Science.gov

Sample records for actual hydrologic conditions

  1. Hydrologic conditions: Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohout, Francis Anthony; Klein, Howard; Sherwood, C.B.; Leach, Stanley D.

    1964-01-01

    Thin layers of dense limestone of low permeability that occur near the top of the Biscayne aquifer in the vicinity of the north end of Levee 30 in Dade County, Florida are of hydrologic importance because they retard the downward infiltration of ponded water in Conservation Area No. 3. This retarding effect frequently results in high head differentials across the levee. Tests made in a small area adjacent to Levee 30 indicate that the coefficient of transmissibility of the aquifer is 3,600,000 gpd (gallons per day) per foot, and the coefficient of vertical permeability of the dense limestones is 13 gpd per square foot. If ground-water flow beneath the levee is laminar, the total inflow to the Levee 30 Canal from Conservation Area No. 3 will be about 350 mgd (million gallons per day), or 540 cfs (cubic feet per second), per mile length of levee when the head difference across the levee is 10 feet.

  2. Establishing seasonal chronicles of actual evapotranspiration under sloping conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouna Chebbi, R.; Prévot, L.; Jacob, F.; Voltz, M.

    2012-04-01

    Estimation of daily and seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETa) is strongly needed for hydrological and agricultural purposes. Although the eddy covariance method is well suited for such estimation of land surface fluxes, this method suffers from limitations when establishing long time series. Missing data are often encountered, resulting from bad meteorological conditions, rejection by quality control tests, power failures… Numerous gap fill techniques have been proposed in the literature but there applicability in sloping conditions is not well known. In order to estimate ETa over long periods (agricultural cycle) on crops cultivated in sloping areas, a pluri-annual experiment was conducted in the Kamech catchment, located in North-eastern Tunisia. This Mediterranean site is characterized by a large heterogeneity in topography, soils and crops. Land surface fluxes were measured using eddy covariance systems. Measurements were collected on the two opposite sides of the Kamech V-shaped catchment, within small fields having slopes steeper than 5%. During three different years, four crops were studied: durum wheat, oat, fava bean and pasture. The topography of the catchment and the wind regime induced upslope and downslope flows over the study fields. In this study, we showed that gap filling of the turbulent fluxes (sensible and latent heat) can be obtained through linear regressions against net radiation. To account for the effect of the topography, linear regressions were calibrated by distinguishing upslope and downslope flows. This significantly improved the quality of the reconstructed data over 30 minute intervals. This gap filling technique also improved the energy balance closure at the daily time scale. As a result, seasonal chronicles of daily ETa throughout the growth cycle of the study crops in the Kamech watershed were established, thus providing useful information about the water use of annual crops in a semi-arid rainfed and hilly area.

  3. Feedback Loop of Data Infilling Using Model Result of Actual Evapotranspiration from Satellites and Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdi Hartanto, Isnaeni; Alexandridis, Thomas K.; van Andel, Schalk Jan; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2014-05-01

    Using satellite data in a hydrological model has long been occurring in modelling of hydrological processes, as a source of low cost regular data. The methods range from using satellite products as direct input, model validation, and data assimilation. However, the satellite data frequently face the missing value problem, whether due to the cloud cover or the limited temporal coverage. The problem could seriously affect its usefulness in hydrological model, especially if the model uses it as direct input, so data infilling becomes one of the important parts in the whole modelling exercise. In this research, actual evapotranspiration product from satellite is directly used as input into a spatially distributed hydrological model, and validated by comparing the catchment's end discharge with measured data. The instantaneous actual evapotranspiration is estimated from MODIS satellite images using a variation of the energy balance model for land (SEBAL). The eight-day cumulative actual evapotranspiration is then obtained by a temporal integration that uses the reference evapotranspiration calculated from meteorological data [1]. However, the above method cannot fill in a cell if the cell is constantly having no-data value during the eight-day periods. The hydrological model requires full set of data without no-data cells, hence, the no-data cells in the satellite's evapotranspiration map need to be filled in. In order to fills the no-data cells, an output of hydrological model is used. The hydrological model is firstly run with reference evapotranspiration as input to calculate discharge and actual evapotranspiration. The no-data cells in the eight-day cumulative map from the satellite are then filled in with the output of the first run of hydrological model. The final data is then used as input in a hydrological model to calculate discharge, thus creating a loop. The method is applied in the case study of Rijnland, the Netherlands where in the winter, cloud cover is

  4. A comparison of continental actual evaporation estimates for Africa to improve hydrological drought forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trambauer, Patricia; Maskey, Shreedhar; Werner, Micha

    2013-04-01

    Evaporation is a key process in the development of hydrological and agricultural droughts. Although distributed drought indicators are often calculated using estimates of evaporation or soil moisture, the estimation of continental evaporation fluxes is complex and typically relies on continental-scale hydrological or land-surface models. However, it appears that most global or continental-scale hydrological models underestimate evaporative fluxes in some regions of Africa, and as a result overestimate stream flows. On the other hand, other studies suggest that land-surface models may overestimate evaporative fluxes. In this study, we computed actual evaporation for the African continent using a continental version of the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB, which is based on a water balance approach. Results are compared with other independently computed evaporation products; the evaporation results from the HTESSEL model and ERA-Interim (both based on the energy balance approach), both the MOD16 evaporation product (largely derived from MODIS remote sensing images), and the GLEAM product (derived from satellite observations). Three alternative versions of the PCR-GLOBWB hydrological model were also considered. In the first the model structure was amended by introducing an irrigation scheme, while in the second and third forcing data (precipitation and potential evaporation) were modified to assess the impact that the choice of forcing has on the actual evaporation fluxes simulated by the model. This resulted in eight products of actual evaporation, and derived drought indices were compared in distinct regions of the African continent spanning different climatic regimes. Annual totals, spatial patterns and seasonality were studied and compared through visual inspection and using statistical methods. The comparison indicated that the representation of irrigation areas has an insignificant contribution to the actual evaporation at a continental scale with a 0.5

  5. Comment on 'Shang S. 2012. Calculating actual crop evapotranspiration under soil water stress conditions with appropriate numerical methods and time step. Hydrological Processes 26: 3338-3343. DOI: 10.1002/hyp.8405'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yatheendradas, Soni; Narapusetty, Balachandrudu; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Funk, Christopher; Verdin, James

    2014-01-01

    A previous study analyzed errors in the numerical calculation of actual crop evapotranspiration (ET(sub a)) under soil water stress. Assuming no irrigation or precipitation, it constructed equations for ET(sub a) over limited soil-water ranges in a root zone drying out due to evapotranspiration. It then used a single crop-soil composite to provide recommendations about the appropriate usage of numerical methods under different values of the time step and the maximum crop evapotranspiration (ET(sub c)). This comment reformulates those ET(sub a) equations for applicability over the full range of soil water values, revealing a dependence of the relative error in numerical ET(sub a) on the initial soil water that was not seen in the previous study. It is shown that the recommendations based on a single crop-soil composite can be invalid for other crop-soil composites. Finally, a consideration of the numerical error in the time-cumulative value of ET(sub a) is discussed besides the existing consideration of that error over individual time steps as done in the previous study. This cumulative ET(sub a) is more relevant to the final crop yield.

  6. Hydrologic Conditions in Kansas, water year 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Madison R.

    2016-03-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring sites in Kansas. In 2015, the network included about 200 real-time streamgages (hereafter referred to as “gages”), 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations, and 30 groundwater-level monitoring wells. These data and associated analyses provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve the understanding of Kansas’s water resources.Real-time data are verified by the USGS throughout the year with regular measurements of streamflow, lake levels, and groundwater levels. These data are used in protecting life and property; and managing water resources for agricultural, industrial, public supply, ecological, and recreational purposes. Yearly hydrologic conditions are characterized by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year (WY) data for the period of record. A WY is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is designated by the year in which it ends.

  7. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, 2013 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Arin J.; Rasmussen, Teresa J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Kansas Water Science Center (KSWSC), in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring gages in the State of Kansas. These include 195 real-time streamflow-gaging stations (herein gages) and 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations. These data and associated analysis, accumulated for many years, provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve our understanding of our water resources.

  8. Hydrologic conditions in Rhode Island during water year 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdi, Richard J.; Socolow, Roy S.

    2015-07-15

    Hydrologic data and conditions throughout Rhode Island during water year 2014 are presented in this report. Stream discharge and groundwater level conditions varied geographically across the State. Ten streamgages reached record-low minimum monthly mean discharges during the year, and a record-high maximum groundwater level was observed at one groundwater well.

  9. Summary of hydrologic conditions in Kansas, water year 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robison, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Kansas Water Science Center, in cooperation with Federal, State, and local agencies, maintains a long-term network of hydrologic monitoring gages in the State of Kansas. These include 206 real-time streamgages, 12 real-time reservoir-level monitoring stations, and 32 groundwater monitoring wells. These data and associated analyses, accumulated over time, provide a unique overview of hydrologic conditions and help improve our understanding of Kansas’s water resources. Yearly hydrologic conditions are determined by comparing statistical analyses of current and historical water year data for the period of record. These data are used in protecting life and property, and managing water resources for agricultural, industrial, public supply, ecological, and recreational purposes.

  10. Hydrologic conditions in Massachusetts during water year 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdi, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrologic data and conditions throughout Massachusetts during water year 2014 (October 1, 2013, to September 30, 2014) are presented in this report. Stream discharge and groundwater levels during water year 2014 varied geographically across the State. The data are described as being above, below, or near normal in relation to long-term averages for the period of record.

  11. Hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisenbies, Mark H.; Hughes, W. Brian

    2000-01-01

    Hydrologic process are the main determinants of the type of wetland located on a site. Precipitation, groundwater, or flooding interact with soil properties and geomorphic setting to yield a complex matrix of conditions that control groundwater flux, water storage and discharge, water chemistry, biotic productivity, biodiversity, and biogeochemical cycling. Hydroperiod affects many abiotic factors that in turn determine plant and animal species composition, biodiversity, primary and secondary productivity, accumulation, of organic matter, and nutrient cycling. Because the hydrologic regime has a major influence on wetland functioning, understanding how hydrologic changes influence ecosystem processes is essential, especially in light of the pressures placed on remaining wetlands by society's demands for water resources and by potential global changes in climate.

  12. Flash Flood Modeling in Changing Hydrological Conditions Using a Hydrological Model and Radar Rainfall Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozalis, S.; Price, C.; Yair, Y.; Morin, E.

    2009-04-01

    Flash floods are one of the most devastating natural disasters, causing much damage to property and can often lead to loss of human lives. This is a particular problem in the Mediterranean region. Understanding the meteorological and hydrological conditions for flash flood generation is an essential step on the way to forecast them and prevent some of the damage they might cause. The occurrence of a flood event is determined by meteorological conditions, producing large amounts of precipitation over a short period of time, as well as hydrological conditions, such as soil type, land cover and soil antecedent moisture conditions, which vary throughout the year and from place to place. The current study is a part of the FLASH research project (EU-FP6). In this work we use a hydrological model with data from twenty major flood events which occurred in the study area between 1991 and 2006, to better understand the role of changing hydrological and meteorological conditions in generating flash floods and in order to improve the prediction of future flash flood events. The model's runoff calculation is done by the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number method, taking into account antecedent soil moisture, land use and soil type. Runoff flow over hillslopes and channels is calculated by the Kinematic wave method. No calibration with measured flow data was performed. As rainfall data we use radar rainfall estimations adjusted to rain gauge along the basin. The model is applied over a 27 km2 basin located in a Mediterranean area in North-Eastern Israel with mean annual precipitation of about 450 mm. The main land use in this area is agriculture, with forests and orchards on the upper part and cultivated fields on its lower parts. We compare the model's runoff calculations with flow observations derived from a flow gauge located on the catchment outlet. The model allows us to explore the special synoptic, rainfall and surface conditions, responsible for the generation of

  13. Self Actualization and Modification of Affective Self Disclosures during a Social Conditioning Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hekmat, Hamid; Theiss, Michael

    1971-01-01

    Analysis of the data indicated that the low self actualizing group had the highest rate of conditioning, while the high self actualizing individuals showed a nonsignificant gain in the rate of affective self disclosures during conditioning but were more resistant to extinction as compared to the low and the moderate groups. (Author)

  14. Hydrologic conditions controlling runoff generation immediately after wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebel, Brian A.; Moody, John A.; Martin, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the control of postwildfire runoff by physical and hydraulic properties of soil, hydrologic states, and an ash layer immediately following wildfire. The field site is within the area burned by the 2010 Fourmile Canyon Fire in Colorado, USA. Physical and hydraulic property characterization included ash thickness, particle size distribution, hydraulic conductivity, and soil water retention curves. Soil water content and matric potential were measured indirectly at several depths below the soil surface to document hydrologic states underneath the ash layer in the unsaturated zone, whereas precipitation and surface runoff were measured directly. Measurements of soil water content showed that almost no water infiltrated below the ash layer into the near-surface soil in the burned site at the storm time scale (i.e., minutes to hours). Runoff generation processes were controlled by and highly sensitive to ash thickness and ash hydraulic properties. The ash layer stored from 97% to 99% of rainfall, which was critical for reducing runoff amounts. The hydrologic response to two rain storms with different rainfall amounts, rainfall intensity, and durations, only ten days apart, indicated that runoff generation was predominantly by the saturation-excess mechanism perched at the ash-soil interface during the first storm and predominantly by the infiltration-excess mechanism at the ash surface during the second storm. Contributing area was not static for the two storms and was 4% (saturation excess) to 68% (infiltration excess) of the catchment area. Our results showed the importance of including hydrologic conditions and hydraulic properties of the ash layer in postwildfire runoff generation models.

  15. Hydrology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, John M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The past year saw a re-emphasis on the practical aspects of hydrology due to regional drought patterns, urban flooding, and agricultural and energy demands on water resources. Highlights of hydrologic symposia, publications, and events are included. (MA)

  16. Hydrologic Conditions in Florida during Water Year 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdi, Richard Jay; Tomlinson, Stewart A.; Irvin, Ronald B.; Fulcher, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Record-high and record-low hydrologic conditions occurred during water year 2007 (October 1, 2006 - September 30, 2007) based on analyses of precipitation, surface-water flows, lake elevations, and ground-water levels. For example, the streamgage at Suwannee River at White Springs in northwest Florida recorded an annual streamflow of 103 cubic feet per second during 2007, or about 6 percent of the period-of-record average since monitoring began in 1906. Lake Okeechobee in south Florida reached record-low elevations (8.82 feet on July 2) since monitoring began in 1912. Several wells throughout the State registered period-of-record lowest daily maximum water levels.

  17. Uncertainty of the hydrological response to climate change conditions; 605 basins, 3 hydrological models, 5 climate models, 5 hydrological variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melsen, Lieke; Mizukami, Naoki; Newman, Andrew; Clark, Martyn; Teuling, Adriaan

    2016-04-01

    Many studies investigated the effect of a changing climate on the hydrological response of a catchment and uncertainty of the effect coming from hydrologic modelling (e.g., forcing, hydrologic model structures, and parameters). However, most past studies used only a single or a small number of catchments. To go beyond the case-study, and to assess the uncertainty involved in modelling the hydrological impact of climate change more comprehensively, we studied 605 basins over a wide range of climate regimes throughout the contiguous USA. We used three different widely-used hydrological models (VIC, HBV, SAC), which we forced with five distinct climate model outputs. The hydrological models have been run for a base period (1986-2008) for which observations were available, and for a future period (2070-2099). Instead of calibrating each hydrological model for each basin, the model has been run with a parameter sample (varying from 1600 to 1900 samples dependent on the number of free parameters in the model). Five hydrological states and fluxes were stored; discharge, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, SWE and snow melt, and 15 different metrics and signatures have been obtained for each model run. With the results, we conduct a sensitivity analysis over the change in signatures from the future period compared to the base period. In this way, we can identify the parameters that are responsible for certain projected changes, and identify the processes responsible for this change. By using three different models, in which VIC is most distinctive in including explicit vegetation parameters, we can compare different process representations and the effect on the projected hydrological change.

  18. Hydrologic conditions in Florida during Water Year 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdi, Richard J.; Holt, Sandra L.; Irvin, Ronald B.; Fulcher, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Record-high and record-low hydrologic conditions occurred during water year 2008 (October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008). Record-low levels were caused by a continuation of the 2007 water year drought conditions into the 2008 water year and persisting until summer rainfall. The gage at the Santa Fe River near Fort White site recorded record-low monthly mean discharges in October and November 2007. The previous records for this site were set in 1956 and 2002, respectively. Record-high conditions in northeast and northwest Florida were caused by the rainfall and runoff associated with Tropical Storm Fay. For example, St. Mary's River near Macclenny recorded a new record-high monthly mean discharge in August 2008. The previous record for this site was set in 1945. Lake Okeechobee in south Florida reached new minimum monthly mean lake levels since monitoring began in 1912 from October to March during the 2008 water year. Some wells throughout northwest and south Florida registered period-of-record lowest daily maximum water levels.

  19. Hydrological conditions at the 800 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 800 Area sanitary landfill at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, on the basis of these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 800 Area landfill is located on the western edge of ANL, just south of Westgate Road. It has been in operation since 1966 and has been used for the disposal of sanitary, general refuse. From 1969 through 1978, however, substantial quantities of liquid organic and inorganic wastes were disposed of in a French drain'' at the northeast corner of the landfill. The 800 Area landfill is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 45.6 m. Trace levels of organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. When this report was prepared, no chemical quality analysis have been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. Recommended actions include installation of five new well clusters and one background well, thorough record-keeping, sample collection and analysis during borehole drilling, slug testing to measure hydraulic conductivity, topographic mapping, continued monitoring of groundwater levels and quality, and monitoring of the unsaturated zone. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Hydrologic Conditions in Northwest Florida: 2006 Water Year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verdi, Richard Jay

    2007-01-01

    Introduction National data for streamflow, ground-water levels, and quality of water for the 2006 water year are accessible to the public on the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Site Information Management System (SIMS) website http://web10capp.er.usgs.gov/adr06_lookup/search.jsp. This fact sheet describes data and hydrologic conditions throughout northwest Florida during the 2006 water year (fig. 1), when record-low monthly streamflow conditions were reported at several streamgage locations. Prior to 1960, these data were published in various USGS Water-Supply Papers and included water-related data collected by the USGS during the water year (October 1 to September 30). In 1961, a series of annual reports, 'Water Resources Data-Florida,' was introduced that published surface-water data. In 1964, a similar report was introduced for the purposes of publishing water-quality data. In 1975, the reports were merged to a single volume and were expanded to publish data for surface water, water quality, and ground-water levels. Formal publication of the annual report series was discontinued at the end of the 2005 water year, upon activation of the SIMS website database.

  1. Hydrologic conditions in the Wheatland Flats area, Platte County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crist, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The area includes about 260 square miles in central Platte County that consists of Wheatland Flats and a border region. Wheatland Flats is an area of about 100 square miles that is bounded by Chugwater Creek on the east, the Laramie River on the north, and Sybille Creek on the west. The southern boundary is approximately the southernmost limit of alluvial terrace deposits. Surface water diverted from the Laramie River along with ground water from wells is used to irrigate about 57,000 acres most of which are on and adjacent to Wheatland Flats. More than 200 wells are used for irrigation, industrial, and municipal supplies. The wells are completed in an upper aquifer consisting primarily of shallow alluvial deposits of Quaternary age and a lower aquifer, the Arikaree Formation of early Miocene age. Net water-level decline after approximately 20 years (1958-60 to 1979) generally is less than 10 feet in each aquifer , although declines of as much as 13 feet have occurred in the Airkaree Formation at specific locations. A digital model was used to simulate hydrologic conditions in the Wheatland Flats area. The model indicated that ground-water discharge to streams decreased by 10 percent from 1971 to 1978. Stream-discharge measurements are not available to verify the loss. However, it is reasonable to assume, on the basis of hydraulic-head decline in the aquifers, that there has been some ground-water contribution to the stream. (USGS)

  2. Hydrologic conditions in New Hampshire and Vermont, water year 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiah, Richard G.; Jarvis, Jason D.; Hegemann, Robert F.; Hilgendorf, Gregory S.; Ward, Sanborn L.

    2013-01-01

    Record-high hydrologic conditions in New Hampshire and Vermont occurred during water year 2011, according to data from 125 streamgages and lake gaging stations, 27 creststage gages, and 41 groundwater wells. Annual runoff for the 2011 water year was the sixth highest on record for New Hampshire and the highest on record for Vermont on the basis of a 111-year reference period (water years 1901–2011). Groundwater levels for the 2011 water year were generally normal in New Hampshire and normal to above normal in Vermont. Record flooding occurred in April, May, and August of water year 2011. Peak-of-record streamflows were recorded at 38 streamgages, 25 of which had more than 10 years of record. Flooding in April 2011 was widespread in parts of northern New Hampshire and Vermont; peak-of-record streamflows were recorded at nine streamgages. Flash flooding in May 2011 was isolated to central and northeastern Vermont; peakof- record streamflows were recorded at five streamgages. Devastating flooding in August 2011 occurred throughout most of Vermont and in parts of New Hampshire as a result of the heavy rains associated with Tropical Storm Irene. Peak-ofrecord streamflows were recorded at 24 streamgages.

  3. The spectral properties of sphagnum canopies under varying hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A.; Bryant, R. G.; Baird, A. J.

    2003-04-01

    We tested the extent to which the reflectance properties (wavelengths: 0.4-2.5 μm) of Sphagnum can be used to indicate near-surface hydrological conditions in northern wetlands. We experimented on five species of Sphagnum: S. cuspidatum Hoffm, S. papillosum H. Lindb., S. capillifolium (Ehrh.) Hedw., S. magellanicum Brid., and S. pulchrum (Braithw.) Warnst.. Our experiments were performed on intact canopies of Sphagnum (including c. 7 cm of underlying litter - proto peat) unlike previous studies (e.g. Vogelmann & Moss, 1993). In drying experiments on the first three species we found species-specific associations between: (1) The ratio of short-wave infrared (SWIR: 1.3-2.5 μm) to near infrared reflectance (NIR: 0.7-1.3 μm) (SWIR/NIR) and the volumetric moisture content (VMC) of the near-surface zone of the acrotelm. (2) The relative depth of the water absorption feature at 1.205 μm (RDI) and the near-surface VMC. (3) The red edge inflection point (REIP) and near-surface VMC. In experiments involving drying followed by re-wetting on samples of S. magellanicum and S. pulchrum, we found that the relationships outlined in 1, 2 and 3 were hysteretic. We comment on the implications of our results for monitoring large-scale, intra- and inter- seasonal changes in carbon balance processes in northern wetlands.

  4. RESPONSE OF WETLAND PLANT SPECIES TO HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding hydrologic requirements of native and introduced species is critical to sustaining native plant communities in wetlands of disturbed landscapes. We examined plant assemblages and 31 species from emergent wetlands in an urbanizing area of the Pacific Northwest, USA,...

  5. RESPONSE OF WETLAND PLANT SPECIES TO HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding hydrologic requirements of native and introduced species is critical to sustaining native plant communities in wetlands of disturbed landscapes. We examined plant assemblages and 31 species from emergent wetlands in an urbanizing area of the Pacific Northwest, USA, ...

  6. Hydrology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, John M.

    1977-01-01

    Lists many recent research projects in hydrology, including flow in fractured media, improvements in remote-sensing techniques, effects of urbanization on water resources, and developments in drainage basins. (MLH)

  7. Transferring rainfall runoff model parameters to ungauged catchments: Does the metric by which hydrologic similarity is defined actually matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Archfield, S. A.; Wagener, T.; Vogel, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    Daily streamflow information is critical for solving any number of hydrologic problems. Because most of the world's stream reaches are ungauged, this data is commonly needed for rivers that have no readily available measurements of streamflow. One approach to estimating daily streamflow time series at ungauged catchments transfers a set of model parameters resulting from the calibration of a rainfall-runoff model at a gauged catchment (or set of gauged catchments) to an ungauged site of interest. Central to this approach is the selection of a gauged donor catchment that is considered hydrologically similar to the ungauged catchment. A number of published studies compare various methods to define hydrologic similarity, typically using distance between the catchments or similarity in catchments characteristics; however, no one metric of hydrologic similarity has been demonstrated to provide a consistent approach to select a suitable donor catchment. For 16 unregulated catchments in the mid-Atlantic United States, this study shows that the similarity metric matters little if the catchments are classified as good receivers, which we define as catchments having more than two donor catchments that result in reasonable models of daily streamflow. Rainfall-runoff models were calibrated at each of the 16 study catchments and then the study catchments were treated as ungauged and model parameters from each of the other 15 catchments were transferred to the ungauged catchment. For catchments that are good receivers, combining the model output from several donors - no matter whether the donors were selected using distance or similarity in catchment characteristics - resulted in estimated daily streamflow comparable to the observed streamflow at the ungauged location. However, none of the similarity metrics were useful for selecting a suitable donor catchment when the ungauged catchment is considered to be a poor receiver (defined as a catchment with only one donor catchment

  8. An experimental seasonal hydrological forecasting system over the Yellow River basin - Part 1: Understanding the role of initial hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xing; Ma, Feng; Wang, Linying; Zheng, Ziyan; Ma, Zhuguo; Ye, Aizhong; Peng, Shaoming

    2016-06-01

    The hydrological cycle over the Yellow River has been altered by the climate change and human interventions greatly during past decades, with a decadal drying trend mixed with a large variation of seasonal hydrological extremes. To provide support for the adaptation to a changing environment, an experimental seasonal hydrological forecasting system is established over the Yellow River basin. The system draws from a legacy of a global hydrological forecasting system that is able to make use of real-time seasonal climate predictions from North American Multimodel Ensemble (NMME) climate models through a statistical downscaling approach but with a higher resolution and a spatially disaggregated calibration procedure that is based on a newly compiled hydrological observation dataset with 5 decades of naturalized streamflow at 12 mainstream gauges and a newly released meteorological observation dataset including 324 meteorological stations over the Yellow River basin. While the evaluation of the NMME-based seasonal hydrological forecasting will be presented in a companion paper to explore the added values from climate forecast models, this paper investigates the role of initial hydrological conditions (ICs) by carrying out 6-month Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) and reverse ESP-type simulations for each calendar month during 1982-2010 with the hydrological models in the forecasting system, i.e., a large-scale land surface hydrological model and a global routing model that is regionalized over the Yellow River. In terms of streamflow predictability, the ICs outweigh the meteorological forcings up to 2-5 months during the cold and dry seasons, but the latter prevails over the former in the predictability after the first month during the warm and wet seasons. For the streamflow forecasts initialized at the end of the rainy season, the influence of ICs for lower reaches of the Yellow River can be 5 months longer than that for the upper reaches, while such a difference

  9. [Method for direct generation data for formatted case report forms based on requirement for data authenticity in actual clinical conditions].

    PubMed

    Shao, Ming-Yi; Liu, Bao-Yan; He, Li-Yun; Zhang, Run-Shun

    2013-04-01

    Data authenticity is the basic requirement of clinical studies. In actual clinical conditions how to establish formatted case report forms (CRF) in line with the requirement for data authenticity is the key to ensure clinical data quality. On the basis of the characteristics of clinical data in actual clinical conditions, we determined elements for establishing formatted case report forms by comparing differences in data characteristics of CRFs in traditional clinical studies and in actual clinical conditions, and then generated formatted case report forms in line with the requirement for data authenticity in actual clinical conditions. The data of formatted CRFs generated in this study could not only meet the requirement for data authenticity of clinical studies in actual clinical conditions, but also comply with data management practices for clinical studies, thus it is deemed as a progress in technical methods.

  10. On the Impact of Uncertainty in Initial Conditions of Hydrologic Models on Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, S.; Sheikholeslami, R.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the initial conditions for predictive models remains a challenge due to the uncertainty in measurement/identification of the state variables at the scale of interest. However, the characterization of uncertainty in initial conditions has arguably attracted less attention compared with other sources of uncertainty in hydrologic modelling (e.g, parameter, data, and structural uncertainty). This is perhaps because it is commonly believed that: (1) hydrologic systems (relatively rapidly) forget their initial conditions over time, and (2) other sources of uncertainty (e.g., in data) are dominant. This presentation revisits the basic principles of the theory of nonlinear dynamical systems in the context of hydrologic systems. Through simple example case studies, we demonstrate how and under what circumstances different hydrologic processes represent a range of attracting limit sets in their evolution trajectory in state space over time, including fixed points, limit cycles (periodic behaviour), torus (quasi-periodic behaviour), and strange attractors (chaotic behaviour). Furthermore, the propagation (or dissipation) of uncertainty in initial conditions of several hydrologic models through time, under any of the possible attracting limit sets, is investigated. This study highlights that there are definite situations in hydrology where uncertainty in initial conditions remains of significance. The results and insights gained have important implications for hydrologic modelling under non-stationarity in climate and environment.

  11. Emissions from heavy-duty vehicles under actual on-road driving conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Thomas D.; Johnson, Kent; Miller, J. Wayne; Maldonado, Hector; Chernich, Don

    Emission measurements of five 1996-2005 heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs), representing three engine certification levels, were made using a Mobile Emissions Laboratory under actual on-road driving conditions on surface streets and highways. The results show that emissions depend on the emission component, the age/certification of vehicle/engine, as well as driving condition. For NO x emissions, there was a trend of decreasing emissions in going from older to newer model years and certification standards. Some vehicles showed a tendency toward higher NO x emissions per mile for the higher speed events (⩾55 mph) as compared to the 40 mph cruise and the other surface street driving, while others did not show large differences between different types of driving. For particulate matter (PM), the three oldest trucks had the highest emissions for surface street driving, while the two newest trucks had the highest PM emissions for highway driving. For total hydrocarbons (THC) emissions, some vehicles showed a tendency for higher emissions for the surface street segments compared to the steady-state segments, while others showed a tendency for higher emissions for the 40 mph cruise segments compared to the highway cruise segments. CO emissions under steady-state driving conditions were relatively low (1-3 g mile -1).

  12. Changing hydrological conditions in the Po basin under global warming.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Erika; Verdecchia, Marco; Giorgi, Filippo; Colaiuda, Valentina; Tomassetti, Barbara; Lombardi, Annalina

    2014-09-15

    The Po River is a crucial resource for the Italian economy, since 40% of the gross domestic product comes from this area. It is thus crucial to quantify the impact of climate change on this water resource in order to plan for future water use. In this paper a mini ensemble of 8 hydrological simulations is completed from 1960 to 2050 under the A1B emission scenario, by using the output of two regional climate models as input (REMO and RegCM) at two different resolutions (25 km-10 km and 25 km-3 km). The river discharge at the outlet point of the basin shows a change in the spring peak of the annual cycle, with a one month shift from May to April. This shift is entirely due to the change in snowmelt timing which drives most of the discharge during this period. Two other important changes are an increase of discharge in the wintertime and a decrease in the fall from September to November. The uncertainty associated with the winter change is larger compared to that in the fall. The spring shift and the fall decrease of discharge imply an extension of the hydrological dry season and thus an increase in water stress over the basin. The spatial distributions of the discharge changes are in agreement with what is observed at the outlet point and the uncertainty associated with these changes is proportional to the amplitude of the signal. The analysis of the changes in the anomaly distribution of discharge shows that both the increases and decreases in seasonal discharge are tied to the changes in the tails of the distribution, i.e. to the increase or decrease of extreme events.

  13. Extreme drought to extreme floods: summary of hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Pojunas, Timothy K.; Peck, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) Georgia Water Science Center (WSC) maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 317 real-time streamgages, more than 180 groundwater wells of which 31 are real-time, and 10 lake-level monitoring stations. One of the many benefits of data collected from this monitoring network is that analysis of the data provides an overview of the hydrologic conditions of rivers, creeks, reservoirs, and aquifers in Georgia.

  14. Classification of simulated and actual NOAA-6 AVHRR data for hydrologic land-surface feature definition. [Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    An examination of the possibilities of using Landsat data to simulate NOAA-6 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data on two channels, as well as using actual NOAA-6 imagery, for large-scale hydrological studies is presented. A running average was obtained of 18 consecutive pixels of 1 km resolution taken by the Landsat scanners were scaled up to 8-bit data and investigated for different gray levels. AVHRR data comprising five channels of 10-bit, band-interleaved information covering 10 deg latitude were analyzed and a suitable pixel grid was chosen for comparison with the Landsat data in a supervised classification format, an unsupervised mode, and with ground truth. Landcover delineation was explored by removing snow, water, and cloud features from the cluster analysis, and resulted in less than 10% difference. Low resolution large-scale data was determined useful for characterizing some landcover features if weekly and/or monthly updates are maintained.

  15. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the 137Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of 137Cs (10−11 ~ 10−9 molL−1 of 137Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed “weathered biotite” (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed 137Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of 137Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed 137Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima. PMID:26868138

  16. [An investigation into the actual condition of the sports drink intake on children].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Amano, H; Miura, K; Nagasaka, N

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual condition of the sport drink intake on children. We conducted an investigation by means of questionnaires at 3 nursery schools and a day nursery in and around Hiroshima City, and using 505 answers with the comparison between 4 areas. The following results were obtained: 1) Less than 10% of the children often took sport drinks and about 70% of the children sometimes. 2) In response to the question of when taken, 40-50% of answers revealed that the drinks were taken when the children ill and 20-40% of answers were take from home. 3) In response to the question as to why children begin to take the drinks, many parents answered that they were advised by a doctor and a nurse to give their child sport drinks to prevent for dehydration, when their children were ill. This answer accounted for about 60% of the answers to this question. 4) Parents imagined that fruit drinks, carbonated beverages and beverages with lactic acid promoted tooth decay. Also the image of cariogenicity was less than 100% fruit juices, home-made juices, sport drinks, cow milks and water or tea in that order. The results suggest that parents regard sport drinks as beverages which do not promote tooth decay and give their child sport drinks frequency.

  17. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the 137Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of 137Cs (10‑11 ~ 10‑9 molL‑1 of 137Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed “weathered biotite” (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed 137Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of 137Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed 137Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima.

  18. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the 137Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of 137Cs (10-11 ~ 10-9 molL-1 of 137Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed “weathered biotite” (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed 137Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of 137Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed 137Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima.

  19. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the (137)Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of (137)Cs (10(-11) ~ 10(-9 )molL(-1) of (137)Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed "weathered biotite" (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed (137)Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of (137)Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed (137)Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima.

  20. Cadmium and zinc interactions and their transfer in soil-crop system under actual field conditions.

    PubMed

    Nan, Zhongren; Li, Jijun; Zhang, Jianming; Cheng, Guodong

    2002-02-21

    The transfer of Cd and Zn from calcareous soils nearby a non-ferrous mining and smelting bases to the spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and corn (Zea mays L.) tissues and the interactions between the two metals concerned were investigated under actual field conditions. Samples of soils and entire crops were randomly collected during harvest time in 1998 in the Baiyin region. The soil metal contents showed that the furrows had been polluted (mean values: 3.16 mg kg(-1) for Cd; 146.78 mg kg(-1) for Zn) and the significant spatial variation of the soil contamination existed here (ranges, Cd: 0.14-19.3 mg kg(-1); Zn: 43.5-565.0 mg kg(-1)). The translocation ratios of the two metals from soil to crop parts in the region studied were relatively lower and the order of the element transfer in different plant tissues was root > stem > grain. The transfer ratio of element Cd was lower than that of element Zn. Cd and Zn uptake by the crop structures could be best described by four models (P < 0.01): linear; exponential; quadratic; and cubic. Apart from a linear relationship between the element Cd in the corn grains and soils, models were generally non-lincar. An analysis of Cd-Zn interaction mechanism led to the conclusion that the effects of the two metals were synergistic to each other under field conditions, in which increasing Cd and Zn contents in soils could increase the accumulations of Zn or Cd in the two crops.

  1. Summary of hydrologic conditions of the Louisville area of Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, Edwin Allen

    1966-01-01

    Water problems and their solutions have been associated with the growth and development of the Louisville area for more than a century. Many hydrologic data that aided water users in the past can be applied to present water problems and will be helpful for solving many similar problems in the future. Most of the water problems of Louisville, a water-rich area, concern management and are associated with the distribution of supplies, the quality of water, drainage, and waste disposal. The local hydrologic system at Louisville is dominated by the Ohio River and the glacial-outwash deposits beneath its flood plain. The water-bearing limestones in the uplands are ,secondary sources of water. The average flow of the Ohio River at Louisville, 73 billion gallons per day, and the potential availability of 370 million gallons per day of ground water suitable for industrial cooling purposes minimize the chance of acute water shortage in the area. Under current development, use of water averages about 211 million gallons per day, excluding about 392 million gallons of Ohio River water circulated daily through steampower plants and returned directly to the river. Optimum use and control of the water resources will be dependent on solving several water problems. The principal sources of water are in the Ohio River bottom land, whereas the new and potential centers of use are in the uplands. Either water must be piped to these new centers from the present sources or new supplies must be developed. Available data on streamflow and ground water are adequate to plan for the development of small local supplies. Since the completion of floodwalls and levees in 1953, widespread damage from flooding is a thing of the past in the Louisville area. Some local flooding of unprotected areas and of lowlands along tributary streams still takes place. The analyses of streamflow data are useful in planning for protection of these areas, but additional streamflow records and flood-area mapping

  2. Effects of baseline conditions on the simulated hydrologic response to projected climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koczot, Kathryn M.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Hay, Lauren E.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in temperature and precipitation projected from five general circulation models, using one late-twentieth-century and three twenty-first-century emission scenarios, were downscaled to three different baseline conditions. Baseline conditions are periods of measured temperature and precipitation data selected to represent twentieth-century climate. The hydrologic effects of the climate projections are evaluated using the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), which is a watershed hydrology simulation model. The Almanor Catchment in the North Fork of the Feather River basin, California, is used as a case study. Differences and similarities between PRMS simulations of hydrologic components (i.e., snowpack formation and melt, evapotranspiration, and streamflow) are examined, and results indicate that the selection of a specific time period used for baseline conditions has a substantial effect on some, but not all, hydrologic variables. This effect seems to be amplified in hydrologic variables, which accumulate over time, such as soil-moisture content. Results also indicate that uncertainty related to the selection of baseline conditions should be evaluated using a range of different baseline conditions. This is particularly important for studies in basins with highly variable climate, such as the Almanor Catchment.

  3. AI-related BMD variation in actual practice conditions: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sanz, María; Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Servitja, Sonia; Garcia-Giralt, Natalia; Garrigos, Laia; Rodriguez-Morera, Jaime; Albanell, Joan; Martínez-García, Maria; González, Iria; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Tusquets, Ignasi; Nogués, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the progression of bone mineral density (BMD) during 3 years of aromatase inhibitors (AI) therapy in actual practice conditions. This prospective, clinical cohort study of Barcelona-Aromatase induced Bone Loss in Early breast cancer (B-ABLE) assessed BMD changes during 3 years of AI treatment in women with breast cancer. Patients with osteoporosis (T score < -2.5 or T score ≤ -2.0) and a major risk factor and/or prevalent fragility fractures were treated with oral bisphosphonates (BPs). Of 685 women recruited, 179 (26.1%) received BP treatment. By the third year of AI therapy, this group exhibited increased BMD in the lumbar spine (LS; 2.59%) and femoral neck (FN; 2.50%), although the increase was significant only within the first year (LS: 1.99% and FN: 2.04%). Despite BP therapy, however, approximately 15% of these patients lost more than 3% of their baseline bone mass. At 3 years, patients without BP experienced BMD decreases in the LS (-3.10%) and FN (-2.79%). In this group, BMD changes occurred during the first (LS: -1.33% and FN: -1.25%), second (LS: -1.19% and FN: -0.82%), and third (LS: -0.57% and FN: -0.65%) years of AI treatment. Increased BMD (>3%) was observed in just 7.6% and 10.8% of these patients at the LS and FN, respectively. Our data confirm a clinically relevant bone loss associated with AI therapy amongst nonusers of preventative BPs. We further report on the importance of BMD monitoring as well as calcium and 25-hydroxy vitamin D supplementation in these patients. PMID:26911377

  4. Are there trends towards drier hydrological conditions in Central America?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, H. G.

    2013-12-01

    A summary of hydrological projections at the end of the century from 30 General Circulation Models (GCMs) is presented; and several hydrometeorological parameters are analyzed to validate if there are hydroclimatological trends during the observational period (1982-2005) consistent with the GCMs results. At the end of the century the median of 30 GCM simulations projects a drier future for Tegucigalpa and San Jose, with a marked increment in evapotranspiration in the first half of the rainy season along with reductions of soil moisture. With respect to the observations (1982-2005): 1) the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index showed negative trends in the North Pacific coast of Costa Rica, the border of Honduras and Nicaragua, and especially in southern Mexico (except the Yucatan Peninsula). Positive trends were found in the several parts of Central America, 2) the Palmer Drought Severity Index showed strong and consistent trends from Nicaragua to the North of Central America and southern Mexico (not including Yucatan), consistent with the direction of GCM projections; 3) negative precipitation trends in satellite data were found in Nicaragua, with strong trends in its Caribbean coast; 4) NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis precipitation showed strong negative trends in northern Central America, the Central Valley, the Dry Pacific of Costa Rica and the South-Pacific coast of Nicaragua, all consistent with the direction of GCM projections; and 5) station data showed no significant trends however, and 6) Reanalysis' temperature showed positive trends in southern Mexico (not including Yucatan) and negative trends in El Salvador. It can be concluded that several trends in drought indexes and precipitation are consistent with the future projected by the GCMs; that is, with some exceptions some of the trends were validated towards a drier future for the region, especially in the northern part.

  5. Normal streamflows and water levels continue—Summary of hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Ankcorn, Paul D.; Peck, Michael F.

    2016-03-31

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) South Atlantic Water Science Center (SAWSC) Georgia office, in cooperation with local, State, and other Federal agencies, maintains a long-term hydrologic monitoring network of more than 350 real-time, continuous-record, streamflow-gaging stations (streamgages). The network includes 14 real-time lake-level monitoring stations, 72 real-time surface-water-quality monitors, and several water-quality sampling programs. Additionally, the SAWSC Georgia office operates more than 204 groundwater monitoring wells, 39 of which are real-time. The wide-ranging coverage of streamflow, reservoir, and groundwater monitoring sites allows for a comprehensive view of hydrologic conditions across the State. One of the many benefits this monitoring network provides is a spatially distributed overview of the hydrologic conditions of creeks, rivers, reservoirs, and aquifers in Georgia.Streamflow and groundwater data are verified throughout the year by USGS hydrographers and made available to water-resource managers, recreationists, and Federal, State, and local agencies. Hydrologic conditions are determined by comparing the statistical analyses of data collected during the current water year to historical data. Changing hydrologic conditions underscore the need for accurate, timely data to allow informed decisions about the management and conservation of Georgia’s water resources for agricultural, recreational, ecological, and water-supply needs and in protecting life and property.

  6. Hydrologic conditions related to the Hog Canyon Riparian Restoration Project, dinosaur national monument. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L.; Wagner, J.

    1992-10-01

    In September, 1990, an interdisciplinary team of hydrologists, botanists, soil scientists, and park resource managers met to develop a plan for evaluating riparian conditions and management opportunities for Hog Canyon. At this meeting a set of study objectives was developed to help focus information needs. This report focuses on analysis of hydrologic data collected during the first year of the study. Specifically, the authors discuss seasonal surface and ground water hydrologic conditions, stream channel and ground water relationships, soil moisture conditions, and other aspects of Hog Canyon hydrology relevant to the management objectives. A set of preliminary management/restoration alternatives are also presented as a starting point for continued discussions by the evaluation team.

  7. Divergence of actual and reference evapotranspiration observations for irrigated sugarcane with windy tropical conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standardized reference evapotranspiration (ET) and ecosystem-specific vegetation coefficients are frequently used to estimate actual ET. However, equations for calculating reference ET have not been well validated in more humid environments. We measured ET (ETEC) using Eddy Covariance (EC) towers a...

  8. Hydrologic Conditions Viewed by the Nimbus Meteorological Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabchevsky, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    The unexploited value of the Nimbus meteorological sensor data relates to the satellites' ability for global, temporal, repetitive and uniform tonal and spatial coverage of the earth's surface. Examples are presented illustrating how synoptic views of large areas increase interpretive capability and enable focusing on large targets of interest. The effect of resolution of the Nimbus imaging systems on these observations is discussed, together with the assessment of the areal and temporal magnitude of changes observed by these systems. Two case studies are presented exemplifying the satellites' ability for repetitive observations enabling phenomena to be monitored under special conditions. One study deals with changes observed in the Antarctic ice conditions utilizing the Nimbus 2 and 3 television picture data. The other study deals with terrestrial changes in the Mississippi River Valley and the Niger River Valley (Africa), observed primarily in the 0.7 to 1.3 micron spectral band.

  9. Nutrient dynamics in the lower Mississippi river floodplain: Comparing present and historic hydrologic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schramm, H.L.; Cox, M.S.; Tietjen, T.E.; Ezell, A.W.

    2009-01-01

    Alterations to the lower Mississippi River-floodplain ecosystem to facilitate commercial navigation and to reduce flooding of agricultural lands and communities in the historic floodplain have changed the hydrologic regime. As a result, the flood pulse usually has a lower water level, is of shorter duration, has colder water temperatures, and a smaller area of floodplain is inundated. Using average hydrologic conditions and water temperatures, we used established nitrogen and phosphorus processes in soils, an aquatic ecosystem model, and fish bioenergetic models to provide approximations of nitrogen and phosphorus flux in Mississippi River flood waters for the present conditions of a 2-month (mid-March to mid-May) flood pulse and for a 3-month (mid-March to mid-June), historic flood pulse. We estimated that the soils and aquatic biota can remove or sequester 542 and 976 kg nitrogen ha-1 during the present and historic hydrologic conditions, respectively. Phosphorus, on the other hand, will be added to the water largely as a result of anaerobic soil conditions but moderated by biological uptake by aquatic biota during both present and historic hydrologic conditions. The floodplain and associated water bodies may provide an important management opportunity for reducing downstream transport of nitrogen in Mississippi River waters. ?? 2009, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  10. Habitat and Hydrology Condition Indices for the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat and hydrology indices were developed to assess the conditions in reaches of the impounded Upper Mississippi River, the Fort Peck and Garrison reaches of the Upper Missouri River, the Missouri National Recreational River, and the channelized Lower Missouri River, and the O...

  11. HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS AFFECTING THE TROPOSPHERIC FLUX OF VINCLOZOLIN AND ITS DEGRADATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory chamber was used to determine hydrologic conditions that lead to the tropospheric flux of a suspected anti-androgenic dicarboximide fungicide, vinclozolin (3-(3,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-5-vinyl-oxzoli-dine-2,4-dione) and three degradation products from sterilized...

  12. Strategies of Plant Water Use under Stochastic Hydrologic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vico, G.; Albertson, J.; Katul, G.; Porporato, A.; Ridolfi, L.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2003-12-01

    Recent papers on ecohydrology have discussed how a "tragedy of the commons" effect, in which the competitive evolutionary outcome is lower than the ecosystem optimum (e.g. maximum productivity), may arise in plants because of a trade-off between resource-uptake rate and resource efficiency. Using simple deterministic and stochastic models of soil water balance and ecosystem response to water stress, we investigate how efficient water-use strategies can evolve and persist against more aggressive but less efficient strategies of water use. Survival of plants and coexistence of different species is discussed in relation to their drought tolerance and water use efficiency, under conditions of temporal and spatial environmental variability

  13. Hydrological Responses to Land-Use Change Scenarios under Constant and Changed Climatic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Nan, Zhuotong; Yu, Wenjun; Ge, Yingchun

    2016-02-01

    This study quantified the hydrological responses to land-use change scenarios in the upper and middle Heihe River basin (HRB), northwest China, under constant and changed climatic conditions by combining a land-use/cover change model (dynamic conversion of land use and its effects, Dyna-CLUE) and a hydrological model (soil and water assessment tool, SWAT). Five land-use change scenarios, i.e., historical trend (HT), ecological protection (EP), strict ecological protection (SEP), economic development (ED), and rapid economic development (RED) scenarios, were established. Under constant climatic condition, hydrological variations are only induced by land-use changes in different scenarios. The changes in mean streamflow at the outlets of the upper and the middle HRB are not pronounced, although the different scenarios produce different outcomes. However, more pronounced changes are observed on a subbasin level. The frequency of extreme flood is projected to decrease under the SEP scenario, while under the other scenarios, no changes can be found. Two emission scenarios (A1B and B1) of three general circulation models (HadCM3, CGCM3, and CCSM3) were employed to generate future possible climatic conditions. Under changed climatic condition, hydrological variations are induced by the combination of land-use and climatic changes. The results indicate that the impacts of land-use changes become secondary when the changed climatic conditions have been considered. The frequencies of extreme flood and drought are projected to decrease and increase, respectively, under all climate scenarios. Although some agreements can be reached, pronounced difference of hydrological responses can be observed for different climate scenarios of different GCMs.

  14. Hydrological Responses to Land-Use Change Scenarios under Constant and Changed Climatic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Nan, Zhuotong; Yu, Wenjun; Ge, Yingchun

    2016-02-01

    This study quantified the hydrological responses to land-use change scenarios in the upper and middle Heihe River basin (HRB), northwest China, under constant and changed climatic conditions by combining a land-use/cover change model (dynamic conversion of land use and its effects, Dyna-CLUE) and a hydrological model (soil and water assessment tool, SWAT). Five land-use change scenarios, i.e., historical trend (HT), ecological protection (EP), strict ecological protection (SEP), economic development (ED), and rapid economic development (RED) scenarios, were established. Under constant climatic condition, hydrological variations are only induced by land-use changes in different scenarios. The changes in mean streamflow at the outlets of the upper and the middle HRB are not pronounced, although the different scenarios produce different outcomes. However, more pronounced changes are observed on a subbasin level. The frequency of extreme flood is projected to decrease under the SEP scenario, while under the other scenarios, no changes can be found. Two emission scenarios (A1B and B1) of three general circulation models (HadCM3, CGCM3, and CCSM3) were employed to generate future possible climatic conditions. Under changed climatic condition, hydrological variations are induced by the combination of land-use and climatic changes. The results indicate that the impacts of land-use changes become secondary when the changed climatic conditions have been considered. The frequencies of extreme flood and drought are projected to decrease and increase, respectively, under all climate scenarios. Although some agreements can be reached, pronounced difference of hydrological responses can be observed for different climate scenarios of different GCMs.

  15. Modelling hydrological conditions in the maritime forest region of south-western Nova Scotia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanni, Shelagh; Keys, Kevin; Meng, Fan-Rui; Yin, Xiwei; Clair, Tom; Arp, Paul A.

    2000-02-01

    Hydrological processes and conditions were quantified for the Mersey River Basin (two basins: one exiting below Mill Falls, and one exiting below George Lake), the Roger's Brook Basin, Moosepit Brook, and for other selected locations at and near Kejimkujik National Park in Nova Scotia, Canada, from 1967 to 1990. Addressed variables included precipitation (rain, snow, fog), air temperature, stream discharge, snowpack accumulations, throughfall, soil and subsoil moisture, soil temperature and soil frost, at a monthly resolution. It was found that monthly per hectare stream discharge was essentially independent of catchment area from <20 km2 to more than 1000 km2. The forest hydrology model ForHyM2 was used to simulate monthly rates of stream discharge, throughfall and snowpack water equivalents for mature forest conditions. These simulations were in good agreement with the historical records once the contributions of fog and mist to the area-wide water budget were taken into account, each on a monthly basis. The resulting simulations establish a hydrologically consistent, continuous, comprehensive and partially verified record for basin-wide outcomes for all major hydrological processes and conditions, be these related to stream discharge, soil moisture, soil temperature, snowpack accumulations, soil frost, throughfall, interception and soil percolation.

  16. Realizing ecosystem services: wetland hydrologic function along a gradient of ecosystem condition.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Daniel L; Cohen, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Wetlands provide numerous ecosystem services, from habitat provision to pollutant removal, floodwater storage, and microclimate regulation. Delivery of particular services relies on specific ecological functions, and thus to varying degree on wetland ecological condition, commonly quantified as departure from minimally impacted reference sites. Condition assessments are widely adopted as regulatory indicators of ecosystem function, and for some services (e.g., habitat) links between condition and function are often direct. For others, however, links are more tenuous, and using condition alone to enumerate ecosystem value (e.g., for compensatory mitigation) may underestimate important services. Hydrologic function affects many services cited in support of wetland protection both directly (floodwater retention, microclimate regulation) and indirectly (biogeochemical cycling, pollutant removal). We investigated links between condition and hydrologic function to test the hypothesis, embedded in regulatory assessment of wetland value, that condition predicts function. Condition was assessed using rapid and intensive approaches, including Florida's official wetland assessment tool, in 11 isolated forested wetlands in north Florida (USA) spanning a land use intensity gradient. Hydrologic function was assessed using hydrologic regime (mean, variance, and rates of change of water depth), and measurements of groundwater exchange and evapotranspiration (ET). Despite a wide range in condition, no systematic variation in hydrologic regime was observed; indeed reference sites spanned the full range of variation. In contrast, ET was affected by land use, with higher rates in intensive (agriculture and urban) landscapes in response to higher leaf area. ET determines latent heat exchange, which regulates microclimate, a valuable service in urban heat islands. Higher ET also indicates higher productivity and thus carbon cycling. Groundwater exchange regularly reversed flow direction

  17. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 2 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 2 compares various catagories of flight plans and flight tracking data produced by a simulation system developed for the Federal Aviation Administrations by SRI International. (Flight tracking data simulate actual flight tracks of all aircraft operating at a given time and provide for rerouting of flights as necessary to resolve traffic conflicts.) The comparisons of flight plans on the forecast to flight plans on the verifying analysis confirm Task 1 findings that wind speeds are generally underestimated. Comparisons involving flight tracking data indicate that actual fuel burn is always higher than planned, in either direction, and even when the same weather data set is used. Since the flight tracking model output results in more diversions than is known to be the case, it was concluded that there is an error in the flight tracking algorithm.

  18. Novel in-situ focus monitor technology in attenuated PSM under actual illumination condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izuha, Kyoko; Asano, Masafumi; Fujisawa, Tadahito; Inoue, Soichi

    2003-06-01

    A focus monitor technology for attenuated PSM under annular illumination has been developed as an in-line quality control. The focus monitor pattern on a reticle employs a pair of grouped lozenge-shaped opening patterns in attenuated phase shifting region. Since the phase shifting angles of the light passing through the first and second opening patterns are 90 degrees and 180 degrees, respectively, the best focus position for the first pattern shifts to that for the second pattern. The subtraction of the length of the patterns is a linear function of the actual focal position printed on the wafer. Therefore, the effective focal position can be extracted by measuring the subtraction of the measured length. A high resolution of 10-nm defocus could be achieved by this technique.

  19. Rheological investigation of body cream and body lotion in actual application conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Min-Sun; Ahn, Hye-Jin; Song, Ki-Won

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to systematically evaluate and compare the rheological behaviors of body cream and body lotion in actual usage situations. Using a strain-controlled rheometer, the steady shear flow properties of commercially available body cream and body lotion were measured over a wide range of shear rates, and the linear viscoelastic properties of these two materials in small amplitude oscillatory shear flow fields were measured over a broad range of angular frequencies. The temperature dependency of the linear viscoelastic behaviors was additionally investigated over a temperature range most relevant to usual human life. The main findings obtained from this study are summarized as follows: (1) Body cream and body lotion exhibit a finite magnitude of yield stress. This feature is directly related to the primary (initial) skin feel that consumers usually experience during actual usage. (2) Body cream and body lotion exhibit a pronounced shear-thinning behavior. This feature is closely connected with the spreadability when cosmetics are applied onto the human skin. (3) The linear viscoelastic behaviors of body cream and body lotion are dominated by an elastic nature. These solid-like properties become a criterion to assess the selfstorage stability of cosmetic products. (4) A modified form of the Cox-Merz rule provides a good ability to predict the relationship between steady shear flow and dynamic viscoelastic properties for body cream and body lotion. (5) The storage modulus and loss modulus of body cream show a qualitatively similar tendency to gradually decrease with an increase in temperature. In the case of body lotion, with an increase in temperature, the storage modulus is progressively decreased while the loss modulus is slightly increased and then decreased. This information gives us a criterion to judge how the characteristics of cosmetic products are changed by the usual human environments.

  20. Measuring peatland morphology and eco-hydrological condition with laser scanning and spatial statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennie, J. J.; Anderson, K.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a project to investigate the link between the remotely-sensed surface structure of lowland raised bogs, their ecology and hydrological status. Lowland raised bogs contain unique biodiversity, and play a major role in moderating global climate. Undisturbed UK peatlands sequester between 0.4 and 0.7 tonnes of carbon per ha per year, but when peat decays (usually due to direct or indirect anthropogenic impacts), carbon is released to the atmosphere, potentially transforming peatlands from carbon sources to sinks. This project exploits the link between peatland surface structure, developmental topography and hydrological condition. Bog surfaces exhibit characteristic topographical features, grading from wet depressions (pools and hollows), to dry mounds (hummocks). Each of these surface types is also distinguishable by the position of the mean water table, species composition and carbon sequestration rate. Previous studies have used remote sensing to monitor peatland vegetation, but these have not exploited structural information, despite the fact that this is likely to provide a useful proxy for monitoring hydrological condition. This project was undertaken at Wedholme Flow, Cumbria, UK, a lowland raised bog with surface conditions ranging from drained and degraded peat to intact primary raised bog. Hydrological dipwells were installed at eight locations in the bog (March 2008), and results demonstrate a range of hydrological condition characteristics with mean summer depth to water table in the range 50 cm (drained peatland dominated by Calluna vulgaris) to 8 cm (active raised bog). Ecological survey data from a range of condition types (co- located with each dipwell) were collected in July 2008 and analysed in relation to hydrological data. These data show a strong relationship between species distribution and hydrological gradients, with highest diversity occurring at water table depths 15 to 25 cm below the surface. Coincidently

  1. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 3 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 3 compares flight plans developed on the Suitland forecast with actual data observed by the aircraft (and averaged over 10 degree segments). The results show that the average difference between the forecast and observed wind speed is 9 kts. without considering direction, and the average difference in the component of the forecast wind parallel to the direction of the observed wind is 13 kts. - both indicating that the Suitland forecast underestimates the wind speeds. The Root Mean Square (RMS) vector error is 30.1 kts. The average absolute difference in direction between the forecast and observed wind is 26 degrees and the temperature difference is 3 degree Centigrade. These results indicate that the forecast model as well as the verifying analysis used to develop comparison flight plans in Tasks 1 and 2 is a limiting factor and that the average potential fuel savings or penalty are up to 3.6 percent depending on the direction of flight.

  2. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This summary report discusses the results of each of the four major tasks of the study. Task 1 compared airline flight plans based on operational forecasts to plans based on the verifying analyses and found that average fuel savings of 1.2 to 2.5 percent are possible with improved forecasts. Task 2 consisted of similar comparisons but used a model developed for the FAA by SRI International that simulated the impact of ATc diversions on the flight plans. While parts of Task 2 confirm the Task I findings, inconsistency with other data and the known impact of ATC suggests that other Task 2 findings are the result of errors in the model. Task 3 compares segment weather data from operational flight plans with the weather actually observed by the aircraft and finds the average error could result in fuel burn penalties (or savings) of up to 3.6 percent for the average 8747 flight. In Task 4 an in-depth analysis of the weather forecast for the 33 days included in the study finds that significant errors exist on 15 days. Wind speeds in the area of maximum winds are underestimated by 20 to 50 kts., a finding confirmed in the other three tasks.

  3. Divergence of actual and reference evapotranspiration observations for irrigated sugarcane with windy tropical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. G.; Wang, D.; Tirado-Corbalá, R.; Zhang, H.; Ayars, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Standardized reference evapotranspiration (ET) and ecosystem-specific vegetation coefficients are frequently used to estimate actual ET. However, equations for calculating reference ET have not been well validated in tropical environments. We measured ET (ETEC) using eddy covariance (EC) towers at two irrigated sugarcane fields on the leeward (dry) side of Maui, Hawaii, USA in contrasting climates. We calculated reference ET at the fields using the short (ET0) and tall (ETr) vegetation versions of the American Society for Civil Engineers (ASCE) equation. The ASCE equations were compared to the Priestley-Taylor ET (ETPT) and ETEC. Reference ET from the ASCE approaches exceeded ETEC during the mid-period (when vegetation coefficients suggest ETEC should exceed reference ET). At the windier tower site, cumulative ETr exceeded ETEC by 854 mm over the course of the mid-period (267 days). At the less windy site, mid-period ETr still exceeded ETEC, but the difference was smaller (443 mm). At both sites, ETPT approximated mid-period ETEC more closely than the ASCE equations ((ETPT-ETEC) < 170 mm). Analysis of applied water and precipitation, soil moisture, leaf stomatal resistance, and canopy cover suggest that the lower observed ETEC was not the result of water stress or reduced vegetation cover. Use of a custom-calibrated bulk canopy resistance improved the reference ET estimate and reduced seasonal ET discrepancy relative to ETPT and ETEC in the less windy field and had mixed performance in the windier field. These divergences suggest that modifications to reference ET equations may be warranted in some tropical regions.

  4. Relating seasonal streamflow forecast skill to uncertainties in initial conditions, future forcings, and hydrologic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, A. W.; Hopson, T. M.; Newman, A. J.; Sampson, K. M.; Brekke, L. D.; Arnold, J.; Raff, D. A.; Clark, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Skill in model-based hydrologic forecasting depends on the ability to estimate a watershed's initial moisture and energy conditions, to forecast future weather and climate inputs, and on the quality of the hydrologic model's representation of watershed processes. The impact of these factors on prediction skill varies regionally, seasonally, and by model. We investigate these influences in a series of predictability experiments using calibrated hydrologic simulation models for a 630-watershed dataset that spans the continental US (CONUS), and using the current major simulation models of National Weather Service streamflow forecasting operations. Earlier work in this area (Wood and Lettenmaier, GRL 2008) outlined an ensemble-based strategy for attributing streamflow forecast uncertainty between two endpoints representing zero information about future forcings (ie, the NWS ensemble streamflow prediction, or ESP approach) versus zero information about initial conditions (termed ';reverse-ESP'). This study adopts a more comprehensive approach to characterize the effects of varying levels of uncertainty, from zero knowledge to perfect information in the model world, on streamflow prediction uncertainty. Ensemble hindcasts reflecting varying levels of uncertainty are initialized on a monthly basis for the basins' periods of record, creating background sensitivity information that helps to decompose total hydrologic prediction error into the three components identified above. Observed streamflow prediction errors are then coupled with estimates of realistic uncertainties in future forcing and with model simulation error to infer initial condition errors. This presentation reports findings from the predictability experiments, summarizing the relative importance of uncertainties in basin initial conditions and weather and climate forecasts, and their dependence on forecast lead time, initiation date and regional hydroclimate characteristics.

  5. Wetlands monitoring - hydrological conditions and water quality in selected transects of Biebrza National Park.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmaszczyk, Mateusz; Okruszko, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    Water Framework Directive (WFD) obligates Member States to prevent further deterioration as well as to protect and enhance the status of aquatic ecosystems and wetlands. In order to fulfill one of the WFD objectives - to keep wetlands in good surface water and groundwater status (determined by good ecological, chemical and quantitative status) it is necessary to specify most favourable conditions for them. In that case monitoring of factors responsible for wetlands status in natural areas is a key issue. Further, achieved knowledge of existing relations in ecosystems can be implemented in protection and restoration projects. There are a number of factors influencing diversity of habitats responsible for developing different wetland ecosystems and their sustaining in good ecological status. It's believed that among significant factors such as hydrological conditions, water quality, nutrient availability in the soil, pH value and management (e.g. grazing, mowing) the hydrological conditions are the most important. In presented work authors concentrated on hydrological conditions and water quality and theirs influence on wetland vegetation of Biebrza National Park (BNP). BNP located north-east part of Poland is recognized by many scientist as a unique undisturbed wetland reference area. Five transects located in different basins of BNP were chosen. Transects consist of piezometers in which the water table levels and water quality were measured. Analysis of electroconductivity (EC), alkalinity (HCO3-) and pH were done directly in the field. In the laboratory anions (NO3-, PO43-, Cl-, SO42-) and cations (NH4+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Br+, Li+, Na+, K+) concentration was determined using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). D-divers, electronic devices to permanent measurement of groundwater level changes were located in some of the piezometers. Piezometers were located in the sites characterized by different hydrological conditions, from groundwater fed to river fed areas

  6. Global test of the conductor for Tore Supra under actual working conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Aymar, R.; Deck, C.; Genevey, P.; Lefevre, F.; Leloup, C.; Meuris, C.; Palanque, S.; Sagniez, A.; Turck, B.

    1981-09-01

    In a plasma current disruption event, the superconducting winding of the toroidal coils of a Tokomak must suffer severe conditions of magnetic field variations without losing superconductivity. An experimental setup has been built to simulate conditions which would eventually occur in ''Tore Supra'' and study the behavior of the designed conductor. A sample of this conductor is subjected simultaneously to a dc transverse magnetic field up to 9.5 T, a transport current up to 2200 amp and two pulsed field components: one parallel to the conductor length, up to 1 T and one perpendicular, up to 0.35 T. The time constant of these pulsed field components is adjustable from 8 to 150 ms. They can be applied independently or simultaneously. The experimental arrangement is able to provide quantitative limits for safe operations of ''Tore Supra''. 7 refs.

  7. How can we best use climate information and hydrologic initial conditions to improve seasonal streamflow forecasts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, P. A.; Wood, A. W.; Rothwell, E.; Clark, M. P.; Brekke, L. D.; Arnold, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decades, a number of forecasting centers around the world have offered seasonal streamflow predictions, using methodologies that span a wide range of data requirements and complexity. In the western United States, two primary approaches have been adopted for operational purposes: (i) development of regression equations between future streamflow and in situ observations (e.g. rainfall, snow water equivalent), and (ii) ensemble hydrologic model simulations that combine initial watershed moisture states with historically observed weather sequences for the forecast period (e.g., Ensemble Streamflow Prediction, ESP). Nevertheless, none of these methodologies makes use of analyzed or forecast climate information, which might increase the skill of seasonal predictions. Further, there is a need to better understand the marginal benefits of using more complex methods (from statistical to dynamical) and different types of information. In this work, we provide a systematic intercomparison of various seasonal streamflow forecasting techniques, including: (1) a dynamical approach based on conceptual hydrologic modeling and ESP, (2) statistical regression using climate information and/or initial hydrologic conditions, (3) an ESP trace weighting scheme based on analog climatic conditions, and (4) combination of dynamical and statistical forecasts (i.e. hybrid approach). Climate information is taken from the NCEP CFSv2 reanalysis and reforecast datasets. These methods are tested for predicting spring (e.g., May-September) runoff volumes at case study basins located in the US Pacific Northwest, and results obtained for several initialization times are evaluated in terms of accuracy, probabilistic skill and statistical consistency. Preliminary results show that for earlier initialization times (October 1 to December 1), statistical and hybrid techniques that make use of climate information outperform ESP in terms of correlation and probabilistic skill. Although ESP at

  8. Hydrological response to changing climate conditions: Spatial streamflow variability in the boreal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teutschbein, C.; Grabs, T.; Karlsen, R. H.; Laudon, H.; Bishop, K.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we combined a multimodel ensemble based on 15 regional climate models with a multicatchment approach to explore the hydrologic sensitivity of 14 neighboring and rather similar catchments to changing climate conditions. Current (1982-2010) and future (2062-2090) streamflow was simulated with the HBV model. A diagnostic approach was used, which considered major behavioral catchment functions by using hydrologically relevant signatures related to overall water balance, flow duration curves and hydrograph attributes. Projected increases in temperature and precipitation resulted in increased total available streamflow, with lower spring and summer flows, but substantially higher winter streamflow. Furthermore, significant changes in flow durations with lower chances of both high and low flows can be expected in boreal Sweden in the future. This overall trend in projected streamflow pattern changes was comparable among the analyzed catchments but the magnitude of change differed considerably. This suggests that catchments belonging to the same region can show distinctly different degrees of hydrological responses to the same external climate change signal. We reason that differences in spatially distributed physical catchment properties within catchments are not only of great importance for current streamflow behavior, but also play a major role in the sensitivity of catchments to changing climate conditions.

  9. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  10. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, T.L.; Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.R.; Skinner, Q.D.

    1992-06-01

    The scope of this program is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by RBOSC to carry out this study. Research objectives were designed to evaluate hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical properties and conditions which would affect the design and performance of large-scale embankments. The objectives of this research are: assess the unsaturated movement and redistribution of water and the development of potential saturated zones and drainage in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the unsaturated movement of solubles and major chemical constituents in disposed processed oil shale under natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the physical and constitutive properties of the processed oil shale and determine potential changes in these properties caused by disposal and weathering by natural and simulated climatic conditions; assess the use of previously developed computer model(s) to describe the infiltration, unsaturated movement, redistribution, and drainage of water in disposed processed oil shale; evaluate the stability of field scale processed oil shale solid waste embankments using computer models.

  11. Conditioning of Flow Projections under Climate Change on Hydrologic Signatures within the GLUE Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovic, Andrijana; Plavsic, Jasna; Despotovic, Jovan

    2016-04-01

    Climate change impact on water resources is generally quantified in terms of relative changes in characteristic flows (e.g. annual runoff, median annual flows, etc.) over a future period compared to the baseline one. These changes are estimated under the assumed emission scenarios and with one or more modelling chains (combinations of the Global and Regional Climate Models, and a hydrological model). Since different modelling chains yield different projections, estimates of these relative changes are uncertain. High prediction uncertainty is reflected in a wide 90 per cent prediction uncertainty band (90PPU) or in a distribution that resembles the uniform distribution. Therefore, research in robustness of the modelling chains has been conducted. The goal of the research is to appoint higher probabilities to the projections obtained by the more robust chains, and in that way reduce the uncertainty in flow projections under climate change. In this research, the hydrologic projections are conditioned on the hydrologic signatures within the GLUE framework. Namely, a relative change obtained with a modelling chain is assigned a likelihood depending on the performance of the chain in terms of the hydrologic signatures over the baseline period. High flow projections (2nd percentile of the daily flows) are conditioned on the high-segment of the flow duration curve (FDC), projections of the median flows are conditioned on the FDC mid-segment slope, and the projections of the low flows are conditioned on the FDC low-segment. The projections of total annual runoff are conditioned on the entire FDC. The likelihoods are quantified in terms of Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient (NSE) evaluated from the FDCs of the flows simulated by the modelling chains and the observed FDC. The methodology presented is applied to develop flow projections in the Kolubara River catchment in Serbia over the mid 21st century (2041-2070). Hydrologic projections are obtained by the HBV

  12. Hydrologic modification to improve habitat in riverine lakes: Management objectives, experimental approach, and initial conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Barry L.; Barko, John W.; Gerasimov, Yuri; James, William F.; Litvinov, Alexander; Naimo, Teresa J.; Wiener, James G.; Gaugush, Robert F.; Rogala, James T.; Rogers, Sara J.; Schoettger, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Finger Lakes habitat-rehabilitation project is intended to improve physical and chemical conditions for fish in six connected back water lakes in Navigation Pool 5 of the upper Missouri River. The primary management objective is to improve water temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration and current velocity during winter for bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus, and black crappies, Pomoxis nigromaculatus, two of the primary sport fishes in the lakes. The lakes will be hydrologically altered by Installing culverts to Introduce controlled flows of oxygenated water into four lakes, and an existing unregulated culvert on a fifth lake will be equipped with a control gate to regulate inflow. These habitat modifications constitute a manipulative field experiment that will compare pre-project (1991 to summer 1993) and post-project (fall 1993 to 1996) conditions in the lakes, including hydrology, chemistry, rooted vegetation, and fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Initial data indicate that the Finger Lakes differ in water chemistry, hydrology, and macrophyte abundance. Macroinvertebrate communities also differed among lakes: species diversity was highest in lakes with dense aquatic macrophytes. The system seems to support a single fish community, although some species concentrated in individual lakes at different times. The introduction of similar flows into five of the lakes will probably reduce the existing physical and chemical differences among lakes. However, our ability to predict the effects of hydrologic modification on fish populations is limited by uncertainties concerning both the interactions of temperature, oxygen and current in winter and the biological responses of primary and secondary producers. Results from this study should provide guidance for similar habitat-rehabilitation projects in large rivers.

  13. Catchment Sensitivity to Changing Climate Conditions: Does the Landscape Control Hydrological Responses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada Montano, B.; Teutschbein, C.; Grabs, T.; Karlsen, R.; Laudon, H.; Bishop, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been recognized that streamflow-generating processes are not only dependent on climatic conditions, but also affected by physical catchment properties such as topography, geology, soils and land cover. We hypothesize that these landscape characteristics do not only lead to highly variable hydrologic behavior of rather similar catchments under the same stationary climate conditions, but that they also play a fundamental role for the sensitivity of a catchment to a changing climate. A multi-model ensemble based on 15 regional climate models was combined with a multi-catchment approach to explore the hydrologic sensitivity of 14 partially nested and rather similar catchments in Northern Sweden to changing climate conditions and the importance of small-scale spatial variability. Current (1981-2010) and future (2061-2090) streamflow was simulated with the HBV model. As expected, projected increases in temperature and precipitation resulted in increased total available streamflow, with lower spring and summer flows, but substantially higher winter streamflow. Furthermore, significant changes in flow durations with lower chances of both high and low flows can be expected in boreal Sweden in the future. This overall trend in projected streamflow pattern changes was comparable among the analyzed catchments while the magnitude of change differed considerably. This suggests that catchments belonging to the same region can show distinctly different degrees of hydrological responses to the same external climate change signal. We reason that differences in spatially distributed physical catchment properties at smaller scales are not only of great importance for current streamflow behavior, but also play a major role as first-order control for the sensitivity of catchments to changing climate conditions.

  14. Use of stage data to characterize hydrologic conditions in an urbanizing environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, G.; Bales, J.D.; Coles, J.F.; Giddings, E.M.P.; Zappia, H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on the use of continuous stage data to describe the relation between urban development and three aspects of hydrologic condition that are thought to influence stream ecosystems - overall stage variability, stream flashiness, and the duration of extreme-stage conditions. This relation is examined using data from more than 70 watersheds in three contrasting environmental settings - the humid Northeast (the metropolitan Boston, Massachusetts, area); the very humid Southeast (the metropolitan Birmingham, Alabama, area); and the semiarid West (the metropolitan Salt Lake City, Utah, area). Results from the Birmingham and Boston studies provide evidence linking increased urbanization with stream flashiness. Fragmentation of developed land cover patches appears to ameliorate the effects of urbanization on overall variability and flashiness. There was less success in relating urbanization and streamflow conditions in the Salt Lake City study. A related investigation of six North Carolina sites with long term discharge and stage data indicated that hydrologic condition metrics developed using continuous stage data are comparable to flow based metrics, particularly for stream flashiness measures.

  15. Hydrological response to changing climate conditions: Spatial streamflow variability in the boreal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teutschbein, Claudia; Grabs, Thomas; Karlsen, Reinert H.; Laudon, Hjalmar; Bishop, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    It has long been recognized that streamflow-generating processes are not only dependent on climatic conditions, but also affected by physical catchment properties such as topography, geology, soils and land cover. We hypothesize that these landscape characteristics do not only lead to highly variable hydrologic behavior of rather similar catchments under the same stationary climate conditions (Karlsen et al., 2014), but that they also play a fundamental role for the sensitivity of a catchment to a changing climate (Teutschbein et al., 2015). A multi-model ensemble based on 15 regional climate models was combined with a multi-catchment approach to explore the hydrologic sensitivity of 14 partially nested and rather similar catchments in Northern Sweden to changing climate conditions and the importance of small-scale spatial variability. Current (1981-2010) and future (2061-2090) streamflow was simulated with the HBV model. As expected, projected increases in temperature and precipitation resulted in increased total available streamflow, with lower spring and summer flows, but substantially higher winter streamflow. Furthermore, significant changes in flow durations with lower chances of both high and low flows can be expected in boreal Sweden in the future. This overall trend in projected streamflow pattern changes was comparable among the analyzed catchments while the magnitude of change differed considerably. This suggests that catchments belonging to the same region can show distinctly different degrees of hydrological responses to the same external climate change signal. We reason that differences in spatially distributed physical catchment properties at smaller scales are not only of great importance for current streamflow behavior, but also play a major role as first-order control for the sensitivity of catchments to changing climate conditions. References Karlsen, R.H., T. Grabs, K. Bishop, H. Laudon, and J. Seibert (2014). Landscape controls on

  16. Hydrological conditions control in situ DOM retention and release along a Mediterranean river.

    PubMed

    Butturini, A; Guarch, A; Romaní, A M; Freixa, A; Amalfitano, S; Fazi, S; Ejarque, E

    2016-08-01

    Uncertainties exist regarding the magnitude of in situ dissolved organic matter (DOM) processing in lotic systems. In addition, little is known about the effects of extreme hydrological events on in-stream DOM retention or release during downriver transport. This study quantified the net in-stream retention/release efficiencies (η) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and its humic and protein-like fluorescent fractions along a Mediterranean river during drought, baseflow and flood conditions. High performance size exclusion chromatography was used to describe the apparent size distributions of the humic and protein-like DOM moieties. A snapshot mass balance allowed estimating the η values of DOC and humic and protein-like fractions. Significant DOM net retention (η < 0) was detected during the drought condition and the protein-like fraction was more retained than the humic-like fraction and bulk DOC. In addition, small substances were more efficiently retained than larger substances. DOC retention decreased under baseflow conditions, but it remained significant. The humic and protein-like net efficiencies exhibited high variability, but the net retention were not significant. From a longitudinal perspective, the entire fluvial corridor contributed net retention of DOC and humic and protein-like moieties net retention during drought condition. In contrast, net retention/release efficiencies exhibited spatial variability during baseflow condition. The flood preferentially mobilized large size DOM molecules and the fluvial corridor behaved as a homogeneous passive DOM (η = 0) conduit. This research highlights the relevance of hydrological extreme events on the magnitude of DOM retention/release mass balance and emphasizes the need to perform measurements during these conditions to quantify the impact of fluvial corridors on DOM fate and transport. PMID:27132197

  17. Hydrological conditions control in situ DOM retention and release along a Mediterranean river.

    PubMed

    Butturini, A; Guarch, A; Romaní, A M; Freixa, A; Amalfitano, S; Fazi, S; Ejarque, E

    2016-08-01

    Uncertainties exist regarding the magnitude of in situ dissolved organic matter (DOM) processing in lotic systems. In addition, little is known about the effects of extreme hydrological events on in-stream DOM retention or release during downriver transport. This study quantified the net in-stream retention/release efficiencies (η) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and its humic and protein-like fluorescent fractions along a Mediterranean river during drought, baseflow and flood conditions. High performance size exclusion chromatography was used to describe the apparent size distributions of the humic and protein-like DOM moieties. A snapshot mass balance allowed estimating the η values of DOC and humic and protein-like fractions. Significant DOM net retention (η < 0) was detected during the drought condition and the protein-like fraction was more retained than the humic-like fraction and bulk DOC. In addition, small substances were more efficiently retained than larger substances. DOC retention decreased under baseflow conditions, but it remained significant. The humic and protein-like net efficiencies exhibited high variability, but the net retention were not significant. From a longitudinal perspective, the entire fluvial corridor contributed net retention of DOC and humic and protein-like moieties net retention during drought condition. In contrast, net retention/release efficiencies exhibited spatial variability during baseflow condition. The flood preferentially mobilized large size DOM molecules and the fluvial corridor behaved as a homogeneous passive DOM (η = 0) conduit. This research highlights the relevance of hydrological extreme events on the magnitude of DOM retention/release mass balance and emphasizes the need to perform measurements during these conditions to quantify the impact of fluvial corridors on DOM fate and transport.

  18. The elasticity of hydrological forecast skill with respect to initial conditions and meteorological forcing for two major flood events in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thober, Stephan; Wood, Andy; Samaniego, Luis; Clark, Martyn; Kumar, Rohini; Zink, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    events along the Elbe and Danube river. The mesoscale Hydrologic Model - mHM is used to evaluate the impact of varying initial conditions and meteorological forcing. The original meteorological data used to generate ensemble forcing is provided by the German Weather Service (DWD). Common metrics such as mean absolute error (MAE) and continuous ranked probability skill scores (CRPSS) are employed to evaluate the forecast skill. Moreover, the elasticity is quantified which is defined as the change in runoff skill per unit change either in forcing or initial condition skill. The analysis helps to understand the relative importance of basin initial conditions and meteorological forecasts for extreme floods in Germany. Results indicate that initial land surface conditions have great impact in hydrological forecast skill for short lead times (e.g., 16.9% chance of reaching actual peak discharge with historic land surface condition). For longer lead times, however, the hydrological forecast skill becomes more dependent on the forecast skill in the meteorological forcing.

  19. Characterizing the impact of spatiotemporal variations in stormwater infrastructure on hydrologic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, T.; Mejia, A.; Hale, R. L.; Gironas, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Urban stormwater infrastructure design has evolved in time, reflecting changes in stormwater policy and regulations, and in engineering design. This evolution makes urban basins heterogeneous socio-ecological-technological systems. We hypothesize that this heterogeneity creates unique impact trajectories in time and impact hotspots in space within and across cities. To explore this, we develop and implement a network hydro-engineering modeling framework based on high-resolution digital elevation and stormwater infrastructure data. The framework also accounts for climatic, soils, land use, and vegetation conditions in an urban basin, thus making it useful to study the impacts of stormwater infrastructure across cities. Here, to evaluate the framework, we apply it to urban basins in the metropolitan areas of Phoenix, Arizona. We use it to estimate different metrics to characterize the storm-event hydrologic response. We estimate both traditional metrics (e.g., peak flow, time to peak, and runoff volume) as well as new metrics (e.g., basin-scale dispersion mechanisms). We also use the dispersion mechanisms to assess the scaling characteristics of urban basins. Ultimately, we find that the proposed framework can be used to understand and characterize the impacts associated with stormwater infrastructure on hydrologic conditions within a basin. Additionally, we find that the scaling approach helps in synthesizing information but it requires further validation using additional urban basins.

  20. Organic priority substances and microbial processes in river sediments subject to contrasting hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    Zoppini, Annamaria; Ademollo, Nicoletta; Amalfitano, Stefano; Casella, Patrizia; Patrolecco, Luisa; Polesello, Stefano

    2014-06-15

    Flood and drought events of higher intensity and frequency are expected to increase in arid and semi-arid regions, in which temporary rivers represent both a water resource and an aquatic ecosystem to be preserved. In this study, we explored the variation of two classes of hazardous substances (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Nonylphenols) and the functioning of the microbial community in river sediments subject to hydrological fluctuations (Candelaro river basin, Italy). Overall, the concentration of pollutants (∑PAHs range 8-275ngg(-1); ∑NPs range 299-4858ngg(-1)) suggests a moderate degree of contamination. The conditions in which the sediments were tested, flow (high/low) and no flow (wet/dry/arid), were associated to significant differences in the chemical and microbial properties. The total organic carbon contribution decreased together with the stream flow reduction, while the contribution of C-PAHs and C-NPs tended to increase. NPs were relatively more concentrated in sediments under high flow, while the more hydrophobic PAHs accumulated under low and no flow conditions. Passing from high to no flow conditions, a gradual reduction of microbial processes was observed, to reach the lowest specific bacterial carbon production rates (0.06fmolCh(-1)cell(-1)), extracellular enzyme activities, and the highest doubling time (40h) in arid sediments. In conclusion, different scenarios for the mobilization of pollutants and microbial processes can be identified under contrasting hydrological conditions: (i) the mobilization of pollutants under high flow and a relatively higher probability for biodegradation; (ii) the accumulation of pollutants during low flow and lower probability for biodegradation; (iii) the drastic reduction of pollutant concentrations under dry and arid conditions, probably independently from the microbial activity (abiotic processes). Our findings let us infer that a multiple approach has to be considered for an appropriate water

  1. The evolution of hydrological and water quality conditions on Techirghiol Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maftei, Carmen; Buta, Constantin; Tofan, Lucica

    2015-04-01

    Changes in climate and environment conditions alter the hydraulic and chemical properties of lakes. With a surface from 1300ha, the Techirghiol Lake, situated on the littoral of the Black Sea at 15km from Constanta town, is considered the greatest hypersaline lake of Romania very well known (from 1891) especially for the curative qualities of its water and mud. Physical and geographical conditions associated with an arid climate regime - where the annual precipitation is less than 400mm and the average temperatures exceed (lead evaporative potential to 700-1000mm), cause a strong concentration of mineral salts that give the lake an excessive salinity. In conditions of excessive salinity forms a therapeutic mud as a result of bacterial decomposition of aquatic organisms that have done there, especially crustaceans Arthemia and algae that live in water. This mud, highly hydrated, rich in minerals, has therapeutic properties, for this reason in Techirghiol has developed a strong health resort. Fresh water is a threat to the therapeutic lake properties. In hydrological year 1961-1962, the overland flow value to the lake was approximately 0.4 million m3, and from 1972-1973 the value reached 6 million cubic meters per year a great contribution was from the irrigation water. One of the consequences is the increasing of the lake level and the second is the decreasing of salinity. For this reason a hydraulic work system has been built to separate the saline water of the lake and the freshwater. The aim of this paper is to investigate the hydrologic and chemical responses of the Techirghiol Lake to the changes in climate and environment conditions.

  2. Human Impacts to Coastal Ecosystems in Puerto Rico (HICE-PR): Actual Condition of Coral Reefs Associated with the Guanica and Manati Watersheds in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Perez, J. L.; Barreto, M.; Guild, L. S.; Ortiz, J.; Setegn, S. G.; Ramos-Scharron, C. E.; Armstrong, R.; Santiago, L.

    2015-12-01

    For several decades Puerto Rico's coastal and marine ecosystems (CMEs), particularly coral reefs, have suffered the effects of anthropogenic stresses associated to population growth and varying land use. Here we present an overview of the first year of findings of a NASA-funded project that studies human impacts in two priority watersheds (Manatí and Guánica). The project includes remote sensing analysis and hydrological, ecological and socio-economic modeling to provide a multi-decadal assessment of change of CMEs. The project's main goal is to evaluate the impacts of land use/land cover changes on the quality and extent of CMEs in priority watersheds in the north and south coasts of Puerto Rico. This project will include imagery from Landsat 8 to assess coastal ecosystems extent. Habitat and species distribution maps will be created by incorporating field and remotely-sensed data into an Ecological Niche Factor Analysis. The social component will allow us to study the valuation of specific CMEs attributes from the stakeholder's point of view. Field data was collected through a series of phototransects at the main reefs associated with these two priority watersheds. A preliminary assessment shows a range in coral cover from 0.2-30% depending on the site (Guánica) whereas apparently healthy corals dominate the reef in the north coast (Manatí). Reefs on the southwest coast of PR (Guánica) show an apparent shift from hard corals to a more algae and soft corals dominance after decades of anthropogenic impacts (sedimentation, eutrophication, mechanical damage through poorly supervised recreational activities, etc.). Additionally preliminary results from land cover/land use changes analyses show dynamic historical shoreline changes in beaches located west of the Manatí river mouth and a degradation of water quality in Guánica possibly being one of the main factors affecting the actual condition of its CMEs.

  3. Carabid Beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) as Indicatorsof Hydrological Site Conditions in Floodplain Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerisch, Michael; Schanowski, Arno; Figura, Wolfgang; Gerken, Bernd; Dziock, Frank; Henle, Klaus

    2006-08-01

    The relationship of carabid beetle species occurrence patterns and environmental variables characterising the hydrological regime has been studied at the River Elbe in Central Germany. Both flood duration and groundwater depth had major influence on species assemblages as the ordination of study plots mainly followed a gradient along these two variables. The simultaneous ordination of the plots according to species occurrence and environmental parameters showed a highly significant joint structure with the first two axes of a co-inertia analysis, explaining >98% of the variance. A total of 27 species out of 129 caught fulfilled criteria of fidelity and specificity to the plots of the five clusters revealed by their abiotic conditions and were sufficiently abundant to be suitable indicators for one or a combination of clusters of plots.

  4. Hydrological conditions determine branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether distributions in soils of the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Carme; Menges, Johanna; Fietz, Susanne; Sachse, Dirk; Rosell-Melé, Antoni

    2013-04-01

    Temperature is one of the key environmental factors driving climate change, but past continental temperature records are constrained by the few proxies that can be applied in these environments. The MBT-CBT proxy is based on the distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs), bacterial membrane lipids in soils1.Since the degree of cyclisation of the GDGTs (CBT) was found to corellate to soil pH, while tindex degree of methylation (MBT) corellates to mean annual temperature and soil pH. a combination of these two indices allows the estimation of mean annual temperature (MAT). However, it has been suggested, that other factors such as the hydrological conditions can also influence the MBT2, although it has never been testet directly. To asses the effect of hydrological conditions on the MBT-CBT a set of 25 soil samples of the Iberian Peninsula covering a temperature range from 10-18°C and a wide range of hydrological regimes was analysed (405 mm to 1455 mm per year) . We found that CBT was significantly correlated to soil pH confirming it even at a regional scale as a robust proxy for soil pH. The MBT was also shown to relate to soil pH, but the the expected relation between MBT and MAT could not be established. In fact, the correlation between MBT and MAT was inverse to the one expected according to previous studies and presented large scatter (R2=0,2). Consequently the MAT estimation using the MBT-CBT proxy leads to an underestimation of MAT, which is most prominent at the dryest sites and reaches up to 24°C. Instead we found a significant correlation between MBT and annual mean precipitation as well as the Aridity Index (AI)3, a parameter quantifying water availability in soils. This suggests that in dry environments or under moisture shortage the influence of the degree of methylation of branched GDGTs is not coupled to temperature but to the degree of water availability. 1. Weijers, J.W.H. et al. 2007. GCA. 71, 703-713. 2. Peterse, F

  5. Modeling channel-floodplain hydrologic connectivity under non-stationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Call, B.; Belmont, P.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional floodplain inundation models typically rely on the assumption of stationary flood frequency distributions and static channel geometries. However, changes in climate, land cover, or water management have been shown to systematically shift the mean and variance of flood flows. Further, changes in flood magnitudes have been shown to cause systematic changes in channel widths and depths. Therefore, some amount of change in the flood regime will be absorbed by changes in channel conveyance, but the subsequent changes to the frequency and magnitude of floodplain inundation are not obvious. This work presents a numerical model of channel-floodplain hydrologic connectivity under non-stationary conditions. Specifically, the model predicts the width of floodplain inundation in response to a time series of synthetically generated floods. Flood time series are generated via generalized extreme value probability density functions (PDFs) with specified mean, variance, and skew parameters. To simulate non-stationary conditions, we modify the mean, variance, and/or skew systematically during each run. Throughout each model run, the geometry of the alluvial channel changes in response to flood flows according to simple hydraulic geometry relations. Results suggest that a river's inundation regime is more sensitive to changes in the variance parameter of a governing PDF than to changes in the mean parameter. Simple changes in the mean of the governing PDF result in changes to channel geometry (e.g. channel widening or narrowing), but the frequency and magnitude of inundation may adjust with time after the onset of non-stationary hydrology towards a state of dynamic equilibrium similar to the previous inundation regime. However, changes in the PDF's variance parameter can induce greater variation in channel geometry, often resulting in less frequent, but greater magnitudes of floodplain inundation.

  6. Projecting impacts of climate change on hydrological conditions and biotic responses in a chalk valley riparian wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, A. R.; Thompson, J. R.; Acreman, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Projected changes in climate are likely to substantially impact wetland hydrological conditions that will in turn have implications for wetland ecology. Assessing ecohydrological impacts of climate change requires models that can accurately simulate water levels at the fine-scale resolution to which species and communities respond. Hydrological conditions within the Lambourn Observatory at Boxford, Berkshire, UK were simulated using the physically based, distributed model MIKE SHE, calibrated to contemporary surface and groundwater levels. The site is a 10 ha lowland riparian wetland where complex geological conditions and channel management exert strong influences on the hydrological regime. Projected changes in precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, channel discharge and groundwater level were derived from the UK Climate Projections 2009 ensemble of climate models for the 2080s under different scenarios. Hydrological impacts of climate change differ through the wetland over short distances depending on the degree of groundwater/surface-water interaction. Discrete areas of groundwater upwelling are associated with an exaggerated response of water levels to climate change compared to non-upwelling areas. These are coincident with regions where a weathered chalk layer, which otherwise separates two main aquifers, is absent. Simulated water levels were linked to requirements of the MG8 plant community and Desmoulin's whorl snail (Vertigo moulinsiana) for which the site is designated. Impacts on each are shown to differ spatially and in line with hydrological impacts. Differences in water level requirements for this vegetation community and single species highlight the need for separate management strategies in distinct areas of the wetland.

  7. Hydrological conditions at the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, based on these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 317/319 Area is located between Meridian Road and the southern border of ANL. The 317 Area was commissioned in the late 1940s for the temporary storage of radioactive waste. Low- and high-level solid radioactive waste is stored in partially buried concrete vaults. Low-level radioactive waste awaiting shipment for off-site disposal is stored in aboveground steel bins north of the vaults. The 319 Area is an inactive landfill, located east of the 317 Area that was used for the disposal of general refuse, demolition debris, and laboratory equipment. Fluorescent light bulbs, chemical containers, and suspect waste were also placed in the landfill. Liquid chemical wastes were disposed of at each site in gravel-filled trenches called French drains.'' The 317/319 Area is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 19.5m. Organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. At the time of this report, no chemical quality analyses had been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. 14 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-05-04

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 [times] 3.0 [times] 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  9. Hydrological modelling for flood forecasting: Calibrating the post-fire initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanasiou, C.; Makropoulos, C.; Mimikou, M.

    2015-10-01

    Floods and forest fires are two of the most devastating natural hazards with severe socioeconomic, environmental as well as aesthetic impacts on the affected areas. Traditionally, these hazards are examined from different perspectives and are thus investigated through different, independent systems, overlooking the fact that they are tightly interrelated phenomena. In fact, the same flood event is more severe, i.e. associated with increased runoff discharge and peak flow and decreased time to peak, if it occurs over a burnt area than that occurring over a land not affected by fire. Mediterranean periurban areas, where forests covered with flammable vegetation coexist with agricultural land and urban zones, are typical areas particularly prone to the combined impact of floods and forest fires. Hence, the accurate assessment and effective management of post-fire flood risk becomes an issue of priority. The research presented in this paper aims to develop a robust methodological framework, using state of art tools and modern technologies to support the estimation of the change in time of five representative hydrological parameters for post-fire conditions. The proposed methodology considers both longer- and short-term initial conditions in order to assess the dynamic evolution of the selected parameters. The research focuses on typical Mediterranean periurban areas that are subjected to both hazards and concludes with a set of equations that associate post-fire and pre-fire conditions for five Fire Severity (FS) classes and three soil moisture states. The methodology has been tested for several flood events on the Rafina catchment, a periurban catchment in Eastern Attica (Greece). In order to validate the methodology, simulated hydrographs were produced and compared against available observed data. Results indicate a close convergence of observed and simulated flows. The proposed methodology is particularly flexible and thus easily adaptable to catchments with similar

  10. Persistent Organic Pollutants in Streamwater: Influence of Hydrological Conditions and Landscape Type.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, Sarah; Bergknut, Magnus; Futter, Martyn N; Jansson, Stina; Laudon, Hjalmar; Lundin, Lisa; Wiberg, Karin

    2016-07-19

    Concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in streamwater were measured in a remote catchment in northern Sweden and downstream to the Baltic Sea. Sampling took place at seven sites during two years and under different hydrological conditions: during the snow-free, snow-covered, and spring-flood seasons. Concentrations varied substantially between seasons and were up to 20 times higher during the spring flood compared to the preceding snow-covered period. The increase in concentrations with runoff was due to higher levels of particle-associated contaminants, while the dissolved concentrations remained stable. Particulate-contaminant concentrations were positively correlated primarily to suspended particulate matter (SPM) at sites in areas with a high land-cover fraction of sorted sediment. When upstream sampling locations were compared, a mire-dominated stream had higher concentrations and a lower retention of atmospherically deposited contaminants than a forest stream of the same catchment size. Contaminant concentrations (normalized to volume) did not increase consistently downstream despite the presence of several point sources. However, when normalized to the amount of SPM, concentrations were on average >20 times higher at the outlet in the Baltic Sea compared to the outlet from the remote catchment without point sources. PMID:27336735

  11. 21st century increases in the likelihood of extreme hydrologic conditions for the mountainous basins of the Southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Iris T.; Ficklin, Darren L.; Carrillo, Carlos A.; McIntosh, Russell

    2015-10-01

    Extreme hydrologic conditions, such as floods, droughts, and elevated stream temperatures, significantly impact the societal fabric and ecosystems, and there is rising concern about increases in the frequency of extreme conditions with projected climate changes. Here we ask what changes in the occurrence of extreme hydrologic conditions can be expected by the end of the century for the important water-generating, mountainous basins of the Southwestern United States, namely the Sierra Nevada and Upper Colorado River Basins. The extreme conditions considered are very high flows, low flows, and elevated stream temperature as derived from historic and future simulations using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydrologic model and downscaled output from a General Circulation Model ensemble. Results indicate noteworthy differences in the frequency changes of extremes based on geographic region, season, elevation, and stream size. We found wide-spread increases in the occurrence of stream flows exceeding 150% of historic monthly averages for winter by the end of the century, and extensive increases in the occurrence of both extreme low flows (representing <50% of historic monthly averages), and elevated stream temperatures (>3 °C of monthly averages) during the summer months, with some basins expecting extreme conditions 90-100% of the time by the end of the century. Understanding the differences in the changes of extreme conditions can identify climate-sensitive regions and assist in targeted planning for climate change adaptation and mitigation.

  12. Understanding the hydrological sensitivity of land use/land management changes to soil and climate conditions across the United Kingdom (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, I.; Hess, T.

    2013-12-01

    Wilting Point and Field Capacity). For example, the much shorter growing season of spring beans compared to permanent grass results in only up to 20% more annual average hydrological effective rainfall and recharge in a droughty soil in drier parts of the country (as the greater growing season potential evapotranspiration of the grass is curtailed by soil water stress), compared to more than double in a non-droughty soil (where the greater grass evapotranspiration leads to higher soil moisture deficits and shorter recharge periods). At the catchment scale, plausible improvements in improved agricultural soil management produced modest simulated increases of up to 10% in the simulated BFI in most catchments in England and Wales, although the greatest relative increases were in the more water stressed southern and eastern England. However, this is also associated with an increase in actual evapotranspiration due to increased infiltration of rainfall so that overall hydrologically effective rainfall decreases. The paper will demonstrate that the impacts of land use and land management change will not be spatially homogenous because of the complex interactions between the weather, vegetation and soils, and will identify the broad (soil and climate) conditions across the UK in which changes in land use/land management changes are likely to have positive or negative effects on hydrological processes.

  13. Biodegradation of polyacrylamide by anaerobic digestion under mesophilic condition and its performance in actual dewatered sludge system.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaohu; Luo, Fan; Yi, Jing; He, Qunbiao; Dong, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) used in sludge dewatering widely exists in high-solid anaerobic digestion. Degradation of polyacrylamide accompanied with accumulation of its toxic monomer is important to disposition of biogas residues. The potential of anaerobic digestion activity in microbial utilization of PAM was investigated in this study. The results indicated that the utilization rate of PAM (as nitrogen source) was influenced by accumulation of ammonia, while cumulative removal of amide group was accorded with zeroth order reaction in actual dewatered system. The adjoining amide group can combined into ether group after biodegradation. PAM can be broken down in different position of its carbon chain backbone. In actual sludge system, the hydrolytic PAM was liable to combined tyrosine-rich protein to form colloid complex, and then consumed as carbon source to form monomer when easily degradable organics were exhausted. The accumulation of acrylamide was leveled off ultimately, accompanied with the yield of methane.

  14. Overview of drought and hydrologic conditions in the United States and southern Canada, water years 1986-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Sandra L.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the drought and hydrologic conditions in the United States and southern Canada during the 1986-90 water years. This drought, which spread from the Eastern United States, where it was referred to as 'the drought of the century,' through the Midwest to the West Coast, brought to mind the Dust Bowl era of the 1930's. However, generally localized floods were numerous, but only one hurricane (Hugo) was of any consequence to the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands during a coincident period of anomalously low hurricane activity. The drought began in early 1984 as an 'agricultural drought,' which is a precipitation deficiency that results in a lack of soil moisture that is detrimental to agricultural production. This condition did not affect streamflow until about March or April 1986. A 'hydrological drought,' which is far more serious and widespread than an agricultural drought, was apparent from the low streamflow conditions that occurred after April 1986. To illustrate the changing nature of the drought, maps and synopses of monthly hydrologic conditions for the water years 1986-90 are presented.

  15. Summary of U.S. Geological Survey investigations and hydrologic conditions in the Southwest Florida Water Management District for 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knutilla, Robert Lloyd; Rollins, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes water-resources investigations in the Southwest Florida Water Management District performed by the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, for fiscal year 1978. The investigations are part of the Federal program of appraising the nation 's water resources. The cooperative program for fiscal year 1978 included 37 interpretive investigations. Abstracts of 30 reports released during 1978 and a bibliography of reports released since 1933 are included. The hydrologic setting of southwest Florida and discussions of surface-water, ground-water, and quality-of-water conditions are given. Hydrologic conditions in southwest Florida are described and illustrated by hydrographs of selected surface-water, ground-water and lake-stage data collection sites. In addition, summaries of water-use data and data on the regional observation monitor-well program are provided. (Kosco-USGS)

  16. Summary of U.S. Geological Survey investigations and hydrologic conditions in the Southwest Florida Water Management District for 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buono, A.; Causseaux, K.W.; Moore, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Southwest Florida Subdistrict of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division for fiscal year 1977. The organization and mission of the subdistrict office are described. The cooperative program for fiscal year 1977 included 41 interpretive investigations. Abstracts of twenty reports released by the subdistrict during 1977 and an extensive bibliography of reports released from 1933 to 1977 are included. The hydrologic setting of southwest Florida is outlined followed by discussions of surface-water, ground-water, and quality-of-water conditions. Hydrologic conditions in southwest Florida in 1977 are shown by the presentation of hydrographs from selected surface-water, ground-water, and lake-stage data collection sites.

  17. Water regime of Playa Lakes from southern Spain: conditioning factors and hydrological modeling.

    PubMed

    Moral, Francisco; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Miguel; Beltrán, Manuel; Benavente, José; Cifuentes, Victor Juan

    2013-07-01

    Andalusia's lowland countryside has a network of small geographically isolated playa lakes scattered across an area of 9000 km2 whose watersheds are mostly occupied by clayey rocks. The hydrological model proposed by the authors seeks to find equilibrium among usefulness, simplicity, and applicability to isolated playas in a semiarid context elsewhere. Based in such model, the authors have used monthly climatic data, water stage measurements, and the basin morphometry of a particular case (Los Jarales playa lake) to calibrate the soil water budget in the catchment and the water inputs from the watershed (runoff plus groundwater flow) at different scales, from monthly to daily. After the hydrologic model was calibrated, the authors implemented simulations with the goal of reproducing the past hydrological dynamics and forecasting water regime changes that would be caused by a modification of the wetland morphometry.

  18. Influence of Antecedent Hydrologic Conditions on Nitrate and Phosphorus Export from a Small Agricultural Catchment in Southern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrae, M. L.; English, M. C.; Schiff, S. L.; Stone, M.

    2009-04-01

    The ability of the scientific community to quantify and predict discharge and nutrient transport in a range of settings is confounded by the effects of antecedent hydrologic conditions in upland areas. Previous work has empirically linked spatial variables such as land use, soil type, topography, and drainage characteristics to hydrochemical export from various landscapes (e.g. MCDOWELL et al., 2001; ARHEIMER and LIDEN, 2000; STAMM et al., 1998; JORDAN et al., 1997; WELSCH et al., 2001). However, the specific reasons why similar types of events produce different nutrient export patterns are poorly understood. Nutrient (nitrate, soluble and total phosphorus) transport from agricultural catchments is difficult to quantify and predict because of the influence of variable hydrologic flowpaths and their interaction with varying nutrient pools. This research examines the role of antecedent hydrologic conditions on stream discharge and nitrate (NO3-), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and total phosphorus (TP) export from a small (2.7 km2) first-order agricultural catchment in Southern Ontario, Canada. During 59 events occurring over a two-year sampling period (year-round), runoff ratios ranged from 0-0.99). Runoff ratios increased throughout successive events as conditions became wetter although key indices of antecedent wetness such as water table position, pre-event streamflow and soil moisture did not yield predictive relationships. Nitrate, SRP and TP transport from the catchment increased with antecedent wetness during some periods but decreased with antecedent wetness during other periods. This variability appears to be linked to a combination of the position of water table before and during the event, as well as timing of fertilizer application. It is hypothesized that in general, wetter antecedent hydrologic conditions increase nutrient transport from the catchment by increasing macropore connectivity between surface soil horizons and tile drains, although this

  19. Impacts of Autonomous Adaptations on the Hydrological Drought Under Climate Change Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, T.; Satoh, Y.; Pokhrel, Y. N.; KIM, H.; Yoshimura, K.

    2014-12-01

    Because of expected effects of climate changes on quantity and spatial distribution of available water resources, assessment of the changes in the balance between the demand and supply of water resources is critical for some regions. Historically, water deficiencies were overcome by planned water management such as dam regulation and irrigation. But only few studies have investigated the effect of anthropogenic factors on the risk of imbalance of water demand and supply under climate change conditions. Therefore, estimation of the potential deficiency in existing infrastructures under water-environment change is needed to support our society to adapt against future climate changes. This study aims to estimate the impacts of climate changes on the risk of water scarcity projected based on CMIP5 RCP scenarios and the efficiency of autonomous adaptation by anthropogenic water management, such as reservoir operation and irrigation using ground water. First, tendencies of the changes in water scarcity under climate change are estimated by an improved land surface model, which integrates natural water cycles and human activities. Second, the efficiencies of human-developed infrastructure are analyzed by comparing the naturalized and fully anthropogenic offline simulations. It was found that number of hydrological drought days will be increased and decreased in approximately 70 % and 24 % of global land, respectively, considering anthropogenic water management, however, they are approximately 82 % and 16 %, respectively, under naturalized condition without anthropogenic water management. The differences indicate how autonomous adaptation through anthropogenic water management can reduce the impacts of climate change. Also, adequate enhancement of infrastructure is necessary against expected water scarcity under climate change because such positive and negative effects of artificial water regulation show comparable impact on water scarcity risk to that of climate change in

  20. Response and adaptation of grapevine cultivars to hydrological conditions forced by a changing climate in a complex landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzi, Francesca; Bonfante, Antonello; Alfieri, Silvia Maria; Monaco, Eugenia; De Mascellis, Roberto; Manna, Piero; Menenti, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    requirements were determined. To assess cultivars adaptability, hydrological requirements were evaluated against hydrological indicators. A probabilistic assessment of adaptability was performed, and the inaccuracy of estimated hydrological requirements was accounted for by the error of estimate and its distribution. Maps of cultivars potential distribution, i.e. locations where each cultivar is expected to be compatible with climate, were derived and possible options for adaptation to climate change were defined. The 2021 - 2050 climate scenario was characterized by higher temperatures throughout the year and by a significant decrease in precipitation during spring and autumn. The results have shown the relevant variability of soils water regime and its effects on cultivars adaptability. In the future climate scenario, a hydrological indicator (i.e. relative evapotranspiration deficit - RETD), averaged over the growing season, showed an average increase of 5-8 %, and more pronounced increases occurred in the phenological phases of berry formation and ripening. At the locations where soil hydrological conditions were favourable (like the ancient terraces), hydrological indicators were quite similar in both climate scenarios and the adaptability of the cultivars was high both in the reference and future climate case. The work was carried out within the Italian national project AGROSCENARI funded by the Ministry for Agricultural, Food and Forest Policies (MIPAAF, D.M. 8608/7303/2008) Keywords: climate change, Vitis vinifera L., simulation model, yield response functions, potential cultivation area.

  1. Study of how hydrological conditions affect the propagation of pseudorandom signals from the shelf in deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgunov, Yu. N.; Bezotvetnykh, V. V.; Burenin, A. V.; Voitenko, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    The paper examines how hydrological conditions affect manifestation of the acoustic "landslide" effect, which consists in focusing of acoustic energy in the near-bottom layer on the shelf and its transition to the axis of an underwater sound channel in deep water. We compare the results of experiments performed in the Sea of Japan in April 2014 and August 2006 on the same acoustic track, where the distance between corresponding points was more than 100 km. In April, the hydrological conditions in the shelf region of the track and in the upper layer of the deep-water part of the sea were characterized by the presence of a relatively weak (~0.35 s-1) negative vertical sound velocity gradient, whereas in August 2006, it was ~1.5 s-1. Experimental and numerical studies showed that the acoustic landslide effect also manifests itself under conditions of a weak negative sound velocity gradient, but the structure of the acoustic field trapped by the underwater sound channel has a more complex character with a time-expanded pulse characteristic. Nevertheless, its ordered, stable, and well-identified structure at all track points chosen for measurements make it possible to reliably create an efficient (with accuracies to hundredths of a percent) underwater navigation systems like GLONASS and GPS for the spring hydrology season.

  2. QUANTIFYING AN UNCERTAIN FUTURE: HYDROLOGIC MODEL PERFORMANCE FOR A SERIES OF REALIZED "FUTURE" CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GIS-based hydrologic modeling offers a convenient means of assessing the impacts associated with land-cover/use change for environmental planning efforts. Future scenarios can be developed through a combination of modifications to the land-cover/use maps used to parameterize hydr...

  3. Exploring transport dynamics of "new" and "old" tracers under varying hydrologic conditions in structured soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Joshua; Callaghan, Michael; Mikulic, Danijela; Cey, Edwin

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained, structured soils are prone to preferential flow along macropores that can enhance vertical migration of surface applied contaminants ("new" solutes) due to water bypassing the soil matrix. This same bypass phenomenon can also inhibit the flushing of in situ salt or other contaminants ("old" solutes), thereby hampering reclamation of previously impacted soils. In all cases, mass exchange between the soil matrix and macropores is a significant control on water and solute movement in the soil profile. The dynamics of these mass exchange processes and the associated transport of both new and old tracers were studied in field- and core-scale experiments on low permeability, macroporous soils. A multi-year investigation of new (DFBA) and old (Cl) tracer transport was completed on two 20 x 20 m test plots within a tile-drained field. Irrigation water was applied to one test plot, while the second plot served as an unirrigated control. Detailed monitoring, including wells, lysimeters, tensiometers, soil cores, tile drains, and electrical resistivity tomography, revealed a comprehensive picture of the hydraulic system response and distribution of chemical tracers over multiple field seasons. A large difference in solute transport within and between seasons was attributed to temporally varying hydrologic (water table and soil moisture) conditions, despite similar total volumes of water application. Time-varying soil hydraulic properties and soil macropore saturation were believed to play a major role, and were explored in more detail with large, intact soil monolith experiments. Two paired-core infiltration experiments were completed using the same volumes of irrigation water, but different irrigation rates and durations. The migration of new (Br, I, and dye) and old (Cl) tracers was monitored throughout the experiments, and the final tracer distribution was characterized by destructive sampling at the conclusion of irrigation. The spatial and temporal

  4. [The Red Cross System for War Relief during the Second World War and Actual Conditions of Its Efforts in Burma].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yukari

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to show the system for relief provided by the Japanese Red Cross relief units during the Second World War, as well as the actual activities of sixteen of its relief units dispatched to Burma. The Red Cross wartime relief efforts involved using personnel and funding prepared beforehand to provide aid to those injured in war, regardless of their status as ally or enemy. Thus they were able to receive support from the army in order to ensure safety and provide supplies. Nurses dispatched to Burma took care of many patients who suffered from malnutrition and physical injuries amidst the outbreak of infectious diseases typical of tropical areas, without sufficient replacement members. Base hospitals not meant for the front lines also came under attack, and the nurses' lives were thus in mortal danger. Of the 374 original members, 29 died or went missing in action.

  5. An eye-tracking investigation into readers' sensitivity to actual versus expected utility in the comprehension of conditionals.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Matthew; Ferguson, Heather J; Stewart, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The successful comprehension of a utility conditional (i.e., an "if p, then q" statement where p and/or q is valued by one or more agents) requires the construction of a mental representation of the situation described by that conditional and integration of this representation with prior context. In an eye-tracking experiment, we examined the time course of integrating conditional utility information into the broader discourse model. Specifically, the experiment determined whether readers were sensitive, during rapid heuristic processing, to the congruency between the utility of the consequent clause of a conditional (positive or negative) and a reader's subjective expectations based on prior context. On a number of eye-tracking measures we found that readers were sensitive to conditional utility-conditionals for which the consequent utility mismatched the utility that would be anticipated on the basis of prior context resulted in processing disruption. Crucially, this sensitivity emerged on measures that are accepted to indicate early processing within the language comprehension system and suggests that the evaluation of a conditional's utility informs the early stages of conditional processing.

  6. Assessment of hydrologic conditions in potential coal-lease tracts in the Warrior coal field, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puente, Celso; Newton, John F.; Bingham, Roy H.

    1982-01-01

    Assessing the hydrology of potential Federal coal-lease tracts, because of their dissemination and limited data, requires some predictive capability. Four tracts assessed were located in the outcrop of three coal groups and of other relatively impermeable rocks in the Pottsville Formation. Physical settings of the tracts and most other areas in the Warrior coal field are similar. This results in similar ground-water and surface-water characteristics, in similar impacts resulting from surface coal mining, and in maximizing the transfer-ability of data. Assessments of the tracts reflected the small storage of water in underlying rocks and corresponding low yields to wells and to the base flow of streams. Ground water and surface water in undisturbed areas are generally of good quality. Some subbasins in the tracts have already been impacted by mining. Estimates of streamflow characteristics and the availability and quality of ground water in the tracts were made using available methodology , or assessments based on local and regional data. Estimates of the degree mineralization of surface-water were made using methodology developed from other coal hydrology work. Climatic, physiographic, hydrologic, and land-use data were analyzed by regressions to derive relations for assessing water quality in streams draining mined and unmined areas. In this approach, an equation was derived to estimate specific conductance. Additional equations, based on relations between specific conductance and other constituents, allow estimates of mine drainage indicators such as hardness, dissolved solids, and sulfate. Hydrologic assessments of the tracts, based on limited verification data, proved to be reasonably accurate. (USGS)

  7. Hydrologic Simulations in Complex Terrain Conditioned on Different Precipitation Inputs During IPHEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, E. N.; Erlingis, J. M.; Vergara, H. J.; Gourley, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    An Intensive Observation Period for the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), part of NASA's Ground Validation campaign for the newly launched Global Precipitation Measurement Mission took place from May-June 2014 in the Smoky Mountains of western North Carolina. As part of the experiment, the National Severe Storms Laboratory's (NSSL) mobile dual-pol X-band radar, NOXP, was deployed in the Pigeon River Basin (PRB). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of different post-processing algorithms of NOXP data with the suite of observation platforms within the IPHEx domain. In addition, the impact of standard precipitation datasets (Stage IV gauge-corrected radar estimates, Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor System Quantitative Precipitation Estimates, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42V7 rainfall, CMORPH, WRF, etc.) on the performance of the CREST hydrologic model at small basin scales in complex terrain will be examined. Hydrologic simulations using a version of CREST with a priori parameters were conducted in the three small catchments within the PRB previously studied by Tao and Barros (2013): the Cataloochee Creek Basin, the East Fork Pigeon River Basin, and the West Fork Pigeon River Basin.

  8. High-resolution numerical modeling of meteorological and hydrological conditions during May 2014 floods in Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujadinovic, Mirjam; Vukovic, Ana; Cvetkovic, Bojan; Pejanovic, Goran; Nickovic, Slobodan; Djurdjevic, Vladimir; Rajkovic, Borivoj; Djordjevic, Marija

    2015-04-01

    In May 2014 west Balkan region was affected by catastrophic floods in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and eastern parts of Croatia. Observed precipitation amount were extremely high, on many stations largest ever recorded. In the period from 12th to 18th of May, most of Serbia received between 50 to 100 mm of rainfall, while western parts of the country, which were influenced the most, had over 200 mm of rainfall, locally even more than 300 mm. This very intense precipitation came when the soil was already saturated after a very wet period during the second half of April and beginning of May, when most of Serbia received between 120 i 170 mm of rainfall. New abundant precipitation on already saturated soil increased surface and underground water flow, caused floods, soil erosion and landslides. High water levels, most of them record breaking, were measured on the Sava, Drina, Dunav, Kolubara, Ljig, Ub, Toplica, Tamnava, Jadar, Zapadna Morava, Velika Morava, Mlava and Pek river. Overall, two cities and 17 municipals were severely affected by the floods, 32000 people were evacuated from their homes, while 51 died. Material damage to the infrastructure, energy power system, crops, livestock funds and houses is estimated to more than 2 billion euro. Although the operational numerical weather forecast gave in generally good precipitation prediction, flood forecasting in this case was mainly done through the expert judgment rather than relying on dynamic hydrological modeling. We applied an integrated atmospheric-hydrologic modelling system to some of the most impacted catchments in order to timely simulate hydrological response, and examine its potentials as a flood warning system. The system is based on the Non-hydrostatic Multiscale Model NMMB, which is a numerical weather prediction model that can be used on a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Its non-hydrostatic module allows high horizontal resolution and resolving cloud systems as well as large

  9. Determination of biologically significant hydrologic condition metrics in urbanizing watersheds: an empirical analysis over a range of environmental settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steuer, Jeffrey J.; Stensvold, Krista A.; Gregory, Mark B.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the relations among 83 hydrologic condition metrics (HCMs) and changes in algal, invertebrate, and fish communities in five metropolitan areas across the continental United States. We used a statistical approach that employed Spearman correlation and regression tree analysis to identify five HCMs that are strongly associated with observed biological variation along a gradient of urbanization. The HCMs related to average flow magnitude, high-flow magnitude, high-flow event frequency, high-flow duration, and rate of change of stream cross-sectional area were most consistently associated with changes in aquatic communities. Although our investigation used an urban gradient design with short hydrologic periods of record (≤1 year) of hourly cross-sectional area time series, these five HCMs were consistent with previous investigations using long-term daily-flow records. The ecological sampling day often was included in the hydrologic period. Regression tree models explained up to 73, 92, and 79% of variance for specific algal, invertebrate, and fish community metrics, respectively. National models generally were not as statistically significant as models for individual metropolitan areas. High-flow event frequency, a hydrologic metric found to be transferable across stream type and useful for classifying habitat by previous research, was found to be the most ecologically relevant HCM; transformation by precipitation increased national-scale applicability. We also investigated the relation between measures of stream flashiness and land-cover indicators of urbanization and found that land-cover characteristic and pattern variables, such as road density, percent wetland, and proximity of developed land, were strongly related to HCMs at both a metropolitan and national scale and, therefore, may be effective land-use management options in addition to wholesale impervious-area reduction.

  10. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

  11. Post-fire hydrologic model assessment for peak flow estimates across diverse watersheds and climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, B.; Kinoshita, A. M.; Hogue, T. S.; Napper, C.

    2011-12-01

    Wildfires alter land surfaces and land-atmosphere interactions, enhancing hydrologic responses such as flooding and debris flows. Accurate prediction of post-fire events is important for efficient mitigation. The US Forest Service (USFS) Burn Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams are required to estimate post-fire runoff and sediment fluxes in areas that have values at risk or threaten human life and natural resources. The purpose of this study is to provide specialists and policy makers with guidance on tools to assist in post-fire hydrologic monitoring and management. A survey of post-fire hydrologic model usage by the USFS reveals inconsistency in model parameter attainment, model usage, and awareness of alternative modeling practices. To address the USFS needs for quick and accurate model predictions, an assessment of current modeling systems (USGS Regression, TR-55, HEC-HMS, Wildcat5, etc.), parameters (inputs and outputs), and regional application under pre- and post-fire scenarios is undertaken. This suite of models is then applied to a diverse set of sites affected by wildfire in the western United States to estimate peak flow events (pre- and post-fire). Results show inconsistency between model predictions for peak flow events at each site, with less confidence in the larger return periods (25- and 50-year peak flow events). Pre-fire, models developed and fine-tuned specifically for a region produce similar results to observed flows, however models are not readily transferable to different regions. More complex models are time and parameter intensive but often do not produce more confident results. Peak flow in all models is highly sensitive to model parameters and currently, a strict protocol for gathering parameters and running models does not exist. To validate study models, several post-fire sites (southern and northern California, Colorado, and Montana) have been instrumented and are being used to monitor in situ hydrologic variables such as discharge

  12. The development of a test system for investigating the performances of personal aerosol samplers under actual workplace conditions.

    PubMed

    Botham, R A; Hughson, G W; Vincent, J H; Mark, D

    1991-10-01

    The performances of new "total" aerosol samplers for use in workplaces are required to match the inhalability criteria as contained in the latest recommendations of the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In the past, practical evaluations have been carried out under idealized conditions in wind tunnels, and there is now the need to extend these to more realistic workplace conditions. This paper describes a new test system that was designed and built for this purpose. It consisted of a life-size mannequin mounted on a trolley so that it can be taken to and wheeled around in workplaces. The mannequin itself incorporated a robotic arm so that, under joystick control, it can be made to simulate a range of worker movements, orientations, and attitudes. An electronically controlled, compact breathing machine provided a range of typical breathing parameters for the mannequin. The pump also provided air movement for a number of personal samplers that were mounted on the torso of the mannequin and tested in that position. Sampler performance should be assessed by comparing directly the aerosol collected by the sampler with that inhaled by the mannequin (and collected on filters inside the head).

  13. Assessment of hydrological extremes in the basins of Shilka and Argun rivers (Far East of Russia) in changing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Daria; Semenova, Olga; Vinogradova, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    Eastern Transbaikal region of Russia is formed by the basins of the Argun and Shilka Rivers (the upreaches of the Amur River). This region is simultaneously under the flood and drought hazard threat due to the combination of dry continental climate and monsoon impacts. Observed intensification of extreme hazard events in the region requires the scientific base of development of adaptation and mitigation measures. The aim of the study is the analysis of long-term variability of hydrological characteristics of the region by the means of mathematical statistics and projection of hydrological extremes in changing conditions of climate and landscapes based on hydrological modelling. Our research consisted of two stages. Firstly, we developed the database of observed daily hydrographs for about 50 runoff gauges of the region with average continuous period of observations 50 years (up to 2013) and areas from 12.3 to 200000 km2. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted and the trends of changes were assessed and analyzed. At the second stage we selected four river watersheds as the objects of modelling, namely, the gauging stations at the rivers Zun-Cooka, Gazipur, Borzya and Mogoytuy, ranging in size from 100 to 4000 km2. The basins are characterized by the variety of runoff conditions. Average elevation is about 650 m, hilly plateaus dominate the relief. The landscapes are taiga and forest-steppe with discontinuous permafrost. The climate is continental, annual precipitation varies within the range 200-450 mm, runoff - from 30 to 100 mm. The objectives of modelling stage were 1) the estimation of the hydrological model's parameters and its validation at historical data, 2) development of conceptual scenarios of changes of climate and landscapes, 3) running the model in projection mode to assess the implications of possible changes in hydrological regime. High variability of climate and hydrological regime do not allow for conventional modelling procedures to be

  14. Summary of hydrologic conditions in the Reedy Creek Improvement District, central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    The Reedy Creek Improvement is an area of about 43 square miles in southwestern Orange and northwestern Osceola Counties, Florida. A systematic program of hydrologic data collection in the Reedy Creek Improvement District and vicinity provided data for assessing the impact of development, mostly the Walt Disney World Theme Park and related development on the hydrology. Data collected include stream discharge, water quality, groundwater levels, lakes levels, and climatological. Rainfall has been less than the long-term average in the Reedy Creek Improvement District since development began in 1968. The deficient rainfall has reduced stream discharge, lowered groundwater and lake levels, and possibly affected water quality in the area. Groundwater levels and lake levels have declined since 1970. However, the coincidence of below-average rainfall with the period of development makes it impossible to assess the effect of pumping on declines. Occurrence of toxic metals does not relate to development, but distribution of insecticides and herbicides does appear to relate to development. Specific conductance, phosphorous, and nitrate concentrations have increased in Reedy Creek since 1970, probably due to disposal of treated wastes. (USGS)

  15. Hydrology for urban land planning--A guidebook on the hydrologic effects of urban land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1968-01-01

    The application of current knowledge of the hydrologic effects of urbanization to the Brandywine should be viewed as a forecast of conditions which may be expected as urbanization proceeds. By making such forecasts in advance of actual urban development, the methods can be tested, data can be extended, and procedures improved as verification becomes possible.

  16. A preliminary evaluation of hydrologic conditions of the Lakeland Ridge area of Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Alton F.

    1971-01-01

    The Lakeland ridge are covers about 300 square miles in north-west Polk County. The rapid growth of this area has resulted in an increase in ground-water withdrawals such that in 1968 about 67.5 million gallons per day was pumped to satisfy the demands of municipal, irrigation and industrial users. Declines of water-levels of as much as 30 feet in the area cause pumps to lose suction and increase the hazard of upward migration of saline water. However, no widespread deterioration of water quality has been noted to date. Considerable hydrologic data are available for the Lakeland ridge area. However, in order to give water managers a proper base for decisions that would allow for optimum utilization of the groundwater resources, more detailed data are needed about the hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer, the quantity of groundwater withdrawals, and the quality of water at various depths in the Floridan aquifer.

  17. Basin-scale simulation of current and potential climate changed hydrologic conditions in the Lake Michigan Basin, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, Daniel E.; Walker, John F.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) is the largest public investment in the Great Lakes in two decades. A task force of 11 Federal agencies developed an action plan to implement the initiative. The U.S. Department of the Interior was one of the 11 agencies that entered into an interagency agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as part of the GLRI to complete scientific projects throughout the Great Lakes basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, a bureau within the Department of the Interior, is involved in the GLRI to provide scientific support to management decisions as well as measure progress of the Great Lakes basin restoration efforts. This report presents basin-scale simulated current and forecast climatic and hydrologic conditions in the Lake Michigan Basin. The forecasts were obtained by constructing and calibrating a Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) model of the Lake Michigan Basin; the PRMS model was calibrated using the parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis (PEST) software suite. The calibrated model was used to evaluate potential responses to climate change by using four simulated carbon emission scenarios from eight general circulation models released by the World Climate Research Programme’s Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3. Statistically downscaled datasets of these scenarios were used to project hydrologic response for the Lake Michigan Basin. In general, most of the observation sites in the Lake Michigan Basin indicated slight increases in annual streamflow in response to future climate change scenarios. Monthly streamflows indicated a general shift from the current (2014) winter-storage/snowmelt-pulse system to a system with a more equally distributed hydrograph throughout the year. Simulated soil moisture within the basin illustrates that conditions within the basin are also expected to change on a monthly timescale. One effect of increasing air temperature as a result of the changing

  18. Hydrologic conditions and budgets for the Black Hills of South Dakota, through water year 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, Daniel G.; Carter, Janet M.

    2001-01-01

    The Black Hills are an important recharge area for aquifers in the northern Great Plains. The surface-water hydrology of the area is highly influenced by interactions with the Madison and Minnelusa aquifers, including large springs and streamflow loss zones. Defining responses of ground water and streamflow to a variety of hydrogeologic influences is critical to development of hydrologic budgets for ground- and surface-water systems. Hydrographs for 52 observation wells and 1 cave site are used to show ground-water response to cumulative precipitation departures. Aquifers considered include the Precambrian, Deadwood, Madison, Minnelusa, Minnekahta, and Inyan Kara aquifers, with wells completed in the Inyan Kara aquifer generally showing small response to precipitation patterns. Many wells completed in the other aquifers have large short- and long-term fluctuations in water levels. Madison and Minnelusa wells in the southern Black Hills show a general tendency for smaller water-level fluctuations than in other areas. Streamflow characteristics and relations with precipitation are examined for 33 gaging stations representative of five different hydrogeologic settings that are identified. The ?limestone headwater? setting occurs within outcrops of the Madison Limestone and Minnelusa Formation along the ?Limestone Plateau,? where direct runoff is uncommon and streamflow consists almost entirely of base flow originating as ground-water discharge from headwater springs. Thus, variability in daily, monthly, and annual flow is small. Annual streamflow correlates poorly with precipitation; however, consideration of ?moving averages? (involving up to 11 years of annual precipitation data for some stations) improves relations substantially. The ?crystalline core? area is encircled by the outcrop band of the Madison and Minnelusa Formations and is dominated by igneous and metamorphic rocks. Base flow ranges from about 41 to 73 percent for representative streams; however

  19. The hydrological performance of a green roof test bed under UK climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovin, Virginia; Vesuviano, Gianni; Kasmin, Hartini

    2012-01-01

    SummaryThis paper presents new rainfall and runoff data from a UK green roof test bed which has been collected almost-continuously over a 29-month period from 01/01/2007 to 31/05/2009. Overall, the monitoring period was fairly typical of the location's long-term climatic averages, although the data set includes some extreme events in June 2007, which were associated with serious flooding locally. To focus on the system's performance under rainfall events likely to be of interest from an urban drainage/stormwater management perspective, return period analysis has been applied to identify those storm events with a rainfall depth in excess of 5 mm and a return period greater than one year. According to these criteria, 22 significant events have been identified, of which 21 have reliable runoff records. Overall the roof provided 50.2% cumulative annual rainfall retention, with a total volumetric retention equivalent to 30% during the significant events. The annual performance figures are towards the lower end of a range of international data, probably reflecting the fact that rainfall depths may be higher and evapotranspiration rates lower than in some more continental climatic settings. The roof's finite retention depth means that the maximum possible retention percentage declines as storm depth increases, and retention varied from between 0 and 20 mm, or 0% to 100%. Although some attenuation and delay of peak runoff is generally observed (mean peak flow reduction of 60% for the 21 significant events), the irregularity of natural rainfall patterns, combined with the variable influence of detention storage in specific events, makes the identification of peak-to-peak lag times difficult and arguably meaningless. Regression analyses have been undertaken to explore the potential to predict the roof's hydrological performance as a function of storm characteristics. However, these are shown to have poor predictive capability, even for the system from which they were derived

  20. Turbidity in the fluvial Gironde Estuary (S-W France) based on 10 year continuous monitoring: sensitivity to hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalón-Rojas, I.; Schmidt, S.; Sottolichio, A.

    2015-03-01

    Climate change and human activities impact the volume and timing of freshwater input to estuaries. These modifications in fluvial discharges are expected to influence estuarine suspended sediment dynamics, and in particular the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ). Located in the southwest France, the Gironde fluvial-estuarine systems has an ideal context to address this issue. It is characterized by a very pronounced TMZ, a decrease in mean annual runoff in the last decade, and it is quite unique in having a long-term and high-frequency monitoring of turbidity. The effect of tide and river flow on turbidity in the fluvial estuary is detailed, focusing on dynamics related to changes in hydrological conditions (river floods, periods of low-water, inter-annual changes). Turbidity shows hysteresis loops at different time scales: during river floods and over the transitional period between the installation and expulsion of the TMZ. These hysteresis patterns, that reveal the origin of sediment, locally resuspended or transported from the watershed, may be a tool to evaluate the presence of remained mud. Statistics on turbidity data bound the range of river flow that promotes the TMZ installation in the fluvial stations. Hydrological indicators of the persistence and turbidity level of the TMZ are also defined. The long-term evolution of these indicators confirms the influence of discharge decrease on the intensification of the TMZ in tidal rivers, and provides a tool to evaluate future scenarios.

  1. Effect of Hydrologic and Geochemical Conditions on Oxygen-Enhanced Bioremediation in a Gasoline-Contaminated Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, J.E.; Bradley, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of pre-existing factors, e.g., hydrologic, geochemical, and microbiological properties, on the results of oxygen addition to a reformulated gasoline-contaminated groundwater system was studied. Oxygen addition with an oxygen-release compound (a proprietary form of magnesium peroxide produced different results with respect to dissolved oxygen (DO) generation and contaminant decrease in the two locations. Oxygen-release compound injected at the former UST source area did not significantly change measured concentrations of DO, benzene, toluene, or MTBE. Conversely, oxygen-release compound injected 200 m downgradient of the former UST source area rapidly increased DO levels, and benzene, toluene, and MTBE concentrations decreased substantially. The different results could be related to differences in hydrologic and geochemical conditions that characterized the two locations prior to oxygen addition. The lack of recharge to ground water in the paved UST source area led to a much larger geochemical sink for DO compared to ground water in the unpaved area.

  2. Hydrologic conditions in the Chicod Creek basin, North Carolina, before and during channel modifications, 1975-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, S.A.; Simmons, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Beginning in late 1978, stream channels throughout the 60-square mile Chicod Creek basin underwent extensive modification to increase drainage efficiency and reduce flooding potential. Drainage modifications in this Coastal Plain basin, consisting primarily of channel excavation and clearing of channel blockages, were completed in December 1981. The hydrologic condition of the basin before and during modification was determined from observed data. Observed data indicate hydrologic changes occurred in selected basin characteristics. For example, water levels in the surficial aquifer within 250 feet of Juniper Branch declined as much as 0.4 feet during modifications; at distances greater than 250 feet from the stream, ground-water levels did not change. Base flows increased, and suspended-sediment concentrations for high flows were several times greater than before channel modifications. Increases in selected chemical constituent concentrations in stream water during modifications were as follows: calcium, 12 percent; sodium, 18 percent; bicarbonate, 84 percent; and phosphorous, 80 percent. Significant changes were not found in either pesticide concentrations or coliform bacteria counts.

  3. Carbon Monoxide Photoproduction from Particles and Solutes in the Delaware Estuary under Contrasting Hydrological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Song, Guisheng; Richardson, John D; Werner, James P; Xie, Huixiang; Kieber, David J

    2015-12-15

    Full-spectrum, ultraviolet (UV), and visible broadband apparent quantum yields (AQYs) for carbon monoxide (CO) photoproduction from chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) were determined in the Delaware Estuary in two hydrologically contrasting seasons in 2012: an unusually low flow in August and a storm-driven high flow in November. Average AQYs for CDOM and POM in November were 10 and 16 times the corresponding AQYs in August. Maximum AQYs in November occurred in a midestuary particle absorption maximum zone. Although POM AQYs were generally smaller than CDOM AQYs, the ratio of the former to the latter increased substantially from the UV to the visible. In both seasons, UV solar radiation was the primary driver for CO photoproduction from CDOM whereas visible light was the principal contributor to POM-based CO photoproduction. CDOM dominated CO photoproduction in the uppermost water layer while POM prevailed at deeper depths. On a depth-integrated basis, the Delaware Estuary shifted from a CDOM-dominated system in August to a POM-dominated system in November with respect to CO photoproduction. This study reveals that flood events may enhance photochemical cycling of terrigenous organic matter and switch the primary photochemical driver from CDOM to POM. PMID:26506215

  4. Uncertainty in Estimates of the Apparent Temperature Sensitivity of Peatland Dissolved Organic Carbon Fluxes under Changing Hydrologic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. M.; Ballard, C. E.; Ireson, A. M.; Buytaert, W.; Wheater, H. S.; Rose, R.

    2010-12-01

    Peatlands cover ca. 3% of the land surface yet account for ca. 30% of the global soil carbon sink. As climate conditions are known to control carbon accumulation in peatlands, future projections of increased temperatures and decreased summer precipitation could alter peatland carbon fluxes by influencing the water table dynamics in these saturated soils. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a small but significant peatland carbon flux that can alter the balance between net carbon sink or source. In spite of this importance, DOC fluxes are often overlooked in both measured and modelled estimates of peatland carbon budgets. Integration of DOC fluxes into peatland carbon models is hindered because limited data are available to quantify production rates and their sensitivity to changes in temperature and water table, particularly in comparison to carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes. The few data that exist are largely based on laboratory incubation experiments; and it is unclear whether these laboratory derived values are comparable with the apparent temperature sensitivities observed in the field. Here, we present new analysis of long-term monitoring data from a British peatland site (Moor House), where we estimate the apparent temperature sensitivity of net DOC production using observed DOC concentrations and soil temperatures and estimates of soil water content from a hydrological model. Our estimates take into account uncertainties from both the observational data and the hydrological model. Our aim is to determine whether our laboratory derived Q10 values of net DOC production of 1.84 under saturated and 3.53 under unsaturated conditions for this site are comparable with values derived from the field monitoring data. If correct, these Q10 values suggest that DOC fluxes could increase under warmer and drier conditions.

  5. Dynamics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter influenced by hydrological conditions in a large, shallow, and eutrophic lake in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongqiang; Zhang, Yunlin; Shi, Kun; Liu, Xiaohan; Niu, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    High concentrations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are terrestrially derived from upstream tributaries to Lake Taihu, China, and are influenced by hydrological conditions of the upstream watershed. To investigate how the dynamics of CDOM in Lake Taihu are influenced by upstream inflow runoff, four sampling cruises, differing in hydrological conditions, were undertaken in the lake and its three major tributaries, rivers Yincun, Dapu, and Changdou. CDOM absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and stable isotope δ(13)C and δ(15)N measurements were conducted to characterize the dynamics of CDOM. The mean absorption coefficient a(350) collected from the three river profiles (5.15 ± 1.92 m(-1)) was significantly higher than that of the lake (2.95 ± 1.88 m(-1)), indicating that the upstream rivers carried a substantial load of CDOM to the lake. This finding was substantiated by the exclusively terrestrial signal exhibited by the level of δ(13)C (-26.23 ± 0.49‰) of CDOM samples collected from the rivers. Mean a(350) and COD in Lake Taihu were significantly higher in the wet season than in the dry season (t test, p < 0.0001), suggesting that the abundance of CDOM in the lake is strongly influenced by hydrological conditions of the watershed. Four components were identified by parallel factor analysis, including two protein-like components (C1 and C2), a terrestrial humic-like component (C3), and a microbial humic-like (C4) component. The contribution percentage of the two humic-like components relative to the summed fluorescence intensity of the four components (C humic) increased significantly from the dry to the wet season. This seasonal difference in contribution further substantiated that an enhanced rainfall followed by an elevated inflow runoff in the lake watershed in the wet season may result in an increase in humic-like substances being discharged into the lake compared to that in the dry

  6. Hydrologic conditions and assessment of water resources in the Turkey Creek watershed, Jefferson County, Colorado, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bossong, Clifford R.; Caine, Jonathan Saul; Stannard, David I.; Flynn, Jennifer L.; Stevens, Michael R.; Heiny-Dash, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    The 47.2-square-mile Turkey Creek watershed, in Jefferson County southwest of Denver, Colorado, is relatively steep with about 4,000 feet of relief and is in an area of fractured crystalline rocks of Precambrian age. Water needs for about 4,900 households in the watershed are served by domestic wells and individual sewage-disposal systems. Hydrologic conditions are described on the basis of contemporary hydrologic and geologic data collected in the watershed from early spring 1998 through September 2001. The water resources are assessed using discrete fracture-network modeling to estimate porosity and a physically based, distributed-parameter watershed runoff model to develop estimates of water-balance terms. A variety of climatologic and hydrologic data were collected. Direct measurements of evapotranspiration indicate that a large amount (3 calendar-year mean of 82.9 percent) of precipitation is returned to the atmosphere. Surface-water records from January 1, 1999, through September 30, 2001, indicate that about 9 percent of precipitation leaves the watershed as streamflow in a seasonal pattern, with highest streamflows generally occurring in spring related to snowmelt and precipitation. Although conditions vary considerably within the watershed, overall watershed streamflow, based on several records collected during the 1940's, 1950's, 1980', and 1990's near the downstream part of watershed, can be as high as about 200 cubic feet per second on a daily basis during spring. Streamflow typically recedes to about 1 cubic foot per second or less during rainless periods and is rarely zero. Ground-water level data indicate a seasonal pattern similar to that of surface water in which water levels are highest, rising tens of feet in some locations, in the spring and then receding during rainless periods at relatively constant rates until recharged. Synoptic measurements of water levels in 131 mostly domestic wells in fall of 2001 indicate a water-table surface that

  7. Estimating phosphorus removal by steel slag in a flume experiment: effects of P concentrations and subsurface hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chagas, I. S. P.; Huang, C. H.; Bowling, L. C.; Smith, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Managing excessive phosphorus (P) is essential to reduce the incidence of environmental quality issues, such as eutrophication and harmful algal blooms. One potential strategy that have been developed with this purpose is the use of P sorption materials (PSMs) to sequester P from water systems, which is the objective of this study. We evaluated the performance of steel slag, an industrial by-product with high P sorption potential, through a flume experiment under two different subsurface hydrological conditions, drainage and saturation, and two input P concentrations, 1 and 5 ppm. The 10-m flume configuration, designed to simulate processes occurring in a drainage ditch, is comprised of four 2.5-m sequential segments: a sediment bed, a slag bed over sediment, a slag dam built over a slag bed, and another sediment bed. In the experiments, all four segments of the flume were set to either saturation or with a constant drainage (percolation) of 0.1 L/min for each segment. The experiment was conducted with a constant flow of elevated P water at 7.3 L/min for 4 hrs (adsorption run) and followed 24 hrs later by a 4-hr run of deionized water (desorption run) at the same inflow rate. The adsorption-desorption cycle was repeated three times with the same sediment and slag materials, to allow testing of the resilience of P sorption under different PSM placement, subsurface hydrologic and P loading conditions. Preliminary results from the first adsorption and desorption cycle show that the flow-through slag section sequestered the most P during the adsorption runs. By comparing the different P inflow concentrations analysis, it is clear that the removal process is concentration driven: 83% of the injected P was removed in the 5 ppm as compared to 46% in the 1 ppm saturation run. Because of the higher P removal at 5 ppm P inflow, slightly higher release was also observed during the desorption run. Analyses of the persistence of steel slag as PSM under repeated adsorption and

  8. Occurrence and modeling of pharmaceuticals on a sewage-impacted Mediterranean river and their dynamics under different hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Victoria; Marcé, Rafael; Pérez, Sandra; Ginebreda, Antoni; Cortina, Jose Luís; Barceló, Damià

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence of 73 representative pharmacologically active compounds (PhACs) was assessed in a sewage-impacted section of the Llobregat River (NE Catalonia, Spain). This Mediterranean river is characterized by flow rate fluctuations strongly influenced by seasonal rainfall. River flow variations increase the potential environmental risk posed by organic micro-pollutants as their concentrations may increase substantially under low flow conditions. Little is known about the transport behavior of emerging contaminants in surface waters once they are discharged from waste water treatment plants (WWTP) into rivers. This research aimed to study the presence and fate of emerging contaminants under different hydrological conditions by sampling two different sites along the river in different seasons. The highest levels of pharmaceuticals were determined during cold and dry periods. The impact of the flow changes on the concentration of the pharmaceuticals in the river was assessed with the relative sensitive coefficients. Due to expected dilution effects, the response of pharmaceuticals to river flow was negative. Only in a few cases, positive relationships between drug concentrations and flow were detected, suggesting an important role of other hydrological phenomena like sediment re-suspension as well as the source of pollutants. To evaluate the role of other factors influencing PhAC concentrations, a plug-flow model was applied to obtain disappearance constants "k" for a set of selected compounds. Erythromycin presented k values of -0.15 h(-1) in both sites being the compound more efficiently removed from the water column. The k values for ibuprofen, furosemide, enrofloxacin, enalapril, acetaminophen, diclofenac and Ketoprofen were between -0.04 and -0.10 h(-1) showing less disappearance than erythromycin in the water column. However, other compounds presented k values<0.06, which suggested conservative behavior of these compounds in the water column. This study

  9. Statistical description of wetland hydrological connectivity to the River Murray in South Australia under both natural and regulated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Sean J.; Souter, Nicholas J.; Bean, Nigel G.; Ross, Joshua V.; Thompson, Richard M.; Bjornsson, Kjartan T.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of river regulation on the connectivity of the South Australian River Murray to its floodplain wetlands was examined using unregulated 'natural' and 'regulated' river flow data simulated between the years 1895 to 2009. A sample of 185 wetlands was used to calculate a range of connectivity statistics under both simulation scenarios. These statistics summarised the timing and duration of both connection and disconnection, as well as inundated area. Wetlands ranged from being permanently inundated, connected multiple times per year due to both small fluctuations in river level and the annual flood pulse, to flooded with diminishing frequency depending on the size of the annual flood pulse and their position on the floodplain. Under the natural scenario a wide range of wetland connectivity profiles were recorded whereas under the regulated scenario wetlands tended to be either permanently inundated or infrequently flooded. Under natural conditions wetlands that required higher flow before connecting were less frequently connected and for shorter periods. Under regulated conditions a larger proportion of wetland area was permanently connected than under natural conditions, however the annual flood pulse connected a larger area of wetlands under natural conditions. The information derived from this analysis can be used to design wetland management plans for individual wetlands within a river-wide management regime restoring lost hydrological variability.

  10. Effect of antecedent-hydrological conditions on rainfall triggering of debris flows in ash-fall pyroclastic mantled slopes of Campania (southern Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Napolitano, E.; Fusco, F; Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.; De Vita, P.

    2016-01-01

    Mountainous areas surrounding the Campanian Plain and the Somma-Vesuvius volcano (southern Italy) are among the most risky areas of Italy due to the repeated occurrence of rainfallinduced debris flows along ash-fall pyroclastic soil-mantled slopes. In this geomorphological framework, rainfall patterns, hydrological processes taking place within multi-layered ash-fall pyroclastic deposits and soil antecedent moisture status are the principal factors to be taken into account to assess triggering rainfall conditions and the related hazard. This paper presents the outcomes of an experimental study based on integrated analyses consisting of the reconstruction of physical models of landslides, in situ hydrological monitoring, and hydrological and slope stability modeling, carried out on four representative source areas of debris flows that occurred in May 1998 in the Sarno Mountain Range. The hydrological monitoring was carried out during 2011 using nests of tensiometers and Watermark pressure head sensors and also through a rainfall and air temperature recording station. Time series of measured pressure head were used to calibrate a hydrological numerical model of the pyroclastic soil mantle for 2011, which was re-run for a 12-year period beginning in 2000, given the availability of rainfall and air temperature monitoring data. Such an approach allowed us to reconstruct the regime of pressure head at a daily time scale for a long period, which is representative of about 11 hydrologic years with different meteorological conditions. Based on this simulated time series, average winter and summer hydrological conditions were chosen to carry out hydrological and stability modeling of sample slopes and to identify Intensity- Duration rainfall thresholds by a deterministic approach. Among principal results, the opposing winter and summer antecedent pressure head (soil moisture) conditions were found to exert a significant control on intensity and duration of rainfall

  11. Mechanical and Hydrologic Effects of Riparian Vegetation on Critical Conditions for Streambank Stability: Upper Truckee River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.; Pollen, N. L.; Langendoen, E. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Upper Truckee River is the single largest contributor of sediment to Lake Tahoe with a large proportion of the suspended-sediment load coming from eroding streambanks. Recent advances in quantifying streambank processes highlight the combined effects of hydraulic erosion at the bank toe with geotechnical stability of the upper part of the bank and resulted in the development of a deterministic model of bank-toe erosion and streambank stability (Simon et al., 1999). The use of riparian vegetation in schemes of bank stabilization and stream restoration have become popular but are often implemented on a trial and error basis because of a lack of quantifiable information on the mechanical and hydrologic effects of vegetation on bank stability. This study, conducted along an unstable reach of the Upper Truckee River, combines field data with numerical modeling to quantify (1) hydraulic and geotechnical driving and resisting forces that control bank failures, (2) the mechanical and hydrologic effects of vegetation on shear strength, and (3) the critical conditions for bank stability with and without indigenous riparian species. Tests were conducted using three top-bank treatments: bare (control), Lemmon's willow, and young Lodgepole pine. The susceptibility of the bank toe to erosion by hydraulic forces was quantified by conducting submerged jet tests of in situ material to determine the erodibility coefficient (k) and the critical shear stress of the material. Drained, shear-strength parameters (cohesion and friction angle) of the banks were determined from borehole shear tests at various depths. Pore-water pressure and matric suction were monitored at three depths (30, 100, and 150 cm) with digital tensiometers to calculate changes in apparent cohesion for the period (September 2003 - May 2004) and to differentiate between the hydrologic effects of the two species. Root reinforcement of the two species was quantified by determining the relation between root

  12. Hydrologic conditions, stream-water quality, and selected groundwater studies conducted in the Lawrenceville area, Georgia, 2003-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Williams, Lester J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrologic studies conducted during 2003-2008 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Cooperative Water Program with the City of Lawrenceville, Georgia, provide important data for the management of water resources. The Cooperative Water Program includes (1) hydrologic monitoring (precipitation, streamflow, and groundwater levels) to quantify baseline conditions in anticipation of expanded groundwater development, (2) surface-water-quality monitoring to provide an understanding of how stream quality is affected by natural (such as precipitation) and anthropogenic factors (such as impervious area), and (3) geologic studies to better understand groundwater flow and hydrologic processes in a crystalline rock setting. The hydrologic monitoring network includes each of the two watersheds projected for groundwater development?the Redland-Pew Creek and upper Alcovy River watersheds?and the upper Apalachee River watershed, which serves as a background or control watershed because of its similar hydrologic and geologic characteristics to the other two watersheds. In each watershed, precipitation was generally greater during 2003-2005 than during 2006-2008, and correspondingly streamflow and groundwater levels decreased. In the upper Alcovy River and Redland-Pew Creek watersheds, groundwater level declines during 2003-2008 were mostly between 2 and 7 feet, with maximum observed declines of as much as 28.5 feet in the upper Alcovy River watershed, and 49.1 feet in the Redland-Pew Creek watershed. Synoptic base-flow measurements were used to locate and quantify gains or losses to streamflow resulting from groundwater interaction (groundwater seepage). In September 2006, seepage gains were measured at five of nine reaches evaluated in the upper Alcovy River watershed, with losses in the other four. The four losing reaches were near the confluence of the Alcovy River and Cedar Creek where the stream gradient is low and bedrock is at or near the land surface. In the Redland

  13. Deriving hydrologic conditions in the southern Caucasus region during the Little Ice Age using different geomorphological and paleoenvironmental archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Suchodoletz, Hans; Benito, Dario Martin; Pederson, Neil; Faust, Dominik

    2016-04-01

    From the 15th century to ca. 1850 AD, the Little Ice Age (LIA), was one of the most prominent climatic fluctuations during the Holocene. It was characterized by negative temperature anomalies evidenced for many regions of the Northern Hemisphere (Mann 2002). During the LIA, many of these regions showed significant changes of their landscape dynamics such as glacier advances and an intensified hydrological cycle. Although glacier advances and reduced pine growth are reported from the Greater Caucasus for parts of the LIA (Solomina 2005), little is known about the hydrological conditions of the humid to semi-arid Lesser Caucasus and Transcaucasus region during the LIA. Existing pollen records are so strongly disturbed by anthropogenic activity during the last millenia that the LIA is not resolved in the only existing pollen-based precipitation reconstruction for the region (Connor & Kvavadze 2008). Here, we present data derived from different kinds of geomorphological archives from the southern Caucasus region (fluvial sediments, indicators for the timing of incision of recently dry valleys). These data demonstrate intensive geomorphic activity during the LIA obviously caused by a strongly intensified hydrological cycle. Given the rather low temporal resolution of these geomorphological archives, however, more highly-resolved palaeoenvironmental data are needed to better understand also minor climatic and hydrologic fluctuations around the LIA period. To this end, we intend to use a recently developed multispecies tree-ring network from living trees (Martin-Benito et al., in revision). This tree-ring network will be expanded both in space and time using subfossil wood material (stems) found embedded into fluvial LIA-terrace deposits and radiocarbon-dated to the end of the 15th century AD. By overlapping these samples with the living tree network, we will be able to better characterize sub-ordinate climatic and hydrologic fluctuations during the LIA period. References

  14. QUANTIFYING AN UNCERTAIN FUTURE: HYDROLOGIC MODEL PERFORMANCE FOR A SERIES OF REALIZED "/FUTURE" CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic analysis of model performance during simulations based on observed landcover/use change is used to quantify errors associated with simulations of known "future" conditions. Calibrated and uncalibrated assessments of relative change over different lengths of...

  15. Evaluating DEM conditioning techniques, elevation source data, and grid resolution for field-scale hydrological parameter extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Kathryn; Lindsay, John B.; Berg, Aaron A.

    2016-09-01

    Although digital elevation models (DEMs) prove useful for a number of hydrological applications, they are often the end result of numerous processing steps that each contains uncertainty. These uncertainties have the potential to greatly influence DEM quality and to further propagate to DEM-derived attributes including derived surface and near-surface drainage patterns. This research examines the impacts of DEM grid resolution, elevation source data, and conditioning techniques on the spatial and statistical distribution of field-scale hydrological attributes for a 12,000 ha watershed of an agricultural area within southwestern Ontario, Canada. Three conditioning techniques, including depression filling (DF), depression breaching (DB), and stream burning (SB), were examined. The catchments draining to each boundary of 7933 agricultural fields were delineated using the surface drainage patterns modeled from LiDAR data, interpolated to a 1 m, 5 m, and 10 m resolution DEMs, and from a 10 m resolution photogrammetric DEM. The results showed that variation in DEM grid resolution resulted in significant differences in the spatial and statistical distributions of contributing areas and the distributions of downslope flowpath length. Degrading the grid resolution of the LiDAR data from 1 m to 10 m resulted in a disagreement in mapped contributing areas of between 29.4% and 37.3% of the study area, depending on the DEM conditioning technique. The disagreements among the field-scale contributing areas mapped from the 10 m LiDAR DEM and photogrammetric DEM were large, with nearly half of the study area draining to alternate field boundaries. Differences in derived contributing areas and flowpaths among various conditioning techniques increased substantially at finer grid resolutions, with the largest disagreement among mapped contributing areas occurring between the 1 m resolution DB DEM and the SB DEM (37% disagreement) and the DB-DF comparison (36.5% disagreement in mapped

  16. Urban development under extreme hydrologic and weather conditions for El Paso-Juarez: Recommendations resulting from hydrologic modeling, GIS, and remote sensing analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barud-Zubillaga, Alberto

    During the 2006 El Paso-Juarez flood there were many concerns regarding the capability of the existing stormwater system to handle 50- and 100-year flood events in El Paso, Texas and Juarez, Mexico area. Moreover in 2008, a considerable wet year from the normal 223 mm of annual precipitation for El Paso demonstrated that the area could very well received large amounts of precipitation at localized areas in short periods of time, representing a great flood threat to residents living in areas prone to flood. Some climate change projections for the area are exactly what had occurred over the last two decades; an increased number of torrential rainstorms over smaller concentrated pieces of land separated by longer years of drought between rainstorms. This study consisted in three projects focused on three critical regions within the El Paso-Juarez area that were greatly affected by the 2006 Flood. The goal was to identify if natural arroyos or the existent built stormwater system, could properly managed the projected precipitation patterns. The three projects described in this dissertation touch on the following points: (a) the importance of a reliable precipitation model that could accurately describes precipitation patterns in the region under extreme drought and wet climates conditions; (b) differences in land use/land cover characteristics as factors promoting or disrupting the possibility for flooding, and (c) limitations and capabilities of existent stormwater systems and natural arroyos as means to control flooding. Conclusions and recommendations are shown below, which apply not only to each particular project, but also to all study areas and similar areas in the El Paso-Juarez region. Urbanization can improve or worsen a pre-existing natural stormwater system if built under its required capacity. Such capacity should be calculated considering extreme weather conditions, based on a denser network of precipitation stations to capture the various microclimates

  17. Breed effects and heterosis in advanced generations of composite populations on actual weight, adjusted weight, hip height, and condition score of beef cows.

    PubMed

    Gregory, K E; Cundiff, L V; Koch, R M

    1992-06-01

    Heterosis effects were evaluated in three composite populations in F1, F2, and F3 generations separately and combined in 1-yr-old and from 2- through greater than or equal to 7-yr-old beef cows. Traits included actual weight, weight adjusted to a common condition score, hip height, and condition score. Breed effects were evaluated in the nine parental breeds (Red Poll [R], Hereford [H], Angus [A], Limousin [L], Braunvieh [B], Pinzgauer [P], Gelbvieh [G], Simmental [S], and Charolais [C]) that contributed to the three composite populations (MARC I = 1/4 B, 1/4 C, 1/4 L, 1/8 H, 1/8 A; MARC II = 1/4 G, 1/4 S, 1/4 H, 1/4 A; and MARC III = 1/4 R, 1/4 P, 1/4 H, 1/4 A). Breed group (parental breed and composite) effects were significant for all traits analyzed. The effects of heterosis were generally important (P less than .05) for all traits in F1, F2, and F3 generations separately and combined in the three composite populations. Generally, the magnitude of heterosis observed at 1 yr of age did not differ from that observed in cows from 2 through greater than or equal to 7 yr old. Adjusting weight to a common condition score resulted in an average reduction of heterosis effects on actual weight by approximately one-fourth. Thus, approximately one-fourth of the effects of heterosis on weight result from heterosis effects on condition score. Generally, retained heterosis in the F3 generation of either 1-yr-old or from 2-through greater than or equal to 7-yr-old cows of the three composite populations did not differ (P greater than .05) from expectation based on retained heterozygosity for the traits analyzed. These results support the hypothesis that heterosis for weight, hip height, and condition score of cows of these age classes is the result of dominance effects of genes.

  18. A Modeling Study Evaluating the Thermal-Hydrological Conditions In and Near Waste Emplacement Tunnels At Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    J.T. Birkholzer; N. Halecky; S.W> Webb; P.F. Peterson; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-10-11

    In heated tunnels such as those designated for emplacement of radioactive waste at the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, temperature gradients cause natural convection processes that may significantly influence the moisture conditions in the tunnels and in the surrounding fractured rock. Large-scale convection cells in the heated tunnels would provide an effective mechanism for turbulent mixing and axial transport of vapor generated from evaporation of pore water in the nearby formation. As a result, vapor would be transported from the elevated-temperature sections of the tunnels into cool end sections (where no waste is emplaced), would condense there, and subsequently drain into underlying rock units. To study these processes, we have developed a new simulation method that couples existing tools for simulating thermal-hydrological (TH) conditions in the fractured formation with a module that approximates turbulent natural convection in heated emplacement drifts. The new method simultaneously handles (1) the flow and energy transport processes in the fractured rock, (2) the flow and energy transport processes in the cavity, and (3) the heat and mass exchange at the rock-cavity interface. An application is presented studying the future TH conditions within and near a representative waste emplacement tunnel at Yucca Mountain. Particular focus is on the potential for condensation along the emplacement section, a possible result of heat output differences between individual waste packages.

  19. A vegetation-based time-varying parameterization framework for improving hydrological modeling under non-stationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Tian, Fuqiang; Hu, Hongchang

    2015-04-01

    Temporal stability of model parameters is one major concern in hydrological modeling especially under non-stationary conditions including climate change and variation in catchment characteristics. In this study, we focus on the impact of variation in catchment characteristics on model parameters stability. According to the annual cycle of vegetation phenology inferred by the variability of NDVI, we split one year to growth period (May-October) and dormant period (November-April), and calibrate the parameters of a semi-distributed model (the THREW model) to 19 growth periods and 19 dormant periods during 1982-2000 in the upper Han River basin of central China (the largest tributary of Yangtze River). The results show that the calibrated parameters present significant non-stationarity, where the variation magnitude for the dormant periods is larger than that for the growth periods. The variation of the parameters can be attributed to the variation of vegetation cover, which is the most visible and detectable feature in all catchment characteristics experiencing change during the study period. Furthermore, it can be considered as an index representing the self-organization of catchment characteristics due to co-evolution of vegetation, soil, topography, geology, and so on, and even the feedbacks between climate and various catchment characteristics. We develop a time-varying parameterization scheme consisting of 14 unitary regression equations for NDVI and model parameters, and embed this scheme in the hydrological model. The correlation coefficients between model parameters and NDVI are 0.50-0.75 for the growth periods, and 0.42-0.63 for the dormant periods, indicating that the variability of calibrated parameters can reflect the changing conditions of the study area. The simulations of the modified parameterization scheme suggest that considering time instability of model parameters can improve the modeling performance for both high flows and low flows under non

  20. Turbidity in the fluvial Gironde Estuary (southwest France) based on 10-year continuous monitoring: sensitivity to hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalón-Rojas, I.; Schmidt, S.; Sottolichio, A.

    2015-06-01

    Climate change and human activities impact the volume and timing of freshwater input to estuaries. These modifications in fluvial discharges are expected to influence estuarine suspended sediment dynamics, and in particular the turbidity maximum zone (TMZ). Located in southwest France, the Gironde fluvial-estuarine system has an ideal context to address this issue. It is characterized by a very pronounced TMZ, a decrease in mean annual runoff in the last decade, and it is quite unique in having a long-term and high-frequency monitoring of turbidity. The effect of tide and river flow on turbidity in the fluvial estuary is detailed, focusing on dynamics related to changes in hydrological conditions (river floods, periods of low discharge, interannual changes). Turbidity shows hysteresis loops at different timescales: during river floods and over the transitional period between the installation and expulsion of the TMZ. These hysteresis patterns, that reveal the origin of sediment, locally resuspended or transported from the watershed, may be a tool to evaluate the presence of remained mud. Statistics on turbidity data bound the range of river flow that promotes the upstream migration of TMZ in the fluvial stations. Whereas the duration of the low discharge period mainly determines the TMZ persistence, the freshwater volume during high discharge periods explains the TMZ concentration at the following dry period. The evolution of these two hydrological indicators of TMZ persistence and turbidity level since 1960 confirms the effect of discharge decrease on the intensification of the TMZ in tidal rivers; both provide a tool to evaluate future scenarios.

  1. Return to normal streamflows and water levels: summary of hydrologic conditions in Georgia, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knaak, Andrew E.; Caslow, Kerry; Peck, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Drought conditions, persistent in the area since 2010, continued into the 2013 WY. In February 2013, Georgia was free of extreme (D3) drought conditions, as defined by the U.S. Drought Monitor, for the first time since August 2010 due to extended periods of heavy rainfall (U.S. Drought Monitor, 2013). According to the Office of the State Climatologist, the city of Savannah recorded 9.75 inches of rain in February 2013, the highest monthly total in February out of 143 years of record. Macon and Columbus also received record rainfalls in February 2013. Above-normal precipitation continued in June 2013, and the cities of Augusta and Savannah recorded the wettest June on record. In July, precipitation for the entire State of Georgia was 3.53 inches above normal (Dunkley, 2013). Above-normal rainfall from February to September 2013 increased streamflow and raised groundwater levels, and lakes and reservoirs were raised to full-pool elevations.

  2. Straw mulching reduces the harmful effects of extreme hydrological and temperature conditions in citrus orchards.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Jing; Liu, Dongbi; Li, Zhiguo; Zhang, Guoshi; Tao, Yong; Xie, Juan; Pan, Junfeng; Chen, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Extreme weather conditions with negative impacts can strongly affect agricultural production. In the Danjiangkou reservoir area, citrus yields were greatly influenced by cold weather conditions and drought stress in 2011. Soil straw mulching (SM) practices have a major effect on soil water and thermal regimes. A two-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate whether the SM practices can help achieve favorable citrus fruit yields. Results showed that the annual total runoff was significantly (P<0.05) reduced with SM as compared to the control (CK). Correspondingly, mean soil water storage in the top 100 cm of the soil profile was increased in the SM as compared to the CK treatment. However, this result was significant only in the dry season (Jan to Mar), and not in the wet season (Jul to Sep) for both years. Interestingly, the SM treatment did not significantly increase citrus fruit yield in 2010 but did so in 2011, when the citrus crop was completely destroyed (zero fruit yield) in the CK treatment plot due to extremely low temperatures during the citrus overwintering stage. The mulch probably acted as an insulator, resulting in smaller fluctuations in soil temperature in the SM than in the CK treatment. The results suggested that the small effects on soil water and temperature changes created by surface mulch had limited impact on citrus fruit yield in a normal year (e.g., in 2010). However, SM practices can positively impact citrus fruit yield in extreme weather conditions.

  3. Straw mulching reduces the harmful effects of extreme hydrological and temperature conditions in citrus orchards.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wang, Jing; Liu, Dongbi; Li, Zhiguo; Zhang, Guoshi; Tao, Yong; Xie, Juan; Pan, Junfeng; Chen, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Extreme weather conditions with negative impacts can strongly affect agricultural production. In the Danjiangkou reservoir area, citrus yields were greatly influenced by cold weather conditions and drought stress in 2011. Soil straw mulching (SM) practices have a major effect on soil water and thermal regimes. A two-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate whether the SM practices can help achieve favorable citrus fruit yields. Results showed that the annual total runoff was significantly (P<0.05) reduced with SM as compared to the control (CK). Correspondingly, mean soil water storage in the top 100 cm of the soil profile was increased in the SM as compared to the CK treatment. However, this result was significant only in the dry season (Jan to Mar), and not in the wet season (Jul to Sep) for both years. Interestingly, the SM treatment did not significantly increase citrus fruit yield in 2010 but did so in 2011, when the citrus crop was completely destroyed (zero fruit yield) in the CK treatment plot due to extremely low temperatures during the citrus overwintering stage. The mulch probably acted as an insulator, resulting in smaller fluctuations in soil temperature in the SM than in the CK treatment. The results suggested that the small effects on soil water and temperature changes created by surface mulch had limited impact on citrus fruit yield in a normal year (e.g., in 2010). However, SM practices can positively impact citrus fruit yield in extreme weather conditions. PMID:24489844

  4. Estimated water use and general hydrologic conditions for Oregon, 1985 and 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broad, T.M.; Collins, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    percent of metered irrigation withdrawals. The estimates-of-error are presented to show the relative, rather than absolute, accuracy of the data for each water-use category. A total of 8,400 million gallons of water per day was withdrawn in Oregon during 1990, about 1,900 million gallons per day more than the 6,500 million gallons per day withdrawn in 1985. Whereas actual water use increased in 1990, the major differences between 1985 and 1990 were attributed to the inclusion of offstream fish hatcheries, the use of different crop coefficients to estimate irrigation, and the availability of more detailed information in the 1990 estimates. Surface-water withdrawals accounted for 92 percent of the total withdrawals in 1990; irrigation was the largest category of water use, accounting for 82 percent of the total withdrawals.

  5. Hydrological conditions regulate dissolved organic matter quality in an intermittent headwater stream. From drought to storm analysis.

    PubMed

    Guarch-Ribot, Alba; Butturini, Andrea

    2016-11-15

    Storms and droughts are an essential driver for the dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration in headwater streams. However, the relationship between DOM quality and discharge (Q) has not been addressed in depth and the impact of other hydro-climatic or biogeochemical drivers has not been explored. In this study DOM quality variability was explored at seasonal and storm event scales during an intensive 2.5-year-long sampling in a Mediterranean stream characterized by a severe summer drought. DOM quality was described in terms of absorbance and fluorescence properties. Most of the DOM properties were strongly related to discharge revealing the input of allochthonous, degraded, aromatic, humic and increased-molecular-size DOM under high flow conditions. However, these relationships disappeared or reversed during drying and rewetting periods. Each DOM response at the storm event scale (DOM-Q hysteresis) was outlined with two descriptors that summarised its trend (dilution/flushing/chemostasis) and shape (linear/nonlinear response). Multiple linear regression and commonality analysis showed that, in addition to the magnitude of storm episodes, antecedent hydrological conditions, namely pre-event basal flow and the magnitude of the previous storm event, played a significant role in regulating the trends and shapes of DOM-Q hysteresis. PMID:27470016

  6. Hydrological conditions regulate dissolved organic matter quality in an intermittent headwater stream. From drought to storm analysis.

    PubMed

    Guarch-Ribot, Alba; Butturini, Andrea

    2016-11-15

    Storms and droughts are an essential driver for the dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration in headwater streams. However, the relationship between DOM quality and discharge (Q) has not been addressed in depth and the impact of other hydro-climatic or biogeochemical drivers has not been explored. In this study DOM quality variability was explored at seasonal and storm event scales during an intensive 2.5-year-long sampling in a Mediterranean stream characterized by a severe summer drought. DOM quality was described in terms of absorbance and fluorescence properties. Most of the DOM properties were strongly related to discharge revealing the input of allochthonous, degraded, aromatic, humic and increased-molecular-size DOM under high flow conditions. However, these relationships disappeared or reversed during drying and rewetting periods. Each DOM response at the storm event scale (DOM-Q hysteresis) was outlined with two descriptors that summarised its trend (dilution/flushing/chemostasis) and shape (linear/nonlinear response). Multiple linear regression and commonality analysis showed that, in addition to the magnitude of storm episodes, antecedent hydrological conditions, namely pre-event basal flow and the magnitude of the previous storm event, played a significant role in regulating the trends and shapes of DOM-Q hysteresis.

  7. Hydrologic budget and conditions of Permian, Pennsylvanian, and Mississippian aquifers in the Appalachian Plateaus physiographic province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, Kurt J.; Yager, Richard M.; Nelms, David L.; Ladd, David E.; Monti,, Jack; Kozar, Mark D.

    2015-08-13

    Hydrograph separation data from 849 streamflow gaging stations in the study area were used to assess trends in streamflow, base flow, surface runoff, and base-flow index, or ratio of base flow to streamflow, in the Appalachian Plateaus for the period from 1930 to 2011. Annual data anomalies for each of the four variables were individually defined as the annual standard deviation from the mean at all 849 streamflow gaging stations. Annual data anomalies confirm the close relation of annual precipitation to both base flow and runoff components of streamflow, and both components increased during the period of analysis. Around 1970, conditions shifted streamflow from values generally below to above long-term means. At a regional scale, increases in base flow account for most of these observed

  8. The Performance of Plants, Molluscs, and Carabid Beetles as Indicators of Hydrological Conditions in Floodplain Grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follner, Klaus; Henle, Klaus

    2006-08-01

    Floodplain systems are among the most complex ecosystems. To assess their ecological condition, several indicator systems have been developed. However, none of them quantifies environmental factors related to the dynamics of water levels, which is a major driver for the occurrence and distribution of species in floodplains. We present a new bioindicator system for the duration of inundation per year and mean depth of groundwater during the vegetation period. The new indicator system is based on carabid beetles, molluscs, and plants. The indicator system generally proved to be precise as well as temporally and spatially transferable within the same river system, the Elbe River in Germany. The indication based on plants was clearly most precise and transferable. The results are discussed in terms of application of the indicator system.

  9. Sewage Contamination under Different Storm and Hydrologic Conditions in Three Urban Waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templar, H.; Corsi, S.; McLellan, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Fecal contamination in urban waterways is a major public and environmental health threat. Sanitary sewer and combined sewer overflows are major point sources of fecal pollution. Additionally, stormwater runoff and failing sewer infrastructure contribute fecal contamination and pathogens to urban waterways. Traditionally, fecal indicator bacteria such as E. coli, enterococci, and fecal coliforms are used to gauge fecal contamination in water; however, these general indicators are unable to distinguish fecal sources in the environment. This study used two human-specific fecal indicator bacteria to identify human sewage contamination in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where three rivers form an estuary that discharges to Lake Michigan. Two-hour composite samples were collected at four sites, one in each of the three rivers and one in the estuary, to represent the entire hydrograph before, during, and after a rain event. Samples were collected throughout a variety of conditions, including dry-weather baseline, light and heavy rain events, and combined sewage overflows (CSOs). These samples were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays to determine human sewage loads in each river during each type of event. Low levels of human indicators were found during dry-weather baseline conditions, and loads increased significantly (one to two orders of magnitude) during rain events. Sampling upstream of the estuary indicated sewage contamination was originating in the heavily urbanized part of the watersheds, likely a result of failing infrastructure. CSO events contributed the highest loads, which were on average ten-fold higher than rainfall events with no CSO. This information will be a useful for directing the efforts of local agencies and municipalities to investigate failing infrastructure, as well as agencies at the state and federal levels to create appropriate goals to address the human health concerns that are posed by sewage contamination in urban

  10. Modelling hyporheic processes for regulated rivers under transient hydrological and hydrogeological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siergieiev, D.; Ehlert, L.; Reimann, T.; Lundberg, A.; Liedl, R.

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the effects of major hydrogeological controls on hyporheic exchange and bank storage is essential for river water management, groundwater abstraction, restoration and ecosystem sustainability. Analytical models cannot adequately represent complex settings with, for example, transient boundary conditions, varying geometry of surface water-groundwater interface, unsaturated and overland flow, etc. To understand the influence of parameters such as (1) sloping river banks, (2) varying hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed and (3) different river discharge wave scenarios on hyporheic exchange characteristics such as (a) bank storage, (b) return flows and (c) residence time, a 2-D hydrogeological conceptual model and, subsequently, an adequate numerical model were developed. The numerical model was calibrated against observations in the aquifer adjacent to the hydropower regulated Lule River, Northern Sweden, which has predominantly diurnal discharge fluctuations during summer and long-lasting discharge peaks during autumn and winter. Modelling results revealed that bank storage increased with river wave amplitude, wave duration and smaller slope of the river bank, while maximum exchange flux decreased with wave duration. When a homogeneous clogging layer covered the entire river-aquifer interface, hydraulic conductivity positively affected bank storage. The presence of a clogging layer with hydraulic conductivity < 0.001 m d-1 significantly reduced the exchange flows and virtually eliminated bank storage. The bank storage return/fill time ratio was positively related to wave amplitude and the hydraulic conductivity of the interface and negatively to wave duration and bank slope. Discharge oscillations with short duration and small amplitude decreased bank storage and, therefore, the hyporheic exchange, which has implications for solute fluxes, redox conditions and the spawning potential of riverbeds. Based on these results, river regulation strategies can

  11. Modelling hyporheic processes for regulated rivers under transient hydrological and hydrogeological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siergieiev, D.; Ehlert, L.; Reimann, T.; Lundberg, A.; Liedl, R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of major hydrogeological controls on hyporheic exchange and bank storage is essential for river water management, groundwater abstraction, restoration and ecosystem sustainability. Analytical models cannot adequately represent complex settings with, for example, transient boundary conditions, varying geometry of surface water-groundwater interface, unsaturated and overland flow, etc. To understand the influence of parameters such as (1) sloping river banks, (2) varying hydraulic conductivity of the riverbed and (3) different river discharge wave scenarios on hyporheic exchange characteristics such as (a) bank storage, (b) return flows and (c) residence time, a 2-D hydrogeological conceptual model and, subsequently, an adequate numerical model were developed. The numerical model was calibrated against observations in the aquifer adjacent to the hydropower-regulated Lule River, northern Sweden, which has predominantly diurnal discharge fluctuations during summer and long-lasting discharge peaks during autumn and winter. Modelling results revealed that bank storage increased with river wave amplitude, wave duration and smaller slope of the river bank, while maximum exchange flux decreased with wave duration. When a homogeneous clogging layer covered the entire river-aquifer interface, hydraulic conductivity positively affected bank storage. The presence of a clogging layer with hydraulic conductivity < 0.001 m d-1 significantly reduced the exchange flows and virtually eliminated bank storage. The bank storage return/fill time ratio was positively related to wave amplitude and the hydraulic conductivity of the interface and negatively to wave duration and bank slope. Discharge oscillations with short duration and small amplitude decreased bank storage and, therefore, the hyporheic exchange, which has implications for solute fluxes, redox conditions and the potential of riverbeds as fish-spawning locations. Based on these results, river

  12. Modeling present hydrological conditions as a key to predict the future - results from a case study of a periglacial catchment in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E.; Lindborg, T.; Berglund, S.

    2015-12-01

    The routing of water through periglacial landscapes is closely connected to the presence of permafrost, and freezing and thawing processes. To predict responses in the landscape to climate driven changes, we need to better understand the present day hydrology. The present hydrological processes, and the uncertainties in the data used to describe them, must be investigated and understood before we can develop models describing possible future conditions. In this work we have studied the hydrology of a catchment in the Kangerlussuaq region, Greenland. Johansson et al. (2015) presented a hydrological model of the catchment based on a new hydrological and meteorological data set from the catchment area. The present water balance was quantified, and the spatial and seasonal dynamics of the main hydrological fluxes were presented. It was shown that the model was able to reproduce the measured lake level dynamics and the measured components of the water balance. Based on this work we have used the numerical model to investigate the sensitivity in hydrological responses to different meteorological, geological and geometrical model input data. The aim with this study is to investigate the importance of the use of local data, but also to highlight the importance of present day site understanding when developing and applying the model for predicting responses to a changing climate. The results show that the site specific model is highly sensitive to the meteorological input data. Driving the model with precipitation data from a meteorological station only 30 km away from the catchment instead of local data from the studied catchment, or using local precipitation data not corrected for wind and adhesion losses, resulted in large discrepancies between measured and calculated lake levels. The modelled intra-annual dynamics of the active layer groundwater was shown to be sensitive both to the applied soil temperatures but also to the active layer depth and sediment stratigraphy.

  13. Hydrologic conditions at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, emphasis; 1974-1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barraclough, Jack T.; Lewis, Barney D.; Jensen, Rodger G.

    1981-01-01

    Aqueous chemical and radioactive wastes have been discharged to shallow ponds and to shallow or deep wells on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since 1952 and has affected the quality of the ground water in the underlying Snake River Plain aquifer. Ongoing studies conducted from 1974 through 1978 have shown the perpetuation of a perched ground-water zone in the basalt underlying the waste disposal ponds at the INEL 's Test Reactor Area and of several waste plumes in the regional aquifer created by deep well disposal at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The perched zone contains tritium, chromium-51, cobalt-60, strontium-90, and several nonradioactive chemicals. Tritium has formed the largest waste plume south of the ICPP, and accounts for 95 percent of the total radioacticity disposed of through the ICPP disposal well. Waste plumes with similar configurations and flowpaths contain sodium, chloride, and nitrate. Strontium-90, iodine-129, and cesium-137 are also discharged through the well but they are sorbed from solution as they move through the aquifer or are discharged in very small quantities. Strontium-90 and iodine-129 have formed small waste plumes and cesium-137 is not detectable in ground-water samples. Radionuclide plume size and concentrations therein are controlled by aquifer flow conditions, the quantity discharged, radioactive decay, sorption, dilution by dispersion, and perhaps other chemical reactions. Chemical wastes are subject to the same processes except for radioactive decay. (USGS)

  14. Understanding Nutrient Processing Under Similar Hydrologic Conditions Along a River Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garayburu-Caruso, V. A.; Mortensen, J.; Van Horn, D. J.; Gonzalez-Pinzon, R.

    2015-12-01

    Eutrophication is one of the main causes of water impairment across the US. The fate of nutrients in streams is typically described by the dynamic coupling of physical processes and biochemical processes. However, isolating each of these processes and determining its contribution to the whole system is challenging due to the complexity of the physical, chemical and biological domains. We conducted column experiments seeking to understand nutrient processing in shallow sediment-water interactions along representative sites of the Jemez River-Rio Grande continuum (eight stream orders), in New Mexico (USA). For each stream order, we used a set of 6 columns packed with 3 different sediments, i.e., Silica Cone Density Sand ASTM D 1556 (0.075-2.00 mm), gravel (> 2mm) and native sediments from each site. We incubated the sediments for three months and performed tracer experiments in the laboratory under identical flow conditions, seeking to normalize the physical processes along the river continuum. We added a short-term pulse injection of NO3, resazurin and NaCl to each column and determined metabolism and NO3 processing using the Tracer Additions for Spiraling Curve Characterization method (TASCC). Our methods allowed us to study how changes in bacterial communities and sediment composition along the river continuum define nutrient processing.

  15. Solute transport modelling in karst conduits with slow zones during different hydrologic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Tomás; Uriarte, Jesus A.; Olazar, Martín; Antigüedad, Iñaki; Angulo, Bárbara

    2010-09-01

    SummaryEight tracer tests conducted under different flow conditions in two well-developed karst connections in the Santa Eufemia-Ereñozar karst unit (Basque Country, northern Spain) are considered for transport characterization. Lithium tracer was injected as an impulse release for obtaining well-defined tracer breakthrough curves (TBCs). In order to simulate curve evolution and obtain transport characteristic parameters, two approaches have been applied: a standard analytical solution and a new numerical one that accounts for transient storage processes. The numerical model simulates the effect of localized variations in conduit geometry that give way to dead zones or slow zones in the transport process. This model fits the experimental curves well and explains their tails mainly by diversion processes from the main flow line towards stagnant zones. An increase in dispersion coefficient values is observed in both conduits as flow rates and average flow velocities increase. Stagnation and tracer transient retention processes, which may be quantified by means of the numerical solution, are more important as circulating flow rates decrease and travel times increase. The diversion processes in the two connections follow a similar evolution, with significant changes in the magnitude of the retentions registered depending on the hydrodynamic state of the traced system. Consequently, there is a clear hydrodynamic-controlled tailing effect.

  16. Stable isotope evidence for hydrologic conditions during regional metamorphism in the Panamint Mountains, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bergfeld, D.; Nabelek, P.I. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Labotka, T.C. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Kingston Peak Formation forms part of the Panamint Mountains, California, metamorphic core-complex. Peak tremolite-grade metamorphism as exhibited in Wildrose Canyon occurred in the Jurassic; a retrograde thermal event may have occurred in the Cretaceous. The formation consists dominantly of interbedded siliceous limestones and graphitic calcareous schists. Stable isotopic analysis shows two distinct groups of data. delta O-18 values of calcite from the limestones range between 15.3 and 17.3[per thousand], probably reflecting their original Proterozoic depositional values. Likewise the delta C-13 values are also unshifted, ranging from +1% to +3.8%o. In contrast, delta O-18 values of calcite from the schists are for the most part > 20[per thousand]. These high values could reflect the original depostional conditions; however, they may be due to equilibration with silicate minerals which range from 14.9 to 17.9[per thousand]. Overall, the combined oxygen and carbon isotopic data indicate that most isotopic changes can be explained by closed-system equilibration. Only a limited amount of interaction with externally-derived fluids during metamorphism is evident in the isotopic data. The interaction may have been confined to vicinities of faults and fractures which are common in Wildrose Canyon.

  17. The drought of 1998-2002 in North Carolina - precipitation and hydrologic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, J. Curtis

    2005-01-01

    Drought conditions prevailed across much of North Carolina during 1998-2002, resulting in widespread record-low streamflow and ground-water levels in many areas. During this 4-year period, the drought was continuous in areas of western North Carolina, although eastern areas of the State had some periods of relief from tropical storms in 1998 and 1999. The occurrence of dry winters in 2001 and 2002 along with a dry spring in 2002, exacerbated drought conditions across the State and resulted in substantial declines in streamflow and ground-water levels during the summer of 2002. The drought caused widespread hardship and economic losses across North Carolina. During the latter months of 2002, more than 200 municipalities that included most major cities operated under some form of voluntary, mandatory, or emergency water conservation. Reservoirs across North Carolina were at record or near record-low levels, including some of the largest ones used for multiple purposes (flood control, low-flow augmentation, and(or) recreation), and required continuous and careful operation to balance the upstream and downstream needs of users. Precipitation deficits during the 1998-2002 drought for some locations in North Carolina were among the largest documented since the beginning of systematic collection of weather data. The largest deficits occurred primarily in the western Piedmont and were as much as 60 to 70 inches in some locations during the 4-year period. Cumulative monthly precipitation departures for the period May 1998 through September 2002 at 13 selected precipitation sites across the State ranged from 5.3 inches below normal in Greenville (eastern North Carolina) to 66.7 inches below normal in Hickory (western North Carolina). During the 12-month period October 2002 through September 2003, precipitation departures at 7 of the 13 sites were more than 20 inches above normal, primarily in the western Piedmont. Precipitation data for the period of record were examined for

  18. Hydrologic conditions in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2010-01-01

    Much of the surface water that flows into the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge (FPNWR) probably exits southward through Fakahatchee Strand as it did prior to development, because culverts and bridges constructed along I-75 allow overland flow to continue southward within the strand. During the dry season and periods of low water levels, however, much of the flow is diverted westward by the I-75 Canal into Merritt Canal at the southwestern corner of the FPNWR. Substantial drainage of groundwater from the FPNWR into the I-75 Canal is indicated by (1) greater surface-water outflows than inflows in the FPNWR, (2) flows that increase to the west along the I-75 Canal, and (3) correlation of rapid groundwater-level declines at sites close to the I-75 Canal with rapid declines in canal surface-water levels due to operation of a control structure in the Merritt Canal. This drainage of groundwater probably occurs through permeable limestone exposed in the I-75 Canal bank below a cap rock layer. Compared to predevelopment conditions, the time currently required to drain ponded water in some areas of the refuge should be less because of accelerated groundwater discharge into the I-75 Canal caused by the lowering of water levels in the canal during the peak of the wet season extending into the early dry season. This drainage probably reduces the duration of the hydroperiod in these wetlands from the wet season into the dry season, possibly reducing or limiting the extent or vitality of wildlife and plant community habitats.

  19. Hydrologic Information Science (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System is intended to advance hydrologic science through better capacity to access and organize hydrologic information, as described by Tarboton et al. (2009), in this session. This development may help to create a new branch of hydrologic science, namely hydrologic information science, which is that branch of hydrologic science which deals with the organization, analysis and synthesis of hydrologic information. There are several parts of this body of information: time series data on water observations at point locations that describe the flow, level, and quality of water; GIS data that describe the watersheds, aquifers, streams, waterbodies, wells and other water features of the landscape; remote sensing data that measure distributed properties such as rainfall intensity and land surface temperature; climate grids that describe current and predict climate conditions, and information from hydrologic simulation models. Taken together, these various forms of information can be considered as a description of a set of hydrologic fields that are groups of variables distributed over a domain of time and space. The fundamental principles of hydrologic information science need to be formulated around the representation of hydrologic fields, and the interaction of one form of field with another. In particular, what is needed are insights as to how to define transformations of hydrologic fields which link information at different spatial scales, and which support interpolation of information simultaneously in space and time.

  20. Modelling hydrological extremes under non-stationary conditions using climate covariates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliades, Lampros; Galiatsatou, Panagiota; Loukas, Athanasios

    2013-04-01

    Extreme value theory is a probabilistic theory that can interpret the future probabilities of occurrence of extreme events (e.g. extreme precipitation and streamflow) using past observed records. Traditionally, extreme value theory requires the assumption of temporal stationarity. This assumption implies that the historical patterns of recurrence of extreme events are static over time. However, the hydroclimatic system is nonstationary on time scales that are relevant to extreme value analysis, due to human-mediated and natural environmental change. In this study the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution is used to assess nonstationarity in annual maximum daily rainfall and streamflow timeseries at selected meteorological and hydrometric stations in Greece and Cyprus. The GEV distribution parameters (location, scale, and shape) are specified as functions of time-varying covariates and estimated using the conditional density network (CDN) as proposed by Cannon (2010). The CDN is a probabilistic extension of the multilayer perceptron neural network. Model parameters are estimated via the generalized maximum likelihood (GML) approach using the quasi-Newton BFGS optimization algorithm, and the appropriate GEV-CDN model architecture for the selected meteorological and hydrometric stations is selected by fitting increasingly complicated models and choosing the one that minimizes the Akaike information criterion with small sample size correction. For all case studies in Greece and Cyprus different formulations are tested with combinational cases of stationary and nonstationary parameters of the GEV distribution, linear and non-linear architecture of the CDN and combinations of the input climatic covariates. Climatic indices such as the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), which describes atmospheric circulation in the eastern tropical pacific related to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) index that varies on an interdecadal

  1. Meteor Crater: An Analog for Using Landforms to Reconstruct Past Hydrologic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, M. C.; Dietrich, W. E.; Howard, A. D.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Kring, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    fluvial activity. Our analysis suggests that depositional landforms may record only a small fraction of the total runoff, which has implications for analyses on Mars. Current work is focused on using a hydrodynamic model to predict the conditions (frequency-intensity-duration) that can produce runoff capable of transporting sediment and initiating debris flow failures at Meteor Crater.

  2. Hydrological responses to climate change conditioned by historic alterations of land-use and water-use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsjö, J.; Asokan, S. M.; Prieto, C.; Bring, A.; Destouni, G.

    2011-08-01

    This paper quantifies and conditions expected hydrological responses in the Aral Sea Drainage Basin (ASDB; occupying 1.3 % of the earth's land surface), Central Asia, to multi-model projections of climate change in the region from 20 general circulation models (GCMs). The aim is to investigate how uncertainties of future climate change interact with the effects of historic human re-distributions of water for land irrigation to influence future water fluxes and water resources. So far, historic irrigation changes have greatly amplified water losses by evapotranspiration (ET) in the ASDB, whereas the 20th century climate change has not much affected the regional net water loss to the atmosphere. Projected future climate change (for the period 2010-2039) however is here calculated to considerably increase the net water loss to the atmosphere. Furthermore, the ET response strength to any future temperature change will be further increased by maintained (or increased) irrigation practices. With such irrigation practices, the river runoff is likely to decrease to near-total depletion, with risk for cascading ecological regime shifts in aquatic ecosystems downstream of irrigated land areas. Without irrigation, the agricultural areas of the principal Syr Darya river basin could sustain a 50 % higher temperature increase (of 2.3 °C instead of the projected 1.5 °C until 2010-2039) before yielding the same consumptive ET increase and associated R decrease as with the present irrigation practices.

  3. Actual conditions of work, fatigue and sleep in non-employed, home-based female information technology workers with preschool children.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Shun

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a study on time budget and fatigue feelings over a two-month period of 12 non-employed, home-based female workers using computers (mean age 35.2 yr). All of them had at least one preschool child. The actual amount of work done by these women and the related effects on the fatigue feelings and sleep were investigated. The results showed that the work done was characterized by involving many night hours, irrespective of the day of the week. The degree of subjective fatigue was not dependent on the number of hours worked, but affected by the time at which the work of the day was completed. This tendency was notable after one o'clock in the morning when the work was completed. Those who followed such a work pattern took daytime naps, although a quality of the subsequent nighttime sleep taken might be poor. They took a nap around 14:00 but not around 19:00. The sleep strategies were thus shown to be affected by home-based work. A need is suggested to support these workers in adjusting work time distribution and taking sleep patterns adapted to individual conditions. PMID:15732317

  4. Discrimination of rapeseed and weeds under actual field conditions based on principal component analysis and artificial neural network by VIS/NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min; Bao, Yidan; He, Yong

    2007-11-01

    The study documented successful discrimination between five weed species and rapeseed plants under actual field conditions using visible and near infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy. A hybrid recognition model, BP artificial neural networks (BP-ANN) combined with principal component analysis (PCA), had been established for discrimination of weeds in rapeseed field. Spectra tests were performed on the rapeseed and five-weed species canopy of 180 samples in the field using a spectrophotometer (325-1075 nm). 6 optimal PCs were selected as the input of BP neural networks to build the prediction model. Rapeseed samples were marked as 1, while the five weed species marked as 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, which were used as output set of BP-ANN. 120 samples were randomly selected as the training set, and the remainder as prediction set. It showed excellent predictions with the correlation value of 0.9745, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was under 5% thus 100% of prediction accuracy was achieved. The results are promising for further work in real-time identification of weed patches in rapeseed fields for precision weed management.

  5. Actual Condition of Paddy Field Levee Maintenance by Various Farm Households including Large-scale Farming in the Developed Land Renting Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Yasuyo

    The survey of interview, resource acquisition, photographic operation, and questionnaire were carried out in the “n” Community in the “y” District in Hakusan City in Ishikawa Prefecture to investigate the actual condition of paddy field levee maintenance in the area where land-renting market was proceeding, large-scale farming was dominant, and the problems of geographically scattered farm-land existed. In the study zone, 1) an agricultural production legal person rent-cultivated some of the paddy fields and maintained the levees, 2) another agricultural production legal person rent-cultivated some of the soy bean fields for crop changeover and land owners maintained the levees. The results indicated that sufficient maintenance was executed on the levees of the paddy fields cultivated by the agricultural production legal person, the soy bean fields for crop changeover, and the paddy fields cultivated by the land owners. Each reason is considered to be the managerial strategy, the economic incentive, the mutual monitoring and cross-regulatory mechanism, etc.

  6. Permafrost hydrology in changing climatic conditions: seasonal variability of stable isotope composition in rivers in discontinuous permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streletskiy, Dmitry A.; Tananaev, Nikita I.; Opel, Thomas; Shiklomanov, Nikolay I.; Nyland, Kelsey E.; Streletskaya, Irina D.; Tokarev, Igor'; Shiklomanov, Alexandr I.

    2015-09-01

    Role of changing climatic conditions on permafrost degradation and hydrology was investigated in the transition zone between the tundra and forest ecotones at the boundary of continuous and discontinuous permafrost of the lower Yenisei River. Three watersheds of various sizes were chosen to represent the characteristics of the regional landscape conditions. Samples of river flow, precipitation, snow cover, and permafrost ground ice were collected over the watersheds to determine isotopic composition of potential sources of water in a river flow over a two year period. Increases in air temperature over the last forty years have resulted in permafrost degradation and a decrease in the seasonal frost which is evident from soil temperature measurements, permafrost and active-layer monitoring, and analysis of satellite imagery. The lowering of the permafrost table has led to an increased storage capacity of permafrost affected soils and a higher contribution of ground water to river discharge during winter months. A progressive decrease in the thickness of the layer of seasonal freezing allows more water storage and pathways for water during the winter low period making winter discharge dependent on the timing and amount of late summer precipitation. There is a substantial seasonal variability of stable isotopic composition of river flow. Spring flooding corresponds to the isotopic composition of snow cover prior to the snowmelt. Isotopic composition of river flow during the summer period follows the variability of precipitation in smaller creeks, while the water flow of larger watersheds is influenced by the secondary evaporation of water temporarily stored in thermokarst lakes and bogs. Late summer precipitation determines the isotopic composition of texture ice within the active layer in tundra landscapes and the seasonal freezing layer in forested landscapes as well as the composition of the water flow during winter months.

  7. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Second quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-05-04

    The scope of the research program and the continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large scale research sufficient to describe commercial scale embankment behavior. The large scale approach was accomplished by establishing five lysimeters, each 7.3 {times} 3.0 {times} 3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process. Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. (RBOSC) through a separate cooperative agreement with the University of Wyoming (UW) to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin of Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was filled in the lysimeter cells.

  8. Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.; Reeves, T.L.; Skinner, Q.D.; Hasfurther, V.

    1992-11-01

    The scope of the original research program and of its continuation is to study interacting hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical factors affecting the behavior and disposal of combusted processed oil shale. The research combines bench-scale testing with large-scale testing sufficient to describe commercial-scale embankment behavior. The large-scale testing was accomplished by constructing five lysimeters, each 7.3{times}3.0{times}3.0 m deep, filled with processed oil shale that has been retorted and combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas (Lurgi) process (Schmalfield 1975). Approximately 400 tons of Lurgi processed oil shale waste was provided by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Co., Inc. to carry out this study. Three of the lysimeters were established at the RBOSC Tract C-a in the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. Two lysimeters were established in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL) at UW. The ESL was specifically designed and constructed so that a large range of climatic conditions could be physically applied to the processed oil shale which was placed in the lysimeter cells. This report discusses and summarizes results from scientific efforts conducted between October 1991 and September 1992 for Fiscal Year 1992.

  9. Model parameters conditioning on regional hydrologic signatures for process-based design flood estimation in ungauged basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Daniela; De Luca, Davide Luciano

    2015-04-01

    making and in hydraulic design. The obtained results highlight the relevant impact of uncertainty in regional estimates of hydrological signatures on posterior parameters distribution and on uncertainty bounds of simulated peak discharges. The results of the continuous simulation, generally, better matched those of the statistical flood frequency analysis, thus this approach is recommended for the flood frequency analysis in the study area. REFERENCES Biondi D, Claps P, Cruscomagno F, De Luca DL, Fiorentino M, Ganora D, Gioia A, Iacobellis V, Laio F, Manfreda S, Versace P (2012). Dopo il VAPI: la valutazione delle massime portate al colmo di piena nell'esperienza del POR Calabria (in Italian). Proceedings of XXXIII Italian National Conference on Hydraulics and Hydraulic Engineering, Brescia - Italy, 10-15 September 2012. Bulygina N, McIntyre N, Wheater HS (2009). Conditioning rainfall- runoff model parameters for ungauged catchments and land management impacts analysis. Hydrol Earth Syst Sci 13:893-904. doi:10.5194/hess-13-893-2009. Bulygina N, McIntyre N, Wheater H (2011). Bayesian conditioning of a rainfall-runoff model for predicting flows in ungauged catchments and under land use changes. Water Resour Res 47: W02503. doi:10.1029/2010WR009240. Gupta HV, Wagener T, Liu Y (2008). Reconciling theory with observations: elements of a diagnostic approach to model evaluation. Hydrol Process 22: 3802-3813. doi:10.1002/hyp.6989. Laio F, Ganora D, Claps P, Galeati G (2011). Spatially smooth regional estimation of the flood frequency curve (with uncertainty). J Hydrol 408: 67-77.

  10. Preferential degradation of polyphenols from Sphagnum - 4-Isopropenylphenol as a proxy for past hydrological conditions in Sphagnum-dominated peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellekens, Judith; Bindler, Richard; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; McClymont, Erin L.; Abbott, Geoffrey D.; Biester, Harald; Pontevedra-Pombal, Xabier; Buurman, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The net accumulation of remains of Sphagnum spp. is fundamental to the development of many peatlands. The effect of polyphenols from Sphagnum on decomposition processes is frequently cited but has barely been studied. The central area of the Rödmossamyran peatland (Sweden) is an open lawn that consists mostly of Sphagnum spp. with a very low contribution from vascular plants. In order to determine the effects of decay on sphagnum phenols, 53 samples of a 2.7 m deep core from this lawn were analysed with pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (pyrolysis-GC-MS) and compared with more traditional decomposition proxies such as C/N ratio, UV light transmission of alkaline peat extracts, and bulk density. Factor analysis of 72 quantified pyrolysis products suggested that the variation in 4-isopropenylphenol was largely determined by aerobic decomposition instead of Sphagnum abundance. In order to evaluate the effects of aerobic decay in Sphagnum peat, down-core records from different climatic regions were compared using molecular markers for plant biopolymers and C/N ratio. These included markers for lignin from vascular plants ((di)methoxyphenols), polyphenols from Sphagnum spp. (4-isopropenylphenol), and cellulose (levoglucosan). Our results indicate that polyphenols from Sphagnum are preferentially degraded over polysaccharides; consequently the variability of the marker for sphagnum acid, 4-isopropenylphenol, was found indicative of decomposition instead of reflecting the abundance of Sphagnum remains. The fact that 4-isopropenylphenol is aerobically degraded in combination with its specificity for Sphagnum spp. makes it a consistent indicator of past hydrological conditions in Sphagnum-dominated peat. In contrast, the variability of C/N records in Sphagnum-dominated peat was influenced by both vegetation shifts and decomposition, and the dominant effect differed between the studied peatlands. Our results provide direction for modelling studies that try to

  11. Hydrological responses to climate change conditioned by historic alterations of land-use and water-use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsjö, J.; Asokan, S. M.; Prieto, C.; Bring, A.; Destouni, G.

    2012-05-01

    This paper quantifies and conditions expected hydrological responses in the Aral Sea Drainage Basin (ASDB; occupying 1.3% of the earth's land surface), Central Asia, to multi-model projections of climate change in the region from 20 general circulation models (GCMs). The aim is to investigate how uncertainties of future climate change interact with the effects of historic human re-distributions of water for land irrigation to influence future water fluxes and water resources. So far, historic irrigation changes have greatly amplified water losses by evapotranspiration (ET) in the ASDB, whereas 20th century climate change has not much affected the regional net water loss to the atmosphere. Results show that errors in temperature (T) and precipitation (P) from single GCMs have large influence on projected change trends (for the period 2010-2039) of river runoff (R), even though the ASDB is spatially well resolved by current GCMs. By contrast, observed biases in GCM ensemble mean results have relatively small influence on projected R change trends. Ensemble mean results show that projected future climate change will considerably increase the net water loss to the atmosphere. Furthermore, the ET response strength to any future T change will be further increased by maintained (or increased) irrigation practices, which shows how climate change and water use change can interact in modifying ET (and R). With maintained irrigation practices, R is likely to decrease to near-total depletion, with risk for cascading ecological regime shifts in aquatic ecosystems downstream of irrigated land areas. Without irrigation, the agricultural areas of the principal Syr Darya river basin could sustain a 50% higher T increase (of 2.3 °C instead of the projected 1.5 °C until 2010-2039) before yielding the same consumptive ET increase and associated R decrease as with the present irrigation practices.

  12. Water allocation assessment in low flow river under data scarce conditions: a study of hydrological simulation in Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Bangash, Rubab F; Passuello, Ana; Hammond, Michael; Schuhmacher, Marta

    2012-12-01

    River Francolí is a small river in Catalonia (northeastern Spain) with an average annual low flow (~2 m(3)/s). The purpose of the River Francolí watershed assessments is to support and inform region-wide planning efforts from the perspective of water protection, climate change and water allocation. In this study, a hydrological model of the Francolí River watershed was developed for use as a tool for watershed planning, water resource assessment, and ultimately, water allocation purposes using hydrological data from 2002 to 2006 inclusive. The modeling package selected for this application is DHI's MIKE BASIN. This model is a strategic scale water resource management simulation model, which includes modeling of both land surface and subsurface hydrological processes. Topographic, land use, hydrological, rainfall, and meteorological data were used to develop the model segmentation and input. Due to the unavailability of required catchment runoff data, the NAM rainfall-runoff model was used to calculate runoff of all the sub-watersheds. The results reveal a potential pressure on the availability of groundwater and surface water in the lower part of River Francolí as was expected by the IPCC for Mediterranean river basins. The study also revealed that due to the complex hydrological regime existing in the study area and data scarcity, a comprehensive physically based method was required to better represent the interaction between groundwater and surface water. The combined ArcGIS/MIKE BASIN models appear as a useful tool to assess the hydrological cycle and to better understand water allocation to different sectors in the Francolí River watershed.

  13. Hydrologic Conditions that Influence Streamflow Losses in a Karst Region of the Upper Peace River, Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, P.A.; Lewelling, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    The upper Peace River from Bartow to Fort Meade, Florida, is described as a groundwater recharge area, reflecting a reversal from historical groundwater discharge patterns that existed prior to the 1950s. The upper Peace River channel and floodplain are characterized by extensive karst development, with numerous fractures, crevasses, and sinks that have been eroded in the near-surface and underlying carbonate bedrock. With the reversal in groundwater head gradients, river water is lost to the underlying groundwater system through these karst features. An investigation was conducted to evaluate the hydrologic conditions that influence streamflow losses in the karst region of the upper Peace River. The upper Peace River is located in a basin that has been altered substantially by phosphate mining and increases in groundwater use. These alterations have changed groundwater flow patterns and caused streamflow declines through time. Hydrologic factors that have had the greatest influence on streamflow declines in the upper Peace River include the lowering of the potentiometric surfaces of the intermediate aquifer system and Upper Floridan aquifer beneath the riverbed elevation due to below-average rainfall (droughts), increases in groundwater use, and the presence of numerous karst features in the low-water channel and floodplain that enhance the loss of streamflow. Seepage runs conducted along the upper Peace River, from Bartow to Fort Meade, indicate that the greatest streamflow losses occurred along an approximate 2-mile section of the river beginning about 1 mile south of the Peace River at Bartow gaging station. Along the low-water and floodplain channel of this 2-mile section, there are about 10 prominent karst features that influence streamflow losses. Losses from the individual karst features ranged from 0.22 to 16 cubic feet per second based on measurements made between 2002 and 2007. The largest measured flow loss for all the karst features was about 50 cubic

  14. Antecedent conditions, hydrological connectivity and anthropogenic inputs: Factors affecting nitrate and phosphorus transfers to agricultural headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Outram, Faye N; Cooper, Richard J; Sünnenberg, Gisela; Hiscock, Kevin M; Lovett, Andrew A

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines relationships between rainfall-runoff, catchment connectivity, antecedent moisture conditions and fertiliser application with nitrate-N and total phosphorus (TP) fluxes in an arable headwater catchment over three hydrological years (2012-2014). Annual precipitation totals did not vary substantially between years, yet the timing of rainfall strongly influenced runoff generation and subsequent nitrate-N and TP fluxes. The greatest nitrate-N (>250 kg N day(-1)) and TP (>10 kg TP day(-1)) fluxes only occurred when shallow groundwater was within 0.6m of the ground surface and runoff coefficients were greater than 0.1. These thresholds were reached less frequently in 2012 due to drought recovery resulting in lower annual nitrate-N (7.4 kg N ha(-1)) and TP (0.12 kg P ha(-1)) fluxes in comparison with 2013 (15.1 kg N ha(-1); 0.21 kg P ha(-1)). The wet winter of 2013 with elevated shallow groundwater levels led to more frequent activation of sub-surface pathways and tile drain flow. Throughout the period, dry antecedent conditions had a temporary effect in elevating TP loads. Evidence of TP source exhaustion after consecutive storm events can be attributed to the repeated depletion of temporarily connected critical source areas to the river network via impermeable road surfaces. Fertiliser application varied considerably across three years due to differences in crop rotation between farms, with annual N and P fertiliser inputs varying by up to 21% and 41%, respectively. Proportional reductions in annual riverine nitrate-N and TP loadings were not observed at the sub-catchment outlet as loadings were largely influenced by annual runoff. Nitrate loadings were slightly higher during fertiliser application, but there was little relationship between P fertiliser application and riverine TP load. These data indicate that this intensive arable catchment may be in a state of biogeochemical stationarity, whereby legacy stores of nutrients buffer against changes

  15. Porosity Development in a Coastal Setting: A Reactive Transport Model to Assess the Influence of Heterogeneity of Hydrological, Geochemical and Lithological Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqueda, A.; Renard, P.; Cornaton, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal karst networks are formed by mineral dissolution, mainly calcite, in the freshwater-saltwater mixing zone. The problem has been approached first by studying the kinetics of calcite dissolution and then coupling ion-pairing software with flow and mass transport models. Porosity development models require high computational power. A workaround to reduce computational complexity is to assume the calcite dissolution reaction is relatively fast, thus equilibrium chemistry can be used to model it (Sanford & Konikow, 1989). Later developments allowed the full coupling of kinetics and transport in a model. However kinetics effects of calcite dissolution were found negligible under the single set of assumed hydrological and geochemical boundary conditions. A model is implemented with the coupling of FeFlow software as the flow & transport module and PHREEQC4FEFLOW (Wissmeier, 2013) ion-pairing module. The model is used to assess the influence of heterogeneities in hydrological, geochemical and lithological boundary conditions on porosity evolution. The hydrologic conditions present in the karst aquifer of Quintana Roo coast in Mexico are used as a guide for generating inputs for simulations.

  16. Sediment distribution and hydrologic conditions of the Potomac aquifer in Virginia and parts of Maryland and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarland, E. Randolph

    2013-01-01

    hydrologic function have not been well understood. Water-supply planning and development efforts have been hampered, and interpretations of regulatory criteria for allowable water-level declines have been ambiguous. An investigation undertaken during 2010–11 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, provides a comprehensive regional description of the spatial distribution of Potomac aquifer sediments and their relation to hydrologic conditions. Altitudes and thicknesses of 2,725 vertical sediment intervals represent the spatial distribution of Potomac aquifer sediments in the Virginia Coastal Plain and adjacent parts of Maryland and North Carolina. Sediment intervals are designated as either dominantly coarse or fine grained and were determined by interpretation of geophysical logs and ancillary information from 456 boreholes. Sediment-interval and borehole summary statistical data indicate regional trends in sediment lithology and stratigraphic continuity, upon which three structurally based and hydrologically distinct sediment depositional subareas are designated. Broad patterns of sediment deposition over time are inferred from published sediment pollen-age data. Discrepancies in previously drawn hydrostratigraphic relations between southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina are partly resolved based on borehole geophysical logs and a recently documented geologic map and corehole. A conceptual model theorizes the depositional history of the sediments and geologically accounts for their distribution. Documented pumping tests of the Potomac aquifer at 197 locations produced 336 values of transmissivity and 127 values of storativity. Based on effective aquifer thicknesses, 296 values of sediment hydraulic conductivity and 113 values of sediment specific storage are calculated. Vertical hydraulic gradients are calculated from 9,479 pairs of water levels measured between November 17, 1953, and October 4

  17. Phosphorus mass balance and internal load in an impacted subtropical isolated wetland subject to transient hydrologic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, J. H.; Jawitz, J. W.; Min, J.

    2009-12-01

    Internal loading is a critical component of the phosphorus (P) budget of aquatic systems, and can control the trophic conditions. While diffusion is generally considered the dominant process controlling internal P load to the water column, advection due to water table fluctuations resulting from episodic flooding and drying cycles can be a significant component of the P budget of depressional wetlands. Within the drainage basin of Lake Okeechobee, Florida, P is exported annually to the lake from impacted isolated wetlands located on beef farming facilities via ditches and canals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusive and advective fluxes in relation to the total P loads entering and exiting one of these isolated wetlands. Diffusive fluxes were calculated from depth-variable pore water concentrations measured using multilevel samplers and pore water equilibrators. Advective fluxes were estimated based on groundwater fluctuations calculated within a hydrologic-budget framework. Results from an eleven-month monitoring period (May 2005-March 2006) indicated that the diffusive flux of soluble reactive P (SRP) was 0.42 ± 0.24 mg m-2 d-1 and occurred for 230 days out of 335. In comparison, the advective flux occurred over a shorter duration of just 21 days, yet generated a greater flux controlled by the concentrations of shallow pore water and the velocity of the ground water moving upwards into the wetland water column. The highest advective flux of SRP was estimated at 27.4 mg m-2 d-1. Based on these fluxes the corresponding P load to the wetland via internal modes was estimated at 5.2 kg and 0.93 kg from diffusion and advection respectively, representing a significant fraction of the total P load entering the wetland water column. Plant colonization during dry periods in P enriched soils is also a significant mechanism for P release from the soil at the time of flooding, however, this component to the wetland P budget was not evaluated as

  18. Hydrologic conditions in the coal mining district of Indiana and implications for reclamation of abandoned mine lands

    SciTech Connect

    Olyphant, G.A.; Harper, D.

    1998-12-31

    Bedrock strata of the mining district of Indiana (Indiana Coal Mining District, ICMD) include numerous coalbeds of economic importance, together with underclays, roof shales, limestones, and sandstones of Pennsylvanian age. These are typically poor aquifers with low hydraulic conductivities and specific yields. Surficial materials include loess, till, alluvium, and other deposits of pleistocene age. The loess and till also have low hydraulic conductivities, so that very few shallow aquifers exist in the vicinities of abandoned mine land (AML) sites, except where they are close to the alluvial fill of large bedrock valleys. The hydrologic cascade at AML sites in Indiana is strongly conditioned by the existence of elevated deposits of coarse-grained coal-preparation refuse and flooded underground mine workings. Flooded mines are the principal conduits of groundwater flow in the area, but their boundaries, flowpaths, and mechanisms of recharge and discharge are very different from those of natural aquifers and are poorly understood. Acidic mine drainage often emerges as seepages and springs on the edges of the elevated refuse deposits, but the low permeability of the natural surficial materials and bedrock inhibits the development of off-site groundwater contaminant plumes. The water balance across the surface of the refuse deposits is critical to reclamation planning and success. Enhancing runoff through reduction of infiltration capacity has the beneficial effect of reducing recharge through the acid-generating refuse, but the excess runoff may be accompanied by soil erosion that can lead to reclamation failure. Furthermore, during cool seasons and stormy periods, a well vegetated surface promotes recharge through increased infiltration, resulting in greater rates of acidic baseflow seepage. Passive Anoxic Limestone Drains (PALDs) have been successfully coupled with wetland treatment systems to improve surface waters that discharge from AML sites. Storm runoff from

  19. Hydrologic and water-quality conditions in the Horse Creek Basin, west-central Florida, October 1992-February 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewelling, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    A baseline study of the 241-square-mile Horse Creek basin was undertaken from October 1992 to February 1995 to assess the hydrologic and water-quality conditions of one of the last remaining undeveloped basins in west-central Florida. During the period of the study, much of the basin remained in a natural state, except for limited areas of cattle and citrus production and phosphate mining. Rainfall in 1993 and 1994 in the Horse Creek basin was 8 and 31 percent, respectively, above the 30-year long-term average. The lowest and highest maximum instantaneous peak discharge of the six daily discharge stations occurred at the Buzzard Roost Branch and the Horse Creek near Arcadia stations with 185 to 4,180 cubic feet per second, respectively. The Horse Creek near Arcadia station had the lowest number of no-flow days with zero days and the Brushy Creek station had the highest number with 113 days. During the study, the West Fork Horse Creek subbasin had the highest daily mean discharge per square mile with 30.6 cubic feet per second per square mile, and the largest runoff coefficient of 43.7 percent. The Buzzard Roost Branch subbasin had the lowest daily mean discharge per square mile with 5.05 cubic feet per second per square mile, and Brushy Creek and Brandy Branch shared the lowest runoff coefficient of 0.6 percent. Brandy Branch had the highest monthly mean runoff in both 1993 and 1994 with 11.48 and 19.28 inches, respectively. During the high-baseflow seepage run, seepage gains were 8.87 cubic feet per second along the 43-mile Horse Creek channel. However, during the low-baseflow seepage run, seepage losses were 0.88 cubic foot per second. Three methods were used to estimate average annual ground-water recharge in the Horse Creek basin: (1) well hydrograph, (2) chloride mass balance, and (3) streamflow hydrograph. Estimated average annual recharge using these three methods ranged from 3.6 to 8.7 inches. The high percentage of carbonate plus bicarbonate analyzed at

  20. Conceptual Model of Hydrologic and Thermal Conditions of the Eastbank Aquifer System near Rocky Reach Dam, Douglas County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Heeswijk, Marijke; Cox, Stephen E.; Huffman, Raegan L.; Curran, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    2006 and seasonal pumpage patterns were relatively stable, reported trends of increasing temperatures of water pumped by the hatchery well field are most likely explained by increasing trends in river temperatures. Most of the water pumped by the hatchery well field recharges in an area west to southwest of the well field about 2 months prior to the time it is pumped from the aquifer. The northern extent of the hatchery well field may pump some colder water from a bedrock depression to the north and west of the well field. The conceptual model of hydrologic and thermal conditions is supported by analyses of historical water temperatures, water-level data collected on July 18, 2007, and dissolved-constituent and bacterial concentrations in samples collected on August 20?22, 2007.

  1. Oregon Hydrologic Landscapes: An Approach for Broadscale Hydrologic Classification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gaged streams represent only a small percentage of watershed hydrologic conditions throughout the Unites States and globe, but there is a growing need for hydrologic classification systems that can serve as the foundation for broad-scale assessments of the hydrologic functions of...

  2. Hydrologic conditions, groundwater quality, and analysis of sink hole formation in the Albany area of Dougherty County, Georgia, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Debbie W.; Painter, Jaime A.; McCranie, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Albany Water, Gas, and Light Commission has conducted water resources investigations and monitored groundwater conditions and availability in the Albany, Georgia, area since 1977. This report presents an overview of hydrologic conditions, water quality, and groundwater studies in the Albany area of Dougherty County, Georgia, during 2009. Historical data also are presented for comparison with 2009 data. During 2009, groundwater-level data were collected in 29 wells in the Albany area to monitor water-level trends in the surficial, Upper Floridan, Claiborne, Clayton, and Providence aquifers. Groundwater-level data from 21 of the 29 wells indicated an increasing trend during 2008–09. Five wells show no trend due to lack of data and three wells have decreasing trends. Period-of-record water levels (period of record ranged between 1957–2009 and 2003–2009) declined slightly in 10 wells and increased slightly in 4 wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer; declined in 1 well and increased in 2 wells tapping the Claiborne aquifer; declined in 4 wells and increased in 2 wells tapping the Clayton aquifer; and increased in 1 well tapping the Providence aquifer. Analyses of groundwater samples collected during 2009 from 12 wells in the Upper Floridan aquifer in the vicinity of a well field located southwest of Albany indicate that overall concentrations of nitrate plus nitrite as nitrogen increased slightly from 2008 in 8 wells. A maximum concentration of 12.9 milligrams per liter was found in a groundwater sample from a well located upgradient from the well field. The distinct difference in chemical constituents of water samples collected from the Flint River and samples collected from wells located in the well-field area southwest of Albany indicates that little water exchange occurs between the Upper Floridan aquifer and Flint River where the river flows adjacent to, but downgradient of, the well field. Water

  3. Forecast of thermal-hydrological conditions and air injection test results of the single heater test at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Tsang, Y.W.

    1996-12-01

    The heater in the Single Heater Test (SHT) in alcove 5 of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) was turned on August 26, 1996. A large number of sensors are installed in the various instrumented boreholes to monitor the coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical responses of the rock mass to the heat generated in the single heater. In this report the authors present the results of the modeling of both the heating and cooling phases of the Single Heater Test (SHT), with focus on the thermal-hydrological aspect of the coupled processes. Also in this report, the authors present simulations of air injection tests will be performed at different stages of the heating and cooling phase of the SHT.

  4. Hydrogeology and hydrologic conditions of the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer System from Long Island, New York, to North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Pope, Jason P.; Monti, Jack; Nardi, Mark R.; Finkelstein, Jason S.; McCoy, Kurt J.

    2013-11-14

    Updates to the regional hydrologic budget include revised estimates of aquifer recharge, water use and streamflow data. Inflow to the aquifer system of about 20,000 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) includes 19,600 Mgal/d from recharge from precipitation, 200 Mgal/d of recharge from wastewater via onsite domestic septic systems, and 200 Mgal/d from the release of water from aquifer storage. Outflow from the aquifer system includes groundwater discharge to streams (11,900 Mgal/d), groundwater withdrawals (1,500 Mgal/d), and groundwater discharge to coastal waters (6,600 Mgal/d). A numerical modeling analysis is required to improve this hydrologic budget calculation and to forecast future changes in water levels and aquifer storage caused by groundwater withdrawals, land-use changes, and the effects of climate variability and change.

  5. Restoring the hydrologic response to pre-developed conditions in an urbanized headwater catchment: Reality or utopia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, O.; Istanbulluoglu, E.

    2012-12-01

    The conversion of forested areas to impervious surfaces, lawns and pastures alters the natural hydrology of an area by increasing the flashiness of stormwater generated runoff, resulting in increased streamflow peaks and volumes. Currently, most of the stormwater from developed areas in the Puget Sound region remains uncontrolled. The lack of adequate stormwater facilities along with increasing urbanization and population growth illustrates the importance of understanding urban watershed behavior and best management practices (BMPs) that improve changes in hydrology. In this study, we developed a lumped urban ecohydrology model that represents vegetation dynamics, connects pervious and impervious surfaces and implements various BMP scenarios. The model is implemented in an urban headwater subcatchment located in the Newaukum Creek Basin. We evaluate the hydrologic impact of controlling runoff at the source and disconnecting impervious surfaces from the storm drain using rain barrels and bioretention cells. BMP scenarios consider the basin's land use/land coverage, the response of different impervious surface types, the potential for BMP placement, the size and drainage area for BMPs, and the mitigation needs to meet in-stream flow goals.

  6. The concept of hydrologic landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrologic landscapes are multiples or variations of fundamental hydrologic landscape units. A fundamental hydrologic landscape unit is defined on the basis of land-surface form, geology, and climate. The basic land-surface form of a fundamental hydrologic landscape unit is an upland separated from a lowland by an intervening steeper slope. Fundamental hydrologic landscape units have a complete hydrologic system consisting of surface runoff, ground-water flow, and interaction with atmospheric water. By describing actual landscapes in terms of land-surface slope, hydraulic properties of soils and geologic framework, and the difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration, the hydrologic system of actual landscapes can be conceptualized in a uniform way. This conceptual framework can then be the foundation for design of studies and data networks, syntheses of information on local to national scales, and comparison of process research across small study units in a variety of settings. The Crow Wing River watershed in central Minnesota is used as an example of evaluating stream discharge in the context of hydrologic landscapes. Lake-research watersheds in Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Nebraska are used as an example of using the hydrologic-landscapes concept to evaluate the effect of ground water on the degree of mineralization and major-ion chemistry of lakes that lie within ground-water flow systems.

  7. Restoration Hydrology: Synthesis of Hydrologic Data for Historical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. R.; Agarwal, D.; van Ingen, C.

    2009-12-01

    The inclusion of hydrologic data from various sources into a common cyber-infrastructure is essential for hydrologic synthesis in support of aquatic habitat restoration. With a compilation of all USGS watershed stream gauging records and all NOAA precipitation records for California, long-term as well as short-term watershed data can be made available for habitat restoration plans. This data synthesis would be tedious based on prior technology and thus was not frequently undertaken in the past. A few examples illustrate the essential role of cyber-infrastructure in restoration hydrology. When annual precipitation and runoff are examined for Coastal California watersheds, there is a near constancy in actual annual evapotranspiration that is watershed scale invariant over drainage areas from 1 to 3000 square kilometers. Another example examines stream baseflow recession in multiple streams where agricultural practices have changed over the last 40 years. These analyses are quantifying the magnitude of the human-induced change. Maintaining stream baseflows in summer months in central California coastal streams is essential for migratory fish habitat restoration, and the availability of an appropriate cyber-infrastructure significantly eases that assessment. The final example where data management was essential in habitat assessment was an examination of early spring river flows that had daily fluctuations caused by agricultural needs for frost protection in grape vineyards. Farmers anticipated frost conditions by night-time water extractions which in combination with low river flows negatively impacted the stream habitat for salmonids. These applications of cyber-infrastructure are being handed off to resource agency personnel to have them directly engage in restoration hydrology.

  8. Meteorological and hydrological conditions driving the formation and disappearance of black blooms, an ecological disaster phenomena of eutrophication and algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Shi, Kun; Liu, Junjie; Deng, Jianming; Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Guangwei; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2016-11-01

    Potentially toxic black blooms can disrupt drinking water treatment plants and have fatal effects on aquatic ecosystems; therefore, lake management is required to determine whether conditions are favorable for the formation and disappearance of black blooms in water supply sources. Long-term climate background, short-term thresholds of meteorological and hydrological conditions, and the duration of harmful algal blooms (HABs) were investigated as factors affecting the formation and disappearance of black blooms in hyper-eutrophic Lake Taihu. Long-term climate warming (0.31°C/decade), decreases in wind speed (0.26m/s per decade) and air pressure (0.16hPa/decade), and the increase in the meteorological index of black blooms (3.6days/decade) in Lake Taihu over the past 51years provided climate conditions conducive to the formation and occurrence of black blooms. A total of 16 black bloom events with an area larger than 0.1km(2) were observed from 2007 to 2014. Several critical thresholds for short-term meteorological and hydrological conditions were determined for the formation of black blooms, including a five-day average air temperature above 25°C, a five-day average wind speed <2.6m/s, average precipitation of five consecutive days close to 0, and continuous HAB accumulation for >5days. Heavy precipitation events, sudden cooling, and large wind disturbances were the driving factors of black blooms' disappearance. The use of a coupling model that combines the remote sensing of HABs with environmental, meteorological, and hydrological observations could permit an adequate and timely response to black blooms in drinking water sources.

  9. Meteorological and hydrological conditions driving the formation and disappearance of black blooms, an ecological disaster phenomena of eutrophication and algal blooms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Shi, Kun; Liu, Junjie; Deng, Jianming; Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Guangwei; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2016-11-01

    Potentially toxic black blooms can disrupt drinking water treatment plants and have fatal effects on aquatic ecosystems; therefore, lake management is required to determine whether conditions are favorable for the formation and disappearance of black blooms in water supply sources. Long-term climate background, short-term thresholds of meteorological and hydrological conditions, and the duration of harmful algal blooms (HABs) were investigated as factors affecting the formation and disappearance of black blooms in hyper-eutrophic Lake Taihu. Long-term climate warming (0.31°C/decade), decreases in wind speed (0.26m/s per decade) and air pressure (0.16hPa/decade), and the increase in the meteorological index of black blooms (3.6days/decade) in Lake Taihu over the past 51years provided climate conditions conducive to the formation and occurrence of black blooms. A total of 16 black bloom events with an area larger than 0.1km(2) were observed from 2007 to 2014. Several critical thresholds for short-term meteorological and hydrological conditions were determined for the formation of black blooms, including a five-day average air temperature above 25°C, a five-day average wind speed <2.6m/s, average precipitation of five consecutive days close to 0, and continuous HAB accumulation for >5days. Heavy precipitation events, sudden cooling, and large wind disturbances were the driving factors of black blooms' disappearance. The use of a coupling model that combines the remote sensing of HABs with environmental, meteorological, and hydrological observations could permit an adequate and timely response to black blooms in drinking water sources. PMID:27396313

  10. Actual Condition Evaluation of Cogeneration System in an Urbanized Hotel, and Study of the Optimal Operation to Minimize the CO2 Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuta, Masafumi; Kaneko, Akira; Yamamoto, Toru

    Recently, there is an important subject to reduce of the CO2 emission discharged from a building. A cogeneration system (CGS) is one of the effective facilities to reduce of the CO2 emission, but prudent consideration is required in design and operation. Because it is necessary to be matching electric demand and heat demand in order to obtain the high efficiency. In this paper, it is evaluated the power generation efficiency and heat recovery one of CGS in the actual urbanized hotel as measurement result. In addition, the optimal operation analysis is carried out in order to minimize CO2 emission in the present facility.

  11. In situ monitoring of the diurnal cycling of dynamic metal species in a stream under contrasting photobenthic biofilm activity and hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    Tercier-Waeber, Mary-Lou; Hezard, Teddy; Masson, Matthieu; Schäfer, Jörg

    2009-10-01

    The diurnal evolution of the dynamic fraction, i.e., the potentially bioavailable fraction, of Cd, Cu, and Pb in a small river impacted by mining and smelting waste was studied in situ, under contrasting biofilm activity and hydrological conditions, using an automated voltammetric analyzer. The in situ, near real-time measurements revealed persistent dynamic metal species diurnal cycles. These cycles were affected mainly by the biochemical conditions rather than hydrological conditions. The data obtained from the in situ measurements, coupled with complementary laboratory analyses, revealed that various processes control the diurnal dynamic metal species cycles in the studied site; the trends of the diurnal cycles of the dynamic metal species can be different from those observed for the dissolved metal species measured in filtered samples. Moreover, the dynamic fraction of a given cationic metal can show diurnal cycles with opposite trends depending on the environmental conditions. All these findings highlight the interest and importance of automated, continuous measurements of specific relevant environmental metal fractions, compared to punctual weekly or monthly traditional sampling strategies of total dissolved metal analysis, to allow more appropriate water quality control and reliable assessment of metal ecotoxicological impact.

  12. Influence of antecedent hydrologic conditions on patterns of hydrochemical export from a first-order agricultural watershed in Southern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrae, M. L.; English, M. C.; Schiff, S. L.; Stone, M.

    2010-07-01

    SummaryThe ability to quantify and predict discharge and nutrient export patterns from agricultural catchments is confounded by the effects of antecedent hydrologic conditions (AHC) in upland areas. This paper examines the impacts of AHC on storm hydrologic response and nutrient export for 59 events measured over a 2-year period (year-round). Event-related discharge and nutrient (nitrate, phosphate) export were highly temporally variable. Runoff ratios ranged from 0 to 0.99 over the study period, with the lowest median runoff ratios being observed during the summer and early autumn period and the highest median runoff ratios being observed in March following snowmelt. Runoff ratios were positively correlated with AHC indices such as pre-event stream discharge (1-day) and antecedent (14-day) stream discharge although strong predictive relationships could not be generated ( p > 0.01). In general, runoff ratios increased throughout successive events as AHC became wetter; however trends observed among suites of events with having similar AHC did not produce similar patterns of hydrologic or nutrient export response, which clearly demonstrates the non-linear responses to variable AHC in the watershed. Basin nitrate ( NO3-), total phosphorus (TP) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) export varied with AHC in the basin, and flow-weighted mean nutrient concentrations (FWMC) ranged considerably (mean, range: 8, 1-18 mg L -1 NO 3-N; 18, 3-161 μg L -1 SRP; 75, 15-274 μg L -1 TP). Nutrient export increased with successive events when the basin was on a wetting trend, but decreased with successive events when the basin was on an overall drying trend. These patterns were linked to peak water table position during events and timing of fertilizer application. Overall, this work demonstrates that watershed hydrologic and nutrient export responses to precipitation and AHC are complex and cannot be predicted using simple linear relationships. This study also demonstrates the need

  13. Hydrological cycle.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, H C; Mercante, M A; Santos, E T

    2011-04-01

    The Pantanal hydrological cycle holds an important meaning in the Alto Paraguay Basin, comprising two areas with considerably diverse conditions regarding natural and water resources: the Plateau and the Plains. From the perspective of the ecosystem function, the hydrological flow in the relationship between plateau and plains is important for the creation of reproductive and feeding niches for the regional biodiversity. In general, river declivity in the plateau is 0.6 m/km while declivity on the plains varies from 0.1 to 0.3 m/km. The environment in the plains is characteristically seasonal and is home to an exuberant and abundant diversity of species, including some animals threatened with extinction. When the flat surface meets the plains there is a diminished water flow on the riverbeds and, during the rainy season the rivers overflow their banks, flooding the lowlands. Average annual precipitation in the Basin is 1,396 mm, ranging from 800 mm to 1,600 mm, and the heaviest rainfall occurs in the plateau region. The low drainage capacity of the rivers and lakes that shape the Pantanal, coupled with the climate in the region, produce very high evaporation: approximately 60% of all the waters coming from the plateau are lost through evaporation. The Alto Paraguay Basin, including the Pantanal, while boasting an abundant availability of water resources, also has some spots with water scarcity in some sub-basins, at different times of the year. Climate conditions alone are not enough to explain the differences observed in the Paraguay River regime and some of its tributaries. The complexity of the hydrologic regime of the Paraguay River is due to the low declivity of the lands that comprise the Mato Grosso plains and plateau (50 to 30 cm/km from east to west and 3 to 1.5 cm/km from north to south) as well as the area's dimension, which remains periodically flooded with a large volume of water. PMID:21537597

  14. Health of native riparian vegetation and its relation to hydrologic conditions along the Mojave River, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lines, Gregory C.

    1999-01-01

    The health of native riparian vegetation and its relation to hydrologic conditions were studied along the Mojave River mainly during the growing seasons of 1997 and 1998. The study concentrated on cottonwood?willow woodlands (predominantly Populus fremontii and Salix gooddingii) and mesquite bosques (predominantly Prosopis glandulosa). Tree-growth characteristics were measured at 16 cottonwood?willow woodland sites and at 3 mesquite bosque sites. Density of live and dead trees, tree diameter and height, canopy density, live-crown volume, leaf-water potential, leaf-area index, mortality, and reproduction were measured or noted at each site. The sites included healthy and reproducing woodlands and bosques, stressed woodlands and bosques with no reproduction, and woodlands and bosques with high mortality. Tree roots were studied at seven sites to determine the vertical distribution of the root system and their relation to the water table at healthy, stressed, and high-mortality cottonwood?willow woodlands. In the six trenches that were dug for this study in May 1997, no cottonwood roots were observed that reached the water table. The root systems of healthy trees typically ended 1 to 2 feet above the water table. At sites with high mortality, the main root mass was commonly 7 to 8 feet above the water table. Water-table depth was monitored at each of the study sites. In addition, volumetric soil moisture and soil-water potential were monitored at varying depths at three cottonwood?willow woodland study sites and at two mesquite bosque sites. Ground, soil, river, lake, and plant (xylem sap) water were analyzed for concentrations of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes to determine the source of water used by the trees. On the basis of the root-distribution, soil- and leaf-water potential, and isotope data, it was concluded that cottonwood, willow, and mesquite trees mainly rely on ground water for their perennial sustained supply of water. The trees mainly utilize

  15. Microwave hydrology: A trilogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.; Johnston, E. J.; Girard, M. A.; Regusters, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Microwave hydrology, as the term in construed in this trilogy, deals with the investigation of important hydrological features on the Earth's surface as they are remotely, and passively, sensed by orbiting microwave receivers. Microwave wavelengths penetrate clouds, foliage, ground cover, and soil, in varying degrees, and reveal the occurrence of standing liquid water on and beneath the surface. The manifestation of liquid water appearing on or near the surface is reported by a microwave receiver as a signal with a low flux level, or, equivalently, a cold temperature. Actually, the surface of the liquid water reflects the low flux level from the cosmic background into the input terminals of the receiver. This trilogy describes and shows by microwave flux images: the hydrological features that sustain Lake Baykal as an extraordinary freshwater resource; manifestations of subsurface water in Iran; and the major water features of the Congo Basin, a rain forest.

  16. Hydrologic conditions in urban Miami-Dade County, Florida, and the effect of groundwater pumpage and increased sea level on canal leakage and regional groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, Joseph D.; White, Jeremy T.

    2014-01-01

    The model was designed specifically to evaluate the effect of groundwater pumpage on canal leakage at the surface-water-basin scale and thus may not be appropriate for (1) predictions that are dependent on data not included in the calibration process (for example, subdaily simulation of high-intensity events and travel times) and (or) (2) hydrologic conditions that are substantially different from those during the calibration and verification periods. The reliability of the model is limited by the conceptual model of the surface-water and groundwater system, the spatial distribution of physical properties, the scale and discretization of the system, and specified boundary conditions. Some of the model limitations are manifested in model errors. Despite these limitations, however, the model represents the complexities of the interconnected surface-water and groundwater systems that affect how the systems respond to groundwater pumpage, sea-level rise, and other hydrologic stresses. The model also quantifies the relative effects of groundwater pumpage and sea-level rise on the surface-water and groundwater systems.

  17. Acoustics Reveals the Presence of a Macrozooplankton Biocline in the Bay of Biscay in Response to Hydrological Conditions and Predator-Prey Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Lezama-Ochoa, Ainhoa; Irigoien, Xabier; Chaigneau, Alexis; Quiroz, Zaida; Lebourges-Dhaussy, Anne; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Bifrequency acoustic data, hydrological measurements and satellite data were used to study the vertical distribution of macrozooplankton in the Bay of Biscay in relation to the hydrological conditions and fish distribution during spring 2009. The most noticeable result was the observation of a ‘biocline’ during the day i.e., the interface where zooplankton biomass changes more rapidly with depth than it does in the layers above or below. The biocline separated the surface layer, almost devoid of macrozooplankton, from the macrozooplankton-rich deeper layers. It is a specific vertical feature which ties in with the classic diel vertical migration pattern. Spatiotemporal correlations between macrozooplankton and environmental variables (photic depth, thermohaline vertical structure, stratification index and chlorophyll-a) indicate that no single factor explains the macrozooplankton vertical distribution. Rather a set of factors, the respective influence of which varies from region to region depending on the habitat characteristics and the progress of the spring stratification, jointly influence the distribution. In this context, the macrozooplankton biocline is potentially a biophysical response to the search for a particular depth range where light attenuation, thermohaline vertical structure and stratification conditions together provide a suitable alternative to the need for expending energy in reaching deeper water without the risk of being eaten. PMID:24505374

  18. Acoustics reveals the presence of a macrozooplankton biocline in the Bay of Biscay in response to hydrological conditions and predator-prey relationships.

    PubMed

    Lezama-Ochoa, Ainhoa; Irigoien, Xabier; Chaigneau, Alexis; Quiroz, Zaida; Lebourges-Dhaussy, Anne; Bertrand, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Bifrequency acoustic data, hydrological measurements and satellite data were used to study the vertical distribution of macrozooplankton in the Bay of Biscay in relation to the hydrological conditions and fish distribution during spring 2009. The most noticeable result was the observation of a 'biocline' during the day i.e., the interface where zooplankton biomass changes more rapidly with depth than it does in the layers above or below. The biocline separated the surface layer, almost devoid of macrozooplankton, from the macrozooplankton-rich deeper layers. It is a specific vertical feature which ties in with the classic diel vertical migration pattern. Spatiotemporal correlations between macrozooplankton and environmental variables (photic depth, thermohaline vertical structure, stratification index and chlorophyll-a) indicate that no single factor explains the macrozooplankton vertical distribution. Rather a set of factors, the respective influence of which varies from region to region depending on the habitat characteristics and the progress of the spring stratification, jointly influence the distribution. In this context, the macrozooplankton biocline is potentially a biophysical response to the search for a particular depth range where light attenuation, thermohaline vertical structure and stratification conditions together provide a suitable alternative to the need for expending energy in reaching deeper water without the risk of being eaten.

  19. Simulation of hydrologic conditions and suspended-sediment loads in the San Antonio River Basin downstream from San Antonio, Texas, 2000-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banta, J. Ryan; Ockerman, Darwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Suspended sediment in rivers and streams can play an important role in ecological health of rivers and estuaries and consequently is an important issue for water-resource managers. To better understand suspended-sediment loads and transport in a watershed, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the San Antonio River Authority, developed a Hydrological Simulation Program—FORTRAN model to simulate hydrologic conditions and suspended-sediment loads during 2000–12 for four watersheds, which comprise the overall study area in the San Antonio River Basin (hereinafter referred to as the “USGS–2014 model”). The study area consists of approximately 2,150 square miles encompassing parts of Bexar, Guadalupe, Wilson, Karnes, DeWitt, Goliad, Victoria, and Refugio Counties. The USGS–2014 model was calibrated for hydrology and suspended sediment for 2006–12. Overall, model-fit statistics and graphic evaluations from the calibration and testing periods provided multiple lines of evidence indicating that the USGS–2014 model simulations of hydrologic and suspended-sediment conditions were mostly “good” to “very good.” Model simulation results indicated that approximately 1,230 tons per day of suspended sediment exited the study area and were delivered to the Guadalupe River during 2006–12, of which approximately 62 percent originated upstream from the study area. Sample data and simulated model results indicate that most of the suspended-sediment load in the study area consisted of silt- and clay-sized particles (less than 0.0625 millimeters). The Cibolo Creek watershed was the largest contributor of suspended sediment from the study area. For the entire study area, open/developed land and cropland exhibited the highest simulated soil erosion rates; however, the largest contributions of sediment (by land-cover type) were pasture and forest/rangeland/shrubland, which together composed approximately 80 percent of the land cover of the

  20. The influence of reservoirs, climate, land use and hydrologic conditions on loads and chemical quality of dissolved organic carbon in the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal patterns in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads and chemical quality were identified in the Colorado River from the headwaters in the Rocky Mountains to the United States-Mexico border from 1994 to 2011. Watershed- and reach-scale climate, land use, river discharge and hydrologic modification conditions that contribute to patterns in DOC were also identified. Principal components analysis (PCA) identified site-specific precipitation and reach-scale discharge as being correlated with sites in the upper basin, where there were increases in DOC load from the upstream to downstream direction. In the lower basin, where DOC load decreased from upstream to downstream, sites were correlated with site-specific temperature and reach-scale population, urban land use and hydrologic modification. In the reaches containing Lakes Powell and Mead, the two largest reservoirs in the United States, DOC quantity decreased, terrestrially derived aromatic DOC was degraded and/or autochthonous less aromatic DOC was produced. Taken together, these results suggest that longitudinal patterns in the relatively unregulated upper basin are influenced by watershed inputs of water and DOC, whereas DOC patterns in the lower basin are reflective of a balance between watershed contribution of water and DOC to the river and loss of water and DOC due to hydrologic modification and/or biogeochemical processes. These findings suggest that alteration of constituent fluxes in rivers that are highly regulated may overshadow watershed processes that would control fluxes in comparable unregulated rivers. Further, these results provide a foundation for detailed assessments of factors controlling the transport and chemical quality of DOC in the Colorado River.

  1. Quantification of the impact of hydrology on agricultural production as a result of too dry, too wet or too saline conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack-ten Broeke, Mirjam J. D.; Kroes, Joop G.; Bartholomeus, Ruud P.; van Dam, Jos C.; de Wit, Allard J. W.; Supit, Iwan; Walvoort, Dennis J. J.; van Bakel, P. Jan T.; Ruijtenberg, Rob

    2016-08-01

    For calculating the effects of hydrological measures on agricultural production in the Netherlands a new comprehensive and climate proof method is being developed: WaterVision Agriculture (in Dutch: Waterwijzer Landbouw). End users have asked for a method that considers current and future climate, that can quantify the differences between years and also the effects of extreme weather events. Furthermore they would like a method that considers current farm management and that can distinguish three different causes of crop yield reduction: drought, saline conditions or too wet conditions causing oxygen shortage in the root zone. WaterVision Agriculture is based on the hydrological simulation model SWAP and the crop growth model WOFOST. SWAP simulates water transport in the unsaturated zone using meteorological data, boundary conditions (like groundwater level or drainage) and soil parameters. WOFOST simulates crop growth as a function of meteorological conditions and crop parameters. Using the combination of these process-based models we have derived a meta-model, i.e. a set of easily applicable simplified relations for assessing crop growth as a function of soil type and groundwater level. These relations are based on multiple model runs for at least 72 soil units and the possible groundwater regimes in the Netherlands. So far, we parameterized the model for the crops silage maize and grassland. For the assessment, the soil characteristics (soil water retention and hydraulic conductivity) are very important input parameters for all soil layers of these 72 soil units. These 72 soil units cover all soils in the Netherlands. This paper describes (i) the setup and examples of application of the process-based model SWAP-WOFOST, (ii) the development of the simplified relations based on this model and (iii) how WaterVision Agriculture can be used by farmers, regional government, water boards and others to assess crop yield reduction as a function of groundwater

  2. Heterotrophic prokaryote distribution along a 2300 km transect in the North Pacific subtropical gyre during strong La Niña conditions: relationship between distribution and hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Arakawa, H.; Barani, A.; Ceccaldi, H. J.; Hashihama, F.; Gregori, G.

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution of heterotrophic prokaryotes was investigated during the Tokyo-Palau cruise in the western part of the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) along a north-south transect between 33.60 and 13.25° N. The cruise was conducted in three different hydrological areas identified as the Kuroshio region, the Subtropical gyre area and the Transition zone. Two eddies were crossed along the transect: one cold core cyclonic eddy and one warm core anticyclonic eddy and distributions of the heterotrophic prokaryotes were recorded. By using analytical flow cytometry and a nucleic acid staining protocol, heterotrophic prokaryotes were discriminated into three subgroups depending on their nucleic acid content (low, high and very high nucleic acid contents labeled LNA, HNA and VHNA, respectively). Statistical analyses performed on the dataset showed that LNA, mainly associated with temperature and salinity, were dominant in all the hydrological regions. In contrast, HNA distribution seemed to be associated with temperature, salinity, Chl a and silicic acid. A latitudinal increase in the HNA / LNA ratio was observed along the north-south transect and was related to higher phosphate and nitrate concentrations. In the Kuroshio Current, it is suggested that the high concentration of heterotrophic prokaryotes observed at station 4 was linked to the path of the cold cyclonic eddy core. In contrast, it is thought that low concentrations of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the warm core of the anticyclonic gyre (Sta. 9) are related to the low nutrient concentrations measured in the seawater column. Our results showed that the high variability between the various heterotrophic prokaryote cluster abundances depend both on the mesoscale structures and the oligotrophic gradient.

  3. Estimation of Flood Frequencies under Changing Climate Conditions During 21st Century by means of a Numerical Coupled Atmospheric-Hydrologic Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavvas, M. L.; Trinh, T. Q.; Ishida, K.; Fischer, I.; Nosacka, J.; Brown, K.

    2015-12-01

    Effect of climate change on hydrologic flow regimes, particularly extreme events, necessitates modeling of future flows in order to best inform water resources management. The presented modeling approach simulated future flows in the Cache Creek watershed in California, over the 21st century using a hydro-climate model (WEHY-HCM) forced by future climate projections. The future climate projections, based on four emission scenarios, simulated by two GCMs (ECHAM5 and CCSM3) under several initial conditions, were dynamically downscaled using MM5, a regional climate model. The downscaled future precipitation data were bias-corrected before being input into the fully physically-based WEHY watershed hydrology model to simulate the flows at hourly intervals along the main Cache Creek branch and its tributaries during 2010-2099. The results suggest an increasing trend in flood peak discharge magnitudes at the outlet of the studied watershed throughout the 21st century. Similarly, estimates of the 100 and 200-year flood discharge magnitudes increase throughout the study period toward future in the 21st century. The differences among the historical flood frequency, and the flood frequencies during the first half and second half of the 21st century are indicative of the ongoing non-stationarity in the 21st century hydro-climate regime of the study region.

  4. Transfer of metal(loid)s in a small vineyard catchment: contribution of dissolved and particulate fractions in river for contrasted hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    Rabiet, M; Coquery, M; Carluer, N; Gahou, J; Gouy, V

    2015-12-01

    The use of inorganic pesticides in viticulture leads to the accumulation of metal(loid)s in soils which can be transferred to the hydro-systems (groundwater and surface water) via several processes. This study reports on the occurrence and behavior of metal(loid)s (Li, Al, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, and Ba), with a particular focus on Cu, Zn, and As, in a small stream draining a vineyard catchment. Base flow and flood events were monitored in order to assess the spatiotemporal variability of metal(loid) concentrations and to evaluate the contribution of the particulate fraction to the transfer of metal(loid)s according to the hydrological conditions. Results show that very different patterns of metal(loid)s were observed in the Morcille River according to the hydrological conditions. In base flow conditions, Cu and As were mainly transported in dissolved phase, which contributed to more than 70 and 80%, respectively, of the total load during this period. On the contrary, during base flow, Zn was mainly transported as associated to particles (90%). During the two storm events monitored, the particulate fraction was dominant, as its represented around 74-80%, 97%, and 50-70% of the total Cu, Zn, and As load in the river, respectively. Thus, despite a weaker affinity for particles during floods (decrease of particulate content during floods), metal(loid)s were mainly brought as particles, given that high amounts of suspended particulate matter (up to 2031 mg/L) were mobilized. Finally, comprehensive fluxes estimations confirmed that floods were responsible for more than 90% of the total Cu, Zn and 75% for As load transiting in the Morcille River in August within a very short period of time (less than 17%).

  5. Transfer of metal(loid)s in a small vineyard catchment: contribution of dissolved and particulate fractions in river for contrasted hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    Rabiet, M; Coquery, M; Carluer, N; Gahou, J; Gouy, V

    2015-12-01

    The use of inorganic pesticides in viticulture leads to the accumulation of metal(loid)s in soils which can be transferred to the hydro-systems (groundwater and surface water) via several processes. This study reports on the occurrence and behavior of metal(loid)s (Li, Al, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, and Ba), with a particular focus on Cu, Zn, and As, in a small stream draining a vineyard catchment. Base flow and flood events were monitored in order to assess the spatiotemporal variability of metal(loid) concentrations and to evaluate the contribution of the particulate fraction to the transfer of metal(loid)s according to the hydrological conditions. Results show that very different patterns of metal(loid)s were observed in the Morcille River according to the hydrological conditions. In base flow conditions, Cu and As were mainly transported in dissolved phase, which contributed to more than 70 and 80%, respectively, of the total load during this period. On the contrary, during base flow, Zn was mainly transported as associated to particles (90%). During the two storm events monitored, the particulate fraction was dominant, as its represented around 74-80%, 97%, and 50-70% of the total Cu, Zn, and As load in the river, respectively. Thus, despite a weaker affinity for particles during floods (decrease of particulate content during floods), metal(loid)s were mainly brought as particles, given that high amounts of suspended particulate matter (up to 2031 mg/L) were mobilized. Finally, comprehensive fluxes estimations confirmed that floods were responsible for more than 90% of the total Cu, Zn and 75% for As load transiting in the Morcille River in August within a very short period of time (less than 17%). PMID:26253185

  6. Effects of local climate and hydrological conditions on the thermal regime of a reservoir at Tropic of Cancer, in southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Qian, Xin; Han, Bo-Ping; Luo, Lian-Cong; Hamilton, David P

    2012-05-15

    Thermal regime is strongly associated with hydrodynamics in water, and it plays an important role in the dynamics of water quality and ecosystem succession of stratified reservoirs. Changes in both climate and hydrological conditions can modify thermal regimes. Liuxihe Reservoir (23°45'50″N; 113°46'52″E) is a large, stratified and deep reservoir in Guangdong Province, located at the Tropic of Cancer of southern China. The reservoir is a warm monomictic water body with a long period of summer stratification and a short period of mixing in winter. The vertical distribution of suspended particulate material and nutrients are influenced strongly by the thermal structure and the associated flow fields. The hypolimnion becomes anoxic in the stratified period, increasing the release of nutrients from the bottom sediments. Fifty-one years of climate and reservoir operational observations are used here to show the marked changes in local climate and reservoir operational schemes. The data show increasing air temperature and more violent oscillations in inflow volumes in the last decade, while the inter-annual water level fluctuations tend to be more moderate. To quantify the effects of changes in climate and hydrological conditions on thermal structure, we used a numerical simulation model to create scenarios incorporating different air temperatures, inflow volumes, and water levels. The simulations indicate that water column stability, the duration of the mixing period, and surface and outflow temperatures are influenced by both natural factors and by anthropogenic factors such as climate change and reservoir operation schemes. Under continuous warming and more stable storage in recent years, the simulations indicate greater water column stability and increased duration of stratification, while irregular large discharge events may reduce stability and lead to early mixing in autumn. Our results strongly suggest that more attention should be focused on water quality

  7. Physiological condition of juvenile wading birds in relation to multiple landscape stressors in the Florida Everglades: effects of hydrology, prey availability, and mercury bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Gawlik, Dale E; Beerens, James M; Ackerman, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    The physiological condition of juvenile birds can be influenced by multiple ecological stressors, and few studies have concurrently considered the effects of environmental contaminants in combination with ecological attributes that can influence foraging conditions and prey availability. Using three temporally distinct indices of physiological condition, we compared the physiological response of nestling great egrets (Ardea alba) and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) to changing prey availability, hydrology (water depth, recession rate), and mercury exposure in the Florida Everglades. We found that the physiological response of chicks varied between species and among environmental variables. Chick body condition (short-term index) and fecal corticosterone levels (medium-term) were influenced by wetland water depth, prey availability, region, and age, but not by mercury contamination. However, mercury exposure did influence heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in egret chicks, indicating a longer-term physiological response to contamination. Our results indicate that the physiological condition of egret and ibis chicks were influenced by several environmental stressors, and the time frame of the effect may depend on the specialized foraging behavior of the adults provisioning the chicks.

  8. Physiological Condition of Juvenile Wading Birds in Relation to Multiple Landscape Stressors in the Florida Everglades: Effects of Hydrology, Prey Availability, and Mercury Bioaccumulation

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Gawlik, Dale E.; Beerens, James M.; Ackerman, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological condition of juvenile birds can be influenced by multiple ecological stressors, and few studies have concurrently considered the effects of environmental contaminants in combination with ecological attributes that can influence foraging conditions and prey availability. Using three temporally distinct indices of physiological condition, we compared the physiological response of nestling great egrets (Ardea alba) and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) to changing prey availability, hydrology (water depth, recession rate), and mercury exposure in the Florida Everglades. We found that the physiological response of chicks varied between species and among environmental variables. Chick body condition (short-term index) and fecal corticosterone levels (medium-term) were influenced by wetland water depth, prey availability, region, and age, but not by mercury contamination. However, mercury exposure did influence heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in egret chicks, indicating a longer-term physiological response to contamination. Our results indicate that the physiological condition of egret and ibis chicks were influenced by several environmental stressors, and the time frame of the effect may depend on the specialized foraging behavior of the adults provisioning the chicks. PMID:25184221

  9. Physiological condition of juvenile wading birds in relation to multiple landscape stressors in the Florida Everglades: effects of hydrology, prey availability, and mercury bioaccumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Gawlik, Dale E.; Beerens, James M.; Ackerman, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological condition of juvenile birds can be influenced by multiple ecological stressors, and few studies have concurrently considered the effects of environmental contaminants in combination with ecological attributes that can influence foraging conditions and prey availability. Using three temporally distinct indices of physiological condition, we compared the physiological response of nestling great egrets (Ardea alba) and white ibises (Eudocimus albus) to changing prey availability, hydrology (water depth, recession rate), and mercury exposure in the Florida Everglades. We found that the physiological response of chicks varied between species and among environmental variables. Chick body condition (short-term index) and fecal corticosterone levels (medium-term) were influenced by wetland water depth, prey availability, region, and age, but not by mercury contamination. However, mercury exposure did influence heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in egret chicks, indicating a longer-term physiological response to contamination. Our results indicate that the physiological condition of egret and ibis chicks were influenced by several environmental stressors, and the time frame of the effect may depend on the specialized foraging behavior of the adults provisioning the chicks.

  10. Sediment distribution and hydrologic conditions of the Potomac aquifer in Virginia and parts of Maryland and North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFarland, E. Randolph

    2013-01-01

    Sediments of the heavily used Potomac aquifer broadly contrast across major structural features of the Atlantic Coastal Plain Physiographic Province in eastern Virginia and adjacent parts of Maryland and North Carolina. Thicknesses and relative dominance of the highly interbedded fluvial sediments vary regionally. Vertical intervals in boreholes of coarse-grained sediment commonly targeted for completion of water-supply wells are thickest and most widespread across the central and southern parts of the Virginia Coastal Plain. Designated as the Norfolk arch depositional subarea, the entire sediment thickness here functions hydraulically as a single interconnected aquifer. By contrast, coarse-grained sediment intervals are thinner and less widespread across the northern part of the Virginia Coastal Plain and into southern Maryland, designated as the Salisbury embayment depositional subarea. Fine-grained intervals that are generally avoided for completion of water-supply wells are increasingly thick and widespread northward. Fine-grained intervals collectively as thick as several hundred feet comprise two continuous confining units that hydraulically separate three vertically spaced subaquifers. The subaquifers are continuous northward but merge southward into the single undivided Potomac aquifer. Lastly, far southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina are designated as the Albemarle embayment depositional subarea, where both coarse- and fine-grained intervals are of only moderate thickness. The entire sediment thickness functions hydraulically as a single interconnected aquifer. A substantial hydrologic separation from overlying aquifers is imposed by the upper Cenomanian confining unit. Potomac aquifer sediments were deposited by a fluvial depositional complex spanning the Virginia Coastal Plain approximately 100 to 145 million years ago. Westward, persistently uplifted granite and gneiss source rocks sustained a supply of coarse-grained sand and gravel

  11. Development of the Conceptual Models for Chemical Conditions and Hydrology Used in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    LARSON, KURT W

    2000-05-24

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations specify that the DOE must demonstrate on a sound basis that the WIPP disposal system will effectively contain long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides within its boundaries for 10,000 years following closure. In 1996, the DOE submitted the ''40 CFR Part 191 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant'' (CCA) to the EPA. The CCA proposed that the WIPP site complies with EPA's regulatory requirements. Contained within the CCA are descriptions of the scientific research conducted to characterize the properties of the WIPP site and the probabilistic performance assessment (PA) conducted to predict the containment properties of the WIPP disposal system. In May 1998, the EPA certified that the TRU waste disposal at the WIPP complies with its regulations. Waste disposal operations at WIPP commenced on March 28, 1999. The 1996 WIPP PA model of the disposal system included conceptual and mathematical representations of key hydrologic and geochemical processes. These key processes were identified over a 22-year period involving data collection, data interpretation, computer models, and sensitivity studies to evaluate the importance of uncertainty and of processes that were difficult to evaluate by other means. Key developments in the area of geochemistry were the evaluation of gas generation mechanisms in the repository; development of a model of chemical conditions in the repository and actinide concentrations in brine; selecting MgO backfill and demonstrating its effects experimentally; and determining the chemical retardation capability of the Culebra. Key developments in the area of hydrology were evacuating the potential for groundwater to dissolve the Salado Formation (the repository host formation), development of a regional model for

  12. Klamath River Basin Hydrologic Conditions Prior to the September 2002 Die-Off of Salmon and Steelhead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, Dennis D.; Risley, John C.

    2003-05-27

    This report characterizes streamflow and water temperature conditions during the period leading up to the die-off and compares them to historical conditions in the Klamath River. This report is not an exploration of the causative mechanism of the die-off; rather, it is intended to provide detailed documentation of these conditions to be used by those examining the cause(s) of the die-off and to provide information that can contribute to decisions about future water management in the Klamath Basin.

  13. Klamath River Basin Hydrologic Conditions Prior to the September 2002 Die-Off of Salmon and Steelhead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, Dennis D.; Risley, John C.

    2003-01-01

    This report characterizes streamflow and water temperature conditions during the period leading up to the die-off and compares them to historical conditions in the Klamath River. This report is not an exploration of the causative mechanism of the die-off; rather, it is intended to provide detailed documentation of these conditions to be used by those examining the cause(s) of the die-off and to provide information that can contribute to decisions about future water management in the Klamath Basin.

  14. Stream ecological condition modeling at the reach and the hydrologic unit (HUC) scale: A look at model performance and mapping

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Hydrography and updated Watershed Boundary Datasets provide a ready-made framework for hydrographic modeling. Determining particular stream reaches or watersheds in poor ecological condition across large regions is an essential goal for monitoring and management. T...

  15. Form and Actuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitbol, Michel

    A basic choice underlies physics. It consists of banishing actual situations from theoretical descriptions, in order to reach a universal formal construct. Actualities are then thought of as mere local appearances of a transcendent reality supposedly described by the formal construct. Despite its impressive success, this method has left major loopholes in the foundations of science. In this paper, I document two of these loopholes. One is the problem of time asymmetry in statistical thermodynamics, and the other is the measurement problem of quantum mechanics. Then, adopting a broader philosophical standpoint, I try to turn the whole picture upside down. Here, full priority is given to actuality (construed as a mode of the immanent reality self-reflectively being itself) over formal constructs. The characteristic aporias of this variety of "Copernican revolution" are discussed.

  16. Coupling catchment hydrology and transient storage to model the fate of solutes during low-flow conditions of an upland river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trévisan, D.; Periáñez, R.

    2016-03-01

    The residence time of solutes in catchments is longer during low-flow conditions, due to the lengthening of transport routes and the decrease in transfer velocities. In rivers, transient storage depends largely on exchanges with channel storage and the hyporheic zone and reflects the capacity of the river to buffer pollutant loads before they enter the aquatic environment of final receptors. Our objective was to evaluate the fate of solutes along a typical confined river of upland catchments. First, we calculate lateral inflows using a variable-source hydrology approach. Then, water motion and quality in the river channel are predicted by combining hydrodynamics and exchanges with channel storage and the hyporheic zone. The model is mainly parametrized from literature data during baseflow conditions to mimic the fate of adsorptive and non-persistent pollutants. Residence time in surface water, channel storage and the hyporheic zone were found to be sensitive to lateral inflows from groundwater seepage. Channel storage is the main process controlling residence time in upstream conditions, where the riverbed is mainly composed of stones and bedrock. Downstream, along with the formation of sediment deposits and riffle-pool units, hyporheic exchanges also control the lag time in the transfer of solutes. By integrating physically-based processes, the number of parameters is small, but the model still requires a detailed description of stream geometry and morphology. It can be used to evaluate stream restoration or catchment-river management when detailed data of stream geometry and morphology are available.

  17. Hydrologic conditions, recharge, and baseline water quality of the surficial aquifer system at Jekyll Island, Georgia, 2012-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Debbie W.; Torak, Lynn J.

    2016-03-08

    Groundwater levels and specific-conductance measurements showed the dependence of freshwater resources on rainfall to recharge the water-table zone of the surficial aquifer system and to influence groundwater flow on Jekyll Island. The unseasonably dry conditions during November 2012 to April 2013 induced saline water infiltration to the water-table zone from the marshland separating the Jekyll River from the island. A strong correlation (R2 = 0.97) of specific conductance to chloride concentration in water samples from wells installed in the water-table zone provided support for the determination of seasonal directions of groundwater flow by confirming salinity changes in the water-table zone. Unseasonably wet conditions during the late spring to August caused groundwater-flow reversals in some areas. The high dependence of the water-table zone in the surficial aquifer system on precipitation to replenish the aquifer with freshwater underscored the importance of monitoring groundwater levels, water quality, and water use to identify aquifer-discharge conditions that have the potential to promote seawater encroachment and degrade freshwater resources on Jekyll Island.

  18. Impact factors on water quality in the confluence zone of the Daning River and the Yangtze River at different hydrological conditions in the Three Gorges Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbach, A.; Wang, L.; Chen, H.; Hu, W.; Schleicher, N.; Zheng, B.; Norra, S.

    2012-04-01

    Water quality of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) in the Yangtze River became a major concern since the first closure of the dam in 2003. Increasing eutrophication and algal bloom events, especially in confluence bays and backwater areas are observed. Substance transport, water exchange and interaction between water masses in confluence areas of tributaries and the Yangtze main stream are of special interest and mainly driven by large scale water level fluctuations and temporal discharge variations in the reservoir. The Daning River, one tributary of the TGR also adjoins to Dachang city and Wushan city which are by backwater of the TGR. In the frame of the Sino-German "Yangtze-Project" [1] water quality data and samples were collected in the Daning River and its confluence zone with the Yangtze River during two fieldtrips in August and December, 2011. Remarkable hydrological changes during the sampling time were present in August whereas conditions in December were rather stable. Water quality data was recorded in-situ and on-line in varying depths with a towed underwater sensor system. The monitored data comprise seven important physico-chemical water parameters (temperature, electrical conductivity, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, oxygen saturation, pH, chlorophyll a) coupled with a 3D positioning system. Geostatistical evaluation and interpolation of the physico-chemical water parameter data was conducted to get 3D distribution models for the parameters in the water bodies. Selective water samples for analysis of inorganic components (anions, cations, nutrients) in the dissolved and particulate phases were taken from different depths by a free flow sampler. Results reveal that pollutant plumes in the water above the thermocline surround the urban areas during the stable conditions of December. In August the degree of mixing of Yangtze main stream water with the Daning River water was the main driving force for the water chemistry. Contrarily, water quality was

  19. Extension of classical hydrological risk analysis to non-stationary conditions due to climate change - application to the Fulda catchment, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, G.; Koch, M.

    2010-12-01

    An important aspect in water resources and hydrological engineering is the assessment of hydrological risk, due to the occurrence of extreme events, e.g. droughts or floods. When dealing with the latter - as is the focus here - the classical methods of flood frequency analysis (FFA) are usually being used for the proper dimensioning of a hydraulic structure, for the purpose of bringing down the flood risk to an acceptable level. FFA is based on extreme value statistics theory. Despite the progress of methods in this scientific branch, the development, decision, and fitting of an appropriate distribution function stills remains a challenge, particularly, when certain underlying assumptions of the theory are not met in real applications. This is, for example, the case when the stationarity-condition for a random flood time series is not satisfied anymore, as could be the situation when long-term hydrological impacts of future climate change are to be considered. The objective here is to verify the applicability of classical (stationary) FFA to predicted flood time series in the Fulda catchment in central Germany, as they may occur in the wake of climate change during the 21st century. These discharge time series at the outlet of the Fulda basin have been simulated with a distributed hydrological model (SWAT) that is forced by predicted climate variables of a regional climate model for Germany (REMO). From the simulated future daily time series, annual maximum (extremes) values are computed and analyzed for the purpose of risk evaluation. Although the 21st century estimated extreme flood series of the Fulda river turn out to be only mildly non-stationary, alleviating the need for further action and concern at the first sight, the more detailed analysis of the risk, as quantified, for example, by the return period, shows non-negligent differences in the calculated risk levels. This could be verified by employing a new method, the so-called flood series maximum analysis

  20. Independent technical review and analysis of hydraulic modeling and hydrology under low-flow conditions of the Des Plaines River near Riverside, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Over, Thomas M.; Straub, Timothy D.; Hortness, Jon E.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated a streamgage and published daily flows for the Des Plaines River at Riverside since Oct. 1, 1943. A HEC-RAS model has been developed to estimate the effect of the removal of Hofmann Dam near the gage on low-flow elevations in the reach approximately 3 miles upstream from the dam. The Village of Riverside, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources-Office of Water Resources (IDNR-OWR), and the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers-Chicago District (USACE-Chicago) are interested in verifying the performance of the HEC-RAS model for specific low-flow conditions, and obtaining an estimate of selected daily flow quantiles and other low-flow statistics for a selected period of record that best represents current hydrologic conditions. Because the USGS publishes streamflow records for the Des Plaines River system and provides unbiased analyses of flows and stream hydraulic characteristics, the USGS served as an Independent Technical Reviewer (ITR) for this study.

  1. Hydrological conditions and evaluation of sustainable groundwater use in the Sierra Vista Subwatershed, Upper San Pedro Basin, southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gungle, Bruce; Callegary, James B.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Kennedy, Jeffrey R.; Eastoe, Christopher J.; Turner, Dale S.; Dickinson, Jesse E.; Levick, Lainie R.; Sugg, Zachary P.

    2016-08-18

    Looking at the subwatershed as a whole, base flow was in decline along the entire river reach, but determination of the specific cause of the decline was beyond the scope of this report. Conditions in the area from the municipal pumping center of Sierra Vista and Fort Huachuca northeast to the river (from about the Charleston to Tombstone gaging stations) were more commonly in decline than in regions further south. Both long-term indicators, such as regional aquifer groundwater levels and horizontal gradients, and the isotope analysis indicated that groundwater discharge to the river and thus base flow may continue to decline in that area. South of Charleston, indicators were more mixed. Some indicators in the Hereford reach suggest groundwater discharge to the San Pedro River may be increasing there, whereas some indicators in the Palominas reach suggest groundwater discharge to the river there may be declining.

  2. Study of time-lapse processing for dynamic hydrologic conditions. [electronic satellite image analysis console for Earth Resources Technology Satellites imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serebreny, S. M.; Evans, W. E.; Wiegman, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    The usefulness of dynamic display techniques in exploiting the repetitive nature of ERTS imagery was investigated. A specially designed Electronic Satellite Image Analysis Console (ESIAC) was developed and employed to process data for seven ERTS principal investigators studying dynamic hydrological conditions for diverse applications. These applications include measurement of snowfield extent and sediment plumes from estuary discharge, Playa Lake inventory, and monitoring of phreatophyte and other vegetation changes. The ESIAC provides facilities for storing registered image sequences in a magnetic video disc memory for subsequent recall, enhancement, and animated display in monochrome or color. The most unique feature of the system is the capability to time lapse the imagery and analytic displays of the imagery. Data products included quantitative measurements of distances and areas, binary thematic maps based on monospectral or multispectral decisions, radiance profiles, and movie loops. Applications of animation for uses other than creating time-lapse sequences are identified. Input to the ESIAC can be either digital or via photographic transparencies.

  3. Delineation of areas contributing groundwater to selected receiving surface water bodies for long-term average hydrologic conditions from 1968 to 1983 for Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misut, Paul E.; Monti,, Jack

    2016-10-05

    To assist resource managers and planners in developing informed strategies to address nitrogen loading to coastal water bodies of Long Island, New York, the U.S. Geological Survey and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation initiated a program to delineate a comprehensive dataset of groundwater recharge areas (or areas contributing groundwater), travel times, and outflows to streams and saline embayments on Long Island. A four-layer regional three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater-flow model of hydrologic conditions from 1968 to 1983 was used to provide delineations of 48 groundwater watersheds on Long Island. Sixteen particle starting points were evenly spaced within each of the 4,000- by 4,000-foot model cells that receive water-table recharge and tracked using forward particle-tracking analysis modeling software to outflow zones. For each particle, simulated travel times were grouped by age as follows: less than or equal to 10 years, greater than 10 years and less than or equal to 100 years, greater than 100 years and less than or equal to 1,000 years, and greater than 1,000 years; and simulated ending zones were grouped into 48 receiving water bodies, based on the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Waterbody Inventory/Priority Waterbodies List. Areal delineation of travel time zones and groundwater contributing areas were generated and a table was prepared presenting the sum of groundwater outflow for each area.

  4. Water supply implications of herbicide sampling: Hydrologic conditions may affect concentrations of organonitrogen herbicides and may be important considerations in complying with drinking water regulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamer, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    The temporal distribution of the herbicides alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, and metolachlor was documented from September 1991 through August 1992 in the Platte River at Louisville, Neb., the drainage of the Central Nebraska Basins. Lincoln, Ornaha, and other municipalities withdraw groundwater for public supplies from the adjacent alluvium, which is hydraulically connected to the Platte River. Data were collected, in part, to provide information to managers, planners, and public utilities on the likelihood of water supplies being adversely affected by these herbicides. Three computational procedures - monthly means, monthly subsampling, and quarterly subsampling - were used to calculate annual mean herbicide concentrations. When the sampling was conducted quarterly rather than monthly, alachlor and atrazine concentrations were more likely to exceed their respective maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of 2.0 ??g/L and 3.0 ??g/L, and cyanazine concentrations were more likely to exceed the health advisory level of 1.0 ??g/L. The US Environmental Protection Agency has established a tentative MCL of 1.0 ??g/L for cyanazine; data indicate that cyanazine is likely to exceed this level under most hydrologic conditions.

  5. Gene Expression Reaction Norms Unravel the Molecular and Cellular Processes Underpinning the Plastic Phenotypes of Alternanthera Philoxeroides in Contrasting Hydrological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lexuan; Geng, Yupeng; Yang, Hongxing; Hu, Yonghong; Yang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Alternanthera philoxeroides is an amphibious invasive weed that can colonize both aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Individuals growing in different habitats exhibit extensive phenotypic variation but little genetic differentiation. Little is known about the molecular basis underlying environment-induced phenotypic changes. Variation in transcript abundance in A. philoxeroides was characterized throughout the time-courses of pond and upland treatments using RNA-Sequencing. Seven thousand eight hundred and five genes demonstrated variable expression in response to different treatments, forming 11 transcriptionally coordinated gene groups. Functional enrichment analysis of plastically expressed genes revealed pathway changes in hormone-mediated signaling, osmotic adjustment, cell wall remodeling, and programmed cell death, providing a mechanistic understanding of the biological processes underlying the phenotypic changes in A. philoxeroides. Both transcriptional modulation of environmentally sensitive loci and environmentally dependent control of regulatory loci influenced the plastic responses to the environment. Phenotypic responses and gene expression patterns to contrasting hydrological conditions were compared between A. philoxeroides and its alien congener Alternanthera pungens. The terricolous A. pungens displayed limited phenotypic plasticity to different treatments. It was postulated based on gene expression comparison that the interspecific variation in plasticity between A. philoxeroides and A. pungens was not due to environmentally-mediated changes in hormone levels but to variations in the type and relative abundance of different signal transducers and receptors expressed in the target tissue. PMID:26617628

  6. Effect of drying and composting biosolids on the movement of nitrate and phosphate through repacked soil columns under steady-state hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    Cooke, C M; Gove, L; Nicholson, F A; Cook, H F; Beck, A J

    2001-08-01

    Effects of two "enhanced" treatments (drying and composting mesophilic anaerobically digested (MAD) biosolid) on nutrient leaching were investigated. Repacked sandy or sandy loam textured soil cores amended with fresh, dried and composted MAD biosolid (250 kg N ha(-1)), were investigated under steady-state hydrological conditions. Two 24 h, 4.5 mm h(-1) rainfall events, with a 14-day interval, were simulated using water-tracers. Losses of nitrate from the sandy loam soil during rainfall event 1 (43.9-68.0 mg kg(-1)) were significantly greater (P < or = 0.05) than during event 2 (6.4-11.9 mg kg(-1)). Phosphate losses were significantly greater (P < or = 0.05) during event 2 (up to 0.30 mg kg(-1)) compared to the first (< 0.05 mg kg(-1)). The sand soil showed similar effects. Losses of nitrate-N (percentage of total N applied) from the sand soil were small (around 0.06% for fresh/dried and 0.63% for composted MAD biosolids). Losses of nitrate-N from the sandy loam soil were greater; 4% for fresh and dried and 3% for composted MAD biosolids. This research showed that drying MAD biosolid had little impact on nitrate and phosphate losses from soil compared to fresh MAD biosolid. The effect of composting MAD biosolid on nutrient losses was more variable.

  7. Delineation of Areas Contributing Groundwater to Selected Receiving Surface Water Bodies for Long-Term Average Hydrologic Conditions From 1968 to 1983 for Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Misut, Paul E.; Monti,, Jack

    2016-10-05

    To assist resource managers and planners in developing informed strategies to address nitrogen loading to coastal water bodies of Long Island, New York, the U.S. Geological Survey and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation initiated a program to delineate a comprehensive dataset of groundwater recharge areas (or areas contributing groundwater), travel times, and outflows to streams and saline embayments on Long Island. A four-layer regional three-dimensional finite-difference groundwater-flow model of hydrologic conditions from 1968 to 1983 was used to provide delineations of 48 groundwater watersheds on Long Island. Sixteen particle starting points were evenly spaced within each of the 4,000- by 4,000-foot model cells that receive water-table recharge and tracked using forward particle-tracking analysis modeling software to outflow zones. For each particle, simulated travel times were grouped by age as follows: less than or equal to 10 years, greater than 10 years and less than or equal to 100 years, greater than 100 years and less than or equal to 1,000 years, and greater than 1,000 years; and simulated ending zones were grouped into 48 receiving water bodies, based on the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Waterbody Inventory/Priority Waterbodies List. Areal delineation of travel time zones and groundwater contributing areas were generated and a table was prepared presenting the sum of groundwater outflow for each area.

  8. Potentiometric Surface of the Alluvial Aquifer and Hydrologic Conditions in the Juana Diaz area, Puerto Rico, June 29 - July 1, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Jose M.; Santigo-Rivera, Luis; Gómez-Gómez, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    A synoptic survey of the hydrologic conditions in the Juana Diaz area, Puerto Rico, was conducted between June 29 and July 1, 2005, to define the spatial distribution of the potentiometric surface of the alluvial aquifer. The study area encompasses 21 square miles of the more extensive South Coastal Plain Alluvial Aquifer system and is bounded along the north by foothills of the Cordillera Central mountain chain, to the south by the Caribbean Sea, the east by the Rio Descalabrado and to the west by the Rio Inabon. Ground water in the Juana Diaz area is in the Quaternary-age alluvial deposits and the middle-Tertiary age Ponce Limestone and Juana Diaz Formation (Giusti, 1968). The hydraulic properties of the Ponce Limestone in the Juana Diaz area are unknown, and the Juana Diaz Formation is a unit of poor permeability due to its high clay content. Consequently, the Ponce Limestone and the Juana Diaz Formation are generally considered to be the base of the alluvial aquifer in the Juana Diaz area with ground-water flow occurring primarily within the alluvial deposits. The potentiometric-surface map of the alluvial aquifer was delineated using ground-water level measurements taken at existing wells. The water-level measurements were taken at wells that were either not pumping during the survey or were shut down for a brief period. In the latter case, a recovery period of 30 minutes was allowed for the drawdown in the wellbore to achieve a near static level position representative of the aquifer at the measurement point. Land-surface altitude from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 1:20,000 scale topographic maps (Playa de Ponce, Ponce, Rio Descalabrado, and Santa Isabel) were used to refer ground-water levels to mean sea level datum (National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929). In addition to the ground-water level measurements, the potentiometricsurface contours were delineated using hydrologic features, such as drainage ditches and saturated intermittent streams that were

  9. Heterotrophic prokaryote distribution along a 2300 km transect in the North Pacific subtropical gyre during a strong La Niña conditions: relationship between distribution and hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Arakawa, H.; Barani, A.; Ceccaldi, H. J.; Hashihama, F.; Gregori, G.

    2015-06-01

    The spatial distribution of heterotrophic prokaryotes was investigated during the Tokyo-Palau cruise in the western part of the North Pacific subtropical gyre (NPSG) along a north-south transect between 33.60 and 13.25° N. The cruise was conducted in three different hydrological areas identified as the Kuroshio region, the subtropical gyre area and the transition zone. Two eddies were crossed along the transect: one cold-core cyclonic eddy and one warm-core anticyclonic eddy and distributions of the heterotrophic prokaryotes were recorded. By using analytical flow cytometry and a nucleic acid staining protocol, heterotrophic prokaryotes were discriminated into three subgroups depending on their nucleic acid content (low, high and very high nucleic acid contents labelled LNA, HNA and VHNA, respectively). Statistical analyses performed on the data set showed that LNA, mainly associated with low temperature and low salinity, were dominant in all the hydrological regions. In contrast, HNA distribution seemed to be associated with temperature, salinity, Chl a and silicic acid. A latitudinal increase in the HNA / LNA ratio was observed along the north-south transect and was related to higher phosphate and nitrate concentrations. However, the opposite relationship observed for the VHNA / HNA ratio suggested that the link between nucleic acid content and oligotrophic conditions is not linear, underlying the complexity of the biodiversity in the VHNA, HNA and LNA subgroups. In the Kuroshio Current, it is suggested that the high concentration of heterotrophic prokaryotes observed at station 4 was linked to the path of the cold cyclonic eddy core. In contrast, it is thought that low concentrations of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the warm core of the anticyclonic gyre (Sta. 9) are related to the low nutrient concentrations measured in the seawater column. Our results showed that the high variability between the various heterotrophic prokaryote cluster abundances depend both

  10. Results of a 3D MD-based landslide model with hydrologically triggering conditions modeled by means of fractional Richards equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelloni, Gianluca; Bagnoli, Franco

    2014-05-01

    We present an exhaustive investigation of parameters and some further results about the integration between the fractional Richards equation, used to model the infiltration processes in the soil, and a particle-based methods for simulating three-dimensional schemes of triggered deep seated landslides. The integration between the two models is achieved by means a numerical method, according to the failure criterion of Mohr-Coulomb to simulate the static conditions that underlie the triggering mechanism. The basic mechanism was presented by us to EGU 2013 (Particle-based models for hydrologically triggered deep seated landslides - Vol. 15, EGU2013-10599-1, 2013). Initially the modified Lubachevsky-Stillinger (LS) algorithm is used to generate hard-sphere packings. Then we use MD to generate mechanically stable jammed packings of particles interacting with Hertz-Mindlin forces in order to simulate a consolidate soil. In this way we obtain the input structure of our "fictitious" soil to model landslides considering the infiltration processes caused by rainfall. We study the model by varying the stiffness of particles. The models presents similar characteristics proving that the minimal representation of particles (material points with smooth interaction potential) is sufficient to have a good description of the dynamics. We also analyze the sensitivity of the models varying some parameters (hydraulic conductivity, cohesion, slope and friction angle, soil depth, variation of random properties, fractional order of the generalized infiltration model, etc.) and considering both regular and random configuration of the particles. In particular, we consider the triggering time of the simulated landslide by varying the slope angle. At about 45 degrees, depending on the choice of parameters, we observe a change in the dependences of the triggering times on the slope, characterizing the critical angle of the slope.

  11. Achieving Operational Hydrologic Monitoring of Mosquitoborne Disease

    PubMed Central

    Day, Jonathan F.

    2005-01-01

    Mosquitoes and mosquitoborne disease transmission are sensitive to hydrologic variability. If local hydrologic conditions can be monitored or modeled at the scales at which these conditions affect the population dynamics of vector mosquitoes and the diseases they transmit, a means for monitoring or modeling mosquito populations and mosquitoborne disease transmission may be realized. We review how hydrologic conditions have been associated with mosquito abundances and mosquitoborne disease transmission and discuss the advantages of different measures of hydrologic variability. We propose that the useful application of any measure of hydrologic conditions requires additional consideration of the scales for both the hydrologic measurement and the vector control interventions that will be used to mitigate an outbreak of vectorborne disease. Our efforts to establish operational monitoring of St. Louis encephalitis virus and West Nile virus transmission in Florida are also reviewed. PMID:16229760

  12. Evaluation of Global Hydrological Model considering Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Y.; Hanasaki, N.; Takahashi, K.; Hijioka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Construction of reservoirs, especially in the last half of the 20th century, has greatly contributed to the prevention of riverine disasters and the security of water supplies in the world. Since reservoirs markedly alter the river flow in downstream, precise modeling of reservoir operation is necessary for the improvement of river flow simulations. Yet global hydrological simulations considering reservoir operation are still immature - although actual reservoirs are practically operated by considering both meteorological conditions and regional requests within each river basin, modeled reservoirs are operated according to simplified operation schemes optimized for global applicability with less regional variety. Thus, checking the performance of global hydrological models based on the comparison of model outputs with historical observation records is important for better understanding of uncertainties in the hydrological simulation. In this study, we conducted long-term historical hydrological simulations considering 6862 reservoirs worldwide. Simulation settings were based on the protocol of the model intercomparison project, termed ISI-MIP2.1A. We compared time-series of observed and simulated reservoir storage to examine the performance of reservoir operation schemes adopted in the H08 global hydrological model for 29 reservoirs, most of which are located in the United States and Canada, selected by considering data availability on the reservoir operation. We ran the hydrological model under four different meteorological forcing data sets distributed for ISI-MIP2.1A simulations for a historical period. By examining whether the observed water storage lies within the spread of simulated water storage with the four sets of meteorological forcing, we identified a prevailing source of errors in the simulation of the river discharge - reservoir operation schemes or meteorological forcing data.

  13. Arctic hydrology and meteorology

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of arctic ecosystems is directly related to the ongoing physical processes of heat and mass transfer. Furthermore, this system undergoes very large fluctuations in the surface energy balance. The buffering effect of both snow and the surface organic soils can be seen by looking at the surface and 40 cm soil temperatures. The active layer, that surface zone above the permafrost table, is either continually freezing or thawing. A large percentage of energy into and out of a watershed must pass through this thin veneer that we call the active layer. Likewise, most water entering and leaving the watershed does so through the active layer. To date, we have been very successful at monitoring the hydrology of Imnavait Creek with special emphasis on the active layer processes. The major contribution of this study is that year-round hydrologic data are being collected. An original objective of our study was to define how the thermal and moisture regimes within the active layer change during an annual cycle under natural conditions, and then to define how the regime will be impacted by some imposed terrain alteration. Our major analysis of the hydrologic data sets for Imnavait Creek have been water balance evaluations for plots during snowmelt, water balance for the watershed during both rainfall and snowmelt, and the application of a hydrologic model to predict the Imnavait Creek runoff events generated by both snowmelt and rainfall.

  14. Impact of land surface conditions on the predictability of hydrologic processes and mountain-valley circulations in the North American Monsoon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, T.; Vivoni, E. R.; Gochis, D. J.; Mascaro, G.

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneous land surface conditions are essential components of land-atmosphere interactions in regions of complex terrain and have the potential to affect convective precipitation formation. Yet, due to their high complexity, hydrologic processes over mountainous regions are not well understood, and are usually parameterized in simple ways within coupled land-atmosphere modeling frameworks. With the improving model physics and spatial resolution of numerical weather prediction models, there is an urgent need to understand how land surface processes affect local and regional meteorological processes. In the North American Monsoon (NAM) region, the summer rainy season is accompanied by a dramatic greening of mountain ecosystems that adds spatiotemporal variability in vegetation which is anticipated to impact the conditions leading to convection, mountain-valley circulations and mesoscale organization. In this study, we present results from a detailed analysis of a high-resolution (1 km) land surface model, Noah-MP, in a large, mountainous watershed of the NAM region - the Rio Sonora (21,264 km2) in Mexico. In addition to capturing the spatial variations in terrain and soil distributions, recently-developed features in Noah-MP allow the model to read time-varying vegetation parameters derived from remotely-sensed vegetation indices; however, this new implementation has not been fully evaluated. Therefore, we assess the simulated spatiotemporal fields of soil moisture, surface temperature and surface energy fluxes through comparisons to remote sensing products and results from coarser land surface models obtained from the North American Land Data Assimilation System. We focus attention on the impact of vegetation changes along different elevation bands on the diurnal cycle of surface energy fluxes to provide a baseline for future analyses of mountain-valley circulations using a coupled land-atmosphere modeling system. Our study also compares limited streamflow

  15. Relations between precipitation, groundwater withdrawals, and changes in hydrologic conditions at selected monitoring sites in Volusia County, Florida, 1995--2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, Louis C.

    2012-01-01

    precipitation conditions than during wetter than average conditions. For precipitation-averaged hydrologic conditions, water-level changes in the surficial aquifer system were statistically correlated solely with precipitation or were more highly correlated with precipitation than with groundwater withdrawals. Changes in Upper Floridan aquifer water levels and in water-surface stage (stage) at Indian and Scoggin Lakes tended to be highly correlated with both precipitation and withdrawals. The greater influence of withdrawals on stage changes, relative to changes in nearby surficial aquifer system water levels, indicates that these karstic lakes may be better connected hydraulically with the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer than is the surficial aquifer system at the other monitoring sites. At most sites, and for both aquifers, the 2-month moving average of precipitation or groundwater withdrawals included as an explanatory variable in the regression models indicates that water-level changes are not only influenced by stressor conditions across the current month, but also by those of the previous month. The relations between changes in water levels, precipitation, and groundwater withdrawals varied seasonally and in response to a period of drought. Water-level changes tended to be most highly correlated with withdrawals during the spring, when relatively large increases contributed to water-level declines, and during the fall when reduced withdrawal rates contributed to water-level recovery. Water-level changes tended to be most highly (or solely) correlated with precipitation in the winter, when withdrawals are minimal, and in the summer when precipitation is greatest. Water-level changes measured during the drought of October 2005 to June 2008 tended to be more highly correlated with groundwater withdrawals at Upper Floridan aquifer sites than at surficial aquifer system sites, results that were similar to those for precipitation-averaged conditions. Also, changes in stage at

  16. A review of hydrologic and geologic conditions related to the radioactive solid-waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Solid waste contaminated by radioactive matter has been buried in the vicinity of Oak Ridge National Laboratory since 1944. By 1973, an estimated six million cubic feet of such material had been placed in six burial grounds in two valleys. The practice initially was thought of as a safe method for permanently removing these potentially hazardous substances from man's surroundings, but is now que.3tionable at this site because of known leaching of contaminants from the waste, transport in ground water, and release to the terrestrial and fluvial environments. This review attempts to bring together in a single document information from numerous published and unpublished sources regarding the past criteria used for selecting the Oak Ridge burial-ground sites, the historical development and conditions of these facilities as of 1974, the geologic framework of the Laboratory area and the movement of water and water-borne contaminants in that area, the effects of sorption and ion exchange upon radionuclide transport, and a description and evaluation of the existing monitoring system. It is intended to assist Atomic Energy Commission (now Energy Research and Development Administration) officials in the formulation of managerial decisions concerning the burial grounds and present monitoring methods. Sites for the first three burial grounds appear to have been chosen during and shortly after World War II on the basis of such factors as safety, security, and distance from sources of waste origin. By 1950, geologic criteria had been introduced, and in the latter part of that decade, geohydrologic criteria were considered. While no current criteria have been defined, it becomes evident from the historical record that the successful containment of radionuclides below land surface for long periods of time is dependent upon a complex interrelationship between many geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical controls, and any definition of criteria must include consideration of these

  17. Hydrological AnthropoScenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudennec, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The Anthropocene concept encapsulates the planetary-scale changes resulting from accelerating socio-ecological transformations, beyond the stratigraphic definition actually in debate. The emergence of multi-scale and proteiform complexity requires inter-discipline and system approaches. Yet, to reduce the cognitive challenge of tackling this complexity, the global Anthropocene syndrome must now be studied from various topical points of view, and grounded at regional and local levels. A system approach should allow to identify AnthropoScenes, i.e. settings where a socio-ecological transformation subsystem is clearly coherent within boundaries and displays explicit relationships with neighbouring/remote scenes and within a nesting architecture. Hydrology is a key topical point of view to be explored, as it is important in many aspects of the Anthropocene, either with water itself being a resource, hazard or transport force; or through the network, connectivity, interface, teleconnection, emergence and scaling issues it determines. We will schematically exemplify these aspects with three contrasted hydrological AnthropoScenes in Tunisia, France and Iceland; and reframe therein concepts of the hydrological change debate. Bai X., van der Leeuw S., O'Brien K., Berkhout F., Biermann F., Brondizio E., Cudennec C., Dearing J., Duraiappah A., Glaser M., Revkin A., Steffen W., Syvitski J., 2016. Plausible and desirable futures in the Anthropocene: A new research agenda. Global Environmental Change, in press, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2015.09.017 Brondizio E., O'Brien K., Bai X., Biermann F., Steffen W., Berkhout F., Cudennec C., Lemos M.C., Wolfe A., Palma-Oliveira J., Chen A. C-T. Re-conceptualizing the Anthropocene: A call for collaboration. Global Environmental Change, in review. Montanari A., Young G., Savenije H., Hughes D., Wagener T., Ren L., Koutsoyiannis D., Cudennec C., Grimaldi S., Blöschl G., Sivapalan M., Beven K., Gupta H., Arheimer B., Huang Y

  18. Hydrologic and water-quality conditions in the lower Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and parts of the Aucilla-Suwannee-Ochlockonee River basins in Georgia and adjacent parts of Florida and Alabama during drought conditions, July 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Debbie W.; Peck, Michael F.; Painter, Jaime A.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of the Interior sustainable water strategy, WaterSMART, the U.S. Geological Survey documented hydrologic and water-quality conditions in the lower Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint and western and central Aucilla-Suwannee-Ochlockonee River basins in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia during low-flow conditions in July 2011. Moderate-drought conditions prevailed in this area during early 2011 and worsened to exceptional by June, with cumulative rainfall departures from the 1981-2010 climate normals registering deficits ranging from 17 to 27 inches. As a result, groundwater levels and stream discharges measured below median daily levels throughout most of 2011. Water-quality field properties including temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, and pH were measured at selected surface-water sites. Record-low groundwater levels measured in 12 of 43 surficial aquifer wells and 128 of 312 Upper Floridan aquifer wells during July 2011 underscored the severity of drought conditions in the study area. Most wells recorded groundwater levels below the median daily statistic, and 7 surficial aquifer wells were dry. Groundwater-level measurements taken in July 2011 were used to determine the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer. Groundwater generally flows to the south and toward streams except in reaches where streams discharge to the aquifer. The degree of connection between the Upper Floridan aquifer and streams decreases east of the Flint River where thick overburden hydraulically separates the aquifer from stream interaction. Hydraulic separation of the Upper Floridan aquifer from streams located east of the Flint River is shown by stream-stage altitudes that differ from groundwater levels measured in close proximity to streams. Most streams located in the study area during 2011 exhibited below normal flows (streamflows less than the 25th percentile), substantiating the severity of drought conditions that year. Streamflow

  19. Effects of Canals and Roads on Hydrologic Conditions and Health of Atlantic White Cedar at Emily and Richardson Preyer Buckridge Coastal Reserve, North Carolina, 2003-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrell, Gloria M.; Strickland, A. Gerald; Spruill, Timothy B.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of canals and roads on hydrologic conditions and on the health of Atlantic white cedar at the Emily and Richardson Preyer Buckridge Coastal Reserve in North Carolina were evaluated by using data collected from the 1980s to 2006. Water levels were monitored along two transects established perpendicular to roads and canals in areas of healthy and unhealthy Atlantic white cedar as part of a study conducted from February 2003 through March 2006. Because of the low hydraulic gradient at the Reserve, the rate and direction of water movement are sensitive to disturbance. Canals increased drainage and contributed to lower water levels in some parts of the Reserve, whereas roads, depending on orientation, impeded drainage. Canals also appeared to facilitate movement of brackish water from the Alligator River into the interior of the Reserve during storms and wind tides. Data indicate that an influx of brackish water occurred in mid-September 2005 several days after the passage of Hurricane Ophelia. Although precipitation amounts and wind speeds associated with Hurricane Ophelia were not large, substantial changes in specific conductance occurred at the canal site on the unhealthy Atlantic white cedar transect. No corresponding increase in specific conductance was observed at the canal site on the healthy Atlantic white cedar transect. The specific conductance of water samples from canals and piezometers was highly correlated with concentrations of chloride and sodium. Ion ratios of some of the water samples, particularly samples with high specific conductance, were similar to those of seawater. Thermal and chemical stratification of water in the canals occurred during summer and winter months, and turnover and mixing occurred in the spring and fall. Upwelling of ground water as a result of excavation for roads did not appear to have a significant effect on the water quality of samples from the canals or piezometers. The specific conductance of water samples from

  20. Eco-hydrologic Modeling of Rangelands: Evaluating a New Carbon Allocation Approach and Simulating Ecosystem Response to Changing Climate and Management Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. J.; Tague, C.; Choate, J. S.; Adam, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    More than one-third of the United States' land cover is comprised of rangelands, which support both forage production and livestock grazing. For grasses in both semi-arid and humid environments, small changes in precipitation and temperature, as well as grazing, can have disproportionately larger impacts on ecosystem processes. For example, these areas may experience large response pulses under highly variable precipitation and other potential future changes. The ultimate goal of this study is to provide information on the interactions between management activities, climate and ecosystem processes to inform sustainable rangeland management. The specific objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate a new carbon allocation strategy for grasses and (2) test the sensitivity of this improved strategy to changes in climate and grazing strategies. The Regional Hydro-ecologic Simulation System (RHESSys) is a process-based, watershed-scale model that simulates hydrology and biogeochemical cycling with dynamic soil and vegetation modules. We developed a new carbon allocation algorithm for partitioning net primary productivity (NPP) between roots and leaves for grasses. The 'hybrid' approach represents a balance between preferential partitioning due to environmental conditions and age-related growth. We evaluated this new allocation scheme at the point-scale at a variety of rangeland sites in the U.S. using observed biomass measurements and against existing allocation schemes used in RHESSys. Additionally, changes in the magnitude, frequency, and intensity of precipitation and temperature were used to assess ecosystem responses using our new allocation scheme. We found that changes in biomass and NPP were generally more sensitive to changes in precipitation than changes in temperature. At more arid sites, larger percent reductions in historic baseline precipitation affected biomass and NPP more negatively. We incorporated grazing impacts through biomass removal. We found that

  1. How do climate and human impact affect Sphagnum peatlands under oceanic-continental climatic conditions? 2000 years of fire and hydrological history of a bog in Northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcisz, Katarzyna; Tinner, Willy; Colombaroli, Daniele; Kołaczek, Piotr; Słowiński, Michał; Fiałkiewicz-Kozieł, Barbara; Lamentowicz, Mariusz

    2014-05-01

    Climate change affects many natural processes and the same applies to human impact For instance climate change and anthropogenic activities may cause increased fire activity or change peatland dynamics. Currently it is still unknown how Sphagnum peatlands in the oceanic-continental transition zone of Poland may respond to combined effects of heat waves, drought and fire. The aim of the study was to reconstruct the last 2000 years palaeohydrology and fire history at Linje bog in Northern Poland. The main task was to determine the drivers of fire episodes, particularly to identify climatic and anthropogenic forcing. A two-meter peat core was extracted and subsampled with a high resolution. Micro- and macroscopic charcoal analyses were applied to determine past fire activity and the results compared with palaeohydrological reconstructions based on testate amoeba analysis. Palynological human indicators were used to reconstruct human activity. A depth-age model including 20 14C dates was constructed to calculate peat accumulation rates and charcoal influx. We hypothesised that: 1) fire frequency in Northern Poland was determined by climatic conditions (combination of low precipitation and heat waves), as reflected in peatland water table, and that 2) past fire episodes in the last millennium were intensified by human activity. Furthermore climate may have influenced human activity over harvest success and the carrying capacity. Our study shows that fire was important for the studied ecosystem, however, its frequency has increased in the last millennium in concomitance with land use activities. Landscape humanization and vegetation opening were followed by a peatland drying during the Little Ice Age (from ca. AD 1380). Similarly to other palaeoecological studies from Poland, Linje peatland possessed an unstable hydrology during the Little Ice Age. Increased fire episodes appeared shortly before the Little Ice Age and most severe fires were present in the time when

  2. Hydrologic Design in the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, R. M.; Farmer, W. H.; Read, L.

    2014-12-01

    In an era dubbed the Anthropocene, the natural world is being transformed by a myriad of human influences. As anthropogenic impacts permeate hydrologic systems, hydrologists are challenged to fully account for such changes and develop new methods of hydrologic design. Deterministic watershed models (DWM), which can account for the impacts of changes in land use, climate and infrastructure, are becoming increasing popular for the design of flood and/or drought protection measures. As with all models that are calibrated to existing datasets, DWMs are subject to model error or uncertainty. In practice, the model error component of DWM predictions is typically ignored yet DWM simulations which ignore model error produce model output which cannot reproduce the statistical properties of the observations they are intended to replicate. In the context of hydrologic design, we demonstrate how ignoring model error can lead to systematic downward bias in flood quantiles, upward bias in drought quantiles and upward bias in water supply yields. By reincorporating model error, we document how DWM models can be used to generate results that mimic actual observations and preserve their statistical behavior. In addition to use of DWM for improved predictions in a changing world, improved communication of the risk and reliability is also needed. Traditional statements of risk and reliability in hydrologic design have been characterized by return periods, but such statements often assume that the annual probability of experiencing a design event remains constant throughout the project horizon. We document the general impact of nonstationarity on the average return period and reliability in the context of hydrologic design. Our analyses reveal that return periods do not provide meaningful expressions of the likelihood of future hydrologic events. Instead, knowledge of system reliability over future planning horizons can more effectively prepare society and communicate the likelihood

  3. Effects of the Temporal Variability of Evapotranspiration on Hydrologic Simulation in Central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    similar magnitude, small errors in ET can produce relatively large errors in available water, and accurate estimates of actual ET are more important. Local hydrologic conditions can also be an important factor influencing the hydrologic response to ET variability. Various points along a flow path in a hydrologic system respond differently to temporal variations in ET. For example, soil moisture contents in the root zone are sensitive to daily variations in ET, whereas spring flow responds to only longer term variations in ET. Both the Hargreaves and Priestley-Taylor equations for potential ET, when applied with an annually invariant monthly vegetation coefficient derived from comparison of measured ET with computed potential ET values, can be used with a hydrologic model to produce reasonable predictions of water levels and flows. Baseline-adjusted modified coefficients of efficiency for simulated water levels ranged from 0.0, indicating that water levels were simulated equally as well with approximated ET as with actual ET values, to -0.6, indicating that water levels were simulated better with actual ET values. Simulations using the Hargreaves approximation consistently yielded larger absolute and relative errors than the Priestley-Taylor approximation. However, the differences between the Hargreaves and Priestley-Taylor simulations generally were much smaller than differences between these simulations and the simulations using actual ET. This suggests that the simpler Hargreaves equation may be an adequate substitute for the more complex Priestley-Taylor equation, depending on the level of accuracy required to satisfy the particular modeling objectives.

  4. Water-Resource Trends and Comparisons Between Partial-Development and October 2006 Hydrologic Conditions, Wood River Valley, South-Central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skinner, Kenneth D.; Bartolino, James R.; Tranmer, Andrew W.

    2007-01-01

    This report analyzes trends in ground-water and surface-water data, documents 2006 hydrologic conditions, and compares 2006 and historic ground-water data of the Wood River Valley of south-central Idaho. The Wood River Valley extends from Galena Summit southward to the Timmerman Hills. It is comprised of a single unconfined aquifer and an underlying confined aquifer present south of Baseline Road in the southern part of the study area. Streams are well-connected to the shallow unconfined aquifer. Because the entire population of the area depends on ground water for domestic supply, either from domestic or municipal-supply wells, rapid population growth since the 1970s has raised concerns about the continued availability of ground and surface water to support existing uses and streamflow. To help address these concerns, this report evaluates ground- and surface-water conditions in the area before and during the population growth that started in the 1970s. Mean annual water levels in three wells (two completed in the unconfined aquifer and one in the confined aquifer) with more than 50 years of semi-annual measurements showed statistically significant declining trends. Mean annual and monthly streamflow trends were analyzed for three gaging stations in the Wood River Valley. The Big Wood River at Hailey gaging station (13139500) showed a statistically significant trend of a 25-percent increase in mean monthly base flow for March over the 90-year period of record, possibly because of earlier snowpack runoff. Both the 7-day and 30-day low-flow analyses for the Big Wood River near Bellevue gaging station (13141000) show a mean decrease of approximately 15 cubic feet per second since the 1940s, and mean monthly discharge showed statistically significant decreasing trends for December, January, and February. The Silver Creek at Sportsman Access near Picabo gaging station (13150430) also showed statistically significant decreasing trends in annual and mean monthly

  5. Attribution of hydrologic trends using integrated hydrologic and economic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneta, M. P.; Brugger, D. R.; Silverman, N. L.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrologic change has been detected in many regions of the world in the form of trends in annual streamflows, varying depths to the regional water table, or other alterations of the hydrologic balance. Most models used to investigate these changes implement sophisticated descriptions of the physical system but use simplified descriptions of the socioeconomic system. These simplifications come in the form of prescribed water diversions and land use change scenarios, which provide little insight into coupled natural-human systems and have limited predictive capabilities. We present an integrated model that adds realism to the description of the hydrologic system in agricultural regions by incorporating a component that updates the allocation of land and water to crops in response to hydroclimatic (water available) and economic conditions (prices of commodities and agricultural inputs). This component assumes that farmers allocate resources to maximize their net revenues, thus justifying the use of optimality conditions to constrain the parameters of an empirical production function that captures the economic behavior of farmers. Because the model internalizes the feedback between climate, agricultural markets, and farming activity into the hydrologic system, it can be used to understand to what extent human economic activity can exacerbate or buffer the regional hydrologic impacts of climate change in agricultural regions. It can also help in the attribution of causes of hydrologic change. These are important issues because local policy and management cannot solve climate change, but they can address land use and agricultural water use. We demonstrate the model in a case study.

  6. Hydrology for everyone: Share your knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogulu, Nilay; Dogulu, Canay

    2015-04-01

    Hydrology, the science of water, plays a central role in understanding the function and behaviour of water on the earth. Given the increasingly complex, uncertain, and dynamic nature of this system, the study of hydrology presents challenges in solving water-related problems in societies. While researchers in hydrologic science and engineering embrace these challenges, it is important that we also realize our critical role in promoting the basic understanding of hydrology concepts among the general public. Hydrology is everywhere, yet, the general public often lacks the basic understanding of the hydrologic environment surrounding them. Essentially, we believe that a basic level of knowledge on hydrology is a must for everyone and that this knowledge might facilitate resilience of communities to hydrological extremes. For instance, in case of flood and drought conditions, which are the most frequent and widespread hydrological phenomena that societies live with, a key aspect of facilitating community resilience would be to create awareness on the hydrological, meteorological, and climatological processes behind floods and droughts, and also on their potential implications on water resources management. Such knowledge awareness can lead to an increase in individuals' awareness on their role in water-related problems which in turn can potentially motivate them to adopt preparedness behaviours. For these reasons, embracing an approach that will increase hydrologic literacy of the general public should be a common objective for the hydrologic community. This talk, hopefully, will motivate researchers in hydrologic science and engineering to share their knowledge with the general public. We, as early career hydrologists, should take this responsibility more than anybody else. Start teaching hydrology now and share your knowledge with people around you - friends, family, relatives, neighbours, and others. There is hydrology for everyone!

  7. Pantropical forest hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, T.; Kanamori, H.; Chappell, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    First, we show pantropical distributions of annual amount and seasonality of precipitation with world tropical forest map, derived from the global-scale gridded data. Then, using the atmospheric water balance method with the global-scale data, we built pantropical maps of evapotranspiration (ET), runoff (Q) and rainfall recycle (from precipitation) ratio (RR). Comparisons of the pantropical gridded-computations of ET, Q and RR with those from pantropical fields (mostly, experimental forest watersheds) data revealed differences in hydrologic component characteristics between temperate and tropical forests and how such tropical hydrologic components are generated. Furthermore, an application of Budyko's Radiation Dryness Index to our pantropical analyses allowed us to consider the limits of world tropical forests and future distribution of tropical forests under climate change conditions.

  8. Hydrology team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragan, R.

    1982-01-01

    General problems faced by hydrologists when using historical records, real time data, statistical analysis, and system simulation in providing quantitative information on the temporal and spatial distribution of water are related to the limitations of these data. Major problem areas requiring multispectral imaging-based research to improve hydrology models involve: evapotranspiration rates and soil moisture dynamics for large areas; the three dimensional characteristics of bodies of water; flooding in wetlands; snow water equivalents; runoff and sediment yield from ungaged watersheds; storm rainfall; fluorescence and polarization of water and its contained substances; discriminating between sediment and chlorophyll in water; role of barrier island dynamics in coastal zone processes; the relationship between remotely measured surface roughness and hydraulic roughness of land surfaces and stream networks; and modeling the runoff process.

  9. Relations between precipitation, groundwater withdrawals, and changes in hydrologic conditions at selected monitoring sites in Volusia County, Florida, 1995--2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, Louis C.

    2012-01-01

    precipitation conditions than during wetter than average conditions. For precipitation-averaged hydrologic conditions, water-level changes in the surficial aquifer system were statistically correlated solely with precipitation or were more highly correlated with precipitation than with groundwater withdrawals. Changes in Upper Floridan aquifer water levels and in water-surface stage (stage) at Indian and Scoggin Lakes tended to be highly correlated with both precipitation and withdrawals. The greater influence of withdrawals on stage changes, relative to changes in nearby surficial aquifer system water levels, indicates that these karstic lakes may be better connected hydraulically with the underlying Upper Floridan aquifer than is the surficial aquifer system at the other monitoring sites. At most sites, and for both aquifers, the 2-month moving average of precipitation or groundwater withdrawals included as an explanatory variable in the regression models indicates that water-level changes are not only influenced by stressor conditions across the current month, but also by those of the previous month. The relations between changes in water levels, precipitation, and groundwater withdrawals varied seasonally and in response to a period of drought. Water-level changes tended to be most highly correlated with withdrawals during the spring, when relatively large increases contributed to water-level declines, and during the fall when reduced withdrawal rates contributed to water-level recovery. Water-level changes tended to be most highly (or solely) correlated with precipitation in the winter, when withdrawals are minimal, and in the summer when precipitation is greatest. Water-level changes measured during the drought of October 2005 to June 2008 tended to be more highly correlated with groundwater withdrawals at Upper Floridan aquifer sites than at surficial aquifer system sites, results that were similar to those for precipitation-averaged conditions. Also, changes in stage at

  10. Changing Conditions In The Yukon River Basin, Alaska: Biological, Geographical, And Hydrological Research Of The U.S. Geological Survey Alaska Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brabets, T. P.; Frenzel, S. A.; Markon, C.; Degange, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    To address the need for understanding past, present, and future conditions in the northern latitudes, the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Alaska Science Center conducts extensive research in the Yukon River Basin. The basin originates in Canada and spans Alaska from east to west encompassing diverse landscapes in the Arctic and sub-Arctic. Within this large watershed, USGS research is focused on understanding the rapidly changing conditions in the land cover and fires, fish and wildlife populations, and the hydrologic cycle. Some of Alaska largest and most extensive fires occur in the Yukon River Basin. Research suggests that recent fire frequency outpaces the forest replenishment. To provide a more thorough assessment of current fires, and prediction of future fire threats, Landsat imagery with its 30-m spatial resolution and 30-year history allow for unprecedented analysis of historical and existing landscape cover, the effects of fire and climate change on lake drying, and updating of fire burn boundaries. Additionally, caribou have been shown to avoid burned areas for at least 60 years because forage lichens were eliminated and preferred forage may require over 100 years to reach pre-fire abundance. Glaciers in Alaska and in Canada feed the Tanana River, a major tributary to the Yukon River. Gulkana Glacier is one such glacier where the USGS has measured the mass balance continuously since 1966. There has been a cumulative mass loss of more than 15 meters water equivalent since 1966, with two-thirds of that loss occurring since 1990. Streamflow statistics from long-term gaging stations show a tendency for earlier ice break up in the spring and earlier snowmelt peak flows. Glacier-fed streams show higher summer flows as warmer temperatures increased glacier melt. To provide a better understanding of the factors that regulate salmon production, USGS has examined the characteristics of chum salmon spawning habitats and survival of juvenile salmon at two

  11. Hydrological and geomorphological controls of malaria transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. W.; Macklin, M. G.; Thomas, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria risk is linked inextricably to the hydrological and geomorphological processes that form vector breeding sites. Yet environmental controls of malaria transmission are often represented by temperature and rainfall amounts, ignoring hydrological and geomorphological influences altogether. Continental-scale studies incorporate hydrology implicitly through simple minimum rainfall thresholds, while community-scale coupled hydrological and entomological models do not represent the actual diversity of the mosquito vector breeding sites. The greatest range of malaria transmission responses to environmental factors is observed at the catchment scale where seemingly contradictory associations between rainfall and malaria risk can be explained by hydrological and geomorphological processes that govern surface water body formation and persistence. This paper extends recent efforts to incorporate ecological factors into malaria-risk models, proposing that the same detailed representation be afforded to hydrological and, at longer timescales relevant for predictions of climate change impacts, geomorphological processes. We review existing representations of environmental controls of malaria and identify a range of hydrologically distinct vector breeding sites from existing literature. We illustrate the potential complexity of interactions among hydrology, geomorphology and vector breeding sites by classifying a range of water bodies observed in a catchment in East Africa. Crucially, the mechanisms driving surface water body formation and destruction must be considered explicitly if we are to produce dynamic spatial models of malaria risk at catchment scales.

  12. Hydrologic conditions and quality of rainfall and storm runoff for two agricultural areas of the Oso Creek Watershed, Nueces County, Texas, 2005-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, studied hydrologic conditions and quality of rainfall and storm runoff of two (primarily) agricultural areas (subwatersheds) of the Oso Creek watershed in Nueces County, Texas. One area, the upper West Oso Creek subwatershed, is 5,145 acres. The other area, a subwatershed drained by an unnamed Oso Creek tributary (hereinafter, Oso Creek tributary), is 5,287 acres. Rainfall and runoff (streamflow) were continuously monitored at the outlets of the two subwatersheds during October 2005-September 2007. Fourteen rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and major inorganic ions. Nineteen composite runoff samples (10 West Oso Creek, nine Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed for nutrients, major inorganic ions, and pesticides. Twenty-two discrete suspended-sediment samples (10 West Oso Creek, 12 Oso Creek tributary) and 13 bacteria samples (eight West Oso Creek, five Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed. These data were used to estimate, for selected constituents, rainfall deposition to and runoff loads and yields from the study subwatersheds. Quantities of fertilizers and pesticides applied in the subwatersheds were compared with quantities of nutrients and pesticides in rainfall and runoff. For the study period, total rainfall was greater than average. Most of the runoff at both subwatershed outlet sites occurred in response to a few specific storm periods. The West Oso Creek subwatershed produced more runoff during the study period than the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed, 10.83 inches compared with 7.28 inches. Runoff response was quicker and peak flows were higher in the West Oso Creek subwatershed than in the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total nitrogen runoff yield for the 2-year study period averaged 2.61 pounds

  13. Hydrologic conditions and water quality of rainfall and storm runoff for two agricultural areas of the Oso Creek watershed, Nueces County, Texas, 2005-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Fernandez, Carlos J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center at Corpus Christi, studied hydrologic conditions and water quality of rainfall and storm runoff of two primarily agricultural subwatersheds of the Oso Creek watershed in Nueces County, Texas. One area, the upper West Oso Creek subwatershed, is about 5,145 acres. The other area, a subwatershed drained by an unnamed tributary to Oso Creek (hereinafter, Oso Creek tributary), is about 5,287 acres. Rainfall and runoff (streamflow) were continuously monitored at the outlets of the two subwatersheds during the study period October 2005-September 2008. Seventeen rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for nutrients and major inorganic ions. Twenty-four composite runoff water-quality samples (12 at West Oso Creek, 12 at Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed for nutrients, major inorganic ions, and pesticides. Twenty-six discrete suspended-sediment samples (12 West Oso Creek, 14 Oso Creek tributary) and 17 bacteria samples (10 West Oso Creek, 7 Oso Creek tributary) were collected and analyzed. These data were used to estimate, for selected constituents, rainfall deposition to and runoff loads and yields from the two subwatersheds. Quantities of fertilizers and pesticides applied in the two subwatersheds were compared with quantities of nutrients and pesticides in rainfall and runoff. For the study period, total rainfall was greater than average. Most of the runoff from the two subwatersheds occurred in response to a few specific storm periods. The West Oso Creek subwatershed produced more runoff during the study period than the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed, 13.95 inches compared with 9.45 inches. Runoff response was quicker and peak flows were higher in the West Oso Creek subwatershed than in the Oso Creek tributary subwatershed. Total nitrogen runoff yield for the 3

  14. Climate, Hydrology, and Lake Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Forester, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Components of lake sediment such as endogenic minerals, organic compounds, and fossils as well as chemistry and isotopes of those components are sources of information about past continental climate. No matter the size of the lake, the components of their sedimentary records reflect some integration of catchment processes operating on the landscape, within the ground water, and in the lake. Climate change influences and often drives change among these processes, yet the integration of the processes commonly yields unique records in lakes residing under the same climate. An estimate of the actual climate history from lake records as opposed to the apparent climate history from a given lake depends on how well we understand the modern system, or in the absence of a modern system, making use of known modern systems. We single out the effect of hydrology on lake records to illustrate the importance of understanding the modern system. The Waubay Lakes Chain in NE South Dakota is a series of lakes at different elevations and spill points that may be hydrologically connected, even coalescing, or may be isolated, though some remain hydrologically open (Niehus et al. 1999). Pickerel is an "upland" open freshwater lake whose level remains nearly constant, while Waubay is a shallow lake at intermediate elevation having more changes in level and salinity. Bitter, at the lowest elevation, receives spillover from Waubay during high water periods, exhibits wide ranges of salinity and elevation including going dry. Pickerel has a short residence time with lower δ18O and TDS than Waubay and Bitter (08/1991: -4.1 permil, -1.5 permil, and -1.8 permil; 204 mg/L, 6,420 mg/L, and 13,128mg/L respectively). The three lakes see the same climate, but their hydrologies lead to these different characteristics that interpreted in climate terms would suggest Pickerel resides under a wet climate while Bitter resides under a dry climate. The sediment records from these lakes though incompletely

  15. Alternate corrections for estimating actual wetland evapotranspiration from potential evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barclay, Shoemaker W.; Sumner, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Corrections can be used to estimate actual wetland evapotranspiration (AET) from potential evapotranspiration (PET) as a means to define the hydrology of wetland areas. Many alternate parameterizations for correction coefficients for three PET equations are presented, covering a wide range of possible data-availability scenarios. At nine sites in the wetland Everglades of south Florida, USA, the relatively complex PET Penman equation was corrected to daily total AET with smaller standard errors than the PET simple and Priestley-Taylor equations. The simpler equations, however, required less data (and thus less funding for instrumentation), with the possibility of being corrected to AET with slightly larger, comparable, or even smaller standard errors. Air temperature generally corrected PET simple most effectively to wetland AET, while wetland stage and humidity generally corrected PET Priestley-Taylor and Penman most effectively to wetland AET. Stage was identified for PET Priestley-Taylor and Penman as the data type with the most correction ability at sites that are dry part of each year or dry part of some years. Finally, although surface water generally was readily available at each monitoring site, AET was not occurring at potential rates, as conceptually expected under well-watered conditions. Apparently, factors other than water availability, such as atmospheric and stomata resistances to vapor transport, also were limiting the PET rate. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  16. Effect of hydrological conditions on nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide dynamics in a bottomland hardwood forest and its implication for soil carbon sequestration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yu, K.; Faulkner, S.P.; Baldwin, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted at three locations in a bottomland hardwood forest with a distinct elevation and hydrological gradient: ridge (high, dry), transition, and swamp (low, wet). At each location, concentrations of soil greenhouse gases (N2O, CH4 , and CO2), their fluxes to the atmosphere, and soil redox potential (Eh) were measured bimonthly, while the water table was monitored every day. Results show that soil Eh was significantly (P transition > ridge location. The ratio CO2/CH4 production in soil is a critical factor for evaluating the overall benefit of soil C sequestration, which can be greatly offset by CH4 production and emission. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing.

  17. Modelling the hydrological response of debris-free and debris-covered glaciers to present climatic conditions in the semiarid Andes of central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Alvaro; Pellicciotti, Francesca; MacDonell, Shelley; McPhee, James; Vivero, Sebastián; Campos, Cristián; Egli, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the main contributors to runoff of a 62 km2 glacierized catchment in the semiarid Andes of central Chile, where both debris-free and debris-covered glaciers are present, combining an extensive set of field measurements, remote sensing products and an advanced glacio-hydrological model (TOPKAPI-ETH). The catchment contains two debris-free glaciers reaching down to 3900 m asl (Bello and Yeso Glaciers) and one debris-covered avalanche-fed glacier reaching to 3200 m asl (Piramide Glacier). A unique dataset of field measurements collected in the ablation seasons 2013-14 and 2014-15 included four automatic weather stations, manual measurements of snow depth and debris cover thickness, discharge measurements at glaciers outlets, photographic monitoring of surface albedo as well as ablation stakes measurements and snow pits. TOPKAPI-ETH combines physically-oriented parameterizations of snow and ice ablation, gravitational distribution of snow, snow albedo evolution, glacier dynamics, runoff routing and the ablation of debris-covered ice.We obtained the first detailed estimation of mass balance and runoff contribution of debris-covered glaciers in this mountainous region. Results show that while the mass balance of Bello and Yeso Glaciers is mostly controlled by air temperature lapse rates, the mass balance of Piramide Glacier is governed by debris thickness and avalanches. In fact, gravitational distribution by avalanching on wet years plays a key role and modulates the mass balance gradient of all glaciers in the catchment and can turn local mass balance from negative to positive. This is especially the case for Piramide Glacier, which shows large amounts of snow accumulation below the steep walls surrounding its upper area. Despite the thermal insulation effect of the debris cover, the contribution to runoff from debris-free and debris-covered glaciers is similar, mainly due to elevation differences. At the catchment scale, snowmelt represents more than 60

  18. Hydrological recovery in forested landscapes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttle, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Considerable effort has been expended trying to understand how forest landscapes respond hydrologically to natural (e.g. fire) or anthropogenic (e.g. harvesting) disturbance. However, comparable emphasis has not been placed on assessing whether and how these landscapes recover from such disturbances. Hydrological recovery can be defined as the restoration of hydrologic characteristics (e.g. evapotranspiration rates, soil infiltrability) of disturbed and managed sites to a near pre-disturbance condition. Improved and sustainable use of forest resources depends on better knowledge of the spatial and temporal aspects of recovery of hydrologic properties and processes affected by forest disturbance. This enhanced understanding is particularly pressing given such issues as the implications of climate change for forest ecosystems and the transition of forest management in many regions from forestry for wood, pulp and paper to forest harvesting for biofuels, where the potential magnitude of forest disturbances and hydrological recovery times are largely unknown. Initial studies of hydrological recovery focused on streamflow changes at the basin scale due to forest disturbance and regeneration, while more recent work has examined a variety of hydrologic properties and processes across a range of scales. The differing approaches that are currently used to assess hydrological recovery will be examined, drawing examples of recovery rates of various hydrologic processes in different forest landscapes. Counter-intuitive findings of this research will be highlighted, efforts to incorporate models of hydrological recovery into forest management strategies will be reviewed, and important avenues for future research will be discussed.

  19. On conditions and parameters important to model sensitivity for unsaturated flow through layered, fractured tuff; Results of analyses for HYDROCOIN [Hydrologic Code Intercomparison Project] Level 3 Case 2: Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Prindle, R.W.; Hopkins, P.L.

    1990-10-01

    The Hydrologic Code Intercomparison Project (HYDROCOIN) was formed to evaluate hydrogeologic models and computer codes and their use in performance assessment for high-level radioactive-waste repositories. This report describes the results of a study for HYDROCOIN of model sensitivity for isothermal, unsaturated flow through layered, fractured tuffs. We investigated both the types of flow behavior that dominate the performance measures and the conditions and model parameters that control flow behavior. We also examined the effect of different conceptual models and modeling approaches on our understanding of system behavior. The analyses included single- and multiple-parameter variations about base cases in one-dimensional steady and transient flow and in two-dimensional steady flow. The flow behavior is complex even for the highly simplified and constrained system modeled here. The response of the performance measures is both nonlinear and nonmonotonic. System behavior is dominated by abrupt transitions from matrix to fracture flow and by lateral diversion of flow. The observed behaviors are strongly influenced by the imposed boundary conditions and model constraints. Applied flux plays a critical role in determining the flow type but interacts strongly with the composite-conductivity curves of individual hydrologic units and with the stratigraphy. One-dimensional modeling yields conservative estimates of distributions of groundwater travel time only under very limited conditions. This study demonstrates that it is wrong to equate the shortest possible water-travel path with the fastest path from the repository to the water table. 20 refs., 234 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Hydrologic and Water-Quality Conditions During Restoration of the Wood River Wetland, Upper Klamath River Basin, Oregon, 2003-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, Kurt D.; Snyder, Daniel T.; Duff, John H.; Triska, Frank J.; Lee, Karl K.; Avanzino, Ronald J.; Sobieszczyk, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Restoring previously drained wetlands is a strategy currently being used to improve water quality and decrease nutrient loading into Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon. In this 2003-05 study, ground- and surface-water quality and hydrologic conditions were characterized in the Wood River Wetland. Nitrogen and phosphorus levels, primarily as dissolved organic nitrogen and ammonium (NH4) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), were high in surface waters. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations also were elevated in surface water, with median concentrations of 44 and 99 milligrams of carbon per liter (mg-C/L) in the North and South Units of the Wood River Wetland, respectively, reaching a maximum of 270 mg-C/L in the South Unit in late autumn. Artesian well water produced NH4 and SRP concentrations of about 6,000 micrograms per liter (ug/L), and concentrations of 36,500 ug-N/L NH4 and 4,110 ug-P/L SRP in one 26-28 ft deep piezometer well. Despite the high ammonium concentrations, the nitrate levels were moderate to low in wetland surface and ground waters. The surface-water concentrations of NH4 and SRP increased in spring and summer, outpacing those for chloride (a conservative tracer), indicative of evapoconcentration. In-situ chamber experiments conducted in June and August 2005 indicated a positive flux of NH4 and SRP from the wetland sediments. Potential sources of NH4 and SRP include diffusion of nutrients from decomposed peat, decomposing aquatic vegetation, or upwelling ground water. In addition to these inputs, evapoconcentration raised surface-water solute concentrations to exceedingly high values by the end of summer. The increase was most pronounced in the South Unit, where specific conductance reached 2,500 uS/cm and median concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus reached 18,000-36,500 ug-N/L and about 18,000-26,000 ug-P/L, respectively. Water-column SRP and total phosphorus levels decreased during autumn and winter following inputs of irrigation

  1. Towards Reproducibility in Computational Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Christopher; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    The ability to reproduce published scientific findings is a foundational principle of scientific research. Independent observation helps to verify the legitimacy of individual findings; build upon sound observations so that we can evolve hypotheses (and models) of how catchments function; and move them from specific circumstances to more general theory. The rise of computational research has brought increased focus on the issue of reproducibility across the broader scientific literature. This is because publications based on computational research typically do not contain sufficient information to enable the results to be reproduced, and therefore verified. Given the rise of computational analysis in hydrology over the past 30 years, to what extent is reproducibility, or a lack thereof, a problem in hydrology? Whilst much hydrological code is accessible, the actual code and workflow that produced and therefore documents the provenance of published scientific findings, is rarely available. We argue that in order to advance and make more robust the process of hypothesis testing and knowledge creation within the computational hydrological community, we need to build on from existing open data initiatives and adopt common standards and infrastructures to: first make code re-useable and easy to find through consistent use of metadata; second, publish well documented workflows that combine re-useable code together with data to enable published scientific findings to be reproduced; finally, use unique persistent identifiers (e.g. DOIs) to reference re-useable and reproducible code, thereby clearly showing the provenance of published scientific findings. Whilst extra effort is require to make work reproducible, there are benefits to both the individual and the broader community in doing so, which will improve the credibility of the science in the face of the need for societies to adapt to changing hydrological environments.

  2. Towards the prediction of actual evaporation from terrestrial surfaces using analytical complementary relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, Dani; Aminzadeh, Milad; Roderick, Michael L.

    2016-04-01

    Notwithstanding the centrality of potential evaporation (PE) in hydrologic and climate models, its definition and proper use remain widely debated. We propose a mechanistic, pore-based model for evaporation and energy partitioning over drying porous surfaces to define PE for a hypothetical steady-state reference surface temperature. Feedback between drying land surface and overlaying air properties is considered in the hypothetical steady-state with a vanishing sensible heat flux and diversion of available energy to evaporation. Surprisingly, the resulting steady-state PE tracks class A pan evaporation data very closely suggesting that pan evaporation occurs with negligible sensible heat flux (in agreement with summer observations). The new PE enables analytical derivation of asymmetric complementary relationship (CR) between potential and actual evaporation for a wide range of conditions in good agreement with measured actual evaporation. The derivations provide new insights into the origins of asymmetry in the CR linked to input weather data and evolution of the temperature of drying surfaces across scales. The analytical CR could offer physically-based estimates of regional scale actual evaporation during surface drying for a wide range of present and future external inputs that may resolve future energy partitioning patterns and issues related to droughts.

  3. Hydrological research in Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, M.

    2012-12-01

    Almost all major development problems in Ethiopia are water-related: food insecurity, low economic development, recurrent droughts, disastrous floods, poor health conditions, and low energy condition. In order to develop and manage existing water resources in a sustainable manner, knowledge is required about water availability, water quality, water demand in various sectors, and the impacts of water resource projects on health and the environment. The lack of ground-based data has been a major challenge for generating this knowledge. Current advances in remote sensing and computer simulation technology could provide alternative source of datasets. In this talk, I will present the challenges and opportunities in using remote sensing datasets and hydrological models in regions such as Africa where ground-based datasets are scarce.

  4. Analytical Complementary Relationship Between Actual and Potential Evaporation Defined by Steady State Reference Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Aminzadeh, M.; Roderick, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The definition of potential evaporation remains widely debated despite its centrality for hydrologic and climatic models. We employed an analytical pore-scale representation of evaporation from porous surfaces to define potential evaporation using a hypothetical steady-state reference temperature for air and evaporating surface. The feedback between drying land surfaces and overlaying air properties is implicitly incorporated in the hypothetical steady-state where the sensible heat flux vanishes and available energy is consumed by evaporation. Potential evaporation based on steady-state surface temperature was in surprisingly good agreement with class A pan evaporation measurements suggesting that pan evaporation occurs with negligible sensible heat flux. The model facilitates a new analytical generalization of the asymmetric complementary relationship across a wide range of meteorological conditions with good agreement between measured and predicted actual evaporation.

  5. A generalized complementary relationship between actual and potential evaporation defined by a reference surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, Milad; Roderick, Michael L.; Or, Dani

    2016-01-01

    The definition of potential evaporation remains widely debated despite its centrality for hydrologic and climatic models. We employed an analytical pore-scale representation of evaporation from terrestrial surfaces to define potential evaporation using a hypothetical steady state reference temperature that is common to both air and evaporating surface. The feedback between drying land surfaces and overlaying air properties, central in the Bouchet (1963) complementary relationship, is implicitly incorporated in the hypothetical steady state where the sensible heat flux vanishes and the available energy is consumed by evaporation. Evaporation rates predicted based on the steady state reference temperature hypothesis were in good agreement with class A pan evaporation measurements suggesting that evaporation from pans occurs with negligible sensible heat flux. The model facilitates a new generalization of the asymmetric complementary relationship with the asymmetry parameter b analytically predicted for a wide range of meteorological conditions with initial tests yielding good agreement between measured and predicted actual evaporation.

  6. Effects of hydrologic conditions on SWAT model performance and parameter sensitivity for a small, mixed land use catchment in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Me, W.; Abell, J. M.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2015-10-01

    The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was configured for the Puarenga Stream catchment (77 km2), Rotorua, New Zealand. The catchment land use is mostly plantation forest, some of which is spray-irrigated with treated wastewater. A Sequential Uncertainty Fitting (SUFI-2) procedure was used to auto-calibrate unknown parameter values in the SWAT model. Model validation was performed using two data sets: (1) monthly instantaneous measurements of suspended sediment (SS), total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations; and (2) high-frequency (1-2 h) data measured during rainfall events. Monthly instantaneous TP and TN concentrations were generally not reproduced well (24 % bias for TP, 27 % bias for TN, and R2 < 0.1, NSE < 0 for both TP and TN), in contrast to SS concentrations (< 1 % bias; R2 and NSE both > 0.75) during model validation. Comparison of simulated daily mean SS, TP and TN concentrations with daily mean discharge-weighted high-frequency measurements during storm events indicated that model predictions during the high rainfall period considerably underestimated concentrations of SS (44 % bias) and TP (70 % bias), while TN concentrations were comparable (< 1 % bias; R2 and NSE both ~ 0.5). This comparison highlighted the potential for model error associated with quick flow fluxes in flashy lower-order streams to be underestimated compared with low-frequency (e.g. monthly) measurements derived predominantly from base flow measurements. To address this, we recommend that high-frequency, event-based monitoring data are used to support calibration and validation. Simulated discharge, SS, TP and TN loads were partitioned into two components (base flow and quick flow) based on hydrograph separation. A manual procedure (one-at-a-time sensitivity analysis) was used to quantify parameter sensitivity for the two hydrologically separated regimes. Several SWAT parameters were found to have different sensitivities between base flow and quick flow. Parameters

  7. Hydrologic Conditions and Distribution of Selected Constituents in Water, Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1996 through 1998

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. Bartholomay; B. J. Tucker; L. C. Davis; M. R. Greene

    2000-09-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds and disposal wells at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer. The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, maintains a monitoring network at the INEEL to determine hydrologic trends and to delineate the movement to radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from the Snake River Plain aquifer during 1996-98. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INEEL decreased or remained constant during 1996-98. Decreased concentrations are attributed to reduced rates of radioactive-waste disposal, sorption process, radioactive decay, and changes in waste-disposal practices. Detectable concentrations of chemical constituents in water from the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INEEL were variable during 1996-98.

  8. Preliminary subsurface hydrologic considerations: Columbia River Plateau Physiographic Province. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veatch, M.D.

    1980-04-01

    This report contains a discussion of the hydrologic conditions of the Columbia River Plateau physiographic province. The Columbia River Plateau is underlain by a thick basalt sequence. The Columbia River basalt sequence contains both basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds. These sedimentary interbeds, which are layers of sedimentary rock between lava flows, are the main aquifer zones in the basalt sequence. Permeable interflow zones, involving the permeable top and/or rubble bottom of a flow, are also water-transmitting zones. A number of stratigraphic units are present in the Pasco Basin, which is in the central part of the Columbia River Plateau. At a conceptual level, the stratigraphic sequence from the surface downward can be separated into four hydrostratigraphic systems. These are: (1) the unsaturated zone, (2) the unconfined aquifer, (3) the uppermost confined aquifers, and (4) the lower Yakima basalt hydrologic sequence. A conceptual layered earth model (LEM) has been developed. The LEM represents the major types of porous media (LEM units) that may be encountered at a number of places on the Columbia Plateau, and specifically in the Pasco Basin. The conceptual LEM is not representative of the actual three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic sequence and hydrologic conditions existing at any specific site within the Columbia Plateau physiographic province. However, the LEM may be useful for gaining a better understanding of how the hydrologic regime may change as a result of disruptive events that may interact with a waste repository in geologic media.

  9. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central element in a metaphysical…

  10. El Observatorio Gemini - Status actual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levato, H.

    Se hace una breve descripción de la situación actual del Observatorio Gemini y de las últimas decisiones del Board para incrementar la eficiencia operativa. Se hace también una breve referencia al uso argentino del observatorio.

  11. Hydrology and water quality in two mountain basins of the northeastern US: Assessing baseline conditions and effects of ski area development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wemple, B.; Shanley, J.; Denner, J.; Ross, D.; Mills, K.

    2007-01-01

    Mountain regions throughout the world face intense development pressures associated with recreational and tourism uses. Despite these pressures, much of the research on bio-geophysical impacts of humans in mountain regions has focused on the effects of natural resource extraction. This paper describes findings from the first 3 years of a study examining high elevation watershed processes in a region undergoing alpine resort development. Our study is designed as a paired-watershed experiment. The Ranch Brook watershed (9.6 km2) is a relatively pristine, forested watershed and serves as the undeveloped 'control' basin. West Branch (11.7 km2) encompasses an existing alpine ski resort, with approximately 17% of the basin occupied by ski trails and impervious surfaces, and an additional 7% slated for clearing and development. Here, we report results for water years 2001-2003 of streamflow and water quality dynamics for these watersheds. Precipitation increases significantly with elevation in the watersheds, and winter precipitation represents 36-46% of annual precipitation. Artificial snowmaking from water within West Branch watershed currently augments annual precipitation by only 3-4%. Water yield in the developed basin exceeded that in the control by 18-36%. Suspended sediment yield was more than two and a half times greater and fluxes of all major solutes were higher in the developed basin. Our study is the first to document the effects of existing ski area development on hydrology and water quality in the northeastern US and will serve as an important baseline for evaluating the effects of planned resort expansion activities in this area.

  12. Drought Analysis for River Basins, Using the Hydrological Model SIMGRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querner, E.; van Lanen, H.; Rhebergen, W.

    2009-05-01

    Drought is a recurring and worldwide phenomenon, with spatial and temporal characteristics that vary significantly from one region to another. Drought has major impacts on society and affects among others the environment and the economy. Impacts are likely to increase with time as societies demands higher services for water and the environment. This will even be more pronounced in the coming decades with the projected climate change, i.e. droughts are becoming more severe in large parts of the world. The prediction of droughts is an essential part of impact assessment for current and future conditions, as part of integrated land and water management. An important question is how changes in meteorological drought will propagate into hydrological droughts in terms of changes in the groundwater system or in the river flow. The objective of our study is to develop and test tools that quantify the space-time development of droughts in a river basin. The spatial aspect of a hydrological drought (spatially-distributed recharge and groundwater heads), in a river basin brings different challenges with respect to describing the characteristics of a drought, such as: onset, duration, severity and extend. We used the regional hydrological model SIMGRO as a basis to generate the necessary data for the drought analysis. SIMGRO is a distributed physically-based model that simulates regional transient saturated groundwater flow, unsaturated flow, actual evapotranspiration, sprinkler irrigation, stream flow, groundwater and surface water levels as a response to rainfall, reference evapotranspiration, and groundwater abstraction. The model is used within the GIS environment Arc-View, which enables the use of digital data, such as soil map, land use, watercourses, as input data for the model. It is also a tool for analysis, because interactively data and results can be presented, as will be shown. Droughts in different hydrological variables (recharge, groundwater heads, river flow

  13. Impact of potential and (scintillometer-based) actual evapotranspiration estimates on the performance of a lumped rainfall-runoff model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samain, B.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2013-11-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) plays a key role in hydrological impact studies and operational flood forecasting models as ET represents a loss of water from a catchment. Although ET is a major component of the catchment water balance, the evapotranspiration input for rainfall-runoff models is often simplified in contrast to the detailed estimates of catchment averaged precipitation. In this study, an existing conceptual rainfall-runoff model calibrated for and operational in the Bellebeek catchment in Belgium firstly has been validated and its sensitivity to different available potential ET input has been studied. It has been shown that when applying a calibrated rainfall-runoff model, the model input should be consistent with the input used for the calibration process, not only on the volume of ET, but also on the seasonal pattern. Secondly, estimates of the actual evapotranspiration based on measurements of a large aperture scintillometer (LAS) have been used as model forcing in the rainfall-runoff model. From this analysis, it has been shown that the actual evapotranspiration is a crucial factor in simulating the catchment water balance and the resulting stream flow. Regarding the actual evapotranspiration estimates from the LAS, it has been concluded that they can be considered realistic in summer months. In the months where stable conditions prevail (autumn, winter and (early) spring), an underestimation of the actual evapotranspiration is made, which has an important impact on the catchment's water balance.

  14. Coral Geochemical Proxy Records Of The East Asian Winter Monsoon And Hydrological Conditions In The Central Vietnam From 1978-2004 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Shen, C.; Chen, Y.; Chiang, H.; Lam, D. D.; Ngai, N.

    2007-12-01

    Monthly-resolution geochemical proxies, including δ18O, δ13C, Sr/Ca, and Ba/Ca, in a living Porites coral head, collected from Son Tra Island, a near-shore island located at the north tip of Vung Da Nang Bay, central Vietnam (16°12'59.4", 108°1'57.1"), was used to quantitatively reconstruct records of sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), seasonality of rainfall, and regional terrestrial input during a period of 1978-2004 AD. By comparing the 1/4-century geochemical data, five features are exhibited. (1) The coral Sr/Ca-inferred summer SSTs correspond well with the 1°x1° instrumental data to suggest that the regional SST record can be retrieved from this local coral head. (2) Interannual variation of coral winter SST data does not follow regional instrumental values. The harmonic phenomenon between coral inferred winter SST dynamic and the surface pressure difference, between the southern South China Sea (SCS) (0-10°N, 105-115°E) and the northern SCS (22.5-32.5°N, 112-122°E), indicating that the cold local SST induced by East Asian winter monsoon was addressed in the Son Tra coral. (3) 1‰ seasonal anomaly of δ18O residual (Δδ18O) suggests a 2-4-psu seasonal salinity change between dry and wet seasons. (4) The synchronous intra-annual changes of δ18O and Ba/Ca data suggest that the rainy season is from late summer to winter, which is consistent with the meteorological record. (5) The high Ba/Ca background level of 10 μmol/mol in 1992-2004, 2-3 times larger than the averaged value of 4 μmol/mol in 1978-1992, indicates an enhanced terrestrial sediment discharge into the bay over the past 10 years. Ba records probably reflect an impact of human activity on hydrological change since the Vietnam War.

  15. Polythermal Glacier Hydrology: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D. L.; Hodson, Andrew J.; Moorman, Brian J.; Vatne, Geir; Hubbard, Alun L.

    2011-11-01

    The manner by which meltwater drains through a glacier is critical to ice dynamics, runoff characteristics, and water quality. However, much of the contemporary knowledge relating to glacier hydrology has been based upon, and conditioned by, understanding gleaned from temperate valley glaciers. Globally, a significant proportion of glaciers and ice sheets exhibit nontemperate thermal regimes. The recent, growing concern over the future response of polar glaciers and ice sheets to forecasts of a warming climate and lengthening summer melt season necessitates recognition of the hydrological processes in these nontemperate ice masses. It is therefore timely to present an accessible review of the scientific progress in glacial hydrology where nontemperate conditions are dominant. This review provides an appraisal of the glaciological literature from nontemperate glaciers, examining supraglacial, englacial, and subglacial environments in sequence and their role in hydrological processes within glacierized catchments. In particular, the variability and complexity in glacier thermal regimes are discussed, illustrating how a unified model of drainage architecture is likely to remain elusive due to structural controls on the presence of water. Cold ice near glacier surfaces may reduce meltwater flux into the glacier interior, but observations suggest that the transient thermal layer of near surface ice holds a hydrological role as a depth-limited aquifer. Englacial flowpaths may arise from the deep incision of supraglacial streams or the propagation of hydrofractures, forms which are readily able to handle varied meltwater discharge or act as locations for water storage, and result in spatially discrete delivery of water to the subglacial environment. The influence of such drainage routes on seasonal meltwater release is explored, with reference to summer season upwellings and winter icing formation. Moreover, clear analogies emerge between nontemperate valley glacier and

  16. Water-quality and hydrologic conditions at a site of ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds, South Grafton, Massachusetts, September and October 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiSimone, L.A.; Barlow, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-water quality and hydrologic data were collected at a site contaminated by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in South Grafton, Massachusetts, during September and October 1994. The VOCs have formed a plume of contaminated ground water at an abandoned textile mill adjacent to the Blackstone River. Concentrations of total VOCs in the plume ranged from less than 1 to more than 40,000 micrograms per liter. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was the primary chlorinated contaminant, comprising as much as 98 percent of the total VOCs. The highest concentration, 43,000 micrograms per liter, was higher than any previously measured concentration at the site; however, the maximum extent and distribution of concentrations in the VOC plume in September 1994 was similar to that found in July 1993 and in earlier rounds of sampling. In addition to TCE, 1,2-dichloroethene (1,2-DCE) and vinyl chloride were detected at most sites. Spatial and temporal changes in concentrations of TCE, 1,2-DCE, and vinyl chloride are consistent with the hypothesis that TCE biodegradation was the source of 1,2-DCE and vinyl chloride. Ground water at the site contained low to moderately high concentrations of dissolved solids (44 to 406 milligrams per liter), had a moderately high specific conductance (155 to 670 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius), and was slightly acidic (pH=5.9 to 7.0). Concentrations of the major ions-calcium, sodium, chloride, and sulfate-were not related to VOC concentrations. Dissolved-oxygen concentrations were low (0 to 2 milligrams per liter) throughout most of the aquifer. Distribution of nitrogen species, iron, and manganese indicates that zones of varying oxidation-reduction potential were present in the aquifer. Concentrations of trace metals other than iron or manganese, including arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and copper, generally were less than analytical detection limits. Stream stage in the Blackstone River at the site during September and October 1994

  17. Movement of water and heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb and Ni) through sand and sandy loam amended with biosolids under steady-state hydrological conditions.

    PubMed

    Gove, L; Cooke, C M; Nicholson, F A; Beck, A J

    2001-06-01

    New guidelines for using biosolids in UK agriculture favour the use of enhanced treated biosolids, such as dried and composted cakes, due to concerns about the potential for transfer of pathogens into the food chain. However, there is a need to ensure that their use is environmentally acceptable and does not increase the risk to potable water supplies or the food chain from other contaminants such as heavy metals and xenobiotic organic chemicals. The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of composted and dried mesophilic anaerobically digested dewatered (MADD) biosolids would increase the risk of heavy metal leaching from cultivated horizons when compared to more conventionally used MADD cake. Three biosolids (MADD sewage sludge cake - fresh, dried and composted) were mixed with a sand (typic quartzipsamments, %OM = 3.0, pH = 6.5) or a sandy loam (typic hapludalf, %OM = 4.8, pH = 7.6) at an application rate equivalent to 250 kg N/ha/y resulting in loadings of approximately Zn: 6 microg, Cu: 2 microg, Pb: 5 microg and Ni: 0.2 microg/g of soil dry weight basis. These amended soils were repacked into columns (0.4 m by 0.1 m internal diameter) and leaching of Zn, Cu, Pb and Ni was investigated following application of two 24 h simulated rainfall events of 4.5 mm/h. Water balance data and the use of conservative tracers (Cl- and Br ) showed that the hydrological regimes of each core were comparable and, thus, unlikely to account for differences in metal leaching observed. Although no significant difference (P = 0.05) was observed between biosolid amended and control soils, those amended with composted sludge consistently gave higher loss of all metals than did the control soils. Total losses of metals from compost amended soil over the two rainfall events were in the ranges, Zn:20.5-58.2, Cu:9.0-30.5, Pb:24.2-51.2 and Ni:16.0-39.8 microg metal/kg amended soil, compared with Zn:16.4-41.1, Cu:6.2-25.3, Pb:16.9-41.7, and Ni:3.7-25.4 microg metal/kg soil

  18. New hydrology bibliography available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, Jan R.

    Hydrotitles is the first bibliography to be published specifically covering hydrology and hydrology-related sciences. With the increasing numbers of journals and publications in this area, Hydrotitles fills a long-felt need for assistance in guiding the practitioner through the mass of literature to publications that are relevant to his or her needs. The bimonthly publication is published by Geosystems (P.O. Box 40, Didcot, Oxon OX11 9BX, United Kingdom; ISSN 0953-7589, $150 per year.)Entries are arranged by a subject hierarchy according to Geosaurus, Geosystem's thesaurus of geoscience. The main subject headings are hydrology; hydrogeology; hydraulics; experimental hydrology and hydrometry; numerical hydrology; hydrogeochemistry; water quality, treatment, supply and management; environmental hydrology, water pollution and acid rain; fluvial geomorphology; glaciology; climate change; energy; equipment; computer methods; policy and law; limnology; and engineering. There follows a locational index, a stratigraphical index, a geographical index, and an author index.

  19. Global warming and the hydrologic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiciga, Hugo A.; Valdes, Juan B.; Vogel, Richard; Garvey, Jeff; Schwarz, Harry

    1996-01-01

    Starting with a review of the basic processes that govern greenhouse warming, we have demonstrated that the hydrologic cycle plays a key role in the heat balance of the Earth's surface—atmosphere system. Through the water and other climatic feedbacks, the hydrologic cycle is shown to be a key factor in the climate's evolution as greenhouse gases continue to build up in the atmosphere. This paper examines the current predictive capability of general circulation models linked with macroscale and landscape-scale hydrologic models that simulate regional and local hydrologic regimes under global warming scenarios. Issues concerning hydrologic model calibration and validation in the context of climate change are addressed herein. It is shown that the natural uncertainty in hydrologic regimes in the present climate introduces a signal-to-noise interpretation problem for discerning greenhouse-induced variations in regional hydrologic regimes. Simulations of river basins by means of macroscale hydrologic models nested within general circulation models have been implemented in a few selected cases. From the perspective of water resources management, such simulations, carried out in detail under greenhouse-warming scenarios in midlatitudinal basins of the United States, predict shorter winter seasons, larger winter floods, drier and more frequent summer weather, and overall enhanced and protracted hydrologic variability. All these predictions point to potentially worsening conditions for flood control, water storage, and water supply in areas of semiarid midlatitudinal climate currently dependent of spring snowmelt. Little information of this type is currently available for other areas of the world. Practice of sound water resources engineering principles ought to be adequate to cope with additional hydrologic uncertainty that might arise from global warming.

  20. Scaling Applications in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, Mekonnen

    2010-05-01

    Besides downscaling applications, scaling properties of hydrological fields can be used to address a variety of research questions. In this presentation, we will use scaling properties to address questions related to satellite evapotranspiration algorithms, precipitation-streamflow relationships, and hydrological model calibration. Most of the existing satellite-based evapotranspiration (ET) algorithms have been developed using fine-resolution Landsat TM and ASTER data. However, these algorithms are often applied to coarse-resolution MODIS data. Our results show that applying the satellite-based algorithms, which are developed at ASTER resolution, to MODIS resolution leads to ET estimates that (1) preserve the overall spatial pattern (spatial correlation in excess of 0.90), (2) increase the spatial standard deviation and maximum value, (3) have modest conditional bias: underestimate low ET rates (< 1 mm/day) and overestimate high ET rates; the overestimation is within 20%. The results emphasize the need for exploring alternatives for estimation of ET from MODIS. Understanding the relationship between the scaling properties of precipitation and streamflow is important in a number of applications. We present the results of a detailed river flow fluctuation analysis on daily records from 14 stations in the Flint River basin in Georgia in the United States with focus on effect of watershed area on long memory of river flow fluctuations. The areas of the watersheds draining to the stations range from 22 km2 to 19,606 km2. Results show that large watersheds have more persistent flow fluctuations and stronger long-term (time greater than scale break point) memory than small watersheds while precipitation time series shows weak long-term correlation. We conclude that a watershed acts as a 'filter' for a 'white noise' precipitation with more significant filtering in case of large watersheds. Finally, we compare the scaling properties of simulated and observed spatial soil

  1. Hydrologic and water-quality conditions in the Kansas River, northeast Kansas, November 2001-August 2002, and simulation of ammonia assimilative capacity and bacteria transport during low flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Christensen, Victoria G.

    2005-01-01

    Four hypothetical simulations of varied effluent discharges from existing WWTFs and addition of a proposed WWTF near DeSoto were simulated to better understand future water-quality conditions in the Kansas River. Results indicated that ammonia and dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Kansas River will decrease from the conditions observed during synoptic surveys II (February 25 through March 1, 2002) and III (July 22 through August 8, 2002) except near the proposed WWTF where concentrations of ammonia would be near or exceed criteria for waterborne species. Effects of the proposed WWTF on dissolved oxygen would result in concentrations less than the State of Kansas aquatic-life-support use criteria of 5.0 milligrams per liter for 1 to 2 miles downstream from either of the proposed sites. 

  2. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  3. An update of hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer and perched groundwater zones, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, emphasis 2006-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Linda C.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1952, radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged to infiltration ponds (also called percolation ponds), evaporation ponds, and disposal wells at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has affected water quality in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and perched groundwater zones underlying the INL. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, maintains groundwater monitoring networks at the INL to determine hydrologic trends, and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer and in perched groundwater zones. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from aquifer and perched groundwater wells in the USGS groundwater monitoring networks during 2006-08. Water in the Snake River Plain aquifer primarily moves through fractures and interflow zones in basalt, generally flows southwestward, and eventually discharges at springs along the Snake River. The aquifer primarily is recharged from infiltration of irrigation water, infiltration of streamflow, groundwater inflow from adjoining mountain drainage basins, and infiltration of precipitation. From March-May 2005 to March-May 2008, water levels in wells generally remained constant or rose slightly in the southwestern corner of the INL. Water levels declined in the central and northern parts of the INL. The declines ranged from about 1 to 3 feet in the central part of the INL, to as much as 9 feet in the northern part of the INL. Water levels in perched groundwater wells around the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATRC) also declined. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INL generally decreased or remained constant during 2006-08. Decreases in concentrations were attributed to decreased rates of radioactive-waste disposal, radioactive decay, changes in waste-disposal methods, and dilution from recharge and underflow. In April

  4. An update of hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, Emphasis 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Linda C.

    2006-01-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds, evaporation ponds, and disposal wells at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer underlying the INL. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, maintains ground-water monitoring networks at the INL to determine hydrologic trends, and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from wells in the USGS ground-water monitoring networks during 1999-2001. Water in the Snake River Plain aquifer moves principally through fractures and interflow zones in basalt, generally flows southwestward, and eventually discharges at springs along the Snake River. The aquifer is recharged principally from infiltration of irrigation water, infiltration of streamflow, ground-water inflow from adjoining mountain drainage basins, and infiltration of precipitation. Water levels in wells rose in the northern and west-central parts of the INL by 1 to 3 feet, and declined in the southwestern parts of the INL by up to 4 feet during 1999-2001. Detectable concentrations of radiochemical constituents in water samples from wells in the Snake River Plain aquifer at the INL generally decreased or remained constant during 1999-2001. Decreases in concentrations were attributed to decreased rates of radioactive-waste disposal, radioactive decay, changes in waste-disposal methods, and dilution from recharge. Tritium concentrations in water samples decreased as much as 8.3 picocuries per milliliter (pCi/mL) during 1999-2001, ranging from 0.43?0.14 to 13.6?0.6 pCi/mL in October 2001. Tritium concentrations in five wells near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) increased a few picocuries per milliliter from October 2000 to October 2001. Strontium-90 concentrations decreased or remained

  5. Geochemical and hydrologic considerations and the use of enthalpy-chloride diagrams in the prediction of underground conditions in hot-spring systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal water ascending in a hot-spring system may cool by conduction of heat to the surrounding rock, by boiling, by mixing with cooler water, or by a combination of these processes. Complete or partial chemical reequilibration may occur as a result of this cooling. In spite of these complexities, in many places chemical compositions of hot-spring waters may be used to estimate underground conditions. A plot of enthalpy versus chloride is particularly useful for determining underground temperatures, salinities, and boiling and mixing relations. The utility of this approach is illustrated using hot-spring composition data from Cerro Prieto, Mexico, Orakeikorako, New Zealand, and Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. ?? 1979.

  6. Hydrologic and water-quality conditions in the Kansas River, northeast Kansas, November 2001-August 2002, and simulation of ammonia assimilative capacity and bacteria transport during low flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Christensen, Victoria G.

    2005-01-01

    Instantaneous loads of ammonia and bacteria were computed to determine primary inputs to the Kansas River and ammonia and bacteria decay rates in the river. The Oakland WWTF in Topeka was the largest contributor of both ammonia and bacteria on the basis of samples collected during the three synoptic surveys, except for fecal coliform bacteria collected during synoptic survey III when the DeSoto WWTF was discharging the largest concentration of bacteria. The ammonia assimilative process was about twice as effective during the summer synoptic survey than it was during the winter survey. Decay of fecal coliform bacteria density was less evident and appeared to have little seasonal effect on the basis of data collected for this report. The summer low-streamflow water-quality conditions were suitable for nitrification, algae that consume ammonia, and consequently, decaying organic matter that consume oxygen. The consumption of dissolved oxygen due to nitrification and decaying algae contributed to thre

  7. Hydrologic Services Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD. National Weather Service.

    A course to develop an understanding of the scope of water resource activities, of the need for forecasting, of the National Weather Service's role in hydrology, and of the proper procedures to follow in fulfilling this role is presented. The course is one of self-help, guided by correspondence. Nine lessons are included: (1) Hydrology in the…

  8. Hands-On Hydrology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

    2004-01-01

    A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

  9. Towards a debris-flow warning system based on hydrological measurements of the triggering conditions. A study of El Rebaixader catchment (Central Pyrenees, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abancó, Clàudia; Hürlimann, Marcel; Moya, José

    2014-05-01

    Debris flows represent a risk to the society due to their high destructive power. Rainfall is the main debris-flow triggering factor. Rainfall thresholds are generally used for warning of debris flow occurrence in susceptible catchments. However, the efficiency of such thresholds for real time hazard assessment is often conditioned by many factors, such as: the location and number of the rain gauges used (both to define the thresholds, and for setting off warnings); the temporal and spatial evolution of rainfall's convective cells or the effect of snow cover melting. These factors affect the length of the warning time, which is of crucial importance for issuing alert messages or alarms to the people and infrastructures at risk. The Rebaixader catchment (Central Pyrenees, Spain) is being monitored since 2009 by six stations recording information on initiation (4 stations) and flow detection and cinematic behaviour (2 stations). Until December 2013, 7 debris flows, 17 debris floods and 4 rockfalls have been recorded. The objectives of this work were: a) the definition of rainfall thresholds at two different rain gauges; b) the analysis of the infiltration patterns in order to define their potential use for warning systems and c) preliminary testing of rainfall thresholds' efficiency in terms of warning time, in this catchment. This last goal consisted in the comparison of the time elapsed between the rainfall threshold was exceeded and the event occurrence was detected by the stations at the channel area. The results suggest that the intensity-duration rainfall thresholds sometimes provide warning times which would be too short for an adequate reaction in the Rebaixader catchment (less than 10 minutes). The combination of such rainfall thresholds with infiltration measurements is useful to increase the warning time. This occurs especially in the events triggered in spring, when the snowmelt plays an important role in the event's triggering conditions. However, the

  10. Hydrologic Conditions and Water-Quality Conditions Following Underground Coal Mining in the North Fork of the Right Fork of Miller Creek Drainage Basin, Carbon and Emery Counties, Utah, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkowske, C.D.; Cillessen, J.L.; Brinton, P.N.

    2007-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, reassessed the hydrologic system in and around the drainage basin of the North Fork of the Right Fork (NFRF) of Miller Creek, in Carbon and Emery Counties, Utah. The reassessment occurred 13 years after cessation of underground coal mining that was performed beneath private land at shallow depths (30 to 880 feet) beneath the NFRF of Miller Creek. This study is a follow-up to a previous USGS study of the effects of underground coal mining on the hydrologic system in the area from 1988 to 1992. The previous study concluded that mining related subsidence had impacted the hydrologic system through the loss of streamflow over reaches of the perennial portion of the stream, and through a significant increase in dissolved solids in the stream. The previous study also reported that no substantial differences in spring-water quality resulted from longwall mining, and that no clear relationship between mining subsidence and spring discharge existed. During the summers of 2004 and 2005, the USGS measured discharge and collected water-quality samples from springs and surface water at various locations in the NFRF of Miller Creek drainage basin, and maintained a streamflow-gaging station in the NFRF of Miller Creek. This study also utilized data collected by Cyprus-Plateau Mining Corporation from 1992 through 2001. Of thirteen monitored springs, five have discharge levels that have not returned to those observed prior to August 1988, which is when longwall coal mining began beneath the NFRF of Miller Creek. Discharge at two of these five springs appears to fluctuate with wet and dry cycles and is currently low due to a drought that occurred from 1999-2004. Discharge at two other of the five springs did not increase with increased precipitation during the mid-1990s, as was observed at other monitored springs. This suggests that flowpaths to these springs may have been altered by land

  11. The CUAHSI Community Hydrologic Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Maidment, D. R.; Zaslavsky, I.; Ames, D. P.; Goodall, J. L.; Hooper, R. P.; Horsburgh, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrologic information is collected by many individuals and organizations in government and academia for many purposes, including general monitoring of the condition of the water environment and specific investigations of hydrologic processes. Comprehensive understanding of hydrology requires integration of this information from multiple sources. The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) has developed a Hydrologic Information System (HIS) to provide better access to data by enabling the publication, cataloging, discovery and retrieval of hydrologic data using web services. This paper describes HIS capability developed to promote data sharing and interoperability in the Hydrologic Sciences with the purpose of enabling hydrologic analyses that integrate data from multiple sources. The CUAHSI HIS is an Internet based system comprised of hydrologic databases and servers connected through web services as well as software for data publication, discovery and access. The system that has been developed provides new opportunities for the water research community to approach the management, publication, and analysis of their data systematically. The system's flexibility in storing and enabling public access to similarly formatted data and metadata has created a community data resource from public and academic data that might otherwise have been confined to the private files of agencies or individual investigators. Additionally, HIS provides an analysis environment within which data from multiple sources can be discovered, accessed and integrated. The CUAHSI HIS serves as a prototype for the infrastructure to support a network of large scale environmental observatories or research watersheds, and indeed, components of the CUAHSI HIS have now been adopted or modified for use within the Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) network. Software and further information may be obtained from http://his.cuahsi.org.

  12. The inequality of water scarcity events: who is actually being affected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldkamp, Ted I. E.; Wada, Yoshihide; Kummu, Matti; Aerts, Jeroen C. J. H.; Ward, Philip J.

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades, changing hydro-climatic and socioeconomic conditions increased regional and global water scarcity problems. In the near future, projected changes in human water use and population growth - in combination with climate change - are expected to aggravate water scarcity conditions and its associated impacts on our society. Whilst a wide range of studies have modelled past and future regional and global patterns of change in population or land area impacted by water scarcity conditions, less attention is paid on who is actually affected and how vulnerable this share of the population is to water scarcity conditions. The actual impact of water scarcity events, however, not only depends on the numbers being affected, but merely on how sensitive this population is to water scarcity conditions, how quick and efficient governments can deal with the problems induced by water scarcity, and how many (financial and infrastructural) resources are available to cope with water scarce conditions. Only few studies have investigated the above mentioned interactions between societal composition and water scarcity conditions (e.g. by means of the social water scarcity index and the water poverty index) and, up to our knowledge, a comprehensive global analysis including different water scarcity indicators and multiple climate and socioeconomic scenarios is missing. To address this issue, we assess in this contribution the adaptive capacity of a society to water scarcity conditions, evaluate how this may be driven by different societal factors, and discuss how enhanced knowledge on this topic could be of interest for water managers in their design of adaptation strategies coping with water scarcity events. For that purpose, we couple spatial information on water scarcity conditions with different components from, among others, the Human Development Index and the Worldwide Governance Indicators, such as: the share of the population with an income below the poverty

  13. Preliminary hydrologic budget of the sand-and-gravel aquifer under unstressed conditions : with a section on water-quality monitoring, Pensacola, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trapp, Henry

    1978-01-01

    The sand-and-gravel aquifer is the only freshwater aquifer in southern Escambia County, Fla. Problems related to the development of the aquifer include sustained yield, contamination, and saltwater intrusion. A digital model was applied to the sand-and-gravel aquifer in central and southern Escambia County treating the aquifer 's 'main producing zone ' as a discrete, leaky, confined aquifer. Under conditions of no pumping, most values for the final-head matrix agreed with assumed values within 4 feet in the area of principal interest. Discharge per unit land area was 1.04 cubic feet per second per square mile, in close agreement with the base runoff streams maintained by the aquifer. Total natural aquifer discharge within the area of principal interest determined by the model was 159 million gallons per day. The applicability of the present non-unique calibration for predicting the effects of pumping is questionable; a multilayered model may be required. Effluent infiltrating from holding lagoons for spray irrigation at the Scenic Hills Sewage Plant may have affected the quality of local perched ground water in the sand-and-gravel aquifer. Observation wells drilled near areas of heavy pumping around Bayou Chico indicated no saltwater intrusion. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Seasonal Hydrologic Predictability: Sources and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    I first review sources of predictability in seasonal hydrological forecasts. Recent work shows that at short lead times (typically up to a few months), hydrologic forecast skill is mostly controlled by hydrologic initial conditions (primarily soil moisture and where and when relevant, snow water storage), but at longer lead times, climate forecast skill dominates. Unfortunately, aside from a few special situations, climate forecast skill for lead times beyond about a month is minimal. Therefore, for practical purposes, hydrological initial conditions are the primary source of hydrological forecast skill. This is the premise of the widely used Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) method. I also investigate barriers to the use of seasonal hydrological forecasts in water resource systems operation. I review in particular work approximately a decade ago by Maurer, which casts light on the potential for improved reservoir system operations through improved forecasts as a function of the usable reservoir storage relative to the mean annual inflow, relative to the simplest forecast (climatology). In general, the potential economic benefits of improved forecasts are largest for relatively small reservoirs.

  15. Hydrological Classification, a Practical Tool for Mangrove Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Van Loon, Anne F.; Te Brake, Bram; Van Huijgevoort, Marjolein H. J.; Dijksma, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Mangrove restoration projects, aimed at restoring important values of mangrove forests after degradation, often fail because hydrological conditions are disregarded. We present a simple, but robust methodology to determine hydrological suitability for mangrove species, which can guide restoration practice. In 15 natural and 8 disturbed sites (i.e. disused shrimp ponds) in three case study regions in south-east Asia, water levels were measured and vegetation species composition was determined. Using an existing hydrological classification for mangroves, sites were classified into hydrological classes, based on duration of inundation, and vegetation classes, based on occurrence of mangrove species. For the natural sites hydrological and vegetation classes were similar, showing clear distribution of mangrove species from wet to dry sites. Application of the classification to disturbed sites showed that in some locations hydrological conditions had been restored enough for mangrove vegetation to establish, in some locations hydrological conditions were suitable for various mangrove species but vegetation had not established naturally, and in some locations hydrological conditions were too wet for any mangrove species (natural or planted) to grow. We quantified the effect that removal of obstructions such as dams would have on the hydrology and found that failure of planting at one site could have been prevented. The hydrological classification needs relatively little data, i.e. water levels for a period of only one lunar tidal cycle without additional measurements, and uncertainties in the measurements and analysis are relatively small. For the study locations, the application of the hydrological classification gave important information about how to restore the hydrology to suitable conditions to improve natural regeneration or to plant mangrove species, which could not have been obtained by estimating elevation only. Based on this research a number of recommendations

  16. Hydrological Classification, a Practical Tool for Mangrove Restoration.

    PubMed

    Van Loon, Anne F; Te Brake, Bram; Van Huijgevoort, Marjolein H J; Dijksma, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Mangrove restoration projects, aimed at restoring important values of mangrove forests after degradation, often fail because hydrological conditions are disregarded. We present a simple, but robust methodology to determine hydrological suitability for mangrove species, which can guide restoration practice. In 15 natural and 8 disturbed sites (i.e. disused shrimp ponds) in three case study regions in south-east Asia, water levels were measured and vegetation species composition was determined. Using an existing hydrological classification for mangroves, sites were classified into hydrological classes, based on duration of inundation, and vegetation classes, based on occurrence of mangrove species. For the natural sites hydrological and vegetation classes were similar, showing clear distribution of mangrove species from wet to dry sites. Application of the classification to disturbed sites showed that in some locations hydrological conditions had been restored enough for mangrove vegetation to establish, in some locations hydrological conditions were suitable for various mangrove species but vegetation had not established naturally, and in some locations hydrological conditions were too wet for any mangrove species (natural or planted) to grow. We quantified the effect that removal of obstructions such as dams would have on the hydrology and found that failure of planting at one site could have been prevented. The hydrological classification needs relatively little data, i.e. water levels for a period of only one lunar tidal cycle without additional measurements, and uncertainties in the measurements and analysis are relatively small. For the study locations, the application of the hydrological classification gave important information about how to restore the hydrology to suitable conditions to improve natural regeneration or to plant mangrove species, which could not have been obtained by estimating elevation only. Based on this research a number of recommendations

  17. Hydrological Classification, a Practical Tool for Mangrove Restoration.

    PubMed

    Van Loon, Anne F; Te Brake, Bram; Van Huijgevoort, Marjolein H J; Dijksma, Roel

    2016-01-01

    Mangrove restoration projects, aimed at restoring important values of mangrove forests after degradation, often fail because hydrological conditions are disregarded. We present a simple, but robust methodology to determine hydrological suitability for mangrove species, which can guide restoration practice. In 15 natural and 8 disturbed sites (i.e. disused shrimp ponds) in three case study regions in south-east Asia, water levels were measured and vegetation species composition was determined. Using an existing hydrological classification for mangroves, sites were classified into hydrological classes, based on duration of inundation, and vegetation classes, based on occurrence of mangrove species. For the natural sites hydrological and vegetation classes were similar, showing clear distribution of mangrove species from wet to dry sites. Application of the classification to disturbed sites showed that in some locations hydrological conditions had been restored enough for mangrove vegetation to establish, in some locations hydrological conditions were suitable for various mangrove species but vegetation had not established naturally, and in some locations hydrological conditions were too wet for any mangrove species (natural or planted) to grow. We quantified the effect that removal of obstructions such as dams would have on the hydrology and found that failure of planting at one site could have been prevented. The hydrological classification needs relatively little data, i.e. water levels for a period of only one lunar tidal cycle without additional measurements, and uncertainties in the measurements and analysis are relatively small. For the study locations, the application of the hydrological classification gave important information about how to restore the hydrology to suitable conditions to improve natural regeneration or to plant mangrove species, which could not have been obtained by estimating elevation only. Based on this research a number of recommendations

  18. Advancing reservoir operation description in physically based hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghileri, Daniela; Giudici, Federico; Castelletti, Andrea; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Last decades have seen significant advances in our capacity of characterizing and reproducing hydrological processes within physically based models. Yet, when the human component is considered (e.g. reservoirs, water distribution systems), the associated decisions are generally modeled with very simplistic rules, which might underperform in reproducing the actual operators' behaviour on a daily or sub-daily basis. For example, reservoir operations are usually described by a target-level rule curve, which represents the level that the reservoir should track during normal operating conditions. The associated release decision is determined by the current state of the reservoir relative to the rule curve. This modeling approach can reasonably reproduce the seasonal water volume shift due to reservoir operation. Still, it cannot capture more complex decision making processes in response, e.g., to the fluctuations of energy prices and demands, the temporal unavailability of power plants or varying amount of snow accumulated in the basin. In this work, we link a physically explicit hydrological model with detailed hydropower behavioural models describing the decision making process by the dam operator. In particular, we consider two categories of behavioural models: explicit or rule-based behavioural models, where reservoir operating rules are empirically inferred from observational data, and implicit or optimization based behavioural models, where, following a normative economic approach, the decision maker is represented as a rational agent maximising a utility function. We compare these two alternate modelling approaches on the real-world water system of Lake Como catchment in the Italian Alps. The water system is characterized by the presence of 18 artificial hydropower reservoirs generating almost 13% of the Italian hydropower production. Results show to which extent the hydrological regime in the catchment is affected by different behavioural models and reservoir

  19. Evaluation of groundwater quality and selected hydrologic conditions in the South Coast aquifer, Santa Isabel area, Puerto Rico, 2008–09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodríguez, José M.

    2013-01-01

    The source of drinking water in the Santa Isabel and Coamo areas of Puerto Rico (Molina and Gómez-Gómez, 2008) is the South Coast aquifer (hereafter referred to as the aquifer), which supplies about 30,700 cubic meters per day (m³/d) to Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority (PRASA) public-supply wells. In addition, approximately 45 wells provide an estimated 33,700 m³/d of groundwater to irrigate crops in the area. In 1967, baseline nitrate concentrations in groundwater throughout most of the aquifer were generally less than 6 milligrams per liter (mg/L) as nitrogen in collected water samples (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012). In 2007, elevated nitrate concentrations were detected in the aquifer, near Santa Isabel and the foothills north of the coastal plain at Santa Isabel as part of a regional groundwater-quality assessment conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during 2007 (Rodríguez and Gómez-Gómez, 2008). The increase in nitrate concentrations has been of concern to local government agencies because of its potential effect on public supply. To address public-supply concerns, the USGS, in cooperation with the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (PRDNER), evaluated groundwater quality in the aquifer near the Santa Isabel area between January 2008 and May 2009. The objectives of the study were to (1) define the groundwater-quality conditions of the aquifer, with emphasis on the distribution of nitrate concentrations; (2) identify potential sources leading to elevated nitrate concentrations; (3) estimate the nitrate loads from major sources identified; and (4) estimate the groundwater withdrawals by principal-use categories in the area. Results of this study will be used by Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and Federal agencies in developing strategies that can result in containment of high nitrate groundwater to minimize degradation of fresh groundwater in the aquifer.

  20. Hydrologic conditions and terrestrial laser scanning of post-fire debris flows in the San Gabriel Mountains, CA, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Kevin M.; Hanshaw, M.N.; Howle, James F.; Kean, Jason W.; Staley, Dennis M.; Stock, Jonathan D.; Bawden, Gerald W.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate rainfall-runoff conditions that generate post-wildfire debris flows, we instrumented and surveyed steep, small watersheds along the tectonically active front of the San Gabriel Mountains, California. Fortuitously, we recorded runoff-generated debris-flows triggered by one spatially restricted convective event with 28 mm of rainfall falling over 62 minutes. Our rain gages, nested hillslope overland-flow sensors and soil-moisture probes, as well as a time series of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) revealed the effects of the storm. Hillslope overland-flow response, along two ~10-m long flow lines perpendicular to and originating from a drainage divide, displayed only a 10 to 20 minute delay from the onset of rainfall with accumulated totals of merely 5-10 mm. Depth-stratified soil-moisture probes displayed a greater time delay, roughly 20- 30 minutes, indicating that initial overland flow was Hortonian. Furthermore, a downstream channel-monitoring array recorded a pronounced discharge peak generated by the passage of a debris flow after 18 minutes of rainfall. At this time, only four of the eleven hillslope overlandflow sensors confirmed the presence of surface-water flow. Repeat TLS and detailed field mapping using GPS document how patterns of rainsplash, overland-flow scour, and rilling contributed to the generation of meter-scale debris flows. In response to a single small storm, the debris flows deposited irregular levees and lobate terminal snouts on hillslopes and caused widespread erosion of the valley axis with ground surface lowering exceeding 1.5 m.

  1. Bioconversion of Coal: Hydrologic indicators of the extent of coal biodegradation under different redox conditions and coal maturity, Velenje Basin case study, Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanduč, Tjaša; Grassa, Fausto; Lazar, Jerneja; Jamnikar, Sergej; Zavšek, Simon; McIntosh, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Underground mining of coal and coal combustion for energy has significant environmental impacts. In order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, other lower -carbon energy sources must be utilized. Coalbed methane (CBM) is an important source of relatively low-carbon energy. Approximately 20% of world's coalbed methane is microbial in origin (Bates et al., 2011). Interest in microbial CBM has increased recently due to the possibility of stimulating methanogenesis. Despite increasing interest, the hydrogeochemical conditions and mechanisms for biodegradation of coal and microbial methane production are poorly understood. This project aims to examine geochemical characteristics of coalbed groundwater and coalbed gases in order to constrain biogeochemical processes to better understand the entire process of coal biodegradation of coal to coalbed gases. A better understanding of geochemical processes in CBM areas may potentially lead to sustainable stimulation of microbial methanogenesis at economical rates. Natural analogue studies of carbon dioxide occurring in the subsurface have the potential to yield insights into mechanisms of carbon dioxide storage over geological time scales (Li et al., 2013). In order to explore redox processes related to methanogenesis and determine ideal conditions under which microbial degradation of coal is likely to occur, this study utilizes groundwater and coalbed gas samples from Velenje Basin. Determination of the concentrations of methane, carbondioxide, nitrogen, oxygen, argon was performed with homemade NIER mass spectrometer. Isotopic composition of carbon dioxide, isotopic composition of methane, isotopic composition of deuterium in methane was determined with Europa-Scientific IRMS with an ANCA-TG preparation module and Thermo Delta XP GC-TC/CF-IRMS coupled to a TRACE GC analyzer. Total alkalinity of groundwater was measured by Gran titration. Major cations were analyzed by ICP-OES and anions by IC method. Isotopic composition of

  2. Frozen Ground Controls on Hydrological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinzman, L. D.; Kane, D. L.; Woo, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    laterally resulting in drier surface conditions. Understanding the interdependence of frozen ground, hydrology and ecosystems is critically important to enable accurate projections of future conditions in the high latitudes.

  3. Watershed analysis of the Salmon River watershed, Washington : hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey analyzed selected hydrologic conditions as part of a watershed analysis of the Salmon River watershed, Washington, conducted by the Quinault Indian Nation. The selected hydrologic conditions were analyzed according to a framework of hydrologic key questions that were identified for the watershed. The key questions were posed to better understand the natural, physical, and biological features of the watershed that control hydrologic responses; to better understand current streamflow characteristics, including peak and low flows; to describe any evidence that forest harvesting and road construction have altered frequency and magnitude of peak and low flows within the watershed; to describe what is currently known about the distribution and extent of wetlands and any impacts of land management activities on wetlands; and to describe how hydrologic monitoring within the watershed might help to detect future hydrologic change, to preserve critical ecosystem functions, and to protect public and private property.

  4. Hydrologic Conditions and Quality of Rainfall and Storm Runoff in Agricultural and Rangeland Areas in San Patricio County, Texas, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.

    2002-01-01

    During 2000?2001, rainfall and runoff were monitored in one mixed agricultural watershed and two rangeland watersheds in San Patricio County, located in the Coastal Bend area of South Texas. During this period, five rainfall samples were collected and analyzed for selected nutrients. Ten runoff samples from nine runoff events were collected at the three watershed monitoring stations. Runoff samples were analyzed for selected nutrients, major ions, trace elements, pesticides, and bacteria. Study area rainfall during 2000 and 2001 was 33.27 and 28.20 inches, respectively, less than the long-term average annual of 36.31 inches. Total runoff from the study area watersheds during 2000?2001 was 2.46 inches; the regional average is about 2 inches per year. Rainfall and runoff during the study period was typical of historical patterns, with periods of below average rainfall interspersed with extreme events. Three individual storm events accounted for about 29 percent of the total rainfall and 86 percent of the total runoff during 2000?2001. Runoff concentrations of nutrients, major ions, and trace elements generally were larger in the mixed agricultural watershed than runoff concentrations in the rangeland watersheds. Pesticides were detected in two of eight runoff samples. Three pesticides (atrazine, deethylatrazine, and trifluralin) were detected in very small concentrations; only deethylatrazine was detected in a concentration greater than the laboratory minimum reporting level. Bacteria in agricultural and rangeland runoff is a potential water-quality concern as all fecal coliform and E. coli densities in the runoff samples exceeded Texas Surface Water Quality Standards for receiving waters. However, runoff and relatively large bacteria densities represent very brief and infrequent conditions, and the effect on downstream water is not known. Rainfall deposition is a major source of nitrogen delivered to the study area. Rainfall nitrogen (mostly ammonia and nitrate

  5. Acting, predicting and intervening in a socio-hydrological world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, S. N.

    2014-03-01

    This paper asks a simple question: if humans and their actions co-evolve with hydrological systems (Sivapalan et al., 2012), what is the role of hydrological scientists, who are also humans, within this system? To put it more directly, as traditionally there is a supposed separation of scientists and society, can we maintain this separation as socio-hydrologists studying a socio-hydrological world? This paper argues that we cannot, using four linked sections. The first section draws directly upon the concern of science-technology studies to make a case to the (socio-hydrological) community that we need to be sensitive to constructivist accounts of science in general and socio-hydrology in particular. I review three positions taken by such accounts and apply them to hydrological science, supported with specific examples: (a) the ways in which scientific activities frame socio-hydrological research, such that at least some of the knowledge that we obtain is constructed by precisely what we do; (b) the need to attend to how socio-hydrological knowledge is used in decision-making, as evidence suggests that hydrological knowledge does not flow simply from science into policy; and (c) the observation that those who do not normally label themselves as socio-hydrologists may actually have a profound knowledge of socio-hydrology. The second section provides an empirical basis for considering these three issues by detailing the history of the practice of roughness parameterisation, using parameters like Manning's n, in hydrological and hydraulic models for flood inundation mapping. This history sustains the third section that is a more general consideration of one type of socio-hydrological practice: predictive modelling. I show that as part of a socio-hydrological analysis, hydrological prediction needs to be thought through much more carefully: not only because hydrological prediction exists to help inform decisions that are made about water management; but also because

  6. Response of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi to Hydrologic Gradients in the Rhizosphere of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex. Steudel Growing in the Sun Island Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Wu, Jieting; Ma, Fang; Yang, Jixian; Li, Shiyang; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Within the rhizosphere, AM fungi are a sensitive variable to changes of botanic and environmental conditions, and they may interact with the biomass of plant and other microbes. During the vegetative period of the Phragmites australis growing in the Sun Island Wetland (SIW), the variations of AM fungi colonization were studied. Root samples of three hydrologic gradients generally showed AM fungi colonization, suggesting that AM fungi have the ability for adaptation to flooded habitats. There were direct and indirect hydrological related effects with respect to AM fungi biomass, which interacted simultaneously in the rhizosphere. Though water content in soil and reed growth parameters were both positively associated with AM fungi colonization, only the positive correlations between reed biomass parameters and the colonization could be expected, or both the host plant biomass and the AM fungi could be beneficial. The variations in response of host plant to the edaphic and hydrologic conditions may influence the effectiveness of the plant-mycorrhizal association. This study included a hydrologic component to better assess the role and distribution of AM fungi in wetland ecosystems. And because of that, the range of AM fungi was extended, since they actually showed a notable adaptability to hydrologic gradients. PMID:26146633

  7. Response of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi to Hydrologic Gradients in the Rhizosphere of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex. Steudel Growing in the Sun Island Wetland.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wu, Jieting; Ma, Fang; Yang, Jixian; Li, Shiyang; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Within the rhizosphere, AM fungi are a sensitive variable to changes of botanic and environmental conditions, and they may interact with the biomass of plant and other microbes. During the vegetative period of the Phragmites australis growing in the Sun Island Wetland (SIW), the variations of AM fungi colonization were studied. Root samples of three hydrologic gradients generally showed AM fungi colonization, suggesting that AM fungi have the ability for adaptation to flooded habitats. There were direct and indirect hydrological related effects with respect to AM fungi biomass, which interacted simultaneously in the rhizosphere. Though water content in soil and reed growth parameters were both positively associated with AM fungi colonization, only the positive correlations between reed biomass parameters and the colonization could be expected, or both the host plant biomass and the AM fungi could be beneficial. The variations in response of host plant to the edaphic and hydrologic conditions may influence the effectiveness of the plant-mycorrhizal association. This study included a hydrologic component to better assess the role and distribution of AM fungi in wetland ecosystems. And because of that, the range of AM fungi was extended, since they actually showed a notable adaptability to hydrologic gradients.

  8. Assessing predictability of a hydrological stochastic-dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfan, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The water cycle includes the processes with different memory that creates potential for predictability of hydrological system based on separating its long and short memory components and conditioning long-term prediction on slower evolving components (similar to approaches in climate prediction). In the face of the Panta Rhei IAHS Decade questions, it is important to find a conceptual approach to classify hydrological system components with respect to their predictability, define predictable/unpredictable patterns, extend lead-time and improve reliability of hydrological predictions based on the predictable patterns. Representation of hydrological systems as the dynamical systems subjected to the effect of noise (stochastic-dynamical systems) provides possible tool for such conceptualization. A method has been proposed for assessing predictability of hydrological system caused by its sensitivity to both initial and boundary conditions. The predictability is defined through a procedure of convergence of pre-assigned probabilistic measure (e.g. variance) of the system state to stable value. The time interval of the convergence, that is the time interval during which the system losses memory about its initial state, defines limit of the system predictability. The proposed method was applied to assess predictability of soil moisture dynamics in the Nizhnedevitskaya experimental station (51.516N; 38.383E) located in the agricultural zone of the central European Russia. A stochastic-dynamical model combining a deterministic one-dimensional model of hydrothermal regime of soil with a stochastic model of meteorological inputs was developed. The deterministic model describes processes of coupled heat and moisture transfer through unfrozen/frozen soil and accounts for the influence of phase changes on water flow. The stochastic model produces time series of daily meteorological variables (precipitation, air temperature and humidity), whose statistical properties are similar

  9. The hydrologic laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, A.I.

    1963-01-01

    The knowledge of soil and rock testing, including the application of the test or analysis data to field problems, is still in its infancy. By learning more about the basic laws and principles of nature we can more accurately predict hydrologic phenomena of the future, as well as solve more efficiently the hydrologic problems of the present Our reservoir of fundamental facts and basic knowledge has been, and can be even more fully, increased by the analysis and research work of the Hydrologic Laboratory.

  10. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  11. The Experimental Hydrology Wiki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, T.; Tromp-van Meerveld, I.

    2009-04-01

    The „Experimental Hydrology Wiki" is a forum for experimental hydrologists, which allows us to learn about, recommend, question and discuss methods and equipment of experimental hydrology. As a database of "lessons learned" it does not only contain short descriptions of specific experimental equipment but also information on encountered errors and problems and recommendations on how to deal with them. This makes valuable personal field experience accessible to a wider audience and thus helps us in not making the same mistakes others have made before us. The general idea and layout of the Experimental Hydrology Wiki is presented here along with an invitation to all experimental hydrologists to contribute with their knowledge and experience! http://www.experimental-hydrology.net/

  12. The Experimental Hydrology Wiki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume, Theresa; van Meerveld, Ilja; Graeff, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The "Experimental Hydrology Wiki" is a forum for hydrologists to learn about, recommend, question and discuss new and established, basic and advanced methods and equipment for hydrological research. As a database of "lessons learned" it does not only contain short descriptions of specific experimental equipment but also information on encountered errors and problems and recommendations on how to deal with them. This makes valuable personal field experience accessible to a wider audience. The Wiki allows experimentalists to share and find solutions for common problems and thus helps us in not making the same mistakes others have made before us. At the same time modellers can use this platform to find information on sources of error and uncertainty in the data they use for model validation and calibration. The general idea and layout of the Experimental Hydrology Wiki is presented here along with an invitation to all experimental hydrologists to contribute their knowledge and experiences! http://www.experimental- hydrology.net/

  13. Hydrological sciences and water security: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, G.; Demuth, S.; Mishra, A.; Cudennec, C.

    2015-04-01

    This paper provides an introduction to the concepts of water security including not only the risks to human wellbeing posed by floods and droughts, but also the threats of inadequate supply of water in both quantity and quality for food production, human health, energy and industrial production, and for the natural ecosystems on which life depends. The overall setting is one of constant change in all aspects of Earth systems. Hydrological systems (processes and regimes) are changing, resulting from varying and changing precipitation and energy inputs, changes in surface covers, mining of groundwater resources, and storage and diversions by dams and infrastructures. Changes in social, political and economic conditions include population and demographic shifts, political realignments, changes in financial systems and in trade patterns. There is an urgent need to address hydrological and social changes simultaneously and in combination rather than as separate entities, and thus the need to develop the approach of `socio-hydrology'. All aspects of water security, including the responses of both UNESCO and the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) to the concepts of socio-hydrology, are examined in detailed papers within the volume titled Hydrological Sciences and Water Security: Past, Present and Future.

  14. Hydrologic unit maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seaber, Paul R.; Kapinos, F. Paul; Knapp, George L.

    1987-01-01

    A set of maps depicting approved boundaries of, and numerical codes for, river-basin units of the United States has been developed by the U.S . Geological Survey. These 'Hydrologic Unit Maps' are four-color maps that present information on drainage, culture, hydrography, and hydrologic boundaries and codes of (1) the 21 major water-resources regions and the 222 subregions designated by the U.S . Water Resources Council, (2) the 352 accounting units of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Data Network, and (3) the 2,149 cataloging units of the U.S . Geological Survey's 'Catalog of information on Water Data:' The maps are plotted on the Geological Survey State base-map series at a scale of 1 :500,000 and, except for Alaska, depict hydrologic unit boundaries for all drainage basins greater than 700 square miles (1,813 square kilometers). A complete list of all the hydrologic units, along with their drainage areas, their names, and the names of the States or outlying areas in which they reside, is contained in the report. These maps and associated codes provide a standardized base for use by water-resources organizations in locating, storing, retrieving, and exchanging hydrologic data, in indexing and inventorying hydrologic data and information, in cataloging water-data acquisition activities, and in a variety of other applications. Because the maps have undergone extensive review by all principal Federal, regional, and State water-resource agencies, they are widely accepted for use in planning and describing water-use and related land-use activities, and in geographically organizing hydrologic data . Examples of these uses are given in the report . The hydrologic unit codes shown on the maps have been approved as a Federal Information Processing Standard for use by the Federal establishment.

  15. Studying the Hydrology of Landslides: Pore Water Pressure, Preferential Flow and Feedbacks Between Slope Displacement and Hillslope Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaard, T.; Greco, R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrology is one of the most important triggering factors for slope destabilization. When a slope becomes unstable, cracks and fissures develop during slope deformation. These discontinuities affect both geotechnical and hydrological conditions of the slope. The crucial role of water flow, and especially the important role of preferential flow in unstable slopes, is generally recognized. However, in hydrological modelling, the unstable slope is characterized using static subsurface properties. The dynamic feedback between slope deformation and slope hydrology, being positive or negative depending on other geotechnical conditions, is not taken into account although it influences the pore pressure distribution and as such the overall stability. This research aims to highlight and quantify the dynamic nature of the subsurface hydrological conditions in unstable slopes. We focus on the role preferential flow has on slope destabilization and more specifically on the feedbacks between differential displacement and hydrological behaviour of the subsurface in natural slopes. We will present examples of field experimental work where we measured the hydrological influence of fissures, theoretical analysis and case study modelling of combined hydrology and slope stability, including feedbacks. The results show the subtle trade-off of increased infiltration and storage capacity in a slope and the increased drainage capacity of well connected preferential flow paths. We will furthermore highlight the current status of our knowledge as well as identify the knowledge gaps we face and the importance of cross- and multidisciplinary approach to better understand the internal dynamics of slope deformation and hillslope hydrology.

  16. Hydrologic conditions in Broward County, Florida, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaven, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    During the 1976 water year, rainfall was 3.6 percent below average in Broward County, Fla. Water levels in the Pompano Beach and Dixie well fields were lower during the peak of the 1976 dry season than the peak of the record low dry season in 1971. Flow in the major canals was variable during the 1976 water year compared to 1962-75 averages. Flows in Cypress Creek, Middle River, and Snake Creek at S-29 were higher than the average. Flows in Plantation Canal and South New River were equal to the 1962-75 averages, while Hillsboro, North New River, and Snake Creek at N.W. 67th Avenue were below the long-term averages. The concentrations of principal mineral constituents in surface water in Broward County were within limits established by Florida State Water Standards, with the exception of iron at one station. Total coliforms were equal to or within permissible limits for class III water and waters for public supply in Broward canals at all sites during the 1976 water year. Fecal coliform did not exceed the permissible limit for public water supply at any of the sites during the 1976 water year. (Kosco-USGS)

  17. Hydrologic conditions near Glendo, Platte County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welder, G.E.; Weeks, Edwin P.

    1965-01-01

    The Glendo area of Platte and Carbon Counties, Wyo., about 250 square miles in extent, is in the Great Plains physiographic province. It is bordered on the west by the Laramie Range and on the east by the Hartville uplift. The North Platte River and Horseshoe and Middle Bear Creeks are the principal streams that drain the area. Gentle to steep hills, which lie between 4,450 and 6,360 feet above sea level, characterize the topography. Approximately 7,600 acres of land is cultivated in the Horseshoe Creek valley and 1,000 or more acres in the Cassa Flats of the North Platte River and Middle Bear Creek valleys. The average annual precipitation of 13.15 inches and the streamflow diverted for irrigation from Horseshoe Creek and the North Platte River are usually inadequate to sustain crops during the entire growing season. Sedimentary rocks, which underlie about 99 percent of the Glendo area, range in age from Cambrian(?) to Recent and in thickness from about 3,000 to 4,700 feet. Beds of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age dip steeply away from the Laramie Range and the Hartville uplift to form a large syncline, which is interrupted by the Elkhorn anticline in the central part of the area. Beds of Tertiary and Quaternary age that were deposited over the older structural features and later were partly removed by erosion have dips of less than 6 ? . The 'Converse sand' of local usage at the top of the Hartville Formation of Mississippian(7), Pennsylvanian, and Permian age, the White River Formation of Oligocene age, and the flood-plain deposits of Recent .age are the most important aquifers in the Glendo area. The Hartville Formation consists predominantly of hard limestone and dolomite and of lesser amounts of sandstone and shale ; its thickness ranges from 850 to 1,050 feet throughout most of the area. The 'Converse sand' is an artesian aquifer consisting of fine- to medium-grained porous sandstone having an average thickness of about 80 feet. Recharge to the Hartville Formation is mainly from seepage of surface water from Glendo Reservoir and Spring Creek; ground water is discharged from the formation to the overlying White River Formation and the alluvium in the North Platte River valley near Cassa and to four wells in the Horseshoe Creek valley. Flowing wells yielding from a few gallons per minute to 175 gpm (gallons per minute) or more from the 'Converse sand' can probably be located in an area from ? mile to 1? miles wide and about 4? miles long in the lower Horseshoe Creek valley. The depth to the 'Converse sand' in this area depends upon the topographic relief and distance from the outcrop and ranges from 250 to about 1,000 feet. The discharge induced by pumping a well in the aquifer in the 'Converse sand' would probably amount to about 2 gpm per foot of drawdown. Values of 2,000, 2,100, and 10,300 gpd (gallons per day) per ft for the coefficient of transmissibility of the 'Converse sand' were obtained from aquifer tests at three wells. The chemical analyses of samples from the Hartville Formation ('Converse. sand' included) indicate that the water in the formation is of fairly good quality and adequate for domestic, stock, and irrigation uses, although the fluoride content is low and the water is hard. The White River Formation is composed of as much as 575 feet of fractured siltstone and claystone, and the flood-plain deposits include up to 65 feet of silt, sand, and gravel. Precipitation is the main type of recharge to the rocks of Tertiary age. Recharge to the alluvium in the valleys of Horseshoe Creek and the North Platte River occurs mainly by seepage of ground water from. underlying beds, by infiltration of irrigation water, and by infiltration of streamflow as bank storage. Ground water is discharged naturally from the area by seepage to streams, by underflow, and by evapotranspiration and artificially by wells. In 1961, the total discharge from 38 wells in the White River and Arikaree Formations and 2

  18. State hydrologic unit maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seaber, P.R.; Kapinos, F.P.; Knapp, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    A set of maps depicting approved boundaries of, and numerical codes for, river-basin units of the United States has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. These ' State Hydrologic Unit Maps ' are four-color maps that present information on drainage, culture, hydrography, and hydrologic boundaries and codes: (1) the 21 major water-resources regions and the 222 subregions designated by the U.S. Water Resources Council; (2) the 352 accounting units of the U.S. Geological Survey 's National Water Data Network; and (3) the 2,149 cataloging units of the U.S. Geological Survey 's Catalog of Information on Water Data. The maps are plotted on the Geological Survey State base-map series at a scale of 1:500,000 and, except for Alaska, depict hydrologic unit boundaries for all drainage basins greater than 700 mi squared (1,813 km squared). A complete list of all the hydrologic units, along with their drainage areas, their names, and the names of the States or outlying areas in which they reside, is contained in the report. These maps and associated codes provide a standardized base for use by water-resources organizations in locating, storing, retrieving, and exchanging hydrologic data. The Hydrologic Unit Codes shown on the maps have been approved as a Federal Information Processing Standard for use by the Federal establishment. (USGS)

  19. Understanding the relationship between actual and potential evapotranspirations from long- term water balance analysis and flux observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Yang, H.; Sun, F.

    2007-12-01

    Increase in air temperature and decrease in pan evaporation was found to be common worldwide during the past half century. This results in controversy in view of the changes to the hydrological cycle. Increases in precipitation have been expected due to the Clausius¡§CClapyeron relation in that the specific humidity increases exponentially with the greenhouse-gas induced temperature increasing and confirmed by measurements over northern extratropical land areas. The hydrologic cycle is expected to be intensified (or accelerated). However, the decreased pan evaporation is found to be well related to the global dimming, i.e., the decreased solar radiation induced by the pollution increasing, thus evaporation (i.e., the latent heat flux) should be steadily decreasing from the energy balance perspective. Many researchers explained that the potential evaporation (usually measured by pan) is decreased with increasing of precipitation; however, the increased soil moisture (due to precipitation increasing) can be evaporated because of extra energy available. Therefore, the actual and potential evaporation are in complementary relationship, which is expected to unify the controversy between global warming and dimming. This means that pan evaporation decrease implicates acceleration of the global hydrologic cycle, i.e., increase in the terrestrial evaporation. Based on the complementary theory, many operational formulae have been introduced to estimated actual evaporation from the potential evaporation. Our recent water balance analysis of 108 catchments in non-humid regions of China has shown that there are no general opposite trends between potential and actual evaporation in the same period. A novel phenomenon has been found that the complementary relationships in evaporation are distinctly confirmed when the annual actual and potential evaporation are plotted against annual precipitation; However, complementary relationships disappear in many catchments when actual and

  20. EVALUATION OF URBANIZATION IMPACTS ON HYDROLOGY - LABORATORY AND FIELD APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although urbanization has a major impact on watershed hydrology, there have not been many studies to quantify how basic hydrological relationships are altered by the addition of impervious surface under controlled conditions. In addition, few studies have been conducted to quanti...

  1. A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF MODEL UNCERTAINTY FOR FORECASTING HYDROLOGIC CHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GIS-based hydrologic modeling offers a convenient means of assessing the impacts associated with land-cover/use change for environmental planning efforts. Alternative future scenarios can be used as input to hydrologic models and compared with existing conditions to evaluate pot...

  2. Controls on dissolved organic matter (DOM) degradation in a headwater stream: the influence of photochemical and hydrological conditions in determining light-limitation or substrate-limitation of photo-degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cory, R. M.; Harrold, K. H.; Neilson, B. T.; Kling, G. W.

    2015-11-01

    We investigated how absorption of sunlight by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) controls the degradation and export of DOM from Imnavait Creek, a beaded stream in the Alaskan Arctic. We measured concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), as well as concentrations and characteristics of CDOM and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM), during ice-free periods of 2011-2012 in the pools of Imnavait Creek and in soil waters draining to the creek. Spatial and temporal patterns in CDOM and FDOM in Imnavait Creek were analyzed in conjunction with measures of DOM degradation by sunlight and bacteria and assessments of hydrologic residence times and in situ UV exposure. CDOM was the dominant light attenuating constituent in the UV and visible portion of the solar spectrum, with high attenuation coefficients ranging from 86 ± 12 m-1 at 305 nm to 3 ± 1 m-1 in the photosynthetically active region (PAR). High rates of light absorption and thus light attenuation by CDOM contributed to thermal stratification in the majority of pools in Imnavait Creek under low-flow conditions. In turn, thermal stratification increased the residence time of water and DOM, and resulted in a separation of water masses distinguished by contrasting UV exposure (i.e., UV attenuation by CDOM with depth resulted in bottom waters receiving less UV than surface waters). When the pools in Imnavait Creek were stratified, DOM in the pool bottom water closely resembled soil water DOM in character, while the concentration and character of DOM in surface water was reproduced by experimental photo-degradation of bottom water. These results, in combination with water column rates of DOM degradation by sunlight and bacteria, suggest that photo-degradation is the dominant process controlling DOM fate and export in Imnavait Creek. A conceptual model is presented showing how CDOM amount and lability interact with incident UV light and water residence time to determine whether photo

  3. Does drought alter hydrological functions in forest soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimbel, Katharina; Puhlmann, Heike; Weiler, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Climate change will probably alter precipitation patterns across central Europe, and (summer) droughts are expected to be more frequent and severe in future. Droughts may modify soil properties, such as the pore volume distribution, soil aggregation, water repellency and rooting patterns. These changes in soil properties affect the hydrological functioning of the soil like water retention, infiltration and percolation and thereby the site conditions for plants. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of droughts on the hydrological functioning of forest soils. We conducted rainfall-reduction experiments in three woodlands (nine investigation sites) across Germany. We established adaptive roofing systems which allow a flexible reduction of the precipitation between 15 % and 65 % of the incoming precipitation depending on the actual precipitation. The impact of the imposed droughts on the soil properties was assessed by repeated analyses of soil aggregation, hydrophobicity and pore volume distribution. Hydrological functioning of the soil was assessed by means of repeated dye tracer sprinkling experiments. Comparing dye tracer images of 2011 with images taken after two years of imposed drought, we found a general shift in infiltration processes depending on the soil type. Sandy soils showed a shift from front-like infiltration towards a more fingered and scattered infiltration. Soils rich in clay tend to develop unstained (= not wetted) areas in the top layer, which might hint to evolving hydrophobicity. This was confirmed by field and laboratory hydrophobicity tests. Further, the same profiles were showing signs of lower permeability in the bottom layers. Similar to hydrophobicity, we want to link the results of soil aggregation and pore volume distribution to the changes in the infiltration pattern. Our study shows that changes in precipitation pattern can severely affect forest soil properties and their hydrological functions. The results of this

  4. Doing hydrology forwards: Using field experimental data to inform a conceptual model of landscape driven hydrologic connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, L. A.; Smith, T. J.; McGlynn, B. L.; Jencso, K. G.

    2011-12-01

    Given the known tradeoffs between hydrologic model complexity, efficiency, and predictive uncertainty there is an increasing desire to identify conceptual catchment models that accurately reflect catchment processes whilst preserving model identifiability. These models should specify the relationship between catchment form (including landscape topography, vegetation patterns, and stream networks) and hydrologic functioning (including streamflow patterns). We present a new hydrologic modeling approach that uses the distribution of landscape elements along the stream network as a template by which landscape-scale hydrologic connectivity and catchment runoff can be simulated. Here, we define hydrologic connectivity as the transient hydrological linkages between landscape elements and the stream. Our conceptualization emphasizes the importance of hydrologic connections between hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) zones. Observations indicate that it is the frequency of these HRS hydrologic connections that drive aggregate catchment runoff response, rather than the magnitude of flux at any one connection. We applied the model to the Stringer Creek watershed of the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest (TCEF), located in central Montana, USA. Detailed field observations were used to inform the underpinnings of the model and to corroborate internal consistency of the model's simulations. The ability of the model to simulate internal dynamics without conditioning the parameters on these data indicate the potential of this model to be more convincingly extrapolated to other hydrologic conditions and tested at catchments of varying topographic structure. Current and future work is aimed at further developing the modeling approach and testing the limits of its applicability across space and time.

  5. HRE-Pond Cryogenic Barrier Technology Demonstration: Pre- and Post-Barrier Hydrologic Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Moline, G.R.

    1999-06-01

    The Homogeneous Reactor Experiment (HRE) Pond is the site of a former impoundment for radioactive wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in east Tennessee. The pond received radioactive wastes from 1957 to 1962, and was subsequently drained, filled with soil, and covered with an asphalt cap. The site is bordered to the east and south by an unnamed stream that contains significant concentrations of radioactive contaminants, primarily {sup 90}Sr. Because of the proximity of the stream to the HRE disposal site and the probable flow of groundwater from the site to the stream, it was hypothesized that the HRE Pond has been a source of contamination to the creek. The HRE-Pond was chosen as the site of a cryogenic barrier demonstration to evaluate this technology as a means for rapid, temporary isolation of contaminants in the type of subsurface environment that exists on the ORR. The cryogenic barrier is created by the circulation of liquid CO{sub 2} through a system of thermoprobes installed in boreholes which are backfilled with sand. The probes cool the subsurface, creating a vertical ice wall by freezing adjacent groundwater, effectively surrounding the pond on four sides. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the hydrologic conditions within and around the pond prior to, during, and after the cryogenic barrier emplacement. The objectives were (1) to provide a hydrologic baseline for post-banner performance assessment, (2) to confirm that the pond is hydraulically connected to the surrounding sediments, (3) to determine the likely contaminant exit pathways from the pond, and (4) to measure changes in hydrologic conditions after barrier emplacement in order to assess the barrier performance. Because relatively little information about the subsurface hydrology and the actual configuration of the pond existed, data from multiple sources was required to reconstruct this complex system.

  6. Hydrological extremes and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundzewicz, Z. W.; Matczak, P.

    2015-04-01

    Economic losses caused by hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - have been on the rise. Hydrological extremes jeopardize human security and impact on societal livelihood and welfare. Security can be generally understood as freedom from threat and the ability of societies to maintain their independent identity and their functional integrity against forces of change. Several dimensions of security are reviewed in the context of hydrological extremes. The traditional interpretation of security, focused on the state military capabilities, has been replaced by a wider understanding, including economic, societal and environmental aspects that get increasing attention. Floods and droughts pose a burden and serious challenges to the state that is responsible for sustaining economic development, and societal and environmental security. The latter can be regarded as the maintenance of ecosystem services, on which a society depends. An important part of it is water security, which can be defined as the availability of an adequate quantity and quality of water for health, livelihoods, ecosystems and production, coupled with an acceptable level of water-related risks to people, environments and economies. Security concerns arise because, over large areas, hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - are becoming more frequent and more severe. In terms of dealing with water-related risks, climate change can increase uncertainties, which makes the state's task to deliver security more difficult and more expensive. However, changes in population size and development, and level of protection, drive exposure to hydrological hazards.

  7. Does drought alter hydrological functions in forest soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimbel, Katharina F.; Puhlmann, Heike; Weiler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is expected to impact the water cycle and severely affect precipitation patterns across central Europe and in other parts of the world, leading to more frequent and severe droughts. Usually when projecting drought impacts on hydrological systems, it is assumed that system properties, like soil properties, remain stable and will not be affected by drought events. To study if this assumption is appropriate, we address the effects of drought on the infiltration behavior of forest soils using dye tracer experiments on six sites in three regions across Germany, which were forced into drought conditions. The sites cover clayey-, loamy- and sandy-textured soils. In each region, we compared a deciduous and a coniferous forest stand to address differences between the main tree species. The results of the dye tracer experiments show clear evidence for changes in infiltration behavior at the sites. The infiltration changed at the clayey plots from regular and homogeneous flow to fast preferential flow. Similar behavior was observed at the loamy plots, where large areas in the upper layers remained dry, displaying signs of strong water repellency. This was confirmed by water drop penetration time (WDPT) tests, which revealed, in all except one plot, moderate to severe water repellency. Water repellency was also accountable for the change of regular infiltration to fingered flow in the sandy soils. The results of this study suggest that the drought history or, more generally, the climatic conditions of a soil in the past are more important than the actual antecedent soil moisture status regarding hydrophobicity and infiltration behavior; furthermore, drought effects on infiltration need to be considered in hydrological models to obtain realistic predictions concerning water quality and quantity in runoff and groundwater recharge.

  8. Snow and Glacier Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brubaker, Kaye

    The study of snow and ice is rich in both fundamental science and practical applications. Snow and Glacier Hydrology offers something for everyone, from resource practitioners in regions where water supply depends on seasonal snow pack or glaciers, to research scientists seeking to understand the role of the solid phase in the water cycle and climate. The book is aimed at the advanced undergraduate or graduate-level student. A perusal of online documentation for snow hydrology classes suggests that there is currently no single text or reference book on this topic in general use. Instructors rely on chapters from general hydrology texts or operational manuals, collections of journal papers, or their own notes. This variety reflects the fact that snow and ice regions differ in climate, topography, language, water law, hazards, and resource use (hydropower, irrigation, recreation). Given this diversity, producing a universally applicable book is a challenge.

  9. Hillslope hydrology and stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Godt, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Landslides are caused by a failure of the mechanical balance within hillslopes. This balance is governed by two coupled physical processes: hydrological or subsurface flow and stress. The stabilizing strength of hillslope materials depends on effective stress, which is diminished by rainfall. This book presents a cutting-edge quantitative approach to understanding hydro-mechanical processes across variably saturated hillslope environments and to the study and prediction of rainfall-induced landslides. Topics covered include historic synthesis of hillslope geomorphology and hydrology, total and effective stress distributions, critical reviews of shear strength of hillslope materials and different bases for stability analysis. Exercises and homework problems are provided for students to engage with the theory in practice. This is an invaluable resource for graduate students and researchers in hydrology, geomorphology, engineering geology, geotechnical engineering and geomechanics and for professionals in the fields of civil and environmental engineering and natural hazard analysis.

  10. AGU Hydrology Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-04-01

    The Executive Committee of the AGU Hydrology Section met in regular session at 4:00 P.M. on Thursday, December 8, 1983, in Room 378 of the Cathedral Hill Hotel, San Francisco, Calif. Seven board members were present with section president, Peter Eagleson, presiding.A total of 18 sessions were presented in San Francisco, and all were well attended, as was reported by program chairman Dennis Lettenmaier. Added to the regular sessions of General Hydrology, General Ground-water Hydrology, and Sediment Transport were the following special sessions: Glacier Ocean Interaction, presider Edward Josberger; Orinoco and the Amazon, presider Edward Andrews; Transport and Geochemical Interactions in Stream Water, presider F. E. Bencola; Instream Flow Requirements for Fish, presider Brian W. Mar; Multivariate Modeling of Hydrologic and Other Geophysical Time Series, presiders Jose D. Salas and David R. Dawdy; Optimization Techniques for Managing Ground Water and Stream Aquifer Systems, presider Steve Gorelick; Treatment of Evapotranspiration Soil Moisture Evolution and Aquifer Recharge in Watershed Models, presiders Arlen D. Feldman and Hubert J. Morel-Seytoux; Statistical Procedures for Estimating of Flood Risk at Gauged Sites, presider J. R. Stedinger; and Searching for More Physically Based Extreme Value Distributions in Hydrology, presider Juan B. Valdes. The session on Glacier Ocean Interaction received the most publicity, with numerous accounts of some of the presentations appearing in the newspaper. One of the pleasant surprises of the meetings was the high attendance at the special sessions on Optimization Techniques for Managing Ground Water and Stream Aquifer Systems and Multivariate Modeling of Hydrologic and Other Geophysical Time Series. Both sessions were highly interdisciplinary, attracting numerous scientists from other sections of AGU.

  11. Detecting hydrological changes through conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Caracciolo, Domenico; Pumo, Dario; Francipane, Antonio; Valerio Noto, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    Natural changes and human modifications in hydrological systems coevolve and interact in a coupled and interlinked way. If, on one hand, climatic changes are stochastic, non-steady, and affect the hydrological systems, on the other hand, human-induced changes due to over-exploitation of soils and water resources modifies the natural landscape, water fluxes and its partitioning. Indeed, the traditional assumption of static systems in hydrological analysis, which has been adopted for long time, fails whenever transient climatic conditions and/or land use changes occur. Time series analysis is a way to explore environmental changes together with societal changes; unfortunately, the not distinguishability between causes restrict the scope of this method. In order to overcome this limitation, it is possible to couple time series analysis with an opportune hydrological model, such as a conceptual hydrological model, which offers a schematization of complex dynamics acting within a basin. Assuming that model parameters represent morphological basin characteristics and that calibration is a way to detect hydrological signature at a specific moment, it is possible to argue that calibrating the model over different time windows could be a method for detecting potential hydrological changes. In order to test the capabilities of a conceptual model in detecting hydrological changes, this work presents different "in silico" experiments. A synthetic-basin is forced with an ensemble of possible future scenarios generated with a stochastic weather generator able to simulate steady and non-steady climatic conditions. The experiments refer to Mediterranean climate, which is characterized by marked seasonality, and consider the outcomes of the IPCC 5th report for describing climate evolution in the next century. In particular, in order to generate future climate change scenarios, a stochastic downscaling in space and time is carried out using realizations of an ensemble of General

  12. The application of remote sensing to the development and formulation of hydrologic planning models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, T. R.; Castruccio, P. A.; Loats, H. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a remote sensing model and its efficiency in determining parameters of hydrologic models are reviewed. Procedures for extracting hydrologic data from LANDSAT imagery, and the visual analysis of composite imagery are presented. A hydrologic planning model is developed and applied to determine seasonal variations in watershed conditions. The transfer of this technology to a user community and contract arrangements are discussed.

  13. History of hydrology archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, William

    There has long been concern over how to archive important material related to the history of hydrology. Bill Back (U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Va.), past chairman of the AGU Committee on History and Heritage of Hydrology, has made contact with the American Heritage Center, which has been collecting such material for nearly 20 years. They now have an expanding program and are most enthusiastic about helping us preserve historical material. They would like to receive files, manuscripts, photographs, and similar material from hydrologists throughout the United States and other countries.

  14. Human water consumption intensifies hydrological drought worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yoshihide; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Wanders, Niko; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2013-09-01

    Over the past 50 years, human water use has more than doubled and affected streamflow over various regions of the world. However, it remains unclear to what degree human water consumption intensifies hydrological drought (the occurrence of anomalously low streamflow). Here, we quantify over the period 1960-2010 the impact of human water consumption on the intensity and frequency of hydrological drought worldwide. The results show that human water consumption substantially reduced local and downstream streamflow over Europe, North America and Asia, and subsequently intensified the magnitude of hydrological droughts by 10-500%, occurring during nation- and continent-wide drought events. Also, human water consumption alone increased global drought frequency by 27 (±6)%. The intensification of drought frequency is most severe over Asia (35 ± 7%), but also substantial over North America (25 ± 6%) and Europe (20 ± 5%). Importantly, the severe drought conditions are driven primarily by human water consumption over many parts of these regions. Irrigation is responsible for the intensification of hydrological droughts over the western and central US, southern Europe and Asia, whereas the impact of industrial and households’ consumption on the intensification is considerably larger over the eastern US and western and central Europe. Our findings reveal that human water consumption is one of the more important mechanisms intensifying hydrological drought, and is likely to remain as a major factor affecting drought intensity and frequency in the coming decades.

  15. Hydrologic effects of increased urbanization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guay, Joel R.

    1995-01-01

    Urban areas in Perris Valley, California, have more than tripled during the last 20 years, resulting in increased storm-runoff volumes and peak discharges. To quantify the effects of increased urbanization, rainfall-runoff models of the basin were developed to simulate runoff for 1970-75 and 1990-93 conditions. Hourly rainfall data for 1949-93 were used with the rainfall-runoff models to simulate a long-term record of storm runoff. The hydrologic effects of increased urbanization from 1970-75 to 1990-93 conditions were analyzed by comparing the frequency of annual peak discharges and runoff volumes, and a duration analysis of storm peak discharges. The maximum annual-peak discharge for the 1990-93 model simulation was 32 percent higher than the discharge for 1970-75 model simulation. However, the frequency analysis of each time series indicated the 100-year peak discharges for each study period were identical.

  16. A question driven socio-hydrological modeling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M.; Portney, K.; Islam, S.

    2015-08-01

    Human and hydrological systems are coupled: human activity impacts the hydrological cycle and hydrological conditions can, but do not always, trigger changes in human systems. Traditional modeling approaches with no feedback between hydrological and human systems typically cannot offer insight into how different patterns of natural variability or human induced changes may propagate through this coupled system. Modeling of coupled human and hydrological systems, also called socio-hydrological systems, recognizes the potential for humans to transform hydrological systems and for hydrological conditions to influence human behavior. However, this coupling introduces new challenges and existing literature does not offer clear guidance regarding the choice of modeling structure, scope, and detail. A shared understanding of important processes within the field is often used to develop hydrological models, but there is no such consensus on the relevant processes in socio-hydrological systems. Here we present a question driven process to address these challenges. Such an approach allows modeling structure, scope, and detail to remain contingent and adaptive to the question context. We demonstrate its utility by exploring a question: what is the impact of reservoir operation policy on the reliability of water supply for a growing city? Our example model couples hydrological and human systems by linking the rate of demand decreases to the past reliability to compare standard operating policy (SOP) with hedging policy (HP). The model shows that reservoir storage acts both as a buffer for variability and as a delay triggering oscillations around a sustainable level of demand. HP reduces the threshold for action thereby decreasing the delay and the oscillation effect. As a result per capita demand decreases during periods of water stress are more frequent but less drastic and the additive effect of small adjustments decreases the tendency of the system to overshoot available

  17. Spatial dynamics of ecosystem service flows: a comprehensive approach to quantifying actual services

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Johnson, Gary W.; Voigt, Brian; Villa, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Recent ecosystem services research has highlighted the importance of spatial connectivity between ecosystems and their beneficiaries. Despite this need, a systematic approach to ecosystem service flow quantification has not yet emerged. In this article, we present such an approach, which we formalize as a class of agent-based models termed “Service Path Attribution Networks” (SPANs). These models, developed as part of the Artificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services (ARIES) project, expand on ecosystem services classification terminology introduced by other authors. Conceptual elements needed to support flow modeling include a service's rivalness, its flow routing type (e.g., through hydrologic or transportation networks, lines of sight, or other approaches), and whether the benefit is supplied by an ecosystem's provision of a beneficial flow to people or by absorption of a detrimental flow before it reaches them. We describe our implementation of the SPAN framework for five ecosystem services and discuss how to generalize the approach to additional services. SPAN model outputs include maps of ecosystem service provision, use, depletion, and flows under theoretical, possible, actual, inaccessible, and blocked conditions. We highlight how these different ecosystem service flow maps could be used to support various types of decision making for conservation and resource management planning.

  18. Value of medium range weather forecasts in the improvement of seasonal hydrologic prediction skill

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Shraddhanand; Voisin, Nathalie; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-08-15

    We investigated the contribution of medium range weather forecasts with lead times up to 14 days to seasonal hydrologic prediction skill over the Conterminous United States (CONUS). Three different Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP)-based experiments were performed for the period 1980-2003 using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model to generate forecasts of monthly runoff and soil moisture (SM) at lead-1 (first month of the forecast period) to lead-3. The first experiment (ESP) used a resampling from the retrospective period 1980-2003 and represented full climatological uncertainty for the entire forecast period. In the second and third experiments, the first 14 days of each ESP ensemble member were replaced by either observations (perfect 14-day forecast) or by a deterministic 14-day weather forecast. We used Spearman rank correlations of forecasts and observations as the forecast skill score. We estimated the potential and actual improvement in baseline skill as the difference between the skill of experiments 2 and 3 relative to ESP, respectively. We found that useful runoff and SM forecast skill at lead-1 to -3 months can be obtained by exploiting medium range weather forecast skill in conjunction with the skill derived by the knowledge of initial hydrologic conditions. Potential improvement in baseline skill by using medium range weather forecasts, for runoff (SM) forecasts generally varies from 0 to 0.8 (0 to 0.5) as measured by differences in correlations, with actual improvement generally from 0 to 0.8 of the potential improvement. With some exceptions, most of the improvement in runoff is for lead-1 forecasts, although some improvement in SM was achieved at lead-2.

  19. Oregon hydrologic landscape regions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Individuals who spend time working with streams intuitively come to understand that stream hydrologic and ecological characteristics are related to the attributes of the watersheds in which they occur. This is easy to see in Oregon with its large climatic and geologic variations ...

  20. ALLOCATION OF MONITORING SITES FOR REGIONAL SURVEYS OF HYDROLOGIC UNITS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to characterize the ecological condition of Pacific Northwest watersheds and their aquatic ecosystems, interagency teams have developed the Aquatic and Riparian Effectiveness Monitoring Plan. Monitoring is targeted at the subwatershed scale (6th-field Hydrologic Unit Co...

  1. Hydrologic classification of Bristol Bay, Alaska using hydrologic landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, J.; Wigington, P. J.; Sproles, E.

    2013-12-01

    The use of hydrologic landscapes has proven to be a useful tool for broad scale assessment and classification of landscapes across the United States. These classification systems help organize larger geographical areas into areas of similar hydrologic characteristics based on climate, terrain and underlying geology. Such characterization of landscapes into areas of common hydrologic patterning is particularly instructive in regions where site specific hydrologic data is sparse or spatially incomplete. By using broad scale landscape metrics to organize the landscape into discrete, characterized units, natural resources managers can gain valuable understanding of landscape patterning and how locations may be differentially affected by a variety of environmental stressors ranging from land use change to management of salmon resources to climate change. Further, the heterogeneity of aquatic habitats and undisturbed hydrologic regimes within this area are a known principal driver for its region-wide fisheries stability. The use of hydrologic landscapes offers an opportunity to better characterize the hydrologic and landscape influences on structuring biotic populations at a regional scale. We have undertaken a hydrologic landscape approach for the Bristol Bay region of Alaska to gain a better understanding of the overall hydrologic environment found in this region since its hydrologic patterning plays a principal role in structuring its world-renowned salmon fishery. Heretofore, a characterization of the entire Bristol Bay region into discrete hydrologic units has not been undertaken. Our classification structure includes indices of annual climate and seasonality, terrain, and geology. Following categorization of landscape units, we compared hydrologic landscape units to locations of available long term streamflow for characterization of expected hydrologic behavior. This demonstration of hydrologic landscapes in Bristol Bay, Alaska shows the utility of using large

  2. Merging raster meteorological data with low resolution satellite images for improved estimation of actual evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherif, Ines; Alexandridis, Thomas; Chambel Leitao, Pedro; Jauch, Eduardo; Stavridou, Domna; Iordanidis, Charalampos; Silleos, Nikolaos; Misopolinos, Nikolaos; Neves, Ramiro; Safara Araujo, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Actual evapotranspiration (ETa) can be estimated using Energy Balance models and remotely sensed data. In particular, satellite images acquired in visible, near and thermal infrared parts of the spectrum have been used with the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) to estimate actual evapotranspiration. This algorithm is solving the Energy Balance Equation using data from a meteorological station present in the vicinity, and assumes the meteorological conditions homogeneous over the study area. Most often, data from a representative weather station are used. This assumption may lead to substantial errors in areas with high spatial variability in weather parameters. In this paper, the ITA-MyWater algorithms (Integrated Thermodynamic Algorithms for MyWater project), an adaptation of SEBAL was merged together with spatially distributed meteorological data to increase the accuracy of ETa estimations at regional scale using MODIS satellite images. The major changes introduced to migrate from point to raster are that (i) air temperature and relative humidity maps are used for the estimation of the Energy Balance terms, including instantaneous net radiation and soil heat flux and (ii) the variability of wind speed is taken into account to generate maps of the aerodynamic resistance, sensible heat flux and difference between soil and air temperature at the boundary conditions (at dry and wet pixels). The approach was applied in the river basin of Tamega in Portugal, where actual evapotranspiration was estimated for several MODIS 8-day periods from spring to winter of the same year. The raster meteorological maps were produced by the MM5 weather forecast model. Daily reference evapotranspiration was calculated with MOHID LAND model. Using a temporal integration technique and the daily reference evapotranspiration maps, the cumulative evapotranspiration over the MODIS 8-day period was estimated and compared to the global evapotranspiration MODIS product (MOD16A2

  3. Curricula and Syllabi in Hydrology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This collection of papers is intended to provide a means for the exchange of information on hydrological techniques and for the coordination of research and data collection. The objectives and trends in hydrological education are presented. The International Hydrological Decade (IHD) Working Group on Education recommends a series of topics that…

  4. Social dimensions of vulnerability to glacier-hydrology hazards in Peru and Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, Graham; Carey, Mark; Huggel, Christian; Kargel, Jeffrey S.

    2014-05-01

    Snow and ice hazards affect populations worldwide, and prevention and adaptation plans must devote more attention to the human dimensions of these hazards. Historically, most research on glacier hazards has emphasized glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) and rock-ice landslides. This work often focuses on technical approaches or scientific knowledge about these high-magnitude and low-frequency hazards. This study examines a different type of cryospheric hazard, one that is low-magnitude and high-frequency, especially under future climate change projections: the increasingly recognized hydrologic hazards related to runoff variability in downstream communities below shrinking glaciers. By focusing on actual water users in glacier-fed watersheds, the research helps illuminate key vulnerabilities to hydrological change. It demonstrates that people are indeed vulnerable to decreased runoff, but that these vulnerabilities must be analyzed in the context of global change, including socio-economic and political variables, and not just through technical or scientific approaches. The study examines water use for export-oriented agriculture in Peru's billion-dollar Chavimochic Project, which depends on a single canal from the Santa River that could be damaged by a GLOF or avalanche. Or the canal could experience declining water supplies in the future if water use increases, particularly due to international agricultural demands, while water supplies from glacial ice decreases. The study also provides insights from Khumbu, Nepal, where changing hydrological conditions are leading to reduced water access for household uses, declining crop yields, reduced water access for meeting the high water demands of tourists, and reduced hydro-electricity generation capabilities. Although these effects are widespread, there are clear patterns of socially determined vulnerability among the population, with low livelihood diversity an important indicator of increased susceptibility to harm

  5. Assessment of Morphotectonic Influences on Hydrological Environment in Vicinity of an Active Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Mukherjee, S.

    2011-12-01

    Studying effects of faulted zones in shaping the hydrological environment of any landscape in a long run is difficult, though these can play a crucial role in regulating the flow and accumulation of water. While aquifer recharge is directly influenced by the structural changes associated with tectonic activity, surface flow may also be influenced depending upon the topography. While planning for water resource management, groundwater remediation or hydrological restoration it is imperative to understand and suitably include these influences to derive maximum benefit. This study aimed at characterization of surface as well as subsurface hydrological conditions in a hard-rock terrain, morphed under the influence of neotectonic activity, associated with tensional type of faulting. The area selected lies approximately between 28.20 - 28.60 N and 77.00 - 77.40 E, in vicinity of an active fault, with quartzitic rocks showing signs of multiple folding. Associated tear faults in adjoining areas have also been observed. To initially identify sites suitable for geophysical surveys, a spatial analysis involving seismic data and 3D visualization was done to identify the lineaments. The information thus obtained was correlated with geological information derived from hyperspectral satellite imagery. Geochemical analysis was also performed to verify the same. Influence of faulting activity on regulating water flow on surface as well as groundwater was studied. For surface water bodies hydrological analysis on elevation data (DEM) was performed whereas for subsurface recharge, margins of geological units were targeted. This was confirmed by actual field geophysical (resistivity) surveys at suitable strategic locations. The relative influences of structural lineaments on regulating subsurface water storage were also determined. The resulting database in GIS platform can also be used for flow modeling and aquifer potential / vulnerability studies. Also, the role of faulting

  6. Hydrology of a prairie slough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Ming-Ko; Rowsell, Robert D.

    1993-06-01

    A three year study was carried out at a prairie slough to determine the hydrological processes occurring in the wetland and its surrounding uplands. On the upland slopes, snow accumulation was highly uneven, giving rise to spatial variations in infiltration and overland flow during melt. Rainfall distribution was more uniform but much of it was lost to evaporation, leaving minor amounts to groundwater recharge or runoff to the slough. The slough comprises a pond and its fringing non-flooded wetlands, the areal extents of which changed during the season as the pond expanded and contracted. Slough storage was rapidly replenished by the snow and ice melt in the slough and by the meltwater input through overland flow from the uplands. During summer, rainfall was the main source of water supply to the experimental slough, and evaporation exceeded water yield to the groundwater system. Water balance allows a contrast of hydrological conditions between years, with the drier years producing storage deficit for the slough, and wet summers producing a surplus.

  7. Subdaily Hydrologic Variability by Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, K. H.; Ruffing, C.; Smith, J. M.; Daniels, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    The effects dams have on hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecologic regimes has been well characterized using mean daily discharge. Subdaily discharge variation (herein flashiness) has not been well characterized for a variety of dam, watershed, and land cover characteristics. The hourly hydrologic records for 30 sites across the continental United States were analyzed for flashiness using the Richards-Baker Index, coefficient of daily variation, percent of total flow variation, and the percent of the year when daily discharge is greater than mean daily discharge. The goal of this analysis is to evaluate the role of catchment variables such as mean slope and land use conditions across receiving watersheds in predicting flashiness; compare flashiness metrics across sites to identify relationships between dam related variables such as type and size; and determine the most appropriate temporal extent for assessing flashiness in streamflow. Our approach relies on data at the watershed scale with a fine temporal grain to determine flashiness over a decade of operation for each dam.

  8. Summary of hydrologic modeling for the Delaware River Basin using the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Lant, Jeremiah G.; Claggett, Peter; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Milly, Paul C.D.; Nelson, Hugh L.; Hoffman, Scott A.; Colarullo, Susan J.; Fischer, Jeffrey M.

    2015-11-18

    The Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER) is a decision support system for the nontidal part of the Delaware River Basin that provides a consistent and objective method of simulating streamflow under historical, forecasted, and managed conditions. In order to quantify the uncertainty associated with these simulations, however, streamflow and the associated hydroclimatic variables of potential evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, and snow accumulation and snowmelt must be simulated and compared to long-term, daily observations from sites. This report details model development and optimization, statistical evaluation of simulations for 57 basins ranging from 2 to 930 km2 and 11.0 to 99.5 percent forested cover, and how this statistical evaluation of daily streamflow relates to simulating environmental changes and management decisions that are best examined at monthly time steps normalized over multiple decades. The decision support system provides a database of historical spatial and climatic data for simulating streamflow for 2001–11, in addition to land-cover and general circulation model forecasts that focus on 2030 and 2060. WATER integrates geospatial sampling of landscape characteristics, including topographic and soil properties, with a regionally calibrated hillslope-hydrology model, an impervious-surface model, and hydroclimatic models that were parameterized by using three hydrologic response units: forested, agricultural, and developed land cover. This integration enables the regional hydrologic modeling approach used in WATER without requiring site-specific optimization or those stationary conditions inferred when using a statistical model.

  9. Development of hydrologic landscape regions for classifying hydrologic permanace and hydrological-ecological interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a 2001 paper, Winter proposed the concept of the hydrologic landscape unit as a fundamental unit composed of an upland and lowland separated by a steeper slope. Winter suggested that this concept could be useful for hydrologic research, data analysis, and comparing hydrologic...

  10. One-Water Hydrologic Flow Model (MODFLOW-OWHM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.; Boyce, Scott E.; Schmid, Wolfgang; Hughes, Joseph D.; Mehl, Steffen W.; Leake, Stanley A.; Maddock, Thomas; Niswonger, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    -constrained conditions. From large- to small-scale settings, MF-OWHM has the unique set of capabilities to simulate and analyze historical, present, and future conjunctive-use conditions. MF-OWHM is especially useful for the analysis of agricultural water use where few data are available for pumpage, land use, or agricultural information. The features presented in this IHM include additional linkages with SFR, SWR, Drain-Return (DRT), Multi-Node Wells (MNW1 and MNW2), and Unsaturated-Zone Flow (UZF). Thus, MF-OWHM helps to reduce the loss of water during simulation of the hydrosphere and helps to account for “all of the water everywhere and all of the time.” In addition to groundwater, surface-water, and landscape budgets, MF-OWHM provides more options for observations of land subsidence, hydraulic properties, and evapotranspiration (ET) than previous models. Detailed landscape budgets combined with output of estimates of actual evapotranspiration facilitates linkage to remotely sensed observations as input or as additional observations for parameter estimation or water-use analysis. The features of FMP have been extended to allow for temporally variable water-accounting units (farms) that can be linked to land-use models and the specification of both surface-water and groundwater allotments to facilitate sustainability analysis and connectivity to the Groundwater Management Process (GWM). An example model described in this report demonstrates the application of MF-OWHM with the addition of land subsidence and a vertically deforming mesh, delayed recharge through an unsaturated zone, rejected infiltration in a riparian area, changes in demand caused by deficiency in supply, and changes in multi-aquifer pumpage caused by constraints imposed through the Farm Process and the MNW2 Package, and changes in surface water such as runoff, streamflow, and canal flows through SFR and SWR linkages.

  11. Concepts of hydrological connectivity: Research approaches, pathways and future agendas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, L. J.; Wainwright, J.; Ali, G. A.; Tetzlaff, D.; Smith, M. W.; Reaney, S. M.; Roy, A. G.

    2013-04-01

    For effective catchment management and intervention in hydrological systems a process-based understanding of hydrological connectivity is required so that: i) conceptual rather than solely empirical understanding drives how systems are interpreted; and ii) there is an understanding of how continuous flow fields develop under different sets of environmental conditions to enable managers to know when, where and how to intervene in catchment processes successfully. In order to direct future research into process-based hydrological connectivity this paper: i) evaluates the extent to which different concepts of hydrological connectivity have emerged from different approaches to measure and predict flow in different environments; ii) discusses the extent to which these different concepts are mutually compatible; and iii) assesses further research to contribute to a unified understanding of hydrological processes. Existing research is categorised into five different approaches to investigating hydrological connectivity: i) evaluating soil-moisture patterns (soil-moisture connectivity); ii) understanding runoff patterns and processes on hillslopes (flow-process connectivity); iii) investigating topographic controls (terrain-connectivity) including the impact of road networks on hydrological connectivity and catchment runoff; iv) developing models to explore and predict hydrological connectivity; and v) developing indices of hydrological connectivity. Analysis of published research suggests a relationship between research group, approach, geographic setting and the interpretation of hydrological connectivity. For further understanding of hydrological connectivity our knowledge needs to be developed using a range of techniques and approaches, there should be common understandings between researchers approaching the concept from different perspectives, and these meanings need to be communicated effectively with those responsible for land management.

  12. Preimpoundment hydrologic conditions in the Swatara Creek (1981- 84) and estimated postimpoundment water quality in and downstream from the planned Swatara State Park Reservoir, Lebanon and Schuylkill counties, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishel, D.K.

    1988-01-01

    The hydrology and water quality of Swatara Creek were studied by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, Bureau of State Parks, from July 1981 through September 1984. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of anthracite-coal mining and other point and nonpoint sources on the water quality of a planned 10,500 acre-foot reservoir. The Swatara State Park Reservoir is planned to be used for recreation and drinking-water supply for the city of Lebanon and surrounding communities. Annual precipitation during 1982, 1983, and 1984 was about 8 percent below, near normal, and 29 percent above the long-term average, respectively. The average annual precipitation during a year with near-normal precipitation, the 1983 water year, was 47 inches at Pine Grove. Mean streamflows during 1982, 1983, and 1984 were about 15 percent below, 4 percent above, and 50 percent above the long-term average, respectively. The average streamflow to the planned reservoir area during the 1983 water year was about 220 cubic feet per second. Inflows to, and downstream discharge from, the planned reservoir wer poorly buffered. Median alkalinity ranged from 4 to 7 mg/L (milligrams per liter) and median acidity ranged from 2 to 5 mg/L at the three sampling locations. Maximum total-recoverable iron, aluminum, and manganese concentrations were 100,000, 66,000, and 2,300 micrograms per liter, respectively. During 1983 the annual discharges of total-recoverable iron, aluminum, and manganese to the planned reservoir area were estimated to be 692, 300, and 95 tons, respectively. About 87 percent of the total-recoverable iron and 91 percent of total-recoverable sluminum measured was in the suspended phase. The data indicated that mine drainage affects the quality of Swatara Creek and will affect the quality of the planned reservoir. In addition to mine drainage, point-source nutrient and metal discharges will probably affect the

  13. Simulated Effects of Seasonal Ground-Water Pumpage for Irrigation on Hydrologic Conditions in the Lower Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, Southwestern Georgia and Parts of Alabama and Florida, 1999-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, L. Elliott; Torak, Lynn J.

    2006-01-01

    derived from decreased discharge or increased recharge of stream-aquifer flux (from about 23 to 39 percent), leakage to or from the upper semiconfining unit (from about 30 to 36 percent), regional flow (from about 8 to 11 percent), Lakes Seminole and Blackshear (about 2 percent), and flux at the Upper Floridan aquifer updip boundary (about 1 percent). Storage effects (decreased storage gain or increased storage loss) contributed from about 11 to 36 percent of irrigation pumpage during the growing season. Water managers can use the model to determine where and how much additional ground-water pumpage for irrigation should be permitted based on a variety of hydrologic constraints. For example, the model results may indicate that in some critical locations, additional ground-water pumpage during a prolonged drought might reduce stream-aquifer flux enough to cause noncompliance of established minimum instream flow conditions.

  14. [Socio-hydrology: A review].

    PubMed

    Ding, Jing-yi; Zhao, Wen-wu; Fang, Xue-ning

    2015-04-01

    Socio-hydrology is an interdiscipline of hydrology, nature, society and humanity. It mainly explores the two-way feedbacks of coupled human-water system and its dynamic mechanism of co-evolution, and makes efforts to solve the issues that human faces today such as sustainable utilization of water resources. Starting from the background, formation process, and fundamental concept of socio-hydrology, this paper summarized the features of socio-hydrology. The main research content of socio-hydrology was reduced to three aspects: The tradeoff in coupled human-water system, interests in water resources management and virtual water research in coupled human-water system. And its differences as well as relations with traditional hydrology, eco-hydrology and hydro-sociology were dwelled on. Finally, with hope to promote the development of socio-hydrology researches in China, the paper made prospects for the development of the subject from following aspects: Completing academic content and deepening quantitative research, focusing on scale studies of socio-hydrology, fusing socio-hydrology and eco-hydrology.

  15. Relationship of perceived and actual motor competence in children.

    PubMed

    Raudsepp, Lennart; Liblik, Raino

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between children's actual and perceived motor competence. 280 children between the ages of 10 and 13 years individually completed the Children's Physical Self-perception Profile which assesses perceptions of sport competence, physical conditioning, strength, body attractiveness, and general physical self-worth. The internal reliabilities (a) of the subscales ranged from .75 to .82. After completing the profile, the subject's actual motor competence was measured using tests of aerobic fitness and functional strength. Body fatness (sum of five skinfolds) was measured as an objective measure of perceived body attractiveness. Analysis of variance showed that boys and girls differed in perceived competence and actual motor competence. The boys showed higher perceived competence on four scores, but there was no sex difference in perception of body attractiveness. Correlations and regression analysis showed that actual and perceived motor competence were significantly but only moderately (r =.25-.56) correlated. In addition, items of perceived physical competence and age accounted for 17% (sit-ups) to 25% (endurance shuttle run) of the variance in actual motor competence of the children. These findings showed that 10- to 13-yr-old children can only moderately assess personal motor competence. PMID:12186225

  16. Self-Actualization, Liberalism, and Humanistic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Charles Mack

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between personality factors and political orientation has long been of interest to psychologists. This study tests the hypothesis that there is no significant relationship between self-actualization and liberalism-conservatism. The hypothesis is supported. (Author)

  17. Human water consumption intensifies hydrological drought worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Y.; Van Beek, L. P.; Wanders, N.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past decades, human water consumption has more than doubled, and reduced streamflow over various regions of the world. However, it remains unclear to what degree human water consumption intensifies hydrological droughts, i.e. the occurrence of anomalously low streamflow. Here, we quantify over the period 1960-2010 the impact of human water consumption on the intensity and frequency of hydrological droughts worldwide. We simulated streamflow by the global hydrological and water resources model PCR-GLOBWB at a 0.5 degree spatial resolution, and reduced the amount of streamflow with different levels of human water consumption over the period 1960-2010. We applied the commonly used variable threshold level method to identify below-normal water availability as the onset of hydrological droughts. We then standardized the deficit volume dividing relative to the threshold level to express the intensity of drought conditions to normal streamflow conditions. The results show that human water consumption substantially reduced local and downstream streamflow in many regions of the world. This subsequently intensified hydrological droughts regionally by 10-500%. Irrigation is responsible for the intensification of hydrological droughts over western and central U.S., southern Europe, Asia, and southeastern Australia, whereas the impact of industrial and households' consumption on the intensification is considerably larger over eastern U.S., and western and central Europe. The results also show that drought frequency increased by more than 27% compared to pristine or natural condition as a result of human water consumption. The intensification of drought frequency is most severe over Asia, but also substantial over North America and Europe. Importantly, global population under severe hydrological droughts considerably increased from 0.7 billion in 1960 to 2.2 billion in 2010 due to rapid population growth. As a limited validation exercise, we compared simulated deficit

  18. Human impact on the hydrology of the Lake of Monate (Italy): an experimental data base to investigate anthropogenic disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, A.; Castellarin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Lake of Monate is located in the Lombardia region, in Northern Italy, close to the highest peaks of the Alps. The lake surface is about 2.5 square kilometers, with a maximum and mean water depth of 34 and 18 meters, respectively. Intensive agricultural cultivation and mining activities took place in the surrounding area since ancient times, as well as intensive urban and industrial development in the recent past. Notwithstanding the above anthropic activity, and the urbanization along the lake banks, the Lake of Monate is still close to pristine conditions, therefore being a unique example of ecosystem in equilibrium. The human impact is negligble because the lake has no tributaries, being the water inflow supplied by groundwater fluxes only, providing an average inflow volume of about 3.18 million of cubic meters. Since Roman times intensive mining activities are taking place in a large area that is located outside the geographical contributing catchment to the lake. In fact, the two mining sites of Cava Faraona and Cava Santa Maria are placed beyond the geographical divide between the Lake of Monate and the contiguous Lake of Ternate. However, the presence of subsurface rock layers that are tilted towards the Lake of Monate makes the actual contributing catchment more extended, therefore including the mining sites. For this reason, the recent decision to intensify the mining activities induced relevant concerns for the possible impact on the ecological equilibrium of the lake. Therefore, the local administration promoted an intensive monitoring campaign finalized to reach a better understanding of the hydrology of the lake and the subsurface water fluxes, to quantify the actual impact of the mining works. Meteorological and hydrological data at several location and fine time scale are being collected from Fall 2013 therefore putting together an experimental data set of relevant scientific value. This contribution aims to present the meteorological

  19. Arctic hydrology and meteorology

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    To date, five years of hydrologic and meteorologic data have been collected at Imnavait Creek near Toolik Lake, Alaska. This is the most complete set of field data of this type collected in the Arctic of North America. These data have been used in process-oriented research to increase our understanding of atmosphere/hydrosphere/biosphere/lithosphere interactions. Basically, we are monitoring heat and mass transfer between various spheres to quantify rates. These could be rates of mass movement such as hillslope flow or rates of heat transfer for active layer thawing or combined heat and mass processes such as evapotranspiration. We have utilized a conceptual model to predict hydrologic processes. To test the success of this model, we are comparing our predicted rates of runoff and snowmelt to measured valves. We have also used a surface energy model to simulate active layer temperatures. The final step in this modeling effort to date was to predict what impact climatic warming would have on active layer thicknesses and how this will influence the hydrology of our research watershed by examining several streambeds.

  20. Inverse hydrological modelling of spatio-temporal rainfall patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, Jens; Hörning, Sebastian; Bárdossy, András

    2016-04-01

    Distributed hydrological models are commonly used for simulating the non-linear response of a watershed to rainfall events for addressing different hydrological properties of the landscape. Such models are driven by spatial rainfall patterns for consecutive time steps, which are normally generated from point measurements using spatial interpolation methods. However, such methods fail in reproducing the true spatio-temporal rainfall patterns especially in data scarce regions with poorly gauged catchments or for highly dynamic, small scaled rainstorms which are not well recorded by existing monitoring networks. Consequently, uncertainties are associated with poorly identified spatio-temporal rainfall distribution in distributed rainfall-runoff-modelling since the amount of rainfall received by a catchment as well as the dynamics of the runoff generation of flood waves are underestimated. For addressing these challenges a novel methodology for inverse hydrological modelling is proposed using a Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo framework. Thereby, potential candidates of spatio-temporal rainfall patterns are generated and selected according their ability to reproduce the observed surface runoff at the catchment outlet for a given transfer function in a best way. The Methodology combines the concept of random mixing of random spatial fields with a grid-based spatial distributed rainfall runoff model. The conditional target rainfall field is obtained as a linear combination of unconditional spatial random fields. The corresponding weights of the linear combination are selected such that the spatial variability of the rainfall amounts as well as the actual observed rainfall values are reproduced. The functionality of the methodology is demonstrated on a synthetic example. Thereby, the known spatio-temporal distribution of rainfall is reproduced for a given number of point observations of rainfall and the integral catchment response at the catchment outlet for a synthetic catchment

  1. Hydrological Ensemble Prediction System (HEPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thielen-Del Pozo, J.; Schaake, J.; Martin, E.; Pailleux, J.; Pappenberger, F.

    2010-09-01

    Flood forecasting systems form a key part of ‘preparedness' strategies for disastrous floods and provide hydrological services, civil protection authorities and the public with information of upcoming events. Provided the warning leadtime is sufficiently long, adequate preparatory actions can be taken to efficiently reduce the impacts of the flooding. Following on the success of the use of ensembles for weather forecasting, the hydrological community now moves increasingly towards Hydrological Ensemble Prediction Systems (HEPS) for improved flood forecasting using operationally available NWP products as inputs. However, these products are often generated on relatively coarse scales compared to hydrologically relevant basin units and suffer systematic biases that may have considerable impact when passed through the non-linear hydrological filters. Therefore, a better understanding on how best to produce, communicate and use hydrologic ensemble forecasts in hydrological short-, medium- und long term prediction of hydrological processes is necessary. The "Hydrologic Ensemble Prediction Experiment" (HEPEX), is an international initiative consisting of hydrologists, meteorologist and end-users to advance probabilistic hydrologic forecast techniques for flood, drought and water management applications. Different aspects of the hydrological ensemble processor are being addressed including • Production of useful meteorological products relevant for hydrological applications, ranging from nowcasting products to seasonal forecasts. The importance of hindcasts that are consistent with the operational weather forecasts will be discussed to support bias correction and downscaling, statistically meaningful verification of HEPS, and the development and testing of operating rules; • Need for downscaling and post-processing of weather ensembles to reduce bias before entering hydrological applications; • Hydrological model and parameter uncertainty and how to correct and

  2. Comparing hydrological signatures of small agricultural catchments using uncertain data provided by a soft hydrological monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabit, Armand; Colin, François

    2016-04-01

    Discharge estimation is one of the greatest challenge for every hydrologist as it is the most classical hydrological variable used in hydrological studies. The key lies in the rating curves and the way they were built: based on field measurements or using physical equations as the Manning-Strickler relation… However, as we all know, data and associated uncertainty deeply impact the veracity of such rating curves that could have serious consequences on data interpretation. And, of all things, this affects every catchment in the world, not only the gauged catchments but also and especially the poorly gauged ones that account for the larger part of the catchment of the world. This study investigates how to compare hydrological behaviour of 11 small (0.1 to 0.6 km2) poorly gauged catchments considering uncertainty associated to their rating curves. It shows how important the uncertainty can be using Manning equation and focus on its parameter: the roughness coefficient. Innovative work has been performed under controlled experimental conditions to estimate the Manning coefficient values for the different cover types observed in studied streams: non-aquatic vegetations. The results show that estimated flow rates using suitable roughness coefficients highly differ from those we should have obtained if we only considered the common values given in the literature. Moreover, it highlights how it could also affect all derived hydrological indicators commonly used to compare hydrological behaviour. Data of rainfall and water depth at a catchment's outlet were recorded using automatic logging equipment during 2008-2009. The hydrological regime is intermittent and the annual precipitation ranged between 569 and 727 mm. Discharge was then estimated using Manning's equation and channel cross-section measurements. Even if discharge uncertainty is high, the results show significant variability between catchment's responses that allows for catchment classification. It also

  3. Hydrologic Classification of Bristol Bay, Alaska Using Hydrologic Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, J.; Wigington, P. J., Jr.; Sproles, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    The use of hydrologic landscapes has proven to be a useful tool for broad scale assessment and classification of landscapes across the United States. These classification systems help organize larger geographical areas into areas of similar hydrologic characteristics based on climate, terrain and underlying geology. Such characterization of landscapes into areas of common hydrologic patterning is particularly instructive where site specific hydrologic data is sparse or spatially incomplete. By using broad scale landscape metrics to organize the landscape into discrete, characterized units, natural resources managers can gain valuable understanding of landscape patterning and how locations may be differentially affected by a variety of environmental stressors ranging from land use change to climate change. The heterogeneity of aquatic habitats and undisturbed hydrologic regimes within Bristol Bay are a known principal driver for its overall fisheries stability and the use of hydrologic landscapes offers the ability to better characterize the hydrologic and landscape influences on structuring biotic populations at a regional scale. Here we classify the entire Bristol Bay region into discrete hydrologic landscape units based on indices of annual climate and seasonality, terrain, and geology. We then compared hydrologic landscape units to locations of available long term streamflow for characterization of expected hydrologic behavior where streamflow data was lacking. This demonstration of hydrologic landscapes in Bristol Bay, Alaska shows the utility of using large-scale datasets on climate, terrain and geology to infer broad scale hydrologic patterning within a data poor area. Disclaimer: The authors' views expressed here do not necessarily reflect views or policies of USEPA.

  4. Effects of hydrology on red mangrove recruits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    Coastal wetlands along the Gulf of Mexico have been experiencing significant shifts in hydrology and salinity levels over the past century as a result of changes in sea level and freshwater drainage patterns. Local land management in coastal zones has also impacted the hydrologic regimes of salt marshes and mangrove areas. Parks and refuges in south Florida that contain mangrove forests have, in some cases, been ditched or impounded to control mosquito outbreaks and to foster wildlife use. And while mangroves dominate the subtropical coastlines of Florida and thrive in saltwater environments, little is known about how they respond to changes in hydrology under managed or variable tidal conditions. USGS researchers designed a study to evaluate the basic hydrological requirements of mangroves so that their health and survival may be more effectively managed in controlled impoundments and restored wetlands. Mangroves are commonly found in the intertidal zone (between low and high tides) in a rather broad spectrum of hydrologic settings. Because they thrive at the interface of land and sea, mangroves are subject to changes in freshwater flow (flow rate, nutrients, pollutants) and to marine influences (sea-level rise, salinity). Salinity has long been recognized as a controlling factor that determines the health and distribution of mangrove forests. Field and experimental observations indicate that most mangrove species achieve their highest growth potential under brackish conditions (modest salinity) between 10 and 20 parts per thousand (ppt). Yet, if provided with available propagules, successful regeneration, and limited competition from other plants, then mangroves can survive and thrive in freshwater systems as well. Because little is known about the growthand survival patterns of mangrove species relative to changing hydrology, USGS scientists conducted greenhouse and field experiments to determine how flooded or drained patterns of hydrology would influence

  5. Approaches to modelling hydrology and ecosystem interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Richard P.

    2014-05-01

    As the pressures of industry, agriculture and mining on groundwater resources increase there is a burgeoning un-met need to be able to capture these multiple, direct and indirect stresses in a formal framework that will enable better assessment of impact scenarios. While there are many catchment hydrological models and there are some models that represent ecological states and change (e.g. FLAMES, Liedloff and Cook, 2007), these have not been linked in any deterministic or substantive way. Without such coupled eco-hydrological models quantitative assessments of impacts from water use intensification on water dependent ecosystems under changing climate are difficult, if not impossible. The concept would include facility for direct and indirect water related stresses that may develop around mining and well operations, climate stresses, such as rainfall and temperature, biological stresses, such as diseases and invasive species, and competition such as encroachment from other competing land uses. Indirect water impacts could be, for example, a change in groundwater conditions has an impact on stream flow regime, and hence aquatic ecosystems. This paper reviews previous work examining models combining ecology and hydrology with a view to developing a conceptual framework linking a biophysically defensable model that combines ecosystem function with hydrology. The objective is to develop a model capable of representing the cumulative impact of multiple stresses on water resources and associated ecosystem function.

  6. Arctic hydrology and meteorology. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1988-12-31

    The behavior of arctic ecosystems is directly related to the ongoing physical processes of heat and mass transfer. Furthermore, this system undergoes very large fluctuations in the surface energy balance. The buffering effect of both snow and the surface organic soils can be seen by looking at the surface and 40 cm soil temperatures. The active layer, that surface zone above the permafrost table, is either continually freezing or thawing. A large percentage of energy into and out of a watershed must pass through this thin veneer that we call the active layer. Likewise, most water entering and leaving the watershed does so through the active layer. To date, we have been very successful at monitoring the hydrology of Imnavait Creek with special emphasis on the active layer processes. The major contribution of this study is that year-round hydrologic data are being collected. An original objective of our study was to define how the thermal and moisture regimes within the active layer change during an annual cycle under natural conditions, and then to define how the regime will be impacted by some imposed terrain alteration. Our major analysis of the hydrologic data sets for Imnavait Creek have been water balance evaluations for plots during snowmelt, water balance for the watershed during both rainfall and snowmelt, and the application of a hydrologic model to predict the Imnavait Creek runoff events generated by both snowmelt and rainfall.

  7. Integration of Remote Sensing derived Actual Evapotranspiration with Meteorological Data for Real Time Demand Forecasting in Semi-arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, M. K.; Hafeez, M. M.; Chemin, Y.; Faux, R.; Sixsmith, J.

    2010-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is major consumer of fresh water, but a large part of the water devour for irrigation is wasted due to poor management of irrigation systems. Improving water management in irrigated areas require the analysis of real time water demand in order to determine the possibilities in which it may be modified and rationalised. Real time water demand information in irrigated areas is a key for planning about sustainable use of irrigation water. These activities are needed not only to improve water productivity, but also to increase the sustainability of irrigated agriculture by saving irrigation water. Demand forecasting entail the complete understanding of spatial and expected temporal variability of metrological parameters and evapotranspiration (ET). ET is the overriding aspect for irrigation demand forecasting at farm to catchment scale. Many models have been used to measure the ET rate, either empirical or functional. The major disadvantage of this approach is that most methods generate only point values, resulting in estimates that are not representative of large areas. These methods are based on crop factors under ideal conditions and cannot therefore represent actual crop ET. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful mean to estimate ET over various spatial and temporal scales. For improved irrigation system management and operation, a holistic approach of integrating remote sensing derived ET from SAM-ET (spatial algorithm for mapping ET) algorithm, for Australian agro-ecosystem, with forecasted meteorological data and field application loss functions for major crops were used to forecast actual water demand in Coleambally Irrigation Area (CIA), New South Wales, Australia. It covers approximately 79,000 ha of intensive irrigation and comprise of number of secondary and tertiary canals. In order to capture the spatial variability, CIA has been divided into 22 nodes based on direction of flow and connectivity. All hydrological data of inflow (i

  8. Hydrologic Resources of Guam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, Stephen B.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction The U.S. Territory of Guam, which lies in the western Pacific Ocean near latitude 13?28'N and longitude 144?45'E, is the largest (211 mi2) and southernmost of the islands in the Mariana chain. Ground water supplies about 80 percent of the drinking water for the island's 150,000 residents and nearly one million visitors per year. In northern Guam, water is obtained from wells that tap the upper part of a fresh ground-water lens in an aquifer composed mainly of limestone. About 180 wells, nearly all in the north, withdraw about 35 Mgal/d of water with chloride concentrations ranging from 6 to 585 mg/L. In southern Guam, the main source of freshwater is from surface water that runs off the weathered volcanic rocks that are exposed over much of the area. About 9.9 Mgal/d of freshwater is obtained using surface reservoirs. The island's freshwater resources are adequate to meet current (2003) needs, but future demands will eventually be higher. To better understand the hydrology of the island, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entered into a cooperative study with the Water and Environmental Research Institute of the Western Pacific (WERI) at the University of Guam. The objective of the study was to provide a better understanding of the water resources of the island through analysis of data collected by the USGS on Guam. This report provides a description of the general hydrologic principles of the island's ground-water systems, as well as of the rainfall and geology of Guam. Hydrologic data described in the report include water levels, chloride concentrations, and pumpage from ground-water wells and streamflow data from southern Guam.

  9. Regional scale hydrologic modeling of a karst-dominant geomorphology: The case study of the Island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malagò, Anna; Efstathiou, Dionissios; Bouraoui, Fayçal; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos P.; Franchini, Marco; Bidoglio, Giovanni; Kritsotakis, Marinos

    2016-09-01

    Crete Island (Greece) is a karst dominated region that faces limited water supply and increased seasonal demand, especially during summer for agricultural and touristic uses. In addition, due to the mountainous terrain, interbasin water transfer is very limited. The resulting water imbalance requires a correct quantification of available water resources in view of developing appropriate management plans to face the problem of water shortage. The aim of this work is the development of a methodology using the SWAT model and a karst-flow model (KSWAT, Karst SWAT model) for the quantification of a spatially and temporally explicit hydrologic water balance of karst-dominated geomorphology in order to assess the sustainability of the actual water use. The application was conducted in the Island of Crete using both hard (long time series of streamflow and spring monitoring stations) and soft data (i.e. literature information of individual processes). The KSWAT model estimated the water balance under normal hydrological condition as follows: 6400 Mm3/y of precipitation, of which 40% (2500 Mm3/y) was lost through evapotranspiration, 5% was surface runoff and 55% percolated into the soil contributing to lateral flow (2%), and recharging the shallow (9%) and deep aquifer (44%). The water yield was estimated as 22% of precipitation, of which about half was the contribution from spring discharges (9% of precipitation). The application of the KSWAT model increased our knowledge about water resources availability and distribution in Crete under different hydrologic conditions. The model was able to capture the hydrology of the karst areas allowing a better management and planning of water resources under scarcity.

  10. Short-term Hydropower Reservoir Operations in Chile's Central Interconnected System: Tradeoffs between Hydrologic Alteration and Economic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Hydropower accounts for about 50% of the installed capacity in Chile's Central Interconnected System (CIS) and new developments are envisioned in the near future. Large projects involving reservoirs are perceived negatively by the general public. In terms of operations, hydropower scheduling takes place at monthly, weekly, daily and hourly intervals, and operations at each level affect different environmental processes. Due to its ability to quickly and inexpensively respond to short-term changes in demand, hydropower reservoirs often are operated to provide power during periods of peak demand. This operational scheme, known as hydropeaking, changes the hydrologic regime by altering the rate and frequency of changes in flow magnitude on short time scales. To mitigate impacts on downstream ecosystems, operational constraints -typically minimum instream flows and maximum ramping rates- are imposed on hydropower plants. These operational restrictions limit reduce operational flexibility and can reduce the economic value of energy generation by imposing additional costs on the operation of interconnected power systems. Methods to predict the degree of hydrologic alteration rely on statistical analyses of instream flow time series. Typically, studies on hydrologic alteration use historical operational records for comparison between pre- and post-dam conditions. Efforts to assess hydrologic alteration based on future operational schemes of reservoirs are scarce. This study couples two existing models: a mid-term operations planning and a short-term economic dispatch to simulate short-term hydropower reservoir operations under different future scenarios. Scenarios of possible future configurations of the Chilean CIS are defined with emphasis on the introduction of non-conventional renewables (particularly wind energy) and large hydropower projects in Patagonia. Both models try to reproduce the actual decision making process in the Chilean Central Interconnected System

  11. Editorial for Journal of Hydrology: Regional Studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willems, Patrick; Batelaan, Okke; Hughes, Denis A.; Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrological regimes and processes show strong regional differences. While some regions are affected by extreme drought and desertification, others are under threat of increased fluvial and/or pluvial floods. Changes to hydrological systems as a consequence of natural variations and human activities are region-specific. Many of these changes have significant interactions with and implications for human life and ecosystems. Amongst others, population growth, improvements in living standards and other demographic and socio-economic trends, related changes in water and energy demands, change in land use, water abstractions and returns to the hydrological system (UNEP, 2008), introduce temporal and spatial changes to the system and cause contamination of surface and ground waters. Hydro-meteorological boundary conditions are also undergoing spatial and temporal changes. Climate change has been shown to increase temporal and spatial variations of rainfall, increase temperature and cause changes to evapotranspiration and other hydro-meteorological variables (IPCC, 2013). However, these changes are also region specific. In addition to these climate trends, (multi)-decadal oscillatory changes in climatic conditions and large variations in meteorological conditions will continue to occur.

  12. Outdoor learning in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Jan

    2015-04-01

    For understanding important concepts in hydrology often the most efficient way of learning are field experiments with student involvement. In this contribution, I look back on my personal experiences as a student, an assistant and a teacher and ask myself, with a long-term perspective, what worked and what didn't. Some of the experiments, which I find most useful, are described in more detail such as the estimation of hydraulic conductivities based on groundwater salt dilution and an experiment to demonstrate the difference between flood-wave velocity and water particle velocity. Furthermore, some general thoughts on challenges to generate a good learning environment out in the field are given.

  13. Hydrologic almanac of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heath, Richard C.; Conover, Clyde Stuart

    1981-01-01

    This first edition is a ready reference source of information on various facts and features about water in Florida. It is aimed primarily to help bust politicians, writers, agency officials, water managers, planners, consultants, educators, hydrologists, engineers, scientists, and the general public answer questions that arise on comparative and statistical aspects on the hydrology of Florida. It contains statistical comparative data, much of which was especially prepared for the almanac, a glossary of technical terms, tabular material, and conversion factors. Also included is a selective bibliography of 174 reports on water in Florida. (USGS)

  14. Arctic hydrology and meteorology

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    During 1990, we have continued our meteorological and hydrologic data collection in support of our process-oriented research. The six years of data collected to data is unique in its scope and continuity in a North Hemisphere Arctic setting. This valuable data base has allowed us to further our understanding of the interconnections and interactions between the atmosphere/hydrosphere/biosphere/lithosphere. The increased understanding of the heat and mass transfer processes has allowed us to increase our model-oriented research efforts.

  15. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  16. Deconstructing the hydrologic response: pattern and dynamics of water age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, Markus; Savenije, Hubert; Soulsby, Chris; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2013-04-01

    The water storage and release dynamics at the catchment scale are still incompletely understood. This is in particular true when considering actual particle transport rather than only the hydraulic response. The use of environmental tracers is frequently instructive for getting insights into these transport process patterns. However, the potential of tracers is frequently underexploited. Although known since the early days of tracer hydrology that the composition of water in the runoff, i.e. the water age distribution can be highly variable as a function of flow volumes, it is often treated as being time- and thus flow-invariant. Here we use long term (< 20 years) precipitation, flow and tracer (chloride) data of three contrasting upland catchments in the Scottish Highlands to inform integrated conceptual models. Using the models as virtual laboratories, water and tracer fluxes were tracked through the system in order to get a better understanding of the patterns and temporal, wetness induced dynamics in the composition of stream water and its age distributions. Tracking fluxes through the system showed that the various components of a model, representing individual flow processes, such as preferential or groundwater flow, can be characterized by fundamentally different water age distributions. As a consequence, the wetness dependent dynamics and connectivity patterns of these distinct pools of water are responsible for potentially fast and substantial switches in water age distributions. Further, modeled flux water age distributions were found to be highly sensitive to variable catchment wetness conditions and exhibited considerable hysteresis effects, depending on the catchment wetness history. While the water age during wetting-up conditions is controlled by fast processes (e.g. preferential flow), it is controlled by slow processes (e.g. groundwater flow) under drying-up conditions. This non-linearity is caused by the fact that water age distributions are not

  17. Controls over spatial and temporal variations in annual actual evapotranspiration in snow-free California watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Allison Marie

    Actual evapotranspiration (Eta) is one of the largest components of the hydrologic budget and accounts for a majority of water lost from a watershed. It is primarily controlled by soil water availability, which is largely controlled by rainfall, and atmospheric demand (potential evapotranspiration). Consequently, Eta is sensitive to changes in meteorologic conditions. Understanding the relationship between Et a and controlling meteorologic variables across time and space is important for future predictions of Eta under a changing climate, especially in California where demand for surface and groundwater is high. A regression modeling approach was used to (1) determine the relative control of rainfall, rainfall intensity, and potential evapotranspiration (Etp) over annual and long-term mean annual Eta across watersheds in western California, and (2) quantify the sensitivity of watershed annual Eta to changes in these variables. Annual Eta data for 20 snow-free California watersheds was derived using the water balance method for hydrologic years 1982-2011. Independent variables examined in this study were annual rainfall, rainfall intensity, and potential evapotranspiration. These quantities were obtained or calculated from daily PRISM rainfall and temperature datasets. Results indicated that rainfall was the dominant control over variations in mean annual Eta across the study region (Adj. R2 0.935) and was the primary control over interannual variations in Et a for 15 out of 17 study watersheds. Rainfall intensity was a significant but weaker predictor of mean annual Eta (adj. R2 0.833) and was a significant predictor of annual variations in Eta for 12 out of 17 watersheds. A weak relationship between Etp and Eta was observed across the study region (adj. R2 = 0.660) and the relationship was found to be negative. Etp was a significant, though weak, predictor of annual Eta for 8 out of 17 watersheds. The amount of variance in annual Eta explained by rainfall

  18. Directional connectivity in hydrology and ecology.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Laurel G; Choi, Jungyill; Nungesser, Martha K; Harvey, Judson W

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying hydrologic and ecological connectivity has contributed to understanding transport and dispersal processes and assessing ecosystem degradation or restoration potential. However, there has been little synthesis across disciplines. The growing field of ecohydrology and recent recognition that loss of hydrologic connectivity is leading to a global decline in biodiversity underscore the need for a unified connectivity concept. One outstanding need is a way to quantify directional connectivity that is consistent, robust to variations in sampling, and transferable across scales or environmental settings. Understanding connectivity in a particular direction (e.g., streamwise, along or across gradient, between sources and sinks, along cardinal directions) provides critical information for predicting contaminant transport, planning conservation corridor design, and understanding how landscapes or hydroscapes respond to directional forces like wind or water flow. Here we synthesize progress on quantifying connectivity and develop a new strategy for evaluating directional connectivity that benefits from use of graph theory in ecology and percolation theory in hydrology. The directional connectivity index (DCI) is a graph-theory based, multiscale metric that is generalizable to a range of different structural and functional connectivity applications. It exhibits minimal sensitivity to image rotation or resolution within a given range and responds intuitively to progressive, unidirectional change. Further, it is linearly related to the integral connectivity scale length--a metric common in hydrology that correlates well with actual fluxes--but is less computationally challenging and more readily comparable across different landscapes. Connectivity-orientation curves (i.e., directional connectivity computed over a range of headings) provide a quantitative, information-dense representation of environmental structure that can be used for comparison or detection of

  19. Directional connectivity in hydrology and ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Laurel G.; Choi, Jungyill; Nungesser, Martha K.; Harvey, Judson W.

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying hydrologic and ecological connectivity has contributed to understanding transport and dispersal processes and assessing ecosystem degradation or restoration potential. However, there has been little synthesis across disciplines. The growing field of ecohydrology and recent recognition that loss of hydrologic connectivity is leading to a global decline in biodiversity underscore the need for a unified connectivity concept. One outstanding need is a way to quantify directional connectivity that is consistent, robust to variations in sampling, and transferable across scales or environmental settings. Understanding connectivity in a particular direction (e.g., streamwise, along or across gradient, between sources and sinks, along cardinal directions) provides critical information for predicting contaminant transport, planning conservation corridor design, and understanding how landscapes or hydroscapes respond to directional forces like wind or water flow. Here we synthesize progress on quantifying connectivity and develop a new strategy for evaluating directional connectivity that benefits from use of graph theory in ecology and percolation theory in hydrology. The directional connectivity index (DCI) is a graph-theory based, multiscale metric that is generalizable to a range of different structural and functional connectivity applications. It exhibits minimal sensitivity to image rotation or resolution within a given range and responds intuitively to progressive, unidirectional change. Further, it is linearly related to the integral connectivity scale length—a metric common in hydrology that correlates well with actual fluxes—but is less computationally challenging and more readily comparable across different landscapes. Connectivity-orientation curves (i.e., directional connectivity computed over a range of headings) provide a quantitative, information-dense representation of environmental structure that can be used for comparison or detection of

  20. Hydrologic Landscape Classification to Estimate Bristol Bay Watershed Hydrology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of hydrologic landscapes has proven to be a useful tool for broad scale assessment and classification of landscapes across the United States. These classification systems help organize larger geographical areas into areas of similar hydrologic characteristics based on cl...

  1. Darwinian hydrology: can the methodology Charles Darwin pioneered help hydrologic science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, C.; Troch, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    There have been repeated calls for a Darwinian approach to hydrologic science or for a synthesis of Darwinian and Newtonian approaches, to deepen understanding the hydrologic system in the larger landscape context, and so develop a better basis for predictions now and in an uncertain future. But what exactly makes a Darwinian approach to hydrology "Darwinian"? While there have now been a number of discussions of Darwinian approaches, many referencing Harte (2002), the term is potentially a source of confusion while its connections to Darwin remain allusive rather than explicit. Here we discuss the methods that Charles Darwin pioneered to understand a variety of complex systems in terms of their historical processes of change. We suggest that the Darwinian approach to hydrology follows his lead by focusing attention on the patterns of variation in populations, seeking hypotheses that explain these patterns in terms of the mechanisms and conditions that determine their historical development, using deduction and modeling to derive consequent hypotheses that follow from a proposed explanation, and critically testing these hypotheses against new observations. It is not sufficient to catalogue the patterns or predict them statistically. Nor is it sufficient for the explanations to amount to a "just-so" story not subject to critical analysis. Darwin's theories linked present-day variation to mechanisms that operated over history, and could be independently test and falsified by comparing new observations to the predictions of corollary hypotheses they generated. With a Darwinian framework in mind it is easy to see that a great deal of hydrologic research has already been done that contributes to a Darwinian hydrology - whether deliberately or not. The various heuristic methods that Darwin used to develop explanatory theories - extrapolating mechanisms, space for time substitution, and looking for signatures of history - have direct application in hydrologic science. Some

  2. PATHS groundwater hydrologic model

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.; Schur, J.A.

    1980-04-01

    A preliminary evaluation capability for two-dimensional groundwater pollution problems was developed as part of the Transport Modeling Task for the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). Our approach was to use the data limitations as a guide in setting the level of modeling detail. PATHS Groundwater Hydrologic Model is the first level (simplest) idealized hybrid analytical/numerical model for two-dimensional, saturated groundwater flow and single component transport; homogeneous geology. This document consists of the description of the PATHS groundwater hydrologic model. The preliminary evaluation capability prepared for WISAP, including the enhancements that were made because of the authors' experience using the earlier capability is described. Appendixes A through D supplement the report as follows: complete derivations of the background equations are provided in Appendix A. Appendix B is a comprehensive set of instructions for users of PATHS. It is written for users who have little or no experience with computers. Appendix C is for the programmer. It contains information on how input parameters are passed between programs in the system. It also contains program listings and test case listing. Appendix D is a definition of terms.

  3. Hydrology of Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Kiryukhin, V.A.; Tolstikhin, N.I.

    1988-01-01

    The hydrology of the Southern Ocean floor, the ice sheet covering Antarctica, and the bedrock underlying it is a matter of great interest. This article attempts to shed some light on the problem of the hydrology of this part of the world in the form of prognoses, because the available direct information on the subsurface waters of this vast region is completely inadequate. From the standpoint of their practical utilization, the fresh waters at the base of the Antarctic ice sheet and the waters below the permafrost of the larger islands of Antarctica are the most promising. The large artesian basins of Antarctica with a thick mantle of sedimentary rocks are of interest for their oil and gas potential. One can be certain also of obtaining thermal waters from some of the artesian structures of this continent. Special attention should be paid to the fumaroles and solfataras in areas of present-day volcanism, and to the rift zones, where thermal waters may also be obtained. 16 references.

  4. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  5. [Actual diet of patients with gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Loranskaia, T I; Shakhovskaia, A K; Pavliuchkova, M S

    2000-01-01

    The study of actual nutrition of patients with erosive-ulcerative lesions in the gastroduodenal zone and of patients with operated ulcer has revealed defects in intake of essential nutrients by these patients: overeating of animal fat and refined carbohydrates, deficiency of oil, vitamins A, B2, C, D and food fibers.

  6. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  7. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  8. Teenagers' Perceived and Actual Probabilities of Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namerow, Pearila Brickner; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Explored adolescent females' (N=425) actual and perceived probabilities of pregnancy. Subjects estimated their likelihood of becoming pregnant the last time they had intercourse, and indicated the dates of last intercourse and last menstrual period. Found that the distributions of perceived probability of pregnancy were nearly identical for both…

  9. Uncertainty in hydrological signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Hilary; Westerberg, Ida

    2015-04-01

    Information that summarises the hydrological behaviour or flow regime of a catchment is essential for comparing responses of different catchments to understand catchment organisation and similarity, and for many other modelling and water-management applications. Such information types derived as an index value from observed data are known as hydrological signatures, and can include descriptors of high flows (e.g. mean annual flood), low flows (e.g. mean annual low flow, recession shape), the flow variability, flow duration curve, and runoff ratio. Because the hydrological signatures are calculated from observed data such as rainfall and flow records, they are affected by uncertainty in those data. Subjective choices in the method used to calculate the signatures create a further source of uncertainty. Uncertainties in the signatures may affect our ability to compare different locations, to detect changes, or to compare future water resource management scenarios. The aim of this study was to contribute to the hydrological community's awareness and knowledge of data uncertainty in hydrological signatures, including typical sources, magnitude and methods for its assessment. We proposed a generally applicable method to calculate these uncertainties based on Monte Carlo sampling and demonstrated it for a variety of commonly used signatures. The study was made for two data rich catchments, the 50 km2 Mahurangi catchment in New Zealand and the 135 km2 Brue catchment in the UK. For rainfall data the uncertainty sources included point measurement uncertainty, the number of gauges used in calculation of the catchment spatial average, and uncertainties relating to lack of quality control. For flow data the uncertainty sources included uncertainties in stage/discharge measurement and in the approximation of the true stage-discharge relation by a rating curve. The resulting uncertainties were compared across the different signatures and catchments, to quantify uncertainty

  10. Using GPS loading deformation to distinguish different hydrological measurements and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; van Dam, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    The earth's lithosphere is deformed elastically by seasonal and inter-annual surface mass variations. The Global Positioning System (GPS) accurately measures 3D crustal deformation caused by surface hydrological mass movements. In this study, we calculate the loading deformation using different hydrological models and in-situ hydrological measurements, and compare those modeled results with actual deformation measurements of the dense GPS network in United States and Europe. Therefore, GPS can be used as an independent tool to evaluate the differences between hydrological measurements and models. We are particularly interested in comparing the snow volume differences between in-situ snow measurement (such as SNOTEL) and the snow components of simulated models (such as GLDAS or NLDAS). We, therefore, demonstrate that GPS as a geodetic observation can provide valuable information for hydrological studies.

  11. Exploiting path dependency to improve projections in socio-hydrological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermody, Brian

    2016-04-01

    In trying to understand how societies manage their water resources, researchers are increasingly turning towards the concept of socio-hydrological systems. Socio-hydrological systems are coupled-human water systems where water resource use emerges from the complex interactions between humans and their environment. Socio-hydrological systems tend to exhibit highly non-linear behaviour, making projections of future system state extremely difficult. However, the different sub-components of socio-hydrological systems are actually constrained by the history of past interactions, a feature known as path dependency. In this PICO talk I will explain path dependency in socio-hydrological systems in more detail and how an understanding of our past is essential to make future projections in our complex world.

  12. Mekong River flow and hydrological extremes under climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phi Hoang, Long; Lauri, Hannu; Kummu, Matti; Koponen, Jorma; van Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Supit, Iwan; Leemans, Rik; Kabat, Pavel; Ludwig, Fulco

    2016-07-01

    Climate change poses critical threats to water-related safety and sustainability in the Mekong River basin. Hydrological impact signals from earlier Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3)-based assessments, however, are highly uncertain and largely ignore hydrological extremes. This paper provides one of the first hydrological impact assessments using the CMIP5 climate projections. Furthermore, we model and analyse changes in river flow regimes and hydrological extremes (i.e. high-flow and low-flow conditions). In general, the Mekong's hydrological cycle intensifies under future climate change. The scenario's ensemble mean shows increases in both seasonal and annual river discharges (annual change between +5 and +16 %, depending on location). Despite the overall increasing trend, the individual scenarios show differences in the magnitude of discharge changes and, to a lesser extent, contrasting directional changes. The scenario's ensemble, however, shows reduced uncertainties in climate projection and hydrological impacts compared to earlier CMIP3-based assessments. We further found that extremely high-flow events increase in both magnitude and frequency. Extremely low flows, on the other hand, are projected to occur less often under climate change. Higher low flows can help reducing dry season water shortage and controlling salinization in the downstream Mekong Delta. However, higher and more frequent peak discharges will exacerbate flood risks in the basin. Climate-change-induced hydrological changes will have important implications for safety, economic development, and ecosystem dynamics and thus require special attention in climate change adaptation and water management.

  13. Hydrologic variability in dryland regions: impacts on ecosystem dynamics and food security.

    PubMed

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Bhattachan, Abinash

    2012-11-19

    Research on ecosystem and societal response to global environmental change typically considers the effects of shifts in mean climate conditions. There is, however, some evidence of ongoing changes also in the variance of hydrologic and climate fluctuations. A relatively high interannual variability is a distinctive feature of the hydrologic regime of dryland regions, particularly at the desert margins. Hydrologic variability has an important impact on ecosystem dynamics, food security and societal reliance on ecosystem services in water-limited environments. Here, we investigate some of the current patterns of hydrologic variability in drylands around the world and review the major effects of hydrologic fluctuations on ecosystem resilience, maintenance of biodiversity and food security. We show that random hydrologic fluctuations may enhance the resilience of dryland ecosystems by obliterating bistable deterministic behaviours and threshold-like responses to external drivers. Moreover, by increasing biodiversity and the associated ecosystem redundancy, hydrologic variability can indirectly enhance post-disturbance recovery, i.e. ecosystem resilience.

  14. Responses of trace gases to hydrologic pulses in desert floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Tamara K.; Grimm, Nancy B.

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed hydrologic inputs interact with antecedent moisture conditions to shape biogeochemical dynamics in many ecosystems, but the outcomes of these interactions remain difficult to predict. Hydrologic pulses may influence biogeochemical activity through several mechanisms: by providing water as a resource, providing limiting nutrients or substrates that fuel particular biogeochemical pathways, or determining redox conditions. Antecedent moisture conditions may modify the relative importance of each of these potential mechanisms, by influencing accumulation of labile carbon and nutrients, the severity of water limitation to biological processes, and longer-term effects on abiotic conditions, including redox. We experimentally applied hydrologic pulses of different sizes (1-cm and 20-cm events) to soils of desert floodplains and assessed responses of trace gases (CO2, CH4, NO, and N2O) in dry and monsoon seasons to test these mechanisms. Size of the hydrologic pulse strongly interacted with antecedent soil-moisture conditions to determine emissions of some trace gases. Following dry antecedent conditions, water addition stimulated emissions of CO2, CH4, and NO, but not N2O, and larger experimental pulses resulted in larger fluxes. In the monsoon season, responses to water addition were muted and size of the hydrologic pulse had no effect, except for CH4emission, which increased in response to the 20-cm event. Seasonal contrasts indicated that antecedent moisture conditions constrain the effects of hydrologic pulses on biogeochemical processes, whereas contrasts among responses of different trace gases demonstrated that mechanisms controlling emissions of particular gases are water limitation (CO2), in situ production of nitrogen substrates (NO), or redox conditions (CH4). Strong and predictable interactive effects of water inputs and antecedent conditions indicate that extended droughts may cause elevated emissions of gaseous C and NO following the return of

  15. Modelling hydrological effects of wetland restoration: a differentiated view.

    PubMed

    Staes, J; Rubarenzya, M H; Meire, P; Willems, P

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents findings of a conjunctive hydrological and ecological study into habitat restoration and catchment hydrology. Physically-based, fully distributed hydrological modelling was coupled with spatial analysis and wetland scenario generation techniques to simulate potential effects of restoring lower, middle, and upper catchment wetlands. In the past, anthropogenic interference of this catchments' landscape for agriculture and settlement has left most wetland areas drained, and brought the natural functioning of the ecosystem into conflict with human needs. Many eco-hydrology studies conclude that such disturbances result in a more extreme hydrological regime. The study objectives were to develop and study innovative methods for habitat restoration, and understand the potential hydrological impacts of each approach. The study aims to analyze the scenarios and whether the hydrological response is influenced by the topological placement of the restoration sites. Land-use change scenarios are developed on the basis of physical characteristics and consider the credibility of transitions from current land-use. This study focused on the position of the wetlands in the catchment and hydrological typology. Wetland restoration scenarios are created for different geographical settings within the catchment. A distinction is made between groundwater dependent wetlands and wetlands that are influenced by in-stream water tables or surface water inundations. Results show that there is little effect on the total annual water budget. The results point to river valley rewetting as having the effect of decreasing the paved overland component of stream flow, and increasing the saturated zone flow component. It promoted groundwater recharge. There was no increase of peak flows due to headwater wetlands, contrary to some sources (Bullock & Acreman 2003). The catchments' actual evapotranspiration and root zone water responses were found to be varied over the analysis points

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF HYDROLOGICAL EDUCATION IN UKRAINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukalo, V.

    2009-12-01

    special hydrological training in the next years. After the completion of first and second year academic program, students undertake field practical works under the supervision of their teachers at field stations of the Kyiv National University and the State Hydrometeorological Service. The rapid development of scientific and practical hydrology, an increase of environmental oriented researches stimulate the upgrading of requirements to the hydrological education. In order to meet these requirements a number of measures have been undertaken in the Kyiv University by the way of improving of education methods, education teaching conditions and strengthening the co-operation at home and abroad. A number of the new courses (“Hydroinformatics”, “Environmental Planning and Management” and others) have been developed during last years. The practical training of using of new hydrological and hydrochemical equipment and methods of observation and forecasting in the State Hydometeorological Service is increased. All students have practical works at the organization of the State Hydrometeorological Service: meteorological and hydrological stations, observatories, hydrological forecasting units. The special complex program of practical hydrological training of students was development by the Administration of the State Hydrometeorological Service in 2007.

  17. A Global Hydrological Ensemble Forecasting System: Uncertainty Quantification and Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Xue, X.; Wang, X.; Gourley, J. J.; Kirstetter, P.

    2012-12-01

    A Global Hydrological Ensemble Forecasting System (GHEFS) driven by TRMM Multi-satellite Prediction Analysis (TMPA) precipitation ensembles and Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS) Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) ensembles, via the Coupled Routing and Excess STorage (CREST) distributed hydrological model, provides deterministic and probabilistic (e.g. 95% confidence boundaries) simulations of streamflow. The TMPA inputs enable flood monitoring and short-term forecasts while the GEFS ensembles provide for forecasts up to a seven-day lead time. This talk will focus on a quantification of the system's uncertainty and streamflow ensemble prediction generation using the following three techniques: 1) an error model that first quantifies and then perturbs both temporal and spatial variability of the real-time, TMPA precipitation estimates by considering the version-7 research product as the reference rainfall product; 2) in forecast mode, utilization of the Ensemble Transform method to account for the uncertainty of GEFS forecasts from its initial condition errors; 3) a sequential data assimilation approach - the Ensemble Square Root Kalman Filter (EnSRF) applied to update the CREST model's internal states whenever observations (e.g. streamflow, soil moisture, and actual ET etc.) are available. The GHEFS is validated in several basins in the U.S. and other continents in terms of flood detection capability (e.g. CSI, NSCE, Peak, Timing), showing improved prognostic capability by offering more time for responding agencies and yielding unique uncertainty information about the magnitude of the forecast impacts.

  18. Conceptualizing socio-hydrological drought processes: the rise and fall of the Ancient Maya civilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuil, Linda; Carr, Gemma; Viglione, Alberto; Prskawetz, Alexia; Bloeschl, Guenter

    2016-04-01

    Different communities have followed different paths to arrive at their present situation as a consequence of the continuous, specific interactions between the hydrological and social system. The need to understand the current and future pathways to water security becomes more and more pressing, considering the increasingly delicate balance between water demand and water supply. To contribute to addressing this challenge, we examine the link between water stress and society through socio-hydrological modeling. Within the spirit of the Easter Island model by Brander and Taylor and drawing from the vulnerability literature, we conceptualize the interactions of an agricultural society with its environment. We apply the model to the case of the ancient Maya, a civilization who occupied the Maya Lowlands (parts of present day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize) from around 2000 BC to after AD 830. The hypothesis that modest drought periods played a major role in the fall of the society is explored. We are able to simulate plausible feedbacks and find that a modest reduction in rainfall is a necessary, but not a sufficient condition in order to observe a collapse of 80 percent of the population. Equally important are actual population density and the impact of drought on crop growth. The model shows that reservoirs allow the society to grow larger, but also that the vulnerability to drought increases.

  19. The hydrological and the hydrogeological framework of the Lottenbachtal, Bochum, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhamed, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    This study was performed to investigate the hydrological and the hydrogeological framework of the Lottenbachtal, Germany. Long-term climatic data were statistically analyzed, water and soil samples were collected and analyzed, stream flow discharge was measured and separated, the hydrological balance of this catchment was calculated and a hydrological and hydrogeological conceptual model was constructed. The study area is characterized mainly by the precipitation value ranged between 0.1 and 5 mm/day. The actual evapotranspiration constitutes 31.90 % of the total precipitation, the direct surface runoff constitutes 61.04 %, the soil storage constitutes 3 % and the groundwater recharge of the Lottenbachtal constitutes only 4 % of the total precipitation. The Lottenbachtal has largely affected the diversity of the land use, which includes forests, arable areas, abandoned coal mines and settlement areas. The soil of the forested area is represented by relatively high acidic conditions and relatively high sulfate concentrations, while the soil of the arable areas is represented by near-neutral conditions associated with relatively high concentrations of nutrients and other chemical elements (calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, sulfate, nitrate). The settlement areas are characterized by huge blocks of concrete and backfills, which are rich in calcium and magnesium carbonates. The effects of this diversity in the land use on groundwater and surface water quality resulting by leaching the chemical elements from the soil covers and the other materials. These effects are represented by the following complex water types of Ca-Na-Mg-Cl-SO4-HCO3, Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4, Ca-Na-Mg-Cl-SO4, Ca-Na-Mg-Cl-SO4 and Ca-HCO3, which represent the diversity of the flow paths of the water as well as to mixing processes. The diversity of the land use also affected the physical hydrological-hydrogeological characteristics of the study area by increasing the direct surface runoff and

  20. Hydrological Forecasting Practices in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Fernando; Paiva, Rodrigo; Collischonn, Walter; Ramos, Maria-Helena

    2016-04-01

    This work brings a review on current hydrological and flood forecasting practices in Brazil, including the main forecasts applications, the different kinds of techniques that are currently being employed and the institutions involved on forecasts generation. A brief overview of Brazil is provided, including aspects related to its geography, climate, hydrology and flood hazards. A general discussion about the Brazilian practices on hydrological short and medium range forecasting is presented. Detailed examples of some hydrological forecasting systems that are operational or in a research/pre-operational phase using the large scale hydrological model MGB-IPH are also presented. Finally, some suggestions are given about how the forecasting practices in Brazil can be understood nowadays, and what are the perspectives for the future.

  1. [Research progress on hydrological scaling].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianmei; Pei, Tiefan

    2003-12-01

    With the development of hydrology and the extending effect of mankind on environment, scale issue has become a great challenge to many hydrologists due to the stochasticism and complexity of hydrological phenomena and natural catchments. More and more concern has been given to the scaling issues to gain a large-scale (or small-scale) hydrological characteristic from a certain known catchments, but hasn't been solved successfully. The first part of this paper introduced some concepts about hydrological scale, scale issue and scaling. The key problem is the spatial heterogeneity of catchments and the temporal and spatial variability of hydrological fluxes. Three approaches to scale were put forward in the third part, which were distributed modeling, fractal theory and statistical self similarity analyses. Existing problems and future research directions were proposed in the last part.

  2. Groundwater hydrology instructional system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Ronald G.

    Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, is preparing for its third cycle of the Interactive Remote Instructional System (IRIS) in groundwater hydrology, beginning January 15, 1986. The first cycle finished with an impressive completion ratio for registered participants, and the second cycle has currently been underway since July. This comprehensive hydrogeology program was originally developed for the Soil Conservation Service (of the U.S. Department of Agriculture) to prepare their personnel for professional practice work. Since its evolution into IRIS, an 80% participant completion rate has been recorded for the first cycle, which is a significant departure from success rates traditionally recorded by correspondence courses. This excellent rate of success is the result of 2 years of refinement and demonstrates the progressive nature of the program. IRIS has met the needs of participants by developing a curriculum that reflects current trends in the groundwater industry and has provided a unique educational approach that ensures maximum interaction between the instructional staff and participants.

  3. Connecticut River Hydrologic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestero, T. P.

    2004-12-01

    The Connecticut River basin possesses some characteristics that make it unique for studying hydrologic issues that transcend scale. The watershed was first dramatically altered through natural processes (glaciation) and then heavily impacted by human stresses (dams, deforestation, acid precipitation/deposition), only to exhibit recent decades of return to a more natural state (reforestation, land conservation, stream restoration, pollution abatement, and dam removal). The watershed is sufficiently north to be classified as a cold region. More specifically to hydrology, the watershed exhibits the spectrum of flooding problems: ice dams, convective storms, hurricanes, rain on melting snow, and low pressure systems. The 28,000 square kilometer Connecticut River Watershed covers one third of the states of New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. The >640-km long rivers' headwaters start on the Canadian border at the Fourth Connecticut Lake, and flows southward to discharge in Long Island sound. The lower 100 km of river are tidally influenced. The Connecticut River is responsible for 70 % of the freshwater inflow to Long Island Sound. The Connecticut River is a sixth order stream that exhibits a dendritic pattern in an elongated scheme. This setting therefore affords many first and second order streams in almost parallel fashion, flowing west or east towards the central Connecticut River spine. There are 38 major tributaries to the mainstem Connecticut River, and 26 of these tributaries drain greater than 250 square kilometers. There is in excess of 30,000 km of perennially flowing stream length in the watershed. For more information, see: http://www.unh.edu/erg/connho/

  4. Hydrologic Impacts of a Surface-Applied, Organic Emulsion on Arid Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. H.; Caldwell, T. G.; Goreham, J.; Meadows, D. G.; Shafer, D. S.; Miller, J. J.; McDonald, E. V.

    2005-12-01

    In-place stabilization of environmental contaminants over land areas poses interesting logistical challenges, especially when considering the impact of the stabilizing agent on soil hydrologic processes like infiltration and surface runoff. As one part of a larger field-based study, we investigated the potential hydrologic impacts of using an organic-based emulsion which was designed to stabilize disturbed and undisturbed desert soils. The emulsion, a blend of organic esters, surfactants, water, and a proprietary chelating agent, was tested at the Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, AZ. The goal of the study was to determine whether, and to what extent, field application of this emulsion altered the soil hydraulic properties and hence the infiltration and runoff potential. A randomized complete block design was used to investigate the effects of soil age (old vs young), treatment concentration (control vs two dilution levels), disturbance level (disturbed vs undisturbed), and time (1 year exposure) on the soil hydraulic properties. Hydraulic properties were determined using a 20 cm diameter tension infiltrometer (triplicate measurements for each treatment combination). Initial results show a significant reduction in the saturated hydraulic conductivity by nearly two orders of magnitude following treatment with the emulsion. Triplicate rainfall simulation experiments were also conducted on the test plots to investigate rainfall-runoff processes. Results immediately following treatment show a reduced time to ponding and a higher potential for surface runoff. Tests conducted quarterly for one year after application, however, indicate that hydrologic impacts diminished with time. Targeted laboratory tests are ongoing to better identify the breakdown mechanisms of the emulsion. The field and laboratory results will help guide larger-scale field applications based on actual field conditions.

  5. Potential Evapotranspiration as a Source of Uncertainty and Bias in Hydrologic Impact Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milly, P. C. D.

    2015-12-01

    The diversity of commonly used potential evapotranspiration (PET) models contributes uncertainty in the estimation of hydrologic response to anthropogenic climate change. The temperature sensitivity of six commonly used PET equations (Hamon, Oudin, Penman-Monteith, Priestley-Taylor, Samani-Hargreaves, and Thornthwaite) is readily shown to vary by almost an order of magnitude, with energy-unconstrained (i.e., temperature-based) methods showing the largest sensitivity. The change in annual multimodel (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5) PET under Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 from 1981-2000 to 2081-2100 is typically 10-20% (20-40%) in the low (high) latitudes according to the physics-based Penman-Monteith (ASCE Standardized Reference Evapotranspiration) equation, but 20-40% (20-80%) according to the empirical, temperature-based Hamon equation. Radiation-based Priestley-Taylor changes are smaller than both of these, while empirical, temperature-based Thornthwaite changes are larger than both. These differences in PET change translate to large differences in change of water availability; when combined with a form of the Budyko water-balance relation, the PET methods predict a wide range of runoff changes. Furthermore, all PET methods result in bias that indicates drier conditions globally than those computed by the climate models themselves, and all PET methods overestimate the changes in actual evapotranspiration in non-water-stressed seasons/regions relative to the changes in the climate models. We conclude that use of PET methods that are inappropriate for climate-change applications is a source not only of uncertainty, but also of more drying than suggested by climate models, in hydrologic impact analyses. In view of the bias, it is advised that a no-PET-change analysis be used to define a wet upper bound on potential hydrologic impacts.

  6. CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System and its role in hydrologic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D.; Helly, J. J.; Graham, W.; Kruger, A.; Kumar, P.; Lakshmi, V.; Lettenmaier, D.; Zheng, C.; Lall, U.; Piasecki, M.; Duffy, C.

    2003-12-01

    The Hydrologic Information System component of CUAHSI focuses on building a hydrologic information system to support the advancement of hydrologic science. This system is intended to help with rapidly acquiring diverse geospatial and temporal hydrologic datasets, integrating them into a hydrologic data model or framework describing a region, and supporting analysis, modeling and visualization of the movement of water and the transport of constituents through that region. In addition, the system will feature interfaces for advanced technologies like knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) and also provide a comprehensive metadata description including a hydrologic ontology (HOW) for integration with the Semantic Web. The prototype region is the Neuse river basin in North Carolina. A "digital watershed" is to be built for this basin to help formulate and test the hydrologic data model at a range of spatial scales, from the scale of the whole basin down to the scale of individual experimental sites. This data model will be further developed and refined as additional hydrologic observatories are selected by CUAHSI. This will result in a consistent means for the characterization and comparison of processes in different geographic regions of the nation using a common data framework. The HIS will also provide a generalized digital library capability to manage collections of thematically-organized data from primary sources as well as derived analytical results in the form of data publications. The HIS will be designed from the beginning as an open federation of observatory-based collections that are interoperable with other data and digital library systems. The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System project involves collaboration among several CUAHSI member institutions, with the San Diego Supercomputer Center serving as the technology partner to facilitate the development of a prototype system.

  7. Reproducing Actual Morphology of Planetary Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Sasaki, S.

    1996-03-01

    Assuming that lava flows behave as non-isothermal laminar Bingham fluids, we developed a numerical code of lava flows. We take the self gravity effects and cooling mechanisms into account. The calculation method is a kind of cellular automata using a reduced random space method, which can eliminate the mesh shape dependence. We can calculate large scale lava flows precisely without numerical instability and reproduce morphology of actual lava flows.

  8. The Actual Apollo 13 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The actual Apollo 13 lunar landing mission prime crew from left to right are: Commander, James A. Lovell Jr., Command Module pilot, John L. Swigert Jr.and Lunar Module pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr. The original Command Module pilot for this mission was Thomas 'Ken' Mattingly Jr. but due to exposure to German measles he was replaced by his backup, Command Module pilot, John L. 'Jack' Swigert Jr.

  9. GIS/RS-based Integrated Eco-hydrologic Modeling in the East River Basin, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai

    Land use/cover change (LUCC) has significantly altered the hydrologic system in the East River (Dongjiang) Basin. Quantitative modeling of hydrologic impacts of LUCC is of great importance for water supply, drought monitoring and integrated water resources management. An integrated eco-hydrologic modeling system of Distributed Monthly Water Balance Model (DMWBM), Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) was developed with aid of GIS/RS to quantify LUCC, to conduct physically-based ET (evapotranspiration) mapping and to predict hydrologic impacts of LUCC. To begin with, in order to evaluate LUCC, understand implications of LUCC and provide boundary condition for the integrated eco-hydrologic modeling, firstly the long-term vegetation dynamics was investigated based on Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, and then LUCC was analyzed with post-classification methods and finally LUCC prediction was conducted based on Markov chain model. The results demonstrate that the vegetation activities decreased significantly in summer over the years. Moreover, there were significant changes in land use/cover over the past two decades. Particularly there was a sharp increase of urban and built-up area and a significant decrease of grassland and cropland. All these indicate that human activities are intensive in the East River Basin and provide valuable information for constructing scenarios for studying hydrologic impacts of LUCC. The physically-remote-sensing-based Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) was employed to estimate areal actual ET for a large area rather than traditional point measurements . The SEBS was enhanced for application in complex vegetated area. Then the inter-comparison with complimentary ET model and distributed monthly water balance model was made to validate the enhanced SEBS (ESEBS). The application and test of ESEBS show that it has a good accuracy both monthly and annually and can be effectively applied in the East River Basin. The results of

  10. Simulated natural hydrologic regime of an intermountain playa conservation site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanderson, J.S.; Kotliar, N.B.; Steingraeber, D.A.; Browne, C.

    2008-01-01

    An intermountain playa wetland preserve in Colorado's San Luis Valley was studied to assess how its current hydrologic function compares to its natural hydrologic regime. Current hydrologic conditions were quantified, and on-site effects of off-site water use were assessed. A water-budget model was developed to simulate an unaltered (i.e., natural) hydrologic regime, and simulated natural conditions were compared to observed conditions. From 1998-2002, observed stream inflows accounted for ??? 80% of total annual water inputs. No ground water discharged to the wetland. Evapotranspiration (ET) accounted for ??? 69% of total annual water loss. Simulated natural conditions differed substantially from current altered conditions with respect to depth, variability, and frequency of flooding. During 1998-2002, observed monthly mean surface-water depth was 65% lower than under simulated natural conditions. Observed monthly variability in water depth range from 129% greater (May) to 100% less (September and October) than simulated. As observed, the wetland dried completely (i.e., was ephemeral) in all years; as simulated, the wetland was ephemeral in two of five years. For the period 1915-2002, the simulated wetland was inundated continuously for as long as 16 years and nine months. The large differences in observed and simulated surface-water dynamics resulted from differences between altered and simulated unaltered stream inflows. The maximum and minimum annual total stream inflows observed from 1998-2005 were 3.1 ?? 106 m3 and 0 m3, respectively, versus 15.5 ?? 106 m3 and 3.2 ?? 106 m3 under simulated natural conditions from 1915-2002. The maximum simulated inflow was 484% greater than observed. These data indicate that the current hydrologic regime of this intermountain playa differs significantly from its natural hydrologic regime, which has important implications for planning and assessing conservation success. ?? 2008, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  11. Hydrologic characteristics of Nebraska soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dugan, Jack T.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of the physical characteristics of soil on hydrology is frequently neglected. In this report, the effects of five characteristics on the hydrologic responses of soils in Nebraska are evaluated quantitatively, soils are grouped through use of a simplified coding system according to similarities in hydrologic responses, and are mapped according to these responses. General soils maps of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service and data for the physical properties of the soils proved well-suited to hydrologic interpretation. This interpretation of the maps and data led to the selection of three characteristics as classification variables: Average permeability of the 60-inch soil profile, average maximum soil slope, and depth to the seasonal high water table. Permeability of the least permeable horizon and available water capacity, although not needed as classification variables, are useful in explaining some of the hydrologic responses of soils. The primary soil units used in groupings and interpretation of the soils for this study are the soil associations. A computer program is presented that sorts the soils into groups and calculates statistics for each group. The 147 soil associations in Nebraska were thus sorted into 29 hydrologic soil groups. The location and extent of these hydrologic soil groups are shown on maps at scales of 1:750,000 and 1:250,000 for the State.

  12. Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, William

    Hydrologists can take heart that our profession has matured to the point of having its respectable reputation recognized by the National Academy of Sciences. Opportunities in Hydrology follows the publication of Opportunities in Biology and Opportunities in Chemistry, and was prepared by a committee composed of prestigious water-oriented scientists. I am writing this review because the book is extremely important, and its basic premise—that there is such a thing as a single “discipline” of hydrologic sciences—is contrary to the thinking of many hydrogeologists.The committee proposes that students can obtain adequate training and be prepared to develop a career in “hydrologic sciences.” Such an approach may be suitable for many aspects of hydrology, but it does not represent the interests, needs, goals, history, or future of “hydrogeology,” a clearly recognized subdiscipline of hydrology. The various aspects of hydrology are so wide ranging that, from my personal viewpoint and the viewpoints of many of my colleagues, it takes a person of extremely narrow focus to see hydrology as a single discipline.

  13. Thresholds in Xeric Hydrology and Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, T.; Brooks, P. D.; Simpson, S. C.; Soto, C. D.; Yuan, F.; Turner, D.; Richter, H.

    2011-12-01

    Due to water limitation, thresholds in hydrologic and biogeochemical processes are common in arid and semi-arid systems. Some of these thresholds such as those focused on rainfall runoff relationships have been well studied. However to gain a full picture of the role that thresholds play in driving the hydrology and biogeochemistry of xeric systems a full view of the entire array of processes at work is needed. Here a walk through the landscape of xeric systems will be conducted illustrating the powerful role of hydrologic thresholds on xeric system biogeochemistry. To understand xeric hydro-biogeochemistry two key ideas need to be focused on. First, it is important to start from a framework of reaction and transport. Second an understanding of the temporal and spatial components of thresholds that have a large impact on hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes needs to be offered. In the uplands themselves episodic rewetting and drying of soils permits accelerated biogeochemical processing but also more gradual drainage of water through the subsurface than expected in simple conceptions of biogeochemical processes. Hydrologic thresholds (water content above hygroscopic) results in a stop start nutrient spiral of material across the landscape since runoff connecting uplands to xeric perennial riparian is episodic and often only transports materials a short distance (100's of m). This episodic movement results in important and counter-intuitive nutrient inputs to riparian zones but also significant processing and uptake of nutrients. The floods that transport these biogeochemicals also result in significant input to riparian groundwater and may be key to sustaining these critical ecosystems. Importantly the flood driven recharge process itself is a threshold process dependent on flood characteristics (floods greater than 100 cubic meters per second) and antecedent conditions (losing to near neutral gradients). Floods also appear to influence where arid and semi

  14. A question driven socio-hydrological modeling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, M.; Portney, K.; Islam, S.

    2016-01-01

    Human and hydrological systems are coupled: human activity impacts the hydrological cycle and hydrological conditions can, but do not always, trigger changes in human systems. Traditional modeling approaches with no feedback between hydrological and human systems typically cannot offer insight into how different patterns of natural variability or human-induced changes may propagate through this coupled system. Modeling of coupled human-hydrological systems, also called socio-hydrological systems, recognizes the potential for humans to transform hydrological systems and for hydrological conditions to influence human behavior. However, this coupling introduces new challenges and existing literature does not offer clear guidance regarding model conceptualization. There are no universally accepted laws of human behavior as there are for the physical systems; furthermore, a shared understanding of important processes within the field is often used to develop hydrological models, but there is no such consensus on the relevant processes in socio-hydrological systems. Here we present a question driven process to address these challenges. Such an approach allows modeling structure, scope and detail to remain contingent on and adaptive to the question context. We demonstrate the utility of this process by revisiting a classic question in water resources engineering on reservoir operation rules: what is the impact of reservoir operation policy on the reliability of water supply for a growing city? Our example model couples hydrological and human systems by linking the rate of demand decreases to the past reliability to compare standard operating policy (SOP) with hedging policy (HP). The model shows that reservoir storage acts both as a buffer for variability and as a delay triggering oscillations around a sustainable level of demand. HP reduces the threshold for action thereby decreasing the delay and the oscillation effect. As a result, per capita demand decreases during

  15. Indicated and actual mass inventory measurements for an inverted U-tube steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, G.G.; Plessinger, M.P.; Boucher, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of actual versus indicated secondary liquid level in a steam generator at steaming conditions are presented. The experimental investigation was performed in two different small scale U-tube-in-shell steam generators at typical pressurized water reactor operating conditions (5-7 MPa; saturated) in the Semiscale facility. During steaming conditions, the indicated secondary liquid level was found to vary considerably from the actual ''bottled-up'' liquid level. These difference between indicated and actual liquid level are related to the frictional pressure drop associated with the two-phase steaming condition in the riser. Data from a series of bottle-up experiments (Simultaneously, the primary heat source and secondary feed and steam are terminated) are tabulated and the actual liquid level is correlated to the indicated liquid level.

  16. Modeling hydrologic and ecologic responses using a new eco-hydrological model for identification of droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Yohei; Koike, Toshio; Jaranilla-Sanchez, Patricia Ann

    2014-07-01

    Drought severely damages water and agricultural resources, and both hydrological and ecological responses are important for its understanding. First, precipitation deficit induces soil moisture deficiency and high plant water stress causing agricultural droughts. Second, hydrological drought characterized by deficit of river discharge and groundwater follows agricultural drought. However, contributions of vegetation dynamics to these processes at basin scale have not been quantified. To address this issue, we develop an eco-hydrological model that can calculate river discharge, groundwater, energy flux, and vegetation dynamics as diagnostic variables at basin scale within a distributed hydrological modeling framework. The model is applied to drought analysis in the Medjerda River basin. From model inputs and outputs, we calculate drought indices for different drought types. The model shows reliable accuracy in reproducing observed river discharge in long-term (19 year) simulation. Moreover, the drought index calculated from the model-estimated annual peak of leaf area index correlates well (correlation coefficient r = 0.89) with the drought index from nationwide annual crop production, which demonstrates that the modeled leaf area index is capable of representing agricultural droughts related to historical food shortages. We show that vegetation dynamics have a more rapid response to meteorological droughts than river discharge and groundwater dynamics in the Medjerda basin because vegetation dynamics are sensitive to soil moisture in surface layers, whereas soil moisture in deeper layers strongly contributes to streamflow and groundwater level. Our modeling framework can contribute to analyze drought progress, although analyses for other climate conditions are needed.

  17. A "total parameter estimation" method in the varification of distributed hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Qin, D.; Wang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Conventionally hydrological models are used for runoff or flood forecasting, hence the determination of model parameters are common estimated based on discharge measurements at the catchment outlets. With the advancement in hydrological sciences and computer technology, distributed hydrological models based on the physical mechanism such as SWAT, MIKESHE, and WEP, have gradually become the mainstream models in hydrology sciences. However, the assessments of distributed hydrological models and model parameter determination still rely on runoff and occasionally, groundwater level measurements. It is essential in many countries, including China, to understand the local and regional water cycle: not only do we need to simulate the runoff generation process and for flood forecasting in wet areas, we also need to grasp the water cycle pathways and consumption process of transformation in arid and semi-arid regions for the conservation and integrated water resources management. As distributed hydrological model can simulate physical processes within a catchment, we can get a more realistic representation of the actual water cycle within the simulation model. Runoff is the combined result of various hydrological processes, using runoff for parameter estimation alone is inherits problematic and difficult to assess the accuracy. In particular, in the arid areas, such as the Haihe River Basin in China, runoff accounted for only 17% of the rainfall, and very concentrated during the rainy season from June to August each year. During other months, many of the perennial rivers within the river basin dry up. Thus using single runoff simulation does not fully utilize the distributed hydrological model in arid and semi-arid regions. This paper proposed a "total parameter estimation" method to verify the distributed hydrological models within various water cycle processes, including runoff, evapotranspiration, groundwater, and soil water; and apply it to the Haihe river basin in

  18. Doing hydrology backwards in tropical humid catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real Rangel, R.; Brena-Naranjo, J. A.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down approaches in hydrology offer the possibility to predict water fluxes at the catchment scale based on the interpretation of the observed hydrological response at the catchment itself. Doing hydrology backwards (inferring precipitation and evapotranspiration rates at the catchment scale from streamflow measurements, see Kirchner (2009)) can be a useful methodology for estimating water fluxes at the catchment and regional scales. Previous studies using this inverse modeling approach have been performed in regions (UK, Switzerland, France, Eastern US) where energy-limited (in winter and early spring) and water-limited conditions (in summer) prevail during a large period of the year. However, such approach has not been tested in regions characterized by a quasi-constant supply of water and energy (e.g. humid tropics). The objective of this work is to infer annual rates of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the last decade in 10 catchments located in Mexico's tropical humid regions. Hourly discharge measurements during recession periods were analyzed and parameters for the nonlinear storage-discharge relationship of each catchment were derived. Results showed large variability in both catchment-scale precipitation and evapotranspiration rates among the selected study sites. Finally, a comparison was done between such estimates and those obtained from remotely-sensed data (TRMM for precipitation and MOD16 for evapotranspiration).

  19. Hydrologic considerations in defining isolated wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; LaBaugh, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Wetlands that are not connected by streams to other surface-water bodies are considered to be isolated. Although the definition is based on surface-water connections to other water bodies, isolated wetlands commonly are integral parts of extensive ground-water flow systems, and isolated wetlands can spill over their surface divides into adjacent surface-water bodies during periods of abundant precipitation and high water levels. Thus, characteristics of ground-water flow and atmospheric-water flow affect the isolation of wetlands. In general, the degree that isolated wetlands are connected through the ground-water system to other surface-water bodies depends to a large extent on the rate that ground water moves and the rate that hydrologic stresses can be transmitted through the ground-water system. Water that seeps from an isolated wetland into a gravel aquifer can travel many kilometers through the ground-water system in one year. In contrast, water that seeps from an isolated wetland into a clayey or silty substrate may travel less than one meter in one year. For wetlands that can spill over their surface watersheds during periods of wet climate conditions, their isolation is related to the height to a spill elevation above normal wetland water level and the recurrence interval of various magnitudes of precipitation. The concepts presented in this paper indicate that the entire hydrologic system needs to be considered in establishing a definition of hydrologic isolation.

  20. Hydrological trends in Congo basin (Central Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laraque, A.

    2015-12-01

    The last studies concerning some main Congo basin rivers allowed to subdivide their multi-annual flows into several homogeneous phases. As in West Africa, 1970 was the year of the major hydroclimatic event announcing a weaker flowing period. In the absence of long, reliable and available flow series in the whole Congo basin of 3,8 106km2 area, the present study concerns only the Congo River at Brazzaville/Kinshasa and two of the main tributaries of its right bank, Ubangui at Bangui and Sangha at Ouesso, with hydrologic data available from the first half of the 20th century. For Congo River, in comparison with its secular average, after an excess flow noted during the sixties, a significant drop of 10% occurs in the eighties. However, a return to normal conditions is recorded from 1995. For Ubangui and Sangha, the flows remain weaker since 1970. Within the bi-modal hydrological regimes of Sangha and Congo river, because they are equatorial, we also observe since many years a small decline of the secondary flood of april-june. This phenomenon was emphasized especially these last years and is founded in others rivers of Central Africa, where it reflects the variations of de rainfall patterns and the surfaces features. For the Congo basin, the situation is worrying because that affects the inland waterway transport. Moreover that wakes also the project of junction by a canal of the Congo and Chari basins for fighting against the hydrological decline of Lake Chad.

  1. Lack of instrumental hydrological data? Trying the use of interviews as a way to estimate the regime of temporary streams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, Francesc; Llorens, Pilar; Latron, Jérôme; Cid, Núria; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-04-01

    Temporary streams are those that undergo the recurrent cessation of flow or the complete drying of the stream bed. Although they may represent the main part of the elementary drainage network, or even most of the total network in some areas due to climatic or lithological reasons, temporary streams are rarely included in stream monitoring networks. As a result, hydrological data for assessing the regime of temporary streams are often scarce. The LIFE TRivers project is developing a software (TREHS, Temporary Rivers' Ecological and Hydrological Status), which is designed to help the managers for adequately implement the Water Framework Directive in this type of water bodies. The first need for managing a temporary stream is the characterisation of its hydrological regime, in order to help managers selecting appropriate sampling dates and using the right methods to determine its ecological status. Yet, the deviation of the actual regime from the natural one should be determined in order to assess the potential hydrological alteration due to the human activity and thereby determine the 'hydrological status'. TREHS applies a methodology for regime characterisation based on the results of the EU FP7 project MIRAGE. This methodology is based on the assessment of the temporal patterns of six 'aquatic states' that summarize the transient sets of mesohabitats occurring on a given reach at a particular moment, depending on the hydrological conditions. The qualitative nature of the aquatic states allowed the use of interviews to assess the regime of the streams in the lack of observed flow data. For the questionnaires, the TREHS temporal scheme was simplified from a monthly to a seasonal one and the aquatic states were reduced from six to three (flow, pools and dry). To validate the methodology based on the use of interviews, inhabitants of villages and small towns near to gauging stations were asked to fill the questionnaire. The preliminary results on temporary stream

  2. Global trends in future hydrological drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lanen, H.; Wanders, N.; Wada, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change very likely impacts future hydrological drought characteristics worldwide (i.e. duration and intensity of drought in runoff). However, the magnitude and sign of the change is largely unknown. In this study we quantify impact of climate change on future low flows and hydrological droughts characteristics on a global scale. The global hydrological and water resources model PCR-GLOBWB was used to simulate future river runoff at 0.5 degree globally on a daily basis. The newly available CMIP5 climate projections were obtained through the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Intercomparison Project (ISI-MIP). The model was forced with the daily transient climate fields taken from five GCMs and four underlying emission scenarios (here accounted for by using four Representative Concentration Pathways or RCPs). The monthly Q80 (20 percentile lowest flow) was used to evaluate the changes in low flows and as the threshold level for the hydrological drought characterisation. The monthly threshold was smoothed to allow for drought calculations on a daily basis. The thresholds in the future remained transient and were calculated over the climatology of the last 30 year period to reflect the adaptation of society to new conditions. Trends in the thresholds and drought characteristics were analysed over the period 2000-2099. Results for most GCMs and all RCPs showed that Q80 discharge (low flow metric) indicates a significant negative trend in large parts of South America, Central Africa, the Mediterranean and South East Asia. Under the higher greenhouse gas emission scenarios of RCP6.0 and RCP8.5, the USA and Central and South Europe were also projected to have drier conditions. For all future projections Russia and Canada were expected to get wetter during the 21st century. Under RCP6.0 and RCP8.5 scenarios, the results generally showed the strongest negative changes in future low flow. The results simulated with most GCMs agree well over many parts of the world, however

  3. Spatial uncertainty in remote sensing generated hydrological variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendiguren González, Gorka; Stisen, Simon

    2016-04-01

    The use of satellite remote sensing (RS) has proven its potential to generate different hydrological variables such as Land Surface Temperature (LST), Leaf Area Index (LAI) or Evapotranspiration (ET) among others. In the case of ET different methods combine spectral and thermal information to estimate Actual ET (aET) coincident with satellite overpass. These estimates from space has become popular in the hydrological modeling community. The information obtained from RS estimates can be used to calibrate and validate hydrological models not just at single points or catchment averages, but also the simulated spatial patterns. It is a common assumption that although the RS estimates are uncertain, their strength lies in the spatial pattern information, due to the unprecedented spatial coverage of the observations. When spatial patterns obtained from remote sensing estimates are intended for evaluating the spatial patterns of distributed hydrological models, it will however be necessary to challenge that assumption. This study aims at quantifying the uncertainty of the estimated spatial pattern of temporally aggregated monthly LST and AET maps derived from the MODIS satellite. The proposed approach is based on a cluster analysis performed on hundreds of possible realizations of the estimates generated by sampling within the uncertainty of the individual pixels estimates and taking into account temporal variation and the correlation length of the error. The result is not only monthly maps of LST and AET, but also maps of the uncertainty of the spatial pattern. This type of information is critical when evaluating the spatial pattern performance of hydrological models, because the performance criteria can be adjusted for areas of high and low confidence in the observational data set. The resulting maps are finally utilized for an evaluation of the spatial performance of the 43,000 km2 national hydrological model of Denmark.

  4. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  5. Explosive Percolation Transition is Actually Continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa, R. A.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Goltsev, A. V.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recently a discontinuous percolation transition was reported in a new “explosive percolation” problem for irreversible systems [D. Achlioptas, R. M. D’Souza, and J. Spencer, Science 323, 1453 (2009)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1167782] in striking contrast to ordinary percolation. We consider a representative model which shows that the explosive percolation transition is actually a continuous, second order phase transition though with a uniquely small critical exponent of the percolation cluster size. We describe the unusual scaling properties of this transition and find its critical exponents and dimensions.

  6. Power Delivery from an Actual Thermoelectric Generation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaibe, Hiromasa; Kajihara, Takeshi; Nagano, Kouji; Makino, Kazuya; Hachiuma, Hirokuni; Natsuume, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    Similar to photovoltaic (PV) and fuel cells, thermoelectric generators (TEGs) supply direct-current (DC) power, essentially requiring DC/alternating current (AC) conversion for delivery as electricity into the grid network. Use of PVs is already well established through power conditioning systems (PCSs) that enable DC/AC conversion with maximum-power-point tracking, which enables commercial use by customers. From the economic, legal, and regulatory perspectives, a commercial PCS for PVs should also be available for TEGs, preferably as is or with just simple adjustment. Herein, we report use of a PV PCS with an actual TEG. The results are analyzed, and proper application for TEGs is proposed.

  7. A Smallholder Socio-hydrological Modelling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, S.; Savenije, H.; Rathore, P.

    2014-12-01

    Small holders are farmers who own less than 2 ha of farmland. They often have low productivity and thus remain at subsistence level. A fact that nearly 80% of Indian farmers are smallholders, who merely own a third of total farmlands and belong to the poorest quartile, but produce nearly 40% of countries foodgrains underlines the importance of understanding the socio-hydrology of a small holder. We present a framework to understand the socio-hydrological system dynamics of a small holder. It couples the dynamics of 6 main variables that are most relevant at the scale of a small holder: local storage (soil moisture and other water storage), capital, knowledge, livestock production, soil fertility and grass biomass production. The model incorporates rule-based adaptation mechanisms (for example: adjusting expenditures on food and fertilizers, selling livestocks etc.) of small holders when they face adverse socio-hydrological conditions, such as low annual rainfall, higher intra-annual variability in rainfall or variability in agricultural prices. It allows us to study sustainability of small holder farming systems under various settings. We apply the framework to understand the socio-hydrology of small holders in Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India. This district has witnessed suicides of many sugarcane farmers who could not extricate themselves out of the debt trap. These farmers lack irrigation and are susceptible to fluctuating sugar prices and intra-annual hydroclimatic variability. This presentation discusses two aspects in particular: whether government interventions to absolve the debt of farmers is enough and what is the value of investing in local storages that can buffer intra-annual variability in rainfall and strengthening the safety-nets either by creating opportunities for alternative sources of income or by crop diversification.

  8. Climate and the equilibrium state of land surface hydrology parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    For given climatic rates of precipitation and potential evaporation, the land surface hydrology parameterizations of atmospheric general circulation models will maintain soil-water storage conditions that balance the moisture input and output. The surface relative soil saturation for such climatic conditions serves as a measure of the land surface parameterization state under a given forcing. The equilibrium value of this variable for alternate parameterizations of land surface hydrology are determined as a function of climate and the sensitivity of the surface to shifts and changes in climatic forcing are estimated.

  9. Identifying Biologically Relevant Cues in the Hydrologic Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovellford, R. M.; Flitcroft, R.; Santelmann, M. V.; Grant, G. E.; Safeeq, M.; Lewis, S.

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal variation in hydrologic discharge and temperature defines the availability, connectivity, and quality of lentic habitats. Native aquatic species are adapted to local hydrologic regimes , eg. magnitudes and rates of change . In recent decades, biologically relevant hydrologic conditions have been identified that are necessary to maintain habitat conditions for aquatic obligate species. Another element of hydrologic regimes important to aquatic species are the cues that inform individuals of seasonal changes that precipitate important physiological or behavioral alterations. There is a need for hydrologists, biologists, and ecologists, to define biologically significant cues within the hydrologic regime. Coho salmon (Onchorhynchus kisutch), an anadromous species of Pacific salmon, offers an example of sensitivity to environmental cues. Examinations of the run-timing of mature adult coho salmon on the North Umpqua River, OR, indicate that migration timing coincides with decreasing fall water temperatures prior to increasing winter discharge. For this species, adults leave the ocean ready to spawn. Adults need to spawn in small headwater streams prior to the onset of intense storm conditions that prohibit effective deposition or fertilization of eggs in redds (salmon nests).Therefore, the timing of spawning must be carefully executed. Understanding the cues that trigger specific behaviors gives insight to the processes that provide ecosystem stability and flexibility over time. Improved understanding of these cues may help us protect freshwater ecosystems and improve management for endangered species.

  10. Advanced hydrologic prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Brian A.; Braatz, Dean T.; Halquist, John B.; Deweese, Michael M.; Larson, Lee; Ingram, John J.

    1999-08-01

    As our Nation's population and infrastructure grow, natural disasters are becoming a greater threat to our society's stability. In an average year, inland flooding claims 133 lives and resulting property losses exceed 4.0 billion. Last year, 1997, these losses totaled 8.7 billion. Because of this blossoming threat, the National Weather Service (NWS) has requested funding within its 2000 budget to begin national implementation of the Advanced Hydrologic Prediction System (AHPS). With this system in place the NWS will be able to utilize precipitation and climate predictions to provide extended probabilistic river forecasts for risk-based decisions. In addition to flood and drought mitigation benefits, extended river forecasts will benefit water resource managers in decision making regarding water supply, agriculture, navigation, hydropower, and ecosystems. It's estimated that AHPS, if implemented nationwide, would save lives and provide $677 million per year in economic benefits. AHPS is used currently on the Des Moines River basin in Iowa and will be implemented soon on the Minnesota River basin in Minnesota. Experience gained from user interaction is leading to refined and enhanced product formats and displays. This discussion will elaborate on the technical requirements associated with AHPS implementation, its enhanced products and informational displays, and further refinements based on customer feedback.

  11. Hydrological excitation of polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastula, Y.; Kolaczek, B.

    2006-08-01

    Hydrological excitation of the polar motion (HAM) were computed from the available recently hydrological data series (NCEP, ECMWF, CPC water storage and LaD World simulations of global continental water) and compared. Time variable seasonal spectra of these hydrological excitation functions and of the geodetic excitation function of polar motion computed from the polar motion COMB03 data were compared showing big differences in their temporal characteristics and the necessity of the further improvement of the HAM models. Seasonal oscillations of the global geophysical excitation functions (AAM + OAM + HAM) and their time variations were compared also. These hydrological excitation functions do not close the budget of the global geophysical excitation function of polar motion.

  12. Extreme hydrological events and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundzewicz, Z. W.; Matczak, P.

    2015-06-01

    Economic losses caused by hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - have been on the rise, worldwide. Hydrological extremes jeopardize human security and cause serious threats to human life and welfare and societal livelihood. Floods and droughts can undermine societies' security, understood as freedom from threat and the ability of societies to maintain their independent identity and their functional integrity against forces of change. Several dimensions of security are reviewed in the context of hydrological extremes. Floods and droughts pose a burden and serious challenges to the state, responsible to sustain economic development, societal and environmental security - the maintenance of ecosystem services, on which a society depends. It is shown that reduction of risk of hydrological disasters improves human security.

  13. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.N.

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  14. Assessing Hydrological Extreme Events with Geospatial Data and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivoni, Enrique R.; Grimaldi, Salvatore; Nardi, Fernando; Ivanov, Valeriy Y.; Castelli, Fabio; Bras, Rafael L.; Ubertini, Lucio

    2004-09-01

    Prediction of river basin hydrological response to extreme meteorological events is a primary concern in areas with frequent flooding, landslides, and debris flows. Natural hydrogeological disasters in many regions lead to extensive property damage, impact on societal activities, and loss of life. Hydrologists have a long history of assessing and predicting hydrologic hazards through the combined use of field observations, monitoring networks, remote sensing, and numerical modeling. Nevertheless, the integration of field data and computer models has yet to result in prediction systems that capture space-time interactions between meteorological forcing, land surface characteristics, and the internal hydrological response in river basins. Capabilities for assessing hydrologic extreme events are greatly enhanced via the use of geospatial data sets describing watershed properties such as topography, channel structure, soils, vegetation, and geological features. Recent advances in managing, processing, and visualizing cartographic data with geographic information systems (GIS) have enabled their direct use in spatially distributed hydrological models. In a distributed model application, geospatial data sets can be used to establish the model domain, specify boundary and initial conditions, determine the spatial variation of parameter values, and provide the spatial model forcing. By representing a watershed through a set of discrete elements, distributed models simulate water, energy, and mass transport in a landscape and provide estimates of the spatial pattern of hydrologic states, fluxes, and pathways.

  15. Hydrologic data and description of a hydrologic monitoring plan for Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, Tiffany Rae; McFarland, W.D.

    1996-01-01

    A hydrologic reconnaissance of the Medicine Lake Volcano area was done to collect data needed for the design of a hydrologic monitoring plan. The reconnaissance was completed during two field trips made in June and September 1992, during which geothermal and hydrologic features of public interest in the Medicine Lake area were identified. Selected wells, springs, and geothermal features were located and documented, and initial water-level, discharge, temperature, and specific-conductance measurements were made. Lakes in the study area also were surveyed during the September field trip. Temperature, specific- conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH data were collected by using a multiparameter probe. The proposed monitoring plan includes measurement of water levels in wells, discharge from springs, and lake stage, as well as analysis of well-,spring-, and lake-water quality. In determining lake-water quality, data for both stratified and unstratified conditions would be considered. (Data for stratified conditions were collected during the reconnaissance phase of this project, but data for unstratified conditions were not.) In addition, lake stage also would be monitored. A geothermal feature near Medicine Lake is a "hot spot" from which hot gases discharge from two distinct vents. Gas chemistry and temperature would be monitored in one of these vents.

  16. Estimating groundwater dynamics at a Colorado floodplain site using historical hydrological data and climate information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hubbard, S. S.; Williams, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Developing a predictive understanding of how hydrological variations impact biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial environments is challenging due to the wide range of processes occurring across vast spatiotemporal scales and due to the uncertainty associated with future climate conditions. In this study, we develop a multi-scale time series model to estimate groundwater dynamics at a floodplain site using historical hydrological data and climate information. Our study is focused at Rifle, CO, where the US DOE Sustainable Systems 2.0 project is developing a genome-to-watershed reactive transport simulation capability and where snowmelt annually delivers a hydrological pulse to the floodplain system that significantly influences the water table and subsurface cycles of carbon and nitrogen. Although long-term predictions of biogeochemical cycling at the site require estimates of hydrological conditions, hydrological data include only a few years of groundwater elevation measurements, with river gage data available from a station located approximately 26 miles upstream. To project future hydrological conditions at the site, we developed a multi-scale statistical model to combine both datasets. We first analyzed 47 years of hydrological data from the gage station to identify multi-frequency temporal patterns in the river stage and its relationship to climate factors (e.g., precipitation or temperature). We then developed empirical models to downscale the estimated hydrological information to daily discharge and subsequently transform them to groundwater dynamics at the downstream floodplain site. Our model provides a probabilistic estimation that is conditioned to the multi-scale hydrological and climate information. With the developed approach, we retrospectively estimate groundwater dynamics at the site for the past five decades as well as the associated uncertainty. Based on Colorado River Basin climate projections, we also predict mean and extreme hydrological

  17. Hydrology Section Executive Committee Minutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, James W.

    The AGU Hydrology Section Executive Committee Meeting was called to order at approximately 4 P.M. on Monday, May 18, 1987, by Hydrology Section President Marshall Moss. In attendance were President-Elect George Pinder, Secretary Jim Mercer, Ron Cummings, Helen Joyce Peters, Peter Eagleson, Stephen Burges, Jim Wallis, Jurate Landwehr, Don Nielson, Ken Bencala, Pete Loucks, Jery Stedinger, Dennis Lettenmaier, Lenny Konikow, Ken Potter, John Wilson, Ivan Johnson, and Judy Holoviak.

  18. Seasonal hydrological ensemble forecasts over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Louise; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Stephens, Elisabeth; Cloke, Hannah; Pappenberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the limits of predictability in dynamical seasonal discharge forecasting, in both space and time, over Europe. Seasonal forecasts have an important socioeconomic value. Applications are numerous and cover hydropower management, spring flood prediction, low flow prediction for navigation and agricultural water demands. Additionally, the constant increase in NWP skill for longer lead times and the predicted increase in the intensity and frequency of hydro-meteorological extremes, have amplified the incentive to promote and further improve hydrological forecasts on sub-seasonal to seasonal timescales. In this study, seasonal hydrological forecasts (SEA), driven by the ECMWF's System 4 in hindcast mode, were analysed against an Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) benchmark. The ESP was forced with an ensemble of resampled historical meteorological observations and started with perfect initial conditions. Both forecasts were produced by the LISFLOOD model, run on the pan-European scale with a spatial resolution of 5 by 5 km. The forecasts were issued monthly on a daily time step, from 1990 until the current time, up to a lead time of 7 months. The seasonal discharge forecasts were analysed against the ESP on a catchment scale in terms of their accuracy, skill and sharpness, using a diverse set of verification metrics (e.g. KGE, CRPSS and ROC). Additionally, a reverse-ESP was constructed by forcing the LISFLOOD model with a single perfect meteorological set of observations and initiated from an ensemble of resampled historical initial conditions. The comparison of the ESP with the reverse-ESP approach enabled the identification of the respective contribution of meteorological forcings and hydrologic initial conditions errors to seasonal discharge forecasting uncertainties in Europe. These results could help pinpoint target elements of the forecasting chain which, after being improved, could lead to substantial increase in discharge predictability

  19. Hydrology of Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, Rick M.; Kroening, Sharon E.

    2007-01-01

    Local water managers usually rely on information produced at the State and regional scale to make water-resource management decisions. Current assessments of hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County, Florida, commonly end at the boundaries of two water management districts (South Florida Water Management District and the Southwest Florida Water Management District), which makes it difficult for managers to determine conditions throughout the county. The last comprehensive water-resources assessment of Polk County was published almost 40 years ago. To address the need for current countywide information, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 3?-year study in 2002 to update information about hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County and identify changes that have occurred. Ground-water use in Polk County has decreased substantially since 1965. In 1965, total ground-water withdrawals in the county were about 350 million gallons per day. In 2002, withdrawals totaled about 285 million gallons per day, of which nearly 95 percent was from the Floridan aquifer system. Water-conservation practices mainly related to the phosphate-mining industry as well as the decrease in the number of mines in operation in Polk County have reduced total water use by about 65 million gallons per day since 1965. Polk County is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units. The uppermost water-bearing unit is the surficial aquifer system, which is unconfined and composed primarily of clastic deposits. The surficial aquifer system is underlain by the intermediate confining unit, which grades into the intermediate aquifer system and consists of up to two water-bearing zones composed of interbedded clastic and carbonate rocks. The lowermost hydrogeologic unit is the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system, a thick sequence of permeable limestone and dolostone, consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle semiconfining unit, a middle confining unit, and

  20. Framework for a hydrologic climate-response network in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lent, Robert M.; Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Dudley, Robert W.; Schalk, Luther F.

    2015-01-01

    Many climate-related hydrologic variables in New England have changed in the past century, and many are expected to change during the next century. It is important to understand and monitor these changes because they can affect human water supply, hydroelectric power generation, transportation infrastructure, and stream and riparian ecology. This report describes a framework for hydrologic monitoring in New England by means of a climate-response network. The framework identifies specific inland hydrologic variables that are sensitive to climate variation; identifies geographic regions with similar hydrologic responses; proposes a fixed-station monitoring network composed of existing streamflow, groundwater, lake ice, snowpack, and meteorological data-collection stations for evaluation of hydrologic response to climate variation; and identifies streamflow basins for intensive, process-based studies and for estimates of future hydrologic conditions.

  1. The actual status of Astronomy in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, A.

    The astronomical research in the Republic of Moldova after Nicolae Donitch (Donici)(1874-1956(?)) were renewed in 1957, when a satellites observations station was open in Chisinau. Fotometric observations and rotations of first Soviet artificial satellites were investigated under a program SPIN put in action by the Academy of Sciences of former Socialist Countries. The works were conducted by Assoc. prof. Dr. V. Grigorevskij, which conducted also research in variable stars. Later, at the beginning of 60-th, an astronomical Observatory at the Chisinau State University named after Lenin (actually: the State University of Moldova), placed in Lozovo-Ciuciuleni villages was open, which were coordinated by Odessa State University (Prof. V.P. Tsesevich) and the Astrosovet of the USSR. Two main groups worked in this area: first conducted by V. Grigorevskij (till 1971) and second conducted by L.I. Shakun (till 1988), both graduated from Odessa State University. Besides this research areas another astronomical observations were made: Comets observations, astroclimate and atmospheric optics in collaboration with the Institute of the Atmospheric optics of the Siberian branch of the USSR (V. Chernobai, I. Nacu, C. Usov and A.F. Poiata). Comets observations were also made since 1988 by D. I. Gorodetskij which came to Chisinau from Alma-Ata and collaborated with Ukrainean astronomers conducted by K.I. Churyumov. Another part of space research was made at the State University of Tiraspol since the beggining of 70-th by a group of teaching staff of the Tiraspol State Pedagogical University: M.D. Polanuer, V.S. Sholokhov. No a collaboration between Moldovan astronomers and Transdniestrian ones actually exist due to War in Transdniestria in 1992. An important area of research concerned the Radiophysics of the Ionosphere, which was conducted in Beltsy at the Beltsy State Pedagogical Institute by a group of teaching staff of the University since the beginning of 70-th: N. D. Filip, E

  2. MODIS Solar Diffuser: Modelled and Actual Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Xiong, Xiao-Xiong; Esposito, Joe; Wang, Xin-Dong; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument's solar diffuser is used in its radiometric calibration for the reflective solar bands (VIS, NTR, and SWIR) ranging from 0.41 to 2.1 micron. The sun illuminates the solar diffuser either directly or through a attenuation screen. The attenuation screen consists of a regular array of pin holes. The attenuated illumination pattern on the solar diffuser is not uniform, but consists of a multitude of pin-hole images of the sun. This non-uniform illumination produces small, but noticeable radiometric effects. A description of the computer model used to simulate the effects of the attenuation screen is given and the predictions of the model are compared with actual, on-orbit, calibration measurements.

  3. What do tests of formal reasoning actually measure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    Tests of formal operational reasoning derived from Piagetian theory have been found to be effective predictors of academic achievement. Yet Piaget's theory regarding the underlying nature of formal operations and their employment in specific contexts has run into considerable empirical difficulty. The primary purpose of this study was to present the core of an alternative theory of the nature of advanced scientific reasoning. That theory, referred to as the multiple-hypothesis theory, argues that tests of formal operational reasoning actually measure the extent to which persons have acquired the ability to initiate reasoning with more than one specific antecedent condition, or if they are unable to imagine more than one antecedent condition, they are aware that more than one is possible; therefore conclusions that are drawn are tempered by this possibility. As a test of this multiple-hypothesis theory of advanced reasoning and the contrasting Piagetian theory of formal operations, a sample of 922 college students were first classified as concrete operational, transitional, or formal operational, based upon responses to standard Piagetian measures of formal operational reasoning. They were then administered seven logic tasks. Actual response patterns to the tasks were analyzed and found to be similar to predicted response patterns derived from the multiple-hypothesis theory and were different from those predicted by Piagetian theory. Therefore, support was obtained for the multiple-hypothesis theory. The terms intuitive and reflective were suggested to replace the terms concrete operational and formal operational to refer to persons at varying levels of intellectual development.

  4. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  5. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  6. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  7. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  8. 7 CFR 1437.101 - Actual production history.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Actual production history. 1437.101 Section 1437.101... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.101 Actual production history. Actual production history (APH) is the unit's record of crop yield by crop year for the APH base period. The...

  9. HYDROLOGIC MODEL UNCERTAINTY ASSOCIATED WITH SIMULATING FUTURE LAND-COVER/USE SCENARIOS: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GIS-based hydrologic modeling offers a convenient means of assessing the impacts associated with land-cover/use change for environmental planning efforts. Alternative future scenarios can be used as input to hydrologic models and compared with existing conditions to evaluate pot...

  10. National water summary 1990-91: Hydrologic events and stream water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Richard W.; Chase, Edith B.; Williams, John S.; Moody, David W.

    1993-01-01

    The following discussion is an overview of the three parts of this 1990-91 National Water Summary - "Hydrologic Conditions and Water-Related Events, Water Years 1990-91," "Hydrologic Perspectives on Water Issues," and "State Summaries of Stream Water Quality."

  11. Habitat and Hydrological Effects of Low-head Dams on the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    We sampled sites in the Ohio and impounded Upper Mississippi Rivers to develop indices of habitat and hydrological condition. Discharge in these rivers is controlled by low-head locks and dams. On the Ohio River, the littoral fish cover index, the hydrology index, and a multi-met...

  12. The impact of assumed error variances on surface soil moisture and snow depth hydrologic data assimilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate knowledge of antecedent soil moisture and snow depth conditions is often important for obtaining reliable hydrological simulations of stream flow. Data assimilation (DA) methods can be used to integrate remotely-sensed (RS) soil moisture and snow depth retrievals into a hydrology model and...

  13. Hydrologic filtering of fish life history strategies across the United States: implications for stream flow alteration

    SciTech Connect

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lotic fish have developed life history strategies adapted to the natural variation in stream flow regimes. The natural timing, duration, and magnitude of flow events has contributed to the diversity, production, and composition of fish assemblages over time. Studies evaluating the role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages have been more common at the local or regional scale with very few studies conducted at the continental scale. Furthermore, quantitative linkages between natural hydrologic patterns and fish assemblages are rarely used to make predictions of ecological consequences of hydrologic alterations. We ask two questions: (1) what is the relative role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at large scales? and (2) can relationships between fish assemblages and natural hydrology be utilized to predict fish assemblage responses to hydrologic disturbance? We developed models to relate fish life histories and reproductive strategies to landscape and hydrologic variables separately and then combined. Models were then used to predict the ecological consequences of altered hydrology due to dam regulation. Although hydrology plays a considerable role in structuring fish assemblages, the performance of models using only hydrologic variables was lower than that of models constructed using landscape variables. Isolating the relative importance of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at the continental scale is difficult since hydrology is interrelated to many landscape factors. By applying models to dam-regulated hydrologic data, we observed some consistent predicted responses in fish life history strategies and modes of reproduction. In agreement with existing literature, equilibrium strategists are predicted to increase following dam regulation, whereas opportunistic and periodic species are predicted to decrease. In addition, dam regulation favors the selection of reproductive strategies with extended spawning seasons and preference for stable

  14. Hydrologic filtering of fish life history strategies across the United States: implications for stream flow alteration

    DOE PAGES

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lotic fish have developed life history strategies adapted to the natural variation in stream flow regimes. The natural timing, duration, and magnitude of flow events has contributed to the diversity, production, and composition of fish assemblages over time. Studies evaluating the role of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages have been more common at the local or regional scale with very few studies conducted at the continental scale. Furthermore, quantitative linkages between natural hydrologic patterns and fish assemblages are rarely used to make predictions of ecological consequences of hydrologic alterations. We ask two questions: (1) what is the relative role ofmore » hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at large scales? and (2) can relationships between fish assemblages and natural hydrology be utilized to predict fish assemblage responses to hydrologic disturbance? We developed models to relate fish life histories and reproductive strategies to landscape and hydrologic variables separately and then combined. Models were then used to predict the ecological consequences of altered hydrology due to dam regulation. Although hydrology plays a considerable role in structuring fish assemblages, the performance of models using only hydrologic variables was lower than that of models constructed using landscape variables. Isolating the relative importance of hydrology in structuring fish assemblages at the continental scale is difficult since hydrology is interrelated to many landscape factors. By applying models to dam-regulated hydrologic data, we observed some consistent predicted responses in fish life history strategies and modes of reproduction. In agreement with existing literature, equilibrium strategists are predicted to increase following dam regulation, whereas opportunistic and periodic species are predicted to decrease. In addition, dam regulation favors the selection of reproductive strategies with extended spawning seasons and preference for

  15. Modelling the hydrological behaviour of a coffee agroforestry basin in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Delgado, F.; Roupsard, O.; Moussa, R.; Le Maire, G.; Taugourdeau, S.; Bonnefond, J. M.; Pérez, A.; van Oijen, M.; Vaast, P.; Rapidel, B.; Voltz, M.; Imbach, P.; Harmand, J. M.

    2010-05-01

    The profitability of hydropower in Costa Rica is affected by soil erosion and sedimentation in dam reservoirs, which are in turn influenced by land use, infiltration and aquifer interactions with surface water. In order to foster the provision and payment of Hydrological Environmental Services (HES), a quantitative assessment of the impact of specific land uses on the functioning of drainage-basins is required. The present paper aims to study the water balance partitioning in a volcanic coffee agroforestry micro-basin (1 km2, steep slopes) in Costa Rica, as a first step towards evaluating sediment or contaminant loads. The main hydrological processes were monitored during one year, using flume, eddy-covariance flux tower, soil water profiles and piezometers. A new Hydro-SVAT lumped model is proposed, that balances SVAT (Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer) and basin-reservoir routines. The purpose of such a coupling was to achieve a trade-off between the expected performance of ecophysiological and hydrological models, which are often employed separately and at different spatial scales, either the plot or the basin. The calibration of the model to perform streamflow yielded a NS coefficient equal to 0.80, while the validation of the water balance partitioning was consistent with the independent measurements of actual evapotranspiration (R2=0.79, energy balance closed independently), soil water content (R2=0.49) and water table level (R2=0.90). An uncertainty analysis showed that the streamflow modelling was precise for nearly every time step, while a sensitivity analysis revealed which parameters mostly affected model precision, depending on the season. It was observed that 64% of the incident rainfall R flowed out of the basin as streamflow, 25% as evapotranspiration and the remaining 11% was attributed to deep percolation. The model indicated an interception loss equal to 4% of R, a surface runoff of 5% and an infiltration component of 91%. The modelled

  16. Understanding the Impacts of Climate Change and Land Use Dynamics Using a Fully Coupled Hydrologic Feedback Model between Surface and Subsurface Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Lee, J.; Koo, M.

    2011-12-01

    Climate is the most critical driving force of the hydrologic system of the Earth. Since the industrial revolution, the impacts of anthropogenic activities to the Earth environment have been expanded and accelerated. Especially, the global emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is known to have significantly increased temperature and affected the hydrologic system. Many hydrologists have contributed to the studies regarding the climate change on the hydrologic system since the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was created in 1988. Among many components in the hydrologic system groundwater and its response to the climate change and anthropogenic activities are not fully understood due to the complexity of subsurface conditions between the surface and the groundwater table. A new spatio-temporal hydrologic model has been developed to estimate the impacts of climate change and land use dynamics on the groundwater. The model consists of two sub-models: a surface model and a subsurface model. The surface model involves three surface processes: interception, runoff, and evapotranspiration, and the subsurface model does also three subsurface processes: soil moisture balance, recharge, and groundwater flow. The surface model requires various input data including land use, soil types, vegetation types, topographical elevations, and meteorological data. The surface model simulates daily hydrological processes for rainfall interception, surface runoff varied by land use change and crop growth, and evapotranspiration controlled by soil moisture balance. The daily soil moisture balance is a key element to link two sub-models as it calculates infiltration and groundwater recharge by considering a time delay routing through a vadose zone down to the groundwater table. MODFLOW is adopted to simulate groundwater flow and interaction with surface water components as well. The model is technically flexible to add new model or modify existing model as it is

  17. How the Young Hydrologic Society can rejuvenate hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, T. H.; Berghuijs, W. R.; Smoorenburg, M.; Harrigan, S.; Muller, H.; Dugge, J.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrologic community aims to understand the complex movement, distribution and quality of water around the world. Especially with climate change, suppressed food security and environmental degradation, hydrologists play an important role in sustainable water resources management. To achieve this, worldwide collaboration between researchers is a crucial necessity. For example, IAHS' "Predictions in Ungauged Basins (PUB)" and "Panta Rei" initiatives have shown that working together leads to fruitful results. However, hydrology struggles to unify, with its different research perspectives, myriad of organizations and diverse array of focus areas. Furthermore, within the active hydrologic community, young scientists are underrepresented and often not well connected. Active involvement of those who will deal with tomorrow's water issues is the key to building bridges between generations and the variety of hydrologic research fields. Therefore, the Young Hydrologic Society (YHS) was founded with the following goal: 'Bringing young scientists from around the world together to contribute to the scientific and organizational unification of the global hydrologic community' To realize this, YHS has set itself 4 main objectives: - Function as the link between existing and future student initiatives within the major organizations (e.g. EGU, AGU, IAHS, etc.), - Connect early career scientists (e.g. MSc, PhD, Post-Doc) at an early stage in their career, - Stimulate bottom-up research initiatives, - Create a voice of the young hydrologists in the global scientific debate. YHS is already supported by some of the world's most prominent hydrologists and organizations. But, to make YHS a real success, we need you to spread the word and get in