fall tests under vacuum conditions is developed. The coefficient of restitution is determined with the impact and rebound velocity which are detected by a high-speed camera. To not hinder the view, the vacuum chamber is made of glass. Also a new release mechanism to drop one single particle under vacuum conditions is constructed. Due to that, all properties of the particle can be characterized beforehand.

  15. Impulsivity in Multiplayer Online Battle Arena Gamers: Preliminary Results on Experimental and Self-Report Measures.

    PubMed

    Nuyens, Filip; Deleuze, Jory; Maurage, Pierre; Griffiths, Mark D; Kuss, Daria J; Billieux, Joël

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA) games have become the most popular type of video games played worldwide, superseding the playing of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games and First-Person Shooter games. However, empirical studies focusing on the use and abuse of MOBA games are still very limited, particularly regarding impulsivity, which is an indicator of addictive states but has not yet been explored in MOBA games. In this context, the objective of the present study is to explore the associations between impulsivity and symptoms of addictive use of MOBA games in a sample of highly involved League of Legends (LoL, currently the most popular MOBA game) gamers. Methods Thirty-six LoL gamers were recruited and completed both experimental (Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm) and self-reported impulsivity assessments (s-UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), in addition to an assessment of problematic video game use (Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire). Results Results showed links between impulsivity-related constructs and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Findings indicated that impaired ability to postpone rewards in an experimental laboratory task was strongly related to problematic patterns of MOBA game involvement. Although less consistent, several associations were also found between self-reported impulsivity traits and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Conclusions Despite these results are preliminary and based upon a small (self-selected) sample, the present study highlights potential psychological factors related to the addictive use of MOBA games.

  16. Impulsivity in Multiplayer Online Battle Arena Gamers: Preliminary Results on Experimental and Self-Report Measures

    PubMed Central

    Nuyens, Filip; Deleuze, Jory; Maurage, Pierre; Griffiths, Mark D.; Kuss, Daria J.; Billieux, Joël

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA) games have become the most popular type of video games played worldwide, superseding the playing of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games and First-Person Shooter games. However, empirical studies focusing on the use and abuse of MOBA games are still very limited, particularly regarding impulsivity, which is an indicator of addictive states but has not yet been explored in MOBA games. In this context, the objective of the present study is to explore the associations between impulsivity and symptoms of addictive use of MOBA games in a sample of highly involved League of Legends (LoL, currently the most popular MOBA game) gamers. Methods Thirty-six LoL gamers were recruited and completed both experimental (Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm) and self-reported impulsivity assessments (s-UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), in addition to an assessment of problematic video game use (Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire). Results Results showed links between impulsivity-related constructs and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Findings indicated that impaired ability to postpone rewards in an experimental laboratory task was strongly related to problematic patterns of MOBA game involvement. Although less consistent, several associations were also found between self-reported impulsivity traits and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Conclusions Despite these results are preliminary and based upon a small (self-selected) sample, the present study highlights potential psychological factors related to the addictive use of MOBA games. PMID:27156376

  17. A large experimental apparatus for measuring thermal conductance of LH2 storage tank insulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, S.; Onishi, K.; Kawagoe, E.; Nishigaki, K.

    2000-01-01

    In the Japanese hydrogen project, WE-NET (World Energy Net Work), the conceptual design of the large mass liquid hydrogen storage systems for ground tanks and transportation, whose scales would reach to that of commercialized LNG (liquid national gas), has been studied. This study has concluded that the thermal insulation for a mass storage tank, providing the excellent thermal performance with the optimized strength, should be developed. In order to evaluate thermal conductance of various devised insulations, we have manufactured a large-scale experimental apparatus. This apparatus, which adopts a double guarded flat plate boil-off calorimeter method, can provide the thermal data needed for designing a full-scale tank. It would be possible to test various kinds of specimens with allowable dimensions: diameter 120 cm, thickness up to 30 cm. In the case of a rigid specimen contacting bottom surfaces of liquid hydrogen vessels, the good flatness of their bottom plates is desirable to reduce the thermal resistance between vessels and a specimen surface. This paper describes the abstract of the developed apparatus, its structural design and also the experimental results for verifying its structural design.

  18. Experimental in vivo measurements of light emission in plants: a perspective dedicated to David Walker.

    PubMed

    Kalaji, Hazem M; Goltsev, Vasilij; Bosa, Karolina; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Strasser, Reto J; Govindjee

    2012-12-01

    This review is dedicated to David Walker (1928-2012), a pioneer in the field of photosynthesis and chlorophyll fluorescence. We begin this review by presenting the history of light emission studies, from the ancient times. Light emission from plants is of several kinds: prompt fluorescence (PF), delayed fluorescence (DF), thermoluminescence, and phosphorescence. In this article, we focus on PF and DF. Chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements have been used for more than 80 years to study photosynthesis, particularly photosystem II (PSII) since 1961. This technique has become a regular trusted probe in agricultural and biological research. Many measured and calculated parameters are good biomarkers or indicators of plant tolerance to different abiotic and biotic stressors. This would never have been possible without the rapid development of new fluorometers. To date, most of these instruments are based mainly on two different operational principles for measuring variable chlorophyll a fluorescence: (1) a PF signal produced following a pulse-amplitude-modulated excitation and (2) a PF signal emitted during a strong continuous actinic excitation. In addition to fluorometers, other instruments have been developed to measure additional signals, such as DF, originating from PSII, and light-induced absorbance changes due to the photooxidation of P700, from PSI, measured as the absorption decrease (photobleaching) at about 705 nm, or increase at 820 nm. In this review, the technical and theoretical basis of newly developed instruments, allowing for simultaneous measurement of the PF and the DF as well as other parameters is discussed. Special emphasis has been given to a description of comparative measurements on PF and DF. However, DF has been discussed in greater details, since it is much less used and less known than PF, but has a great potential to provide useful qualitative new information on the back reactions of PSII electron transfer. A review concerning the history

  19. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers for high-energy photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanxiao; Willomitzer, Christian; Zakaria, Golam Abu; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of depth-dose curves in water phantom using a cylindrical ionization chamber require that its effective point of measurement is located at the measuring depth. Recommendations for the position of the effective point of measurement with respect to the central axis valid for high-energy electron and photon beams are given in dosimetry protocols. According to these protocols, the use of a constant shift P(eff) is currently recommended. However, this is still based on a very limited set of experimental results. It is therefore expected that an improved knowledge of the exact position of the effective point of measurement will further improve the accuracy of dosimetry. Recent publications have revealed that the position of the effective point of measurement is indeed varying with beam energy, field size and also with chamber geometry. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the shift of P(eff) can be taken to be constant and independent from the beam energy. An experimental determination of the effective point of measurement is presented based on a comparison between cylindrical chambers and a plane-parallel chamber using conventional dosimetry equipment. For electron beams, the determination is based on the comparison of halfvalue depth R(50) between the cylindrical chamber of interest and a well guarded plane-parallel Roos chamber. For photon beams, the depth of dose maximum, d(max), the depth of 80% dose, d(80), and the dose parameter PDD(10) were used. It was again found that the effective point of measurement for both, electron and photon beams Dosimetry, depends on the beam energy. The deviation from a constant value remains very small for photons, whereas significant deviations were found for electrons. It is therefore concluded that use of a single upstream shift value from the centre of the cylindrical chamber as recommended in current dosimetry protocols is adequate for photons, however inadequate for accurate electron beam dosimetry.

  20. Experimental findings on the underwater measurements uncertainty of speed of sound and the alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, T. Q.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Oliveira, D. P.; Mayworm, R. C.; Souza, R. M.; Costa-Félix, R. P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Speed of sound is an important quantity to characterize reference materials for ultrasonic applications, for instance. The alignment between the transducer and the test body is an key activity in order to perform reliable and consistent measurement. The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of the alignment system to the expanded uncertainty of such measurement. A stainless steel cylinder was previously calibrated on an out of water system typically used for calibration of non-destructive blocks. Afterwards, the cylinder was calibrated underwater with two distinct alignment system: fixed and mobile. The values were statistically compared to the out-of-water measurement, considered the golden standard for such application. For both alignment systems, the normalized error was less than 0.8, leading to conclude that the both measurement system (under and out-of-water) do not diverge significantly. The gold standard uncertainty was 2.7 m-s-1, whilst the fixed underwater system resulted in 13 m-s-1, and the mobile alignment system achieved 6.6 m-s-1. After the validation of the underwater system for speed of sound measurement, it will be applied to certify Encapsulated Tissue Mimicking Material as a reference material for biotechnology application.

  1. Design and Preliminary Experimental Investigation of a Capsule for Measuring the Small Intestine Contraction Pressure.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengbo; Kothari, Vishal; Terry, Benjamin S

    2015-11-01

    A tethered pressure measurement capsule was developed for measuring the small intestine contraction pressure to assist in locating capsules within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and quantifying the contact force between the capsule and the small intestine lumen. The capsule was calibrated statically and dynamically in depth-controlled water at body temperature (37-38 °C). In vitro tests were performed on an intestinal simulator to verify the measurement function of the capsule. To perform a preliminary evaluation of its pressure measuring capabilities, the capsule was tested at a single location in a live pig model. The pressure signal from the live animal test was analyzed in the time domain, and then, the empirical mode decomposition and fast Fourier transformation were applied to analyze the contraction pressure and ambient pressure in the frequency domain. The contraction rate was 9.4 to 11.0 times per minute. The peak value of the contraction pressure was 0.24 ± 0.05 kPa. The successful test of this prototype lays the groundwork for a future untethered, swallowable version of the capsule, which will be capable of measuring dynamic pressures while in transit.

  2. Experimental measurements of hydrodynamic radial forces and stiffness matrices for a centrifugal pump-impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamieh, D. S.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the steady-state hydrodynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller are presented as a function of position within two geometrically different volutes. These correspond to the forces experienced by the impeller at zero whirl frequency. The hydrodynamic force matrices derived from these measurements exhibit both diagonal and off-diagonal terms of substantial magnitude. These terms are of the form which would tend to excite a whirl motion in a rotordynamic analysis of the pump; this may be the cause of 'rough running' reported in many pumps. Static pressure measurements in the impeller discharge flow show that the hydrodynamic force on the impeller contains a substantial component due to the nonisotropy of the net momentum flux leaving the impeller. A similar breakdown of the contributions to the stiffness matrices reveals that the major component of these matrices results from the nonisotropy of the momentum flux.

  3. Experimental and numerical test of the micrometeorological mass difference technique for the measurement of trace gas emissions from small plots.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Vincenzo; Alterio, Giovanni; Peressotti, Alessandro

    2004-05-01

    Micrometeorological methods for measuring fluxes of gases between the land surface and the atmosphere are non-invasive: in fact, they do not interfere with natural processes of gas exchange. The Micrometeorological Mass Difference (MMD) approach can be used for many environmental monitoring purposes, such as to measure methane and carbon dioxide emission from landfills, methane production by grazing animals, trace gas emission from waste products and from agricultural soils, photosynthesis, and transpiration of plant canopies. The purpose of this study is to adapt the MMD technique, originally developed in Australia, to monitor CO2 and trace gases exchange rate at the plot level. Comparison of different treatments in replicated experiments requires plots of few rather than tens of meters. The tests reported here were performed on a square area (4 m x 4 m) in the meteorological field of the experimental farm of CNR-ISAFOM located in Vitulazio, province of Caserta, Italy (40 degrees 07' N, 14 degrees 50' E, 25 m above sea level) and consisted of the release of pure CO2 at different rates (1.7, 1.3, 0.6 L min(-1)) from a single source on the ground in the center of the experimental area and the consequent measurement of the environmental variables (wind speed and direction, CO2 concentration) at different times at four heights (up to 1.2 m) in order to compute the mass balance according to MMD technique. Measured flow rates well accounted for the mass of CO2 released. A flow underestimation occurred when wind speed dropped below 1.5 m s(-1), in accord with the previous findings obtained in Australia: this happened because anemometers can stall at low speeds, and their measurements are unreliable and because of significant loss of mass from the top of the apparatus. The experimental results were compared with outputs of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations. The commercial CFD package Fluent was used to evaluate performances and sources of errors. According to

  4. Experimental comparison of seven commercial dosimetry diodes for measurement of stereotactic radiosurgery cone factors

    SciTech Connect

    Dieterich, Sonja; Sherouse, George W.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to assess the variation in performance of various commercially available dosimetry diodes for quantitative small field dosimetry, specifically by intercomparing measurements of SRS cone factors. Methods: Measurements were made in 6 MV photon beams with fixed SRS cones for two accelerator-based SRS systems: a Varian Clinac iX (Varian/Zmed cones) at 600 MU/min and a CyberKnife model G4 at 800 MU/min. Measurements were made at 1.5 cm depth in water using the IBA Dosimetry ''blue phantom'' 3D scanning system, controlled by omnipro-accept software. Source-to-detector distance was 100 cm for the Clinac, 80 cm for the CyberKnife. Two normalization methods were used for the Clinac, one directly referenced to diode measurements in a 10 cm x 10 cm square field and the other indirectly by ''daisy-chaining'' diode measurements to ion chamber measurement in the 10 cm x 10 cm reference field through an intermediate 4 cm x 4 cm square field. CyberKnife factors were referenced directly to measurements in the 60 mm reference field. Seven commercial diodes were evaluated: PTW TN60008, TN60012, TN60016, TN60017; IBA Dosimetry SFD; Sun Nuclear EDGE; Exradin SD1 (first generation prototype). Results: With the exception of the SFD, all the evaluated devices yielded surprisingly consistent results. Standard deviations of Clinac factors for four diodes (SD1, EDGE, TN60008, and TN60012) ranged from approximately 0.50% at 30 mm to 2.0% at 5 mm cones size when referenced directly to the 10 cm x 10 cm measurement. The daisy-chaining strategy reduced the standard deviation to approximately 0.30% at 30 mm and 1.9% at 5 mm. Standard deviations for the same four diodes in the CyberKnife beam ranged up to approximately 1.0% at 5 mm. Conclusions: The inter-detector variation is small and appears to be systematic with detector packaging, more inherent filtration producing flatter curves for both the relatively hard Clinac beam and the softer CyberKnife beam. The

  5. Smartphones as experimental tools to measure acoustical and mechanical properties of vibrating rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Manuel Á.; González, Miguel Á.

    2016-07-01

    Modern smartphones have calculation and sensor capabilities that make them suitable for use as versatile and reliable measurement devices in simple teaching experiments. In this work a smartphone is used, together with low cost materials, in an experiment to measure the frequencies emitted by vibrating rods of different materials, shapes and lengths. The results obtained with the smartphone have been compared with theoretical calculations and the agreement is good. Alternatively, physics students can perform the experiment described here and use their results to determine the dependencies of the obtained frequencies on the rod characteristics. In this way they will also practice research methods that they will probably use in their professional life.

  6. Measuring Ability, Speed, or Both? Challenges, Psychometric Solutions, and What Can Be Gained From Experimental Control

    PubMed Central

    Goldhammer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The main challenge of ability tests relates to the difficulty of items, whereas speed tests demand that test takers complete very easy items quickly. This article proposes a conceptual framework to represent how performance depends on both between-person differences in speed and ability and the speed-ability compromise within persons. Related measurement challenges and psychometric models that have been proposed to deal with the challenges are discussed. It is argued that addressing individual differences in the speed-ability trade-off requires the control of item response times. In this way, response behavior can be captured exclusively with the response variable remedying problems in traditional measurement approaches. PMID:26807063

  7. Experimental Measurements of Short-Lived Fission Products from Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium and Americium

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Lori A.; Payne, Rosara F.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Pierson, Bruce D.

    2009-11-01

    Fission yields are especially well characterized for long-lived fission products. Modeling techniques incorporate numerous assumptions and can be used to deduce information about the distribution of short-lived fission products. This work is an attempt to gather experimental (model-independent) data on the short-lived fission products. Fissile isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium were irradiated under pulse conditions at the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor to achieve ~108 fissions. The samples were placed on a HPGe (high purity germanium) detector to begin counting in less than 3 minutes post irradiation. The samples were counted for various time intervals ranging from 5 minutes to 1 hour. The data was then analyzed to determine which radionuclides could be quantified and compared to the published fission yield data.

  8. Experimental Measurement of the Staggered Magnetization Curve for a Haldane Spin Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, A.; Ressouche, E.; Maslov, S.; Yokoo, T.; Raymond, S.; Akimitsu, J.

    1998-04-01

    Long-range magnetic ordering in R2BaNiO5 ( R = magnetic rare earth) quasi-one-dimensional mixed-spin antiferromagnets is described by a simple mean-field model that is based on the intrinsic staggered magnetization function of isolated Haldane spin chains for the Ni subsystem, and single-ion magnetization functions for the rare earth ions. The model is applied to new experimental results obtained in powder diffraction experiments on Nd2BaNiO5 and NdYBaNiO5, and to previously published diffraction data for Er2BaNiO5. From this analysis we extract the bare staggered magnetization curve for Haldane spin chains in these compounds.

  9. Comparison Between Predicted and Experimentally Measured Flow Fields at the Exit of the SSME HPFTP Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bache, George

    1993-01-01

    Validation of CFD codes is a critical first step in the process of developing CFD design capability. The MSFC Pump Technology Team has recognized the importance of validation and has thus funded several experimental programs designed to obtain CFD quality validation data. The first data set to become available is for the SSME High Pressure Fuel Turbopump Impeller. LDV Data was taken at the impeller inlet (to obtain a reliable inlet boundary condition) and three radial positions at the impeller discharge. Our CFD code, TASCflow, is used within the Propulsion and Commercial Pump industry as a tool for pump design. The objective of this work, therefore, is to further validate TASCflow for application in pump design. TASCflow was used to predict flow at the impeller discharge for flowrates of 80, 100 and 115 percent of design flow. Comparison to data has been made with encouraging results.

  10. Measuring the impact of enhanced kinship navigator services for informal kinship caregivers using an experimental design.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Leonard H; Fertig, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    While relative care may offer significant benefits to kin children as compared to non-relative foster care, informal kinship caregivers often experience various hardships and needs without the resources of the child welfare system to aid them. They may benefit from services provided by an expanded kinship navigator program. This study, using an experimental design, adds to knowledge about the characteristics and needs of kinship caregivers and the impact of enhanced navigator services. The relative effect of this more intensive intervention was mixed. Caregivers had many of their expressed needs met. Yet, the enhanced services group did not demonstrate: an increase in perceived social support; reduction in caregiver stress; or improvement in child behavior compared to the families receiving brief, traditional navigator services. Little difference was found in post intervention involvement in the child welfare system. Further enhancements to the model are suggested.

  11. Experimental Technique and Assessment for Measuring the Convective Heat Transfer Coefficient from Natural Ice Accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masiulaniec, K. Cyril; Vanfossen, G. James, Jr.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Dukhan, Nihad

    1995-01-01

    A technique was developed to cast frozen ice shapes that had been grown on a metal surface. This technique was applied to a series of ice shapes that were grown in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel on flat plates. Nine flat plates, 18 inches square, were obtained from which aluminum castings were made that gave good ice shape characterizations. Test strips taken from these plates were outfitted with heat flux gages, such that when placed in a dry wind tunnel, can be used to experimentally map out the convective heat transfer coefficient in the direction of flow from the roughened surfaces. The effects on the heat transfer coefficient for both parallel and accelerating flow will be studied. The smooth plate model verification baseline data as well as one ice roughened test case are presented.

  12. Experimental Measurements and Diagnosis of Radio/Frequency Space High Power and Electromagnetic Compatibility Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boria, V. E.; Nuno, L.; Monerris, O.; Smacchia, D.; Argiles, D.; Raboso, D.

    2016-05-01

    Radio-Frequency (RF) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) effects are becoming a major issue for the aerospace industry, especially due to the ever increasing demand of more communication channels, operating at higher operational frequencies with broader bandwidths, and to stringent requirements in terms of reduced mass, volume and footprint for satellite payload components. Additionally, RF breakdown phenomena (such as Multipactor, Corona and Power Handling), as well as Passive Inter-Modulation (PIM) effects, that can imply malfunctioning of satellite communication equipment and undesired interferences, are a common concern for the satellite industry. In order to mitigate all these undesired effects, or even to prevent them, experimental testing and diagnosis techniques are widely requested. In this contribution, state-of-the-art testing facilities and diagnosis techniques for successfully coping with all these effects will be presented, including the most recent advancements and future guidelines in the area.

  13. Experimental measurements on an oscillating 70-degree delta wing in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltani, M. R.; Bragg, M. B.; Brandon, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    A series of low-speed wind tunnel tests on a 70-degree sharp leading-edged delta wing at both static and dynamic conditions were performed to investigate the aerodynamic forces and moments. Forces and moments were obtained from a six component internal strain gauge balance. Static results compared well with the previous experimental findings. Large amplitude dynamic motion was produced by sinusoidally oscillating the model over a range of reduced frequencies. Substantial force and moment overshoots, a delay in dynamic stall, and hysteresis loops between the values of aerodynamnic loads in upstroke and downstroke motion were observed, all of which were strong functions of the reduced frequency. The aerodynamic forces and moments were influenced by the Reynolds number. Asymmetrical vortex bursting produced by nonzero sideslip angle created a complex rolling moment variations with angle of attack.

  14. Development of an alternating integrator for magnetic measurements for experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D. M. Zhao, W. Z.; He, Y. G.; Chen, B.; Wan, B. N.; Shen, B.; Huang, J.; Liu, H. Q.

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance integrator is one of the key electronic devices for reliably controlling plasma in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for long pulse operation. We once designed an integrator system of real-time drift compensation, which has a low integration drift. However, it is not feasible for really continuous operations due to capacitive leakage error and nonlinearity error. To solve the above-mentioned problems, this paper presents a new alternating integrator. In the new integrator, the integrator system of real-time drift compensation is adopted as one integral cell while two such integral cells work alternately. To achieve the alternate function, a Field Programmable Gate Array built in the digitizer is utilized. The performance test shows that the developed integrator with the integration time constant of 20 ms has a low integration drift (<15 mV) for 1000 s.

  15. Children's Rights and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1982-01-01

    Educators need to seriously reflect upon the concept of children's rights. Though the idea of children's rights has been debated numerous times, the idea remains vague and shapeless; however, Maslow's theory of self-actualization can provide the children's rights idea with a needed theoretical framework. (Author)

  16. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  17. Culture Studies and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1983-01-01

    True citizenship education is impossible unless students develop the habit of intelligently evaluating cultures. Abraham Maslow's theory of self-actualization, a theory of innate human needs and of human motivation, is a nonethnocentric tool which can be used by teachers and students to help them understand other cultures. (SR)

  18. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  19. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  20. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  1. Attenuation properties of cement composites: Experimental measurements and Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez Meza, Raul Fernando

    Developing new cement based materials with excellent mechanical and attenuation properties is critically important for both medical and nuclear power industries. Concrete continues to be the primary choice material for the shielding of gamma and neutron radiation in facilities such as nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, spent nuclear fuel pools, heavy particle radiotherapy rooms, particles accelerators, among others. The purpose of this research was to manufacture cement pastes modified with magnetite and samarium oxide and evaluate the feasibility of utilizing them for shielding of gamma and neutron radiation. Two different experiments were conducted to accomplish these goals. In the first one, Portland cement pastes modified with different loading of fine magnetite were fabricated and investigated for application in gamma radiation shielding. The experimental results were verified theoretically through XCOM and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction tests were used to investigate the microstructure of the samples. Mechanical characterization was also perfornmed by compression testing. The results suggest that fine magnetite is a suitable aggregate for increasing the compressive and flexural strength of white Portland cement pastes; however, there is no improvement of the attenuation at intermediate energy (662 keV). For the second experiment, cement pastes with different concentrations of samarium oxide were fabricated and tested for shielding against thermal neutrons. MCNP simulations were used to validate the experimental work. The result shows that samarium oxide increases the effective thermal cross section of Portland cement and has the potential to replace boron bearing compounds currently used in neutron shielding.

  2. Experimental measurements of surface damage and residual stresses in micro-engineered plasma facing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, David; Wirz, Richard E.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2017-04-01

    The thermomechanical damage and residual stresses in plasma-facing materials operating at high heat flux are experimentally investigated. Materials with micro-surfaces are found to be more resilient, when exposed to cyclic high heat flux generated by an arc-jet plasma. An experimental facility, dedicated to High Energy Flux Testing (HEFTY), is developed for testing cyclic heat flux in excess of 10 MW/m2. We show that plastic deformation and subsequent fracture of the surface can be controlled by sample cooling. We demonstrate that W surfaces with micro-pillar type surface architecture have significantly reduced residual thermal stresses after plasma exposure, as compared to those with flat surfaces. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of the W-(110) peak reveal that broadening of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) for micro-engineered samples is substantially smaller than corresponding flat surfaces. Spectral shifts of XRD signals indicate that residual stresses due to plasma exposure of micro-engineered surfaces build up in the first few cycles of exposure. Subsequent cyclic plasma heat loading is shown to anneal out most of the built-up residual stresses in micro-engineered surfaces. These findings are consistent with relaxation of residual thermal stresses in surfaces with micro-engineered features. The initial residual stress state of highly polished flat W samples is compressive (≈ -1.3 GPa). After exposure to 50 plasma cycles, the surface stress relaxes to -1.0 GPa. Micro-engineered samples exposed to the same thermal cycling show that the initial residual stress state is compressive at (- 250 MPa), and remains largely unchanged after plasma exposure.

  3. Experimental Measurement and CFD Model Development of Thick Wind Turbine Airfoils with Leading Edge Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniaci, David C.; White, Edward B.; Wilcox, Benjamin; Langel, Christopher M.; van Dam, C. P.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2016-09-01

    Leading edge erosion and roughness accumulation is an issue observed with great variability by wind plant operators, but with little understanding of the effect on wind turbine performance. In wind tunnels, airfoil models are typically tested with standard grit roughness and trip tape to simulate the effects of roughness and erosion observed in field operation, but there is a lack of established relation between field measurements and wind tunnel test conditions. A research collaboration between lab, academic, and industry partners has sought to establish a method to estimate the effect of erosion in wind turbine blades that correlates to roughness and erosion measured in the field. Measurements of roughness and erosion were taken off of operational utility wind turbine blades using a profilometer. The field measurements were statistically reproduced in the wind tunnel on representative tip and midspan airfoils. Simultaneously, a computational model was developed and calibrated to capture the effect of roughness and erosion on airfoil transition and performance characteristics. The results indicate that the effects of field roughness fall between clean airfoil performance and the effects of transition tape. Severe leading edge erosion can cause detrimental performance effects beyond standard roughness. The results also indicate that a heavily eroded wind turbine blade can reduce annual energy production by over 5% for a utility scale wind turbine.

  4. Evaluating the Performance of Repeated Measures Approaches in Replicating Experimental Benchmark Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConeghy, Kevin; Wing, Coady; Wong, Vivian C.

    2015-01-01

    Randomized experiments have long been established as the gold standard for addressing causal questions. However, experiments are not always feasible or desired, so observational methods are also needed. When multiple observations on the same variable are available, a repeated measures design may be used to assess whether a treatment administered…

  5. Exploring the use of sensors to measure behavioral interactions: an experimental evaluation of using hand trajectories.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jeroen H M; Langdon, Patrick M; Mayagoitia, Ruth E; Howard, Newton

    2014-01-01

    Humans appear to be sensitive to relative small changes in their surroundings. These changes are often initially perceived as irrelevant, but they can cause significant changes in behavior. However, how exactly people's behavior changes is often hard to quantify. A reliable and valid tool is needed in order to address such a question, ideally measuring an important point of interaction, such as the hand. Wearable-body-sensor systems can be used to obtain valuable, behavioral information. These systems are particularly useful for assessing functional interactions that occur between the endpoints of the upper limbs and our surroundings. A new method is explored that consists of computing hand position using a wearable sensor system and validating it against a gold standard reference measurement (optical tracking device). Initial outcomes related well to the gold standard measurements (r = 0.81) showing an acceptable average root mean square error of 0.09 meters. Subsequently, the use of this approach was further investigated by measuring differences in motor behavior, in response to a changing environment. Three subjects were asked to perform a water pouring task with three slightly different containers. Wavelet analysis was introduced to assess how motor consistency was affected by these small environmental changes. Results showed that the behavioral motor adjustments to a variable environment could be assessed by applying wavelet coherence techniques. Applying these procedures in everyday life, combined with correct research methodologies, can assist in quantifying how environmental changes can cause alterations in our motor behavior.

  6. High accuracy measurements of the intrapixel sensitivity of VIS to LWIR astronomical detectors: experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viale, T.; Ketchazo, C.; Guérineau, N.; Boulade, O.; de la Barrière, F.; Moreau, V.; Mugnier, L.; Dubreuil, D.; Bonnefois, A.; Delisle, C.; Druart, G.; Mulet, P.

    2016-08-01

    The reduction of systematic effects is necessary to improve the accuracy in imaging and astrometry. For example, in Euclid Mission which aims at carrying out accurate measurements of dark energy and quantifying precisely its role in the evolution of the Universe, systematic effects need at be controlled to a level better than 10-7 (Euclid, Science Book). To achieve this goal, a high-level of knowledge of the system point spread function (PSF) is required. This paper follows the concept-paper presented at the last SPIE conference1 and gives the recent developments achieved in the design of the test bench for the intrapixel sensitivity measurements. The measurement technique we use is based on the projection of a high spatial resolution periodic pattern on the detector using the self-imaging property of a new class of diffractive objects named continuously self-imaging gratings (CSIG) and developed at ONERA. The principle combines the potential of global techniques, which make measurements at once on the whole FPA, and the accuracy of spot-scan-based techniques, which provide high local precision.

  7. Experimental Measurements of the Chemical Reaction Zone of Detonating Liquid Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyer, Viviane; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Stahl, David B.; Doucet, Michel; Decaris, Lionel

    2009-12-01

    We have a joint project between CEA-DAM Le Ripault and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to study the chemical reaction zone in detonating high explosives using several different laser velocimetry techniques. The short temporal duration of the von Neumann spike and early part of the reaction zone make these measurements difficult. Here, we report results obtained from detonation experiments using VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector) and PDV (photon Doppler velocimetry) methods to measure the particle velocity history at a detonating nitromethane/PMMA interface. Experiments done at CEA were high-explosive-plane-wave initiated and those at LANL were gas-gun-projectile initiated with a detonation run of about 6 charge diameters in all experiments. The experiments had either glass or brass confinement. Excellent agreement of the interface particle velocity measurements at both Laboratories were obtained even though the initiation methods and the velocimetry systems were somewhat different. Some differences were observed in the peak particle velocity because of the ˜2 ns time resolution of the techniques—in all cases the peak was lower than the expected von Neumann spike. This is thought to be because the measurements were not high enough time resolution to resolve the spike.

  8. The (Mis)Measurement of Job Performance in Child Welfare Using (Non)Experimental Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Alice A.; Levy, Michelle M.

    2006-01-01

    This commentary explicates two principal arguments against the conclusions drawn by Robin Perry in his article "Do Social Workers Make Better Child Welfare Workers Than Non-Social Workers?" The first concerns the methodology used, whereas the second centers on the measurement of the dependent variable, performance expectation. Considering the…

  9. How-to-Do-It: Apparatus & Experimental Design for Measuring Fermentation Rates in Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatina, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Describes an apparatus that facilitates the quantitative study of fermentation in yeast by allowing simultaneous measurements of fermentation rates in several treatments and a control. Explains a laboratory procedure in which the apparatus is used. Several suggestions for further investigations are included. (Author/RT)

  10. Measuring Human Performance on Clustering Problems: Some Potential Objective Criteria and Experimental Research Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The study of human performance on discrete optimization problems has a considerable history that spans various disciplines. The two most widely studied problems are the Euclidean traveling salesperson problem and the quadratic assignment problem. The purpose of this paper is to outline a program of study for the measurement of human performance on…

  11. Technical Note: Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of two cylindrical ionization chambers in a clinical proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Yuya; Nishio, Teiji; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: IAEA TRS-398 notes that cylindrical ionization chambers are preferred for reference proton dosimetry. If a cylindrical ionization chamber is used in a phantom to measure the dose as a function of depth, the effective point of measurement (EPOM) must be taken into account. IAEA TRS-398 recommends a displacement of 0.75 times the inner cavity radius (0.75R) for heavy ion beams. Theoretical models by Palmans and by Bhullar and Watchman confirmed this value. However, the experimental results vary from author to author. The purpose of this study is to accurately measure the displacement and explain the past experimental discrepancies. Methods: In this work, we measured the EPOM of cylindrical ionization chambers with high accuracy by comparing the Bragg-peak position obtained with cylindrical ionization chambers (PTW 30013, PTW 31016) to that obtained using a plane-parallel ionization chamber (PTW 34045). Results: The EPOMs of PTW 30013 and 31016 were shifted by 0.92 ± 0.07 R with R = 3.05 mm and 0.90 ± 0.14 R with R = 1.45 mm, respectively, from the reference point toward the source. Conclusions: The EPOMs obtained were greater than the value of 0.75R proposed by the IAEA TRS-398 and the analytical results.

  12. Whiteheadian Actual Entitities and String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Joseph A.

    2012-06-01

    In the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the ultimate units of reality are actual entities, momentary self-constituting subjects of experience which are too small to be sensibly perceived. Their combination into "societies" with a "common element of form" produces the organisms and inanimate things of ordinary sense experience. According to the proponents of string theory, tiny vibrating strings are the ultimate constituents of physical reality which in harmonious combination yield perceptible entities at the macroscopic level of physical reality. Given that the number of Whiteheadian actual entities and of individual strings within string theory are beyond reckoning at any given moment, could they be two ways to describe the same non-verifiable foundational reality? For example, if one could establish that the "superject" or objective pattern of self- constitution of an actual entity vibrates at a specific frequency, its affinity with the individual strings of string theory would be striking. Likewise, if one were to claim that the size and complexity of Whiteheadian 'societies" require different space-time parameters for the dynamic interrelationship of constituent actual entities, would that at least partially account for the assumption of 10 or even 26 instead of just 3 dimensions within string theory? The overall conclusion of this article is that, if a suitably revised understanding of Whiteheadian metaphysics were seen as compatible with the philosophical implications of string theory, their combination into a single world view would strengthen the plausibility of both schemes taken separately. Key words: actual entities, subject/superjects, vibrating strings, structured fields of activity, multi-dimensional physical reality.

  13. Comparison of Actual Surgical Outcomes and 3D Surgical Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Scott; Cevidanes, Lucia; Styner, Martin; Kim, Hyungmin; Reyes, Mauricio; Proffit, William; Turvey, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The advent of imaging software programs have proved to be useful for diagnosis, treatment planning, and outcome measurement, but precision of 3D surgical simulation still needs to be tested. This study was conducted to determine if the virtual surgery performed on 3D models constructed from Cone-beam CT (CBCT) can correctly simulate the actual surgical outcome and to validate the ability of this emerging technology to recreate the orthognathic surgery hard tissue movements in 3 translational and 3 rotational planes of space. Methods Construction of pre- and post-surgery 3D models from CBCTs of 14 patients who had combined maxillary advancement and mandibular setback surgery and 6 patients who had one-piece maxillary advancement surgery was performed. The post-surgery and virtually simulated surgery 3D models were registered at the cranial base to quantify differences between simulated and actual surgery models. Hotelling T-test were used to assess the differences between simulated and actual surgical outcomes. Results For all anatomic regions of interest, there was no statistically significant difference between the simulated and the actual surgical models. The right lateral ramus was the only region that showed a statistically significant, but small difference when comparing two- and one-jaw surgeries. Conclusions Virtual surgical methods were reliably reproduced, oral surgery residents could benefit from virtual surgical training, and computer simulation has the potential to increase predictability in the operating room. PMID:20591553

  14. Design and experimental verification of novel six-degree-of freedom geometric error measurement system for linear stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Ta; Lin, Wei-Chen; Liu, Chien-Sheng

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a novel and simple measurement system for simultaneously measuring the geometric errors in six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) for a moving linear stage of a machine tool is designed and validated. Compared to laser interferometer and laser Doppler systems, this new measurement system is less expensive and capable of multiple functions. The proposed measurement system comprises an optics module, composed of two reflectors and two cubic beam splitters; a sensing module, composed of three two-dimensional position sensitive detectors (PSDs); and a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser. Using skew-ray tracing and a first-order Taylor series expansion, the 6-DOF geometric errors of the moving linear stage, which include translation and rotation errors, are analyzed. A laboratory prototype system is built to verify the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed measurement system. The experimental results show that the displacement uncertainty and the angular uncertainty of the proposed measurement system are less than 1.2 μm and 0.4″, respectively. Compared with the Renishaw laser interferometer XL-80 laser system, the translational accuracy and the rotational accuracy of the proposed measurement system are less than ±1 μm and ±0.2″, respectively, when the linear stage travels 6 mm.

  15. Direct Measurements of Quantum Kinetic Energy Tensor in Stable and Metastable Water near the Triple Point: An Experimental Benchmark.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Carla; Romanelli, Giovanni; Senesi, Roberto

    2016-06-16

    This study presents the first direct and quantitative measurement of the nuclear momentum distribution anisotropy and the quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable (supercooled) water near its triple point, using deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS). From the experimental spectra, accurate line shapes of the hydrogen momentum distributions are derived using an anisotropic Gaussian and a model-independent framework. The experimental results, benchmarked with those obtained for the solid phase, provide the state of the art directional values of the hydrogen mean kinetic energy in metastable water. The determinations of the direction kinetic energies in the supercooled phase, provide accurate and quantitative measurements of these dynamical observables in metastable and stable phases, that is, key insight in the physical mechanisms of the hydrogen quantum state in both disordered and polycrystalline systems. The remarkable findings of this study establish novel insight into further expand the capacity and accuracy of DINS investigations of the nuclear quantum effects in water and represent reference experimental values for theoretical investigations.

  16. Experimental setup and procedure for the measurement of the 7Be(n,α)α reaction at n_TOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, L.; Musumarra, A.; Barbagallo, M.; Pappalardo, A.; Colonna, N.; Damone, L.; Piscopo, M.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maugeri, E.; Heinitz, S.; Schumann, D.; Dressler, R.; Kivel, N.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Ayranov, M.; Bacak, M.; Barros, S.; Balibrea-Correa, J.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cardella, R.; Casanovas, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chen, Y. H.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dupont, E.; Duran, I.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Furman, W.; Ganesan, S.; García-Rios, A.; Gawlik, A.; Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Göbel, K.; Gonc̗alves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heyse, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Kimura, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lerendegui, J.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Meo, S. Lo; Lonsdale, S.; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Mazzone, A.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Nolte, R.; Oprea, A.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.; Rajeev, K.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Rout, P.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J.; Sabate-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Stamatopoulos, A.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Vollaire, J.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wolf, C.; Woods, P. J.; Wright, T.; Z̆ugec, P.

    2016-09-01

    The newly built second experimental area EAR2 of the n_TOF spallation neutron source at CERN allows to perform (n, charged particles) experiments on short-lived highly radioactive targets. This paper describes a detection apparatus and the experimental procedure for the determination of the cross-section of the 7Be(n,α)α reaction, which represents one of the focal points toward the solution of the cosmological Lithium abundance problem, and whose only measurement, at thermal energy, dates back to 1963. The apparently unsurmountable experimental difficulties stemming from the huge 7Be γ-activity, along with the lack of a suitable neutron beam facility, had so far prevented further measurements. The detection system is subject to considerable radiation damage, but is capable of disentangling the rare reaction signals from the very high background. This newly developed setup could likely be useful also to study other challenging reactions requiring the detectors to be installed directly in the neutron beam.

  17. Aerodynamics of the knuckleball pitch: Experimental measurements on slowly rotating baseballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, John P.; Morrissey, Michael P.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we characterize the lift and lateral forces on a two-seam versus four-seam knuckleball and measure the viscous shear stress. We believe these measurements to be the first reported for slowly rotating baseballs. Our findings indicate the seam acts to either delay or advance separation depending upon the ball angle; these results are supported with flow visualization. The combined effect produces significant lift and lateral forces that can rapidly change as the ball rotates. Furthermore, we found the shear stress to be asymmetric which can result in significant in-flight torque. Together, asymmetries in force and shear stress produce the complicated flight trajectories that can confound the hapless batter.

  18. Experimental investigation on the accuracy of alternative devices to measure DNI in comparison to tracking pyrheliometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rommel, Matthias; Larcher, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Solar process heat holds a large potential for the application of solar collectors. In the process temperature range above 120°C concentrating collectors such as parabolic trough and liner concentrating Fresnel collectors are used. In order to support the further development of process heat systems with concentrating collectors it is necessary to install, operate and monitor more field systems in which these collectors are operated under real conditions in the industry. A cost-efficient but sufficiently exact measurement of the direct solar irradiation is necessary for the energetic evaluation of system performance and a technical assessment of the collectors. In this paper we report on a comparison of three different possibilities for the measurement of the direct solar irradiation.

  19. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS Studies of dE/dx measurements with the BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xue-Xiang; Li, Wei-Dong; Roy, A. Briere; Liu, Chun-Lei; Mao, Ze-Pu; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; He, Kang-Lin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Huang, Bin; Huang, Yan-Ping; Jia, Lu-Kui; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Xiu-Rong; Liu, Chun-Yan; Liu, Huai-Min; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Wang, Da-Yong; Wu, Ling-Hui; Wu, Zhi; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhao, Chuan; Zhang, Yao; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2010-12-01

    The Beijing Spectrometer III (BESIII) is a general-purpose detector used for the study of τ-charm physics at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider II (BEPCII). This paper presents our studies of the dE/dx measurement in the drift chamber of BESIII, which is important for the identification of charged particles. Corrections applied to the dE/dx measurement in data reconstruction are discussed. After our current dE/dx calibration, a resolution of about 6% has been obtained for minimum ionization particles, and a 3σ K/π separation is obtained for momenta up to 760 MeV/c. These results meet the design goals of the BESIII drift chamber.

  20. Comparison Between Simulated and Experimentally Measured Performance of a Four Port Wave Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack; Welch, Gerard E.

    2007-01-01

    Performance and operability testing has been completed on a laboratory-scale, four-port wave rotor, of the type suitable for use as a topping cycle on a gas turbine engine. Many design aspects, and performance estimates for the wave rotor were determined using a time-accurate, one-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics-based simulation code developed specifically for wave rotors. The code follows a single rotor passage as it moves past the various ports, which in this reference frame become boundary conditions. This paper compares wave rotor performance predicted with the code to that measured during laboratory testing. Both on and off-design operating conditions were examined. Overall, the match between code and rig was found to be quite good. At operating points where there were disparities, the assumption of larger than expected internal leakage rates successfully realigned code predictions and laboratory measurements. Possible mechanisms for such leakage rates are discussed.

  1. Experimental determination of the self-absorption factor for MTR plates by passive gamma spectrometric measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, R.; Mortreau, P.

    2011-07-01

    The measurement of the absolute activity or the mass of radioactive substances by gamma spectrometry needs to include a correction for the radiation absorption inside the source volume, the so-called self-absorption factor. It depends on geometry and material composition of the source, the detector geometry and on the geometrical arrangement of source and gamma radiation detector; it can be calculated if full information about all that is available. This article however describes how to determine the self-absorption factor from measurements if the radiation sources are plates of uranium fuel with typical parameters of nuclear fuel for MTR reactors and without using detail information on the source geometry, thus allowing easy inspection without relying on - potentially falsified - declarations on the internal properties of the fuel objects and without calculation.

  2. Hybrid predictions of railway induced ground vibration using a combination of experimental measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K. A.; Verbraken, H.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2016-07-01

    Along with the rapid expansion of urban rail networks comes the need for accurate predictions of railway induced vibration levels at grade and in buildings. Current computational methods for making predictions of railway induced ground vibration rely on simplifying modelling assumptions and require detailed parameter inputs, which lead to high levels of uncertainty. It is possible to mitigate against these issues using a combination of field measurements and state-of-the-art numerical methods, known as a hybrid model. In this paper, two hybrid models are developed, based on the use of separate source and propagation terms that are quantified using in situ measurements or modelling results. These models are implemented using term definitions proposed by the Federal Railroad Administration and assessed using the specific illustration of a surface railway. It is shown that the limitations of numerical and empirical methods can be addressed in a hybrid procedure without compromising prediction accuracy.

  3. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with uncharacterized encoding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Shuang; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Li, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Ding, Yu-Yang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-12-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI QKD) is an efficient way to share secrets using untrusted measurement devices. However, the assumption on the characterizations of encoding states is still necessary in this promising protocol, which may lead to unnecessary complexity and potential loopholes in realistic implementations. Here, by using the mismatched-basis statistics, we present the first proof-of-principle experiment of MDI QKD with uncharacterized encoding sources. In this demonstration, the encoded states are only required to be constrained in a two-dimensional Hilbert space, and two distant parties (Alice and Bob) are resistant to state preparation flaws even if they have no idea about the detailed information of their encoding states. The positive final secure key rates of our system exhibit the feasibility of this novel protocol, and demonstrate its value for the application of secure communication with uncharacterized devices.

  4. Theoretical and experimental analysis of laser altimeters for barometric measurements over the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, B. M.; Gardner, C. S.

    1984-01-01

    The statistical characteristics and the waveforms of ocean-reflected laser pulses are studied. The received signal is found to be corrupted by shot noise and time-resolved speckle. The statistics of time-resolved speckle and its effects on the timing accuracy of the receiver are studied in the general context of laser altimetry. For estimating the differential propagation time, various receiver timing algorithms are proposed and their performances evaluated. The results indicate that, with the parameters of a realistic altimeter, a pressure measurement accuracy of a few millibars is feasible. The data obtained from the first airborne two-color laser altimeter experiment are processed and analyzed. The results are used to verify the pressure measurement concept.

  5. Experimental violation of a Bell-Leggett-Garg inequality using weak measurements, Part I: Avoiding loopholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, J.; White, T.; Mutus, J.; Barends, R.; Megrant, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Sank, D.; Kelly, J.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Fowler, A.; Korotkov, A. N.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the violation of a hybrid Bell-Leggett-Garg inequality that avoids both the disjoint sampling and fair sampling loopholes that are common to traditional Bell inequalities. Our algorithm uses sequential weak measurements of a Bell state that are implemented with four superconducting Xmon qubits. In this first of two talks, we detail the high-fidelity partial projections that are needed for this violation, which are realized by entangling an ancilla qubit to each data qubit using a controlled-Z two-qubit gate. After calibration of the ancilla readout, these partial projections indirectly measure qubit expectation values with a tunable amount of state disturbance. For sufficiently weak disturbance, the inequality can be violated using all the data collected in a single configuration.

  6. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500-2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  7. The redox status of experimental hemorrhagic shock as measured by cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Anubhav; Göke, Friederike; Flint, Richard; Loveday, Benjamin P T; Thompson, Nichola; Delahunt, Brett; Kilmartin, Paul A; Cooper, Garth J S; MacDonald, Julia; Hickey, Anthony; Windsor, John A; Phillips, Anthony R J

    2010-05-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) leads to reactive oxygen species production. However, clinicians do not have access to bedside measurements of the redox status during HS. Cyclic voltammetry (CyV) is a simple electrochemical method of measuring redox status. The aims of this study were to 1) report the first application of cyclic voltammetry to measure the acute changes in serum redox status after HS, 2) to contrast it with another severe systemic disease with a different redox pathology (acute pancreatitis [AP]), and 3) to describe the response of CyV over time in a resolving model of AP. In the acute study, 24 male Wistar rats were randomized into three groups: groups 1 (control), 2 (AP), and 3 (HS). In the time-course study, 28 rats were randomized to a sham-control as well as 6 and 24 h post-AP cohorts, respectively.Cyclic voltammetry was performed using a three-electrode system. In the acute study, the first and second voltammetric peaks increased significantly in HS. In contrast, within the AP group, only the first voltammetric peak showed a significant increase. The first voltammetric peak correlated with plasma protein carbonyls (PCs) and with thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, whereas the second voltammetric peak correlated positively with plasma protein carbonyls. In the second study, the first voltammetric peak correlated with physiological improvements. Here, we showed that serum CyV could respond to the serum redox change in HS and AP. Cyclic voltammetry warrants evaluation as a potential real-time beside measure of a patient's redox status during shock.

  8. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Online measurement of the BEPC II background using RadFET dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hui; Li, Jin; Gong, Guang-Hua; Li, Yu-Xiong; Hou, Lei; Shao, Bei-Bei

    2009-09-01

    To monitor the integral dose deposited in the BESIII electromagnetic calorimeter whose performance degrades due to exposure to the BEPC II background, a 400 nm IMPL RadFET dosimeter-based integral dose online monitor system is built. After calibration with the 60Co source and verification with TLD in the pulse radiation fields, an experiment was arranged to measure the BEPC II background online. The results are presented.

  9. Experimental Development of a Novel Stress Sensor for in situ Stress Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Polsky, Yarom; Lance, Michael J; Mattus, Catherine H; Daniels, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe ongoing work to adapt a previously demonstrated method for measuring stress in ceramics to develop a borehole deployed in situ stress sensor. The method involves the use of a cementitious material which exhibits a strong piezo-spectroscopic stress response as a downhole stress gage. A description of the conceptual approach will be provided along with preliminary analysis and proof-of-concept laboratory results.

  10. Regional analysis techniques for integrating experimental and numerical measurements of transport properties of reservoir rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, S. M.; Latham, S.; Middleton, J.; Limaye, A.; Senden, T. J.; Arns, C. H.

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the mechanisms of micro-structural change and their effect on transport properties using digital core analysis requires balancing field of view and resolution. This typically leads to the compromise of working with relatively small samples, where boundary effects can be substantial. A direct comparison with experiment, as e.g. desirable to eliminate unknown parameters and integrate numerical and physical experiments, needs to consider these boundary effects. Here we develop a workflow to define measuring windows within a sample where these boundary effects are minimised allowing the integration of physical and numerical experiment. We consider in particular sleeve leakage and use a radial partitioning of the solutions to various transport equations to derive relevant regional measures, which may be used for the development of cross-correlations between physical properties. Samples of Bentheimer and Castlegate sandstone as well as Mt. Gambier limestone and a sucrosic dolomite are considered. The sample plugs are encased in rubber sleeves and micro-CT images acquired at ambient conditions. Using these high-resolution images we calculate transport properties, namely permeability and electrical conductivity, and analyse the resulting field solutions with regard to flux across different regions of interest. The latter are selected on the basis of distance to the sample sleeve inner surface. Clear bypassing at the sleeve-sample interface in terms of elevated fluxes is observed for all samples, although to different extent. We consider different sleeve boundary conditions to define a measuring window minimising these effects, use the procedure to compare flux averages defined over these measuring windows with conventional choices of simulation domains, and compare resulting physical cross-correlations.

  11. Concurrent Validation of Experimental Army Enlisted Personnel Selection and Classification Measures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    for each MOS. Another baseline predictor used in Select21 was educational status (i.e., high school diploma status), which is used by the Army to...predict attrition. ASVAB scores and pre-enlistment educational tier were retrieved from Soldier personnel records for use in the Select21 research...II), a measure used by the Department of Defense to support career counseling for high school students. A set of three P-E fit predictors was

  12. Seismoelectric Beamforming Imaging Technique Proof of Concept By Numerical Modeling and Experimental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; El Khoury, P.; Sava, P. C.; Cha, M.; Planès, T.

    2014-12-01

    The electrical current density generated by the propagation of a seismic wave at the interface characterized by a rap in the electrical conductivity and/or the permeability produces an electrical field of electrokinetic nature that can be measured remotely with a signal-to-noise ratio depending on the background noise and signal attenuation. "Seismoelectric Beamforming" is a new imaging technique based on scanning a porous media using appropriately delayed in time seismic sources to focus the energy on a regular grid and measure the associate relatively high electric field remotely. This method can be used to image heterogeneities with a high resolution. We are presenting some numerical modeling and preliminary laboratory measurements in a simple tank experiment to validate the scanning approach. The experiment consists of a water-filled bucket in which a cylindrical sandstone core sample is set up vertically crossing the water column. We move the hydrophone at various locations in the bucket and then focus the seismic energy in order to scan the medium and determine the geometry of the porous plug. In the numerical modeling analysis, we will show the efficiency of the seismoelectric beamforming technique in locating and imaging the position of the core sample.

  13. Experimental characterization of the effects of pneumatic tubing on unsteady pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Lindsey, William T.; Curry, Robert E.; Gilyard, Glenn B.

    1990-01-01

    Advances in aircraft control system designs have, with increasing frequency, required that air data be used as flight control feedback. This condition requires that these data be measured with accuracy and high fidelity. Most air data information is provided by pneumatic pressure measuring sensors. Typically unsteady pressure data provided by pneumatic sensing systems are distorted at high frequencies. The distortion is a result of the pressure being transmitted to the pressure sensor through a length of connective tubing. The pressure is distorted by frictional damping and wave reflection. As a result, air data provided all-flush, pneumatically sensed air data systems may not meet the frequency response requirements necessary for flight control augmentation. Both lab and flight test were performed at NASA-Ames to investigate the effects of this high frequency distortion in remotely located pressure measurement systems. Good qualitative agreement between lab and flight data are demonstrated. Results from these tests are used to describe the effects of pneumatic distortion in terms of a simple parametric model.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Liquid-propellant Laser Propulsion with a Horizontal Momentum Measuring Lever

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Bin; Li Long; Tang Zhiping; Cai Jian

    2010-05-06

    Thrust performance of Liquid-propellant laser propulsion (LLP) is seriously influenced by factors like laser parameters, choice of propellants and ablation materials. For the purpose of studying these influences, series of impulse measuring experiments for various propellants and ablation materials were conducted. The key device is a Horizontal Momentum Measuring Lever, which covers a C{sub m} measuring range from 10{sup 3} Ns/MJ to about 1.6x10{sup 4} Ns/MJ. A Nd:YAG laser was used as the laser source. From the result, it is found that laser energy density plays an important role on LLP efficiency, higher energy density leads to higher C{sub m} and I{sub sp}. Highest C{sub m} of about 10{sup 4} Ns/MJ with the I{sub sp} of 3.57s was achieved by focusing the laser to the average energy density of 8.83x10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}. Besides of that, it is also found that when the energy density is certainly high, C{sub m} of LLP increases stably with the increase of the propellant thickness, which gives a potential way to further improve the thrust performance in LLP.

  15. Application of viscous and Iwan modal damping models to experimental measurements from bolted structures

    DOE PAGES

    Deaner, Brandon J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Starr, Michael James; ...

    2015-01-20

    Measurements are presented from a two-beam structure with several bolted interfaces in order to characterize the nonlinear damping introduced by the joints. The measurements (all at force levels below macroslip) reveal that each underlying mode of the structure is well approximated by a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with a nonlinear mechanical joint. At low enough force levels, the measurements show dissipation that scales as the second power of the applied force, agreeing with theory for a linear viscously damped system. This is attributed to linear viscous behavior of the material and/or damping provided by the support structure. At larger forcemore » levels, the damping is observed to behave nonlinearly, suggesting that damping from the mechanical joints is dominant. A model is presented that captures these effects, consisting of a spring and viscous damping element in parallel with a four-parameter Iwan model. As a result, the parameters of this model are identified for each mode of the structure and comparisons suggest that the model captures the stiffness and damping accurately over a range of forcing levels.« less

  16. Application of viscous and Iwan modal damping models to experimental measurements from bolted structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deaner, Brandon J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Starr, Michael James; Segalman, Daniel J.; Sumali, Hartono

    2015-01-20

    Measurements are presented from a two-beam structure with several bolted interfaces in order to characterize the nonlinear damping introduced by the joints. The measurements (all at force levels below macroslip) reveal that each underlying mode of the structure is well approximated by a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with a nonlinear mechanical joint. At low enough force levels, the measurements show dissipation that scales as the second power of the applied force, agreeing with theory for a linear viscously damped system. This is attributed to linear viscous behavior of the material and/or damping provided by the support structure. At larger force levels, the damping is observed to behave nonlinearly, suggesting that damping from the mechanical joints is dominant. A model is presented that captures these effects, consisting of a spring and viscous damping element in parallel with a four-parameter Iwan model. As a result, the parameters of this model are identified for each mode of the structure and comparisons suggest that the model captures the stiffness and damping accurately over a range of forcing levels.

  17. The accurate measurement of second virial coefficients using self-interaction chromatography: experimental considerations.

    PubMed

    Quigley, A; Heng, J Y Y; Liddell, J M; Williams, D R

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of B22, the second virial coefficient, is an important technique for describing the solution behaviour of proteins, especially as it relates to precipitation, aggregation and crystallisation phenomena. This paper describes the best practise for calculating B22 values from self-interaction chromatograms (SIC) for aqueous protein solutions. Detailed analysis of SIC peak shapes for lysozyme shows that non-Gaussian peaks are commonly encountered for SIC, with typical peak asymmetries of 10%. This asymmetry reflects a non-linear chromatographic retention process, in this case heterogeneity of the protein-protein interactions. Therefore, it is important to use the centre of mass calculations for determining accurate retention volumes and thus B22 values. Empirical peak maximum chromatogram analysis, often reported in the literature, can result in errors of up to 50% in B22 values. A methodology is reported here for determining both the mean and the variance in B22 from SIC experiments, includes a correction for normal longitudinal peak broadening. The variance in B22 due to chemical effects is quantified statistically and is a measure of the heterogeneity of protein-protein interactions in solution. In the case of lysozyme, a wide range of B22 values are measured which can vary significantly from the average B22 values.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Liquid-propellant Laser Propulsion with a Horizontal Momentum Measuring Lever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Li, Long; Tang, Zhi-ping; Cai, Jian

    2010-05-01

    Thrust performance of Liquid-propellant laser propulsion (LLP) is seriously influenced by factors like laser parameters, choice of propellants and ablation materials. For the purpose of studying these influences, series of impulse measuring experiments for various propellants and ablation materials were conducted. The key device is a Horizontal Momentum Measuring Lever, which covers a Cm measuring range from 103Ns/MJ to about 1.6×104 Ns/MJ. A Nd:YAG laser was used as the laser source. From the result, it is found that laser energy density plays an important role on LLP efficiency, higher energy density leads to higher Cm and Isp. Highest Cm of about 104Ns/MJ with the Isp of 3.57s was achieved by focusing the laser to the average energy density of 8.83×108W/cm2. Besides of that, it is also found that when the energy density is certainly high, Cm of LLP increases stably with the increase of the propellant thickness, which gives a potential way to further improve the thrust performance in LLP.

  19. Experimental measurement of unsteady drag on shock accelerated micro-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Ankur; Martinez, Adam; Prestridge, Katherine

    2016-11-01

    The unsteady drag history of shock accelerated micro-particles in air is investigated in the Horizontal Shock Tube (HST) facility at Los Alamos National laboratory. Drag forces are estimated based on particle size, particle density, and instantaneous velocity and acceleration measured on hundreds of post-shock particle tracks. We use previously implemented 8-frame Particle Tracking Velocimetry/Anemometry (PTVA) diagnostics to analyze particles in high spatiotemporal resolution from individual particle trajectories. We use a simultaneous LED based shadowgraph to register shock location with respect to a moving particle in each frame. To measure particle size accurately, we implement a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) in synchronization with the PTVA. In this presentation, we will corroborate with more accuracy our earlier observation that post-shock unsteady drag coefficients (CD(t)) are manifold times higher than those predicted by theoretical models. Our results will also show that all CD(t) measurements collapse on a master-curve for a range of particle size, density, Mach number and Reynolds number when time is normalized by a shear velocity based time scale, t* = d/(uf-up) , where d is particle diameter, and uf and up are post-shock fluid and particle velocities.

  20. Comparison of CFD Simulations with Experimental Measurements of Nozzle Clogging in Continuous Casting of Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi-Ghaleni, Mahdi; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Smith, Jeffrey D.; O'Malley, Ronald

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of clog deposit thickness on the interior surfaces of a commercial continuous casting nozzle are compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of melt flow patterns and particle-wall interactions to identify the mechanisms of nozzle clogging. A submerged entry nozzle received from industry was encased in epoxy and carefully sectioned to allow measurement of the deposit thickness on the internal surfaces of the nozzle. CFD simulations of melt flow patterns and particle behavior inside the nozzle were performed by combining the Eulerian-Lagrangian approach and detached eddy simulation turbulent model, matching the geometry and operating conditions of the industrial test. The CFD results indicated that convergent areas of the interior cross section of the nozzle increased the velocity and turbulence of the flowing steel inside the nozzle and decreased the clog deposit thickness locally in these areas. CFD simulations also predicted a higher rate of attachment of particles in the divergent area between two convergent sections of the nozzle, which matched the observations made in the industrial nozzle measurements.

  1. Experimental Development and Demonstration of Ultrasonic Measurement Diagnostics for Sodium Fast Reactor Thermal-hydraulics

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Jones, Byron

    2013-09-13

    This research project will address some of the principal technology issues related to sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR), primarily the development and demonstration of ultrasonic measurement diagnostics linked to effective thermal convective sensing under normatl and off-normal conditions. Sodium is well-suited as a heat transfer medium for the SFR. However, because it is chemically reactive and optically opaque, it presents engineering accessibility constraints relative to operations and maintenance (O&M) and in-service inspection (ISI) technologies that are currently used for light water reactors. Thus, there are limited sensing options for conducting thermohydraulic measurements under normal conditions and off-normal events (maintenance, unanticipated events). Acoustic methods, primarily ultrasonics, are a key measurement technology with applications in non-destructive testing, component imaging, thermometry, and velocimetry. THis project would have yielded a better quantitative and qualitative understanding of the thermohydraulic condition of solium under varied flow conditions. THe scope of work will evaluate and demonstrate ultrasonic technologies and define instrumentation options for the SFR.

  2. Experimental Evaluation of Hot Films on Ceramic Substrates for Skin-Friction Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Gregory K.; Lavine, Adrienne S.; Hamory, Philip J.

    2003-01-01

    An investigation has been performed on the use of low-thermal conductivity, ceramic substrates for hot films intended to measure skin friction. Hot films were deposited on two types of ceramic substrates. Four hot films used composite-ceramic substrates with subsurface thermocouples (TCs), and two hot films were deposited on thin Macor(R) substrates. All six sensors were tested side by side in the wall of the NASA Glenn Research Center 8-ft by 6-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). Data were obtained from zero flow to Mach 1.98 in air. Control measurements were made with three Preston tubes and two boundary-layer rakes. The tests were repeated at two different hot film power levels. All hot films and subsurface TCs functioned throughout the three days of testing. At zero flow, the films on the high-thermal conductivity Macor(R) substrates required approximately twice the power as those on the composite-ceramic substrates. Skin-friction results were consistent with the control measurements. Estimates of the conduction heat losses were made using the embedded TCs but were hampered by variability in coating thicknesses and TC locations.

  3. An experimental method for measuring stress intensity factor distributions in three-dimensional problems

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.W.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to briefly chart the progress over a period of some 30 years during which the writer and his associates have tried to effect a marriage between the well known, frozen stress method (augmented with the methods of Tardy and Post for refining the near tip fringe analysis), with the principles of fracture mechanics, using an extension of an idea proposed by Irwin. Although a conscious effort was made by the writer to keep the elements of the method as simple as possible so as to allow the application to as broad a range of practical problems as possible while maintaining reasonable engineering accuracy, there were occasional diversions into supporting developments such as the singularity change when a crack intersects a free boundary and the combined use of the stress freezing method with moire. In general, the guidelines employed by the writer included: Use of well established experimental methods; simple algorithms where singularity dominated data zones were revealed by the data itself; applicability to any crack shapes even when unknown apriori; and engineering accuracy of {+-}5% in K{sub 1} in Mode 1 dominated problems.

  4. Measuring effectiveness, efficiency and equity in an experimental Payments for Ecosystem Services trial.

    PubMed

    Martin, Adrian; Gross-Camp, Nicole; Kebede, Bereket; McGuire, Shawn

    2014-09-01

    There is currently a considerable effort to evaluate the performance of Payments for Ecosystem Services as an environmental management tool. The research presented here contributes to this work by using an experimental design to evaluate Payments for Ecosystem Services as a tool for supporting biodiversity conservation in the context of an African protected area. The trial employed a 'before and after' and 'with and without' design. We present the results of social and ecological surveys to investigate the impacts of the trial in terms of its effectiveness, efficiency and equity. We find the scheme to be effective at bringing about additional conservation outcomes. However, we also found that increased monitoring is similarly effective in the short term, at lower cost. The major difference - and arguably the significant contribution of the Payments for Ecosystem Services - was that it changed the motives for protecting the park and improved local perceptions both of the park and its authority. We discuss the implications of these results for conservation efficiency, arguing that efficiency should not be defined in terms of short-term cost-effectiveness, but also in terms of the sustainability of behavioral motives in the long term. This insight helps us to resolve the apparent trade-off between goals of equity and efficiency in Payments for Ecosystem Services.

  5. Experimental measurement of a shipboard fire environment with simulated radioactive materials packages

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Wix, S.D.; Beene, D.E. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Results from a series of eight test fires ranging in size from 2.2 to 18.8 MW conducted aboard the Coast Guard fire test ship Mayo Lykes at Mobile, Alabama are presented and discussed. Tests aboard the break-bulk type cargo ship consisted of heptane spray fires simulating engine room and galley fires, wood crib fires simulating cargo hold fires, and pool fires staged for comparison to land-based regulatory fire results. Primary instrumentation for the tests consisted of two pipe calorimeters that simulated a typical package shape for radioactive materials packages. The calorimeters were both located adjacent to the fires and on the opposite side of the cargo hold bulkhead nearest the fire. The calorimeters were constructed from 1.5 m length sections of nominal 2 foot diameter schedule 60 steel pipe. Type K thermocouples were attached at 12 locations on the circumference and ends of the calorimeter. Fire heat fluxes to the calorimeter surfaces were estimated with the use of the Sandia SODDIT inverse heat conduction code. Experimental results from all types of tests are discussed, and some comparisons are made between the environments found on the ship and those found in land-based pool fire tests.

  6. Experimental cavity pressure measurements at subsonic and transonic speeds. Static-pressure results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, E. B.; Stallings, Robert L., Jr.; Tracy, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine cavity flow-characteristics at subsonic and transonic speeds. A rectangular box cavity was tested in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 0.95 at a unit Reynolds number of approximately 3 x 10(exp 6) per foot. The boundary layer approaching the cavity was turbulent. Cavities were tested over a range of length-to-depth ratios (l/h) of 1 to 17.5 for cavity width-to-depth ratios of 1, 4, 8, and 16. Fluctuating- and static-pressure data in the cavity were obtained; however, only static-pressure data is analyzed. The boundaries between the flow regimes based on cavity length-to-depth ratio were determined. The change to transitional flow from open flow occurs at l/h at approximately 6-8 however, the change from transitional- to closed-cavity flow occurred over a wide range of l/h and was dependent on Mach number and cavity configuration. The change from closed to open flow as found to occur gradually. The effect of changing cavity dimensions showed that if the vlaue of l/h was kept fixed but the cavity width was decreased or cavity height was increased, the cavity pressure distribution tended more toward a more closed flow distribution.

  7. Unseeded Supersolubility of Lithium Carbonate: Experimental Measurement and Simulation with Mathematical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuzhu; Song, Xingfu; Wang, Jin; Luo, Yan; Yu, Jianguo

    2009-12-01

    A laser aparatus was employed to investigate the unseeded supersolubility values of Li 2CO 3 in aqueous solution. It shows the supersolubility of Li 2CO 3 decreases with the raise of temperature and stirring speed, and with a reduction of feeding rate of Na 2CO 3. The introduce of ultrasound field leads to obvious reduction on supersolubility, whereas magnetic field causes little effect. The involving factors of impurities and additives on the supersolubility were also studied. It is found that the supersolubility value decreases with the addition of NaCl, KCl, NaNO 3 and NaBr, while increases at the presence of Na 2SO 4, CH 4N 2O, NH 4Cl, (NH 4) 2SO 4 and EDTA disodium. Meanwhile, two mathematical models, empirical correlation and BP neural network, were used to simulate the supersolubility value as a function of temperature and feeding rate of Na 2CO 3. Compared with empirical correlation method, BP neural network simulation has better consistence with the experimental data.

  8. An experimental device for accurate ultrasounds measurements in liquid foods at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Baltasar, E.; Taravillo, M.; Baonza, V. G.; Sanz, P. D.; Guignon, B.

    2012-12-01

    The use of high hydrostatic pressure to ensure safe and high-quality product has markedly increased in the food industry during the last decade. Ultrasonic sensors can be employed to control such processes in an equivalent way as they are currently used in processes carried out at room pressure. However, their installation, calibration and use are particularly challenging in the context of a high pressure environment. Besides, data about acoustic properties of food under pressure and even for water are quite scarce in the pressure range of interest for food treatment (namely, above 200 MPa). The objective of this work was to establish a methodology to determine the speed of sound in foods under pressure. An ultrasonic sensor using the multiple reflections method was adapted to a lab-scale HHP equipment to determine the speed of sound in water between 253.15 and 348.15 K, and at pressures up to 700 MPa. The experimental speed-of-sound data were compared to the data calculated from the equation of state of water (IAPWS-95 formulation). From this analysis, the way to calibrate cell path was validated. After this calibration procedure, the speed of sound could be determined in liquid foods by using this sensor with a relative uncertainty between (0.22 and 0.32) % at a confidence level of 95 % over the whole pressure domain.

  9. Is there a resting frame in the universe? A proposed experimental test based on a precise measurement of particle mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Donald C.

    2017-03-01

    According to the Special Theory of Relativity, there should be no resting frame in our universe. Such an assumption, however, could be in conflict with the Standard Model of cosmology today, which regards the vacuum not as an empty space. Thus, there is a strong need to experimentally test whether there is a resting frame in our universe or not. We propose that this can be done by precisely measuring the masses of two charged particles moving in opposite directions. If all inertial frames are equivalent, there should be no detectable mass difference between these two particles. If there is a resting frame in the universe, one will observe a mass difference that is dependent on the orientation of the laboratory frame. The detailed experimental setup is discussed in this paper.

  10. Experimental validation of a coprime linear microphone array for high-resolution direction-of-arrival measurements.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ning; Bush, Dane; Summers, Jason E

    2015-04-01

    Coprime linear microphone arrays allow for narrower beams with fewer sensors. A coprime microphone array consists of two staggered uniform linear subarrays with M and N microphones, where M and N are coprime with each other. By applying spatial filtering to both subarrays and combining their outputs, M+N-1 microphones yield M⋅N directional bands. In this work, the coprime sampling theory is implemented in the form of a linear microphone array of 16 elements with coprime numbers of 9 and 8. This coprime microphone array is experimentally tested to validate the coprime array theory. Both predicted and measured results are discussed. Experimental results confirm that narrow beampatterns as predicted by the coprime sampling theory can be obtained by the coprime microphone array.

  11. Validation of a numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction model for a prosthetic valve based on experimental PIV measurements.

    PubMed

    Guivier-Curien, Carine; Deplano, Valérie; Bertrand, Eric

    2009-10-01

    A numerical 3-D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of a prosthetic aortic valve was developed, based on a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program using an Arbitrary Eulerian Lagrangian (ALE) formulation. To make sure of the validity of this numerical model, an equivalent experimental model accounting for both the geometrical features and the hydrodynamic conditions was also developed. The leaflet and the flow behaviours around the bileaflet valve were investigated numerically and experimentally by performing particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Through quantitative and qualitative comparisons, it was shown that the leaflet behaviour and the velocity fields were similar in both models. The present study allows the validation of a fully coupled 3-D FSI numerical model. The promising numerical tool could be therefore used to investigate clinical issues involving the aortic valve.

  12. Experimental measurements of thermal properties of high-temperature refractory materials used for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Leathy, Abdelrahman; Jeter, Sheldon; Al-Ansary, Hany; Abdel-Khalik, Said; Golob, Matthew; Danish, Syed Noman; Saeed, Rageh; Djajadiwinata, Eldwin; Al-Suhaibani, Zeyad

    2016-05-01

    This paper builds on studies conducted on thermal energy storage (TES) systems that were built as a part of the work performed for a DOE-funded SunShot project titled "High Temperature Falling Particle Receiver". In previous studies, two small-scale TES systems were constructed for measuring heat loss at high temperatures that are compatible with the falling particle receiver concept, both of which had shown very limited heat loss. Through the course of those studies, it became evident that there was a lack of information about the thermal performance of some of the insulating refractory materials used in the experiments at high temperatures, especially insulating firebrick and perlite concrete. This work focuses on determining the thermal conductivities of those materials at high temperatures. The apparatus consists of a prototype cylindrical TES bin built with the same wall construction used in previous studies. An electric heater is placed along the centerline of the bin, and thermocouples are used to measure temperature at the interfaces between all layers. Heat loss is measured across one of the layers whose thermal conductivity had already been well established using laboratory experiments. This value is used to deduce the thermal conductivity of other layers. Three interior temperature levels were considered; namely, 300°C, 500°C, and 700°C. Results show that the thermal conductivity of insulating firebrick remains low (approximately 0.22 W/m.K) at an average layer temperature as high as 640°C, but it was evident that the addition of mortar had an impact on its effective thermal conductivity. Results also show that the thermal conductivity of perlite concrete is very low, approximately 0.15 W/m.K at an average layer temperature of 360°C. This is evident by the large temperature drop that occurs across the perlite concrete layer. These results should be useful for future studies, especially those that focus on numerical modeling of TES bins.

  13. Quantification of mitral regurgitation by automated cardiac output measurement: experimental and clinical validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, J. P.; Yang, X. S.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Zhou, J.; Vazquez, C. J.; Griffin, B. P.; Stewart, W. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate an automated noninvasive method to quantify mitral regurgitation. BACKGROUND: Automated cardiac output measurement (ACM), which integrates digital color Doppler velocities in space and in time, has been validated for the left ventricular (LV) outflow tract but has not been tested for the LV inflow tract or to assess mitral regurgitation (MR). METHODS: First, to validate ACM against a gold standard (ultrasonic flow meter), 8 dogs were studied at 40 different stages of cardiac output (CO). Second, to compare ACM to the LV outflow (ACMa) and inflow (ACMm) tracts, 50 normal volunteers without MR or aortic regurgitation (44+/-5 years, 31 male) were studied. Third, to compare ACM with the standard pulsed Doppler-two-dimensional echocardiographic (PD-2D) method for quantification of MR, 51 patients (61+/-14 years, 30 male) with MR were studied. RESULTS: In the canine studies, CO by ACM (1.32+/-0.3 liter/min, y) and flow meter (1.35+/-0.3 liter/min, x) showed good correlation (r=0.95, y=0.89x+0.11) and agreement (deltaCO(y-x)=0.03+/-0.08 [mean+/-SD] liter/min). In the normal subjects, CO measured by ACMm agreed with CO by ACMa (r=0.90, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.09+/-0.42 liter/min), PD (r=0.87, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=0.12+/-0.49 liter/min) and 2D (r=0.84, p < 0.0001, deltaCO=-0.16+/-0.48 liter/min). In the patients, mitral regurgitant volume (MRV) by ACMm-ACMa agreed with PD-2D (r= 0.88, y=0.88x+6.6, p < 0.0001, deltaMRV=2.68+/-9.7 ml). CONCLUSIONS: We determined that ACM is a feasible new method for quantifying LV outflow and inflow volume to measure MRV and that ACM automatically performs calculations that are equivalent to more time-consuming Doppler and 2D measurements. Additionally, ACM should improve MR quantification in routine clinical practice.

  14. Experimental Measurement of Transonic Fan Wake Response to Uniform and Simulated Boundary Layer Ingesting Inlet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, Walter F.; Ferrar, Anthony M.; Arend, David

    2011-01-01

    BWB Aircraft with embedded engines and BLI inlets offer attractive advantages in terms of reduced noise from engines and increased range and fuel economy. The BLI inlet produces inlet distortion patterns that can reduce fan performance and stall margin, and can produce undesirable forced responses. Knowledge of the dynamic response of fan flow when subjected to flow distortions of the type produced by BLI inlets is important for the design of distortion tolerant fans. This project is investigating fan response to flow distortion by measuring the response of the fan of a JT15D engine to a flow pattern following the results of the NASA Inlet A BLI wind tunnel tests.

  15. The dynamic role of root-water uptake in coupling potential to actual transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Ta; Katul, Gabriel

    The relationship between actual ( Eact) and potential ( Ep) transpiration above a grass-covered forest clearing was investigated numerically and experimentally from simultaneous measurements of soil moisture content profiles, mean meteorological conditions, turbulent heat and water vapor fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer, and soil hydraulic properties for two drying periods. The relationship between Eact/ Ep was found to be approximately constant and insensitive to variability in near-surface soil moisture content. To explore this near-constant Eact/ Ep, a model that relates potential and actual transpiration and accounts for root-uptake efficiency, potential transpiration rate, and root-density distribution was proposed and field-tested. The total amount of water consumed by the root system was integrated and compared with eddy-correlation latent heat flux measurements (field scale) and total water storage changes (local scale). Model calculations suggested that the deeper and more efficient roots are primarily responsible for the total water loss within the root zone when the near-surface soil layer approaches their wilting point.

  16. Tip convolution on HOPG surfaces measured in AM-AFM and interpreted using a combined experimental and simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoli; Chan, Nicholas; Martini, Ashlie; Egberts, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Amplitude modulated atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) was used to examine the influence of the size of the AFM tip apex on the measured surface topography of single highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) atomic steps. Experimental measurements were complemented by molecular dynamics simulations of AM-AFM and the results from both were evaluated by comparison of the measured or simulated width of the topography at the step to that predicted using simple rigid-body geometry. The results showed that the step width, which is a reflection of the resolution of the measurement, increased with tip size, as expected, but also that the difference between the measured/simulated step width and the geometric calculation was tip size dependent. The simulations suggested that this may be due to the deformation of the bodies and the effect of that deformation on the interaction force and oscillation amplitude. Overall, this study showed that the resolution of AM-AFM measurements of atomic steps can be correlated to tip size and that this relationship is affected by the deformation of the system.

  17. The Water Retention Curves in THF Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Experimental Measurement and Pore Scale Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabadi, N.; Zheng, X.; Dai, S.; Seol, Y.; Zapata, C.; Yun, T.; Jang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The water retention curve (WRC) of hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behaviour of hydrate dissociation for gas production. Most gas hydrates in marine environment have been formed from an aqueous phase (gas-dissolved water). However, the gas hydrate formation from an aqueous phase in a laboratory requires long period due to low gas solubility in water and is also associated with many experimental difficulties such as hydrate dissolution, difficult hydrate saturation control, and dynamic hydrate dissolution and formation. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is chosen to form THF hydrate because the formation process is faster than gas hydrate formation and hydrate saturation is easy to control. THF hydrate is formed at water-excess condition. Therefore, there is only water in the pore space after a target THF hydrate saturation is obtained. The pore habit of THF hydrate is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel and X-ray computed tomography images; and the water retention curves are obtained under different THF hydrate saturation conditions. Targeted THF hydrate saturations are Sh=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. Results shown that at a given water saturation the capillary pressure increases as THF hydrate saturation increases. And the gas entry pressure increases with increasing hydrate saturation. The WRC obtained by experiments is also compared with the results of a pore-network model simulation and Lattice Boltzmann Method. The fitting parameters of van Genuchten equation for different hydrate saturation conditions are suggested for the use as input parameters of reservoir simulators.

  18. Experimental Measurement of Frozen and Partially Melted Water Droplet Impact Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palacios, Jose; Yan, Sihong; Tan, Jason; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    High-speed video of single frozen water droplets impacting a surface was acquired. The droplets diameter ranged from 0.4 mm to 0.9 mm and impacted at velocities ranging from 140 m/sec to 309 m/sec. The techniques used to freeze the droplets and launch the particles against the surfaces is described in this paper. High-speed video was used to quantify the ice accretion area to the surface for varying impact angles (30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg), impacting velocities, and break-up angles. An oxygen /acetylene cross-flow flame used to ensure partial melting of the traveling frozen droplets is also discussed. A linear relationship between impact angle and ice accretion is identified for fully frozen particles. The slope of the relationship is affected by impact speed. Perpendicular impacts, i.e. 30 deg, exhibited small differences in ice accretion for varying velocities, while an increase of 60% in velocity from 161 m/sec to 259 m/sec, provided an increase on ice accretion area of 96% at an impact angle of 60 deg. The increase accretion area highlights the importance of impact angle and velocity on the ice accretion process of ice crystals. It was experimentally observed that partial melting was not required for ice accretion at the tested velocities when high impact angles were used (45 and 60 deg). Partially melted droplets doubled the ice accretion areas on the impacting surface when 0.0023 Joules were applied to the particle. The partially melted state of the droplets and a method to quantify the percentage increase in ice accretion area is also described in the paper.

  19. Circuit models and experimental noise measurements of micropipette amplifiers for extracellular neural recordings from live animals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang Hao; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Vai, Mang I; Klug, Achim; Lei, Tim C

    2014-01-01

    Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  20. Theoretical and Experimental Errors for In Situ Measurements of Plant Water Potential 1

    PubMed Central

    Shackel, Kenneth A.

    1984-01-01

    Errors in psychrometrically determined values of leaf water potential caused by tissue resistance to water vapor exchange and by lack of thermal equilibrium were evaluated using commercial in situ psychrometers (Wescor Inc., Logan, UT) on leaves of Tradescantia virginiana (L.). Theoretical errors in the dewpoint method of operation for these sensors were demonstrated. After correction for these errors, in situ measurements of leaf water potential indicated substantial errors caused by tissue resistance to water vapor exchange (4 to 6% reduction in apparent water potential per second of cooling time used) resulting from humidity depletions in the psychrometer chamber during the Peltier condensation process. These errors were avoided by use of a modified procedure for dewpoint measurement. Large changes in apparent water potential were caused by leaf and psychrometer exposure to moderate levels of irradiance. These changes were correlated with relatively small shifts in psychrometer zero offsets (−0.6 to −1.0 megapascals per microvolt), indicating substantial errors caused by nonisothermal conditions between the leaf and the psychrometer. Explicit correction for these errors is not possible with the current psychrometer design. PMID:16663701

  1. Multicondition Optimization and Experimental Measurements of a Double-Blade Centrifugal Pump Impeller.

    PubMed

    Liu, Houlin; Wang, Kai; Yuan, Shouqi; Tan, Minggao; Wang, Yong; Dong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve internal unsteady flow in a double-blade centrifugal pump (DBCP), this study used major geometric parameters of the original design as the initial values, heads at three conditions (i.e., 80% design flow rate, 100% design flow rate, and 120% design flow rate) as the constraints conditions, and the maximum of weighted average efficiency at the three conditions as the objective function. An adaptive simulated annealing algorithm was selected to solve the energy performance calculation model and the supertransitive approximation method was applied to fix optimal weight factors of individual objectives. On the basis of hydraulic performance optimization, three-condition automatic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) optimization of impeller meridional plane for the DBCP was realized by means of Isight software integrated Pro/E, Gambit, and Fluent software. The shroud arc radii R0 and R1, shroud angle T1, hub arc radius R2, and hub angle T2 on the meridional plane were selected as the design variables and the maximum of weighted average hydraulic efficiency at the three conditions was chosen as the objective function. Performance characteristic test and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of internal flow in the DBCP were conducted. Performance characteristic test results show that the weighted average efficiency of the impeller after the three-condition optimization has increased by 1.46% than that of original design. PIV measurements results show that vortex or recirculation phenomena in the impeller are distinctly improved under the three conditions.

  2. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Epidermal Heat Flux Sensors for Measurements of Core Body Temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihui; Webb, Richard Chad; Luo, Hongying; Xue, Yeguang; Kurniawan, Jonas; Cho, Nam Heon; Krishnan, Siddharth; Li, Yuhang; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2016-01-07

    Long-term, continuous measurement of core body temperature is of high interest, due to the widespread use of this parameter as a key biomedical signal for clinical judgment and patient management. Traditional approaches rely on devices or instruments in rigid and planar forms, not readily amenable to intimate or conformable integration with soft, curvilinear, time-dynamic, surfaces of the skin. Here, materials and mechanics designs for differential temperature sensors are presented which can attach softly and reversibly onto the skin surface, and also sustain high levels of deformation (e.g., bending, twisting, and stretching). A theoretical approach, together with a modeling algorithm, yields core body temperature from multiple differential measurements from temperature sensors separated by different effective distances from the skin. The sensitivity, accuracy, and response time are analyzed by finite element analyses (FEA) to provide guidelines for relationships between sensor design and performance. Four sets of experiments on multiple devices with different dimensions and under different convection conditions illustrate the key features of the technology and the analysis approach. Finally, results indicate that thermally insulating materials with cellular structures offer advantages in reducing the response time and increasing the accuracy, while improving the mechanics and breathability.

  3. Experimental determination of the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate by ultrasonic velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürbüz, H.; Özdemir, B.

    2003-05-01

    The metastable zone width of borax decahydrate (disodium tetraborate decahydrate), represented by the maximum undercooling Δ Tmax, both in pure and impure aqueous solutions were determined according to polythermal method by using the ultrasonic technique. It is found that the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate in pure solutions determined by ultrasonic method fulfills well the linear relation between logΔ Tmax and log(-d T/d t). However, the sensitivity of the method using the ultrasonic technique increases with increasing saturation temperature, probably due to the increase of temperature dependence of solubility with increasing saturation temperature. A comparison of the nucleation temperatures from ultrasonic measurements and from visual determination shows that both detection techniques give almost the same results for borax decahydrate. The results obtained from ultrasonic measurements show, that the presence of Ca 2+ as impurity has only a small effect on the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate as long as the impurity concentrations is in the range of 25-200 ppm. Similar to the effect of Ca 2+, Mg 2+ also has a small effect on the metastable zone width of borax up to the impurity concentration of 100 ppm. However, the presence of 200 ppm Mg 2+ results in a reasonable increase of the metastable zone width.

  4. First experimental results of very high accuracy centroiding measurements for the neat astrometric mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzier, A.; Malbet, F.; Preis, O.; Henault, F.; Kern, P.; Martin, G.; Feautrier, P.; Stadler, E.; Lafrasse, S.; Delboulbé, A.; Behar, E.; Saint-Pe, M.; Dupont, J.; Potin, S.; Cara, C.; Donati, M.; Doumayrou, E.; Lagage, P. O.; Léger, A.; LeDuigou, J. M.; Shao, M.; Goullioud, R.

    2013-09-01

    NEAT is an astrometric mission proposed to ESA with the objectives of detecting Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of nearby solar-type stars. NEAT requires the capability to measure stellar centroids at the precision of 5e-6 pixel. Current state-of-the-art methods for centroid estimation have reached a precision of about 2e-5 pixel at two times Nyquist sampling, this was shown at the JPL by the VESTA experiment. A metrology system was used to calibrate intra and inter pixel quantum efficiency variations in order to correct pixelation errors. The European part of the NEAT consortium is building a testbed in vacuum in order to achieve 5e-6 pixel precision for the centroid estimation. The goal is to provide a proof of concept for the precision requirement of the NEAT spacecraft. In this paper we present the metrology and the pseudo stellar sources sub-systems, we present a performance model and an error budget of the experiment and we report the present status of the demonstration. Finally we also present our first results: the experiment had its first light in July 2013 and a first set of data was taken in air. The analysis of this first set of data showed that we can already measure the pixel positions with an accuracy of about 1e-4 pixel.

  5. Circuit Models and Experimental Noise Measurements of Micropipette Amplifiers for Extracellular Neural Recordings from Live Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang Hao; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Vai, Mang I; Klug, Achim; Lei, Tim C.

    2014-01-01

    Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments. PMID:25133158

  6. Experimental equipment for measuring physical properties of the annular hydrostatic thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozdera, Michal; Drábková, Sylva; Bojko, Marian

    2014-03-01

    The hydraulic circuit, through which the mineral oil is brought, is an important part of hydrostatic bearings. The annular hydrostatic thrust bearing consists of two sliding plates divided by a layer of mineral oil. In the lower plate, there are oil grooves which distribute the liquid between the sliding areas. The hydraulic circuit is made of two basic parts: the energy source and the controlling part. The hydraulic pump, which brings the liquid into the sliding bearing, is the source of the pressure energy. The sliding bearing is weighted down by axial force, which can be changed during the process. That's why in front of the particular oil grooves control components adjusting pressure and flow size are located. This paper deals with a project of a hydraulic circuit for regulation of fluid layer in the annular hydrostatic thrust bearing and the testing equipment for measuring its physical properties. It will include the issue of measuring loading capacity and height of the fluid layer in the annular hydrostatic thrust bearing.

  7. Two-cell theory to measure membrane resistance based on proton flow: Theory development and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Susanta K.; Berry, K. J.

    A two-cell theory is developed to measure proton exchange membrane (PEM) resistance to proton flow during conduction through a PEM fuel cell. The theoretical framework developed herein is based upon fundamental thermodynamic principles and engineering laws. We made appropriate corrections to develop the theoretical model previously proposed by Babu and Nair (B.V. Babu, N. Nair, J. Energy Edu. Sci. Technol. 13 (2004) 13-20) for measuring membrane resistance to the flow of protons, which is the only ion that travels from one electrode to the other through the membrane. A simple experimental set-up and procedure are also developed to validate the theoretical model predictions. A widely used commercial membrane (Nafion ®) and several in-house membranes are examined to compare relative resistance among membranes. According to the theory, resistance of the proton exchange membrane is directly proportional to the time taken for a specific amount of protons to pass through the membrane. A second order differential equation describes the entire process. The results show that theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. It is our speculation that the investigation results will open up a route to develop a simple device to measure resistance during membrane manufacturing since electrolyte resistance is one of the key performance drivers for the advancement of fuel cell technology.

  8. Feeding Experimentation Device (FED): Construction and Validation of an Open-source Device for Measuring Food Intake in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Katrina P; Ali, Mohamed A; O'Neal, Timothy J; Szczot, Ilona; Licholai, Julia A; Kravitz, Alexxai V

    2017-02-21

    Food intake measurements are essential for many research studies. Here, we provide a detailed description of a novel solution for measuring food intake in mice: the Feeding Experimentation Device (FED). FED is an open-source system that was designed to facilitate flexibility in food intake studies. Due to its compact and battery powered design, FED can be placed within standard home cages or other experimental equipment. Food intake measurements can also be synchronized with other equipment in real-time via FED's transistor-transistor logic (TTL) digital output, or in post-acquisition processing as FED timestamps every event with a real-time clock. When in use, a food pellet sits within FED's food well where it is monitored via an infrared beam. When the pellet is removed by the mouse, FED logs the timestamp onto its internal secure digital (SD) card and dispenses another pellet. FED can run for up to 5 days before it is necessary to charge the battery and refill the pellet hopper, minimizing human interference in data collection. Assembly of FED requires minimal engineering background, and off-the-shelf materials and electronics were prioritized in its construction. We also provide scripts for analysis of food intake and meal patterns. Finally, FED is open-source and all design and construction files are online, to facilitate modifications and improvements by other researchers.

  9. FLUKA Monte Carlo assessment of the terrestrial muon flux at low energies and comparison against experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Angelo; Blackmore, Ewart W.; Brugger, Markus; Alía, Rubén García; Stukel, Matthew; Trinczek, Michael

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in the assessment and modelling of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) particularly regarding the evaluation of the radiation effects on airline crew and passengers, interplanetary missions and on-board microelectronics. In the latter field, today the problem is not just limited to Single Event Effects (SEE) as used in avionics, but is more and more observed at ground level. Galactic cosmic muons, coming from the interaction of primary cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere, represent the most numerous species at ground level. In this work, we used the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to assess the atmospheric and terrestrial neutron and muon differential fluxes at various altitudes and specific examples such as the geographic coordinates corresponding to New York City and Vancouver. In this context, particle energy spectra were compared with references available in literature, calculation results obtained by both the QARM and EXPACS codes, as well as recently performed measurements. In addition, the zenith angular distribution, at ground level, was assessed for both neutrons and muons and compared with available references. Differential particle fluxes assessed for Vancouver were used as a primary source to simulate a muon detector currently taking data at TRIUMF to evaluate the passing and stopping terrestrial muon rate under different conditions. Finally, simulations were compared with the experimental measurements made at TRIUMF. Results show an excellent agreement between the FLUKA simulations and both references and the experimental measurements made at TRIUMF.

  10. Experimental evidence for millisecond activation timescales using the Fast IN Chamber (FINCH) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Jaenicke, R.; Klein, H.; Nillius, B.; Reimann, B.; Wetter, T.; Bingemer, H.

    2009-04-01

    Ice formation in clouds is a subject of great practical and fundamental importance since the occurrence of ice particle initializes dramatic changes in the microphysical structure of the cloud, which finally ends in the formation of precipitation. The initially step of ice formation is largely unknown. Homogenous nucleation of ice occurs only below -40 °C. If an ice nucleus (IN) is present, heterogeneous nucleation may occur at higher temperature. Here deposition freezing, condensation and immersion freezing as well as contact freezing are known. Also growth rates of ice particles are known as function of crystal surface properties, temperature and super saturation. Timescales for homogenous freezing activation in the order of 0.01 seconds and nucleation rates have been measured by Anderson et al. (1980) and Hagen et al., (1981) using their expansion cloud chamber. This contribution of deposition mode freezing measurements by the ice nucleus counter FINCH presents evidence that the activation timescale of this freezing mode is in the order of 1E-3 seconds. FINCH is an Ice Nucleus counter which activates IN in a supersaturated environment at freezing temperatures. The activation conditions are actively controlled by mixing three gas flows (aerosol, particle-free cold-dry and warm-humid flows).See Bundke et al. 2008 for details. In a special operation mode of FINCH we are able to produce a controlled peak super saturation in the order of 1 ms duration. For several test aerosols the results observed in this particular mode are comparable to normal mode operations, where the maximum super saturation remains for more than a second, thus leading to the conclusion that the time for activation is in the order of 1ms or less. References: R.J. Anderson et al, "A Study of Homogeneous Condensation Freezing Nucleation of Small Water Droplets in an Expansion Cloud Chamber, Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, Vol. 37, 2508-2520, 1980 U.Bundke et al., "The fast Ice Nucleus

  11. Experimental Measurements of the Effects of Photo-chemical Oxidation on Aerosol Emissions in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miracolo, M. A.; Presto, A. A.; Hennigan, C. J.; Nguyen, N.; Ranjan, M.; Reeder, A.; Lipsky, E.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    Many military and commercial airfields are located in non-attainment areas for particulate matter (PM2.5), but the contribution of emissions from in-use aircraft to local and regional PM2.5 concentrations is uncertain. In collaboration with the Pennsylvania Air National Guard 171st Air Refueling Wing, the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Mobile Laboratory was deployed to measure fresh and aged emissions from a CFM56-2B1 gas-turbine engine mounted on a KC-135 Stratotanker airframe. The CFM-56 family of engine powers many different types of military and civilian aircraft, including the Boeing 737 and several Airbus models. It is one of the most widely deployed models of engines in the world. The goal of this work was to measure the gas-particle partitioning of the fresh emissions at atmospherically relevant conditions and to investigate the effect of atmospheric oxidation on aerosol loadings as the emissions age. Emissions were sampled from an inlet installed one meter downstream of the engine exit plane and transferred into a portable smog chamber via a heated inlet line. Separate experiments were conducted at different engine loads ranging from ground idle to take-off rated thrust. During each experiment, some diluted exhaust was added to the chamber and the volatility of the fresh emissions was then characterized using a thermodenuder. After this characterization, the chamber was exposed to either ambient sunlight or UV lights to initiate photochemical oxidation, which produced secondary aerosol and ozone. A suite of gas and particle-phase instrumentation was used to characterize the evolution of the gas and particle-phase emissions, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to measure particle size and composition distributions. Fresh emissions of fine particles varied with engine load with peak emission factors at low and high loads. At high engine loads, the fresh emissions were dominated by black carbon; at low loads volatile organic carbon emissions were

  12. Non-stationarity in experimental travel time measured in a lysimeter: theoretical and modeling lessons from a simplified hydrological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queloz, Pierre; Carraro, Luca; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Botter, Gianluca; Rao, P. Suresh C.; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Experimental data have been collected over a year-long period in a large weighing lysimeter. Natural climatic forcing occurs, except for rainfall which is artificially generated as a given Poisson process at a daily timescale. A constant water table is maintained and excess infiltrated water is discharged through the outlet at the bottom of the lysimeter. Soil water storage and evapotranspiration fluxes (accentuated by a willow tree planted in the lysimeter) were monitored throughout the experiment, so that accurate time series of all in- and out-fluxes are available. Five rainfall inputs were marked with individually traceable passive solutes (fluorobenzoic acids) at various initial soil moisture conditions during the first month of the experiment. Tracer concentrations were measured in the soil water and in the discharge at high temporal resolution. We aim here at directly measuring solute travel times, a proxy of hydrological transport with the main advantage to blend the bulk effects of water velocity distributions. The drivers of water displacement in this hydrological setting - and in any other realistic case - have intrinsically a non-stationary nature (e.g. random rainfall occurrence, seasonal evapotranspiration cycles and moisture-related soil connectivity), but the integration of these processes over a larger time scale (i.e. typically the time scale of the mean travel time) often lead to the stationary assumption thus considerably simplifying the data interpretation. Results clearly show that even in such a hydrological system with reduced complexity, experimental travel time distributions are non-stationary and are strongly influenced by the states encountered by the system during the transport phase. The measurements help at identifying the relevant key features influencing the experimental bulk transport. Modeling efforts have demonstrated the inability of a plug-flow reactor (old-water first reservoir) to reproduce the solute outfluxes dynamics. On

  13. The Actual Apollo 13 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The actual Apollo 13 lunar landing mission prime crew from left to right are: Commander, James A. Lovell Jr., Command Module pilot, John L. Swigert Jr.and Lunar Module pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr. The original Command Module pilot for this mission was Thomas 'Ken' Mattingly Jr. but due to exposure to German measles he was replaced by his backup, Command Module pilot, John L. 'Jack' Swigert Jr.

  14. Experimental feasibility of the airborne measurement of absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne lidar oil spill experiments carried out to determine the practicability of the AOFSCE (absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency) computational model are described. The results reveal that the model is suitable over a considerable range of oil film thicknesses provided the fluorescence efficiency of the oil does not approach the minimum detection sensitivity limitations of the lidar system. Separate airborne lidar experiments to demonstrate measurement of the water column Raman conversion efficiency are also conducted to ascertain the ultimate feasibility of converting such relative oil fluorescence to absolute values. Whereas the AOFSCE model is seen as highly promising, further airborne water column Raman conversion efficiency experiments with improved temporal or depth-resolved waveform calibration and software deconvolution techniques are thought necessary for a final determination of suitability.

  15. Experimental estimation of the photons visiting probability profiles in time-resolved diffuse reflectance measurement.

    PubMed

    Sawosz, P; Kacprzak, M; Weigl, W; Borowska-Solonynko, A; Krajewski, P; Zolek, N; Ciszek, B; Maniewski, R; Liebert, A

    2012-12-07

    A time-gated intensified CCD camera was applied for time-resolved imaging of light penetrating in an optically turbid medium. Spatial distributions of light penetration probability in the plane perpendicular to the axes of the source and the detector were determined at different source positions. Furthermore, visiting probability profiles of diffuse reflectance measurement were obtained by the convolution of the light penetration distributions recorded at different source positions. Experiments were carried out on homogeneous phantoms, more realistic two-layered tissue phantoms based on the human skull filled with Intralipid-ink solution and on cadavers. It was noted that the photons visiting probability profiles depend strongly on the source-detector separation, the delay between the laser pulse and the photons collection window and the complex tissue composition of the human head.

  16. Experimental estimation of the photons visiting probability profiles in time-resolved diffuse reflectance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawosz, P.; Kacprzak, M.; Weigl, W.; Borowska-Solonynko, A.; Krajewski, P.; Zolek, N.; Ciszek, B.; Maniewski, R.; Liebert, A.

    2012-12-01

    A time-gated intensified CCD camera was applied for time-resolved imaging of light penetrating in an optically turbid medium. Spatial distributions of light penetration probability in the plane perpendicular to the axes of the source and the detector were determined at different source positions. Furthermore, visiting probability profiles of diffuse reflectance measurement were obtained by the convolution of the light penetration distributions recorded at different source positions. Experiments were carried out on homogeneous phantoms, more realistic two-layered tissue phantoms based on the human skull filled with Intralipid-ink solution and on cadavers. It was noted that the photons visiting probability profiles depend strongly on the source-detector separation, the delay between the laser pulse and the photons collection window and the complex tissue composition of the human head.

  17. Centrality measure based on continuous-time quantum walks and experimental realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaac, Josh A.; Zhan, Xiang; Bian, Zhihao; Wang, Kunkun; Li, Jian; Wang, Jingbo B.; Xue, Peng

    2017-03-01

    Network centrality has important implications well beyond its role in physical and information transport analysis; as such, various quantum-walk-based algorithms have been proposed for measuring network vertex centrality. In this work, we propose a continuous-time quantum walk algorithm for determining vertex centrality, and show that it generalizes to arbitrary graphs via a statistical analysis of randomly generated scale-free and Erdős-Rényi networks. As a proof of concept, the algorithm is detailed on a four-vertex star graph and physically implemented via linear optics, using spatial and polarization degrees of freedoms of single photons. This paper reports a successful physical demonstration of a quantum centrality algorithm.

  18. Experimental measurement of the angle of repose of a pile of soft frictionless grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feitosa, Klebert; Shorts, Daniel

    It is well known that dry granular materials can flow like a liquid, but can also behave as a solid and sustain a finite angle of repose, partially as a result of inter-particle friction. Here we investigate the nature of piles formed with soft frictionless grains and measure its angle of repose. The pile is produced by a continuous bubbling of air into a soapy solution in a narrow container of rectangular cross section. We observe a gentle slope at the water-foam interface whose angle dependents on the viscosity of the liquid. In contrast with sand piles, the fluidized region along the interface is several layers deep. We also find that, unlike sand piles, upon interruption of the gas flux, the slope relaxes back to zero as a result of bubble rearrangements and liquid drainage.

  19. [Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement for secondary electron yield of microchannel plate in extreme ultraviolet region].

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Ni, Qi-liang; Dong, Ning-ning; Chen, Bo

    2010-08-01

    Photon counting detectors based on microchannel plate have widespread applications in astronomy. The present paper deeply studies secondary electron of microchannel plate in extreme ultraviolet. A theoretical model describing extreme ultraviolet-excited secondary electron yield is presented, and the factor affecting on the secondary electron yields of both electrode and lead glass which consist of microchannel plate is analyzed according to theoretical formula derived from the model. The result shows that the higher secondary electron yield is obtained under appropriate condition that the thickness of material is more than 20 nm and the grazing incidence angle is larger than the critical angle. Except for several wavelengths, the secondary electron yields of both electrode and lead glass decrease along with the increase in the wavelength And also the quantum efficiency of microchannel plate is measured using quantum efficiency test set-up with laser-produced plasmas source as an extreme ultraviolet radiation source, and the result of experiment agrees with theoretical analysis.

  20. Experimental measurement of velocity correlations for two microparticles in a plasma with ion flow.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Amit K; Goree, J

    2014-07-01

    Velocity correlations are measured in a dusty plasma with only two microparticles. These correlations allow a characterization of the oscillatory modes and an identification of the effects of ion wakes. Ion wake effects are isolated by comparing two experiments with the microparticles aligned parallel vs perpendicular to the ion flow. From records of microparticle velocities, the one- and two-particle distribution functions f(1) and f(2) are obtained, and the two-particle correlation function g(2) ≡ f(2)-f(1)f(1) is calculated. Comparing the two experiments, we find that motion is much more correlated when the microparticles are aligned with the ion flow and the character of the oscillatory modes depends on the ion flow direction due to the ion wake.