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Sample records for actual indoor environments

  1. Vapor Transport to Indoor Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The indoor environment is an important microenvironment for human exposure to chemicals, both because people spend most of their time indoors and because chemicals are often at higher concentrations indoors versus outdoors. This chapter reviews the major components in estimating ...

  2. Hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Golam; Corsi, Richard; Kimura, Yosuke; Allen, David; Weschler, Charles J.

    Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations were estimated using a new indoor air quality model which employs the SAPRC-99 atmospheric chemistry model to simulate indoor homogenous reactions. Model results indicate that typical indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are lower than typical outdoor summertime urban hydroxyl radical levels of 5-10×10 6 molecules cm -3; however, indoor levels can be similar to or greater than typical nighttime outdoor hydroxyl radical levels of approximately 5×10 4 molecules cm -3. Effects of selected parameters on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are presented herein. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are predicted to increase non-linearly with increasing outdoor ozone concentrations, indoor alkene emission rates, and air exchange rates. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations decrease with increasing outdoor nitric oxide concentrations. Indoor temperature and indoor light intensity have moderate impacts on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Outdoor hydroxyl radical concentrations, outdoor nitrate (NO 3rad ) radical concentrations, outdoor hydroperoxy radical concentrations, and hydroxyl radical removal by indoor surfaces are predicted to have no appreciable impact on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Production of hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments appears to be controlled primarily by reactions of alkenes with ozone, and nitric oxide with hydroperoxy radical. Estimated indoor hydroxyl radical levels may potentially affect indoor air quality. Two examples are presented in which reactions of d-limonene and α-pinene with indoor hydroxyl radicals produce aldehydes, which may be of greater concern than the original compounds.

  3. Indoor Environment Program. 1992 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports progress during the year 1992 in the Indoor Environment Program in the Energy and Environment Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Studies in the following areas are reported: energy performance and ventilation in buildings; physical and chemical characterization of indoor air pollutants; indoor radon; indoor air quality; exposure to indoor air pollutants and risk analysis. Pollutants of particular interest include: radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions including environmental tobacco smoke, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides.

  4. Physical factors in the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Levin, H

    1995-01-01

    This comprehensive chapter presents a discussion of physical factors in the nonindustrial indoor environment that affect human health, comfort, productivity, and well-being. Areas stressed include the thermal environment, light, noise, and other mechanical energy.

  5. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building`s occupants while maintaining the building`s energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building`s occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  6. Indoor Environment Program 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Because humans spend an average of 85% to 90% of their time indoors, energy usage by the buildings sector can have a significant impact on human comfort, health and productivity. To advance energy conservation technologies while maintaining indoor air quality, research in the Indoor Environment Program (IEP) is directed toward understanding relations between building energy (usage and technologies), indoor air quality, and human health, comfort and productivity. The IEP addresses the issue of optimizing the health, comfort and productivity of a building's occupants while maintaining the building's energy efficiency. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants with indoor sources, reduced ventilation may produce undesirable effects on indoor air quality and on the health, comfort, and productivity of a building's occupants. This issue is an important theme for the research of other research groups and projects within IEP.

  7. Analysis of Indoor Environment in Classroom Based on Hygienic Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorček, Miroslav; Sternová, Zuzana

    2016-06-01

    The article contains the analysis of experimental ventilation measurement in selected classrooms of the Elementary School Štrba. Mathematical model of selected classroom was prepared according to in-situ measurements and air exchange was calculated. Interior air temperature and quality influences the students ´ comfort. Evaluated data were compared to requirements of standard (STN EN 15251,2008) applicable to classroom indoor environment during lectures, highlighting the difference between required ambiance quality and actually measured values. CO2 concentration refers to one of the parameters indicating indoor environment quality.

  8. Indoor environment program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  9. Indoor environment program - 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    Buildings use approximately one-third of the energy consumed in the United States. The potential energy savings derived from reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings are substantial, since energy use associated with conditioning and distributing ventilation air is about 5.5 EJ per year. However, since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants from indoor sources, reduction of ventilation can have adverse effects on indoor air quality, and on the health, comfort, and productivity of building occupants. The Indoor Environment Program in LBL`s Energy and Environment Division was established in 1977 to conduct integrated research on ventilation, indoor air quality, and energy use and efficiency in buildings for the purpose of reducing energy liabilities associated with airflows into, within, and out of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The Program is part of LBL`s Center for Building Science. Research is conducted on building energy use and efficiency, ventilation and infiltration, and thermal distribution systems; on the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and on exposure and health risks associated with indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semivolatile, and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}.

  10. Aeromycological profile of indoor and outdoor environments.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Manuela; Ribeiro, Helena; Delgado, José Luís; Abreu, Ilda

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the differences between indoor and outdoor aeromicological composition. The aerobiological study was performed, from 15 January to 14 April 2008, using two volumetric spore traps, one placed indoors and another positioned outdoors on the roof of the Faculdade de Ciências building. A total of 23 000 spores were sampled outdoors and 15 500 spores were identified indoors. In both environments, the most abundant fungal spores were Cladosporium, Aspergillus/Penicillium, Agaricus, Rusts, Agrocybe and Lepthosphaeria. Moreover, Alternaria, Botrytis, Coprinus, Fusarium and Ganoderma spores were also detected in the outdoor air. The outdoor maximum (858 spores m(-3) day(-1)) was registered on the 9 February whereas the indoor peak (614 spores m(-3) day(-1)) was reached two days later. Qualitative similarities were found between the indoor and outdoor aeromicological content however quantitatively spore concentrations differed, suggesting the existence of airflows between the two environments due to ventilation, inefficient isolation or passive transport of spores. The majority of the selected fungal types were night sporulators, the exceptions were Aspergillus/Penicillium and Cladosporium, with daily maximum values during the morning and the afternoon, respectively. Several of the identified spores have been proved as causal agents of respiratory problems. Therefore, it is important to know the microbial composition of indoor air in order to take measures to improve air quality helping to reduce health problems related to respiratory allergic diseases in sensitized patients. PMID:20449225

  11. Indoor Allergens in School and Daycare Environments

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Päivi M.; Sever, Michelle L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2009-01-01

    Most studies that have examined exposure to indoor allergens have focused on home environments. However, allergen exposures can be encountered in environments other than the home. For example, many children spend a large part of their time in schools and daycare facilities. Over the past two decades, a large number of studies have been conducted in school and daycare environments. However, the role of indoor exposures in allergy and asthma development or morbidity in these settings is not well characterized. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the importance of indoor allergen exposures in school and daycare settings. We summarize the key findings from recent scientific literature, describe exposure characteristics, discuss the role of these exposures in relation to asthma and allergy symptoms, and provide information on the effectiveness of published interventions. PMID:19577284

  12. a Framework of Cognitive Indoor Navigation Based on Characteristics of Indoor Spatial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, R.; Arikawa, M.

    2015-05-01

    People are easy to get confused in indoor spatial environment. Thus, indoor navigation systems on mobile devices are expected in a wide variety of application domains. Limited by the accuracy of indoor positioning, indoor navigating systems are not common in our society. However, automatic positioning is not all about location-based services (LBS), other factors, such as good map design and user interfaces, are also important to satisfy users of LBS. Indoor spatial environment and people's indoor spatial cognition are different than those in outdoor environment, which asks for different design of LBS. This paper introduces our design methods of indoor navigation system based on the characteristics of indoor spatial environment and indoor spatial cognition.

  13. Indoor Environment Program - 1996 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Indoor Environment Program

    1996-11-01

    The forty-five chemists, physicists, biologists, architects, engineers, staff, and students of the Indoor Environment Program are all working to solve the problems of indoor air quality, health, comfort, and energy use associated with the indoor environment. A common thread throughout this work is the importance of ventilation--both for its role in supporting human health and comfort as well as for its liability in requiring large amounts of energy to heat and cool it. The importance of understanding these interactions can be illustrated by two examples: the health and productivity of workers (Fisk and Rosenfeld, 1996) and the performance of sensitive equipment in clean room environments (Faulkner, et d., 1996). During the past year, we estimated the magnitudes of health and productivity gains that may be obtained by providing better indoor environments. The ratio of the potential financial benefits of improving indoor environments to the costs of the improvements ranges between 20 and 50. A second example is from our Clean Room Energy Efficiency Study: Clean rooms utilize large amounts of electricity to operate fans that recirculate air at very high flow rates through particle filters. Usually, the fans operate continuously at full speed, even when the clean room is unused. To reduce the energy use in a research clean room, the rate of air recirculation was controlled in response to real-time measurements of particle concentration. With this new control system, fan energy use decreased by 65% to 85% while maintaining particle concentrations below the allowable limits except during occasional one-minute periods. The estimated payback period for this technology is one to four years.

  14. Fungal pollution of indoor environments and its management

    PubMed Central

    Haleem Khan, A.A.; Mohan Karuppayil, S.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor environments play important roles in human health. The health hazards posed by polluted indoor environments include allergy, infections and toxicity. Life style changes have resulted in a shift from open air environments to air tight, energy efficient, environments, in which people spend a substantial portion of their time. Most indoor air pollution comes from the hazardous non biological agents and biological agents. Fungi are ubiquitous in distribution and are a serious threat to public health in indoor environments. In this communication, we have reviewed the current status on biotic indoor air pollution, role of fungi as biological contaminants and their impact on human health. PMID:23961203

  15. Fungal pollution of indoor environments and its management.

    PubMed

    Haleem Khan, A A; Mohan Karuppayil, S

    2012-10-01

    Indoor environments play important roles in human health. The health hazards posed by polluted indoor environments include allergy, infections and toxicity. Life style changes have resulted in a shift from open air environments to air tight, energy efficient, environments, in which people spend a substantial portion of their time. Most indoor air pollution comes from the hazardous non biological agents and biological agents. Fungi are ubiquitous in distribution and are a serious threat to public health in indoor environments. In this communication, we have reviewed the current status on biotic indoor air pollution, role of fungi as biological contaminants and their impact on human health. PMID:23961203

  16. Indoor Environment Program 1991 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Much of this energy can be saved by reducing buildings` air infiltration and ventilation, since the heat load associated with these processes is about 13 quads per year. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants that originate indoors, reducing ventilation can cause undesirable side effects such as lowering indoor air quality and adversely affecting the health, comfort and productivity of building occupants. The purpose of this research is to increase the energy efficiency of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The research explores energy use and efficiency of buildings; building ventilation and infiltration; the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and exposure and risk assessment for indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO{sub x}. The Program also conducts multidisciplinary studies on relationships between occupant health and comfort symptoms and factors within a building`s environment. Air infiltration and ventilation rates are measured and modeled for residential and commercial buildings in order to understand energy transport and thermal losses from various components of building shells and ventilation systems. Methods for reducing energy losses are based on these studies. The effectiveness of various ventilation systems for pollutant removal is also investigated. Methods for characterizing ventilation and building energy use are developed for experimental and applied uses.

  17. Indoor Environment Program 1991 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    Approximately 38% of the energy consumed in the United States is used in buildings. Much of this energy can be saved by reducing buildings' air infiltration and ventilation, since the heat load associated with these processes is about 13 quads per year. However, because ventilation is the dominant mechanism for removing pollutants that originate indoors, reducing ventilation can cause undesirable side effects such as lowering indoor air quality and adversely affecting the health, comfort and productivity of building occupants. The purpose of this research is to increase the energy efficiency of buildings while maintaining or improving occupant health and comfort. The research explores energy use and efficiency of buildings; building ventilation and infiltration; the nature, sources, transport, transformation, and deposition of indoor air pollutants; and exposure and risk assessment for indoor air pollutants. Pollutants of particular interest include radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions, including environmental tobacco smoke, CO, and NO[sub x]. The Program also conducts multidisciplinary studies on relationships between occupant health and comfort symptoms and factors within a building's environment. Air infiltration and ventilation rates are measured and modeled for residential and commercial buildings in order to understand energy transport and thermal losses from various components of building shells and ventilation systems. Methods for reducing energy losses are based on these studies. The effectiveness of various ventilation systems for pollutant removal is also investigated. Methods for characterizing ventilation and building energy use are developed for experimental and applied uses.

  18. Indoor environment program: FY 1988 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    The Indoor Environment Program examines the scientific issues associated with the design and operation of buildings to optimize energy performance and occupant comfort and health. Optimizing occupant health and comfort is addressed in various ways by groups within the Program. To examine energy flow through all elements of the building shell, the Energy Performance of Buildings Group measures air infiltration rates, studies thermal characteristics of structural elements, and develops simplified models of the behavior of complete buildings. Potential savings in the infiltration area are great.

  19. Asthma and indoor environment in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Melsom, T; Brinch, L; Hessen, J; Schei, M; Kolstrup, N; Jacobsen, B; Svanes, C; Pandey, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The development of asthma seems to be influenced by the adoption of a Western lifestyle. A study was undertaken to assess the importance of indoor environmental factors in Nepal where the lifestyle and home environment differ from that in the West.
METHODS—The home environment of 121 schoolchildren with asthma and 126 controls aged 11-17 years was studied. The homes of all participants were investigated and the children and their mothers were interviewed using a standardised questionnaire. Cases and controls were identified from an ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood) based population study of 2330 schoolchildren in Kathmandu, Nepal.
RESULTS—Keeping cattle inside the house during the night was related to a lower risk for having asthma (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.2(95% CI 0.1 to 0.5)) while there was no association between asthma and cattle kept outside. Asthma was associated with cigarette smoking by two or more family members (OR 1.9 (95% CI 1.0 to 3.9)) and with the domestic use of smoky fuels (OR 2.2 (95% CI 1.0 to 4.5)). In analyses stratified by sex, passive smoking and the use of smoky fuels were significantly associated with asthma only in boys.
CONCLUSIONS—The risk of asthma in Nepalese children was lower in subjects exposed to cattle kept inside the house and higher in subjects exposed to passive smoking and indoor use of smoky fuels. Childhood exposure to microorganisms or allergens from cattle may protect against the development of atopic disease.

 PMID:11359965

  20. Criegee intermediates in the indoor environment. New insights

    DOE PAGES

    Shallcross, D. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Percival, C. J.

    2014-03-25

    Criegee intermediates are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes and play an important role in indoor chemistry, notably as a source of OH radicals. Recent studies have shown that these Criegee intermediates react very quickly with NO2, SO2, and carbonyls, and in this study, steady-state calculations are used to inspect the potential impact of these data on indoor chemistry. It is shown that these reactions could accelerate NO3 formation and SO2 removal in the indoor environment significantly. In addition, reaction between Criegee intermediates and halogenated carbonyls could provide a significant loss process indoors, where currently one does not exist.

  1. How to Create Healthy Indoor Environments in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Diane; Di Nella, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A green and healthy indoor environment should be a fundamental concern in the place where kids learn and grow. Good indoor air quality (IAQ) has been shown to have positive effects on student and staff productivity, performance, comfort and attendance. Conversely, poor IAQ in classrooms--caused by mold and moisture issues, problems with HVAC…

  2. Variation of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in different outdoor and indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Boev, Blazo; Zunic, Zora S; Ivanova, Kremena; Ristova, Mimoza; Tsenova, Martina; Ajka, Sorsa; Janevik, Emilija; Taleski, Vaso; Bossew, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Subject of this study is an investigation of the variations of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in outdoor and indoor environments of 40 dwellings, 31 elementary schools and five kindergartens. The buildings are located in three municipalities of two, geologically different, areas of the Republic of Macedonia. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track detectors, deployed in the most occupied room of the building, between June 2013 and May 2014. During the deploying campaign, indoor and outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were measured simultaneously at the same location. It appeared that the measured values varied from 22 to 990 Bq/m(3) for indoor radon concentrations, from 50 to 195 nSv/h for outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates, and from 38 to 184 nSv/h for indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. The geometric mean value of indoor to outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates was found to be 0.88, i.e. the outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were on average higher than the indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. All measured can reasonably well be described by log-normal distributions. A detailed statistical analysis of factors which influence the measured quantities is reported. PMID:26943159

  3. Studying the microbiology of the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The majority of people in the developed world spend more than 90% of their lives indoors. Here, we examine our understanding of the bacteria that co-inhabit our artificial world and how they might influence human health. PMID:23514020

  4. Indoor environments and health: moving into the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Samet, Jonathan M; Spengler, John D

    2003-09-01

    The quality of our indoor environments affects well-being and productivity, and risks for diverse diseases are increased by indoor air pollutants, surface contamination with toxins and microbes, and contact among people at home, at work, in transportation, and in many other public and private places. We offer an overview of nearly a century of research directed at understanding indoor environments and health, consider current research needs, and set out policy matters that need to be addressed if we are to have the healthiest possible built environments. The policy context for built environments extends beyond health considerations to include energy use for air-conditioning, selection of materials for sustainability, and design for safety, security, and productivity.

  5. Criegee intermediates in the indoor environment. New insights

    SciTech Connect

    Shallcross, D. E.; Taatjes, C. A.; Percival, C. J.

    2014-03-25

    Criegee intermediates are formed in the ozonolysis of alkenes and play an important role in indoor chemistry, notably as a source of OH radicals. Recent studies have shown that these Criegee intermediates react very quickly with NO2, SO2, and carbonyls, and in this study, steady-state calculations are used to inspect the potential impact of these data on indoor chemistry. It is shown that these reactions could accelerate NO3 formation and SO2 removal in the indoor environment significantly. In addition, reaction between Criegee intermediates and halogenated carbonyls could provide a significant loss process indoors, where currently one does not exist.

  6. Image-Based Localization for Indoor Environment Using Mobile Phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhan, K.; Zhao, J.; Gui, P.; Feng, T.

    2015-05-01

    Real-time indoor localization based on supporting infrastructures like wireless devices and QR codes are usually costly and labor intensive to implement. In this study, we explored a cheap alternative approach based on images for indoor localization. A user can localize him/herself by just shooting a photo of the surrounding indoor environment using the mobile phone. No any other equipment is required. This is achieved by employing image-matching and searching techniques with a dataset of pre-captured indoor images. In the beginning, a database of structured images of the indoor environment is constructed by using image matching and the bundle adjustment algorithm. Then each image's relative pose (its position and orientation) is estimated and the semantic locations of images are tagged. A user's location can then be determined by comparing a photo taken by the mobile phone to the database. This is done by combining quick image searching, matching and the relative orientation. This study also try to explore image acquisition plans and the processing capacity of off-the-shell mobile phones. During the whole pipeline, a collection of indoor images with both rich and poor textures are examined. Several feature detectors are used and compared. Pre-processing of complex indoor photo is also implemented on the mobile phone. The preliminary experimental results prove the feasibility of this method. In the future, we are trying to raise the efficiency of matching between indoor images and explore the fast 4G wireless communication to ensure the speed and accuracy of the localization based on a client-server framework.

  7. Occurrence of black Aspergilli in indoor environments of six countries.

    PubMed

    Varga, János; Kocsubé, Sándor; Szigeti, Gyöngyi; Baranyi, Nikolett; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Jakšić Despot, Daniela; Magyar, Donát; Meijer, Martin; Samson, Robert A; Segvić Klarić, Maja

    2014-06-01

    Black Aspergilli (Aspergillus section Nigri) are widely distributed in various habitats. They act as food spoilage organisms, human pathogens, and mycotoxin producers and are frequently encountered in indoor environments. Black Aspergilli, specifically A. niger, A. welwitschiae, and A. carbonarius, produce different ochratoxins and fumonisins. Ochratoxins are known to induce renal disorders following inhalation, which necessitates the determination of potential mycotoxin-producing species in our environment. This paper aimed to compare the diversity and species distribution of black Aspergilli in the indoor environments of six different countries using morphological and molecular methods. A total of 178 black Aspergillus isolates were identified from six countries. In contrast with results from previous studies, A. niger was not the only black Aspergillus detected in indoor air. Species distribution differed among countries, although the distribution in European countries (Croatia, Hungary, the Netherlands, and Turkey) with a temperate climate was considerably similar. The highest species diversity was observed in indoor samples from Thailand, while the lowest was found in Algeria. Potentially ochratoxin- and fumonisin-producing fungi were detected in the indoor air of all six countries. Further studies need to clarify the effect of these fungi and their mycotoxins on human and animal health.

  8. The indoor environment and inner-city childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kanchongkittiphon, Watcharoot; Gaffin, Jonathan M.; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Exposure to indoor pollutants and allergens has been speculated to cause asthma symptoms and exacerbations and influence the risk of developing asthma. The aim of this article is to review the medical literature regarding the role of the indoor environment on inner-city childhood asthma. Data sources A literature search was performed in PubMed. Studies focusing on inner-city indoor allergen, childhood asthma, and environmental controls were included. Results The prevalence of asthma in children is increasing especially in inner-city area. Exposure to high levels of indoor allergens and pollutants has been related to asthma development. Studies have shown that mouse, cockroach, pets, dust mite, mold, tobacco smoke, endotoxin and nitrogen dioxide are the important exposures. Recent studies have shown that indoor environmental control is beneficial in reducing asthma morbidity and development. Conclusions Inner-city children are exposed to various indoor allergens and pollutants that may lead to asthma development and exacerbation of existing asthma. Multifaceted environmental controls are beneficial in improving asthma symptom and maybe a viable prevention strategy. Further prospective studies of environmental intervention are needed to further identify effective strategies to improve and prevent asthma symptoms in inner-city children. PMID:25003723

  9. D Indoor Building Environment Reconstruction Using Calibration of Rangefinder Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, A.; Anton, F.; Rahman, A. A.; Boguslawski, P.; Gold, C. M.

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, municipalities intend to have 3D city models for facility management, disaster management and architectural planning. 3D data acquisition can be done by laser scanning for indoor environment which is a costly and time consuming process. Currently, for indoor surveying, Electronic Distance Measurement (EDM) and Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) are mostly used. In this paper, several techniques for indoor 3D building data acquisition have been investigated. For reducing the time and cost of indoor building data acquisition process, the Trimble LaserAce 1000 range finder is used. The accuracy of the rangefinder is evaluated and a simple spatial model is reconstructed from real data. This technique is rapid (it requires a shorter time as compared to others), but the results show inconsistencies in horizontal angles for short distances in indoor environments. The range finder was calibrated using a least square adjustment algorithm. To control the uncertainty of the calibration and of the reconstruction of the building from the measurements, interval analysis and homotopy continuation are used.

  10. Lead and cadmium in indoor air and the urban environment.

    PubMed

    Komarnicki, Günter J K

    2005-07-01

    The present study was conducted to find potential terrestrial biomonitors for heavy metals in indoor air in an urban environment. TSP, PM(10), and PM(2.5) were collected in three retirement facilities in the urban area of Vienna. In addition, particulate matter and soil, vegetation, and isopods (Porcellio scaber L.) were collected in the adjacent garden areas. Aerosols were sampled with a low-volume air sampler. The sampled materials were wet ashed and total lead and cadmium contents were determined. Water-soluble heavy metal concentrations were measured in aqueous extracts from air exposed filters, soil, and vegetation. Lead and cadmium were analyzed by graphite furnace AAS. Lead contents in the vegetation were inferred from water-soluble lead in soils. Lead in isopods generally reflected the contents in vegetation. Cadmium in plants probably derived from soil solutions as well as from atmospheric input. Isopods reflected the total cadmium contents in soils. Particulate matter was dominated by PM(2.5), both with respect to mass concentrations and to heavy metal contents. The indoor aerosol was found to be influenced by human activity, indoor sources, and outdoor particles. Relationships between indoor airborne heavy metals and the contents in vegetation (lead and cadmium: positive) and isopods (lead: negative) were identified to have the potential for biomonitoring indoor air quality.

  11. Environmental chemicals relevant for respiratory hypersensitivity: the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Becher, R; Hongslo, J K; Jantunen, M J; Dybing, E

    1996-08-01

    The allergenic constituents of non-industrial indoor environments are predominantly found in the biologic fraction. Several reports have related biological particles such as mites and their excreta, dander from pets and other furred animals, fungi and bacteria to allergic manifestations including respiratory hypersensitivity among the occupants of buildings. Also, bacterial cell-wall components and the spores of toxin-producing moulds may contribute to the induction of hypersensitivity, but the relevance for human health is not yet determined. The knowledge regarding hypersensitivity and asthmatic reactions after exposure to chemical agents is primarily based on data from occupational settings with much higher exposure levels than usually found in non-industrial indoor environments. However, there is evidence that indoor exposure to tobacco smoke, some volatile organic compounds (VOC) and various combustion products (either by using unvented stoves or from outdoor sources) can be related to asthmatic symptoms. In some susceptible individuals, the development of respiratory hypersensitivity or elicitation of asthmatic symptoms may also be related to the indiscriminate use of different household products followed by exposure to compounds such as diisocyanates, organic acid anhydrides, formaldehyde, styrene and hydroquinone. At present, the contribution of the indoor environment both to the development of respiratory hypersensitivity and for triggering asthmatic symptoms is far from elucidated.

  12. Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Arundel, A.V.; Sterling, E.M.; Biggin, J.H.; Sterling, T.D.

    1986-03-01

    A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens.

  13. Indirect health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments.

    PubMed Central

    Arundel, A V; Sterling, E M; Biggin, J H; Sterling, T D

    1986-01-01

    A review of the health effects of relative humidity in indoor environments suggests that relative humidity can affect the incidence of respiratory infections and allergies. Experimental studies on airborne-transmitted infectious bacteria and viruses have shown that the survival or infectivity of these organisms is minimized by exposure to relative humidities between 40 and 70%. Nine epidemiological studies examined the relationship between the number of respiratory infections or absenteeism and the relative humidity of the office, residence, or school. The incidence of absenteeism or respiratory infections was found to be lower among people working or living in environments with mid-range versus low or high relative humidities. The indoor size of allergenic mite and fungal populations is directly dependent upon the relative humidity. Mite populations are minimized when the relative humidity is below 50% and reach a maximum size at 80% relative humidity. Most species of fungi cannot grow unless the relative humidity exceeds 60%. Relative humidity also affects the rate of offgassing of formaldehyde from indoor building materials, the rate of formation of acids and salts from sulfur and nitrogen dioxide, and the rate of formation of ozone. The influence of relative humidity on the abundance of allergens, pathogens, and noxious chemicals suggests that indoor relative humidity levels should be considered as a factor of indoor air quality. The majority of adverse health effects caused by relative humidity would be minimized by maintaining indoor levels between 40 and 60%. This would require humidification during winter in areas with cold winter climates. Humidification should preferably use evaporative or steam humidifiers, as cool mist humidifiers can disseminate aerosols contaminated with allergens. PMID:3709462

  14. The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

    2008-02-12

    The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

  15. Limitations of ambient air quality standards in evaluating indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.E. )

    1992-03-01

    Analysis of the kinds of data used for the derivation of ambient air quality standards (AAQSs) for carbon monoxide and ozone shows that these values are based on the toxicology of the materials and thus are suitable for evaluating potential health effects of indoor environments, especially on the very young, the aged, and the infirm. A similar analysis shows that the AAQSs for suspended particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide are strictly empirical and that they should not be used for any but their first, intended purpose. The AAQSs for non-methane hydrocarbons are based on photochemical smog production, not injury of any kind, and have no utility for indoor environment evaluation.

  16. Relationships between indoor environments and nasal inflammation in nursing personnel.

    PubMed

    Smedbold, Hans Thore; Ahlen, Catrine; Unimed, Sintef; Nilsen, Asbjørn M; Norbäck, Dan; Hilt, Bjørn

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the authors sought to address the relationships between measured indoor environmental factors and nasal patency (i.e., minimum cross-sectional area) and volume and markers of nasal inflammation in nasal lavage fluid. Clinical data were obtained for 115 females who worked at 36 geriatric nursing departments. The indoor climates in the nursing departments were characterized by high room temperatures (median = 23 degrees C), low relative air humidities (median = 24%), and high air exchange rates indicated by low carbon dioxide levels (median = 570 ppm). Evidence of microbial amplification was observed in the ventilation unit in 3 of the departments. Decreased nasal patency was observed relative to microbial amplification in the ventilation units (minimum cross-sectional area 1 = 0.80 cm2 vs. 0.64 cm2, p = .003, minimum cross-sectional area 2 = 0.80 cm2 vs. 0.67 cm2, p = .02) and in relation to elevated indoor temperature (volume 1 = 3.46 cm3 vs. 3.22 cm3, p = .03). The authors concluded that the indoor environment may have affected the nasal mucosa of nursing personnel, thus causing nasal mucosal swelling. The results support the view that fungal contamination of air-supply ducts may be a source of microbial pollution, which can affect the nasal mucosa.

  17. Distributed autonomous mapping of indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J.; Paluri, M.; Cunningham, A.; Christensen, H. I.; Michael, N.; Kumar, V.; Ma, J.; Matthies, L.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes the results of a Joint Experiment performed on behalf of the MAST CTA. The system developed for the Joint Experiment makes use of three robots which work together to explore and map an unknown environment. Each of the robots used in this experiment is equipped with a laser scanner for measuring walls and a camera for locating doorways. Information from both of these types of structures is concurrently incorporated into each robot's local map using a graph based SLAM technique. A Distributed-Data-Fusion algorithm is used to efficiently combine local maps from each robot into a shared global map. Each robot computes a compressed local feature map and transmits it to neighboring robots, which allows each robot to merge its map with the maps of its neighbors. Each robot caches the compressed maps from its neighbors, allowing it to maintain a coherent map with a common frame of reference. The robots utilize an exploration strategy to efficiently cover the unknown environment which allows collaboration on an unreliable communications channel. As each new branching point is discovered by a robot, it broadcasts the information about where this point is along with the robot's path from a known landmark to the other robots. When the next robot reaches a dead-end, new branching points are allocated by auction. In the event of communication interruption, the robot which observed the branching point will eventually explore it; therefore, the exploration is complete in the face of communication failure.

  18. Risk from inhaled mycotoxins in indoor office and residential environments.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Bruce J; Robbins, Coreen A; Swenson, Lonie J; Hardin, Bryan D

    2004-01-01

    Mycotoxins are known to produce veterinary and human diseases when consumed with contaminated foods. Mycotoxins have also been proposed to cause adverse human health effects after inhalation exposure to mold in indoor residential, school, and office environments. Epidemiologic evidence has been inadequate to establish a causal relationship between indoor mold and nonallergic, toxigenic health effects. In this article, the authors model a maximum possible dose of mycotoxins that could be inhaled in 24 h of continuous exposure to a high concentration of mold spores containing the maximum reported concentration of aflatoxins B1 and B2, satratoxins G and H, fumitremorgens B and C, verruculogen, and trichoverrols A and B. These calculated doses are compared to effects data for the same mycotoxins. None of the maximum doses modeled were sufficiently high to cause any adverse effect. The model illustrates the inefficiency of delivery of mycotoxins via inhalation of mold spores, and suggests that the lack of association between mold exposure and mycotoxicoses in indoor environments is due to a requirement for extremely high airborne spore levels and extended periods of exposure to elicit a response. This model is further evidence that human mycotoxicoses are implausible following inhalation exposure to mycotoxins in mold-contaminated home, school, or office environments. PMID:15162841

  19. MANAGING EXPOSURE TO INDOOR AIR POLLUTANTS IN RESIDENTIAL AND OFFICE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the factors to be considered in managing indoor air pollutants in residential and office environments to reduce occupant exposures. Techniques for managing indoor air pollution sources include: source elimination, substitution, modification, and pretreatment a...

  20. Object Detection Applied to Indoor Environments for Mobile Robot Navigation.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Alejandra Carolina; Gómez, Clara; Crespo, Jonathan; Barber, Ramón

    2016-07-28

    To move around the environment, human beings depend on sight more than their other senses, because it provides information about the size, shape, color and position of an object. The increasing interest in building autonomous mobile systems makes the detection and recognition of objects in indoor environments a very important and challenging task. In this work, a vision system to detect objects considering usual human environments, able to work on a real mobile robot, is developed. In the proposed system, the classification method used is Support Vector Machine (SVM) and as input to this system, RGB and depth images are used. Different segmentation techniques have been applied to each kind of object. Similarly, two alternatives to extract features of the objects are explored, based on geometric shape descriptors and bag of words. The experimental results have demonstrated the usefulness of the system for the detection and location of the objects in indoor environments. Furthermore, through the comparison of two proposed methods for extracting features, it has been determined which alternative offers better performance. The final results have been obtained taking into account the proposed problem and that the environment has not been changed, that is to say, the environment has not been altered to perform the tests.

  1. Object Detection Applied to Indoor Environments for Mobile Robot Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Alejandra Carolina; Gómez, Clara; Crespo, Jonathan; Barber, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    To move around the environment, human beings depend on sight more than their other senses, because it provides information about the size, shape, color and position of an object. The increasing interest in building autonomous mobile systems makes the detection and recognition of objects in indoor environments a very important and challenging task. In this work, a vision system to detect objects considering usual human environments, able to work on a real mobile robot, is developed. In the proposed system, the classification method used is Support Vector Machine (SVM) and as input to this system, RGB and depth images are used. Different segmentation techniques have been applied to each kind of object. Similarly, two alternatives to extract features of the objects are explored, based on geometric shape descriptors and bag of words. The experimental results have demonstrated the usefulness of the system for the detection and location of the objects in indoor environments. Furthermore, through the comparison of two proposed methods for extracting features, it has been determined which alternative offers better performance. The final results have been obtained taking into account the proposed problem and that the environment has not been changed, that is to say, the environment has not been altered to perform the tests. PMID:27483264

  2. Object Detection Applied to Indoor Environments for Mobile Robot Navigation.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Alejandra Carolina; Gómez, Clara; Crespo, Jonathan; Barber, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    To move around the environment, human beings depend on sight more than their other senses, because it provides information about the size, shape, color and position of an object. The increasing interest in building autonomous mobile systems makes the detection and recognition of objects in indoor environments a very important and challenging task. In this work, a vision system to detect objects considering usual human environments, able to work on a real mobile robot, is developed. In the proposed system, the classification method used is Support Vector Machine (SVM) and as input to this system, RGB and depth images are used. Different segmentation techniques have been applied to each kind of object. Similarly, two alternatives to extract features of the objects are explored, based on geometric shape descriptors and bag of words. The experimental results have demonstrated the usefulness of the system for the detection and location of the objects in indoor environments. Furthermore, through the comparison of two proposed methods for extracting features, it has been determined which alternative offers better performance. The final results have been obtained taking into account the proposed problem and that the environment has not been changed, that is to say, the environment has not been altered to perform the tests. PMID:27483264

  3. Transmitter antenna placement in indoor environments using particle swarm optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talepour, Zeinab; Tavakoli, Saeed; Ahmadi-Shokouh, Javad

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this article is to suitably locate the minimum number of transmitter antennas in a given indoor environment to achieve good propagation coverage. To calculate the electromagnetic field in various points of the environment, we develop a software engine, named ray-tracing engine (RTE), in Matlab. To achieve realistic calculations, all parameters of geometry and material of building are considered. Particle swarm optimisation is employed to determine good location of transmitters. Simulation results show that a full coverage is obtained through suitably locating three transmitters.

  4. [Airborne fungal community composition in indoor environments in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhi-guo; Ouyang, Zhi-yun; Liu, Peng; Sun, Li; Wang, Xiao-yong

    2013-05-01

    Indoor environmental quality has significant effects on human health. It is reported that adults in China spent about 80%-90% of their time in indoor environments, and a number of physically handicapped people such as the elderly and infants stayed in the room even up to 95% of their total time. Moreover, air conditioner in indoor environments becomes more and more important in modern life, and a closed circulatory system can be formed among human body, room and air conditioner in indoor environments with an air conditioner, which can make the microbes such as bacteria, viruses and mold indoors propagate rapidly or abundantly. Therefore, studies on the microbial pollution in the air at places such as mall, classroom, office, and family home have been the research hotspots recently. In the present study, the community composition and concentration variation pattern of airborne fungi were investigated from Nov 2009 to Oct 2010 in 31 family homes with children in Beijing. Results showed that 24 generas of airborne fungi in family homes were identified from 225 isolates. The most common fungi were Penicillium, Cladosporium, Aspergillus, Alternaria and Phoma. The frequency of Penicillium, Cladosporium, Aspergillus, Alternaria and Monilia was much higher than those of other fungal genera in family home, and the frequency of Penicillium was more than 90%. As for the concentration percentage, airborne fungi with most high concentrations were Penicillium, Cladosporium, Aspergillus, No-sporing, and Alternaria, and totally accounted for more than 65.0%. Penicillium contributed to 32.2% of the total airborne fungi in family homes. In the 31 family homes selected, the fungal concentration in the air ranged from 62-3 498 CFU x m(-3), and the mean concentration was 837 CFU x m(-3). Seasonal variation pattern of total fungi, and Cladosporium, Aspergillus, Alternaria concentration was consistent, and the highest fungal concentration was observed in summer, followed by spring and

  5. Performance Evaluation of Indoor Environment towards Sustainability for Higher Educational Buildings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Natasha; Husin, Husrul Nizam; Wahab, Lilawati Ab; Kamal, Kamarul Syahril; Mahat, Noorsaidi

    2011-01-01

    The indoor environmental factors considered in higher educational building must be determined in order to meet the user's requirement. Disruption of indoor environment may constitute to reduce occupants' efficiencies and their learning process and activities. But the question is, how to ensure that the provision of indoor environmental aspects…

  6. On-body calibration and measurements using personal radiofrequency exposimeters in indoor diffuse and specular environments.

    PubMed

    Aminzadeh, Reza; Thielens, Arno; Bamba, Aliou; Kone, Lamine; Gaillot, Davy Paul; Lienard, Martine; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, response of personal exposimeters (PEMs) is studied under diffuse field exposure in indoor environments. To this aim, both numerical simulations, using finite-difference time-domain method, and calibration measurements were performed in the range of 880-5875 MHz covering 10 frequency bands in Belgium. Two PEMs were mounted on the body of a human male subject and calibrated on-body in an anechoic chamber (non-diffuse) and a reverberation chamber (RC) (diffuse fields). This was motivated by the fact that electromagnetic waves in indoor environments have both specular and diffuse components. Both calibrations show that PEMs underestimate actual incident electromagnetic fields. This can be compensated by using an on-body response. Moreover, it is shown that these responses are different in anechoic chamber and RC. Therefore, it is advised to use an on-body calibration in an RC in future indoor PEM measurements where diffuse fields are present. Using the response averaged over two PEMs reduced measurement uncertainty compared to single PEMs. Following the calibration, measurements in a realistic indoor environment were done for wireless fidelity (WiFi-5G) band. Measured power density values are maximally 8.9 mW/m(2) and 165.8 μW/m(2) on average. These satisfy reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection in 1998. Power density values obtained by applying on-body calibration in RC are higher than values obtained from no body calibration (only PEMs) and on-body calibration in anechoic room, by factors of 7.55 and 2.21, respectively. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:298-309, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. On-body calibration and measurements using personal radiofrequency exposimeters in indoor diffuse and specular environments.

    PubMed

    Aminzadeh, Reza; Thielens, Arno; Bamba, Aliou; Kone, Lamine; Gaillot, Davy Paul; Lienard, Martine; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, response of personal exposimeters (PEMs) is studied under diffuse field exposure in indoor environments. To this aim, both numerical simulations, using finite-difference time-domain method, and calibration measurements were performed in the range of 880-5875 MHz covering 10 frequency bands in Belgium. Two PEMs were mounted on the body of a human male subject and calibrated on-body in an anechoic chamber (non-diffuse) and a reverberation chamber (RC) (diffuse fields). This was motivated by the fact that electromagnetic waves in indoor environments have both specular and diffuse components. Both calibrations show that PEMs underestimate actual incident electromagnetic fields. This can be compensated by using an on-body response. Moreover, it is shown that these responses are different in anechoic chamber and RC. Therefore, it is advised to use an on-body calibration in an RC in future indoor PEM measurements where diffuse fields are present. Using the response averaged over two PEMs reduced measurement uncertainty compared to single PEMs. Following the calibration, measurements in a realistic indoor environment were done for wireless fidelity (WiFi-5G) band. Measured power density values are maximally 8.9 mW/m(2) and 165.8 μW/m(2) on average. These satisfy reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection in 1998. Power density values obtained by applying on-body calibration in RC are higher than values obtained from no body calibration (only PEMs) and on-body calibration in anechoic room, by factors of 7.55 and 2.21, respectively. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:298-309, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27121268

  8. Free-living amoebae: Health concerns in the indoor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.; Ironside, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    Free-living amoebae are the most likely protozoa implicated in health concerns of the indoor environment. These amoebae can be the source of allergic reactions, eye infections or, on rare occasions, encephalitis. While too large to be effectively aerosolized, free- living amoebae can support the multiplication of pathogens such as Legionella which are easily aerosolized and infectious via the pulmonary route. Traditional detection methods for free-living amoebae are laborious and time consuming. Newer techniques for rapidly detecting and quantitating free-living amoebae such as monoclonal antibodies, flow cytometry, gene probes, and laser optics have or could be employed. 25 refs.

  9. [HYGIENIC ASPECTS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC POLLUTION OF INDOOR ENVIRONMENT].

    PubMed

    Gubernskiy, Yu D; Goshin M E; Kalinina N V; Banin, I M

    2016-01-01

    There is presented an overview of studies devoted to the assessment of 50 Hz electromagnetic the radiations in the indoor environment and their impact on the human body. The classification of household appliances depending on their location has been proposed. The levels of intensity of electric and magnetic fields generated by power-frequency (50 Hz) current from a variety of household appliances have been determined. The ranking of household appliances in dependence on the intensity of electromagnetic the radiations has been made. There was performed an estimation of the intensity of electromagnetic fields in dependence on the regimen of the usage of appliances.

  10. [HYGIENIC ASPECTS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC POLLUTION OF INDOOR ENVIRONMENT].

    PubMed

    Gubernskiy, Yu D; Goshin M E; Kalinina N V; Banin, I M

    2016-01-01

    There is presented an overview of studies devoted to the assessment of 50 Hz electromagnetic the radiations in the indoor environment and their impact on the human body. The classification of household appliances depending on their location has been proposed. The levels of intensity of electric and magnetic fields generated by power-frequency (50 Hz) current from a variety of household appliances have been determined. The ranking of household appliances in dependence on the intensity of electromagnetic the radiations has been made. There was performed an estimation of the intensity of electromagnetic fields in dependence on the regimen of the usage of appliances. PMID:27430061

  11. Buoyancy driven acceleration in a hospital operating room indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Zhai, John

    2011-11-01

    In hospital operating rooms, centrally located non-isothermal ceiling jets provide sterile air for protecting the surgical site from infectious particles in the room air as well as room cooling. Modern operating rooms are requiring larger temperature differences to accommodate increasing cooling loads for heat gains from medical equipment. This trend may lead to significant changes in the room air distribution patterns that may sacrifice the sterile air field across the surgical table. Quantitative flow visualization experiments using laser sheet illumination and RANS modeling of the indoor environment were conducted to demonstrate the impact of the indoor environment thermal conditions on the room air distribution. The angle of the jet shear layer was studied as function of the area of the vena contracta of the jet, which is in turn dependent upon the Archimedes number of the jet. Increases in the buoyancy forces cause greater air velocities in the vicinity of the surgical site increasing the likelihood of deposition of contaminants in the flow field. The outcome of this study shows the Archimedes number should be used as the design parameter for hospital operating room air distribution in order to maintain a proper supply air jet for covering the sterile region. This work is supported by ASHRAE.

  12. The relationship between airborne acidity and ammonia in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Suh, H H; Koutrakis, P; Spengler, J D

    1994-01-01

    Indoor acid aerosol, nitric acid (HNO3), and ammonia (NH3) concentrations were measured in 47 homes in State College, Pennsylvania, during the summer of 1991. From each home, 12-hour indoor, 12- and 24-hour outdoor, and 12-hour air exchange samples were collected continuously over a 5-day period. Additionally, questionnaires were administered daily by field technicians to obtain information on house occupant number, ventilation, gas stove use, pets, and other housing characteristics. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between NH3 and corresponding concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H+) and HNO3 inside these homes. As part of this analysis, we also examined indoor/outdoor concentration relationships and identified housing factors that may influence indoor levels. In State College, indoor NH3 concentrations were higher than corresponding outdoor levels, with air conditioner use, air exchange rates, and occupant number identified as important determinants of indoor levels. Indoor concentrations of both H+ and HNO3 were substantially lower than outdoor levels, as homes with air exchange rates less than one exchange per hour were found to have essentially no acid indoors. These low H+ and HNO3 levels likely resulted from their reaction with indoor NH3 and with indoor surfaces. Indoor NH3 concentrations were higher than outdoor levels, indicating the presence of indoor NH3 sources; however, correlations between indoor NH3 and both pets and occupants, its primary indoor sources, were weak and negative, respectively. Mass balance models that included an NH3 neutralization term were found to predict indoor H+ concentrations reasonably well, representing a substantial improvement over outdoor concentrations alone. The accumulation of NH3 indoors was found to be the primary determinant of indoor H+ and HNO3 levels.

  13. Aldehyde measurements in indoor environments in Strasbourg (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, C.; Bulliot, B.; Le Calvé, S.; Mirabel, Ph.

    Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations have been measured in indoor environments of various public spaces (railway station, airport, shopping center, libraries, underground parking garage, etc.) of Strasbourg area (east of France). In addition, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde propionaldehyde and hexanal concentrations have been measured in 22 private homes in the same area. In most of the sampling sites, indoor and outdoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations were measured simultaneously. Gaseous aldehydes levels were quantified by a conventional DNHP-derivatization method followed by liquid chromatography coupled to UV detection. Outdoor formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations were both in the range 1-10 μg m -3, the highest values being measured at the airport and railway station. Indoor concentrations were strongly dependant upon the sampling sites. In homes, the average concentrations were 37 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 46 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for formaldehyde, 15 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 18 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for acetaldehyde, 1.2 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 1.6 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for propionaldehyde, 9 μg m -3 (living rooms) and 10 μg m -3 (bedrooms) for hexanal. However, concentrations as high as 123, 80 and 47 μg m -3 have been found for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and hexanal respectively. In public spaces, the highest formaldehyde concentration (62 μg m -3) was found in a library and the highest concentration of acetaldehyde (26 μg m -3) in the hall of a shopping center. Additional measurements of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were made inside a car both at rest or in a fluid or heavy traffic as well as in a room where cigarettes were smoked. Our data have been discussed and compared with those of previous studies.

  14. The Stockholm Indoor Environment Questionnaire: a sociologically based tool for the assessment of indoor environment and health in dwellings.

    PubMed

    Engvall, K; Norrby, C; Sandstedt, E

    2004-02-01

    The aim was to develop and validate a standardized questionnaire - the Stockholm Indoor Environment Questionnaire (SIEQ). The validation procedure was based on sociological principles and test procedures for validation. The indicators of indoor environment are air quality, thermal climate, noise, and illumination. The indicators of health are symptoms comprised in the sick building syndrome (SBS). The questionnaire also contains questions about the apartment, individual behavior, and personal factors. The everyday language describing the building and its function was first obtained by qualitative personal interviews, then by standardized questions. The interview questionnaire was transformed into a postal self-administered questionnaire. The reduction of the questionnaire was based on correlation analysis. It was found that to obtain a good validity, general questions are not sufficient, but specific question on perceptions and observations are needed. Good test-retest agreement was found both on an area level, building level, and individually. For each indicator, a set of questions are constructed and validated. SIEQ has been used in several studies, and the results are presented in graphic problem profiles. Reference data has been calculated for the Stockholm area.

  15. Plants Clean Air and Water for Indoor Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Wolverton Environmental Services Inc., founded by longtime government environmental scientist B.C. "Bill" Wolverton, is an environmental consulting firm that gives customers access to the results of his decades of cutting-edge bioremediation research. Findings about how to use plants to improve indoor air quality have been published in dozens of NASA technical papers and in the book, "How to Grow Fresh Air: 50 Houseplants That Purify Your Home or Office." The book has now been translated into 12 languages and has been on the shelves of bookstores for nearly 10 years. A companion book, "Growing Clean Water: Nature's Solution to Water Pollution," explains how plants can clean waste water. Other discoveries include that the more air that is allowed to circulate through the roots of the plants, the more effective they are at cleaning polluted air; and that plants play a psychological role in welfare in that people recover from illness faster in the presence of plants. Wolverton Environmental is also working in partnership with Syracuse University, to engineer systems consisting of modular wicking filters tied into duct work and water supplies, essentially tying plant-based filters into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Also, the company has recently begun to assess the ability of the EcoPlanter to remove formaldehyde from interior environments. Wolverton Environmental is also in talks with designers of the new Stennis Visitor's Center, who are interested in using its designs for indoor air-quality filters

  16. On detailed 3D reconstruction of large indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, Egor

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present techniques for highly detailed 3D reconstruction of extra large indoor environments. We discuss the benefits and drawbacks of low-range, far-range and hybrid sensing and reconstruction approaches. The proposed techniques for low-range and hybrid reconstruction, enabling the reconstruction density of 125 points/cm3 on large 100.000 m3 models, are presented in detail. The techniques tackle the core challenges for the above requirements, such as a multi-modal data fusion (fusion of a LIDAR data with a Kinect data), accurate sensor pose estimation, high-density scanning and depth data noise filtering. Other important aspects for extra large 3D indoor reconstruction are the point cloud decimation and real-time rendering. In this paper, we present a method for planar-based point cloud decimation, allowing for reduction of a point cloud size by 80-95%. Besides this, we introduce a method for online rendering of extra large point clouds enabling real-time visualization of huge cloud spaces in conventional web browsers.

  17. Indoor Air '90: the 5th in a series of international conferences on the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Walkinshaw, D

    1992-01-01

    The 5th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate: INDOOR AIR '90 continued a series of international scientific conferences begun in 1978 on a complex, interdisciplinary subject increasingly recognized to be of importance to human comfort, health and productivity, and having important implications for building design and furnishing, office equipment, appliances, cleaning, heating, ventilating, humidifying and air-conditioning. INDOOR AIR '90 constituted a week long program of 542 paper and poster presentations and forum discussions, 100 exhibits, and a public forum. This paper summarizes some of the highlights of this conference and links these to some of the studies reported at earlier INDOOR AIR Conference.

  18. Guidelines on Thermal Comfort of Air Conditioned Indoor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Toyohiko

    The thermal comfort of air conditioned indoor environment for workers depended, of course, on metabolic rate of work, race, sex, age, clothing, climate of the district and state of acclimatization. The attention of the author was directed to the seasonal variation and the sexual difference of comfortable temperature and a survey through a year was conducted on the thermal comfort, and health conditions of workers engaged in light work in a precision machine factory, in some office workers. Besides, a series of experiments were conducted for purpose of determinning the optimum temperature of cooling in summer time in relation to the outdoor temperature. It seemed that many of workers at present would prefer somewhat higher temperature than those before the World War II. Forty years ago the average homes and offices were not so well heated as today, and clothing worn on the average was considerably heavier.

  19. [Comparison of methods for quantification of MVOC in indoor environments].

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Möller, M; Gabrio, T; Palmgren, U; Keller, R; Richter, H; Dott, W; Paul, R

    2005-01-01

    For several years now, MVOC have been regarded as indicators for microbial growth in indoor environments. Until now, a direct correlation between the occurrence of microfungi and MVOC could not be shown in scientific investigations. One reason may be that different analytical methods were applied, and moreover they were not validated sufficiently. The present investigation aimed to test the comparability of both methods (Tenax adsorption/thermal desorption; charcoal adsorption/elution). It turned out that with both methods comparable results can be achieved if the technical handling of the calibration is standardized to a wide extent. Thus, highest demands have to be made on quality assurance. Therefore, it is necessary to formulate technical regulations for the quantification of MVOC.

  20. Stereo vision tracking of multiple objects in complex indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Marrón-Romera, Marta; García, Juan C; Sotelo, Miguel A; Pizarro, Daniel; Mazo, Manuel; Cañas, José M; Losada, Cristina; Marcos, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel system capable of solving the problem of tracking multiple targets in a crowded, complex and dynamic indoor environment, like those typical of mobile robot applications. The proposed solution is based on a stereo vision set in the acquisition step and a probabilistic algorithm in the obstacles position estimation process. The system obtains 3D position and speed information related to each object in the robot's environment; then it achieves a classification between building elements (ceiling, walls, columns and so on) and the rest of items in robot surroundings. All objects in robot surroundings, both dynamic and static, are considered to be obstacles but the structure of the environment itself. A combination of a Bayesian algorithm and a deterministic clustering process is used in order to obtain a multimodal representation of speed and position of detected obstacles. Performance of the final system has been tested against state of the art proposals; test results validate the authors' proposal. The designed algorithms and procedures provide a solution to those applications where similar multimodal data structures are found.

  1. House dust mite and cat allergen in different indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Custovic, A; Taggart, S C; Woodcock, A

    1994-12-01

    Allergy to house dust mites (HDM) and domestic pets is a major cause of asthma. People in developed countries spend more than 90% of their time indoors. We have measured levels of HDM allergen Der pI and cat allergen Fel dI in public buildings and public transport. Dust samples were collected by vacuuming a 1 m2 area for 2 min from five schools, six hotels, four cinemas, six pubs, three buses, two trains and 12 domestic households without a cat. Der pI and Fel dI were assayed with monoclonal antibodies in a two-site immunometric ELISA. Der pI concentration was significantly higher in the private homes than in comparable sites in public places except for cinema seats (where high values were found) compared with domestic sofas. Der pI > 2000 ng/g of fine dust was found in 30% of the upholstered seats, 9% having a concentration > 10,000 ng/g. Fel dI levels were significantly higher in the dust from upholstered seats (geometric mean 14.88 micrograms/g) than in carpeted floors (geometric mean 0.73 micrograms/g), and in public places than in private homes. Fel dI > 8 micrograms/g was found in 79% of the upholstered seats or furniture sampled in public buildings or public transport. In conclusion, upholstered seats from public buildings and public transport constitute an allergen reservoir for continuous contamination of the indoor environment which could compromise the effects of allergen avoidance employed at home.

  2. In Search of a Common European Approach to a Healthy Indoor Environment

    PubMed Central

    Adan, Olaf C.G.; Ng-A-Tham, Julie; Hanke, Wojtek; Sigsgaard, Torben; van den Hazel, Peter; Wu, Felicia

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, policymakers in Europe and around the world are realizing the importance of healthy indoor environments for public health. Certain member states of the European Union (EU) have already achieved successes in improving indoor environmental quality, such as controlling certain contaminants (e.g., environmental tobacco smoke) or developing nationwide policies that address indoor air generally. However, a common European approach to achieving healthy indoor environments is desirable for several reasons including providing a broader recognition of the problem of unhealthy indoor air, setting a policy example for all 27 EU member states, and achieving greater public health equity across the different European nations. In this article we address the question “Why is it so difficult in the EU to develop a coherent approach on indoor environment?” We identify and describe four main barriers: a) the subsidiarity principle in EU policymaking, introducing decentralization of decision making to the member states; b) fragmentation of the topic of the indoor environment; c) the differences in climate and governance among different member states that make a common policy difficult; and d) economic issues. We discuss potential lessons and recommendations from EU and U.S. successes in achieving healthier indoor environments through various policy mechanisms. PMID:17589611

  3. Digitization and visualization of greenhouse tomato plants in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Xu, Lihong; Tan, Chengxiang; Goodman, Erik D; Fu, Daichang; Xin, Longjiao

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the digitization and visualization of potted greenhouse tomato plants in indoor environments. For the digitization, an inexpensive and efficient commercial stereo sensor-a Microsoft Kinect-is used to separate visual information about tomato plants from background. Based on the Kinect, a 4-step approach that can automatically detect and segment stems of tomato plants is proposed, including acquisition and preprocessing of image data, detection of stem segments, removing false detections and automatic segmentation of stem segments. Correctly segmented texture samples including stems and leaves are then stored in a texture database for further usage. Two types of tomato plants-the cherry tomato variety and the ordinary variety are studied in this paper. The stem detection accuracy (under a simulated greenhouse environment) for the cherry tomato variety is 98.4% at a true positive rate of 78.0%, whereas the detection accuracy for the ordinary variety is 94.5% at a true positive of 72.5%. In visualization, we combine L-system theory and digitized tomato organ texture data to build realistic 3D virtual tomato plant models that are capable of exhibiting various structures and poses in real time. In particular, we also simulate the growth process on virtual tomato plants by exerting controls on two L-systems via parameters concerning the age and the form of lateral branches. This research may provide useful visual cues for improving intelligent greenhouse control systems and meanwhile may facilitate research on artificial organisms. PMID:25675284

  4. Digitization and Visualization of Greenhouse Tomato Plants in Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Xu, Lihong; Tan, Chengxiang; Goodman, Erik D.; Fu, Daichang; Xin, Longjiao

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the digitization and visualization of potted greenhouse tomato plants in indoor environments. For the digitization, an inexpensive and efficient commercial stereo sensor—a Microsoft Kinect—is used to separate visual information about tomato plants from background. Based on the Kinect, a 4-step approach that can automatically detect and segment stems of tomato plants is proposed, including acquisition and preprocessing of image data, detection of stem segments, removing false detections and automatic segmentation of stem segments. Correctly segmented texture samples including stems and leaves are then stored in a texture database for further usage. Two types of tomato plants—the cherry tomato variety and the ordinary variety are studied in this paper. The stem detection accuracy (under a simulated greenhouse environment) for the cherry tomato variety is 98.4% at a true positive rate of 78.0%, whereas the detection accuracy for the ordinary variety is 94.5% at a true positive of 72.5%. In visualization, we combine L-system theory and digitized tomato organ texture data to build realistic 3D virtual tomato plant models that are capable of exhibiting various structures and poses in real time. In particular, we also simulate the growth process on virtual tomato plants by exerting controls on two L-systems via parameters concerning the age and the form of lateral branches. This research may provide useful visual cues for improving intelligent greenhouse control systems and meanwhile may facilitate research on artificial organisms. PMID:25675284

  5. Digitization and visualization of greenhouse tomato plants in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Xu, Lihong; Tan, Chengxiang; Goodman, Erik D; Fu, Daichang; Xin, Longjiao

    2015-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the digitization and visualization of potted greenhouse tomato plants in indoor environments. For the digitization, an inexpensive and efficient commercial stereo sensor-a Microsoft Kinect-is used to separate visual information about tomato plants from background. Based on the Kinect, a 4-step approach that can automatically detect and segment stems of tomato plants is proposed, including acquisition and preprocessing of image data, detection of stem segments, removing false detections and automatic segmentation of stem segments. Correctly segmented texture samples including stems and leaves are then stored in a texture database for further usage. Two types of tomato plants-the cherry tomato variety and the ordinary variety are studied in this paper. The stem detection accuracy (under a simulated greenhouse environment) for the cherry tomato variety is 98.4% at a true positive rate of 78.0%, whereas the detection accuracy for the ordinary variety is 94.5% at a true positive of 72.5%. In visualization, we combine L-system theory and digitized tomato organ texture data to build realistic 3D virtual tomato plant models that are capable of exhibiting various structures and poses in real time. In particular, we also simulate the growth process on virtual tomato plants by exerting controls on two L-systems via parameters concerning the age and the form of lateral branches. This research may provide useful visual cues for improving intelligent greenhouse control systems and meanwhile may facilitate research on artificial organisms.

  6. Radioactivity in the indoor building environment in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Todorović, Natasa; Bikit, Istvan; Vesković, Miroslav; Krmar, Miodrag; Mrđa, Dusan; Forkapić, Sofija; Hansman, Jan; Nikolov, Jovana; Bikit, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of activity concentrations of radionuclides in building materials and radon in indoor space is important in the assessment of population exposures, as most individuals spend 80 % of their time indoors. This paper presents the results of activity concentration measurements of: radon emanated from the soil, radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in the soil, indoor radon in the city of Novi Sad (the capital city of Vojvodina) using charcoal canisters and indoor radon in the Vojvodina region using alpha-track detectors and the radioactivity of some building materials. Influences of floor level, space under the rooms, boarding, and the heating system on indoor radon accumulation in the Vojvodina province, situated in the northern part of Serbia, are also presented in this paper. The total effective dose and the activity concentration index are calculated applying the dose criteria recommended by the European Union for building materials.

  7. Inter-comparison of air pollutant concentrations in different indoor environments in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shun-Cheng; Guo, Hai; Li, Wai-Ming; Chan, Lo-Yin

    Indoor air quality in selected indoor environments in Hong Kong such as homes, offices, schools, shopping malls and restaurants were investigated. Average CO 2 levels and total bacteria counts in air-conditioned classrooms, shopping malls and restaurants were comparatively higher than those measured in occupied offices and homes. Elevated CO 2 levels exceeding 1000 ppm and total bacteria counts resulted from high occupancy combined with inadequate ventilation. Average PM 10 levels were usually higher indoors than outdoors in homes, shopping malls and restaurants. The highest indoor PM 10 levels were observed at investigated restaurants due to the presence of cigarette smoking and extensive use of gas stoves for cooking. The restaurants and shopping malls investigated had higher formaldehyde levels than other indoor environments when building material, smoking and internal renovation work were present. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in both indoor and outdoor environments mainly resulted from vehicle exhaust emissions. It was observed that interior decoration work and the use of industrial solvents in an indoor environment could significantly increase the indoor levels of VOCs.

  8. New Courses: Unlock the Mysteries of Productivity, Air Quality, and the Indoor Environment in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiford, Regina

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between indoor air quality and productivity and a three-year research project to measure productivity within an educational setting. Also discusses research showing the impact of good indoor air quality on increasing productivity. Ten ways to manage asthma in a school environment are highlighted. (GR)

  9. Microbial air contamination in indoor environment of a university library.

    PubMed

    Kalwasińska, Agnieszka; Burkowska, Aleksandra; Wilk, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the number of bacteria and mould fungi in the indoor and outdoor environment of Toruń University Library. The sampling sites were located in the rooms serving the functions typical of libraries (i.e. in the Main Reading Room, Current Periodicals Reading Room, Collections Conservation Laboratory, Old Prints Storeroom, in rooms serving other (non-library) functions (i.e. main hall, cafeteria, and toilet) as well as outside the library building. The analyses reveal that the concentrations of bacterial as well as fungal aerosols estimated with the use of the impaction method ranged between 10(1)-10(3) CFU·m(-3), which corresponds to the concentrations normally observed in areas of this kind. Evaluation of the hygienic condition of the studied areas was based on the criteria for microbiological cleanliness in interiors submitted by the European Commission in 1993. According to this classification, the air was considered to be heavily or moderately contaminated with bacteria, while the air contamination with mould fungi was described as low or moderate. The air in the Old Prints Storeroom was considered the least contaminated with microbial aerosol.

  10. PENETRATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICLES INTO THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several recent studies have indicated significant health risks associated with exposure to fine particles as measured outdoors. However, much of the exposure is believed to have occurred infdoors. consequently, there is considerable interest in the relationship between indoor a...

  11. Our interface with the built environment: immunity and the indoor microbiota.

    PubMed

    Lax, Simon; Nagler, Cathryn R; Gilbert, Jack A

    2015-03-01

    The rise of urbanization and an increasingly indoor lifestyle has affected human interactions with our microbiota in unprecedented ways. We discuss how this lifestyle may influence immune development and function, and argue that it is time that we examined ways to manipulate the indoor environment to increase our exposure to a wider phylogeny of microorganisms. An important step is to continue to engage citizen scientists in the efforts to characterize our interactions with the diverse microbial environments that we inhabit.

  12. Walking-induced particle resuspension in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jing; Peccia, Jordan; Ferro, Andrea R.

    2014-06-01

    Resuspension of particles indoors increases the risk of consequent exposure through inhalation and non-dietary ingestion. Studies have been conducted to characterize indoor particle resuspension but results do not always agree, and there are still many open questions in this field. This paper reviews the recent research of indoor resuspension and summarizes findings to answer six critical questions: 1) How does the resuspension sources compared to other indoor sources; 2) How is resuspension determined and how does the resuspension measure change as a function of particle size; 3) What are the primary resuspension mechanisms; 4) What are the factors affecting resuspension; 5) What are the knowledge gaps and future research directions in this area; and 6) How can what we know about resuspension guide better exposure mitigation strategies? From synthesized results, we conclude that resuspension is an important source for indoor particulate matter, compared with other indoor sources. Among all existing quantification terms of resuspension, resuspension fraction has the least variation in its estimates by explicitly defining surface loading and walking frequency, and thus is recommended to be adopted in future research over other terms. Resuspension increases with particle size in the range of 0.7-10 μm, although differences exist in resuspension estimates by orders of magnitude. The primary mechanism of particle resuspension involves rolling detachment, and the adhesive forces can be greatly reduced by microscopic surface roughness. Particle resuspension is by nature complicated, affected by various factors and their interactions. There are still many open questions to be answered to achieve an understanding of resuspension fundamentals. Given the complex and multidisciplinary nature of resuspension, understanding indoor particle resuspension behavior requires cross-disciplinary participation from experts in aerosol science, textile science, surface chemistry

  13. Personalized Alert Notifications and Evacuation Routes in Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Aedo, Ignacio; Yu, Shuxin; Díaz, Paloma; Acuña, Pablo; Onorati, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The preparedness phase is crucial in the emergency management process for reaching an adequate level of readiness to react to potential threats and hazards. During this phase, emergency plans are developed to establish, among other procedures, evacuation and emergency escape routes. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) can support and improve these procedures providing appropriate, updated and accessible information to all people in the affected zone. Current emergency management and evacuation systems do not adapt information to the context and the profile of each person, so messages received in the emergency might be useless. In this paper, we propose a set of criteria that ICT-based systems could achieve in order to avoid this problem adapting emergency alerts and evacuation routes to different situations and people. Moreover, in order to prove the applicability of such criteria, we define a mechanism that can be used as a complement of traditional evacuation systems to provide personalized alerts and evacuation routes to all kinds of people during emergency situations in working places. This mechanism is composed by three main components: CAP-ONES for notifying emergency alerts, NERES for defining emergency plans and generating personalized evacuation routes, and iNeres as the interface to receive and visualize these routes on smartphones. The usability and understandability of proposed interface has been assessed through a user study performed in a fire simulation in an indoor environment. This evaluation demonstrated that users considered iNeres easy to understand, to learn and to use, and they also found very innovative the idea to use smartphones as a support for escaping instead of static signals on walls and doors. PMID:22969373

  14. Indoor environment modeling for interactive robot security application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Sangwoo; Shahab, Qonita M.; Kwon, Yong-Moo; Ahn, Sang Chul

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents our simple and easy to use method to obtain a 3D textured model. For expression of reality, we need to integrate the 3D models and real scenes. Most of other cases of 3D modeling method consist of two data acquisition devices. One is for getting a 3D model and another for obtaining realistic textures. In this case, the former device would be 2D laser range-finder and the latter device would be common camera. Our algorithm consists of building a measurement-based 2D metric map which is acquired by laser range-finder, texture acquisition/stitching and texture-mapping to corresponding 3D model. The algorithm is implemented with laser sensor for obtaining 2D/3D metric map and two cameras for gathering texture. Our geometric 3D model consists of planes that model the floor and walls. The geometry of the planes is extracted from the 2D metric map data. Textures for the floor and walls are generated from the images captured by two 1394 cameras which have wide Field of View angle. Image stitching and image cutting process is used to generate textured images for corresponding with a 3D model. The algorithm is applied to 2 cases which are corridor and space that has the four walls like room of building. The generated 3D map model of indoor environment is shown with VRML format and can be viewed in a web browser with a VRML plug-in. The proposed algorithm can be applied to 3D model-based remote surveillance system through WWW.

  15. Volatile organic compounds in indoor environment and photocatalytic oxidation: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Ang, H M; Tade, Moses O

    2007-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the major pollutants in indoor air, which significantly impact indoor air quality and thus influencing human health. A long-term exposure to VOCs will be detrimental to human health causing sick building syndrome (SBS). Photocatalytic oxidation of VOCs is a cost-effective technology for VOCs removal compared with adsorption, biofiltration, or thermal catalysis. In this paper, we review the current exposure level of VOCs in various indoor environment and state of the art technology for photocatalytic oxidation of VOCs from indoor air. The concentrations and emission rates of commonly occurring VOCs in indoor air are presented. The effective catalyst systems, under UV and visible light, are discussed and the kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation is also presented.

  16. Hazardous indoor CO2 concentrations in volcanic environments.

    PubMed

    Viveiros, Fátima; Gaspar, João L; Ferreira, Teresa; Silva, Catarina

    2016-07-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the main soil gases released silently and permanently in diffuse degassing areas, both in volcanic and non-volcanic zones. In the volcanic islands of the Azores (Portugal) several villages are located over diffuse degassing areas. Lethal indoor CO2 concentrations (higher than 10 vol %) were measured in a shelter located at Furnas village, inside the caldera of the quiescent Furnas Volcano (S. Miguel Island). Hazardous CO2 concentrations were detected not only underground, but also at the ground floor level. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to the CO2 and environmental time series recorded between April 2008 and March 2010 at Furnas village. The results show that about 30% of the indoor CO2 variation is explained by environmental variables, namely barometric pressure, soil water content and wind speed. The highest indoor CO2 concentrations were recorded during bad weather conditions, characterized by low barometric pressure together with rainfall periods and high wind speed. In addition to the spike-like changes observed on the CO2 time series, long-term oscillations were also identified and appeared to represent seasonal variations. In fact, indoor CO2 concentrations were higher during winter period when compared to the dry summer months. Considering the permanent emission of CO2 in various volcanic regions of the world, CO2 hazard maps are crucial and need to be accounted by the land-use planners and authorities. PMID:27155095

  17. Hazardous indoor CO2 concentrations in volcanic environments.

    PubMed

    Viveiros, Fátima; Gaspar, João L; Ferreira, Teresa; Silva, Catarina

    2016-07-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the main soil gases released silently and permanently in diffuse degassing areas, both in volcanic and non-volcanic zones. In the volcanic islands of the Azores (Portugal) several villages are located over diffuse degassing areas. Lethal indoor CO2 concentrations (higher than 10 vol %) were measured in a shelter located at Furnas village, inside the caldera of the quiescent Furnas Volcano (S. Miguel Island). Hazardous CO2 concentrations were detected not only underground, but also at the ground floor level. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to the CO2 and environmental time series recorded between April 2008 and March 2010 at Furnas village. The results show that about 30% of the indoor CO2 variation is explained by environmental variables, namely barometric pressure, soil water content and wind speed. The highest indoor CO2 concentrations were recorded during bad weather conditions, characterized by low barometric pressure together with rainfall periods and high wind speed. In addition to the spike-like changes observed on the CO2 time series, long-term oscillations were also identified and appeared to represent seasonal variations. In fact, indoor CO2 concentrations were higher during winter period when compared to the dry summer months. Considering the permanent emission of CO2 in various volcanic regions of the world, CO2 hazard maps are crucial and need to be accounted by the land-use planners and authorities.

  18. Intake fraction for the indoor environment: a tool for prioritizing indoor chemical sources.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E; Bennett, Deborah H

    2012-09-18

    Reliable exposure-based chemical characterization tools are needed to evaluate and prioritize in a rapid and efficient manner the more than tens of thousands of chemicals in current use. This study applies intake fraction (iF), the integrated incremental intake of a chemical per unit of emission, for a suite of indoor released compounds. A fugacity-based indoor mass-balance model was used to simulate the fate and transport of chemicals for three release scenarios: direct emissions to room air and surface applications to carpet and vinyl. Exposure through inhalation, dermal uptake, and nondietary ingestion was estimated. To compute iF, cumulative intake was summed from all exposure pathways for 20 years based on a scenario with two adults and a 1-year-old child who ages through the simulation. Overall iFs vary by application modes: air release (3.1 × 10(-3) to 6.3 × 10(-3)), carpet application (3.8 × 10(-5) to 6.2 × 10(-3)), and vinyl application (9.0 × 10(-5) to 1.8 × 10(-2)). These iF values serve as initial estimates that offer important insights on variations among chemicals and the potential relative contribution of each pathway over a suite of compounds. The approach from this study is intended for exposure-based prioritization of chemicals released inside homes. PMID:22920860

  19. Determining indoor air quality and identifying the origin of odour episodes in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Eva; Roca, Xavier; Perales, Jose Francisco; Guardino, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for identifying volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and determining air quality of indoor air has been developed. The air samples are collected using pump samplers by the inhabitants when they perceive odorous and/or discomfort episodes. Glass multi-sorbent tubes are connected to the pump samplers for the retention of VOC. The analysis is performed by automatic thermal desorption (ATD) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This methodology can be applied in cases of sick building syndrome (SBS) evaluation, in which building occupants experience a series of varied symptoms that appear to be linked to time spent in the building. Chemical pollutants concentrations (e.g., VOC) have been described to contribute to SBS. To exemplify the methodology, a qualitative determination and an evaluation of existing VOC were performed in a dwelling where the occupants experienced the SBS symptoms. Higher total VOC (TVOC) levels were detected during episodes in indoor air (1.33 +/- 1.53 mg/m3) compared to outdoor air (0.71 +/- 0.46 mg/m3). The concentrations of individual VOCs, such as ethanol, acetone, isopropanol, 1-butanol, acetic acid, acetonitrile and 1-methoxy-2-propanol, were also higher than the expected for a standard dwelling. The external source of VOC was found to be an undeclared activity of storage and manipulation of solvents located at the bottom of a contiguous building.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT AND IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH IN ROMA VILLAGES IN SLOVAKIA AND ROMANIA

    PubMed Central

    Majdan, Marek; Coman, Alexandru; Gallová, Eva; Ďuricová, Janka; Kállayová, Daniela; Kvaková, Mária; Bošák, Ľuboš

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives The objective of this paper is to provide information on indoor air quality and on the quality of the broader indoor environment of the houses in Roma villages in Slovakia and Romania and to discuss possible implications for health. Methods Indoor air was sampled in 11 houses in a Romanian Roma village and in 19 houses in a Slovakian Roma village. Levels of Carbon Monoxide (CO), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), total particulate matter (PM), temperature and humidity were measured. A questionnaire and a checklist were used to obtain additional information on the indoor environment and behavioural factors. We have sampled the same houses in winter and in summer. Results Levels of CO and CO2 were higher in winter in both countries as compared to summer. The limit value of 10 mg/m3 CO was exceeded in a few cases in both countries. In general, levels of CO, CO2 and PM were higher in Romania. Further environmental and behavioural hazards such as indoor smoking, pets inside or lack of ventilation were found. The reported self-perceived quality of the indoor environment was poor in many aspects. Conclusions Our findings of CO, CO2 and PM levels suggest that indoor air pollution in Roma settlements has the potential to be a health threat. The fact that the inhabitants spend a relatively long time inside the houses and that a number of additional environmental and behavioural hazards were identified by our study emphasizes the importance of the indoor air quality for health and thus priority attention should be paid to these issues by health authorities and researchers. Further research is essential and study designs must consider cultural background and specific characteristics of the community, especially in order to obtain valid data on health outcomes. PMID:23285520

  1. An experimental study on Sokkuram Cave Temple dome's indoor environment using a miniature model in winter season

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, S.H.; Chung, K.S.; Park, J.S.; Shin, I.S.; Han, H.T.

    1999-07-01

    Currently, there are many researches on the analysis of indoor environment in Sokkuram Cave Temple. However, there is not enough researches about an experimental study on the dome's indoor environment in Sokkuram Cave Temple using a miniature model. The purpose of this investigation is to measure and analyze characteristics of indoor environment such as relative humidity, dry bulb temperature and air velocity in the miniature model of Sokkuram Cave dome during winter season.

  2. Potential Nationwide Improvements in Productivity and Health from Better Indoor Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

    1998-05-01

    Theoretical considerations and empirical data suggest that existing technologies and procedures can improve indoor environments in a manner that significantly increases productivity and health. Existing literature contains moderate to strong evidence that characteristics of buildings and indoor environments significantly influence rates of respiratory disease, allergy and asthma symptoms, sick building symptoms, and worker performance. While there is considerable uncertainty in our estimates of the magnitudes of productivity gains that may be obtained by providing better indoor environments, the projected gains are very large. For the U.S., we estimate potential annual savings and productivity gains of $6 to $19 billion from reduced respiratory disease, $1 to $4 billion from reduced allergies and asthma, $10 to $20 billion from reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, and $12 to $125 billion from direct improvements in worker performance that are unrelated to health. In two example calculations, the potential financial benefits of improving indoor environments exceed costs by a factor of 8 and 14. Productivity gains that are quantified and demonstrated could serve as a strong stimulus for energy efficiency measures that simultaneously improve the indoor environment.

  3. Potential nationwide improvements in productivity and health from better indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

    1998-07-01

    Theoretical considerations and empirical data suggest that existing technologies and procedures can improve indoor environments in a manner that significantly increases productivity and health. Existing literature contains moderate to strong evidence that characteristics of buildings and indoor environments significantly influence rates of respiratory disease, allergy and asthma symptoms, sick building symptoms, and worker performance. While there is considerable uncertainty in their estimates of the magnitudes of productivity gains that may be obtained by providing better indoor environments, the projected gains are very large. For the US, the authors estimate potential annual savings and productivity gains of $6 to $19 billion from reduced respiratory disease, $1 to $4 billion from reduced allergies and asthma, $10 to $20 billion from reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, and $12 to $125 billion from direct improvements in worker performance that are unrelated to health. In two example calculations, the potential financial benefits of improving indoor environments exceed costs by a factor of 8 and 14. Productivity gains that are quantified and demonstrated could serve as a strong stimulus for energy efficiency measures that simultaneously improve the indoor environment.

  4. Humidification and perceived indoor air quality in the office environment.

    PubMed Central

    Reinikainen, L M; Aunela-Tapola, L; Jaakkola, J J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of humidification on the odour, acceptability, and stuffiness of indoor air. METHODS: In a six period cross over trial at the Pasila Office Center, Helsinki, the air of two wings of the building in turn were ventilated with air of 30%-40% humidity. A third wing served as a non-humidified control area. The quality of indoor air was assessed weekly by a panel containing 18 to 23 members. The intraindividual differences in the ratings for odour, stuffiness, and acceptability between humidified and non-humidified wings were used to assess the effect of humidification. The roles of sex, current smoking, and age as potential effect modifiers were assessed by comparing the mean intraindividual differences in ratings between the groups. RESULTS: Humidified air was found to be more odorous and stuffy (paired t test P = 0.0001) and less acceptable than the non-humidified air (McNemar's test P < 0.001). The differences in odour and stuffiness between humidified and non-humidified air were greater for women and for non-smokers, and greatest differences were in the youngest age group, and least in the oldest age group. The differences were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: An untrained panel of 20 members is able to differentiate a slight malodour and stuffiness in indoor air. The results suggest that steam air humidification decreases the perceived air quality. This effect is strongest in women and young subjects. PMID:9196454

  5. Assessment of indoor PM2.5 in different residential environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassin, Mohamed F.; AlThaqeb, Bothaina E. Y.; Al-Mutiri, Eman A. E.

    2012-09-01

    The indoor air quality (IAQ) as assessed by PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 μm) was measured at indoor settings in various residential houses which were located in different local environments across Kuwait. The indoor house settings included kitchen, living room, and bedrooms. Samples were collected from houses over 24 h. PM2.5 was estimated using a Dust-Trak personal sampler. Results were analyzed and compared with the US Environmental Protection Agencies (EPA) and World Health Organization (WHO) standards and guidelines. The results demonstrated that kitchens have the highest PM2.5 concentration probably due to cooking activities; the bedroom has the lowest PM2.5 concentration. The study shows that Kuwait indoor residential pollution is among the worst in comparison with other countries.

  6. Evaluation of the vehicle contributions of metals to indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Yih; Wang, Jing-Ya; Liu, Wan-Tzu; Lin, Pin-Yu; Tsai, Ching-Tsan; Cheng, Man-Ting

    2012-09-01

    A large number of diesel vehicles carrying gravel and sand shuttle back and forth every day on the major thoroughfares (Tai-16 and Tai-21) from Shinyi to Jiji in Nantou, Taiwan. A total of 10 stations along the major thoroughfares were selected as the exposure sites, whereas a small village located ∼9 km from a main traffic route was selected as the control site. Outdoor and indoor aerosol samples were collected using high-volume samplers and Harvard samplers, respectively. The metal concentrations of outdoor and indoor PM(10) at the exposure sites were, respectively, higher than those at the control site. The plots between metal contents in the aerosols and road dust showed that diesel vehicles contributed significant amounts of metals to the outdoor and indoor aerosols at the exposure sites. Household dust samples along the roadside within 30 m of the main road in the small towns were collected using the wipe method. Based on the results of principal component analysis (PCA), three major components for household dust were identified: resuspended from road dust, brake wear and diesel emissions. Enrichment factors were applied to assess the contribution of pollution sources to household dust. These factors were calculated with respect to unpolluted river dust samples (EF(river)) and road dust (EF(road)). The differences between EF(river) and EF(road) could be mainly attributed to the effects of resuspension by passing vehicles. Approximately 72%, 68%, 68%, 73% and 86% of the vehicle-related metals Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni and Mo content, respectively, in household dust were the result of the resuspension of road dust by passing vehicles. The data of daily intakes of five metals (i.e., Fe, Pb, Cu, Ni and Mo) from inhalation and ingestion pathways showed that the doses from the ingestion pathway were much higher than those from the inhalation pathway.

  7. Clinical learning environments (actual and expected): perceptions of Iran University of Medical Sciences nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Pakpour, Vahid; Aalaa, Maryam; Shekarabi, Robabeh; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Haghani, Hamid; Mehrdad, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educational clinical environment has an important role in nursing students' learning. Any difference between actual and expected clinical environment will decrease nursing students’ interest in clinical environments and has a negative correlation with their clinical performance. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study is an attempt to compare nursing students' perception of the actual and expected status of clinical environments in medical-surgical wards. Participants of the study were 127 bachelor nursing students of Iran University of Medical Sciences in the internship period. Data gathering instruments were a demographic questionnaire (including sex, age, and grade point average), and the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI) originally developed by Professor Chan (2001), in which its modified Farsi version (Actual and Preferred forms) consisting 42 items, 6 scales and 7 items per scale was used. Descriptive and inferential statistics (t-test, paired t-test, ANOVA) were used for data analysis through SPSS version 16. Results: The results indicated that there were significant differences between the preferred and actual form in all six scales. In other word, comparing with the actual form, the mean scores of all items in the preferred form were higher. The maximum mean difference was in innovation and the highest mean difference was in involvement scale. Conclusion: It is concluded that nursing students do not have a positive perception of their actual clinical teaching environment and this perception is significantly different from their perception of their expected environment. PMID:26034726

  8. Experimental Study of RF Energy Transfer System in Indoor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, S.-E.; Proynov, P. P.; Stark, B. H.; Hilton, G. S.; Craddock, I. J.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a multi-transmitter, 2.43 GHz Radio-Frequency (RF) wireless power transfer (WPT) system for powering on-body devices. It is shown that under typical indoor conditions, the received power range spans several orders of magnitude from microwatts to milliwatts. A body-worn dual-polarised rectenna (rectifying antenna) is presented, designed for situations where the dominant polarization is unpredictable, as is the case for the on-body sensors. Power management circuitry is demonstrated that optimally loads the rectenna even under highly intermittent conditions, and boosts the voltage to charge an on-board storage capacitor.

  9. [Inconsistencies between building regulations in force in Italy for indoor environment and wellness factors].

    PubMed

    Faggioli, A; Capasso, L

    2015-01-01

    Indoor environment is one of major health determinants, and the regulations that set the sanitary requirements are of primary importance for the protection of public health. The authors analyse the critical aspects of the complex Italian regulatory system, starting from the EU regulations, through national and regional laws, and finally the municipal regulations. They underline the need for more uniformity and clarity in the determination of health standards, as well as for a simplification of the existing legislation. Moreover, they highlight the importance of controlling and monitoring indoor environment, currently almost completely absent in Italy due to the effects of the regulatory changes of the latest years.

  10. Efficient three-dimensional ray-tracing model for electromagnetic propagation prediction in complex indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z-Y; Guo, L-X; Meng, X

    2013-08-01

    A three-dimensional ray-tracing model for the use of the uniform theory of diffraction and geometrical optics in radio channel characterizations of indoor environments is presented in this paper. Based on the environment information chosen by the proposed modeling approach, the model is effectively applied by utilizing a technique in which multiple reflections, transmissions, and diffractions are considered via the ray-path classification into four different categories. Ray paths belonging to each ray category are determined by using different methods. Our theoretical results are compared with narrowband and wideband measurements. The good agreement with these measurements indicates that our prediction model works well for such indoor communication applications.

  11. Our interface with the built environment: immunity and the indoor microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Simon; Nagler, Cathryn R.; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    The rise of urbanization and an increasingly indoor life-style has affected human interactions with our microbiota in unprecedented ways. We discuss how this lifestyle may influence immune development and function, and argue that it is time that we examined ways to manipulate the indoor environment to increase our exposure to a wider phylogeny of microorganisms. An important step is to continue to engage citizen scientists in the efforts to characterize our interactions with the diverse microbial environments that we inhabit. PMID:25754179

  12. Adverse human health effects associated with molds in the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Bryan D; Kelman, Bruce J; Saxon, Andrew

    2003-05-01

    Molds are common and important allergens. About 5% of individuals are predicted to have some allergic airway symptoms from molds over their lifetime. However, it should be remembered that molds are not dominant allergens and that the outdoor molds, rather than indoor ones, are the most important. For almost all allergic individuals, the reactions will be limited to rhinitis or asthma; sinusitis may occur secondarily due to obstruction. Rarely do sensitized individuals develop uncommon conditions such as ABPA or AFS. To reduce the risk of developing or exacerbating allergies, mold should not be allowed to grow unchecked indoors. When mold colonization is discovered in the home, school, or office, it should be remediated after the source of the moisture that supports its growth is identified and eliminated. Authoritative guidelines for mold remediation are available. Fungi are rarely significant pathogens for humans. Superficial fungal infections of the skin and nails are relatively common in normal individuals, but those infections are readily treated and generally resolve without complication. Fungal infections of deeper tissues are rare and in general are limited to persons with severely impaired immune systems. The leading pathogenic fungi for persons with nonimpaired immune function, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Histoplasma, may find their way indoors with outdoor air but normally do not grow or propagate indoors. Due to the ubiquity of fungi in the environment, it is not possible to prevent immunecompromised individuals from being exposed to molds and fungi outside the confines of hospital isolation units. Some molds that propagate indoors may under some conditions produce mycotoxins that can adversely affect living cells and organisms by a variety of mechanisms. Adverse effects of molds and mycotoxins have been recognized for centuries following ingestion of contaminated foods. Occupational diseases are also recognized in association with

  13. Preliminary data on carrion insects in urban (indoor and outdoor) and periurban environments in central Spain.

    PubMed

    Baz, Arturo; Botías, Cristina; Martín-Vega, Daniel; Cifrián, Blanca; Díaz-Aranda, Luisa M

    2015-03-01

    Although most cases involving entomological evidence occur in urban environments and under indoor conditions, there is a lack of studies determining the insect fauna of forensic importance in those environments. In the current paper we provide the first data on the composition of the forensically important insect species occurring in periurban and both indoor and outdoor urban environments in central Spain. Insects were collected fortnightly by means of carrion-baited traps, uninterruptedly during one year. Most species and individuals were collected in the periurban site, whereas the indoor urban site showed the lowest number of species and captures. Moreover, the composition of species differed among environments and seasons. A few species occurred under both indoor and outdoor conditions, including the blowfly Calliphora vicina and some Sarcophagidae species. These preliminary results suggest interesting differences in the insect composition between environments and conditions which may be of forensic importance, and represent a first step to further research into the application of insects to forensic investigations in urban environments of central Spain.

  14. Brominated flame retardants in the indoor environment - Comparative study of indoor contamination from three countries.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Audy, Ondřej; Vojta, Šimon; Bečanová, Jitka; Romanak, Kevin; Melymuk, Lisa; Krátká, Martina; Kukučka, Petr; Okeme, Joseph; Saini, Amandeep; Diamond, Miriam L; Klánová, Jana

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of more than 20 brominated flame retardants (FRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and emerging FRs, were measured in air, dust and window wipes from 63 homes in Canada, the Czech Republic and the United States in the spring and summer of 2013. Among the PBDEs, the highest concentrations were generally BDE-209 in all three matrices, followed by Penta-BDEs. Among alternative FRs, EHTBB and BEHTBP were detected at the highest concentrations. DBDPE was also a major alternative FR detected in dust and air. Bromobenzenes were detected at lower levels than PBDEs and other alternative FRs; among the bromobenzenes, HBB and PBEB were the most abundant compounds. In general, FR levels were highest in the US and lowest in the Czech Republic - a geographic trend that reflects the flame retardants' market. No statistically significant differences were detected between bedroom and living room FR concentrations in the same house (n=10), suggesting that sources of FRs are widespread indoors and mixing between rooms. The concentrations of FRs in air, dust, and window film were significantly correlated, especially for PBDEs. We found a significant relationship between the concentrations in dust and window film and in the gas phase for FRs with log KOA values <14, suggesting that equilibrium was reached for these but not compounds with log KOA values >14. This hypothesis was confirmed by a large discrepancy between values predicted using a partitioning model and the measured values for FRs with log KOA values >14.

  15. Brominated flame retardants in the indoor environment - Comparative study of indoor contamination from three countries.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Audy, Ondřej; Vojta, Šimon; Bečanová, Jitka; Romanak, Kevin; Melymuk, Lisa; Krátká, Martina; Kukučka, Petr; Okeme, Joseph; Saini, Amandeep; Diamond, Miriam L; Klánová, Jana

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of more than 20 brominated flame retardants (FRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and emerging FRs, were measured in air, dust and window wipes from 63 homes in Canada, the Czech Republic and the United States in the spring and summer of 2013. Among the PBDEs, the highest concentrations were generally BDE-209 in all three matrices, followed by Penta-BDEs. Among alternative FRs, EHTBB and BEHTBP were detected at the highest concentrations. DBDPE was also a major alternative FR detected in dust and air. Bromobenzenes were detected at lower levels than PBDEs and other alternative FRs; among the bromobenzenes, HBB and PBEB were the most abundant compounds. In general, FR levels were highest in the US and lowest in the Czech Republic - a geographic trend that reflects the flame retardants' market. No statistically significant differences were detected between bedroom and living room FR concentrations in the same house (n=10), suggesting that sources of FRs are widespread indoors and mixing between rooms. The concentrations of FRs in air, dust, and window film were significantly correlated, especially for PBDEs. We found a significant relationship between the concentrations in dust and window film and in the gas phase for FRs with log KOA values <14, suggesting that equilibrium was reached for these but not compounds with log KOA values >14. This hypothesis was confirmed by a large discrepancy between values predicted using a partitioning model and the measured values for FRs with log KOA values >14. PMID:27248661

  16. Impact of climate change on the domestic indoor environment and associated health risks in the UK.

    PubMed

    Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Dimitroulopoulou, Chrysanthi; Thornes, John; Lai, Ka-Man; Taylor, Jonathon; Myers, Isabella; Heaviside, Clare; Mavrogianni, Anna; Shrubsole, Clive; Chalabi, Zaid; Davies, Michael; Wilkinson, Paul

    2015-12-01

    There is growing evidence that projected climate change has the potential to significantly affect public health. In the UK, much of this impact is likely to arise by amplifying existing risks related to heat exposure, flooding, and chemical and biological contamination in buildings. Identifying the health effects of climate change on the indoor environment, and risks and opportunities related to climate change adaptation and mitigation, can help protect public health. We explored a range of health risks in the domestic indoor environment related to climate change, as well as the potential health benefits and unintended harmful effects of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies in the UK housing sector. We reviewed relevant scientific literature, focusing on housing-related health effects in the UK likely to arise through either direct or indirect mechanisms of climate change or mitigation and adaptation measures in the built environment. We considered the following categories of effect: (i) indoor temperatures, (ii) indoor air quality, (iii) indoor allergens and infections, and (iv) flood damage and water contamination. Climate change may exacerbate health risks and inequalities across these categories and in a variety of ways, if adequate adaptation measures are not taken. Certain changes to the indoor environment can affect indoor air quality or promote the growth and propagation of pathogenic organisms. Measures aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions have the potential for ancillary public health benefits including reductions in health burdens related heat and cold, indoor exposure to air pollution derived from outdoor sources, and mould growth. However, increasing airtightness of dwellings in pursuit of energy efficiency could also have negative effects by increasing concentrations of pollutants (such as PM2.5, CO and radon) derived from indoor or ground sources, and biological contamination. These effects can largely be ameliorated by mechanical

  17. Impact of climate change on the domestic indoor environment and associated health risks in the UK.

    PubMed

    Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Dimitroulopoulou, Chrysanthi; Thornes, John; Lai, Ka-Man; Taylor, Jonathon; Myers, Isabella; Heaviside, Clare; Mavrogianni, Anna; Shrubsole, Clive; Chalabi, Zaid; Davies, Michael; Wilkinson, Paul

    2015-12-01

    There is growing evidence that projected climate change has the potential to significantly affect public health. In the UK, much of this impact is likely to arise by amplifying existing risks related to heat exposure, flooding, and chemical and biological contamination in buildings. Identifying the health effects of climate change on the indoor environment, and risks and opportunities related to climate change adaptation and mitigation, can help protect public health. We explored a range of health risks in the domestic indoor environment related to climate change, as well as the potential health benefits and unintended harmful effects of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies in the UK housing sector. We reviewed relevant scientific literature, focusing on housing-related health effects in the UK likely to arise through either direct or indirect mechanisms of climate change or mitigation and adaptation measures in the built environment. We considered the following categories of effect: (i) indoor temperatures, (ii) indoor air quality, (iii) indoor allergens and infections, and (iv) flood damage and water contamination. Climate change may exacerbate health risks and inequalities across these categories and in a variety of ways, if adequate adaptation measures are not taken. Certain changes to the indoor environment can affect indoor air quality or promote the growth and propagation of pathogenic organisms. Measures aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions have the potential for ancillary public health benefits including reductions in health burdens related heat and cold, indoor exposure to air pollution derived from outdoor sources, and mould growth. However, increasing airtightness of dwellings in pursuit of energy efficiency could also have negative effects by increasing concentrations of pollutants (such as PM2.5, CO and radon) derived from indoor or ground sources, and biological contamination. These effects can largely be ameliorated by mechanical

  18. Mobile Robot Self-Localization System Using Single Webcam Distance Measurement Technology in Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Li, I-Hsum; Chen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Wei-Yen; Su, Shun-Feng; Lai, To-Wen

    2014-01-01

    A single-webcam distance measurement technique for indoor robot localization is proposed in this paper. The proposed localization technique uses webcams that are available in an existing surveillance environment. The developed image-based distance measurement system (IBDMS) and parallel lines distance measurement system (PLDMS) have two merits. Firstly, only one webcam is required for estimating the distance. Secondly, the set-up of IBDMS and PLDMS is easy, which only one known-dimension rectangle pattern is needed, i.e., a ground tile. Some common and simple image processing techniques, i.e., background subtraction are used to capture the robot in real time. Thus, for the purposes of indoor robot localization, the proposed method does not need to use expensive high-resolution webcams and complicated pattern recognition methods but just few simple estimating formulas. From the experimental results, the proposed robot localization method is reliable and effective in an indoor environment. PMID:24473282

  19. Mobile robot self-localization system using single webcam distance measurement technology in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Li, I-Hsum; Chen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Wei-Yen; Su, Shun-Feng; Lai, To-Wen

    2014-01-01

    A single-webcam distance measurement technique for indoor robot localization is proposed in this paper. The proposed localization technique uses webcams that are available in an existing surveillance environment. The developed image-based distance measurement system (IBDMS) and parallel lines distance measurement system (PLDMS) have two merits. Firstly, only one webcam is required for estimating the distance. Secondly, the set-up of IBDMS and PLDMS is easy, which only one known-dimension rectangle pattern is needed, i.e., a ground tile. Some common and simple image processing techniques, i.e., background subtraction are used to capture the robot in real time. Thus, for the purposes of indoor robot localization, the proposed method does not need to use expensive high-resolution webcams and complicated pattern recognition methods but just few simple estimating formulas. From the experimental results, the proposed robot localization method is reliable and effective in an indoor environment. PMID:24473282

  20. Mobile robot self-localization system using single webcam distance measurement technology in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Li, I-Hsum; Chen, Ming-Chang; Wang, Wei-Yen; Su, Shun-Feng; Lai, To-Wen

    2014-01-27

    A single-webcam distance measurement technique for indoor robot localization is proposed in this paper. The proposed localization technique uses webcams that are available in an existing surveillance environment. The developed image-based distance measurement system (IBDMS) and parallel lines distance measurement system (PLDMS) have two merits. Firstly, only one webcam is required for estimating the distance. Secondly, the set-up of IBDMS and PLDMS is easy, which only one known-dimension rectangle pattern is needed, i.e., a ground tile. Some common and simple image processing techniques, i.e., background subtraction are used to capture the robot in real time. Thus, for the purposes of indoor robot localization, the proposed method does not need to use expensive high-resolution webcams and complicated pattern recognition methods but just few simple estimating formulas. From the experimental results, the proposed robot localization method is reliable and effective in an indoor environment.

  1. Relationship Between Indoor Air Pollutant Levels and Residential Environment in Children With Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Lee, Ho Seok; Park, Mi Ran; Lee, Sang Woon; Kim, Eun Hye; Cho, Joong Bum; Kim, Jihyun; Han, Youngshin; Jung, Kweon; Cheong, Hae Kwan; Lee, Sang Il

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was aimed to investigate the relationship between indoor air pollutant levels and residential environment in children with atopic dermatitis (AD) living in Seoul. Methods A total of 150 children with AD were included. Residential environment was assessed by questionnaires which were completed by their parents. To evaluate the level of exposure to the indoor air pollutants, concentrations of the indoor air pollutants including particulate matter with diameter less than 10 µm (PM10), formaldehyde, carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), Total Volatile Organic Compound (TVOC), benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, xylene, styrene, bacterial aerosols, and airborne fungi were measured. Results A significant difference was exhibited in the levels of PM10 in case of visible fungus on the walls (P=0.047). There was relationship between the construction year of the house, moving to a newly constructed building within 1 year and formaldehyde level. With the use of artificial air freshener, the differences were found in the concentrations of TVOC (P=0.003), benzene (P=0.015), toluene (P=0.012) and ethyl-benzene (P=0.027). The concentration of xylene was significantly high when oil was used as heating fuel (P=0.015). Styrene exhibited differences depending on building type and its concentrations were significantly high in a residential and commercial complex building (P=0.005). The indoor concentration of bacterial aerosols was significantly low with the use of air cleaner (P=0.045). High NO2, benzene concentrations were present in case of almost no ventilation (P=0.028 and P=0.028, respectively). Conclusions Individual residential environments are closely related with the levels of the indoor air pollutants. To alleviate AD symptoms, simple questions about residential environments such as visible fungus on the walls and the use of artificial air freshener are helpful to assess the possibility of increased indoor air pollutant levels

  2. RSSI-based smooth localization for indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujian; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) technique, for its better penetrability over traditional techniques such as infrared or ultrasound, is widely used for indoor localization and tracking. In this paper, three novel measurements, point decision accuracy, path matching error and wrong jumping ratio, are firstly defined to express the localization efficiency. Then, a novel RSSI-based smooth localization (RSL) algorithm is designed, implemented, and evaluated on the WiFi networks. The tree-based mechanism determines the current position and track of the entity by assigning the weights and accumulative weights for all collected RSSI information of reference points so as to make the localization smooth. The evaluation results indicate that the proposed algorithm brings better localization smoothness of reducing 10% path matching error and 30% wrong jumping ratio over the RADAR system. PMID:25143988

  3. Do indoor environments in schools influence student performance? A review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Mark J.; Heath, Garvin A.

    2004-11-24

    Limited research is available on potential adverse effects of school environments on academic performance, despite strong public concern. We examine the scientific evidence relevant to this relationship by reviewing available research relating schools and other indoor environments to human performance or attendance. As a primary focus, we critically review evidence for direct relationships between indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in buildings and performance or attendance. As a secondary focus, we summarize, without critique, evidence on potential connections indirectly linking IEQ to performance or attendance: relationships between IEQ and health, between health and performance or attendance, and between attendance and performance. The most persuasive direct evidence showed increases in indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and outdoor concentrations of several specific pollutants to be related to reduced school attendance. The most persuasive indirect evidence showed indoor dampness and microbiologic pollutants to be related to asthma and respiratory infections, which have in turn been related to reduced performance and attendance. Furthermore, a substantial scientific literature links poor IEQ (e.g., low ventilation rate, excess moisture or formaldehyde) with respiratory and other health effects in children and adults. Overall, evidence suggests that poor IEQ in schools can influence the performance and attendance of students, primarily through health effects from indoor pollutants. Also, inadequate IEQ in schools seems sufficiently common to merit strong public concern. Evidence is available to justify (1) immediate actions to protect IEQ in schools and (2) focused research on exposures, prevention, and causation, to better guide policies and actions on IEQ in schools.

  4. Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their relationship with building energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-04-01

    Theoretical considerations and empirical data suggest that existing technologies and procedures can improve indoor environments in a manner that significantly increases productivity and health. Existing literature contains moderate to strong evidence that characteristics of buildings and indoor environments significantly influence rates of communicable respiratory illness, allergy and asthma symptoms, sick building symptoms, and worker performance. While there is considerable uncertainty in the estimates of the magnitudes of productivity gains that may be obtained by providing better indoor environments, the projected gains are very large. For the U.S., the estimated potential annual savings and productivity gains are $6 to $14 billion from reduced respiratory disease, $2 to $4 billion from reduced allergies and asthma, $10 to $30 billion from reduced sick building syndrome symptoms, and $20 to $160 billion from direct improvements in worker performance that are unrelated to health. Productivity gains that are quantified and demonstrated could serve as a strong stimulus for energy efficiency measures that simultaneously improve the indoor environment.

  5. Thermal Analysis--Human Comfort--Indoor Environments. NBS Special Publication 491.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangum, Billy W., Ed.; Hill, James E., Ed.

    Included in these proceedings are 11 formal papers presented by leading researchers in the field of thermal comfort and heat stress at a symposium held for the purpose of exploring new aspects of indoor thermal environments, caused primarily by the impact of energy conservation in new and existing buildings. The contributed papers were from…

  6. Preferred-Actual Learning Environment "Spaces" and Earth Science Outcomes in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chun-Yen; Hsiao, Chien-Hua; Barufaldi, James P.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the possibilities of differential impacts on students' earth science learning outcomes between different preferred-actual learning environment spaces by using a newly developed ESCLEI (Earth Science Classroom Learning Environment Instrument). The instrument emphasizes three simultaneously important classroom components:…

  7. A Comparison of Actual and Preferred Classroom Environments as Perceived by Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Hsiang-Ru; Chou, Wei-Lun; Miao, Nae-Fang; Wu, Yu-Ping; Lee, Pi-Hsia; Jwo, Jiunn-Chern

    2015-01-01

    Background: A good classroom environment can promote students' learning motivation and affect their academic efficacy and adaptation. This study compares the perceptions of Taiwanese middle school students regarding actual and preferred classroom environments and explores the association with sex and grade level. Methods: Data were collected using…

  8. Occupant perception of indoor air and comfort in four hospitality environments.

    PubMed

    Moschandreas, D J; Chu, P

    2002-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of customer and staff perceptions of indoor air quality at two restaurants, a billiard hall, and a casino. The survey was conducted at each environment for 8 days: 2 weekend days on 2 consecutive weekends and 4 weekdays. Before and during the survey, each hospitality environment satisfied ventilation requirements set in ASHRAE Standard 62-1999, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air. An objective of this study was to test the hypothesis: If a hospitality environment satisfies ASHRAE ventilation requirements, then the indoor air is acceptable, that is, fewer than 20% of the exposed occupants perceive the environment as unacceptable. A second objective was to develop a multiple regression model that predicts the dependent variable, the environment is acceptable, as a function of a number of independent perception variables. Occupant perception of environmental, comfort, and physical variables was measured using a questionnaire. This instrument was designed to be efficient and unobtrusive; subjects could complete it within 3 min. Significant differences of occupant environment perception were identified among customers and staff. The dependent variable, the environment is acceptable, is affected by temperature, occupant density, and occupant smoking status, odor perception, health conditions, sensitivity to chemicals, and enjoyment of activities. Depending on the hospitality environment, variation of independent variables explains as much as 77% of the variation of the dependent variable. PMID:11843426

  9. Children exposure to indoor ultrafine particles in urban and rural school environments.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro Rufo, João; Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Slezakova, Klara; Pereira, Maria do Carmo; Aguiar, Lívia; Teixeira, João Paulo; Moreira, André; Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    Extended exposure to ultrafine particles (UFPs) may lead to consequences in children due to their increased susceptibility when compared to older individuals. Since children spend in average 8 h/day in primary schools, assessing the number concentrations of UFPs in these institutions is important in order to evaluate the health risk for children in primary schools caused by indoor air pollution. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess and determine the sources of indoor UFP number concentrations in urban and rural Portuguese primary schools. Indoor and outdoor ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations were measured in six urban schools (US) and two rural schools (RS) located in the north of Portugal, during the heating season. The mean number concentrations of indoor UFPs were significantly higher in urban schools than in rural ones (10.4 × 10(3) and 5.7 × 10(3) pt/cm(3), respectively). Higher UFP levels were associated with higher squared meters per student, floor levels closer to the ground, chalk boards, furniture or floor covering materials made of wood and windows with double-glazing. Indoor number concentrations of ultrafine-particles were inversely correlated with indoor CO2 levels. In the present work, indoor and outdoor concentrations of UFPs in public primary schools located in urban and rural areas were assessed, and the main sources were identified for each environment. The results not only showed that UFP pollution is present in augmented concentrations in US when compared to RS but also revealed some classroom/school characteristics that influence the concentrations of UFPs in primary schools.

  10. Behaviours of psychotropic substances in indoor and outdoor environments of Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Cecinato, Angelo; Balducci, Catia; Romagnoli, Paola; Perilli, Mattia

    2014-01-01

    The intensive campaign conducted in March 2013 in Rome, Italy, at one coffee bar, one primary school and two homes revealed that in indoor environments, drugs can reach concentration levels exceeding orders of magnitude those recorded outdoors, even when the same substances are not consumed there. At homes, the gross average of cocaine reached 0.13 ng/m3 indoors and 0.09 ng/m3 outdoors (ratio~1.6); Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol was 6.6 ng/m3 indoors and 1.1 ng/m3 outdoors (ratio~7); cannabidiol reached 0.30 and 0.07 ng/m3, respectively (ratio~6); and cannabinol 2.3 ng/m3 indoors and 0.7 ng/m3 outdoors (ratio~3). At the coffee bar, the average drug burdens were even higher, namely 0.33, 4.7, 14.3 and 2.5 ng/m3, respectively, for cocaine, cannabidiol, tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinol. The school presented a special behaviour: the indoor/outdoor concentration ratios of cocaine, cannabidiol, tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinol accounting for ~1.5, ~0, ~4 and ~0.5, in the order. Cocaine was more abundant on weekdays at all sites except one home indoors, whilst total cannabinoids prevailed on weekends at the other home and the school. Using the regional network stations as reference, all indoor locations except one were more contaminated by cocaine by a factor≥1.5, whilst cannabinoids were, aside from the school, up to 100 times higher.

  11. Carbonaceous aerosol characteristics in outdoor and indoor environments of Nanchang, China, during summer 2009.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hong; Zou, Changwei; Cao, Junji; Tsang, Pokeung

    2011-11-01

    A study of carbonaceous aerosol was initiated in Nanchang, a city in eastern China, for the first time. Daily and diurnal (daytime and nighttime) PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < or =2.5 microm) samples were collected at an outdoor site and in three different indoor environments (common office, special printing and copying office, and student dormitory) in a campus of Nanchang University during summer 2009 (5-20 June). Daily PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < or =10 microm) samples were collected only at the outdoor site, whereas PM2.5 samples were collected at both indoor and outdoor sites. Loaded PM2.5 and PM10 samples were analyzed for organic and elemental carbon (OC, EC) by thermal/optical reflectance following the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments-Advanced (IMPROVE-A) protocol. Ambient mass concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 in Nanchang were compared with the air quality standards in China and the United States, and revealed high air pollution levels in Nanchang. PM2.5 accounted for about 70% of PM10, but the ratio of OC and EC in PM2.5 to that in PM10 was higher than 80%, which indicated that OC and EC were mainly distributed in the fine particles. The variations of carbonaceous aerosol between daytime and nighttime indicated that OC was released and formed more rapidly in daytime than in nighttime. OC/EC ratios were used to quantify secondary organic carbon (SOC). The differences in SOC and SOC/OC between daytime and nighttime were useful in interpreting the secondary formation mechanism. The results of (1) OC and EC contributions to PM2.5 at indoor sites and the outdoor site; (2) indoor-outdoor correlation of OC and EC; (3) OC-EC correlation; and (4) relative contributions of indoor and outdoor sources to indoor carbonaceous aerosol indicated that OC indoor sources existed in indoor sites, with the highest OC emissions in I2 (the special printing and copying office), and that indoor EC originated

  12. CFD analysis of dense gas dispersion in indoor environment for risk assessment and risk mitigation.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, M; Jayanti, S; Swaminathan, T

    2012-03-30

    Environmental risks are inherent in the operation of any complex chemical process industry. The indoor release of hazardous chemicals that are denser than air is a topic of special concern, since dense clouds tend to persist at ground level or human breath level which leads to a magnification of their harmful potential. In the present work, we propose a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based model for indoor risk assessment considering accidental release of a sustained, small, undetected leak of a dense toxic gas (chlorine) in an industrial indoor environment. Results from simulations show that the denser chlorine gas spreads like a liquid and flows all along the floor. At the same time, its concentration at a point away from the ground level increases slowly, thus showing that both stratification and dilution effects are present as the dense gas spreads. The implications of this spreading pattern from a risk assessment and risk mitigation point of view are discussed.

  13. Indoors forensic entomology: colonization of human remains in closed environments by specific species of sarcosaprophagous flies.

    PubMed

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L O; Karhunen, Pekka J; Goebeler, Sirkka; Saukko, Pekka; Sääksjärvi, Ilari E

    2010-06-15

    Fly species that are commonly recovered on human corpses concealed in houses or other dwellings are often dependent on human created environments and might have special features in their biology that allow them to colonize indoor cadavers. In this study we describe nine typical cases involving forensically relevant flies on human remains found indoors in southern Finland. Eggs, larvae and puparia were reared to adult stage and determined to species. Of the five species found the most common were Lucilia sericata Meigen, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy and Protophormia terraenovae Robineau-Desvoidy. The flesh fly Sarcophaga caerulescens Zetterstedt is reported for the first time to colonize human cadavers inside houses and a COI gene sequence based DNA barcode is provided for it to help facilitate identification in the future. Fly biology, colonization speed and the significance of indoors forensic entomological evidence are discussed.

  14. Understanding and controlling airborne organic compounds in the indoor environment: mass transfer analysis and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Xiong, J; Mo, J; Gong, M; Cao, J

    2016-02-01

    Mass transfer is key to understanding and controlling indoor airborne organic chemical contaminants (e.g., VVOCs, VOCs, and SVOCs). In this study, we first introduce the fundamentals of mass transfer and then present a series of representative works from the past two decades, focusing on the most recent years. These works cover: (i) predicting and controlling emissions from indoor sources, (ii) determining concentrations of indoor air pollutants, (iii) estimating dermal exposure for some indoor gas-phase SVOCs, and (iv) optimizing air-purifying approaches. The mass transfer analysis spans the micro-, meso-, and macroscales and includes normal mass transfer modeling, inverse problem solving, and dimensionless analysis. These representative works have reported some novel approaches to mass transfer. Additionally, new dimensionless parameters such as the Little number and the normalized volume of clean air being completely cleaned in a given time period were proposed to better describe the general process characteristics in emissions and control of airborne organic compounds in the indoor environment. Finally, important problems that need further study are presented, reflecting the authors' perspective on the research opportunities in this area.

  15. Impact of indoor environment on path loss in body area networks.

    PubMed

    Hausman, Sławomir; Januszkiewicz, Łukasz

    2014-10-20

    In this paper the influence of an example indoor environment on narrowband radio channel path loss for body area networks operating around 2.4 GHz is investigated using computer simulations and on-site measurements. In contrast to other similar studies, the simulation model included both a numerical human body phantom and its environment-room walls, floor and ceiling. As an example, radio signal attenuation between two different configurations of transceivers with dipole antennas placed in a direct vicinity of a human body (on-body scenario) is analyzed by computer simulations for several types of reflecting environments. In the analyzed case the propagation environments comprised a human body and office room walls. As a reference environment for comparison, free space with only a conducting ground plane, modelling a steel mesh reinforced concrete floor, was chosen. The transmitting and receiving antennas were placed in two on-body configurations chest-back and chest-arm. Path loss vs. frequency simulation results obtained using Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method and a multi-tissue anthropomorphic phantom were compared to results of measurements taken with a vector network analyzer with a human subject located in an average-size empty cuboidal office room. A comparison of path loss values in different environments variants gives some qualitative and quantitative insight into the adequacy of simplified indoor environment model for the indoor body area network channel representation.

  16. Indoor environment and children's health: recent developments in chemical, biological, physical and social aspects.

    PubMed

    Le Cann, Pierre; Bonvallot, Nathalie; Glorennec, Philippe; Deguen, Séverine; Goeury, Christophe; Le Bot, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Much research is being carried out into indoor exposure to harmful agents. This review focused on the impact on children's health, taking a broad approach to the indoor environment and including chemical, microbial, physical and social aspects. Papers published from 2006 onwards were reviewed, with regards to scientific context. Most of publications dealt with chemical exposure. Apart from the ongoing issue of combustion by-products, most of these papers concerned semi volatile organic compounds (such as phthalates). These may be associated with neurotoxic, reprotoxic or respiratory effects and may, therefore, be of particular interest so far as children are concerned. In a lesser extent, volatile organic compounds (such as aldehydes) that have mainly respiratory effects are still studied. Assessing exposure to metals is still of concern, with increasing interest in bioaccessibility. Most of the papers on microbial exposure focused on respiratory tract infections, especially asthma linked to allergens and bio-aerosols. Physical exposure includes noise and electromagnetic fields, and articles dealt with the auditory and non auditory effects of noise. Articles on radiofrequency electromagnetic fields mainly concerned questions about non-thermal effects and papers on extremely low-frequency magnetic fields focused on the characterization of exposure. The impact of the indoor environment on children's health cannot be assessed merely by considering the effect of these different types of exposure: this review highlights new findings and also discusses the interactions between agents in indoor environments and also with social aspects.

  17. Indoor environment and children's health: recent developments in chemical, biological, physical and social aspects.

    PubMed

    Le Cann, Pierre; Bonvallot, Nathalie; Glorennec, Philippe; Deguen, Séverine; Goeury, Christophe; Le Bot, Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Much research is being carried out into indoor exposure to harmful agents. This review focused on the impact on children's health, taking a broad approach to the indoor environment and including chemical, microbial, physical and social aspects. Papers published from 2006 onwards were reviewed, with regards to scientific context. Most of publications dealt with chemical exposure. Apart from the ongoing issue of combustion by-products, most of these papers concerned semi volatile organic compounds (such as phthalates). These may be associated with neurotoxic, reprotoxic or respiratory effects and may, therefore, be of particular interest so far as children are concerned. In a lesser extent, volatile organic compounds (such as aldehydes) that have mainly respiratory effects are still studied. Assessing exposure to metals is still of concern, with increasing interest in bioaccessibility. Most of the papers on microbial exposure focused on respiratory tract infections, especially asthma linked to allergens and bio-aerosols. Physical exposure includes noise and electromagnetic fields, and articles dealt with the auditory and non auditory effects of noise. Articles on radiofrequency electromagnetic fields mainly concerned questions about non-thermal effects and papers on extremely low-frequency magnetic fields focused on the characterization of exposure. The impact of the indoor environment on children's health cannot be assessed merely by considering the effect of these different types of exposure: this review highlights new findings and also discusses the interactions between agents in indoor environments and also with social aspects. PMID:21889403

  18. Perceived Indoor Environment and Occupants' Comfort in European "Modern" Office Buildings: The OFFICAIR Study.

    PubMed

    Sakellaris, Ioannis A; Saraga, Dikaia E; Mandin, Corinne; Roda, Célina; Fossati, Serena; de Kluizenaar, Yvonne; Carrer, Paolo; Dimitroulopoulou, Sani; Mihucz, Victor G; Szigeti, Tamás; Hänninen, Otto; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Bartzis, John G; Bluyssen, Philomena M

    2016-01-01

    Indoor environmental conditions (thermal, noise, light, and indoor air quality) may affect workers' comfort, and consequently their health and well-being, as well as their productivity. This study aimed to assess the relations between perceived indoor environment and occupants' comfort, and to examine the modifying effects of both personal and building characteristics. Within the framework of the European project OFFICAIR, a questionnaire survey was administered to 7441 workers in 167 "modern" office buildings in eight European countries (Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain). Occupants assessed indoor environmental quality (IEQ) using both crude IEQ items (satisfaction with thermal comfort, noise, light, and indoor air quality), and detailed items related to indoor environmental parameters (e.g., too hot/cold temperature, humid/dry air, noise inside/outside, natural/artificial light, odor) of their office environment. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the relations between perceived IEQ and occupants' comfort. The highest association with occupants' overall comfort was found for "noise", followed by "air quality", "light" and "thermal" satisfaction. Analysis of detailed parameters revealed that "noise inside the buildings" was highly associated with occupants' overall comfort. "Layout of the offices" was the next parameter highly associated with overall comfort. The relations between IEQ and comfort differed by personal characteristics (gender, age, and the Effort Reward Imbalance index), and building characteristics (office type and building's location). Workplace design should take into account both occupant and the building characteristics in order to provide healthier and more comfortable conditions to their occupants. PMID:27120608

  19. Perceived Indoor Environment and Occupants' Comfort in European "Modern" Office Buildings: The OFFICAIR Study.

    PubMed

    Sakellaris, Ioannis A; Saraga, Dikaia E; Mandin, Corinne; Roda, Célina; Fossati, Serena; de Kluizenaar, Yvonne; Carrer, Paolo; Dimitroulopoulou, Sani; Mihucz, Victor G; Szigeti, Tamás; Hänninen, Otto; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Bartzis, John G; Bluyssen, Philomena M

    2016-04-25

    Indoor environmental conditions (thermal, noise, light, and indoor air quality) may affect workers' comfort, and consequently their health and well-being, as well as their productivity. This study aimed to assess the relations between perceived indoor environment and occupants' comfort, and to examine the modifying effects of both personal and building characteristics. Within the framework of the European project OFFICAIR, a questionnaire survey was administered to 7441 workers in 167 "modern" office buildings in eight European countries (Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain). Occupants assessed indoor environmental quality (IEQ) using both crude IEQ items (satisfaction with thermal comfort, noise, light, and indoor air quality), and detailed items related to indoor environmental parameters (e.g., too hot/cold temperature, humid/dry air, noise inside/outside, natural/artificial light, odor) of their office environment. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the relations between perceived IEQ and occupants' comfort. The highest association with occupants' overall comfort was found for "noise", followed by "air quality", "light" and "thermal" satisfaction. Analysis of detailed parameters revealed that "noise inside the buildings" was highly associated with occupants' overall comfort. "Layout of the offices" was the next parameter highly associated with overall comfort. The relations between IEQ and comfort differed by personal characteristics (gender, age, and the Effort Reward Imbalance index), and building characteristics (office type and building's location). Workplace design should take into account both occupant and the building characteristics in order to provide healthier and more comfortable conditions to their occupants.

  20. Perceived Indoor Environment and Occupants’ Comfort in European “Modern” Office Buildings: The OFFICAIR Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakellaris, Ioannis A.; Saraga, Dikaia E.; Mandin, Corinne; Roda, Célina; Fossati, Serena; de Kluizenaar, Yvonne; Carrer, Paolo; Dimitroulopoulou, Sani; Mihucz, Victor G.; Szigeti, Tamás; Hänninen, Otto; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Bartzis, John G.; Bluyssen, Philomena M.

    2016-01-01

    Indoor environmental conditions (thermal, noise, light, and indoor air quality) may affect workers’ comfort, and consequently their health and well-being, as well as their productivity. This study aimed to assess the relations between perceived indoor environment and occupants’ comfort, and to examine the modifying effects of both personal and building characteristics. Within the framework of the European project OFFICAIR, a questionnaire survey was administered to 7441 workers in 167 “modern” office buildings in eight European countries (Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, The Netherlands, Portugal, and Spain). Occupants assessed indoor environmental quality (IEQ) using both crude IEQ items (satisfaction with thermal comfort, noise, light, and indoor air quality), and detailed items related to indoor environmental parameters (e.g., too hot/cold temperature, humid/dry air, noise inside/outside, natural/artificial light, odor) of their office environment. Ordinal logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the relations between perceived IEQ and occupants’ comfort. The highest association with occupants’ overall comfort was found for “noise”, followed by “air quality”, “light” and “thermal” satisfaction. Analysis of detailed parameters revealed that “noise inside the buildings” was highly associated with occupants’ overall comfort. “Layout of the offices” was the next parameter highly associated with overall comfort. The relations between IEQ and comfort differed by personal characteristics (gender, age, and the Effort Reward Imbalance index), and building characteristics (office type and building’s location). Workplace design should take into account both occupant and the building characteristics in order to provide healthier and more comfortable conditions to their occupants. PMID:27120608

  1. An evaluation of antifungal agents for the treatment of fungal contamination in indoor air environments.

    PubMed

    Rogawansamy, Senthaamarai; Gaskin, Sharyn; Taylor, Michael; Pisaniello, Dino

    2015-06-01

    Fungal contamination in indoor environments has been associated with adverse health effects for the inhabitants. Remediation of fungal contamination requires removal of the fungi present and modifying the indoor environment to become less favourable to growth.  This may include treatment of indoor environments with an antifungal agent to prevent future growth. However there are limited published data or advice on chemical agents suitable for indoor fungal remediation. The aim of this study was to assess the relative efficacies of five commercially available cleaning agents with published or anecdotal use for indoor fungal remediation. The five agents included two common multi-purpose industrial disinfectants (Cavicide® and Virkon®), 70% ethanol, vinegar (4.0%-4.2% acetic acid), and a plant-derived compound (tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil) tested in both a liquid and vapour form. Tea tree oil has recently generated interest for its antimicrobial efficacy in clinical settings, but has not been widely employed for fungal remediation. Each antifungal agent was assessed for fungal growth inhibition using a disc diffusion method against a representative species from two common fungal genera, (Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum), which were isolated from air samples and are commonly found in indoor air. Tea tree oil demonstrated the greatest inhibitory effect on the growth of both fungi, applied in either a liquid or vapour form. Cavicide® and Virkon® demonstrated similar, although less, growth inhibition of both genera. Vinegar (4.0%-4.2% acetic acid) was found to only inhibit the growth of P. chrysogenum, while 70% ethanol was found to have no inhibitory effect on the growth of either fungi. There was a notable inhibition in sporulation, distinct from growth inhibition after exposure to tea tree oil, Virkon®, Cavicide® and vinegar. Results demonstrate that common cleaning and antifungal agents differ in their capacity to inhibit the growth

  2. An evaluation of antifungal agents for the treatment of fungal contamination in indoor air environments.

    PubMed

    Rogawansamy, Senthaamarai; Gaskin, Sharyn; Taylor, Michael; Pisaniello, Dino

    2015-06-02

    Fungal contamination in indoor environments has been associated with adverse health effects for the inhabitants. Remediation of fungal contamination requires removal of the fungi present and modifying the indoor environment to become less favourable to growth.  This may include treatment of indoor environments with an antifungal agent to prevent future growth. However there are limited published data or advice on chemical agents suitable for indoor fungal remediation. The aim of this study was to assess the relative efficacies of five commercially available cleaning agents with published or anecdotal use for indoor fungal remediation. The five agents included two common multi-purpose industrial disinfectants (Cavicide® and Virkon®), 70% ethanol, vinegar (4.0%-4.2% acetic acid), and a plant-derived compound (tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil) tested in both a liquid and vapour form. Tea tree oil has recently generated interest for its antimicrobial efficacy in clinical settings, but has not been widely employed for fungal remediation. Each antifungal agent was assessed for fungal growth inhibition using a disc diffusion method against a representative species from two common fungal genera, (Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum), which were isolated from air samples and are commonly found in indoor air. Tea tree oil demonstrated the greatest inhibitory effect on the growth of both fungi, applied in either a liquid or vapour form. Cavicide® and Virkon® demonstrated similar, although less, growth inhibition of both genera. Vinegar (4.0%-4.2% acetic acid) was found to only inhibit the growth of P. chrysogenum, while 70% ethanol was found to have no inhibitory effect on the growth of either fungi. There was a notable inhibition in sporulation, distinct from growth inhibition after exposure to tea tree oil, Virkon®, Cavicide® and vinegar. Results demonstrate that common cleaning and antifungal agents differ in their capacity to inhibit the growth

  3. An Evaluation of Antifungal Agents for the Treatment of Fungal Contamination in Indoor Air Environments

    PubMed Central

    Rogawansamy, Senthaamarai; Gaskin, Sharyn; Taylor, Michael; Pisaniello, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Fungal contamination in indoor environments has been associated with adverse health effects for the inhabitants. Remediation of fungal contamination requires removal of the fungi present and modifying the indoor environment to become less favourable to growth.  This may include treatment of indoor environments with an antifungal agent to prevent future growth. However there are limited published data or advice on chemical agents suitable for indoor fungal remediation. The aim of this study was to assess the relative efficacies of five commercially available cleaning agents with published or anecdotal use for indoor fungal remediation. The five agents included two common multi-purpose industrial disinfectants (Cavicide® and Virkon®), 70% ethanol, vinegar (4.0%−4.2% acetic acid), and a plant-derived compound (tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil) tested in both a liquid and vapour form. Tea tree oil has recently generated interest for its antimicrobial efficacy in clinical settings, but has not been widely employed for fungal remediation. Each antifungal agent was assessed for fungal growth inhibition using a disc diffusion method against a representative species from two common fungal genera, (Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum), which were isolated from air samples and are commonly found in indoor air. Tea tree oil demonstrated the greatest inhibitory effect on the growth of both fungi, applied in either a liquid or vapour form. Cavicide® and Virkon® demonstrated similar, although less, growth inhibition of both genera. Vinegar (4.0%–4.2% acetic acid) was found to only inhibit the growth of P. chrysogenum, while 70% ethanol was found to have no inhibitory effect on the growth of either fungi. There was a notable inhibition in sporulation, distinct from growth inhibition after exposure to tea tree oil, Virkon®, Cavicide® and vinegar. Results demonstrate that common cleaning and antifungal agents differ in their capacity to inhibit the

  4. Neural computing thermal comfort index PMV for the indoor environment intelligent control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Chen, Yifei

    2013-03-01

    Providing indoor thermal comfort and saving energy are two main goals of indoor environmental control system. An intelligent comfort control system by combining the intelligent control and minimum power control strategies for the indoor environment is presented in this paper. In the system, for realizing the comfort control, the predicted mean vote (PMV) is designed as the control goal, and with chastening formulas of PMV, it is controlled to optimize for improving indoor comfort lever by considering six comfort related variables. On the other hand, a RBF neural network based on genetic algorithm is designed to calculate PMV for better performance and overcoming the nonlinear feature of the PMV calculation better. The formulas given in the paper are presented for calculating the expected output values basing on the input samples, and the RBF network model is trained depending on input samples and the expected output values. The simulation result is proved that the design of the intelligent calculation method is valid. Moreover, this method has a lot of advancements such as high precision, fast dynamic response and good system performance are reached, it can be used in practice with requested calculating error.

  5. A concentration rebound method for measuring particle penetrationand deposition in the indoor environment

    SciTech Connect

    tlthatcher@lbl.gov

    2002-09-01

    Continuous, size resolved particle measurements were performed in two houses in order to determine size-dependent particle penetration and deposition in the indoor environment. The experiments consisted of three parts: (1) measurement of the particle loss rate following artificial elevation of indoor particle concentrations, (2) rapid reduction in particle concentration through induced ventilation by pressurization of the houses with HEPA-filtered air, and (3) measurement of the particle concentration rebound after house pressurization stopped. During the particle concentration decay period, when indoor concentrations are very high, losses due to deposition are large compared to gains due to particle infiltration. During the concentration rebound period, the opposite is true. The large variation in indoor concentration allows the effects of penetration and deposition losses to be separated by the transient, two-parameter model we employed to analyze the data. We found penetration factors between 0.3 and 1 and deposition loss rates between 0.1 and 5 h{sup -1}, for particles between 0.1 and 10 {micro}m.

  6. HyMoTrack: A Mobile AR Navigation System for Complex Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Gerstweiler, Georg; Vonach, Emanuel; Kaufmann, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Navigating in unknown big indoor environments with static 2D maps is a challenge, especially when time is a critical factor. In order to provide a mobile assistant, capable of supporting people while navigating in indoor locations, an accurate and reliable localization system is required in almost every corner of the building. We present a solution to this problem through a hybrid tracking system specifically designed for complex indoor spaces, which runs on mobile devices like smartphones or tablets. The developed algorithm only uses the available sensors built into standard mobile devices, especially the inertial sensors and the RGB camera. The combination of multiple optical tracking technologies, such as 2D natural features and features of more complex three-dimensional structures guarantees the robustness of the system. All processing is done locally and no network connection is needed. State-of-the-art indoor tracking approaches use mainly radio-frequency signals like Wi-Fi or Bluetooth for localizing a user. In contrast to these approaches, the main advantage of the developed system is the capability of delivering a continuous 3D position and orientation of the mobile device with centimeter accuracy. This makes it usable for localization and 3D augmentation purposes, e.g. navigation tasks or location-based information visualization. PMID:26712755

  7. HyMoTrack: A Mobile AR Navigation System for Complex Indoor Environments.

    PubMed

    Gerstweiler, Georg; Vonach, Emanuel; Kaufmann, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Navigating in unknown big indoor environments with static 2D maps is a challenge, especially when time is a critical factor. In order to provide a mobile assistant, capable of supporting people while navigating in indoor locations, an accurate and reliable localization system is required in almost every corner of the building. We present a solution to this problem through a hybrid tracking system specifically designed for complex indoor spaces, which runs on mobile devices like smartphones or tablets. The developed algorithm only uses the available sensors built into standard mobile devices, especially the inertial sensors and the RGB camera. The combination of multiple optical tracking technologies, such as 2D natural features and features of more complex three-dimensional structures guarantees the robustness of the system. All processing is done locally and no network connection is needed. State-of-the-art indoor tracking approaches use mainly radio-frequency signals like Wi-Fi or Bluetooth for localizing a user. In contrast to these approaches, the main advantage of the developed system is the capability of delivering a continuous 3D position and orientation of the mobile device with centimeter accuracy. This makes it usable for localization and 3D augmentation purposes, e.g. navigation tasks or location-based information visualization. PMID:26712755

  8. Indoor-outdoor air quality relationships in vehicle: effect of driving environment and ventilation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Andy T.; Chung, Michael W.

    Nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide concentration were measured inside and outside of a light-goods-vehicle at different locations and driving conditions for a 6-month period. To investigate the exposure of the vehicle passenger to the specified outdoor pollutant, the indoor-outdoor air quality (IO) relationships under various driving conditions, namely traffic density, ventilation modes and type of roadway were studied. Four main types of driving environments were selected: highway, countryside, urban street and tunnel. The vehicle was driven under the three main types of ventilation conditions: air-conditioning with air-recirculation, air-conditioning with fresh air intake and natural ventilation. It is found that the IO ratio is not specific only to the mode of ventilation but also depends on the driving environment. The IO value can vary drastically even using the same ventilation mode when the vehicle is travelling in a different environment. It is found that using fresh-air ventilation mode, the IO can change from approximately 0.5-3 as it commutes from a highway to the countryside. The results also indicate that indoor NO level increased as the traffic density increases. The fluctuation of indoor NO level of naturally ventilated vehicle followed the variation of outdoor NO concentration with the IO value varying from 0.5 to 5. The results also show that even in an air-conditioned van, the indoor NO and CO concentration is significantly affected by that outdoor. It suggests the use of different ventilation mode when commuting in different environment.

  9. Po-210 as long-term integrating radon indicator in the indoor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsson, C.

    1990-07-01

    The general objective is to improve the knowledge about the transferring processes leading from airborne radon/radon daughters to embedded Po-210 in hard surfaces in the indoor environment. The specific goal of the research is to identify situations in which the surface activity of Po-210 can be used as a long-term indicator of lung cancer risk from past or future radon exposures.

  10. Scene analysis for a breadboard Mars robot functioning in an indoor environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    The problem is delt with of computer perception in an indoor laboratory environment containing rocks of various sizes. The sensory data processing is required for the NASA/JPL breadboard mobile robot that is a test system for an adaptive variably-autonomous vehicle that will conduct scientific explorations on the surface of Mars. Scene analysis is discussed in terms of object segmentation followed by feature extraction, which results in a representation of the scene in the robot's world model.

  11. Validation of experimental whole-body SAR assessment method in a complex indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Bamba, Aliou; Joseph, Wout; Vermeeren, Gunter; Tanghe, Emmeric; Gaillot, Davy Paul; Andersen, Jørgen B; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Lienard, Martine; Martens, Luc

    2013-02-01

    Experimentally assessing the whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR(wb) ) in a complex indoor environment is very challenging. An experimental method based on room electromagnetics theory (accounting only the line-of-sight as specular path) is validated using numerical simulations with the finite-difference time-domain method. Furthermore, the method accounts for diffuse multipath components (DMC) in the total absorption rate by considering the reverberation time of the investigated room, which describes all the losses in a complex indoor environment. The advantage of the proposed method is that it allows discarding the computational burden because it does not use any discretizations. Results show good agreement between measurement and computation at 2.8 GHz, as long as the plane wave assumption is valid, that is, at large distances from the transmitter. Relative deviations of 0.71% and 4% have been obtained for far-field scenarios, and 77.5% for the near field-scenario. The contribution of the DMC in the total absorption rate is also quantified here, which has never been investigated before. It is found that the DMC may represent an important part of the total absorption rate; its contribution may reach up to 90% for certain scenarios in an indoor environment.

  12. Enhanced Rgb-D Mapping Method for Detailed 3d Modeling of Large Indoor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shengjun; Zhu, Qing; Chen, Wu; Darwish, Walid; Wu, Bo; Hu, Han; Chen, Min

    2016-06-01

    RGB-D sensors are novel sensing systems that capture RGB images along with pixel-wise depth information. Although they are widely used in various applications, RGB-D sensors have significant drawbacks with respect to 3D dense mapping of indoor environments. First, they only allow a measurement range with a limited distance (e.g., within 3 m) and a limited field of view. Second, the error of the depth measurement increases with increasing distance to the sensor. In this paper, we propose an enhanced RGB-D mapping method for detailed 3D modeling of large indoor environments by combining RGB image-based modeling and depth-based modeling. The scale ambiguity problem during the pose estimation with RGB image sequences can be resolved by integrating the information from the depth and visual information provided by the proposed system. A robust rigid-transformation recovery method is developed to register the RGB image-based and depth-based 3D models together. The proposed method is examined with two datasets collected in indoor environments for which the experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the proposed method

  13. Self-Organizing Distributed Architecture Supporting Dynamic Space Expanding and Reducing in Indoor LBS Environment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seol Young; Jo, Hyeong Gon; Kang, Soon Ju

    2015-01-01

    Indoor location-based services (iLBS) are extremely dynamic and changeable, and include numerous resources and mobile devices. In particular, the network infrastructure requires support for high scalability in the indoor environment, and various resource lookups are requested concurrently and frequently from several locations based on the dynamic network environment. A traditional map-based centralized approach for iLBSs has several disadvantages: it requires global knowledge to maintain a complete geographic indoor map; the central server is a single point of failure; it can also cause low scalability and traffic congestion; and it is hard to adapt to a change of service area in real time. This paper proposes a self-organizing and fully distributed platform for iLBSs. The proposed self-organizing distributed platform provides a dynamic reconfiguration of locality accuracy and service coverage by expanding and contracting dynamically. In order to verify the suggested platform, scalability performance according to the number of inserted or deleted nodes composing the dynamic infrastructure was evaluated through a simulation similar to the real environment. PMID:26016908

  14. Occurrence of toxigenic Aspergillus versicolor isolates and sterigmatocystin in carpet dust from damp indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Engelhart, Steffen; Loock, Annette; Skutlarek, Dirk; Sagunski, Helmut; Lommel, Annette; Färber, Harald; Exner, Martin

    2002-08-01

    Over the past decade, there has been growing concern regarding the role of toxigenic fungi in damp indoor environments; however, there is still a lack of field investigations on exposure to mycotoxins. The goal of our pilot study was to quantify the proportion of toxigenic Aspergillus versicolor isolates in native carpet dust from damp dwellings with mold problems and to determine whether sterigmatocystin can be detected in this matrix. Carpet dust samples (n = 11) contained from <2.5 x 10(1) to 3.6 x 10(5) (median, 3.1 x 10(4)) A. versicolor CFU/g of dust, and the median proportion of A. versicolor from total culturable fungi was 18%. Based on thin-layer chromatography detection of sterigmatocystin, 49 of 50 A. versicolor isolates (98%) were found to be toxigenic in vitro. By using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry, sterigmatocystin could be detected in low concentrations (2 to 4 ng/g of dust) in 2 of 11 native carpet dust samples. From this preliminary study, we conclude that most strains of A. versicolor isolated from carpet dust are able to produce sterigmatocystin in vitro and that sterigmatocystin may occasionally occur in carpet dust from damp indoor environments. Further research and systematic field investigation are needed to confirm our results and to provide an understanding of the health implications of mycotoxins in indoor environments.

  15. Perceived Comfort of Indoor Environment and Users' Performance in Office Building with Smart Elements - case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipová, Ivana; Vilčeková, Silvia

    2013-11-01

    A greater degree of awareness of comfort and productivity of building users according to post-occupancy evaluation and feedback of users in intelligent buildings is necessary. This report presents a summary of the results from a physical measurements, a post-occupancy evaluation study on perceived comfort of indoor environment and self-evaluation of occupant's performance in the new multifunctional 5 floor-building in city of Kosice, Slovakia. There were investigated degree of perceived comfort and user's performance with regard to objective measurement, respondents' response and building character. This case study has highlighted that influence of monitored factors of building with smart elements is positively received and wasn't determined their negative impact on perceived comfort of indoor environment and occupants' performance. Results show that respondents are mostly satisfied with their indoor environment conditions of workplace. Interviews with respondents detected they have not been perceived (negative) factors in workplace because they have been too concentric on the work and they have not felt discomfort.

  16. Self-organizing distributed architecture supporting dynamic space expanding and reducing in indoor LBS environment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seol Young; Jo, Hyeong Gon; Kang, Soon Ju

    2015-05-26

    Indoor location-based services (iLBS) are extremely dynamic and changeable, and include numerous resources and mobile devices. In particular, the network infrastructure requires support for high scalability in the indoor environment, and various resource lookups are requested concurrently and frequently from several locations based on the dynamic network environment. A traditional map-based centralized approach for iLBSs has several disadvantages: it requires global knowledge to maintain a complete geographic indoor map; the central server is a single point of failure; it can also cause low scalability and traffic congestion; and it is hard to adapt to a change of service area in real time. This paper proposes a self-organizing and fully distributed platform for iLBSs. The proposed self-organizing distributed platform provides a dynamic reconfiguration of locality accuracy and service coverage by expanding and contracting dynamically. In order to verify the suggested platform, scalability performance according to the number of inserted or deleted nodes composing the dynamic infrastructure was evaluated through a simulation similar to the real environment.

  17. Self-organizing distributed architecture supporting dynamic space expanding and reducing in indoor LBS environment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seol Young; Jo, Hyeong Gon; Kang, Soon Ju

    2015-01-01

    Indoor location-based services (iLBS) are extremely dynamic and changeable, and include numerous resources and mobile devices. In particular, the network infrastructure requires support for high scalability in the indoor environment, and various resource lookups are requested concurrently and frequently from several locations based on the dynamic network environment. A traditional map-based centralized approach for iLBSs has several disadvantages: it requires global knowledge to maintain a complete geographic indoor map; the central server is a single point of failure; it can also cause low scalability and traffic congestion; and it is hard to adapt to a change of service area in real time. This paper proposes a self-organizing and fully distributed platform for iLBSs. The proposed self-organizing distributed platform provides a dynamic reconfiguration of locality accuracy and service coverage by expanding and contracting dynamically. In order to verify the suggested platform, scalability performance according to the number of inserted or deleted nodes composing the dynamic infrastructure was evaluated through a simulation similar to the real environment. PMID:26016908

  18. Practical Implementation of Semi-Automated As-Built Bim Creation for Complex Indoor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.; Jung, J.; Heo, J.

    2015-05-01

    In recent days, for efficient management and operation of existing buildings, the importance of as-built BIM is emphasized in AEC/FM domain. However, fully automated as-built BIM creation is a tough issue since newly-constructed buildings are becoming more complex. To manage this problem, our research group has developed a semi-automated approach, focusing on productive 3D as-built BIM creation for complex indoor environments. In order to test its feasibility for a variety of complex indoor environments, we applied the developed approach to model the `Charlotte stairs' in Lotte World Mall, Korea. The approach includes 4 main phases: data acquisition, data pre-processing, geometric drawing, and as-built BIM creation. In the data acquisition phase, due to its complex structure, we moved the scanner location several times to obtain the entire point clouds of the test site. After which, data pre-processing phase entailing point-cloud registration, noise removal, and coordinate transformation was followed. The 3D geometric drawing was created using the RANSAC-based plane detection and boundary tracing methods. Finally, in order to create a semantically-rich BIM, the geometric drawing was imported into the commercial BIM software. The final as-built BIM confirmed that the feasibility of the proposed approach in the complex indoor environment.

  19. Determination of fluorotelomer alcohols in selected consumer products and preliminary investigation of their fate in the indoor environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established an ongoing effort to identify the major perfluorocarboxylic acid (PFCA) sources in nonoccupational indoor environments and characterize their transport and fate. This study determined the concentrations of perfluorote...

  20. Composition of heavy metals and airborne fibers in the indoor environment of a building during renovation.

    PubMed

    Latif, Mohd Talib; Baharudin, Nor Hafizah; Velayutham, Puvaneswary; Awang, Normah; Hamdan, Harimah; Mohamad, Ruqyyah; Mokhtar, Mazlin B

    2011-10-01

    The renovation of a building will certainly affect the quality of air in the vicinity of where associated activities were undertaken, this includes the quality of air inside the building. Indoor air pollutants such as particulate matter, heavy metals, and fine fibers are likely to be emitted during renovation work. This study was conducted to determine the concentration of heavy metals, asbestos and suspended particulates in the Biology Building, at the Universiti Kebangsaan, Malaysia (UKM). Renovation activities were carried out widely in the laboratories which were located in this building. A low-volume sampler was used to collect suspended particulate matter of a diameter size less than 10 μm (PM₁₀) and an air sampling pump, fitted with a cellulose ester membrane filter, were used for asbestos sampling. Dust was collected using a small brush and scope. The concentration of heavy metals was determined through the use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy and the fibers were counted through a phase contrast microscope. The concentrations of PM₁₀ recorded in the building during renovation action (ranging from 166 to 542 μg m⁻³) were higher than the value set by the Department of Safety and Health for respirable dust (150 μg m⁻³). Additionally, they were higher than the value of PM₁₀ recorded in indoor environments from other studies. The composition of heavy metals in PM₁₀ and indoor dust were found to be dominated by Zn and results also showed that the concentration of heavy metals in indoor dust and PM₁₀ in this study was higher than levels recorded in other similar studies. The asbestos concentration was 0.0038 ± 0.0011 fibers/cc. This was lower than the value set by the Malaysian Department of Occupational, Safety and Health (DOSH) regulations of 0.1 fibers/cc, but higher than the background value usually recorded in indoor environments. This study strongly suggests that renovation issues need to be considered seriously

  1. Environmental tobacco smoke particles in multizone indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. L.; Nazaroff, W. W.

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is a major source of human exposure to airborne particles. To better understand the factors that affect exposure, and to investigate the potential effectiveness of technical control measures, a series of experiments was conducted in a two-room test facility. Particle concentrations, size distributions, and airflow rates were measured during and after combustion of a cigarette. Experiments were varied to obtain information about the effects on exposure of smoker segregation, ventilation modification, and air filtration. The experimental data were used to test the performance of an analytical model of the two-zone environment and a numerical multizone aerosol dynamics model. A respiratory tract particle deposition model was also applied to the results to estimate the mass of ETS particles that would be deposited in the lungs of a nonsmoker exposed in either the smoking or nonsmoking room. Comparisons between the experimental data and model predictions showed good agreement. For time-averaged particle mass concentration, the average bias between model and experiments was less than 10%. The average absolute error was typically 35%, probably because of variability in particle emission rates from cigarettes. For the conditions tested, the use of a portable air filtration unit yielded 65-90% reductions in predicted lung deposition relative to the baseline scenario. The use of exhaust ventilation in the smoking room reduced predicted lung deposition in the nonsmoking room by more than 80%, as did segregating the smoker from nonsmokers with a closed door.

  2. Flow-based ammonia gas analyzer with an open channel scrubber for indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Heima, Minako; Yamasaki, Takayuki; Tanaka, Toshinori; Koga, Tomoko; Toda, Kei

    2013-11-15

    A robust and fully automated indoor ammonia gas monitoring system with an open channel scrubber (OCS) was developed. The sample gas channel dimensions, hydrophilic surface treatment to produce a thin absorbing solution layer, and solution flow rate of the OCS were optimized to connect the OCS as in-line gas collector and avoid sample humidity effects. The OCS effluent containing absorbed ammonia in sample gas was injected into a derivatization solution flow. Derivatization was achieved with o-phthalaldehyde and sulfite in pH 11 buffer solution. The product, 1-sulfonateisoindole, is detected with a home-made fluorescence detector. The limit of detection of the analyzer based on three times the standard deviation of baseline noise was 0.9 ppbv. Sample gas could be analyzed 40 times per hour. Furthermore, relative humidity of up to 90% did not interfere considerably with the analyzer. Interference from amines was not observed. The developed gas analysis system was calibrated using a solution-based method. The system was used to analyze ammonia in an indoor environment along with an off-site method, traditional impinger gas collection followed by ion chromatographic analysis, for comparison. The results obtained using both methods agreed well. Therefore, the developed system can perform on-site monitoring of ammonia in indoor environments with improved time resolution compared with that of other methods.

  3. Review of bioaerosols in indoor environment with special reference to sampling, analysis and control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Bipasha; Lal, Himanshu; Srivastava, Arun

    2015-12-01

    Several tiny organisms of various size ranges present in air are called airborne particles or bioaerosol which mainly includes live or dead fungi and bacteria, their secondary metabolites, viruses, pollens, etc. which have been related to health issues of human beings and other life stocks. Bio-terror attacks in 2001 as well as pandemic outbreak of flue due to influenza A H1N1 virus in 2009 have alarmed us about the importance of bioaerosol research. Hence characterization i.e. identification and quantification of different airborne microorganisms in various indoor environments is necessary to identify the associated risks and to establish exposure threshold. Along with the bioaerosol sampling and their analytical techniques, various literatures revealing the concentration levels of bioaerosol have been mentioned in this review thereby contributing to the knowledge of identification and quantification of bioaerosols and their different constituents in various indoor environments (both occupational and non-occupational sections). Apart from recognition of bioaerosol, developments of their control mechanisms also play an important role. Hence several control methods have also been briefly reviewed. However, several individual levels of efforts such as periodic cleaning operations, maintenance activities and proper ventilation system also serve in their best way to improve indoor air quality. PMID:26436919

  4. Metagenomic Insights into the Bioaerosols in the Indoor and Outdoor Environments of Childcare Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Su-Kyoung; Kim, Jinman; Ha, Sung-min; Oh, Hyun-Seok; Chun, Jongsik; Sohn, Jongryeul; Yi, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Airborne microorganisms have significant effects on human health, and children are more vulnerable to pathogens and allergens than adults. However, little is known about the microbial communities in the air of childcare facilities. Here, we analyzed the bacterial and fungal communities in 50 air samples collected from five daycare centers and five elementary schools located in Seoul, Korea using culture-independent high-throughput pyrosequencing. The microbial communities contained a wide variety of taxa not previously identified in child daycare centers and schools. Moreover, the dominant species differed from those reported in previous studies using culture-dependent methods. The well-known fungi detected in previous culture-based studies (Alternaria, Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Cladosporium) represented less than 12% of the total sequence reads. The composition of the fungal and bacterial communities in the indoor air differed greatly with regard to the source of the microorganisms. The bacterial community in the indoor air appeared to contain diverse bacteria associated with both humans and the outside environment. In contrast, the fungal community was largely derived from the surrounding outdoor environment and not from human activity. The profile of the microorganisms in bioaerosols identified in this study provides the fundamental knowledge needed to develop public health policies regarding the monitoring and management of indoor air quality. PMID:26020512

  5. SIMO channel performance evaluation on indoor environment at 2.4 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votis, Constantinos I.; Christofilakis, Vasilis; Kostarakis, Panos

    2016-04-01

    This work presents an experimental study of single-input multiple-output (SIMO) channel performance in the indoor radio propagation environment. Indoor channel measurements at the 2.4-GHz ISM frequency band have been conducted using a versatile channel sounder test-bed platform. A single transmitting antenna, four receiving antennas with two proposed geometries and a four-branch receiver circuitry were used in order to achieve channel sounder measurements exploiting baseband signal-processing techniques. In-depth investigation of SIMO wireless channel performance was realised through three types of metrics: signal strength, gain coefficient and capacity. Performance results indicate SIMO channel capacity enhancement and illustrate differences between the two proposed geometries.

  6. Evaluation of Dicarbonyls Generated in a Simulated Indoor Air Environment Using an In Vitro Exposure System

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stacey E.; Jackson, Laurel G.; Franko, Jennifer; Wells, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, there has been increasing awareness regarding the potential impact of indoor air pollution on health. Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or oxygenated organic compounds formed from indoor chemistry has been suggested to contribute to adverse health effects. These studies use an in vitro monitoring system called VitroCell, to assess chemicals found in the indoor air environment. The structurally similar dicarbonyls diacetyl, 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA), glyoxal, glutaraldehyde, and methyl glyoxal were selected for use in this system. The VitroCell module was used to determine whether these dicarbonyls were capable of inducing inflammatory cytokine expression by exposed pulmonary epithelial cells (A549). Increases in the relative fold change in messenger RNA expression of the inflammatory mediators, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were identified following exposure to diacetyl, 4-OPA, glyoxal, glutaraldehyde, and methyl glyoxal when compared to a clean air control. Consistent results were observed when the protein levels of these cytokines were analyzed. Exposure to 4-OPA significantly elevated IL-8, IL-6, GM-CSF, and TNF-α while glutaraldehyde caused significant elevations in IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α. IL-6 and IL-8 were also significantly elevated after exposure to diacetyl, glyoxal, and methyl glyoxal. These studies suggest that exposure to structurally similar oxygenated reaction products may be contributing to some of the health effects associated with indoor environments and may provide an in vitro method for identification and characterization of these potential hazards. PMID:20200221

  7. Healthy environment--indoor air quality of Brazilian elementary schools nearby petrochemical industry.

    PubMed

    Godoi, Ricardo H M; Godoi, Ana F L; Gonçalves Junior, Sérgio J; Paralovo, Sarah L; Borillo, Guilherme C; Gonçalves Gregório Barbosa, Cybelli; Arantes, Manoela G; Charello, Renata C; Rosário Filho, Nelson A; Grassi, Marco T; Yamamoto, Carlos I; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja; Rotondo, Giuliana G; De Wael, Karolien; van Grieken, Rene

    2013-10-01

    The mitigation of pollution released to the environment originating from the industrial sector has been the aim of all policy-makers and its importance is evident if the adverse health effects on the world population are considered. Although this concern is controversial, petroleum refinery has been linked to some adverse health effects for people living nearby. Apart from home, school is the most important indoor environment for children and there is increasing concern about the school environment and its impact on health, also in developing countries where the prevalence of pollution is higher. As most of the children spend more than 40% of their time in schools, it is critical to evaluate the pollution level in such environment. In the metropolitan region of Curitiba, South Brazil, five schools nearby industries and highways with high density traffic, were selected to characterize the aerosol and gaseous compounds indoor and outdoor of the classrooms, during 2009-2011. Size segregated aerosol samples were collected for analyses of bulk and single particle elemental profiles. They were analyzed by electron probe X-ray micro-analysis (EPXMA), and by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), to investigate the elemental composition of individual particles and bulk samples. The concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX); NO2; SO2; acetic acid; and formic acid were assessed indoor and outdoor using passive diffusion tubes. BTEX were analyzed by GC-MS and other collected gasses by ion chromatography. Individual exposition of BTEX was assessed by personal passive diffusion tubes. Results are interpreted separately and as a whole with the specific aim of identifying compounds that could affect the health of the scholars. In view of the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, local deposition efficiencies in the children's respiratory systems were calculated, revealing the deposition of particles at extrathoracic

  8. Healthy environment--indoor air quality of Brazilian elementary schools nearby petrochemical industry.

    PubMed

    Godoi, Ricardo H M; Godoi, Ana F L; Gonçalves Junior, Sérgio J; Paralovo, Sarah L; Borillo, Guilherme C; Gonçalves Gregório Barbosa, Cybelli; Arantes, Manoela G; Charello, Renata C; Rosário Filho, Nelson A; Grassi, Marco T; Yamamoto, Carlos I; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja; Rotondo, Giuliana G; De Wael, Karolien; van Grieken, Rene

    2013-10-01

    The mitigation of pollution released to the environment originating from the industrial sector has been the aim of all policy-makers and its importance is evident if the adverse health effects on the world population are considered. Although this concern is controversial, petroleum refinery has been linked to some adverse health effects for people living nearby. Apart from home, school is the most important indoor environment for children and there is increasing concern about the school environment and its impact on health, also in developing countries where the prevalence of pollution is higher. As most of the children spend more than 40% of their time in schools, it is critical to evaluate the pollution level in such environment. In the metropolitan region of Curitiba, South Brazil, five schools nearby industries and highways with high density traffic, were selected to characterize the aerosol and gaseous compounds indoor and outdoor of the classrooms, during 2009-2011. Size segregated aerosol samples were collected for analyses of bulk and single particle elemental profiles. They were analyzed by electron probe X-ray micro-analysis (EPXMA), and by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), to investigate the elemental composition of individual particles and bulk samples. The concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX); NO2; SO2; acetic acid; and formic acid were assessed indoor and outdoor using passive diffusion tubes. BTEX were analyzed by GC-MS and other collected gasses by ion chromatography. Individual exposition of BTEX was assessed by personal passive diffusion tubes. Results are interpreted separately and as a whole with the specific aim of identifying compounds that could affect the health of the scholars. In view of the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, local deposition efficiencies in the children's respiratory systems were calculated, revealing the deposition of particles at extrathoracic

  9. Colorimetric monitoring of formaldehyde in indoor environment using built-in camera on mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yoshika; Katori, Risa; Tsuda, Yuko; Kitahara, Takio

    2016-01-01

    A simple monitoring system of indoor air pollution is proposed by integrating a novel colorimetric detector of formaldehyde (HCHO) and a function of a built-in camera on mobile phone. The colorimetric detector employs a solid phase colorimetric reagent made from 4-amino-3-hydrazino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole, ZnO, KIO4 and agar, and changes colour from white to purple by exposure to HCHO gas. The degree of colour changes expressed in Red, Green and Blue model model responded to the HCHO concentration levels both in air and from building materials. Limit of quantitation of the detector with 24 h-exposure resulted in 0.011 mg/m(3) of air concentration which meets a requirement of methodology to detect indoor air quality guideline level of HCHO set by World Health Organization. The detector is also applicable to classify HCHO-emitting materials at least into Type 1, whose emission flux is greater than 120 μg/m(2)/h, and others. Then, variation of the acquired photo images was investigated by using various mobile phones and changing conditions of photography. As a result, the calibration of the measured colour intensity with a colour standard reduced the variation of the results and gave a significant output when the auto-focused images were taken under the condition of common indoor environment. PMID:26616679

  10. Understanding vapour plume structure in indoor environments for the detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foat, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Dogs remain the most effective method for the detection of explosives in many situations yet the spatially, temporally and chemically varying signature that they sense cannot easily be quantified. Vapour plumes can be highly unsteady and intermittent and the problem is further complicated in indoor spaces where turbulent, transitional and laminar regions may exist and where there may be no dominant flow direction. Intermittent plumes can have peak concentrations that are considerably higher than the time averaged values. As dogs can sample the air at 5 Hz it is possible that these unsteady fluctuations play a key part in their detection process. A low Reynolds number (Re less than 5000 at the inlet) benchmark test case for indoor airflow has been studied using large-eddy simulation computational fluid dynamics. Fixed concentration vapour sources have been included on the floor of the room and the resulting vapour dispersion has been modelled. Sources with different surface areas have been included and their instantaneous and mean concentration profiles compared. The results from this study will provide insight into canine detection of vapour in indoor environments.

  11. Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in air from various indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Anneli; Andersson, Barbro; Haglund, Peter

    2005-08-01

    Eleven organophosphorus compounds (OPs) that are used as plasticizers and flame retardants were analysed in duplicate samples of indoor air from 17 domestic and occupational environments. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns were used as adsorbents and analysis was performed using GC with a nitrogen phosphorus selective detector. The total amounts of OPs in the air samples ranged between 36 and 950 ng m(-3); tris(chloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) being the most abundant (0.4 to 730 ng m(-3)), followed by tributyl phosphate (0.5-120 ng m(-3)). Public buildings tended to have about 3-4 times higher levels of OPs than domestic buildings. The relative amounts of individual OPs varied between the sites and generally reflected the building materials, furniture and consumer products used in the sampled environments. Potential sources of these compounds include, inter alia, acoustic ceilings, upholstered furniture, wall coverings, floor polish and polyvinylchloride floor coverings. A correlation was observed between the TCEP concentrations in the air in the sampled environments and previously reported concentrations in dust, but no such correlation was seen for the heavier and less volatile tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP). Based on estimated amounts of indoor air inhaled and dust ingested, adults and children in the sampled environments would be exposed to up to 5.8 microg kg(-1) day(-1) and 57 microg kg(-1) day(-1) total OPs, respectively. PMID:16049584

  12. Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers in air from various indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Anneli; Andersson, Barbro; Haglund, Peter

    2005-08-01

    Eleven organophosphorus compounds (OPs) that are used as plasticizers and flame retardants were analysed in duplicate samples of indoor air from 17 domestic and occupational environments. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns were used as adsorbents and analysis was performed using GC with a nitrogen phosphorus selective detector. The total amounts of OPs in the air samples ranged between 36 and 950 ng m(-3); tris(chloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) being the most abundant (0.4 to 730 ng m(-3)), followed by tributyl phosphate (0.5-120 ng m(-3)). Public buildings tended to have about 3-4 times higher levels of OPs than domestic buildings. The relative amounts of individual OPs varied between the sites and generally reflected the building materials, furniture and consumer products used in the sampled environments. Potential sources of these compounds include, inter alia, acoustic ceilings, upholstered furniture, wall coverings, floor polish and polyvinylchloride floor coverings. A correlation was observed between the TCEP concentrations in the air in the sampled environments and previously reported concentrations in dust, but no such correlation was seen for the heavier and less volatile tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBEP). Based on estimated amounts of indoor air inhaled and dust ingested, adults and children in the sampled environments would be exposed to up to 5.8 microg kg(-1) day(-1) and 57 microg kg(-1) day(-1) total OPs, respectively.

  13. Location Based Service in Indoor Environment Using Quick Response Code Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakimpour, F.; Zare Zardiny, A.

    2014-10-01

    Today by extensive use of intelligent mobile phones, increased size of screens and enriching the mobile phones by Global Positioning System (GPS) technology use of location based services have been considered by public users more than ever.. Based on the position of users, they can receive the desired information from different LBS providers. Any LBS system generally includes five main parts: mobile devices, communication network, positioning system, service provider and data provider. By now many advances have been gained in relation to any of these parts; however the users positioning especially in indoor environments is propounded as an essential and critical issue in LBS. It is well known that GPS performs too poorly inside buildings to provide usable indoor positioning. On the other hand, current indoor positioning technologies such as using RFID or WiFi network need different hardware and software infrastructures. In this paper, we propose a new method to overcome these challenges. This method is using the Quick Response (QR) Code Technology. QR Code is a 2D encrypted barcode with a matrix structure which consists of black modules arranged in a square grid. Scanning and data retrieving process from QR Code is possible by use of different camera-enabled mobile phones only by installing the barcode reader software. This paper reviews the capabilities of QR Code technology and then discusses the advantages of using QR Code in Indoor LBS (ILBS) system in comparison to other technologies. Finally, some prospects of using QR Code are illustrated through implementation of a scenario. The most important advantages of using this new technology in ILBS are easy implementation, spending less expenses, quick data retrieval, possibility of printing the QR Code on different products and no need for complicated hardware and software infrastructures.

  14. Three-Dimensional Statistical Gas Distribution Mapping in an Uncontrolled Indoor Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Reggente, Matteo; Lilienthal, Achim J.

    2009-05-23

    In this paper we present a statistical method to build three-dimensional gas distribution maps (3D-DM). The proposed mapping technique uses kernel extrapolation with a tri-variate Gaussian kernel that models the likelihood that a reading represents the concentration distribution at a distant location in the three dimensions. The method is evaluated using a mobile robot equipped with three 'e-noses' mounted at different heights. Initial experiments in an uncontrolled indoor environment are presented and evaluated with respect to the ability of the 3D map, computed from the lower and upper nose, to predict the map from the middle nose.

  15. Toxic-metabolite-producing bacteria and fungus in an indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Peltola, J; Andersson, M A; Haahtela, T; Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H; Rainey, F A; Kroppenstedt, R M; Samson, R A; Salkinoja-Salonen, M S

    2001-07-01

    Toxic-metabolite-emitting microbes were isolated from the indoor environment of a building where the occupant was suffering serious building-related ill-health symptoms. Toxic substances soluble in methanol and inhibitory to spermatozoa at <10 microg (dry weight) ml(-1) were found from six bacterial isolates and one fungus. The substances from isolates of Bacillus simplex and from isolates belonging to the actinobacterial genera Streptomyces and Nocardiopsis were mitochondriotoxic. These substances dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi) of boar spermatozoa. The substances from the Streptomyces isolates also swelled the mitochondria. The substances from isolates of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai and Bacillus pumilus damaged the cell membrane barrier function of sperm cells.

  16. Breathing thermal manikins for indoor environment assessment: important characteristics and requirements.

    PubMed

    Melikov, Arsen

    2004-09-01

    Recently, breathing thermal manikins have been developed and used for indoor environment measurement, evaluation and optimization as well as validation of the computational fluid dynamic predictions of airflow around a human body. Advances in the assessment of occupants' thermal comfort and perceived air quality by means of breathing thermal manikins have also been made. In order to perform accurate measurements and realistic evaluation and assessment, the design and characteristics of a manikin must comply with certain requirements. The most important of these, such as the number, size and shape of body segments, control mode, breathing simulation etc., are discussed and specified in this paper.

  17. Robust 3D Position Estimation in Wide and Unconstrained Indoor Environments.

    PubMed

    Mossel, Annette

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a system for 3D position estimation in wide, unconstrained indoor environments is presented that employs infrared optical outside-in tracking of rigid-body targets with a stereo camera rig. To overcome limitations of state-of-the-art optical tracking systems, a pipeline for robust target identification and 3D point reconstruction has been investigated that enables camera calibration and tracking in environments with poor illumination, static and moving ambient light sources, occlusions and harsh conditions, such as fog. For evaluation, the system has been successfully applied in three different wide and unconstrained indoor environments, (1) user tracking for virtual and augmented reality applications, (2) handheld target tracking for tunneling and (3) machine guidance for mining. The results of each use case are discussed to embed the presented approach into a larger technological and application context. The experimental results demonstrate the system's capabilities to track targets up to 100 m. Comparing the proposed approach to prior art in optical tracking in terms of range coverage and accuracy, it significantly extends the available tracking range, while only requiring two cameras and providing a relative 3D point accuracy with sub-centimeter deviation up to 30 m and low-centimeter deviation up to 100 m. PMID:26694388

  18. Robust 3D Position Estimation in Wide and Unconstrained Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Mossel, Annette

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a system for 3D position estimation in wide, unconstrained indoor environments is presented that employs infrared optical outside-in tracking of rigid-body targets with a stereo camera rig. To overcome limitations of state-of-the-art optical tracking systems, a pipeline for robust target identification and 3D point reconstruction has been investigated that enables camera calibration and tracking in environments with poor illumination, static and moving ambient light sources, occlusions and harsh conditions, such as fog. For evaluation, the system has been successfully applied in three different wide and unconstrained indoor environments, (1) user tracking for virtual and augmented reality applications, (2) handheld target tracking for tunneling and (3) machine guidance for mining. The results of each use case are discussed to embed the presented approach into a larger technological and application context. The experimental results demonstrate the system’s capabilities to track targets up to 100 m. Comparing the proposed approach to prior art in optical tracking in terms of range coverage and accuracy, it significantly extends the available tracking range, while only requiring two cameras and providing a relative 3D point accuracy with sub-centimeter deviation up to 30 m and low-centimeter deviation up to 100 m. PMID:26694388

  19. A coupled sensor-spectrophotometric device for continuous measurement of formaldehyde in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Carter, Ellison M; Jackson, Mark C; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E

    2014-01-01

    Despite long-standing awareness of adverse health effects associated with chronic human exposure to formaldehyde, this hazardous air pollutant remains a challenge to measure in indoor environments. Traditional analytical techniques evaluate formaldehyde concentrations over several hours to several days in a single location in a residence, making it difficult to characterize daily temporal and spatial variation in human exposure to formaldehyde. There is a need for portable, easy-to-use devices that are specific and sensitive to gas-phase formaldehyde over short sampling periods so that dynamic processes governing formaldehyde fate, transport, and potential remediation in indoor environments may be studied more effectively. A recently developed device couples a chemical sensor element with spectrophotometric analysis for detection and quantification of part per billion (ppbv) gas-phase formaldehyde concentrations. This study established the ability of the coupled sensor-spectrophotometric device (CSSD) to report formaldehyde concentrations accurately and continuously on a 30-min sampling cycle at low ppbv concentrations previously untested for this device in a laboratory setting. Determination of the method detection limit (MDL), based on 40 samples each at test concentrations of 5 and 10 ppbv, was found to be 1.9 and 2.0 ppbv, respectively. Performance of the CSSD was compared with the dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization method for formaldehyde concentrations ranging from 5-50 ppbv, and a linear relationship with a coefficient of determination of 0.983 was found between these two analytical techniques. The CSSD was also used to monitor indoor formaldehyde concentrations in two manufactured homes. During this time, formaldehyde concentrations varied from below detection limit to 65 ppbv and were above the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommended exposure limit (REL) of 16 ppbv, which is also the exposure limit

  20. Assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor and outdoor air of preschool environments (3-5 years old children).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta; Slezakova, Klara; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Pereira, Maria do Carmo; Morais, Simone

    2016-01-01

    This work characterizes levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in indoor and outdoor air of preschool environments, and assesses the respective risks for 3-5-years old children. Eighteen gaseous and particulate (PM1 and PM2.5) PAHs were collected indoors and outdoors during 63 days at preschools in Portugal. Gaseous PAHs accounted for 94-98% of total concentration (ΣPAHs). PAHs with 5-6 rings were predominantly found in PM1 (54-74% particulate ΣPAHs). Lighter PAHs originated mainly from indoor sources whereas congeners with 4-6 rings resulted mostly from outdoor emissions penetration (motor vehicle, fuel burning). Total cancer risks of children were negligible according to USEPA, but exceeded (8-13 times) WHO health-based guideline. Carcinogenic risks due to indoor exposure were higher than for outdoors (4-18 times).

  1. The lasting effect of limonene-induced particle formation on air quality in a genuine indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Carolin; Wissenbach, Dirk K; von Bergen, Martin; Franck, Ulrich; Wendisch, Manfred; Schlink, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric ozone-terpene reactions, which form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, can affect indoor air quality when outdoor air mixes with indoor air during ventilation. This study, conducted in Leipzig, Germany, focused on limonene-induced particle formation in a genuine indoor environment (24 m(3)). Particle number, limonene and ozone concentrations were monitored during the whole experimental period. After manual ventilation for 30 min, during which indoor ozone levels reached up to 22.7 ppb, limonene was introduced into the room at concentrations of approximately 180 to 250 μg m(-3). We observed strong particle formation and growth within a diameter range of 9 to 50 nm under real-room conditions. Larger particles with diameters above 100 nm were less affected by limonene introduction. The total particle number concentrations (TPNCs) after limonene introduction clearly exceed outdoor values by a factor of 4.5 to 41 reaching maximum concentrations of up to 267,000 particles cm(-3). The formation strength was influenced by background particles, which attenuated the formation of new SOA with increasing concentration, and by ozone levels, an increase of which by 10 ppb will result in a six times higher TPNC. This study emphasizes indoor environments to be preferred locations for particle formation and growth after ventilation events. As a consequence, SOA formation can produce significantly higher amounts of particles than transported by ventilation into the indoor air.

  2. Indoor environment and cancer: materials specifications in building construction and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Adebamowo, E

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to environmental health hazards is a continuing threat to human health, particularly in developing countries. Though reduction of environmental health hazards is one of the eight aims of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDG), this aim has not received the same level of support and attention as the others. Yet it is difficult to envisage how the MDG can be attained without it. It is imperative that every nation, especially developing ones pay more attention to environmental determinants of health and disease in order to improve the quality and quantity of life of their citizens.In this paper, I review some of the building materials specified by architects and other building professionals for the indoor environment (buildings) and their impact on diseases risk, in particular, the risk of cancer. I also discuss the role of building professionals in reducing risk of cancer from exposure to unhealthy indoor environments. Some of these building materials include asbestos roofing materials, lead water pipes, chemicals in paints and granite stones. It is the duty and responsibility of building professionals to become more aware of the health implications of the materials they specify for clients and ensure that these are materials that will not contribute to an increase in the risk of cancer and other chronic diseases.

  3. Comparative study of millimeter wave propagation at 30 GHz and 60 GHz in indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polydorou, A.; Stratakos, G.; Capsalis, C.; Uzunoglu, N.

    1995-10-01

    The millimeter wave band appears to be a favourable choice for personal wireless communication systems for indoor environment, as it meets the requirements for sufficient bandwidth, small terminal dimensions and sporadic usage for commercial applications. In this paper measurements of millimeter wave propagation in both 30 GHz and 60 GHz bands, are presented in a comparative way. The topology of measurements covers both a line-of-sight situation and also a case where a direct path between transmitter and receiver does not exist. Although the second case does not seem obvious for outdoor applications in these frequencies, in indoor environment the multipath signals produced by objects like walls, doors, furniture etc., can be utilised in order to overcome the man-made shadowing. Both slow and fast fading characteristics of the received signal are studied and the measurements are modelled by the conventional Rician and Rayleigh distributions. Both frequency bands offer advantages for usage in in-house wireless communication systems. Although in 30 GHz band the coverage area is bigger than in 60 GHz (with the same transmitting power), frequency reuse is easier in 60 GHz band. because even if millimeter waves ‘escape’ through ‘windows’, the specific attenuation due to atmospheric oxygen (15 dB/km) at 60 GHz eliminates the interference between communication channels in neighbouring buildings.

  4. Toward a Computer Vision-based Wayfinding Aid for Blind Persons to Access Unfamiliar Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Tian, YingLi; Yang, Xiaodong; Yi, Chucai; Arditi, Aries

    2012-01-01

    Independent travel is a well known challenge for blind and visually impaired persons. In this paper, we propose a proof-of-concept computer vision-based wayfinding aid for blind people to independently access unfamiliar indoor environments. In order to find different rooms (e.g. an office, a lab, or a bathroom) and other building amenities (e.g. an exit or an elevator), we incorporate object detection with text recognition. First we develop a robust and efficient algorithm to detect doors, elevators, and cabinets based on their general geometric shape, by combining edges and corners. The algorithm is general enough to handle large intra-class variations of objects with different appearances among different indoor environments, as well as small inter-class differences between different objects such as doors and door-like cabinets. Next, in order to distinguish intra-class objects (e.g. an office door from a bathroom door), we extract and recognize text information associated with the detected objects. For text recognition, we first extract text regions from signs with multiple colors and possibly complex backgrounds, and then apply character localization and topological analysis to filter out background interference. The extracted text is recognized using off-the-shelf optical character recognition (OCR) software products. The object type, orientation, location, and text information are presented to the blind traveler as speech. PMID:23630409

  5. Bioaccessibility of metals in dust from the indoor environment: application of a physiologically based extraction test.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Ip, Ka-Hei

    2007-11-15

    A physiologically based extraction test, simulating sequential digestion in the stomach and intestine, has been applied to dust samples collected from various domestic and working settings to define bioaccessible concentrations of metals (Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, U, Zn) in the indoor environment. With the exception of Ca, Cd, and Zn in the stomach phase, mean bioaccessibilities (relative to respective total metal concentrations) were less than 50%. For a given metal, bioaccessibility in either phase was variable among samples but, in many cases, displayed an inverse dependence on total concentration. This suggests that, to a good approximation, variations in both metal contamination and accessibility in the indoor environment arise from variable proportions of metal-rich particulates of low digestibility. Compared with accessibility in the stomach, accessibility in the more alkaline, carbonate-rich intestine was either lower (Al, Ca, Cd, Mn, Ni, Sn, Pb, Zn), similar (Co, Cu, Fe) or greater (Cr, U). We attribute these observations to precipitation and/or readsorption in the intestine, stabilization by complexation, or anion-like adsorption of negatively charged, polyatomic species, respectively.

  6. Removal of fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments by the unipolar ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uk Lee, Byung; Yermakov, Mikhail; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2004-09-01

    The continuous emission of unipolar ions was evaluated in order to determine its ability to remove fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments. The evolution of the indoor aerosol concentration and particle size distribution was measured in real time with the ELPI in a room-size (24.3 m3) test chamber where the ion emitter was operating. After the results were compared with the natural decay, the air cleaning factor was determined. The particle aerodynamic size range of ∼0.04-2 μm was targeted because it represents many bioaerosol agents that cause emerging diseases, as well as those that can be used for biological warfare or in the event of bioterrorism. The particle electric charge distribution (also measured in the test chamber with the ELPI) was rapidly affected by the ion emission. It was concluded that the corona discharge ion emitters (either positive or negative), which are capable of creating an ion density of 105-106 e± cm-3, can be efficient in controlling fine and ultrafine aerosol pollutants in indoor air environments, such as a typical office or residential room. At a high ion emission rate, the particle mobility becomes sufficient so that the particle migration results in their deposition on the walls and other indoor surfaces. Within the tested ranges of the particle size and ion density, the particles were charged primarily due to the diffusion charging mechanism. The particle removal efficiency was not significantly affected by the particle size, while it increased with increasing ion emission rate and the time of emission. The performance characteristics of three commercially available ionic air purifiers, which produce unipolar ions by corona discharge at relatively high emission rates, were evaluated. A 30-minute operation of the most powerful device among those tested resulted in the removal of about 97% of 0.1 μm particles and about 95% of 1 μm particles from the air in addition to the natural decay effect.

  7. Negotiating Safety and Sexual Risk Reduction With Clients in Unsanctioned Safer Indoor Sex Work Environments: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Krüsi, Andrea; Chettiar, Jill; Ridgway, Amelia; Abbott, Janice; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined how unique, low-barrier, supportive housing programs for women who are functioning as unsanctioned indoor sex work environments in a Canadian urban setting influence risk negotiation with clients in sex work transactions. Methods. We conducted 39 semistructured qualitative interviews and 6 focus groups with women who live in low-barrier, supportive housing for marginalized sex workers with substance use issues. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Results. Women’s accounts indicated that unsanctioned indoor sex work environments promoted increased control over negotiating sex work transactions, including the capacity to refuse unwanted services, negotiate condom use, and avoid violent perpetrators. Despite the lack of formal legal and policy support for indoor sex work venues in Canada, the environmental-structural supports afforded by these unsanctioned indoor sex work environments, including surveillance cameras and support from staff or police in removing violent clients, were linked to improved police relationships and facilitated the institution of informal peer-safety mechanisms. Conclusions. This study has drawn attention to the potential role of safer indoor sex work environments as venues for public health and violence prevention interventions and has indicated the critical importance of removing the sociolegal barriers preventing the formal implementation of such programs. PMID:22571708

  8. Emission of air pollutants from burning candles with different composition in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Derudi, Marco; Gelosa, Simone; Sliepcevich, Andrea; Cattaneo, Andrea; Cavallo, Domenico; Rota, Renato; Nano, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Candle composition is expected to influence the air pollutants emissions, possibly leading to important differences in the emissions of volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In this regard, the purity of the raw materials and additives used can play a key role. Consequently, in this work emission factors for some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic species, short-chain aldehydes and particulate matter have been determined for container candles constituted by different paraffin waxes burning in a test chamber. It has been found that wax quality strongly influences the air pollutant emissions. These results could be used, at least at a first glance, to foresee the expected pollutant concentration in a given indoor environment with respect to health safety standards, while the test chamber used for performing the reported results could be useful to estimate the emission factors of any other candle in an easy-to-build standardised environment. PMID:24318837

  9. Infrared marker-based tracking in an indoor unknown environment for augmented reality applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yetao; Weng, Dongdong; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2009-11-01

    Marker based tracking requires complicated preparation work that impedes its use in augmented reality applications. This paper presents a novel tracking scheme to be used in an indoor unknown scene by adapting simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) algorithms. An infrared (IR) marker system is specifically designed to simplify the feature recognition and tracking in SLAM process. With one initial IR marker, the other markers can be projected randomly onto a large-area environment. The pose of camera can be estimated with a monocular IR camera in real time. Experimental result demonstrates that the proposed system meets the requirements of accuracy for large-area tracking. A prototype system is built to show its feasibility in unknown environment and potential use in applications.

  10. Plastics additives in the indoor environment--flame retardants and plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Wensing, M; Uhde, E; Salthammer, T

    2005-03-01

    Phthalic acid esters and phosphororganic compounds (POC) are generally known as semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and are frequently utilized as plasticizers and flame retardants in commercial products. In the indoor environment, both compound groups are released from a number of sources under normal living conditions and accumulate in air and dust. Therefore, inhalation of air and ingestion of house dust have to be considered as important pathways for the assessment of exposure in living habitats. Especially in the case of very young children, the oral and dermal uptake from house dust might be of relevance for risk assessment. A critical evaluation of indoor exposure to phthalates and POC requires the determination of the target compounds in indoor air and house dust as well as emission studies. The latter are usually carried out under controlled conditions in emission test chambers or cells. Furthermore, chamber testing enables the determination of condensable compounds by fogging sampling. In the case of automobiles, specific scenarios have been developed to study material emissions on a test stand or to evaluate the exposure of users while the vehicle is driving. In this review, results from several studies are summarized and compared for seven phthalic esters and eight POC. The available data for room air and dust differ widely depending on investigated compound and compartment. Room air studies mostly include only a limited number of measurements, which makes a statistical evaluation difficult. The situation is much better for house dust measurements. However, the composition of house dust is very inhomogeneous and the result is strongly dependent on the particle size distribution used for analysis. Results of emission studies are presented for building products, electronic equipment, and automobiles. Daily rates for inhalation and dust ingestion of phthalic esters and POC were calculated from 95-percentiles or maximum values. A comparison of the data

  11. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F, A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H.

    2014-11-11

    It is well known that radon daughters up to {sup 214}Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  12. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F., A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H.

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that radon daughters up to 214Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  13. Improving the Health of Workers in Indoor Environments: Priority Research Needs for a National Occupational Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Mendell, Mark J.; Fisk, William J.; Kreiss, Kathleen; Levin, Hal; Alexander, Darryl; Cain, William S.; Girman, John R.; Hines, Cynthia J.; Jensen, Paul A.; Milton, Donald K.; Rexroat, Larry P.; Wallingford, Kenneth M.

    2002-01-01

    Indoor nonindustrial work environments were designated a priority research area through the nationwide stakeholder process that created the National Occupational Research Agenda. A multidisciplinary research team used member consensus and quantitative estimates, with extensive external review, to develop a specific research agenda. The team outlined the following priority research topics: building-influenced communicable respiratory infections, building-related asthma/allergic diseases, and nonspecific building-related symptoms; indoor environmental science; and methods for increasing implementation of healthful building practices. Available data suggest that improving building environments may result in health benefits for more than 15 million of the 89 million US indoor workers, with estimated economic benefits of $5 to $75 billion annually. Research on these topics, requiring new collaborations and resources, offers enormous potential health and economic returns. PMID:12197969

  14. Improving the health of workers in indoor environments: priority research needs for a national occupational research agenda.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Mark J; Fisk, William J; Kreiss, Kathleen; Levin, Hal; Alexander, Darryl; Cain, William S; Girman, John R; Hines, Cynthia J; Jensen, Paul A; Milton, Donald K; Rexroat, Larry P; Wallingford, Kenneth M

    2002-09-01

    Indoor nonindustrial work environments were designated a priority research area through the nationwide stakeholder process that created the National Occupational Research Agenda. A multidisciplinary research team used member consensus and quantitative estimates, with extensive external review, to develop a specific research agenda. The team outlined the following priority research topics: building-influenced communicable respiratory infections, building-related asthma/allergic diseases, and nonspecific building-related symptoms; indoor environmental science; and methods for increasing implementation of healthful building practices. Available data suggest that improving building environments may result in health benefits for more than 15 million of the 89 million US indoor workers, with estimated economic benefits of $5 to $75 billion annually. Research on these topics, requiring new collaborations and resources, offers enormous potential health and economic returns.

  15. Fusion of Building Information and Range Imaging for Autonomous Location Estimation in Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kohoutek, Tobias K.; Mautz, Rainer; Wegner, Jan D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel approach for autonomous location estimation and navigation in indoor environments using range images and prior scene knowledge from a GIS database (CityGML). What makes this task challenging is the arbitrary relative spatial relation between GIS and Time-of-Flight (ToF) range camera further complicated by a markerless configuration. We propose to estimate the camera's pose solely based on matching of GIS objects and their detected location in image sequences. We develop a coarse-to-fine matching strategy that is able to match point clouds without any initial parameters. Experiments with a state-of-the-art ToF point cloud show that our proposed method delivers an absolute camera position with decimeter accuracy, which is sufficient for many real-world applications (e.g., collision avoidance). PMID:23435055

  16. Fusion of building information and range imaging for autonomous location estimation in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Kohoutek, Tobias K; Mautz, Rainer; Wegner, Jan D

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel approach for autonomous location estimation and navigation in indoor environments using range images and prior scene knowledge from a GIS database (CityGML). What makes this task challenging is the arbitrary relative spatial relation between GIS and Time-of-Flight (ToF) range camera further complicated by a markerless configuration. We propose to estimate the camera's pose solely based on matching of GIS objects and their detected location in image sequences. We develop a coarse-to-fine matching strategy that is able to match point clouds without any initial parameters. Experiments with a state-of-the-art ToF point cloud show that our proposed method delivers an absolute camera position with decimeter accuracy, which is sufficient for many real-world applications (e.g., collision avoidance).

  17. Fusion of building information and range imaging for autonomous location estimation in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Kohoutek, Tobias K; Mautz, Rainer; Wegner, Jan D

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel approach for autonomous location estimation and navigation in indoor environments using range images and prior scene knowledge from a GIS database (CityGML). What makes this task challenging is the arbitrary relative spatial relation between GIS and Time-of-Flight (ToF) range camera further complicated by a markerless configuration. We propose to estimate the camera's pose solely based on matching of GIS objects and their detected location in image sequences. We develop a coarse-to-fine matching strategy that is able to match point clouds without any initial parameters. Experiments with a state-of-the-art ToF point cloud show that our proposed method delivers an absolute camera position with decimeter accuracy, which is sufficient for many real-world applications (e.g., collision avoidance). PMID:23435055

  18. [Indoor pollution].

    PubMed

    Tarsitani, G

    1995-01-01

    The Author reports more important phases from the beginning of housing to now: the indoor pollution time. Shelter is a basic need; humans require protection against the elements, somewhere to store and prepare the food, and a secure place to raise offspring; but indoor environment is not always safe. It has been known since Hippocrates' time that housing conditions affect health. Today situation starts from the enormous growth of urbanization. At 1888 in Italy first legislation on health, including healthy building, has been issued. The prevention policies were based on local hygiene regulations. At present housing programmes of who stress the problem in consideration too of the great part of time that, in industrialized Countries, we all pass at home, in the indoor environment. Following the general introduction the Author relates on the features of indoor climate, that may be identical that out of doors, or may be modified by heating, cooling, humidification and ventilation. Larger commentaries are reported on indoor pollution and its increasing by modern technology producing several new hazards. Physical, chemical and biological indoor air pollutants, with their principal sources and health damages associated, are analyzed. In conclusion the author shows some data from a research on indoor pollution in the houses of Rome.

  19. Time-resolved measurements of aerosol elemental concentrations in indoor working environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žitnik, M.; Kastelic, A.; Rupnik, Z.; Pelicon, P.; Vaupetič, P.; Bučar, K.; Novak, S.; Samardžija, Z.; Matsuyama, S.; Catella, G.; Ishii, K.

    2010-12-01

    We have measured the elemental concentrations in aerosols with a 2-h time resolution in two different types of working environment: a chemistry laboratory dealing with the processing of advanced nanoparticulate materials and a medium-sized machine workshop. Non-stop 10-day and 12-day samplings were performed at each location in order to determine the concentration trends during the non-working/working and weekday/weekend periods. Supplementary measurements of PM10 aerosols with a 2-day sample collection time were performed with a standard Gent PM10 sampler to compare the elemental concentrations with the time-averaged concentrations detected by the 2D step-sampler. The concentrations were determined a posteriori by analyzing the x-ray spectra of aerosol samples emitted after 3-MeV proton bombardment. The PM10 samples collected in the chemistry laboratory were additionally inspected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the chemical compositions of the individual particles. In the workshop, a total PM10 mass sampling was performed simultaneously with a minute resolution to compare the signal with typical outdoor PM10 concentration levels. A factor analysis of the time-resolved dataset points to six and eight factors in the chemistry laboratory and the machine workshop, respectively. These factors describe most of the data variance, and their composition in terms of different elements can be related to specific indoor activities and conditions. We were able to demonstrate that the elemental concentration sampling with hourly resolution is an excellent tool for studying the indoor air pollution. While sampling the total PM10 mass concentration with a minute resolution may lack the potential to identify the emission sources in a "noisy" environment, the time averaging on a day time scale is too coarse to cope with the working dynamics, even if elemental sensitivity is an option.

  20. Preschool Teachers' Perceptions of Children's Rough-and-Tumble Play (R&T) in Indoor and Outdoor Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storli, Rune; Sandseter, Ellen Beate Hansen

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores teacher-reported prevalence of rough-and-tumble play (R&T) in preschool and investigates how their restriction to such play varies in different play environments (indoor and outdoor). An electronic questionnaire exploring preschool teachers' beliefs and practices regarding children's dramatic play themes was conducted by…

  1. Exploration of long-term care institution managers' perceptions of institutional indoor environment quality and ease of administration.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yen Ping; Lin, Chia Ching; Huang, Ying Chia

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the level of management's perception of the importance of indoor environment indicators at long-term care facilities as well as the differences between the level of perceived importance and the level of implementation. This study also analyzed the indicators for improving indoor environments. This study selected Taiwanese long-term care facility managers as its subjects to whom questionnaires were distributed by mail Descriptive statistics, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and an importance-performance analysis were used to conduct analyses on the data retrieved from the questionnaires. The results indicate that, of the indoor environment indicators of four facility spaces, bedrooms had the highest perceived level of importance. The lounge was the easiest space in which to implement the indicators. Differences were found between the perceived level of importance and the level of implementation for six of the indoor environment indicators of the four facility spaces. In these four spaces, the ventilation indicator was the most important, whereas implementing the temperature and humidity indicators was the most difficult. The highest priority for indicator improvement was given to the temperature in the bedrooms and bathrooms, whereas control over temperature, humidity, and sound had a low priority. The indicators seen as requiring continuous maintenance were lighting and ventilation. Facility managers had a high level of awareness and competence in implementing the ventilation indicator. However, although they were aware of the importance of the temperature, humidity, and sound indicators, their implementation was difficult, suggesting that they needed to be improved.

  2. A Movement-Assisted Deployment of Collaborating Autonomous Sensors for Indoor and Outdoor Environment Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Niewiadomska-Szynkiewicz, Ewa; Sikora, Andrzej; Marks, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Using mobile robots or unmanned vehicles to assist optimal wireless sensors deployment in a working space can significantly enhance the capability to investigate unknown environments. This paper addresses the issues of the application of numerical optimization and computer simulation techniques to on-line calculation of a wireless sensor network topology for monitoring and tracking purposes. We focus on the design of a self-organizing and collaborative mobile network that enables a continuous data transmission to the data sink (base station) and automatically adapts its behavior to changes in the environment to achieve a common goal. The pre-defined and self-configuring approaches to the mobile-based deployment of sensors are compared and discussed. A family of novel algorithms for the optimal placement of mobile wireless devices for permanent monitoring of indoor and outdoor dynamic environments is described. They employ a network connectivity-maintaining mobility model utilizing the concept of the virtual potential function for calculating the motion trajectories of platforms carrying sensors. Their quality and utility have been justified through simulation experiments and are discussed in the final part of the paper. PMID:27649186

  3. An investigation into the effect of playback environment on perception of sonic booms when heard indoors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Daniel; Davies, Patricia

    2015-10-01

    Aircraft manufacturers are interested in designing and building a new generation of supersonic aircraft that produce shaped sonic booms of lower peak amplitude than booms created by current supersonic aircraft. To determine if the noise exposure from these "low"booms is more acceptable to communities, new laboratory testing to evaluate people's responses must occur. To guide supersonic aircraft design, objective measures that predict human response to modified sonic boom waveforms and other impulsive sounds are needed. The present research phase is focused on understanding people's reactions to booms when heard inside, and therefore includes consideration of the effects of house type and the indoor acoustic environment. A test was conducted in NASA Langley's Interior Effects Room (IER), with the collaboration of NASA Langley engineers. This test was focused on the effects of low-frequency content and of vibration, and subjects sat in a small living room environment. A second test was conducted in a sound booth at Purdue University, using similar sounds played back over earphones. The sounds in this test contained less very-low-frequency energy due to limitations in the playback, and the laboratory setting is a less natural environment. For the purpose of comparison, and to improve the robustness of the model, both sonic booms and other more familiar transient sounds were used in the tests. The design of the tests and the signals are briefly described, and the results of both tests will be presented.

  4. A Movement-Assisted Deployment of Collaborating Autonomous Sensors for Indoor and Outdoor Environment Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomska-Szynkiewicz, Ewa; Sikora, Andrzej; Marks, Michał

    2016-09-14

    Using mobile robots or unmanned vehicles to assist optimal wireless sensors deployment in a working space can significantly enhance the capability to investigate unknown environments. This paper addresses the issues of the application of numerical optimization and computer simulation techniques to on-line calculation of a wireless sensor network topology for monitoring and tracking purposes. We focus on the design of a self-organizing and collaborative mobile network that enables a continuous data transmission to the data sink (base station) and automatically adapts its behavior to changes in the environment to achieve a common goal. The pre-defined and self-configuring approaches to the mobile-based deployment of sensors are compared and discussed. A family of novel algorithms for the optimal placement of mobile wireless devices for permanent monitoring of indoor and outdoor dynamic environments is described. They employ a network connectivity-maintaining mobility model utilizing the concept of the virtual potential function for calculating the motion trajectories of platforms carrying sensors. Their quality and utility have been justified through simulation experiments and are discussed in the final part of the paper.

  5. A Movement-Assisted Deployment of Collaborating Autonomous Sensors for Indoor and Outdoor Environment Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Niewiadomska-Szynkiewicz, Ewa; Sikora, Andrzej; Marks, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Using mobile robots or unmanned vehicles to assist optimal wireless sensors deployment in a working space can significantly enhance the capability to investigate unknown environments. This paper addresses the issues of the application of numerical optimization and computer simulation techniques to on-line calculation of a wireless sensor network topology for monitoring and tracking purposes. We focus on the design of a self-organizing and collaborative mobile network that enables a continuous data transmission to the data sink (base station) and automatically adapts its behavior to changes in the environment to achieve a common goal. The pre-defined and self-configuring approaches to the mobile-based deployment of sensors are compared and discussed. A family of novel algorithms for the optimal placement of mobile wireless devices for permanent monitoring of indoor and outdoor dynamic environments is described. They employ a network connectivity-maintaining mobility model utilizing the concept of the virtual potential function for calculating the motion trajectories of platforms carrying sensors. Their quality and utility have been justified through simulation experiments and are discussed in the final part of the paper. PMID:27649186

  6. Flame retardants in the indoor environment -- Part II: release of VOCs (triethylphosphate and halogenated degradation products) from polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Salthammer, T; Fuhrmann, F; Uhde, E

    2003-03-01

    Organophosphate esters, halogenated and non-halogenated, are frequently used for fire protection of building materials. With regard to toxicological profiles it is desired to avoid human exposure in the indoor environment. Moreover, some hazardous volatile organic compounds detected in indoor air are directly linked to the utilization of flame retardants. In this study, different polyurethane (PUR) products for building and indoor use treated with organophosphate flame retardants were tested in 1 m(3) emission test chambers. Emissions of flame retardants and degradation products were measured under living conditions. A PUR hard foam sample showed area-specific emission rates >100 microg/m(2) h for the compound triethylphosphate. During the tests several chlorinated degradation products of organophophorous flame retardants could be identified in the chamber air. PMID:12608925

  7. Do indoor environments influence asthma and asthma-related symptoms among adults in homes?: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jie, Yu; Ismail, Noor Hassim; Jie, Xu; Isa, Zaleha Md

    2011-09-01

    This review summarizes the results of epidemiological studies focusing on the detrimental effects of home environmental factors on asthma morbidity in adults. We reviewed the literature on indoor air quality (IAQ), physical and sociodemographic factors, and asthma morbidity in homes, and identified commonly reported asthma, allergic, and respiratory symptoms involving the home environment. Reported IAQ and asthma morbidity data strongly indicated positive associations between indoor air pollution and adverse health effects in most studies. Indoor factors most consistently associated with asthma and asthma-related symptoms in adults included fuel combustion, mold growth, and environmental tobacco smoke. Environmental exposure may increase an adult's risk of developing asthma and also may increase the risk of asthma exacerbations. Evaluation of present IAQ levels, exposure characteristics, and the role of exposure to these factors in relation to asthma morbidity is important for improving our understanding, identifying the burden, and for developing and implementing interventions aimed at reducing asthma morbidity.

  8. Rapid on-site air sampling with a needle extraction device for evaluating the indoor air environment in school facilities.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mitsuru; Mizuguchi, Ayako; Ueta, Ikuo; Takahashi, Kazuya; Saito, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    A rapid on-site air sampling technique was developed with a miniaturized needle-type sample preparation device for a systematic evaluation of the indoor air environments in school facilities. With the in-needle extraction device packed with a polymer particle of divinylbenzene and activated carbon particles, various types of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were successfully extracted. For evaluating the indoor air qualities in school facilities, air samples in renovated rooms using organic solvent as a thinner of the paint were analyzed along with measurements of several VOCs in indoor air samples taken in newly built primary schools mainly using low-VOCs materials. After periodical renovation/maintenance, the time-variation profile of typical VOCs found in the school facilities has also been monitored. From the results, it could be observed that the VOCs in most of the rooms in these primary schools were at a quite low level; however, a relatively higher concentration of VOCs was found in some specially designed rooms, such as music rooms. In addition, some non-regulated compounds, including benzyl alcohol and branched alkanes, were detected in these primary schools. The results showed a good applicability of the needle device to indoor air analysis in schools, suggesting a wide range of future employment of the needle device, especially for indoor air analysis in other types of facilities and rooms including hospitals and hotels. PMID:23665624

  9. Autonomous Visual Navigation of an Indoor Environment Using a Parsimonious, Insect Inspired Familiarity Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Brayfield, Brad P.

    2016-01-01

    The navigation of bees and ants from hive to food and back has captivated people for more than a century. Recently, the Navigation by Scene Familiarity Hypothesis (NSFH) has been proposed as a parsimonious approach that is congruent with the limited neural elements of these insects’ brains. In the NSFH approach, an agent completes an initial training excursion, storing images along the way. To retrace the path, the agent scans the area and compares the current scenes to those previously experienced. By turning and moving to minimize the pixel-by-pixel differences between encountered and stored scenes, the agent is guided along the path without having memorized the sequence. An important premise of the NSFH is that the visual information of the environment is adequate to guide navigation without aliasing. Here we demonstrate that an image landscape of an indoor setting possesses ample navigational information. We produced a visual landscape of our laboratory and part of the adjoining corridor consisting of 2816 panoramic snapshots arranged in a grid at 12.7-cm centers. We show that pixel-by-pixel comparisons of these images yield robust translational and rotational visual information. We also produced a simple algorithm that tracks previously experienced routes within our lab based on an insect-inspired scene familiarity approach and demonstrate that adequate visual information exists for an agent to retrace complex training routes, including those where the path’s end is not visible from its origin. We used this landscape to systematically test the interplay of sensor morphology, angles of inspection, and similarity threshold with the recapitulation performance of the agent. Finally, we compared the relative information content and chance of aliasing within our visually rich laboratory landscape to scenes acquired from indoor corridors with more repetitive scenery. PMID:27119720

  10. Assessing and controlling risks from the emission of organic chemicals from construction products into indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Brown, Veronica M; Crump, Derrick R; Harrison, Paul T C

    2013-12-01

    Construction products can be a significant source of indoor pollutants, including volatile organic compounds that may be a risk to the health and well-being of building occupants. There are currently a number of schemes for the labelling of products according to their potential to emit organic compounds. Assessment of the complex mixtures of compounds that may be released has mandated the development of test methods that allow the determination of the concentrations of the chemicals released from products in controlled test chamber environments. In response to concerns about the financial burden faced by manufacturers required to test products according to the various different labelling schemes currently in existence, the European Commission has investigated the scope for greater harmonisation. This initiative has sought to harmonise the process for the assessment of emissions data, complementing work led by the European standards organisation focussed on harmonising the test chamber procedures. The current labelling schemes have a range of requirements with respect to the number of chemicals to be quantified. A comparison of 13 schemes worldwide has identified 15 lists of target compounds, with a total of 611 chemicals occurring on at least one of the target lists. While harmonisation may clarify and perhaps simplify these requirements, at least in Europe, it can be expected that future changes to product formulations, the introduction of new products and our increasing knowledge about the potential risks to health, will require continued development of new and improved measurement techniques. There is, therefore, a particular challenge for analytical chemists to ensure the efficient provision of high quality emissions data and thereby ultimately enable effective control of risks to human health through the prevention or reduction of indoor air pollution.

  11. College Science Students' Perception Gaps in Preferred-Actual Learning Environment in a Reformed Introductory Earth Science Course in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chun-Yeh; Chang, Yueh-Hsia

    2010-01-01

    This study used an instrument to examine undergraduate students' preferred and actual learning environment perceptions in an introductory earth science course. The results show that science students expect to learn in a learning environment combining teacher-centred and student-centred approaches. However, an expectation incongruence was found in…

  12. A Comparison of the Actual and Preferred Classroom Learning Environment in Biology and Chemistry as Perceived by High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Lazarowitz, Reuven

    1986-01-01

    The actual and preferred students' perception of classroom learning environment was measured using a modified Hebrew version of the Learning Environment Inventory (LEI). This (validated and analyzed for reliability) was given to chemistry (N=1080) and biology (N=400) students. Results and implications are discussed. (Author/JN)

  13. The lasting effect of limonene-induced particle formation on air quality in a genuine indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Carolin; Wissenbach, Dirk K; von Bergen, Martin; Franck, Ulrich; Wendisch, Manfred; Schlink, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric ozone-terpene reactions, which form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, can affect indoor air quality when outdoor air mixes with indoor air during ventilation. This study, conducted in Leipzig, Germany, focused on limonene-induced particle formation in a genuine indoor environment (24 m(3)). Particle number, limonene and ozone concentrations were monitored during the whole experimental period. After manual ventilation for 30 min, during which indoor ozone levels reached up to 22.7 ppb, limonene was introduced into the room at concentrations of approximately 180 to 250 μg m(-3). We observed strong particle formation and growth within a diameter range of 9 to 50 nm under real-room conditions. Larger particles with diameters above 100 nm were less affected by limonene introduction. The total particle number concentrations (TPNCs) after limonene introduction clearly exceed outdoor values by a factor of 4.5 to 41 reaching maximum concentrations of up to 267,000 particles cm(-3). The formation strength was influenced by background particles, which attenuated the formation of new SOA with increasing concentration, and by ozone levels, an increase of which by 10 ppb will result in a six times higher TPNC. This study emphasizes indoor environments to be preferred locations for particle formation and growth after ventilation events. As a consequence, SOA formation can produce significantly higher amounts of particles than transported by ventilation into the indoor air. PMID:25966888

  14. The role of molds in the relation between indoor environment and atopy in asthma patients

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Emel; Doruk, Sibel; Genc, Sebahat; Ozkutuk, Ayşe Aydan; Karadag, Fisun; Ergor, Gul; Itil, Bahriye Oya; Cımrın, Arif Hikmet

    2013-01-01

    Background: The effect of mold fungi to allergic sensitization is not well-known. We aimed to evaluate the role of molds in the relation between indoor environment and atopy in asthmatics. Materials and Methods: The air samples obtained from 66 stable asthmatics and 35 control subject's houses were sprayed into Sabouraud dextrose agar. Allergy skin testing were performed in both groups. The temperature and humidity of each house were measured. Results: The incidence of atopy was similar in cases (59.1%) and controls (51.4%). The average amount of mold was 35.9 CFU/m3 and 34.3 CFU/m3, respectively. The number of household residents was positively correlated with the amount of molds. There was no difference in the amount of mold with respect to dosage of inhaler corticosteroids as well as symptom levels in asthmatics. The most frequently encountered allergens were Dermatophagoides farinae/Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, grass/weeds and molds. Spending childhood in a village was more common among atopics. Conclusion: Living environment during the childhood might affect atopy and asthma. Based on the identification of molds as the second most frequent allergen after mites in our study population, assessment of mold sensitization as well as in forming patients about ways to avoid them seem likely to contribute to the effective management of uncontrolled asthma. PMID:24523798

  15. The Impact of Congruency Between Preferred and Actual Learning Environments on Tenth Graders' Science Literacy in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Yen; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Lin, Chun-Yen; Chang, Yueh-Hsia; Chen, Chia-Li D.

    2010-08-01

    This study explored the effects of congruency between preferred and actual learning environment (PLE & ALE) perceptions on students' science literacy in terms of science concepts, attitudes toward science, and the understanding of the nature of science in an innovative curriculum of High Scope Project, namely Sci-Tech Mind and Humane Heart (STMHH). A pre-/post-treatment experiment was conducted with 34 Taiwanese tenth graders involved in this study. Participating students' preferred learning environment perception and pre-instruction scientific literacy were evaluated before the STMHH curriculum. Their perceptions toward the actual STMHH learning environment and post-instruction scientific literacy were also examined after the STMHH. Students were categorized into two groups; "preferred alignment with actual learning environment" (PAA) and "preferred discordant with actual learning environment" (PDA), according to their PLEI and ALEI scores. The results of this study revealed that most of the students in this study preferred learning in a classroom environment where student-centered and teacher-centered learning environments coexisted. Furthermore, the ANCOVA analysis showed marginally statistically significant difference between groups in terms of students' post-test scores on scientific literacy with the students' pre-test scores as the covariate. As a pilot study with a small sample size aiming to probe the research direction of this problem, the result of marginally statistically significant and approaching large sized effect magnitude is likely to implicate that the congruency between preferred and actual learning environments on students' scientific literacy is noteworthy. Future study of this nature appears to merit further replications and investigations.

  16. Contrasts in spatial and temporal variability of oxidative capacity and elemental composition in moxibustion, indoor and outdoor environments in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Lim, Min Yee; Hwang, Chaxi; Zhao, Baixiao; Shao, Longyi

    2015-07-01

    Moxibustion is a traditional Chinese medicine therapy that burns moxa floss which produces a substantial amount of PM10 into the environment, thus spawning safety concerns about health impacts of the smoke. We compared the oxidative capacity and elemental composition of moxibustion-derived and ambient PM10 in summer and winter to provide a source-, spatial- and temporal-comparison of PM10 biological responses. The PM10 oxidative capacity was 2.04 and 1.45 fold lower, and dose-dependent slope gradient was 2.36 and 1.76 fold lower in moxibustion environment than indoor or outdoor. Oxidative damage was highly correlated with iron, cesium, aluminum and cobalt in indoor, but moxibustion environment displayed low associations. The total elemental concentration was also lower in moxibustion environment than indoor (2.28 fold) or outdoor (2.79 fold). The source-to-dose modeling and slope gradient analysis in this study can be used as a model for future source-, spatial- and temporal-related moxibustion safety evaluation studies. PMID:25818086

  17. A systematic review of evidence and implications of spatial and seasonal variations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in indoor human environments.

    PubMed

    Paciência, Inês; Madureira, Joana; Rufo, João; Moreira, André; Fernandes, Eduardo de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Many volatile organic compounds (VOC) are classified as known or possible human carcinogens, irritants, and toxicants, and VOC exposure has been associated with asthma and other respiratory symptoms/diseases. This review summarizes recent quantitative data regarding VOC in four categories of indoor environments (schools, housing, offices, and other indoor) and compares the types and concentration levels of individual VOC that were detected, measured, and reported according to season (cold and warm). The influence of outdoor air on concentrations of indoor VOC was also assessed as ratios of indoor versus outdoor. Papers published from 2000 onward were reviewed and 1383 potentially relevant studies were identified. From these, 177 were removed after duplication, 1176 were excluded for not meeting the review criteria, and 40 were included in this review. On average, higher mean concentrations of indoor VOC were found in housing environments, in offices, and in the cold season. Volatile organic compounds are commonly present in indoor air and specific compounds, and their concentrations vary among indoor environments and seasons, indicating corresponding differences in sources (indoors and outdoors). Actions and policies to reduce VOC exposures, such as improved product labeling and consumer education, are recommended. PMID:27163962

  18. Towards a Holistic Framework for the Evaluation of Emergency Plans in Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Emilio; Poveda, Geovanny; Garijo, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    One of the most promising fields for ambient intelligence is the implementation of intelligent emergency plans. Because the use of drills and living labs cannot reproduce social behaviors, such as panic attacks, that strongly affect these plans, the use of agent-based social simulation provides an approach to evaluate these plans more thoroughly. (1) The hypothesis presented in this paper is that there has been little interest in describing the key modules that these simulators must include, such as formally represented knowledge and a realistic simulated sensor model, and especially in providing researchers with tools to reuse, extend and interconnect modules from different works. This lack of interest hinders researchers from achieving a holistic framework for evaluating emergency plans and forces them to reconsider and to implement the same components from scratch over and over. In addition to supporting this hypothesis by considering over 150 simulators, this paper: (2) defines the main modules identified and proposes the use of semantic web technologies as a cornerstone for the aforementioned holistic framework; (3) provides a basic methodology to achieve the framework; (4) identifies the main challenges; and (5) presents an open and free software tool to hint at the potential of such a holistic view of emergency plan evaluation in indoor environments. PMID:24662453

  19. Application of a variable pressure infrared spectrometer for formaldehyde measurements in indoor and outdoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanoune, B.; Lemoine, B.

    2006-10-01

    Pollutants detection by tunable diode laser spectroscopy is conventionally achieved by scanning the emission frequency of the laser around an isolated absorption line of the species under investigation. Absolute quantification relies on the comparison of the measured absorption signal with the absorption signal of a calibrated sample at the same pressure, or with a calculated line profile when the spectroscopic parameters are available and accurate. We developed an alternative procedure : with the laser emission frequency actively stabilized on top of the absorption line, both the pressure inside the cell and the absorption signal are measured while the cell is progressively filled with the sample up to about 12 Torr. The slope at origin of the signal vs. pressure curve is proportional to the concentration in the sample and absolute concentration is obtained with a calibrated mixture injected into the cell at regular intervals. This procedure, which proves as efficient as the conventional one, has been applied together with a mobile spectrometer to the quantification of formaldehyde in outdoor and indoor (buildings and cars) environments.

  20. Intelligent behaviors for a convoy of indoor mobile robots operating in unknown environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, Nathan M.; Nguyen, Hoa G.; Pezeshkian, Narek

    2004-12-01

    Intelligent behaviors allow a convoy of small indoor robots to perform high-level mission tasking. These behaviors include various implementations of map building, localization, obstacle avoidance, object recognition, and navigation. Several behaviors have been developed by SSC San Diego, with integration of other behaviors developed by open-source projects and a technology transfer effort funded by DARPA. The test system, developed by SSC San Diego, consists of ROBART III (a prototype security robot), serving as the master platform, and a convoy of four ActivMedia Pioneer 2-DX robots. Each robot, including ROBART III, is equipped with a SICK LMS 200 laser rangefinder. Using integrated wireless network repeaters, the Pioneer 2-DX robots maintain an ad hoc communication link between the operator and ROBART III. The Pioneer 2-DX robots can also act as rear guards to detect intruders in areas that ROBART III has previously explored. These intelligent behaviors allow a single operator to command the entire convoy of robots during a mission in an unknown environment.

  1. Indoor climate, psychosocial work environment and symptoms in open-plan offices.

    PubMed

    Pejtersen, J; Allermann, L; Kristensen, T S; Poulsen, O M

    2006-10-01

    To study the indoor climate, the psychosocial work environment and occupants' symptoms in offices a cross-sectional questionnaire survey was made in 11 naturally and 11 mechanically ventilated office buildings. Nine of the buildings had mainly cellular offices; five of the buildings had mainly open-plan offices, whereas eight buildings had a mixture of cellular, multi-person and open-plan offices. A total of 2301 occupants, corresponding to a response rate of 72%, completed a retrospective questionnaire. The questionnaire comprised questions concerning environmental perceptions, mucous membrane irritation, skin irritation, central nervous system (CNS) symptoms and psychosocial factors. Occupants in open-plan offices are more likely to perceive thermal discomfort, poor air quality and noise and they more frequently complain about CNS and mucous membrane symptoms than occupants in multi-person and cellular offices. The association between psychosocial factors and office size was weak. Open-plan offices may not be suited for all job types. PRACTICAL IMPLICATION: Open-plan offices may be a risk factor for adverse environmental perceptions and symptoms.

  2. {sup 210}Po as a long-term integrating radon indicator in the indoor environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Exposure to radon (Rn-222) decay products in the indoor environment is suspected of being a significant lung cancer agent in many countries. But quantification of the contemporary lung cancer risk (i.e. probability) on an individual basis is not an easy task. Only past exposures are relevant and assessing individual exposures in retrospect is associated with large uncertainties, if possible at all. One way to extend the validity of contemporary measurements to past decades is to measure long-lived decay products of radon, the long-lived radon daughters. After our laboratory had exemplified the correlation between implanted Po-210 and the estimated radon exposures in six different dwellings, the US Department of Energy and the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute granted funds for a one-year study, ``{sup 210}Po as a Long-Term Integrating Radon Indicator in the Indoor Environment.`` In this report the work performed under these two contracts is reported.

  3. Fate and Transport of Phthalates in Indoor Environments and the Influence of Temperature: A Case Study in a Test House.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chenyang; Liang, Yirui; Xu, Ying

    2015-08-18

    A case study in a test house was conducted to investigate the fate and transport of benzyl butyl phthalate (BBzP) and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) in residential indoor environments and the influence of temperature. Total airborne concentrations of phthalates were sensitive to indoor temperatures, and their steady-state concentration levels increased by a factor of 3 with an increase in temperature from 21 to 30 °C. Strong sorption of phthalates was observed on interior surfaces, including dust, dish plates, windows, mirrors, fabric cloth, and wood. Equilibrium partitioning coefficients for phthalates adsorbed to these surfaces were determined, and their values decreased with increasing temperature. For impervious surfaces, dimensionless partitioning coefficients were calculated and found to be comparable to reported values of the octanol-air partition coefficients of phthalates, Koa, suggesting that an organic film may develop on these surfaces. In addition, sorption kinetics was studied experimentally, and the equilibration time scale for impervious surfaces was found to be faster than that of fabric cloth. Finally, using an indoor fate model to interpret the measurement results, there was good agreement between model predictions and the observed indoor air concentrations of BBzP in the test house.

  4. Exploration of long-term care institution managers' perceptions of institutional indoor environment quality and ease of administration.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yen Ping; Lin, Chia Ching; Huang, Ying Chia

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the level of management's perception of the importance of indoor environment indicators at long-term care facilities as well as the differences between the level of perceived importance and the level of implementation. This study also analyzed the indicators for improving indoor environments. This study selected Taiwanese long-term care facility managers as its subjects to whom questionnaires were distributed by mail Descriptive statistics, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and an importance-performance analysis were used to conduct analyses on the data retrieved from the questionnaires. The results indicate that, of the indoor environment indicators of four facility spaces, bedrooms had the highest perceived level of importance. The lounge was the easiest space in which to implement the indicators. Differences were found between the perceived level of importance and the level of implementation for six of the indoor environment indicators of the four facility spaces. In these four spaces, the ventilation indicator was the most important, whereas implementing the temperature and humidity indicators was the most difficult. The highest priority for indicator improvement was given to the temperature in the bedrooms and bathrooms, whereas control over temperature, humidity, and sound had a low priority. The indicators seen as requiring continuous maintenance were lighting and ventilation. Facility managers had a high level of awareness and competence in implementing the ventilation indicator. However, although they were aware of the importance of the temperature, humidity, and sound indicators, their implementation was difficult, suggesting that they needed to be improved. PMID:23072176

  5. Health and productivity gains from better indoor environments and their implications for the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.

    2000-10-01

    A substantial portion of the US population suffers frequently from communicable respiratory illnesses, allergy and asthma symptoms, and sick building syndrome symptoms. We now have increasingly strong evidence that changes in building design, operation, and maintenance can significantly reduce these illnesses. Decreasing the prevalence or severity of these health effects would lead to lower health care costs, reduced sick leave, and shorter periods of illness-impaired work performance, resulting in annual economic benefits for the US in the tens of billions of dollars. Increasing the awareness of these potential health and economic gains, combined with other factors, could help bring about a shift in the way we design, construct, operate, and occupy buildings. The current goal of providing marginally adequate indoor environments could be replaced by the goal of providing indoor environments that maximize the health, satisfaction, and performance of building occupants. Through research and technology transfer, DOE and its contractors are well positioned to help stimulate this shift in practice and, consequently, improve the health and economic well-being of the US population. Additionally, DOE's energy-efficiency interests would be best served by a program that prepares for the potential shift, specifically by identifying and promoting the most energy-efficient methods of improving the indoor environment. The associated research and technology transfer topics of particular relevance to DOE are identified and discussed.

  6. [Concentration and Size Distribution of Bioaerosols in Indoor Environment of University Dormitory During the Plum Rain Period].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Li, Lu; Zhang, Jia-quan; Zhan, Chang-lin; Liu, Hong-xia; Zheng, Jing-ru; Yao, Rui-zhen; Cao, Jun-ji

    2016-04-15

    Bioaerosols of university dormitory can spread through air and cause a potential health risk for student staying in indoor environment. To quantify the characteristics of bioaerosols in indoor environment of university dormitory, concentration and size distribution of culturable bioaerosols were detected during the plum rain period, the correlations of culturable bioaerosol with concentration of particulate matter, the ambient temperature and relative humidity were analyzed using Spearman's correlation coefficient and finally the changes of size distribution of culturable bioaerosol caused by activities of students were detected. The results showed that the mean concentrations of culturable airborne bacteria and fungi were (2133 +/- 1617) CFUm' and (3111 +/- 2202) CFU x m(-3). The concentrations of culturable airborne bacteria and fungi exhibited negative correlation with PM1, PM2.5, and PM10, respectively. The respirable fractions of bacteria exhibited positive correlation with PM2.5, and the respirable fractions of fungi exhibited significant positive correlation with PM10. Ambient temperature had positive correlation with culturable airborne bacteria and fungi, and relative humidity had negative correlation with culturable airborne bacteria and fungi. In the afternoon, concentrations of culturable airborne fungi in indoor environment of university dormitory significantly increased, and the size distribution of culturable hioaerosols was different in the morning and afternoon. PMID:27548944

  7. [Concentration and Size Distribution of Bioaerosols in Indoor Environment of University Dormitory During the Plum Rain Period].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Li, Lu; Zhang, Jia-quan; Zhan, Chang-lin; Liu, Hong-xia; Zheng, Jing-ru; Yao, Rui-zhen; Cao, Jun-ji

    2016-04-15

    Bioaerosols of university dormitory can spread through air and cause a potential health risk for student staying in indoor environment. To quantify the characteristics of bioaerosols in indoor environment of university dormitory, concentration and size distribution of culturable bioaerosols were detected during the plum rain period, the correlations of culturable bioaerosol with concentration of particulate matter, the ambient temperature and relative humidity were analyzed using Spearman's correlation coefficient and finally the changes of size distribution of culturable bioaerosol caused by activities of students were detected. The results showed that the mean concentrations of culturable airborne bacteria and fungi were (2133 +/- 1617) CFUm' and (3111 +/- 2202) CFU x m(-3). The concentrations of culturable airborne bacteria and fungi exhibited negative correlation with PM1, PM2.5, and PM10, respectively. The respirable fractions of bacteria exhibited positive correlation with PM2.5, and the respirable fractions of fungi exhibited significant positive correlation with PM10. Ambient temperature had positive correlation with culturable airborne bacteria and fungi, and relative humidity had negative correlation with culturable airborne bacteria and fungi. In the afternoon, concentrations of culturable airborne fungi in indoor environment of university dormitory significantly increased, and the size distribution of culturable hioaerosols was different in the morning and afternoon.

  8. Gender, airborne chemical monitoring, and physical work environment are related to indoor air symptoms among nonindustrial workers in the Klang Valley, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Syazwan, Aizat Ismail; Hafizan, Juahir; Baharudin, Mohd Rafee; Azman, Ahmad Zaid Fattah; Izwyn, Zulkapri; Zulfadhli, Ismail; Syahidatussyakirah, Katis

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship of airborne chemicals and the physical work environment risk element on the indoor air symptoms of nonindustrial workers. Design: A cross-sectional study consisting of 200 office workers. A random selection of 200 buildings was analyzed for exposure and indoor air symptoms based on a pilot study in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. Methods: A set of modified published questionnaires by the Department of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH), Malaysia and a previous study (MM040NA questionnaire) pertaining to indoor air symptoms was used in the evaluation process of the indoor air symptoms. Statistical analyses involving logistic regression and linear regression were used to determine the relationship between exposure and indoor air symptoms for use in the development of an indoor risk matrix. Results: The results indicate that some indoor air pollutants (carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, total volatile organic compound, and dust) are related to indoor air symptoms of men and women. Temperature and relative humidity showed a positive association with complaints related to the perceived indoor environmental condition (drafts and inconsistency of temperature). Men predominantly reported general symptoms when stratification of gender involved exposure to formaldehyde. Women reported high levels of complaints related to mucosal and general symptoms from exposure to the dust level indoors. Conclusion: Exposure to pollutants (total volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, and formaldehyde) and physical stressors (air temperature and relative humidity) influence reported symptoms of office workers. These parameters should be focused upon and graded as one of the important elements in the grading procedure when qualitatively evaluating the indoor environment. PMID:23526736

  9. Indoor radon

    SciTech Connect

    Rabkin, M.A.; Bodansky, D.

    1988-12-31

    The first awareness of radon as a health hazard came from observations of increased lung cancer incidence among uranium and other miners. During the past decade there has been increasing recognition of the importance of radon in the indoor environment as well. Extrapolations from radon exposures in mines to those in homes indicate that radon will cause a significant number of lung cancer deaths among the general population if its effects are linearly proportional to the magnitude of the exposure. For example, in the United States roughly 5000 to 20,000 lung cancer deaths per year are now attributed to indoor radon. Consistent with this, the effective dose equivalent from indoor radon is larger than the dose from any other radiation source for most people in temperate climates. Radon is a noble gas and can diffuse freely through the air. The most important isotope of radon, Rn-222, is produced in the alpha-particle decay of Ra-226, which is present in all soil and rock as a product of the U-238 decay series. In consequence, radon is present in both the outdoor and indoor environments, primarily due to its escape from the soil into the open air or into houses. The indoor concentrations are usually much higher than the outdoor concentrations, because the radon that enters into houses escapes relatively slowly. 120 refs., 12 tabs.

  10. Providers' Reported and Actual Use of Coaching Strategies in Natural Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Christine; Cambray-Engstrom, Elizabeth; Woods, Juliann

    2012-01-01

    This case study examined the agreement between reported and actual use of coaching strategies based on home visit data collected on a diverse sample of providers and families. Paired videotape and contact note data of and from providers during home visits were collected over a six month period and analyzed using structured protocols. Results of…

  11. The effect of farrowing environment and previous experience on the maternal behaviour of sows in indoor pens and outdoor huts.

    PubMed

    Wülbers-Mindermann, M; Berg, C; Illmann, G; Baulain, U; Algers, B

    2015-04-01

    Outdoor farrowing huts facilitate a less restricted maternal behaviour in sows compared with sows kept indoors in farrowing pens. The aim of our study was to investigate whether there are behavioural differences between primiparous sows kept outdoors in farrowing huts and indoors in pens, and whether the maternal behaviour during the second parity, when all sows were kept outdoors in farrowing huts, would differ between sows that have experienced the indoor or the outdoor environment, respectively, during their first parturition. A total of 26 Yorkshire×Swedish Landrace sows were studied. Of these, 11 sows were housed outdoors in farrowing huts during both parturitions (group=OUTOUT). The other 15 sows were kept indoors in a barn with single farrowing pens during their first parturition. During their second parturition, sows were kept outdoors in farrowing huts (group=INOUT). The behaviour was video recorded from 2 h prepartum to 48 h postpartum. The sows' responsiveness to playbacks of a piglet's screams was tested on days 2 to 3 postpartum. Parity 1: during the last 2 h prepartum, OUTOUT sows had a higher proportion of observations in the sternal lying position (P<0.01). During parturition, OUTOUT sows changed posture more often (P<0.05) and were lying less (P<0.05) than INOUT sows. All sows in both groups responded with 'lifting head' towards the playback of piglet scream, whereas 100% of OUTOUT sows and only 43% of INOUT sows thereafter were 'getting up' (P <0.01). Parity 2: There were no behavioural differences between INOUT and OUTOUT sows. In conclusion, it is not problematic for a second parity sow with initial maternal experience from an indoor farrowing pen to be kept outdoors in farrowing huts during its following farrowing.

  12. Quantification of differences between occupancy and total monitoring periods for better assessment of exposure to particles in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzbicka, A.; Bohgard, M.; Pagels, J. H.; Dahl, A.; Löndahl, J.; Hussein, T.; Swietlicki, E.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2015-04-01

    For the assessment of personal exposure, information about the concentration of pollutants when people are in given indoor environments (occupancy time) are of prime importance. However this kind of data frequently is not reported. The aim of this study was to assess differences in particle characteristics between occupancy time and the total monitoring period, with the latter being the most frequently used averaging time in the published data. Seven indoor environments were selected in Sweden and Finland: an apartment, two houses, two schools, a supermarket, and a restaurant. They were assessed for particle number and mass concentrations and number size distributions. The measurements using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and two photometers were conducted for seven consecutive days during winter in each location. Particle concentrations in residences and schools were, as expected, the highest during occupancy time. In the apartment average and median PM2.5 mass concentrations during the occupancy time were 29% and 17% higher, respectively compared to total monitoring period. In both schools, the average and medium values of the PM2.5 mass concentrations were on average higher during teaching hours compared to the total monitoring period by 16% and 32%, respectively. When it comes to particle number concentrations (PNC), in the apartment during occupancy, the average and median values were 33% and 58% higher, respectively than during the total monitoring period. In both houses and schools the average and median PNC were similar for the occupancy and total monitoring periods. General conclusions on the basis of measurements in the limited number of indoor environments cannot be drawn. However the results confirm a strong dependence on type and frequency of indoor activities that generate particles and site specificity. The results also indicate that the exclusion of data series during non-occupancy periods can improve the estimates of particle concentrations and

  13. Agreement between the Perceived and Actual Fruit and Vegetable Nutrition Environments among Low-Income Urban Women.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Tiffany L; Gazmararian, Julie A; Goodman, Michael; Kleinbaum, David

    2015-11-01

    The food environment is described by two measures: store-level (actual) and individual-level (perceived). Understanding the relationship between actual and perceived fruit and vegetable (F&V) nutrition environments is important as their association may influence F&V purchases and consumption. The study objective was to assess agreement between perceived and actual environment measures of availability, quality, and affordability/price for fresh and canned/frozen F&V. African American WIC recipients (n=84) self-reported perceptions corresponding to chain food stores (n=13) which were then assessed by surveyors. Nearly 80% of participants had positive perceptions of stores' F&V availability, quality, and affordability. Store assessments indicated high F&V availability and quality and lowest prices for canned varieties. Kappa statistics, sensitivity, and specificity calculated agreement between perceived and actual measures. Results indicated slight to fair agreements. Agreements were highest for quality measures (kappa=0.25 (95% CI:0.08-0.42), p=.008). Research implications include promoting nutrition education and resident interviewing to understand F&V expectations.

  14. Agreement between the Perceived and Actual Fruit and Vegetable Nutrition Environments among Low-Income Urban Women.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Tiffany L; Gazmararian, Julie A; Goodman, Michael; Kleinbaum, David

    2015-11-01

    The food environment is described by two measures: store-level (actual) and individual-level (perceived). Understanding the relationship between actual and perceived fruit and vegetable (F&V) nutrition environments is important as their association may influence F&V purchases and consumption. The study objective was to assess agreement between perceived and actual environment measures of availability, quality, and affordability/price for fresh and canned/frozen F&V. African American WIC recipients (n=84) self-reported perceptions corresponding to chain food stores (n=13) which were then assessed by surveyors. Nearly 80% of participants had positive perceptions of stores' F&V availability, quality, and affordability. Store assessments indicated high F&V availability and quality and lowest prices for canned varieties. Kappa statistics, sensitivity, and specificity calculated agreement between perceived and actual measures. Results indicated slight to fair agreements. Agreements were highest for quality measures (kappa=0.25 (95% CI:0.08-0.42), p=.008). Research implications include promoting nutrition education and resident interviewing to understand F&V expectations. PMID:26548680

  15. Efficiency of final cleaning for lead-based paint abatement in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Choe, Kyoo T; Trunov, Mikhaylo; Willeke, Klaus; Menrath, William; Friedman, Warren

    2002-03-01

    The effectiveness of procedures used for the final indoor cleaning after active lead-based paint abatement were evaluated in a 830 ft3 test chamber. Dry and wet scraping and dry machine sanding were applied to wooden doors obtained from lead-hazard control sites. The airborne particle concentration and size distribution were monitored using a real-time particle size spectrometer. Particulates were also collected on filters and analyzed for total dust and lead. The resulting airborne lead mass was determined for each cleaning procedure, and the potential floor lead loading resulting from the dust settling was calculated. Wipe samples were collected to measure the actual floor lead loading. The effectiveness of final cleaning was evaluated first for dry abatement methods. Various cleaning work practices were tested by applying wet and dry debris sweeping as well as no sweeping in combinations with wet and dry removal of plastic sheeting. Considerable resuspension of leaded particles was detected during dry sweeping: the airborne lead mass increase ranged between 65 and 220 percent. However, this increase did not exceed 22 percent when wet sweeping was applied. Minimal or no resuspension was found when the plastic was folded with leaded debris inside (no sweeping was performed prior to the sheeting removal). During folding activity, the "clean" (uncovered) floor surface may be significantly contaminated with leaded dust from workers' shoes and cleaning tools. The first HEPA vacuuming resulted in a 15- to 20-fold decrease of the airborne lead mass; however, it was not sufficient to reduce the floor lead loading to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) clearance level of 40 microg/ft2, as determined by wipe sampling. Wet mopping following the first HEPA vacuuming was proven to be effective to reduce the lead loading significantly below 40 microg/ft2. The second HEPA vacuuming resulted in further reduction of the airborne lead mass concentration. The

  16. A new approach to detect early or hidden fungal development in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Anton, Rukshala; Moularat, Stéphane; Robine, Enric

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the biodegradation problems encountered in buildings, exposure of their occupants to mold is responsible for numerous diseases such as respiratory infections, immediate or delayed allergies and different types of irritations. However, current techniques are unable to detect mold at an early stage of development or hidden contaminants. Moularat et al., in 2008 has established chemical fingerprints of moldy growth from Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) arising specifically from fungal metabolism and developed the Fungal Contamination Index (FCI) (Moularat et al., 2008a,b). This index has the advantage of detecting fungal development both reliably and rapidly before any visible signs of contamination could be detected. However, even though the FCI has been widely tested, VOCs' analysis by GC/MS, which is required for index calculation, is incompatible with real-time monitoring strategy for indoor environments. In this context, researches around FCI exploitation have been followed up in order to provide a monitoring device widely deployable which is the result of the miniaturization of an analytical chain for portable, reliable and low-cost applications. This device is based on one hand the selection and concentration of chemical compounds from the sample of interest and on the other hand the development of an array of different conducting polymer based sensors in order to obtain a specific footprint. This fungal contamination detection device was the subject of patent applications by the CSTB. The modularity of the system (ability to vary both the elements of detection polymers and retention time of interest) allows for expansion of its use to other pollutants.

  17. A new approach to detect early or hidden fungal development in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Anton, Rukshala; Moularat, Stéphane; Robine, Enric

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the biodegradation problems encountered in buildings, exposure of their occupants to mold is responsible for numerous diseases such as respiratory infections, immediate or delayed allergies and different types of irritations. However, current techniques are unable to detect mold at an early stage of development or hidden contaminants. Moularat et al., in 2008 has established chemical fingerprints of moldy growth from Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) arising specifically from fungal metabolism and developed the Fungal Contamination Index (FCI) (Moularat et al., 2008a,b). This index has the advantage of detecting fungal development both reliably and rapidly before any visible signs of contamination could be detected. However, even though the FCI has been widely tested, VOCs' analysis by GC/MS, which is required for index calculation, is incompatible with real-time monitoring strategy for indoor environments. In this context, researches around FCI exploitation have been followed up in order to provide a monitoring device widely deployable which is the result of the miniaturization of an analytical chain for portable, reliable and low-cost applications. This device is based on one hand the selection and concentration of chemical compounds from the sample of interest and on the other hand the development of an array of different conducting polymer based sensors in order to obtain a specific footprint. This fungal contamination detection device was the subject of patent applications by the CSTB. The modularity of the system (ability to vary both the elements of detection polymers and retention time of interest) allows for expansion of its use to other pollutants. PMID:26169910

  18. An immunoassay for the measurement of (1→3)-β-D-glucans in the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    Douwes, Jeroen; Doekes, Gert; Montijn, Roy; Heederik, Dick; Brunekreef, Bert

    1997-01-01

    An inhibition enzyme immunoassay was developed for quantitation of (1→3)-β-D-glucans in the indoor environment. Immunospecific rabbit antibodies were produced by immunization with bovine serum albuminconjugated laminarin.The laminarin calibration curve ranged from 40 to 3000 ng/ml.Another (1→3)-β-D-glucan (curdlan) showed a similar inhibition curve, but was less reactive on a weight basis. Pustulan, presumed to be (1→3)-β-D-glucan, also showed immunoreactivity in the assay. Control experiments indicated that this was due to (1→3)-β-D-glucan structures. Other non-(1→3)-β-D-glucan polysaccharides did not react. (1→3)-β-Dglucan was detectable in dust from a variety of occupational and environmental settings. We conclude that the new assay offers a useful method for indoor (1→3)-β-Dglucan exposure assessment. PMID:18472854

  19. Stereoscopic helmet mounted system for real time 3D environment reconstruction and indoor ego-motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Giuseppe; Sequeira, Vitor M.; Sadka, Abdul

    2008-04-01

    A novel type of stereoscopic Helmet Mounted System for simultaneous user localization and mapping applications is described. This paper presents precise real time volume data reconstruction. The system is designed for users that need to explore and navigate in unprepared indoor environments without any support of GPS signal or environment preparation through preinstalled markers. Augmented Reality features in support of self-navigation can be interactively added by placing virtual markers in the desired positions in the world coordinate system. They can then be retrieved when the marker is back in the user field of view being used as visual alerts or for back path finding.

  20. Distribution of legacy and emerging semivolatile organic compounds in five indoor matrices in a residential environment.

    PubMed

    Melymuk, Lisa; Bohlin-Nizzetto, Pernilla; Vojta, Šimon; Krátká, Martina; Kukučka, Petr; Audy, Ondřej; Přibylová, Petra; Klánová, Jana

    2016-06-01

    Seven types of indoor samples, covering five indoor matrices, were collected in a residential room, and analyzed for five classes of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs). The goal was to improve the understanding of the relationship between indoor air, surface films and dust, based on differences in sources, physicochemical properties, and indoor environmental characteristics. Comparisons of the five matrices (gas- and particle-phase air, floor dust, surface dust/films and window films) demonstrated that within our test room a semi-quantitative measurement of the SVOC distributions and concentrations could be obtained by air, and composite dust or furniture surface wipes. Dust concentrations varied within the room, and spot samples were not necessarily representative of the average room conditions. Polyurethane foam passive air samplers (PUF-PAS) successfully quantified the total air concentrations of the studied SVOC compound groups, as indoor air concentrations were dominated by gas-phase compounds, however air concentrations of individual particle-bound compounds had higher uncertainty. Measured concentrations of dust/surfaces could be used to estimate air concentrations of legacy SVOCs, demonstrating equilibrium in the room. However, air concentrations of current-use compounds (flame retardants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) could not be estimated from dust/surface concentrations, demonstrating the influence of ongoing primary emissions and non-equilibrium status in the room. PMID:27016813

  1. Distribution of legacy and emerging semivolatile organic compounds in five indoor matrices in a residential environment.

    PubMed

    Melymuk, Lisa; Bohlin-Nizzetto, Pernilla; Vojta, Šimon; Krátká, Martina; Kukučka, Petr; Audy, Ondřej; Přibylová, Petra; Klánová, Jana

    2016-06-01

    Seven types of indoor samples, covering five indoor matrices, were collected in a residential room, and analyzed for five classes of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs). The goal was to improve the understanding of the relationship between indoor air, surface films and dust, based on differences in sources, physicochemical properties, and indoor environmental characteristics. Comparisons of the five matrices (gas- and particle-phase air, floor dust, surface dust/films and window films) demonstrated that within our test room a semi-quantitative measurement of the SVOC distributions and concentrations could be obtained by air, and composite dust or furniture surface wipes. Dust concentrations varied within the room, and spot samples were not necessarily representative of the average room conditions. Polyurethane foam passive air samplers (PUF-PAS) successfully quantified the total air concentrations of the studied SVOC compound groups, as indoor air concentrations were dominated by gas-phase compounds, however air concentrations of individual particle-bound compounds had higher uncertainty. Measured concentrations of dust/surfaces could be used to estimate air concentrations of legacy SVOCs, demonstrating equilibrium in the room. However, air concentrations of current-use compounds (flame retardants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) could not be estimated from dust/surface concentrations, demonstrating the influence of ongoing primary emissions and non-equilibrium status in the room.

  2. A Professional Development School Staff's Perceptions of Actual and Preferred Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiley, Therese J.; Jensen, Rita A.

    A study assessed the teaching/learning environment of one professional development school in a variety of ways that included a combination of quantitative and qualitative measures. Results were analyzed using the eight scales of the "School Level Environment Questionnaire" (SLEQ) as categories: Student Support, Affiliation, Professional Interest,…

  3. Conditional Random Field-Based Offline Map Matching for Indoor Environments.

    PubMed

    Bataineh, Safaa; Bahillo, Alfonso; Díez, Luis Enrique; Onieva, Enrique; Bataineh, Ikram

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an offline map matching technique designed for indoor localization systems based on conditional random fields (CRF). The proposed algorithm can refine the results of existing indoor localization systems and match them with the map, using loose coupling between the existing localization system and the proposed map matching technique. The purpose of this research is to investigate the efficiency of using the CRF technique in offline map matching problems for different scenarios and parameters. The algorithm was applied to several real and simulated trajectories of different lengths. The results were then refined and matched with the map using the CRF algorithm. PMID:27537892

  4. Conditional Random Field-Based Offline Map Matching for Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Bataineh, Safaa; Bahillo, Alfonso; Díez, Luis Enrique; Onieva, Enrique; Bataineh, Ikram

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an offline map matching technique designed for indoor localization systems based on conditional random fields (CRF). The proposed algorithm can refine the results of existing indoor localization systems and match them with the map, using loose coupling between the existing localization system and the proposed map matching technique. The purpose of this research is to investigate the efficiency of using the CRF technique in offline map matching problems for different scenarios and parameters. The algorithm was applied to several real and simulated trajectories of different lengths. The results were then refined and matched with the map using the CRF algorithm. PMID:27537892

  5. Heterogeneous Reactivity of NO2 with Photocatalytic Paints: A Possible Source of Nitrous Acid (HONO) in the Indoor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligorovski, S.; Bartolomei, V.; Gandolfo, A.; Gomez Alvarez, E.; Kleffmann, J.; Wortham, H.

    2014-12-01

    There is an increasing concern about the indoor air environment, where we spend most of our time. Common methods of improving indoor air quality include controlling pollution sources, increasing ventilation rates or using air purifiers. Photocatalytic remediation technology was suggested as a new possibility to eliminate indoor air pollutants instead of just diluting or disposing them. In the present study, heterogeneous reactions of NO2 were studied on photocatalytic paints containing different size and quantity of TiO2. The heterogeneous reactions were conducted in a photo reactor under simulated atmospheric conditions. The flat pyrex rectangular plates covered with the paint were inserted into the reactor. These plates have been sprayed with the photocatalytic paints at our industrial partner's (ALLIOS) facilities using a high precision procedure that allowed the application of a thin layer of a given thickness of the paint. This allows a homogeneous coverage of the surface with the paint and an accurate determination of the exact amount of paint exposed to gaseous NO2. We demonstrate that the indoor photocatalytic paints which contain TiO2 can substantially reduce the concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). We show that the efficiency of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) removal increase with the quantity of TiO2 in the range 0 - 7 %. The geometric uptake coefficients increase from 5 · 10-6 to 1.6 · 10-5 under light irradiation of the paints. On the other hand, during the reactions of NO2 with this paint (7 % of TiO2) nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous acid (HONO) are formed. Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important harmful indoor pollutant and its photolysis leads to the formation of highly reactive OH radicals (Gomez Alvarez et al., 2013). Maximum conversion efficiencies of NO2to HONO and NO of 15 % and 33 % were observed at 30 % RH, respectively. Thus, the quantity of TiO2 embedded in the paint is an important parameter regarding the nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2

  6. Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.

    1990-01-01

    This research has two main goals; (1) to quantify mechanisms for radon entry into homes of different types and to determine the fraction of indoor radon attributable to each source and (2) to model and calculate the dose (and therefore alpha particle fluence) to cells in the human and animal tracheobronchial tree that is pertinent to induction of bronchogenic carcinoma from inhaled radon daughters.

  7. Pedestrian mobile mapping system for indoor environments based on MEMS IMU and range camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haala, N.; Fritsch, D.; Peter, M.; Khosravani, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes an approach for the modeling of building interiors based on a mobile device, which integrates modules for pedestrian navigation and low-cost 3D data collection. Personal navigation is realized by a foot mounted low cost MEMS IMU, while 3D data capture for subsequent indoor modeling uses a low cost range camera, which was originally developed for gaming applications. Both steps, navigation and modeling, are supported by additional information as provided from the automatic interpretation of evacuation plans. Such emergency plans are compulsory for public buildings in a number of countries. They consist of an approximate floor plan, the current position and escape routes. Additionally, semantic information like stairs, elevators or the floor number is available. After the user has captured an image of such a floor plan, this information is made explicit again by an automatic raster-to-vector-conversion. The resulting coarse indoor model then provides constraints at stairs or building walls, which restrict the potential movement of the user. This information is then used to support pedestrian navigation by eliminating drift effects of the used low-cost sensor system. The approximate indoor building model additionally provides a priori information during subsequent indoor modeling. Within this process, the low cost range camera Kinect is used for the collection of multiple 3D point clouds, which are aligned by a suitable matching step and then further analyzed to refine the coarse building model.

  8. Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Program: Benefits of Improving Air Quality in the School Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools (IAQ TfS) Program to help schools prevent, identify, and resolve their IAQ problems. This publication describes the program and its advantages, explaining that through simple, low-cost measures, schools can: reduce IAQ-related health risks and…

  9. BUILDING FEATURES THAT INFLUENCE THE PENETRATION OF TOXIC GASES FROM THE AMBIENT TO THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Strategies to reduce indoor exposures to certain toxic air contaminants suggested a study of the penetration of these toxics from the external atmosphere into an unoccupied research house. The mass balance method is applied to measure rates of sorption and re-emission of the con...

  10. Microclimate and actual evapotranspiration in a humid coastal-plain environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennehy, Kevin F.; McMahon, Peter B.

    1987-09-01

    Continuous hourly measurements of twelve meteorologic variables recorded during 1983 and 1984 were used to examine the microclimate and actual evapotranspiration at a low-level radioactive-waste burial site near Barnwell, South Carolina. The study area is in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of southwestern South Carolina. Monthly, daily, and hourly trends in net radiation, incoming and reflected short-wave radiation, incoming and emitted long-wave radiation, soil-heat flux, dry- and wet-bulb temperatures, soil temperatures, wind direction and speed, and precipitation were used to characterize the microclimate. Average daily air temperatures ranged from -9 to 32° Celsius during the period of study. Net radiation varied from about -27 to 251 watts m -2 and was dominated by incoming short-wave radiation throughout the year. The peak net radiation during a summer day generally occurred 2-3h before the peak vapor pressure deficit. In the winter, these peaks occurred at about the same time of day. Monthly precipitation varied from 15 to 241 mm. The Bowen ratio method was used to estimate hourly evapotranspiration, which was summed to also give daily and monthly evapotranspiration. Actual evapotranspiration varied from 0.0 to 0.7 mm h -1, 0.8-5 mm d -1, and 20-140 mm month -1 during 1983 and 1984. The maximum rate of evapotranspiration generally occurred at the same time of day as maximum net radiation, suggesting net radiation was the main driving force for evapotranspiration. Precipitation exceeded evapotranspiration during 14 months of the 2yr study period. Late fall, winter, and early spring contained the majority of these months. The maximum excess precipitation was 115 mm in February 1983.

  11. Microclimate and actual evapotranspiration in a humid coastal-plain environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dennehy, K.F.; McMahon, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    Continuous hourly measurements of twelve meteorologic variables recorded during 1983 and 1984 were used to examine the microclimate and actual evapotranspiration at a low-level radioactive-waste burial site near Barnwell, South Carolina. The study area is in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of southwestern South Carolina. Monthly, daily, and hourly trends in net radiation, incoming and reflected short-wave radiation, incoming and emitted long-wave radiation, soil-heat flux, dry- and wet-bulb temperatures, soil temperatures, wind direction and speed, and precipitation were used to characterize the microclimate. Average daily air temperatures ranged from -9 to 32?? Celsius during the period of study. Net radiation varied from about -27 to 251 watts m-2 and was dominated by incoming short-wave radiation throughout the year. The peak net radiation during a summer day generally occurred 2-3h before the peak vapor pressure deficit. In the winter, these peaks occurred at about the same time of day. Monthly precipitation varied from 15 to 241 mm. The Bowen ratio method was used to estimate hourly evapotranspiration, which was summed to also give daily and monthly evapotranspiration. Actual evapotranspiration varied from 0.0 to 0.7 mm h-1, 0.8-5 mm d-1, and 20-140 mm month-1 during 1983 and 1984. The maximum rate of evapotranspiration generally occurred at the same time of day as maximum net radiation, suggesting net radiation was the main driving force for evapotranspiration. Precipitation exceeded evapotranspiration during 14 months of the 2yr study period. Late fall, winter, and early spring contained the majority of these months. The maximum excess precipitation was 115 mm in February 1983. ?? 1987.

  12. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the unattached'' fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the unattached'' fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos).

  13. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the ``unattached`` fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the ``unattached`` fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos).

  14. Indoor air quality at life and work environments in Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, P; Balducci, C; Perilli, M; Vichi, F; Imperiali, A; Cecinato, A

    2016-02-01

    The air quality of three different microenvironments (school, dwelling, and coffee bar) located in the city of Rome, Italy, was assessed. Indoor and outdoor concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with PM2.5 particles were determined during an intensive 3-week sampling campaign conducted in March 2013. In interiors, total particulate PAHs ranged from 1.53 to 4.96 ng/m(3) while outdoor air contained from 2.75 to 3.48 ng/m(3). In addition, gaseous toxicants, i.e., NO2, NOx , SO2, O3, and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene isomers), were determined both in internal and external air. To solve the origin of indoor and outdoor PAHs, several source apportionment methods were applied. Multivariate analysis revealed that emissions from motor vehicles, biomass burning for heating purposes, and soil resuspension were the major sources of PAHs in the city. No linear correlation was established between indoor and outdoor values for PM2.5 and BTEX; the respective indoor/outdoor concentration ratios exceed unity except for PM2.5 in the no smoking home and benzene in all school floors. This suggests that important internal sources such as tobacco smoking, cleaning products, and resuspension dust contributed to indoor pollution. Using the monitoring stations of ARPA Lazio regional network as reference, the percentage within PAH group of benzo[a]pyrene, which is the WHO marker for the carcinogenic risk estimates, was ca. 50% higher in all locations investigated.

  15. Indoor air quality at life and work environments in Rome, Italy.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, P; Balducci, C; Perilli, M; Vichi, F; Imperiali, A; Cecinato, A

    2016-02-01

    The air quality of three different microenvironments (school, dwelling, and coffee bar) located in the city of Rome, Italy, was assessed. Indoor and outdoor concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with PM2.5 particles were determined during an intensive 3-week sampling campaign conducted in March 2013. In interiors, total particulate PAHs ranged from 1.53 to 4.96 ng/m(3) while outdoor air contained from 2.75 to 3.48 ng/m(3). In addition, gaseous toxicants, i.e., NO2, NOx , SO2, O3, and BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene isomers), were determined both in internal and external air. To solve the origin of indoor and outdoor PAHs, several source apportionment methods were applied. Multivariate analysis revealed that emissions from motor vehicles, biomass burning for heating purposes, and soil resuspension were the major sources of PAHs in the city. No linear correlation was established between indoor and outdoor values for PM2.5 and BTEX; the respective indoor/outdoor concentration ratios exceed unity except for PM2.5 in the no smoking home and benzene in all school floors. This suggests that important internal sources such as tobacco smoking, cleaning products, and resuspension dust contributed to indoor pollution. Using the monitoring stations of ARPA Lazio regional network as reference, the percentage within PAH group of benzo[a]pyrene, which is the WHO marker for the carcinogenic risk estimates, was ca. 50% higher in all locations investigated. PMID:26490929

  16. Sphingomonas aeria sp. nov. from indoor air of a pharmaceutical environment.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong Kyo; Han, Ji-Hye; Kim, Tae-Su; Joung, Yochan; Cho, Sung-Heun; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Kim, Seung Bum

    2015-01-01

    A proteobacterial strain designated R1-3(T) was isolated from indoor air of a pharmaceutical environment. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, oxidase- and catalase-positive, aerobic, motile and rod-shaped. Strain R1-3(T) grew optimally at pH 7, 30 °C and in 0-2 % NaCl on R2A agar. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain R1-3(T) belongs to the genus Sphingomonas, and is closely related to Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 29837(T) (98.4 % sequence similarity). However, the DNA-DNA relatedness between the two strains was 43 ± 5 % (reciprocal = 37 ± 3 %), which was well below the suggested level for species distinction. Sphingomonas yabuuchiae GTC868(T) (97.7 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Sphingomonas pseudosanguinis G1-2(T) (97.6 %) were also found as distantly related taxa. Strain R1-3(T) was sensitive to most of the tested antibiotics except for erythromycin and streptomycin. The major fatty acid was a summed feature consisting of C18:1 ω7c and/or C18:1 ω6c, and minor proportions of C14:0 2-OH, C16:0 and a summed feature consisting of C16:1 ω7c and/or C16:1 ω6c were also present. The DNA G + C content was 67.2 ± 1.0 mol%. The major polyamines were sym-homospermidine and spermidine. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, and minor amounts of a sphingoglycolipid, a phospholipid, an aminoglycolipid and an unidentified lipid were also present. The phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic data not only supported the affiliation of strain R1-3(T) to the genus Sphingomonas, but also distinguished R1-3(T) from related species. On the basis of physiological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic evidences, strain R1-3(T) clearly merits recognition as a novel species of Sphingomonas, for which the name Sphingomonas aeria sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is R1-3(T) (= KCTC 42061(T) = JCM 19859(T)).

  17. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the indoor environment and associations with prenatal exposure.

    PubMed

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Thomsen, Marianne; Frederiksen, Marie; Pedersen, Marie; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2011-01-01

    As part of a larger exposure study, samples of dust and indoor air were collected in the homes of 43 pregnant women living in the Copenhagen area (Denmark) and analysed for 12 polybrominated diphenyl ethers using GC-MS. A second dust sample collected after delivery was analysed for BDE-183 and BDE-209, which were highly correlated with the pre-delivery samples, but did not reproduce the actual values. Concentrations as high as 80 μg/g were measured for the dominant BDE congener BDE-209, with median concentrations of 332 and 432 ng/g, respectively, in pre- and post-delivery dust samples. In 12% of the dust samples, the concentration of BDE-209 was lower than that of the summed concentration of PentaBDE congeners. The median concentrations of BDE-47 and BDE-99 in dust were 16.9 and 13.6 ng/g, respectively. The dust concentrations were in line with other European studies and confirmed previously established geographical differences between continental Europe and North America. Additional octa- and nonaBDE congeners (BDE-197, BDE-203, BDE-206, BDE-207, and BDE-208) were analysed in dust and analytical issues were discussed as these congeners also can be a product of thermal degradation of BDE-209 in gas chromatographic analysis. BDE-206 was the dominating nonaBDE, with median and maximum concentrations of 12.8 and 2217 ng/g, respectively, but the ratio of nonaBDEs to the sum of nona- and decaBDEs was relatively constant, despite a large range in absolute dust concentrations. While the congeners of the PentaBDE mixture were highly inter-correlated for both dust and air, no correlation was found with BDE-209 in either matrix. Air concentrations were relatively high in an international context, with median concentrations of 134, 63.7 and 119 pg/m³ for BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209, respectively, and not correlated with dust concentrations. Additional placenta data were available for the study group and found to correlate significantly with dust concentrations for some

  18. Low Quality of Basic Caregiving Environments in Child Care: Actual Reality or Artifact of Scoring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Deborah J.; Guss, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Quality Rating Improvement Systems (QRIS) frequently include the Infant-Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ITERS-R) as part of rating and improving child care quality. However, studies utilizing the ITERS-R consistently report low quality, especially for basic caregiving items. This research examined whether the low scores reflected the…

  19. Investigation of microbial community isolated from indoor artworks and air environment: identification, biodegradative abilities, and DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Pangallo, Domenico; Chovanová, Katarina; Simonovicová, Alexandra; Ferianc, Peter

    2009-03-01

    This study deals with establishing the characteristics of a microbial community isolated from indoor artworks and the surrounding air environment. It is one of the few studies on microbial degradation of indoor artworks. It shows the potential biodegradative risk that can occur if artworks are not exhibited and conserved in an appropriate environment. The microbial community isolated from the indoor artworks and air environment was examined by cultural and molecular methods. Different plate assays were used to screen the biodegradative activity of the isolated microflora: Remazol Brilliant Blue R, phenol red, and Azure B for the ligninolytic properties; Ostazin brilliant red H-3B for cellulose degradation; CaCO3 glucose agar for solubilization activity; and B4 agar for biomineralization. To type the bacterial and fungal isolates, 2 PCR methods, repetitive extragenic palindromes (REP) and random amplified microsatellite polymorphisms (RAMP) were used. The art objects were principally colonized by fungi. The most commonly isolated strains were represented by hyphomycetes of the genera Penicillium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Chaetomium. Members of these genera showed intensive biodegradation activity, both on wood and on stone. Bacteria were predominant in the air, exhibiting complex communities, both in the air and on the artworks. The most frequently isolated genera were Bacillus and Staphylococcus with extensive biodegradation abilities. REP-PCR revealed high variability within strains belonging to the same genus. RAMP is a new PCR-based method, used in this research for the first time to cluster the microfilamentous fungi and to characterize and select especially Penicillium and Aspergillus strains, which were isolated in a large number.

  20. Experimental study using infrared thermography on the convective heat transfer of a TGV brake disc in the actual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siroux, Monica; Harmand, Souad; Desmet, Bernard

    2002-07-01

    We present an experimental identification of the local and mean Nusselt number from a rotating TGV brake disk model in the actual environment and exposed to an air flow parallel to the disk surface. This method is based on the use of a heated thermally thick disk combined with the technique of temperature measurement by infrared thermography. The local and mean convective heat transfer coefficient from the disk surface is identified by solving the steady state heat equation by a finite difference method using the experimental temperature distribution as boundary conditions. The experimental setup is constituted of a model disk with all the representative parts of the actual TGV brake system. The disk and its actual environment are inside a wind tunnel test section, so that the rotational disk speed and the air flow velocity can be varied. Tests were carried out for rotational speeds w between 325 and 2000 rpm (rotational Reynolds number Re between 88,500 and 545,000), and for an air flow velocity U ranging between 0 and 12 m(DOT)s-1 (air flow Reynolds number Re0 between 0 and 153,000).

  1. Occurrence and sources of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants in dust from different indoor environments in Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Cristale, Joyce; Hurtado, Alba; Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Lacorte, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the simultaneous presence of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), nine new brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and ten organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) was investigated in dust samples collected from different indoor environments (homes, schools, theatres, a university and a Research Institute) in Barcelona, Spain. OPFRs were detected at the highest concentrations followed by PBDEs. ∑OPFRs ranged from 2053 to 72,090ngg(-1) and tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) was the most abundant compound. BDE-209 was the main PBDE congener detected (up to 14,990ngg(-1)), while other PBDEs ranged from 2.6 to 118ngg(-1). Among the studied NBFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE - up to 4432ngg(-1)) followed by bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP - up to 508ngg(-1)) were detected at the highest concentration, whereas a lower detection frequency was observed for 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and hexabromobenzene (HBB). The levels and profile of flame retardants (FRs) were characteristic of each environment, where theatres followed by homes presented the highest concentrations and schools had the lowest levels. Principal Component Analysis permitted to identify the main sources and distribution of all FRs, according to specific uses in each environment. The simultaneous presence of all FR families in indoor dust points to the need to monitor these compounds to minimize human exposure.

  2. Occurrence and sources of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants in dust from different indoor environments in Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Cristale, Joyce; Hurtado, Alba; Gómez-Canela, Cristian; Lacorte, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the simultaneous presence of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), nine new brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and ten organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) was investigated in dust samples collected from different indoor environments (homes, schools, theatres, a university and a Research Institute) in Barcelona, Spain. OPFRs were detected at the highest concentrations followed by PBDEs. ∑OPFRs ranged from 2053 to 72,090ngg(-1) and tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP) was the most abundant compound. BDE-209 was the main PBDE congener detected (up to 14,990ngg(-1)), while other PBDEs ranged from 2.6 to 118ngg(-1). Among the studied NBFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE - up to 4432ngg(-1)) followed by bis(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate (BEH-TEBP - up to 508ngg(-1)) were detected at the highest concentration, whereas a lower detection frequency was observed for 2-ethylhexyl 2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), pentabromotoluene (PBT) and hexabromobenzene (HBB). The levels and profile of flame retardants (FRs) were characteristic of each environment, where theatres followed by homes presented the highest concentrations and schools had the lowest levels. Principal Component Analysis permitted to identify the main sources and distribution of all FRs, according to specific uses in each environment. The simultaneous presence of all FR families in indoor dust points to the need to monitor these compounds to minimize human exposure. PMID:27179204

  3. OBSTRUCTIVE LUNG DISEASE AND EXPOSURE TO BURNING BIOMASS FUEL IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT.

    PubMed

    Diette, Gregory B; Accinelli, Roberto A; Balmes, John R; Buist, A Sonia; Checkley, William; Garbe, Paul; Hansel, Nadia N; Kapil, Vikas; Gordon, Stephen; Lagat, David K; Yip, Fuyuen; Mortimer, Kevin; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Roth, Christa; Schwaninger, Julie M; Punturieri, Antonello; Kiley, James

    2012-09-01

    It is estimated that up to half of the world's population burns biomass fuel (wood, crop residues, animal dung and coal) for indoor uses such as cooking, lighting and heating. As a result, a large proportion of women and children are exposed to high levels of household air pollution (HAP). The short and long term effects of these exposures on the respiratory health of this population are not clearly understood. On May 9-11, 2011 NIH held an international workshop on the "Health Burden of Indoor Air Pollution on Women and Children," in Arlington, VA. To gather information on the knowledge base on this topic and identify research gaps, ahead of the meeting we conducted a literature search using PubMed to identify publications that related to HAP, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Abstracts were all analyzed and we report on those considered by the respiratory sub study group at the meeting to be most relevant to the field. Many of the studies published are symptom-based studies (as opposed to objective measures of lung function or clinical examination etc.) and measurement of HAP was not done. Many found some association between indoor exposures to biomass smoke as assessed by stove type (e.g., open fire vs. liquid propane gas) and respiratory symptoms such as wheeze and cough. Among the studies that examined objective measures (e.g. spirometry) as a health outcome, the data supporting an association between biomass smoke exposure and COPD in adult women are fairly robust, but the findings for asthma are mixed. If an association was observed between the exposures and lung function, most data seemed to demonstrate mild to moderate reductions in lung function, the pathophysiological mechanisms of which need to be investigated. In the end, the group identified a series of scientific gaps and opportunities for research that need to be addressed to better understand the respiratory effects of exposure to indoor burning of the different forms of

  4. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-08-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses.

  5. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M. ); Hopke, P.K. )

    1993-07-01

    The theoretical potential for the formation of clusters of vapor-phase organic compounds found in indoor air around the [sup 218]PoO[sub x][sup +] ion was investigated as well as which compounds were most likely to form clusters. A compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds has been made for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. Forty-four volatile and semivolatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 that have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the [sup 218]PoO[sub x][sup +] ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones, and the acetates) and the semivolatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos). Although the estimated diameters are consistent with the measured diameters for the unattached fraction, the state of experimental and theoretical knowledge in this area is not sufficiently developed to judge the quantitative validity of these predictions. 48 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  6. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13-52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  7. Exposure to Air Ions in Indoor Environments: Experimental Study with Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Peter; Kundi, Michael; Panny, Michael; Tappler, Peter; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century there has been a scientific debate about the potential effects of air ions on biological tissues, wellbeing and health. Effects on the cardiovascular and respiratory system as well as on mental health have been described. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in this topic. In an experimental indoor setting we conducted a double-blind cross-over trial to determine if higher levels of air ions, generated by a special wall paint, affect cognitive performance, wellbeing, lung function, and cardiovascular function. Twenty healthy non-smoking volunteers (10 female, 10 male) participated in the study. Levels of air ions, volatile organic compounds and indoor climate factors were determined by standardized measurement procedures. Air ions affected the autonomous nervous system (in terms of an increase of sympathetic activity accompanied by a small decrease of vagal efferent activity): In the test room with higher levels of air ions (2194/cm3 vs. 1038/cm3) a significantly higher low to high frequency ratio of the electrocardiography (ECG) beat-to-beat interval spectrogram was found. Furthermore, six of nine subtests of a cognitive performance test were solved better, three of them statistically significant (verbal factor, reasoning, and perceptual speed), in the room with higher ion concentration. There was no influence of air ions on lung function and on wellbeing. Our results indicate slightly activating and cognitive performance enhancing effects of a short-term exposure to higher indoor air ion concentrations. PMID:26569277

  8. Respiratory health effects of the indoor environment in a population of Dutch children

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkstra, L.; Houthuijs, D.; Brunekreef, B.; Akkerman, I.; Boleij, J.S. )

    1990-11-01

    The effect of indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide on respiratory health was studied over a period of 2 yr in a population of nonsmoking Dutch children 6 to 12 yr of age. Lung function was measured at the schools, and information on respiratory symptoms was collected from a self-administered questionnaire completed by the parents of the children. Nitrogen dioxide was measured in the homes of all children with Palmes' diffusion tubes. In addition, information on smoking and dampness in the home was collected by questionnaire. There was no relationship between exposure to nitrogen dioxide in the home and respiratory symptoms. Respiratory symptoms were found to be associated with exposure to tobacco smoke and home dampness. There was a weak, negative association between maximal midexpiratory flow (MMEF) and exposure to nitrogen dioxide. FEV1, peak expiratory flow, and MMEF were all negatively associated with exposure to tobacco smoke. Home dampness was not associated with pulmonary function. Lung function growth, measured over a period of 2 yr, was not consistently associated with any of the indoor exposure variables. The development of respiratory symptoms over time was not associated with indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide. There was a significant association between exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in the home and the development of wheeze. There was also a significant association between home dampness and the development of cough.

  9. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  10. Exposure to Air Ions in Indoor Environments: Experimental Study with Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Peter; Kundi, Michael; Panny, Michael; Tappler, Peter; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2015-11-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century there has been a scientific debate about the potential effects of air ions on biological tissues, wellbeing and health. Effects on the cardiovascular and respiratory system as well as on mental health have been described. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in this topic. In an experimental indoor setting we conducted a double-blind cross-over trial to determine if higher levels of air ions, generated by a special wall paint, affect cognitive performance, wellbeing, lung function, and cardiovascular function. Twenty healthy non-smoking volunteers (10 female, 10 male) participated in the study. Levels of air ions, volatile organic compounds and indoor climate factors were determined by standardized measurement procedures. Air ions affected the autonomous nervous system (in terms of an increase of sympathetic activity accompanied by a small decrease of vagal efferent activity): In the test room with higher levels of air ions (2194/cm³ vs. 1038/cm³) a significantly higher low to high frequency ratio of the electrocardiography (ECG) beat-to-beat interval spectrogram was found. Furthermore, six of nine subtests of a cognitive performance test were solved better, three of them statistically significant (verbal factor, reasoning, and perceptual speed), in the room with higher ion concentration. There was no influence of air ions on lung function and on wellbeing. Our results indicate slightly activating and cognitive performance enhancing effects of a short-term exposure to higher indoor air ion concentrations.

  11. Seasonal variation in airborne endotoxin levels in indoor environments with different micro-environmental factors in Seoul, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Ho; Park, Dong Jin; Park, Wha Me; Park, Dong Uk; Ahn, Jae Kyoung; Yoon, Chung Sik

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the variation over a year in airborne endotoxin levels in the indoor environment of five university laboratories in Seoul, South Korea, and examined the micro-environmental factors that influenced endotoxin levels. These included temperature, relative humidity, CO2, CO, illumination, and wind velocity. A total of 174 air samples were collected and analyzed using the kinetic limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Endotoxin levels ranged from <0.001 to 8.90EU/m(3), with an overall geometric mean of 0.240EU/m(3). Endotoxin levels showed significantly negative correlation with temperature (r=-0.529, p<0.001), CO2 (r=-0.213, p<0.001) and illumination (r=-0.538, p<0.001). Endotoxin levels tended to be higher in winter. Endotoxin levels in laboratories with rabbits were significantly higher than those of laboratories with mice. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the environmental factors affecting endotoxin levels were temperature (coefficient=-0.388, p<0.001) and illumination (coefficient=-0.370, p<0.001). Strategies aimed at reducing airborne endotoxin levels in the indoor environments may be most effective if they focus on illumination. PMID:26656510

  12. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory. PMID:26389906

  13. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-09-15

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory.

  14. INS/GPS/LiDAR Integrated Navigation System for Urban and Indoor Environments Using Hybrid Scan Matching Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanbin; Liu, Shifei; Atia, Mohamed M.; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2015-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of the complementary characteristics of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to provide periodic corrections to Inertial Navigation System (INS) alternatively in different environmental conditions. In open sky, where GPS signals are available and LiDAR measurements are sparse, GPS is integrated with INS. Meanwhile, in confined outdoor environments and indoors, where GPS is unreliable or unavailable and LiDAR measurements are rich, LiDAR replaces GPS to integrate with INS. This paper also proposes an innovative hybrid scan matching algorithm that combines the feature-based scan matching method and Iterative Closest Point (ICP) based scan matching method. The algorithm can work and transit between two modes depending on the number of matched line features over two scans, thus achieving efficiency and robustness concurrently. Two integration schemes of INS and LiDAR with hybrid scan matching algorithm are implemented and compared. Real experiments are performed on an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) for both outdoor and indoor environments. Experimental results show that the multi-sensor integrated system can remain sub-meter navigation accuracy during the whole trajectory. PMID:26389906

  15. Long-term measurement of indoor thermal environment and energy performance in a detached wooden house with passive solar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Yoshimi; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Chikashi

    1998-07-01

    The indoor thermal environment, energy performance and energy consumption for a detached wooden house equipped with two passive solar systems, were investigated over a period of three years. The house with a floor area of 188 m{sup 2} was constructed in the autumn of 1993 in Sendai, Japan; and was well insulated and very airtight compared with other houses in Japan. There are six occupants. Heating equipment is comprises of a thermal storage space heater using night-time electricity and a vented firewood furnace on the first floor. Each room is ventilated all day by a central ventilation system. Two passive solar systems were incorporated: a concrete floor in the southern perimeter of the living room as a direct gain system, and an earth tube embedded around the circumference of the house to supply fresh air. The principal results obtained are as follows: (1) The indoor environment during the heating season was more thermally comfortable, compared with that or ordinary houses in Japan. (2) The concrete floor played a role of thermal storage, which absorbed and released heat for decreasing the fluctuation of room temperature. (3) The earth tube supplied air with lower temperature in the summer and higher temperature in the winter to the room, that the outdoor air temperature. This thermal performance did not decrease in spite of the long-term use. (4) The annual amount of energy consumption of this house was less than that of ordinary houses in the northern part of Japan.

  16. Seasonal variation in airborne endotoxin levels in indoor environments with different micro-environmental factors in Seoul, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Ho; Park, Dong Jin; Park, Wha Me; Park, Dong Uk; Ahn, Jae Kyoung; Yoon, Chung Sik

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the variation over a year in airborne endotoxin levels in the indoor environment of five university laboratories in Seoul, South Korea, and examined the micro-environmental factors that influenced endotoxin levels. These included temperature, relative humidity, CO2, CO, illumination, and wind velocity. A total of 174 air samples were collected and analyzed using the kinetic limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Endotoxin levels ranged from <0.001 to 8.90EU/m(3), with an overall geometric mean of 0.240EU/m(3). Endotoxin levels showed significantly negative correlation with temperature (r=-0.529, p<0.001), CO2 (r=-0.213, p<0.001) and illumination (r=-0.538, p<0.001). Endotoxin levels tended to be higher in winter. Endotoxin levels in laboratories with rabbits were significantly higher than those of laboratories with mice. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the environmental factors affecting endotoxin levels were temperature (coefficient=-0.388, p<0.001) and illumination (coefficient=-0.370, p<0.001). Strategies aimed at reducing airborne endotoxin levels in the indoor environments may be most effective if they focus on illumination.

  17. Evaluation of sensory irritation of delta3-carene and turpentine, and acceptable levels of monoterpenes in occupational and indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Kasanen, J P; Pasanen, A L; Pasanen, P; Liesivuori, J; Kosma, V M; Alarie, Y

    1999-05-28

    The standard mouse bioassay was used for obtaining the RD50 (i.e., the concentration that causes a 50% decrease in respiratory frequency) and for estimating the irritation properties of d-delta3-carene (i.e., (+)-delta3-carene) and commercial turpentine. The chemicals studied possess mainly sensory irritation properties similar to the previously studied monoterpenes, pinenes. The irritation potency of d-delta3-carene (RD50 = 1345 ppm) was almost equal to that of d-pinenes. Thus, d-delta3-carene was about four times more potent as a sensory irritant than I-beta-pinene, whereas the difference with I-alpha-pinene was more marked; as a sensory irritant, I-alpha-pinene is almost inactive. Based on sensory irritation potency and physicochemical and structural properties of pinenes and delta3-carene, the potency of a closely related monoterpene, limonene, is discussed. For commercial turpentine, a mixture of monoterpenes (mainly d-delta3-carene, I-beta-pinene, alpha-pinenes, and limonenes), the RD50 (1173 ppm) was the same order of magnitude as those of d-pinenes and d-delta3-carene. Apparently, d-monoterpenes are responsible for the sensory irritation caused by turpentine. In the wood industry and in the indoor air of nonindustrial environments, monoterpenes are thought to be one of the causative agents for irritation symptoms. The occupational exposure limit (OEL) of turpentine (100 ppm in Finland and the United States) is also used for individual monoterpenes, excluding limonene. Using results from this and our previous study, proposed OELs and recommended indoor levels (RILs) for selected monoterpenes and turpentine were determined based on their RD50 values. According to our studies, the present OEL of turpentine (100 ppm; 560 mg/m3) in Finland and in the United States seems to be suitable only for I-pinenes. For d-monoterpenes and turpentine, an OEL about three times lower is suggested. Our results show that recommended indoor levels (RILs) for monoterpenes are high

  18. Estimation of electromagnetic dosimetric values from non-ionizing radiofrequency fields in an indoor commercial airplane environment.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Erik; Arpón, Javier; Azpilicueta, Leire; López, Peio; de Miguel, Silvia; Ramos, Victoria; Falcone, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    In this article, the impact of topology as well as morphology of a complex indoor environment such as a commercial aircraft in the estimation of dosimetric assessment is presented. By means of an in-house developed deterministic 3D ray-launching code, estimation of electric field amplitude as a function of position for the complete volume of a commercial passenger airplane is obtained. Estimation of electromagnetic field exposure in this environment is challenging, due to the complexity and size of the scenario, as well as to the large metallic content, giving rise to strong multipath components. By performing the calculation with a deterministic technique, the complete scenario can be considered with an optimized balance between accuracy and computational cost. The proposed method can aid in the assessment of electromagnetic dosimetry in the future deployment of embarked wireless systems in commercial aircraft.

  19. OBSTRUCTIVE LUNG DISEASE AND EXPOSURE TO BURNING BIOMASS FUEL IN THE INDOOR ENVIRONMENT

    PubMed Central

    Diette, Gregory B.; Accinelli, Roberto A.; Balmes, John R.; Buist, A. Sonia; Checkley, William; Garbe, Paul; Hansel, Nadia N.; Kapil, Vikas; Gordon, Stephen; Lagat, David K.; Yip, Fuyuen; Mortimer, Kevin; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Roth, Christa; Schwaninger, Julie M.; Punturieri, Antonello; Kiley, James

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that up to half of the world’s population burns biomass fuel (wood, crop residues, animal dung and coal) for indoor uses such as cooking, lighting and heating. As a result, a large proportion of women and children are exposed to high levels of household air pollution (HAP). The short and long term effects of these exposures on the respiratory health of this population are not clearly understood. On May 9–11, 2011 NIH held an international workshop on the "Health Burden of Indoor Air Pollution on Women and Children," in Arlington, VA. To gather information on the knowledge base on this topic and identify research gaps, ahead of the meeting we conducted a literature search using PubMed to identify publications that related to HAP, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Abstracts were all analyzed and we report on those considered by the respiratory sub study group at the meeting to be most relevant to the field. Many of the studies published are symptom-based studies (as opposed to objective measures of lung function or clinical examination etc.) and measurement of HAP was not done. Many found some association between indoor exposures to biomass smoke as assessed by stove type (e.g., open fire vs. liquid propane gas) and respiratory symptoms such as wheeze and cough. Among the studies that examined objective measures (e.g. spirometry) as a health outcome, the data supporting an association between biomass smoke exposure and COPD in adult women are fairly robust, but the findings for asthma are mixed. If an association was observed between the exposures and lung function, most data seemed to demonstrate mild to moderate reductions in lung function, the pathophysiological mechanisms of which need to be investigated. In the end, the group identified a series of scientific gaps and opportunities for research that need to be addressed to better understand the respiratory effects of exposure to indoor burning of the different forms of

  20. A conceptual model to estimate cost effectiveness of the indoor environment improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.

    2003-06-01

    Macroeconomic analyses indicate a high cost to society of a deteriorated indoor climate. The few example calculations performed to date indicate that measures taken to improve IEQ are highly cost-effective when health and productivity benefits are considered. We believe that cost-benefit analyses of building designs and operations should routinely incorporate health and productivity impacts. As an initial step, we developed a conceptual model that shows the links between improvements in IEQ and the financial gains from reductions in medical care and sick leave, improved work performance, lower employee turn over, and reduced maintenance due to fewer complaints.

  1. Particulate matter analysis in indoor environments of urban and rural primary schools using passive sampling methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canha, Nuno; Almeida, Susana Marta; Freitas, Maria do Carmo; Trancoso, Maria; Sousa, Ana; Mouro, Filomena; Wolterbeek, Hubert Th.

    2014-02-01

    Passive sampling methodology was applied to collect particulate matter (PM) in classrooms of urban and rural primary schools. The samples were taken during a year by passive deposition allowing the study of seasonal variability of the particles masses and chemical content. Chemical characterization of the collected particles was performed in order to measure its soluble ions content and elemental composition. To identify the main polluting sources, correlations between parameters and enrichment factors were studied. Higher particle masses concentrations were registered in autumn, with a mean of 1.54 ± 0.74 μg day-1 cm-2. The major element in the collected particles was calcium, representing 63-73% of the analyzed mass of the particles inside the urban classrooms. In the rural cluster, calcium remained the major component but with a slight lower contribution to the overall particles composition (42-46%). The calcium source was hypothesized to be the chalk used in the blackboards of the classrooms due to a strong correlation found between Ca2+ and SO42-. Soil re-suspension, traffic and other anthropogenic emission sources were also identified. Analysis showed enrichment of the particles with Br, Ca, Zn and Sb in the urban cluster and enrichment of the same elements, except for Ca, in the rural cluster. The comparison between the results from both clusters allowed the identification of classrooms with higher particles concentrations that can indicate potential indoor air quality problems (reflected by an indoor accumulation of pollutants).

  2. Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.

    1992-01-01

    During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor [sup 222]Rn and in [sup 222]Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house [sup 222]Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater [sup 222]Rn concentration than the measured outdoor [sup 222]Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding [sup 222]Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

  3. A Depth Video Sensor-Based Life-Logging Human Activity Recognition System for Elderly Care in Smart Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Ahmad; Kamal, Shaharyar; Kim, Daijin

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in depth video sensors technologies have made human activity recognition (HAR) realizable for elderly monitoring applications. Although conventional HAR utilizes RGB video sensors, HAR could be greatly improved with depth video sensors which produce depth or distance information. In this paper, a depth-based life logging HAR system is designed to recognize the daily activities of elderly people and turn these environments into an intelligent living space. Initially, a depth imaging sensor is used to capture depth silhouettes. Based on these silhouettes, human skeletons with joint information are produced which are further used for activity recognition and generating their life logs. The life-logging system is divided into two processes. Firstly, the training system includes data collection using a depth camera, feature extraction and training for each activity via Hidden Markov Models. Secondly, after training, the recognition engine starts to recognize the learned activities and produces life logs. The system was evaluated using life logging features against principal component and independent component features and achieved satisfactory recognition rates against the conventional approaches. Experiments conducted on the smart indoor activity datasets and the MSRDailyActivity3D dataset show promising results. The proposed system is directly applicable to any elderly monitoring system, such as monitoring healthcare problems for elderly people, or examining the indoor activities of people at home, office or hospital. PMID:24991942

  4. A depth video sensor-based life-logging human activity recognition system for elderly care in smart indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Ahmad; Kamal, Shaharyar; Kim, Daijin

    2014-07-02

    Recent advancements in depth video sensors technologies have made human activity recognition (HAR) realizable for elderly monitoring applications. Although conventional HAR utilizes RGB video sensors, HAR could be greatly improved with depth video sensors which produce depth or distance information. In this paper, a depth-based life logging HAR system is designed to recognize the daily activities of elderly people and turn these environments into an intelligent living space. Initially, a depth imaging sensor is used to capture depth silhouettes. Based on these silhouettes, human skeletons with joint information are produced which are further used for activity recognition and generating their life logs. The life-logging system is divided into two processes. Firstly, the training system includes data collection using a depth camera, feature extraction and training for each activity via Hidden Markov Models. Secondly, after training, the recognition engine starts to recognize the learned activities and produces life logs. The system was evaluated using life logging features against principal component and independent component features and achieved satisfactory recognition rates against the conventional approaches. Experiments conducted on the smart indoor activity datasets and the MSRDailyActivity3D dataset show promising results. The proposed system is directly applicable to any elderly monitoring system, such as monitoring healthcare problems for elderly people, or examining the indoor activities of people at home, office or hospital.

  5. Your Indoor Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exchange: The Early Childhood Leaders' Magazine Since 1978, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In the July 24, 2007 edition of "ExchangeEveryday", readers were asked to submit great indoor space elements from their early childhood programs. Readers sent photographs and brief descriptions of creative elements of their indoor environments. A sampling of ideas are shown on this article.

  6. Analysis and Description of HOLTIN Service Provision for AECG monitoring in Complex Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Led, Santiago; Azpilicueta, Leire; Aguirre, Erik; de Espronceda, Miguel Martínez; Serrano, Luis; Falcone, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a novel ambulatory ECG monitoring device developed in-house called HOLTIN is analyzed when operating in complex indoor scenarios. The HOLTIN system is described, from the technological platform level to its functional model. In addition, by using in-house 3D ray launching simulation code, the wireless channel behavior, which enables ubiquitous operation, is performed. The effect of human body presence is taken into account by a novel simplified model embedded within the 3D Ray Launching code. Simulation as well as measurement results are presented, showing good agreement. These results may aid in the adequate deployment of this novel device to automate conventional medical processes, increasing the coverage radius and optimizing energy consumption. PMID:23584122

  7. 3rd hand smoking; heterogeneous oxidation of nicotine and secondary aerosol formation in the indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Lauren; Dubowski, Yael

    2010-05-01

    Tobacco smoking is well known as a significant source of primary indoor air pollutants. However, only recently has it been recognized that the impact of Tobacco smoking may continue even after the cigarette has been extinguished (i.e., third hand smoke) due to the effect of indoor surfaces. These surfaces may affect the fate of tobacco smoke in the form of secondary reactions and pollutants, including secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometry with Attenuated Total Reflection (FTIR-ATR) in tandem with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizing (SMPS) system was used to monitor the ozonation of cellulose sorbed nicotine and resulting SOA formation. SOA formation began at onset of ozone introduction ([O3] = 60 ± 5 ppb) with a size distribution of dp ≤ 25 nm, and was determined to be a result of heterogeneous reaction (opposed to homogeneous). SOA yield from reacted surface nicotine was on the order of 10 %. Simultaneous to SOA monitoring, FTIR-ATR spectra showed surface changes in the nicotine film as the reaction progressed, revealing a pseudo first-order surface reaction rate of 0.0026 ± 0.0008 min-1. Identified surface oxidation products included: cotinine, myosmine, methylnicotinamide and nicotyrine. Surface reaction rate was found to be partially inhibited at high relative humidity. Given the toxicity of some of the identified products (e.g., cotinine has shown potential mutagenicity and teratogenicity) and that small particles may contribute to adverse health effects, the present study indicates that exposure to 3rd hand smoke ozonation products may pose additional health risks.

  8. Aerosol transport simulations in indoor and outdoor environments using computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landazuri, Andrea C.

    This dissertation focuses on aerosol transport modeling in occupational environments and mining sites in Arizona using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The impacts of human exposure in both environments are explored with the emphasis on turbulence, wind speed, wind direction and particle sizes. Final emissions simulations involved the digitalization process of available elevation contour plots of one of the mining sites to account for realistic topographical features. The digital elevation map (DEM) of one of the sites was imported to COMSOL MULTIPHYSICSRTM for subsequent turbulence and particle simulations. Simulation results that include realistic topography show considerable deviations of wind direction. Inter-element correlation results using metal and metalloid size resolved concentration data using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) under given wind speeds and directions provided guidance on groups of metals that coexist throughout mining activities. Groups between Fe-Mg, Cr-Fe, Al-Sc, Sc-Fe, and Mg-Al are strongly correlated for unrestricted wind directions and speeds, suggesting that the source may be of soil origin (e.g. ore and tailings); also, groups of elements where Cu is present, in the coarse fraction range, may come from mechanical action mining activities and saltation phenomenon. Besides, MOUDI data under low wind speeds (<2 m/s) and at night showed a strong correlation for 1 mum particles between the groups: Sc-Be-Mg, Cr-Al, Cu-Mn, Cd-Pb-Be, Cd-Cr, Cu-Pb, Pb-Cd, As-Cd-Pb. The As-Cd-Pb correlates strongly in almost all ranges of particle sizes. When restricted low wind speeds were imposed more groups of elements are evident and this may be justified with the fact that at lower speeds particles are more likely to settle. When linking these results with CFD simulations and Pb-isotope results it is concluded that the source of elements found in association with Pb in the fine fraction come from the ore that is subsequently processed

  9. Experimental study using infrared thermography on the convective heat transfer of a TGV brake disc in the actual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siroux, Monica; Harmand, Souad; Desmet, Bernard

    2001-03-01

    Local and mean convective heat transfer from a rotating TGV brake disc model in the actual environment and submitted to an air flow parallel to the disc surface is studied experimentally in this paper. The experimental technique is based on the use of a heated thermally thick disc combined with the technique of temperature measurement by infrared thermography. The local convective heat transfer coefficient from the disc surface is identified by solving the steady state heat equation by finite difference method using the experimental temperature distribution as boundary conditions. These tests were carried out for rotational speed (omega) between 325 and 2000 rpm (rotational Reynolds number Re between 88500 and 545000) so as to obtain laminar and turbulent flow on the disc, and for air flow velocity U ranging between 0 and 12 m s-1 (air flow Reynolds number Re0 between 0 and 153000).

  10. Inter- and intra-subject variability of kinetics of airway exhalation and deposition of particulate matter in indoor polluted environments.

    PubMed

    Goldoni, Matteo; Acampa, Olga; Longo, Sonia; Poli, Diana; Tagliaferri, Sara; Corradi, Massimo; Renzulli, Francesco Saverio; Mutti, Antonio

    2012-04-01

    PM(2.5) generated by indoor combustion activities can contribute significantly to personal PM exposure. The aims of this study were: (1) to validate a device specifically designed to study the kinetics of particle exhalation and the percentage of airway particle deposition (%DEP) in polluted indoor environments (welding fumes, environmental tobacco smoke - ETS) and (2) to assess the intra- and inter-subject variability of the signal. The device was tested on 14 subjects exposed to welding fumes and 10 subjects exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), performing repeated measures at different environmental PM concentrations. The intra-subject variability of the signal for particles with diameter 0.3-1.0 μm showed a geometric mean of %CV always below 6%, despite the values of %DEP. In the welding fume study, the increase in airborne 0.5-1.0 μm PM concentrations between the consulting room and production department was explainable in terms of increased density due to the metallic composition of particles. The %DEP of 0.3-1.0 μm ETS particles decreased with airborne PM concentration due to the technical limits of a laser particle counter and the perturbation induced by the physical characteristics of ETS PM. However, also at those extreme conditions, the signal remained repeatable and the individual susceptibility to PM remained substantially unaltered. In conclusion, the versatility and portability of our device, together with the repeatability of the signal, confirmed that the kinetics of exhaled particles and %DEP could be routinely measured in polluted environments and used to define individual susceptibility to airborne particles.

  11. High indoor CO2 concentrations in an office environment increases the transcutaneous CO2 level and sleepiness during cognitive work.

    PubMed

    Vehviläinen, Tommi; Lindholm, Harri; Rintamäki, Hannu; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Hirvonen, Ari; Niemi, Olli; Vinha, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform a multiparametric analysis on the environmental factors, the physiological stress reactions in the body, the measured alertness, and the subjective symptoms during simulated office work. Volunteer male subjects were monitored during three 4-hr work meetings in an office room, both in a ventilated and a non-ventilated environment. The environmental parameters measured included CO(2), temperature, and relative humidity. The physiological test battery consisted of measuring autonomic nervous system functions, salivary stress hormones, blood's CO(2)- content and oxygen saturation, skin temperatures, thermal sensations, vigilance, and sleepiness. The study shows that we can see physiological changes caused by high CO(2) concentration. The findings support the view that low or moderate level increases in concentration of CO(2) in indoor air might cause elevation in the blood's transcutaneously assessed CO(2). The observed findings are higher CO(2) concentrations in tissues, changes in heart rate variation, and an increase of peripheral blood circulation during exposure to elevated CO(2) concentration. The subjective parameters and symptoms support the physiological findings. This study shows that a high concentration of CO(2) in indoor air seem to be one parameter causing physiological effects, which can decrease the facility user's functional ability. The correct amount of ventilation with relation to the number of people using the facility, functional air distribution, and regular breaks can counteract the decrease in functional ability. The findings of the study suggest that merely increasing ventilation is not necessarily a rational solution from a technical-economical viewpoint. Instead or in addition, more comprehensive, anthropocentric planning of space is needed as well as instructions and new kinds of reference values for the design and realization of office environments.

  12. Use of 3D laser radar for navigation of unmanned aerial and ground vehicles in urban and indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uijt de Haag, Maarten; Venable, Don; Smearcheck, Mark

    2007-04-01

    This paper discusses the integration of Inertial measurements with measurements from a three-dimensional (3D) imaging sensor for position and attitude determination of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and autonomous ground vehicles (AGV) in urban or indoor environments. To enable operation of UAVs and AGVs at any time in any environment a Precision Navigation, Attitude, and Time (PNAT) capability is required that is robust and not solely dependent on the Global Positioning System (GPS). In urban and indoor environments a GPS position capability may not only be unavailable due to shadowing, significant signal attenuation or multipath, but also due to intentional denial or deception. Although deep integration of GPS and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) data may prove to be a viable solution an alternative method is being discussed in this paper. The alternative solution is based on 3D imaging sensor technologies such as Flash Ladar (Laser Radar). Flash Ladar technology consists of a modulated laser emitter coupled with a focal plane array detector and the required optics. Like a conventional camera this sensor creates an "image" of the environment, but producing a 2D image where each pixel has associated intensity vales the flash Ladar generates an image where each pixel has an associated range and intensity value. Integration of flash Ladar with the attitude from the IMU allows creation of a 3-D scene. Current low-cost Flash Ladar technology is capable of greater than 100 x 100 pixel resolution with 5 mm depth resolution at a 30 Hz frame rate. The proposed algorithm first converts the 3D imaging sensor measurements to a point cloud of the 3D, next, significant environmental features such as planar features (walls), line features or point features (corners) are extracted and associated from one 3D imaging sensor frame to the next. Finally, characteristics of these features such as the normal or direction vectors are used to compute the platform position and attitude

  13. Assessment and determinants of airborne bacterial and fungal concentrations in different indoor environments: Homes, child day-care centres, primary schools and elderly care centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João Cavaleiro; Pereira, Cristiana; Teixeira, João Paulo; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    Until now the influence of risk factors resulting from exposure to biological agents in indoor air has been far less studied than outdoor pollution; therefore the uncertainty of health risks, and how to effectively prevent these, remains. This study aimed (i) to quantify airborne cultivable bacterial and fungal concentrations in four different types of indoor environment as well as to identify the recovered fungi; (ii) to assess the impact of outdoor bacterial and fungal concentrations on indoor air; (iii) to investigate the influence of carbon dioxide (CO2), temperature and relative humidity on bacterial and fungal concentrations; and (iv) to estimate bacterial and fungal dose rate for children (3-5 years old and 8-10 years old) in comparison with the elderly. Air samples were collected in 68 homes, 9 child day-care centres, 20 primary schools and 22 elderly care centres, in a total of 264 rooms with a microbiological air sampler and using tryptic soy agar and malt extract agar culture media for bacteria and fungi growth, respectively. For each building, one outdoor representative location were identified and simultaneously studied. The results showed that child day-care centres were the indoor microenvironment with the highest median bacterial and fungal concentrations (3870 CFU/m3 and 415 CFU/m3, respectively), whereas the lowest median concentrations were observed in elderly care centres (222 CFU/m3 and 180 CFU/m3, respectively). Indoor bacterial concentrations were significantly higher than outdoor concentrations (p < 0.05); whereas the indoor/outdoor ratios for the obtained fungal concentrations were approximately around the unit. Indoor CO2 levels were associated with the bacterial concentration, probably due to occupancy and insufficient ventilation. Penicillium and Cladosporium were the most frequently occurring fungi. Children's had two times higher dose rate to biological pollutants when compared to adult individuals. Thus, due to children

  14. 15 Gbit/s indoor optical wireless systems employing fast adaptation and imaging reception in a realistic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsaadi, Fuad E.

    2016-03-01

    Optical wireless systems are promising candidates for next-generation indoor communication networks. Optical wireless technology offers freedom from spectrum regulations and, compared to current radio-frequency networks, higher data rates and increased security. This paper presents a fast adaptation method for multibeam angle and delay adaptation systems and a new spot-diffusing geometry, and also considers restrictions needed for complying with eye safety regulations. The fast adaptation algorithm reduces the computational load required to reconfigure the transmitter in the case of transmitter and/or receiver mobility. The beam clustering approach enables the transmitter to assign power to spots within the pixel's field of view (FOV) and increases the number of such spots. Thus, if the power per spot is restricted to comply with eye safety standards, the new approach, in which more spots are visible within the FOV of the pixel, leads to enhanced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Simulation results demonstrate that the techniques proposed in this paper lead to SNR improvements that enable reliable operation at data rates as high as 15 Gbit/s. These results are based on simulation and not on actual measurements or experiments.

  15. Apportioning variability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and chlordanes in indoor and outdoor environments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianlei; Jia, Chunrong

    2012-07-01

    Measurements of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in air are subject to substantial variability and uncertainty. This study apportions total variance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and chlordanes to variability and uncertainty components. Concentrations of PAHs and chlordanes were measured inside and outside of 116 residences in three large cities in the U.S. during 1999-2000. Total variance was apportioned to between-city, between-tract, between-residence, and seasonal variation, as well as measurement uncertainty using variance component analysis and log-transformed data for frequently detected compounds. Outdoors, seasonal variation was the greatest portion (44-67%) of total variance, and city effects were significant (19-24%). Indoors, seasonality dominated variability of PAH measurements (>50%). Gas-phase PAHs varied more within city than between cities; particulate-phase PAHs varied significantly between cities but were largely homogeneous within cities. Gas-phase chlordanes showed larger intra-urban variation (63%) than seasonal variation (18%). Measurement uncertainty was generally below 10% with a few exceptions occurring at very low concentrations. Results indicate a need to collect multiple-season samples to account for the large temporal variation between seasons. Samples from centrally located monitoring stations could be representative of ambient SVOCs. Variance component analysis is useful to weigh influential factors in SVOC concentrations, identify and apportion sources, evaluate method performance, and design effective monitoring programs. PMID:22652751

  16. Polyfluorinated Compounds in Serum Linked to Indoor Air in Office Environments

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Alicia J; Webster, Thomas F; Watkins, Deborah J; Nelson, Jessica W; Stapleton, Heather M; Calafat, Antonia M; Kato, Kayoko; Shoeib, Mahiba; Vieira, Verónica M; McClean, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of indoor office air on exposure to polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) among office workers. Week-long, active air sampling was conducted during the winter of 2009 in 31 offices in Boston, MA. Air samples were analyzed for fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), sulfonamides (FOSAs), and sulfonamidoethanols (FOSEs). Serum was collected from each participant (n=31) and analyzed for twelve PFCs including PFOA and PFOS. In air, FTOHs were present in the highest concentrations, particularly 8:2-FTOH (GM=9,920 pg/m3). FTOHs varied significantly by building with the highest levels observed in a newly constructed building. PFOA in serum was significantly correlated with air levels of 6:2-FTOH (r=0.43), 8:2-FTOH (r=0.60), and 10:2-FTOH (r=0.62). Collectively, FTOHs in air significantly predicted PFOA in serum (p < 0.001) and explained approximately 36% of the variation in serum PFOA concentrations. PFOS in serum was not associated with air levels of FOSAs/FOSEs. In conclusion, FTOH concentrations in office air significantly predict serum PFOA concentrations in office workers. Variation in PFC air concentrations by building is likely due to differences in the number, type, and age of potential sources such as carpeting, furniture and/or paint. PMID:22148395

  17. Human Collaborative Localization and Mapping in Indoor Environments with Non-Continuous Stereo

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Edmundo; Munguia, Rodrigo; Bolea, Yolanda; Grau, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the monocular simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem is presented in this work. Data obtained from additional bearing-only sensors deployed as wearable devices is fully fused into an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). The wearable device is introduced in the context of a collaborative task within a human-robot interaction (HRI) paradigm, including the SLAM problem. Thus, based on the delayed inverse-depth feature initialization (DI-D) SLAM, data from the camera deployed on the human, capturing his/her field of view, is used to enhance the depth estimation of the robotic monocular sensor which maps and locates the device. The occurrence of overlapping between the views of both cameras is predicted through geometrical modelling, activating a pseudo-stereo methodology which allows to instantly measure the depth by stochastic triangulation of matched points found through SIFT/SURF. Experimental validation is provided through results from experiments, where real data is captured as synchronized sequences of video and other data (relative pose of secondary camera) and processed off-line. The sequences capture indoor trajectories representing the main challenges for a monocular SLAM approach, namely, singular trajectories and close turns with high angular velocities with respect to linear velocities. PMID:26927100

  18. Human Collaborative Localization and Mapping in Indoor Environments with Non-Continuous Stereo.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Edmundo; Munguia, Rodrigo; Bolea, Yolanda; Grau, Antoni

    2016-02-24

    A new approach to the monocular simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem is presented in this work. Data obtained from additional bearing-only sensors deployed as wearable devices is fully fused into an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). The wearable device is introduced in the context of a collaborative task within a human-robot interaction (HRI) paradigm, including the SLAM problem. Thus, based on the delayed inverse-depth feature initialization (DI-D) SLAM, data from the camera deployed on the human, capturing his/her field of view, is used to enhance the depth estimation of the robotic monocular sensor which maps and locates the device. The occurrence of overlapping between the views of both cameras is predicted through geometrical modelling, activating a pseudo-stereo methodology which allows to instantly measure the depth by stochastic triangulation of matched points found through SIFT/SURF. Experimental validation is provided through results from experiments, where real data is captured as synchronized sequences of video and other data (relative pose of secondary camera) and processed off-line. The sequences capture indoor trajectories representing the main challenges for a monocular SLAM approach, namely, singular trajectories and close turns with high angular velocities with respect to linear velocities.

  19. Measurement of air exchange rates in different indoor environments using continuous CO2 sensors.

    PubMed

    You, Yan; Niu, Can; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Yating; Bai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jiefeng; He, Fei; Zhang, Nan

    2012-01-01

    A new air exchange rate (AER) monitoring method using continuous CO2 sensors was developed and validated through both laboratory experiments and field studies. Controlled laboratory simulation tests were conducted in a 1-m3 environmental chamber at different AERs (0.1-10.0 hr(-1)). AERs were determined using the decay method based on box model assumptions. Field tests were conducted in classrooms, dormitories, meeting rooms and apartments during 2-5 weekdays using CO2 sensors coupled with data loggers. Indoor temperature, relative humidity (RH), and CO2 concentrations were continuously monitored while outdoor parameters combined with on-site climate conditions were recorded. Statistical results indicated that good laboratory performance was achieved: duplicate precision was within 10%, and the measured AERs were 90%-120% of the real AERs. Average AERs were 1.22, 1.37, 1.10, 1.91 and 0.73 hr(-1) in dormitories, air-conditioned classrooms, classrooms with an air circulation cooling system, reading rooms, and meeting rooms, respectively. In an elderly particulate matter exposure study, all the homes had AER values ranging from 0.29 to 3.46 hr(-1) in fall, and 0.12 to 1.39 hr(-1) in winter with a median AER of 1.15.

  20. Human Collaborative Localization and Mapping in Indoor Environments with Non-Continuous Stereo.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Edmundo; Munguia, Rodrigo; Bolea, Yolanda; Grau, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the monocular simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem is presented in this work. Data obtained from additional bearing-only sensors deployed as wearable devices is fully fused into an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF). The wearable device is introduced in the context of a collaborative task within a human-robot interaction (HRI) paradigm, including the SLAM problem. Thus, based on the delayed inverse-depth feature initialization (DI-D) SLAM, data from the camera deployed on the human, capturing his/her field of view, is used to enhance the depth estimation of the robotic monocular sensor which maps and locates the device. The occurrence of overlapping between the views of both cameras is predicted through geometrical modelling, activating a pseudo-stereo methodology which allows to instantly measure the depth by stochastic triangulation of matched points found through SIFT/SURF. Experimental validation is provided through results from experiments, where real data is captured as synchronized sequences of video and other data (relative pose of secondary camera) and processed off-line. The sequences capture indoor trajectories representing the main challenges for a monocular SLAM approach, namely, singular trajectories and close turns with high angular velocities with respect to linear velocities. PMID:26927100

  1. Ensuring Healthy American Indian Generations for Tomorrow through Safe and Healthy Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Joseph A.; Pacheco, Christina M.; Lewis, Charley; Williams, Chandler; Barnes, Charles; Rosenwasser, Lanny; Choi, Won S.; Daley, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    American Indians (AI) have the highest rate of severe physical housing problems in the U.S. (3.9%). Little information exists about the environmental hazards in AI homes. The purposes of this paper are to discuss challenges that were encountered when recruiting AI for a home-and employment-based environmental health assessments, highlight major successes, and propose recommendations for future indoor environmental health studies. The Center for American Indian Community Health (CAICH) and Children’s Mercy Hospital’s Center for Environmental Health and Allergy and Immunology Research Lab collaborated to provide educational sessions and healthy home assessments for AI. Through educational trainings, more than 240 AI were trained on the primary causes of health problems in homes. A total of 72 homes and places of employment were assessed by AI environmental health specialists. The top three categories with the most concerns observed in the homes/places of employment were allergens/dust (98%), safety/injury (89%) and chemical exposure (82%). While some information on smoking inside the home was collected, these numbers may have been underreported due to stigma. This was CAICH’s first endeavor in environmental health and although challenges arose, many more successes were achieved. PMID:25749318

  2. Numerical modeling of particle generation from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aakash C.; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2015-02-01

    Ozone-terpene reactions are important sources of indoor ultrafine particles (UFPs), a potential health hazard for human beings. Humans themselves act as possible sites for ozone-initiated particle generation through reactions with squalene (a terpene) that is present in their skin, hair, and clothing. This investigation developed a numerical model to probe particle generation from ozone reactions with clothing worn by humans. The model was based on particle generation measured in an environmental chamber as well as physical formulations of particle nucleation, condensational growth, and deposition. In five out of the six test cases, the model was able to predict particle size distributions reasonably well. The failure in the remaining case demonstrated the fundamental limitations of nucleation models. The model that was developed was used to predict particle generation under various building and airliner cabin conditions. These predictions indicate that ozone reactions with human-worn clothing could be an important source of UFPs in densely occupied classrooms and airliner cabins. Those reactions could account for about 40% of the total UFPs measured on a Boeing 737-700 flight. The model predictions at this stage are indicative and should be improved further.

  3. Evolution of the indoor biome.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laura J; Adams, Rachel I; Bateman, Ashley; Bik, Holly M; Hawks, John; Hird, Sarah M; Hughes, David; Kembel, Steven W; Kinney, Kerry; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Levy, Gabriel; McClain, Craig; Meadow, James F; Medina, Raul F; Mhuireach, Gwynne; Moreau, Corrie S; Munshi-South, Jason; Nichols, Lauren M; Palmer, Clare; Popova, Laura; Schal, Coby; Täubel, Martin; Trautwein, Michelle; Ugalde, Juan A; Dunn, Robert R

    2015-04-01

    Few biologists have studied the evolutionary processes at work in indoor environments. Yet indoor environments comprise approximately 0.5% of ice-free land area--an area as large as the subtropical coniferous forest biome. Here we review the emerging subfield of 'indoor biome' studies. After defining the indoor biome and tracing its deep history, we discuss some of its evolutionary dimensions. We restrict our examples to the species found in human houses--a subset of the environments constituting the indoor biome--and offer preliminary hypotheses to advance the study of indoor evolution. Studies of the indoor biome are situated at the intersection of evolutionary ecology, anthropology, architecture, and human ecology and are well suited for citizen science projects, public outreach, and large-scale international collaborations. PMID:25770744

  4. Dynamic modeling of human thermal comfort after the transition from an indoor to an outdoor hot environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katavoutas, George; Flocas, Helena A.; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Thermal comfort under non-steady-state conditions primarily deals with rapid environmental transients and significant alterations of the meteorological conditions, activity, or clothing pattern within the time scale of some minutes. In such cases, thermal history plays an important role in respect to time, and thus, a dynamic approach is appropriate. The present study aims to investigate the dynamic thermal adaptation process of a human individual, after his transition from a typical indoor climate to an outdoor hot environment. Three scenarios of thermal transients have been considered for a range of hot outdoor environmental conditions, employing the dynamic two-node IMEM model. The differences among them concern the radiation field, the activity level, and the body position. The temporal pattern of body temperatures as well as the range of skin wettedness and of water loss have been investigated and compared among the scenarios and the environmental conditions considered. The structure and the temporal course of human energy fluxes as well as the identification of the contribution of body temperatures to energy fluxes have also been studied and compared. In general, the simulation results indicate that the response of a person, coming from the same neutral indoor climate, varies depending on the scenario followed by the individual while being outdoors. The combination of radiation field (shade or not) with the kind of activity (sitting or walking) and the outdoor conditions differentiates significantly the thermal state of the human body. Therefore, 75 % of the skin wettedness values do not exceed the thermal comfort limit at rest for a sitting individual under the shade. This percentage decreases dramatically, less than 25 %, under direct solar radiation and exceeds 75 % for a walking person under direct solar radiation.

  5. Dynamic modeling of human thermal comfort after the transition from an indoor to an outdoor hot environment.

    PubMed

    Katavoutas, George; Flocas, Helena A; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Thermal comfort under non-steady-state conditions primarily deals with rapid environmental transients and significant alterations of the meteorological conditions, activity, or clothing pattern within the time scale of some minutes. In such cases, thermal history plays an important role in respect to time, and thus, a dynamic approach is appropriate. The present study aims to investigate the dynamic thermal adaptation process of a human individual, after his transition from a typical indoor climate to an outdoor hot environment. Three scenarios of thermal transients have been considered for a range of hot outdoor environmental conditions, employing the dynamic two-node IMEM model. The differences among them concern the radiation field, the activity level, and the body position. The temporal pattern of body temperatures as well as the range of skin wettedness and of water loss have been investigated and compared among the scenarios and the environmental conditions considered. The structure and the temporal course of human energy fluxes as well as the identification of the contribution of body temperatures to energy fluxes have also been studied and compared. In general, the simulation results indicate that the response of a person, coming from the same neutral indoor climate, varies depending on the scenario followed by the individual while being outdoors. The combination of radiation field (shade or not) with the kind of activity (sitting or walking) and the outdoor conditions differentiates significantly the thermal state of the human body. Therefore, 75% of the skin wettedness values do not exceed the thermal comfort limit at rest for a sitting individual under the shade. This percentage decreases dramatically, less than 25%, under direct solar radiation and exceeds 75% for a walking person under direct solar radiation.

  6. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  7. Modeling-gas phase reactions in indoor environments using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Weschler, Charles J.

    This CFD modeling study examines the concentrations of two gaseous compounds that react in an indoor setting to produce a hypothetical product. The reactants are ozone and either d-limonene or α-terpinene (which reacts with ozone about 40 times faster than d-limonene). In addition to two different terpenes, the scenarios include two air exchange rates (0.5 and 2.0 h-1). The terpene is introduced as a floor source with an emission pattern similar to a floor-care product. These four scenarios have been set in a fairly large two-dimensional room (13.6×40.6 m) with a supply at the top of the left wall and an exhaust at the bottom of the right wall. The room has been deliberately scaled so that the Reynolds numbers for key flow regimes match those of a room in which the calculated flow field has been validated against measured data. It has been further assumed that ozone interacts with room surfaces while the terpenes do not. The results show that for all four scenarios, under steady-state conditions, there are large concentration gradients within the room for both reactants and product. To some extent this is due to imperfect mixing. However, it also reflects that reactions occur at different rates across the room (because of varying reactant concentrations) and that the time available for reactions to occur varies with the room location (because the "age of the air" varies from point to point). Locally, within the room, the concentrations calculated by the CFD method differ significantly from those calculated by a one-compartment mass-balance model assuming perfect mixing.

  8. Bacterial and fungal aerosol in indoor environment in Upper Silesia, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszka, Jozef S.; Kyaw Tha Paw, U.; Lis, Danuta O.; Wlazło, Agnieszka; Ulfig, Krzysztof

    The purpose of this study was to find the typical concentration levels of bacterial and fungal bioaerosol in healthy and moldy homes as well as in office rooms in Upper Silesia Industrial Zone. Airborne bacteria and fungi were collected using the 6-stage Andersen impactor inside and outside of buildings. It was found that the typical level of bacterial aerosol indoors is about 10 3 CFU m -3 in homes and 10 2 CFU m -3 in offices. Only Micrococcus spp was present in all homes studied, constituting 36% of the bacterial genera. The second most common was Staphylococcus epidermidis, present in 76% of homes and constituting 14% of the total. The concentration of fungal aerosol in winter ranged from 10 to 10 2 CFU m -3 in healthy homes and from 10 to 10 3 CFU m -3 in homes with mold problems. In summer these values were elevated reaching 10 3 CFU m -3 in healthy homes and 10 3-10 4 CFU m -3 in moldy buildings. In healthy homes the relative concentration of observed species, including Penicillium, ranged from 3 to about 50% while in moldy homes the highest concentration of Penicillium accounted for 90% of the total fungi. However, the differences between viable fungal species as well as concentrations observed in moldy and healthy homes seem to be too small to be a reason of significantly higher risk for allergic asthma symptoms in any group of buildings. Comparison of the respirable fraction of airborne bacteria and fungi with literature data suggests that the percentage of respirable fungi and bacteria is generally not dependent on the type of home, building material, geographical factors and particulate air pollution.

  9. Straight ladder inclined angle in a field environment: the relationship among actual angle, method of set-up and knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Chang, Chien-Chi; Brunette, Christopher; Fallentin, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ladder inclined angle is a critical factor that could lead to a slip at the base of portable straight ladders, a major cause of falls from heights. Despite several methods established to help workers achieve the recommended 75.5° angle for ladder set-up, it remains unclear if these methods are used in practice. This study explored ladder set-up behaviours in a field environment. Professional installers of a company in the cable and other pay TV industry were observed for ladder set-up at their worksites. The results showed that the actual angles of 265 ladder set-ups by 67 participants averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°. Although all the participants had training on recommended ladder set-up methods, only 3 out of 67 participants applied these methods in their daily work and even they failed to achieve the desired 75.5° angle. Therefore, ladder set-up remains problematic in real-world situations. Practitioner Summary: Professional installers of a cable company were observed for portable straight ladder set-up at their worksites. The ladder inclined angle averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°, while the recommended angle is 75.5°. Only a few participants used the methods that they learned during training in their daily work. PMID:26672809

  10. Straight ladder inclined angle in a field environment: the relationship among actual angle, method of set-up and knowledge.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Chang, Chien-Chi; Brunette, Christopher; Fallentin, Nils

    2016-08-01

    Ladder inclined angle is a critical factor that could lead to a slip at the base of portable straight ladders, a major cause of falls from heights. Despite several methods established to help workers achieve the recommended 75.5° angle for ladder set-up, it remains unclear if these methods are used in practice. This study explored ladder set-up behaviours in a field environment. Professional installers of a company in the cable and other pay TV industry were observed for ladder set-up at their worksites. The results showed that the actual angles of 265 ladder set-ups by 67 participants averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°. Although all the participants had training on recommended ladder set-up methods, only 3 out of 67 participants applied these methods in their daily work and even they failed to achieve the desired 75.5° angle. Therefore, ladder set-up remains problematic in real-world situations. Practitioner Summary: Professional installers of a cable company were observed for portable straight ladder set-up at their worksites. The ladder inclined angle averaged 67.3° with a standard deviation of 3.22°, while the recommended angle is 75.5°. Only a few participants used the methods that they learned during training in their daily work.

  11. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SOCIAL, POLICY AND PHYSICAL VENUE FEATURES AND SOCIAL COHESION ON CONDOM USE FOR PREGNANCY PREVENTION AMONG SEX WORKERS: A SAFER INDOOR WORK ENVIRONMENT SCALE

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Putu; Shoveller, Jean; Dobrer, Sabina; Ogilvie, Gina; Montaner, Julio; Chettiar, Jill; Shannon, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aims to: report on a newly developed ‘Safer Indoor Work Environmental Scale’ that characterizes the social, policy and physical features of indoor venues and social cohesion; and using this scale, longitudinally evaluate the association between these features on sex workers’ (SWs’) condom use for pregnancy prevention. Methods Drawing on a prospective open cohort of female SWs working in indoor venues, a newly-developed ‘Safer Indoor Work Environment Scale’ was used to build six multivariable models with generalized estimating equations (GEE), to determine the independent effects of social, policy and venue-based features and social cohesion on condom use. Results Of 588 indoor SWs, 63.6% used condoms for pregnancy prevention in the last month. In multivariable GEE analysis, the following venue-based features were significantly correlated with barrier contraceptive use for pregnancy prevention: managerial practices and venue safety policies (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.09; 95% Confidence Interval (95%CI) 1.01–1.17) access to sexual and reproductive health services/supplies (AOR=1.10; 95%CI 1.00–1.20) access to drug harm reduction (AOR=1.13; 95%CI 1.01–1.28), and social cohesion among workers (AOR=1.05; 95%CI 1.03–1.07). Access to security features was marginally associated with condom use (AOR=1.13; 95%CI 0.99–1.29). Conclusion The findings of the current study highlight how work environment and social cohesion among SWs are related to improved condom use. Given global calls for the decriminalization of sex work, and potential legislative reforms in Canada, this study points to the critical need for new institutional arrangements (e.g., legal and regulatory frameworks; labour standards) to support safer sex workplaces. PMID:25678713

  12. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K; Probst, Alexander J; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Pukall, Rüdiger; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms were mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.

  13. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Pukall, Rüdiger; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms were mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.

  14. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    DOE PAGES

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; et al

    2015-03-17

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms weremore » mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.« less

  15. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    PubMed Central

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Pukall, Rüdiger; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms were mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms. PMID:25778463

  16. Quo vadis? Microbial profiling revealed strong effects of cleanroom maintenance and routes of contamination in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Auerbach, Anna K.; Probst, Alexander J.; Mahnert, Alexander; Tom, Lauren; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary L.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Pukall, Rüdiger; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-03-01

    Space agencies maintain highly controlled cleanrooms to ensure the demands of planetary protection. To study potential effects of microbiome control, we analyzed microbial communities in two particulate-controlled cleanrooms (ISO 5 and ISO 8) and two vicinal uncontrolled areas (office, changing room) by cultivation and 16S rRNA gene amplicon analysis (cloning, pyrotagsequencing, and PhyloChip G3 analysis). Maintenance procedures affected the microbiome on total abundance and microbial community structure concerning richness, diversity and relative abundance of certain taxa. Cleanroom areas were found to be mainly predominated by potentially human-associated bacteria; archaeal signatures were detected in every area. Results indicate that microorganisms were mainly spread from the changing room (68%) into the cleanrooms, potentially carried along with human activity. The numbers of colony forming units were reduced by up to ~400 fold from the uncontrolled areas towards the ISO 5 cleanroom, accompanied with a reduction of the living portion of microorganisms from 45% (changing area) to 1% of total 16S rRNA gene signatures as revealed via propidium monoazide treatment of the samples. Our results demonstrate the strong effects of cleanroom maintenance on microbial communities in indoor environments and can be used to improve the design and operation of biologically controlled cleanrooms.

  17. Radar micro-Doppler based human activity classification for indoor and outdoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenaldin, Matthew; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the results of our experimental investigation into how different environments impact the classification of human motion using radar micro-Doppler (MD) signatures. The environments studied include free space, through-thewall, leaf tree foliage, and needle tree foliage. Results on presented on classification of the following three motions: crawling, walking, and jogging. The classification task was designed how to best separate these movements. The human motion data were acquired using a monostatic coherent Doppler radar operating in the C-band at 6.5 GHz from a total of six human subjects. The received signals were analyzed in the time-frequency domain using the Short-time Fourier Transform (STFT) which was used for feature extraction. Classification was performed using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) using a Radial Basis Function (RBF). Classification accuracies in the range 80-90% were achieved to separate the three movements mentioned.

  18. Monitoring airborne biotic contaminants in the indoor environment of pig and poultry confinement buildings.

    PubMed

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Li, Xiangzhen; Yang, Xufei; Shinkai, Takumi; Zhang, Yuanhui; Wang, Xinlei; Mackie, Roderick I

    2012-06-01

    Given the growing concerns over human and animal health issues related to confined animal feeding operations, an in-depth examination is required to monitor for airborne bacteria and associated antibiotic resistance genes. Our 16S rRNA-based pyrosequencing revealed that the airborne microbial community skewed towards a higher abundance of Firmicutes (> 59.2%) and Bacteroidetes (4.2-31.4%) within the confinement buildings, while the office environment was predominated by Proteobacteria (55.2%). Furthermore, bioaerosols in the confinement buildings were sporadically associated with genera of potential pathogens, and these genera were more frequently observed in the bioaerosols of pig and layer hen confinement than the turkey confinement buildings and office environment. High abundances of tetracycline resistance genes (9.55 × 10(2) to 1.69 × 10(6) copies ng(-1) DNA) were also detected in the bioaerosols sampled from confinement buildings. Bacterial lineages present in the poultry bioaerosols clustered apart from those present in the pig bioaerosols and among the different phases of pig production, suggesting that different livestock as well as production phase were associated with a distinct airborne microbial community. By understanding the diversity of biotic contaminants associated with the different confinement buildings, this study facilitates the implementation of better management strategies to minimize potential health impacts on both livestock and humans working in this environment. PMID:22414212

  19. Safeguarding indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, K.; Wesolowski, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    California has created and implemented the first state program devoted exclusively to the investigation of nonindustrial indoor air quality. The program is responsible for promoting and conducting research on the determining factors of healthful indoor environments and is structured to obtain information about emission sources, ventilation effects, indoor concentrations, human activity patterns, exposures, health risks, control measures and public policy options. Data are gathered by a variety of methods, including research conducted by staff members, review of the available scientific literature, participation in technical meetings, contractual agreements with outside agencies, cooperative research projects with other groups and consultation with experts. 23 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  20. Evaluation and guidelines for using polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers in double-dome chambers to assess semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in non-industrial indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, Pernilla; Audy, Ondřej; Škrdlíková, Lenka; Kukučka, Petr; Vojta, Šimon; Přibylová, Petra; Prokeš, Roman; Čupr, Pavel; Klánová, Jana

    2014-11-01

    Indoor air pollution has been recognized as an important risk factor for human health, especially in areas where people tend to spend most of their time indoors. Many semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have primarily indoor sources and are present in orders of magnitude higher concentrations indoors than outdoors. Despite this, awareness of SVOCs in indoor air and assessment of the link between indoor concentrations and human health have lagged behind those of outdoor air. This is partially related to challenges associated with indoor sampling of SVOCs. Passive air samplers (PASs), which are widely accepted in established outdoor air monitoring networks, have been used to fill the knowledge gaps on indoor SVOCs distribution. However, their applicability for indoor environments and the assessment of human health risks lack sufficient experimental data. To address this issue, we performed an indoor calibration study of polyurethane foam (PUF) PAS deployed in a double-dome chamber, covering both legacy and new SVOC classes. PUF-PAS and a continuous low-volume active air sampler (AAS) were co-deployed for a calibration period of twelve weeks. Based on the results from this evaluation, PUF-PAS in a double-bowl chamber is recommended for indoor sampling and health risk assessment of gas phase SVOCs, including novel brominated flame retardants (nBFR) providing sufficient exposure time is applied. Data for particle associated SVOCs suffered from significant uncertainties caused by low level of detection and low precision in this study. A more open chamber design for indoor studies may allow for higher sampling rates (RS) and better performance for the particle associated SVOCs. PMID:25274245

  1. Indoor climate.

    PubMed

    Höppe, P R

    1993-09-15

    In industrialized countries most of the time is spent indoors. The basic ambient parameters for a thermally comfortable indoor climate are air temperature, air velocity, humidity and radiation pattern. Besides the thermal component, the concentrations of air pollutants in the indoor air are also of importance for wellbeing and health. Their levels are influenced both by the outdoor concentrations and the indoor emissions. The increasing use of air conditioning systems in many cases has not resulted in improving the indoor climate but causes a wide range of irritations and health problems summarized as 'sick building syndrome'.

  2. Augmenting ViSP's 3D Model-Based Tracker with RGB-D SLAM for 3D Pose Estimation in Indoor Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Chee-Ming, J.; Armenakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a novel application of the Visual Servoing Platform's (ViSP) for pose estimation in indoor and GPS-denied outdoor environments. Our proposed solution integrates the trajectory solution from RGBD-SLAM into ViSP's pose estimation process. Li-Chee-Ming and Armenakis (2015) explored the application of ViSP in mapping large outdoor environments, and tracking larger objects (i.e., building models). Their experiments revealed that tracking was often lost due to a lack of model features in the camera's field of view, and also because of rapid camera motion. Further, the pose estimate was often biased due to incorrect feature matches. This work proposes a solution to improve ViSP's pose estimation performance, aiming specifically to reduce the frequency of tracking losses and reduce the biases present in the pose estimate. This paper explores the integration of ViSP with RGB-D SLAM. We discuss the performance of the combined tracker in mapping indoor environments and tracking 3D wireframe indoor building models, and present preliminary results from our experiments.

  3. The use of ice to enrich the environment of pigs housed indoors.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Jose M; Rizzo, Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Pigs used in research are often housed in barren environments. The effects of ice as a simple enrichment tool for newly weaned pigs were investigated. Four replicates of 120 pigs were separated into 3 groups. One group was given free access to blocks of ice (ice group), another group had access to Classic Kong toys (Kong group), and a 3rd group did not receive any enrichment (control group). The behavior of each group was observed every 5 min from 08:00 hr to 12:00 hr during 4 consecutive days. Pigs were motivated to explore the ice blocks (4.85%±1.34) over the Classic Kong toys (2.03%±0.59). No differences in other behaviors were found between treatments. Ice is an effective and easy-to-replace enrichment device. Blocks of ice can be used as enrichment devices for pigs housed in research facilities.

  4. Longitudinal analysis of microbial interaction between humans and the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Simon; Smith, Daniel P.; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M.; Handley, Kim M.; Scott, Nicole M.; Gibbons, Sean M.; Larsen, Peter; Shogan, Benjamin D.; Weiss, Sophie; Metcalf, Jessica L.; Ursell, Luke K.; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Van Treuren, Will; Hasan, Nur A.; Gibson, Molly K.; Colwell, Rita; Dantas, Gautam; Knight, Rob; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The bacteria that colonize humans and our built environments have the potential to influence our health. Microbial communities associated with seven families and their homes over six weeks were assessed, including three families that moved home. Microbial communities differed significantly among homes, and the home microbiome was largely sourced from humans. The microbiota in each home were identifiable by family. Network analysis identified humans as the primary bacterial vector, and a Bayesian method significantly matched individuals to their dwellings. Draft genomes of potential human pathogens were observed on a kitchen counter could be matched to the hands of occupants. Following a house move, the microbial community in the new house rapidly converged on the microbial community of the occupants’ former house, suggesting rapid colonization by the family’s microbiota. PMID:25170151

  5. Determination of fluorotelomer alcohols in selected consumer products and preliminary investigation of their fate in the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Folk, Edgar E; Roache, Nancy F

    2015-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established an ongoing effort to identify the major perfluorocarboxylic acid (PFCA) sources in nonoccupational indoor environments and characterize their transport and fate. This study determined the concentrations of fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), which are the precursors to PFCAs, in fifty-four consumer products collected from the U.S. open market in the years of 2011 and 2013. The products included carpet, commercial carpet-care liquids, household carpet/fabric-care liquids, treated apparel, treated home textiles, treated non-woven medical garments, floor waxes, food-contact paper, membranes for apparel, and thread-sealant tapes. The FTOHs quantified were 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluoro-1-octanol (6:2 FTOH), 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluoro-1-decanol (8:2 FTOH), and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluoro-1-dodecanol (10:2 FTOH). The content of 6:2 FTOH ranged from non-delectable to 331μgg(-1), 8:2 FTOH from non-delectable to 92μgg(-1), and 10:2 FTOH from non-detectable to 24μgg(-1). In addition, two consumer products from the home textile category were tested in the washing-drying process. One product from the treated apparel category and one from the home textile category were tested in the micro-scale chamber under elevated temperatures. The experimental data show that the washing-drying process with one cycle did not significantly reduce the FTOH concentrations in the tested consumer products. FTOH off-gassing was observed under accelerated aging conditions. Future tests should include air sampling to allow determination of the absolute emission rates at different temperatures. The results of this study should be informative to exposure assessment and risk management. PMID:24997516

  6. Concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in central air-conditioner filter dust and relevance of non-dietary exposure in occupational indoor environments in Greece.

    PubMed

    Besis, Athanasios; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Botsaropoulou, Elisavet; Samara, Constantini

    2014-05-01

    Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous in the indoor environment owing to their use in consumer products and various studies around the world have found higher concentrations indoors than outdoors. Central air conditioner (A/C) systems have been widely used in many workplaces, therefore, studying of PBDEs in central A/C filter dust is useful to better understand the occurrences and health implications of PBDEs in indoor environments. The present study examined the occurrence of PBDEs in central A/C filter dust collected from various workplaces (n = 20) in Thessaloniki, Greece. The sum concentrations of 21 target congeners (∑21PBDE) in A/C dust ranged between 84 and 4062 ng g(-1) with a median value of 1092 ng g(-1), while BDE-209 was found to be the most abundant BDE congener. The daily intake via dust ingestion of PBDEs estimated for the employees of the occupational settings ranged from 3 to 45 ng day(-1) (median 12 ng day(-1)). PMID:24556227

  7. A warmer indoor environment in the evening and shorter sleep onset latency in winter: The HEIJO-KYO study.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Keigo; Obayashi, Kenji; Tone, Nobuhiro; Kurumatani, Norio

    2015-10-01

    Difficulty in initiating sleep is an important problem because it is associated with an increased incidence of depression, diabetes, myocardial infarction, and higher all-cause mortality. Although experimental studies in controlled settings have shown that warm skin temperature of the extremities (feet and hands) before bedtime is associated with shorter sleep onset latency (SOL), evidence from real life situations is limited. We assessed the relationship between indoor temperatures in the evening (2h before bedtime) and SOL among 861 home-dwelling elderly participants. Subjective SOL was determined according to a self-administered sleep diary. Actigraphic (objective) SOL, indoor temperature, and bed temperature were simultaneously measured at participants' homes for 48h during the colder seasons (October-April). The association between evening indoor temperature and SOL was assessed using a multilevel linear regression model with random intercept for individual participants. Evening indoor temperature showed a significant inverse association with log-transformed subjective SOL (β=-0.021, P<0.01) and actigraphic SOL (β=-0.019, P<0.01), independent of potential confounders including gender, insomnia medication, evening physical activity, and bedtime. Higher bed temperature during the 2h after bedtime was significantly associated with shorter log-transformed actigraphic SOL (β=-0.028, P<0.01). These significant associations were maintained even after adjustment for evening outdoor temperature. The clinically important findings of the present study indicate that SOL may be shortened by modification of evening indoor temperature and bed temperature for 2h after bedtime.

  8. Lung Cancer in Chinese Women: Evidence for an Interaction between Tobacco Smoking and Exposure to Inhalants in the Indoor Environment

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Li; Lim, Wei-Yen; Eng, Philip; Leong, Swan Swan; Lim, Tow Keang; Ng, Alan W.K.; Tee, Augustine; Seow, Adeline

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic data suggest that Chinese women have a high incidence of lung cancer in relation to their smoking prevalence. In addition to active tobacco smoke exposure, other sources of fumes and airborne particles in the indoor environment, such as cooking and burning of incense and mosquito coils, have been considered potential risk factors for lung cancer. Objectives We used a case–control study to explore effects of inhalants from combustion sources common in the domestic environment on lung cancer and their modification by active tobacco smoking. Methods We analyzed 703 primary lung cancer cases and 1,578 controls. Data on demographic background and relevant exposures were obtained by face-to-face interviews in the hospital. Results We observed a positive relationship with daily exposure to incense or mosquito coils and to cooking fumes only among smokers, and no association among lifetime nonsmokers. Interactions between smoking and frequency of cooking, or exposure to incense or mosquito coils were statistically significant and consistent with synergistic effects on lung cancer. The odds ratio (OR) comparing smokers without daily incense or mosquito coil exposure with nonsmokers without daily exposure was 2.80 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.86–4.21], whereas the OR comparing smokers with daily exposure to the same referent group was 4.61 (95% CI, 3.41–6.24). In contrast, daily exposure to incense or mosquito coils was not associated with lung cancer among nonsmokers (OR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.72–1.16). We observed the same pattern of associations for smokers without (OR = 2.31; 95% CI, 1.52–3.51) and with (OR = 4.50; 95% CI, 3.21–6.30) daily cooking exposure compared with nonsmokers, with no evidence of an association with daily cooking exposure among nonsmokers. Conclusion Our results suggest that active tobacco smoking not only is an important risk factor for development of lung cancer, but also may cause smokers to be more susceptible

  9. The Performance Analysis of the Map-Aided Fuzzy Decision Tree Based on the Pedestrian Dead Reckoning Algorithm in an Indoor Environment.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Liao, Jhen-Kai; Tsai, Guang-Je; Chang, Hsiu-Wen

    2015-12-28

    Hardware sensors embedded in a smartphone allow the device to become an excellent mobile navigator. A smartphone is ideal for this task because its great international popularity has led to increased phone power and since most of the necessary infrastructure is already in place. However, using a smartphone for indoor pedestrian navigation can be problematic due to the low accuracy of sensors, imprecise predictability of pedestrian motion, and inaccessibility of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in some indoor environments. Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) is one of the most common technologies used for pedestrian navigation, but in its present form, various errors tend to accumulate. This study introduces a fuzzy decision tree (FDT) aided by map information to improve the accuracy and stability of PDR with less dependency on infrastructure. First, the map is quickly surveyed by the Indoor Mobile Mapping System (IMMS). Next, Bluetooth beacons are implemented to enable the initializing of any position. Finally, map-aided FDT can estimate navigation solutions in real time. The experiments were conducted in different fields using a variety of smartphones and users in order to verify stability. The contrast PDR system demonstrates low stability for each case without pre-calibration and post-processing, but the proposed low-complexity FDT algorithm shows good stability and accuracy under the same conditions.

  10. The Performance Analysis of the Map-Aided Fuzzy Decision Tree Based on the Pedestrian Dead Reckoning Algorithm in an Indoor Environment.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Liao, Jhen-Kai; Tsai, Guang-Je; Chang, Hsiu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Hardware sensors embedded in a smartphone allow the device to become an excellent mobile navigator. A smartphone is ideal for this task because its great international popularity has led to increased phone power and since most of the necessary infrastructure is already in place. However, using a smartphone for indoor pedestrian navigation can be problematic due to the low accuracy of sensors, imprecise predictability of pedestrian motion, and inaccessibility of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in some indoor environments. Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) is one of the most common technologies used for pedestrian navigation, but in its present form, various errors tend to accumulate. This study introduces a fuzzy decision tree (FDT) aided by map information to improve the accuracy and stability of PDR with less dependency on infrastructure. First, the map is quickly surveyed by the Indoor Mobile Mapping System (IMMS). Next, Bluetooth beacons are implemented to enable the initializing of any position. Finally, map-aided FDT can estimate navigation solutions in real time. The experiments were conducted in different fields using a variety of smartphones and users in order to verify stability. The contrast PDR system demonstrates low stability for each case without pre-calibration and post-processing, but the proposed low-complexity FDT algorithm shows good stability and accuracy under the same conditions. PMID:26729114

  11. The Performance Analysis of the Map-Aided Fuzzy Decision Tree Based on the Pedestrian Dead Reckoning Algorithm in an Indoor Environment

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Liao, Jhen-Kai; Tsai, Guang-Je; Chang, Hsiu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Hardware sensors embedded in a smartphone allow the device to become an excellent mobile navigator. A smartphone is ideal for this task because its great international popularity has led to increased phone power and since most of the necessary infrastructure is already in place. However, using a smartphone for indoor pedestrian navigation can be problematic due to the low accuracy of sensors, imprecise predictability of pedestrian motion, and inaccessibility of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in some indoor environments. Pedestrian Dead Reckoning (PDR) is one of the most common technologies used for pedestrian navigation, but in its present form, various errors tend to accumulate. This study introduces a fuzzy decision tree (FDT) aided by map information to improve the accuracy and stability of PDR with less dependency on infrastructure. First, the map is quickly surveyed by the Indoor Mobile Mapping System (IMMS). Next, Bluetooth beacons are implemented to enable the initializing of any position. Finally, map-aided FDT can estimate navigation solutions in real time. The experiments were conducted in different fields using a variety of smartphones and users in order to verify stability. The contrast PDR system demonstrates low stability for each case without pre-calibration and post-processing, but the proposed low-complexity FDT algorithm shows good stability and accuracy under the same conditions. PMID:26729114

  12. Elemental mercury emission in the indoor environment due to broken compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs--paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs contain a few milligrams (mg) of elemental mercury. When a CFL breaks, some of the mercury is immediately released as elemental mercury vapor and the remainder is deposited on indoor surfaces with the bulb debris. In a controlled study design...

  13. Impact of simulated climate and building features on the penetration of toxic gases from the ambient into the indoor environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is a combination of experimental results and analysis of formaldehyde penetration across a residential building envelope with the objective of developing an understanding of the factors that govern indoor air concentrations of air toxics and to provide linkages betw...

  14. CONCENTRATIONS OF PARTICULATE ORGANIC SPECIES MEASURED IN INDOOR AND OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTS DURING THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY ( TACS )

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was completed to assess environmental exposures for a group of asthmatic children (n = 9) under the age of six and living in Tampa, Florida. Concentrations of particulate organic species are reported from residential indoor, residential...

  15. Transient secondary organic aerosol formation from limonene ozonolysis in indoor environments: impacts of air exchange rates and initial concentration ratios.

    PubMed

    Youssefi, Somayeh; Waring, Michael S

    2014-07-15

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) results from the oxidation of reactive organic gases (ROGs) and is an indoor particle source. The aerosol mass fraction (AMF), a.k.a. SOA yield, quantifies the SOA forming potential of ROGs and is the ratio of generated SOA to oxidized ROG. The AMF depends on the organic aerosol concentration, as well as the prevalence of later generation reactions. AMFs have been measured in unventilated chambers or steady-state flow through chambers. However, indoor settings have outdoor air exchange, and indoor SOA formation often occurs when ROGs are transiently emitted, for instance from emissions of cleaning products. Herein, we quantify "transient AMFs" from ozonolysis of pulse-emitted limonene in a ventilated chamber, for 18 experiments at low (0.28 h(-1)), moderate (0.53 h(-1)), and high (0.96 h(-1)) air exchange rates (AER) with varying initial ozone-limonene ratios. Transient AMFs increased with the amount of ROG reacted; AMFs also increased with decreasing AERs and increasing initial ozone-limonene ratios, which together likely promoted more ozone reactions with the remaining exocyclic bond of oxidized limonene products in the SOA phase. Knowing the AER and initial ozone-limonene ratio is crucial to predict indoor transient SOA behavior accurately.

  16. Spatial and temporal RF electromagnetic field exposure of children and adults in indoor micro environments in Belgium and Greece.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, Günter; Markakis, Ioannis; Goeminne, Francis; Samaras, Theodoros; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-11-01

    Personal radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure, or exposimetry, is gaining importance in the bioelectromagnetics community but only limited data on personal exposure is available in indoor areas, namely schools, crèches, homes, and offices. Most studies are focused on adult exposure, whereas indoor microenvironments, where children are exposed, are usually not considered. A method to assess spatial and temporal indoor exposure of children and adults is proposed without involving the subjects themselves. Moreover, maximal possible daily exposure is estimated by combining instantaneous spatial and temporal exposure. In Belgium and Greece, the exposure is measured at 153 positions spread over 55 indoor microenvironments with spectral equipment. In addition, personal exposimeters (measuring EMFs of people during their daily activities) captured the temporal exposure variations during several days up to one week at 98 positions. The data were analyzed using the robust regression on order statistics (ROS) method to account for data below the detection limit. All instantaneous and maximal exposures satisfied international exposure limits and were of the same order of magnitude in Greece and Belgium. Mobile telecommunications and radio broadcasting (FM) were most present. In Belgium, digital cordless phone (DECT) exposure was present for at least 75% in the indoor microenvironments except for schools. Temporal variations of the exposure were mainly due to variations of mobile telecommunication signals. The exposure was higher during daytime than at night due to the increased voice and data traffic on the networks. Total exposure varied the most in Belgian crèches (39.3%) and Greek homes (58.2%). PMID:23872299

  17. Spatial and temporal RF electromagnetic field exposure of children and adults in indoor micro environments in Belgium and Greece.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, Günter; Markakis, Ioannis; Goeminne, Francis; Samaras, Theodoros; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2013-11-01

    Personal radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure, or exposimetry, is gaining importance in the bioelectromagnetics community but only limited data on personal exposure is available in indoor areas, namely schools, crèches, homes, and offices. Most studies are focused on adult exposure, whereas indoor microenvironments, where children are exposed, are usually not considered. A method to assess spatial and temporal indoor exposure of children and adults is proposed without involving the subjects themselves. Moreover, maximal possible daily exposure is estimated by combining instantaneous spatial and temporal exposure. In Belgium and Greece, the exposure is measured at 153 positions spread over 55 indoor microenvironments with spectral equipment. In addition, personal exposimeters (measuring EMFs of people during their daily activities) captured the temporal exposure variations during several days up to one week at 98 positions. The data were analyzed using the robust regression on order statistics (ROS) method to account for data below the detection limit. All instantaneous and maximal exposures satisfied international exposure limits and were of the same order of magnitude in Greece and Belgium. Mobile telecommunications and radio broadcasting (FM) were most present. In Belgium, digital cordless phone (DECT) exposure was present for at least 75% in the indoor microenvironments except for schools. Temporal variations of the exposure were mainly due to variations of mobile telecommunication signals. The exposure was higher during daytime than at night due to the increased voice and data traffic on the networks. Total exposure varied the most in Belgian crèches (39.3%) and Greek homes (58.2%).

  18. Significance of indoor environment for the development of allergic symptoms in children followed up to 18 months of age.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, D; Andersson, K; Fagerlund, I; Kjellman, N I

    1996-11-01

    The development of symptoms possibly related to allergy or other forms of hypersensitivity was studied in a group of 638 children on two occasions: when the children were 3 and 18 months of age. Standardized questions were used to collect basic information about the child, technical characteristics of the home, and the mother's perception of the indoor climate. All reported exposure factors were analyzed in relation to the child's symptoms at 18 months of age, by logistic regression techniques. A family history of atopy was associated with a high incidence of most of the investigated symptoms. Attendance at a day nursery before 18 months of age increased the risk of recurrent colds and the need for several courses of treatment with antibiotics. If the mother smoked, the children more often suffered from protracted coughing episodes. If the child has a sibling, the risk of developing a wheeze, repeated colds, and the need for antibiotic treatment increased. No building factors, such as size of the home, heating and ventilation system, type of foundation, dampness, or presence of wall-to-wall carpets, showed a significant correlation to symptoms reported in the children. However, if the mothers reported symptoms that are often connected with "sick buildings", the children more often had eczema, dry skin, or reactions to food. The mothers' complaints about indoor air quality and climate and mucous membrane symptoms were significantly related to the type of building and presence of condensation on the windows in winter, a finding which may indicate that indoor climate factors also have some effect on the health of the children. This study reports the prevalences of symptoms until the age of 18 months. At this age, the allergic manifestations are usually nonspecific, and follow-up examinations to 4-5 years of age are needed before any definite conclusions can be drawn about the development of atopic diseases due to indoor climate factors. PMID:8947336

  19. Monitoring airborne fungal spores in an experimental indoor environment to evaluate sampling methods and the effects of human activity on air sampling.

    PubMed Central

    Buttner, M P; Stetzenbach, L D

    1993-01-01

    Aerobiological monitoring was conducted in an experimental room to aid in the development of standardized sampling protocols for airborne microorganisms in the indoor environment. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the relative efficiencies of selected sampling methods for the retrieval of airborne fungal spores and to determine the effect of human activity on air sampling. Dry aerosols containing known concentrations of Penicillium chrysogenum spores were generated, and air samples were taken by using Andersen six-stage, Surface Air System, Burkard, and depositional samplers. The Andersen and Burkard samplers retrieved the highest numbers of spores compared with the measurement standard, an aerodynamic particle sizer located inside the room. Data from paired samplers demonstrated that the Andersen sampler had the highest levels of sensitivity and repeatability. With a carpet as the source of P. chrysogenum spores, the effects of human activity (walking or vacuuming near the sampling site) on air sampling were also examined. Air samples were taken under undisturbed conditions and after human activity in the room. Human activity resulted in retrieval of significantly higher concentrations of airborne spores. Surface sampling of the carpet revealed moderate to heavy contamination despite relatively low airborne counts. Therefore, in certain situations, air sampling without concomitant surface sampling may not adequately reflect the level of microbial contamination in indoor environments. PMID:8439150

  20. High Temperature Behavior of Cr3C2-NiCr Coatings in the Actual Coal-Fired Boiler Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Rakesh; Sidhu, Hazoor Singh; Sidhu, Buta Singh

    2015-03-01

    Erosion-corrosion is a serious problem observed in steam-powered electricity generation plants, and industrial waste incinerators. In the present study, four compositions of Cr3C2-(Ni-20Cr) alloy coating powder were deposited by high-velocity oxy-fuel spray technique on T-91 boiler tube steel. The cyclic studies were performed in a coal-fired boiler at 1123 K ± 10 K (850 °C ± 10 °C). X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis and elemental mapping analysis techniques were used to analyze the corrosion products. All the coatings deposited on T-91 boiler tube steel imparted hot corrosion resistance. The 65 pctCr3C2 -35 pct (Ni-20Cr)-coated T-91 steel sample performed better than all other coated samples in the given environment.

  1. Does participating in physical activity in outdoor natural environments have a greater effect on physical and mental wellbeing than physical activity indoors? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Thompson Coon, J; Boddy, K; Stein, K; Whear, R; Barton, J; Depledge, M H

    2011-03-01

    Our objective was to compare the effects on mental and physical wellbeing, health related quality of life and long-term adherence to physical activity, of participation in physical activity in natural environments compared with physical activity indoors. We conducted a systematic review using the following data sources: Medline, Embase, Psychinfo, GreenFILE, SportDISCUS, The Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, Arts and Humanities Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index--Science and BIOSIS from inception to June 2010. Internet searches of relevant Web sites, hand searches of relevant journals, and the reference lists of included papers and other review papers identified in the search were also searched for relevant information. Controlled trials (randomized and nonrandomized) were included. To be eligible trials had to compare the effects of outdoor exercise initiatives with those conducted indoors and report on at least one physical or mental wellbeing outcome in adults or children. Screening of articles for inclusion, data extraction, and quality appraisal were performed by one reviewer and checked by a second with discrepancies resolved by discussion with a third if necessary. Due to the heterogeneity of identified studies a narrative synthesis was performed. Eleven trials (833 adults) were included. Most participants (6 trials; 523 adults) were young students. Study entry criteria and methods were sparsely reported. All interventions consisted of a single episode of walking or running indoors with the same activity at a similar level conducted outdoors on a separate occasion. A total of 13 different outcome measures were used to evaluate the effects of exercise on mental wellbeing, and 4 outcome measures were used to assess attitude to exercise. Most trials (n = 9) showed some improvement in mental wellbeing on one or other of the outcome measures. Compared with exercising indoors, exercising in

  2. Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

    2003-07-01

    The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.

  3. Calculation of Passive Sampling Rates from Both Native PCBs and Depuration Compounds in Indoor and Outdoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Persoon, Carolyn; Hornbuckle, Keri C.

    2009-01-01

    Passive sampling has become a practical way of sampling persistent organic pollutants over large spatial and remote areas; however, its ease in use is also coupled with some uncertainty in calculating air concentrations from accumulated mass. Here we report a comparison study of polyurethane-foam-based passive samplers (PUF-PAS) for quantitatively determining the sampling rates of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from air. We measured both uptake of native PCBs and loss of depuration compounds and determined the sampling rates (R-values) for multiple samplers harvested at three different time periods. The uptake of native PCBs in the linear phase was similar to the loss of depuration compounds for indoor air and behaved as predicted. A single R- value of 2.6 m3d−1 was calculated from the mean of 12 samplers deployed indoors from three harvest dates with a range of 2.0 to 3.4 m3d−1 for both uptake of native PCBs and loss of depuration compounds. Loss of depuration compounds in outdoor air also followed the predicted linear behavior with a range of calculated R-value of 4.4 – 8.4 m3d−1. Uptake of native PCBs behavior was extremely variable, probably due to changes in ambient air concentrations and resulted in R-values of 1.6–11.5 m3d−1 with greater variation seen in higher chlorinated homolog groups. PMID:19068264

  4. VLC-Based Positioning System for an Indoor Environment Using an Image Sensor and an Accelerometer Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Phat; Yoo, Myungsik

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it is believed that lighting and communication technologies are being replaced by high power LEDs, which are core parts of the visible light communication (VLC) system. In this paper, by taking advantages of VLC, we propose a novel design for an indoor positioning system using LEDs, an image sensor (IS) and an accelerometer sensor (AS) from mobile devices. The proposed algorithm, which provides a high precision indoor position, consists of four LEDs mounted on the ceiling transmitting their own three-dimensional (3D) world coordinates and an IS at an unknown position receiving and demodulating the signals. Based on the 3D world coordinates and the 2D image coordinate of LEDs, the position of the mobile device is determined. Compared to existing algorithms, the proposed algorithm only requires one IS. In addition, by using an AS, the mobile device is allowed to have arbitrary orientation. Last but not least, a mechanism for reducing the image sensor noise is proposed to further improve the accuracy of the positioning algorithm. A simulation is conducted to verify the performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:27240383

  5. Employing volcanic tuff minerals in interior architecture design to reduce microbial contaminants and airborne fungal carcinogens of indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Gedikoglu, Yaman; Gedikoglu, Gunduz; Berkin, Genco; Ceyhan, Taskin; Altinoz, Meric A

    2012-09-01

    Indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have posed significant risks to human health since people have both shifted to a life spent, for the most part, indoors. Further, changes in materials used in the construction of buildings, furnishings, and tools either leak or encourage the production of VOCs. Whether these enclosed areas are residences, hospitals or workplaces (specifically composting facilities or closed farm buildings for raising livestock), VOCs can rise to levels that threaten people's health. VOCs can either originate from phenolic and benzene-like compounds in building materials and office furniture or from molds (fungi) growing inside improperly ventilated or sealed buildings. Regardless of the source, exposure to VOCs could lead to significant health concerns from sick-building syndrome, 'leukemia houses,' in-hospital fungemia cases or occupation-associated cancer epidemics due to aflatoxicosis. Innovative 21st-century building materials could offer solutions to these challenges. We propose that volcanic materials, clays and minerals (volcanic tuff, modified clay montmorillonite and mineral clinoptilolite), in their original or chemically modified form, could act like synthetic lungs in building walls, breathing and filtering VOCs, and thus limiting human exposure to disease.

  6. Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments. Final progress report, March 1990--August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.

    1992-12-31

    During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor {sup 222}Rn and in {sup 222}Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house {sup 222}Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater {sup 222}Rn concentration than the measured outdoor {sup 222}Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding {sup 222}Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

  7. Effects of surface type and relative humidity on the production and concentration of nitrous acid in a model indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Wainman, T; Weschler, C J; Lioy, P J; Zhang, J

    2001-06-01

    A nested chamber design was constructed for the purpose of studying parameters that affect indoor air chemistry. Experiments were conducted in this system to investigate the effects of three surface types (Teflon, wallpaper, and carpet) and two levels of relative humidity (50% and 70% RH) on the formation of gas-phase nitrous acid (HONO) through the heterogeneous reaction of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) with sorbed water vapor. The results of this investigation show that, compared with Teflon surfaces, carpet made of synthetic fibers increased the NO2 surface removal rate by nearly an order of magnitude and resulted in higher peak HONO concentrations. The results also suggest that the capacity of a surface to sorb water will determine if HONO is released from that surface after the NO2 source has been turned off and the heterogeneous reaction between NO2 and sorbed water is no longer significant. Vinyl-coated wallpaper was found to release HONO for prolonged periods of time after the NO2 source was turned off at both 50% and 70% RH whereas Teflon was found to do so only at 70% RH. The results of this investigation also demonstrate the utility of the nested chamber design in investigating indoor air chemistry. PMID:11414019

  8. VLC-Based Positioning System for an Indoor Environment Using an Image Sensor and an Accelerometer Sensor.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Phat; Yoo, Myungsik

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it is believed that lighting and communication technologies are being replaced by high power LEDs, which are core parts of the visible light communication (VLC) system. In this paper, by taking advantages of VLC, we propose a novel design for an indoor positioning system using LEDs, an image sensor (IS) and an accelerometer sensor (AS) from mobile devices. The proposed algorithm, which provides a high precision indoor position, consists of four LEDs mounted on the ceiling transmitting their own three-dimensional (3D) world coordinates and an IS at an unknown position receiving and demodulating the signals. Based on the 3D world coordinates and the 2D image coordinate of LEDs, the position of the mobile device is determined. Compared to existing algorithms, the proposed algorithm only requires one IS. In addition, by using an AS, the mobile device is allowed to have arbitrary orientation. Last but not least, a mechanism for reducing the image sensor noise is proposed to further improve the accuracy of the positioning algorithm. A simulation is conducted to verify the performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:27240383

  9. VLC-Based Positioning System for an Indoor Environment Using an Image Sensor and an Accelerometer Sensor.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Phat; Yoo, Myungsik

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it is believed that lighting and communication technologies are being replaced by high power LEDs, which are core parts of the visible light communication (VLC) system. In this paper, by taking advantages of VLC, we propose a novel design for an indoor positioning system using LEDs, an image sensor (IS) and an accelerometer sensor (AS) from mobile devices. The proposed algorithm, which provides a high precision indoor position, consists of four LEDs mounted on the ceiling transmitting their own three-dimensional (3D) world coordinates and an IS at an unknown position receiving and demodulating the signals. Based on the 3D world coordinates and the 2D image coordinate of LEDs, the position of the mobile device is determined. Compared to existing algorithms, the proposed algorithm only requires one IS. In addition, by using an AS, the mobile device is allowed to have arbitrary orientation. Last but not least, a mechanism for reducing the image sensor noise is proposed to further improve the accuracy of the positioning algorithm. A simulation is conducted to verify the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Chemical mechanisms of photocatalytic de-soiling and de-polluting processes in indoor environments and urban surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleiman, M.; Rosseler, O.; Montesinos, N.; Litter, M.; Bikiel, D.; Kirchstetter, T.; Bluhm, H.; Ahmed, M.; Salmeron, M.; Destaillats, H.

    2013-12-01

    Photocatalysis has been postulated as a promising approach for the de-pollution of indoor air and urban atmospheres, and for self-cleaning surfaces. Building materials and coatings containing nano-sized TiO2 photocatalytic functionalities are gaining market share, including self-cleaning building envelope materials (coatings, mortar, plaster, architectural fabrics and tiles) and indoor air purifiers. While many studies have reported good performance of photocatalysis in the removal of organic pollutants from indoor air, more information is needed to understand secondary emissions of potentially harmful byproducts from photocatalytic air cleaners. This presentation will describe analytical methods and experimental results from room-sized chamber experiments using a realistic challenge VOC mixture at low ppb levels. We will also present results from separate studies that used synchrotron-based surface spectroscopic and mass spectrometric methods to better understand the photocatalytic mechanisms that regulate the de-soiling and de-polluting activity. Two photocatalytic processes were studied: de-noxification (NOx removal) and de-soiling (removal of deposited black carbon or soot). Ambient pressure XPS was used to study surface and gas-phase species formed during adsorption of NO2 on TiO2 and subsequent UV irradiation at λ = 365 nm. The results illustrate how NOx chemistry on TiO2 surfaces can be affected by the presence of water vapor, heteroatoms present as impurities, and carbonaceous soiling. The reactivity of NOx and NO3- on surfaces leads to reduced adsorbed and gas-phase nitrogenated species. These processes need to be considered in the engineering of depolluting materials and incorporated into atmospheric models. De-soiling properties were investigated by analyzing soot oxidation on TiO2 surfaces. Model soot samples were used as surrogates of urban grime. Using laser desorption coupled with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry synchrotron ionization, we

  11. INDOOR FUNGAL CONTAMINANTS: ASSESSING THE ALLERGIC POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The indoor environment has increased in importance to children's health with children now spending more than 90% of their time indoors. Molds are an important component of this environment and have been associated with exacerbation of asthma as well as a number of other health e...

  12. Investigations on the Behavior of HVOF and Cold Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on T22 Boiler Steel in Actual Boiler Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Niraj; Singh, Harpreet; Prakash, Satya; Karthikeyan, J.

    2012-01-01

    High temperature corrosion accompanied by erosion is a severe problem, which may result in premature failure of the boiler tubes. One countermeasure to overcome this problem is the use of thermal spray protective coatings. In the current investigation high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and cold spray processes have been used to deposit commercial Ni-20Cr powder on T22 boiler steel. To evaluate the performance of the coatings in actual conditions the bare as well as the coated steels were subjected to cyclic exposures, in the superheater zone of a coal fired boiler for 15 cycles. The weight change and thickness loss data were used to establish kinetics of the erosion-corrosion. X-ray diffraction, surface and cross-sectional field emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS) and x-ray mapping techniques were used to analyse the as-sprayed and corroded specimens. The HVOF sprayed coating performed better than its cold sprayed counterpart in actual boiler environment.

  13. EVALUATION OF AIR PURIFICATION DEVICES FOR CONTROL OF INDOOR PM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because people spend most of their time indoors (89%), the indoor environment is a primary determinant of particle exposure. The indoor environment is especially an important determinant for the very young, the very old, and those with underlying cardiopulmonary disease because...

  14. Volatile N-nitrosamines in Environment Tobacco Smoke: Sampling,Analysis, Smission Factors, and Indoor Air Exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Mahanama, K.R.R.; Daisey, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    A more convenient sampling and analysis method for the volatile N-nitrosamines (VNA) in ETS, using commercially available TherrnosorbIN cartridges, was developed and validated. Using the method, emission factors for the two major VNA in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) were determined in a room-sized environmental chamber for six commercial cigarette brands, which together accounted for 62.5% of the total market in California in 1990. The average emission factors were 565 {+-} 115 and 104 {+-} 20 ng per cigarette for N-nitrosodimethylamine and N-nitrosopyrrolidine, respectively. The emission factors were used to estimate VNA exposures from ETS in a typical office building and an average residence. Indoor concentrations of N,N dimethylnitrosamine from ETS for these scenarios were less than 10% of the reported median outdoor concentration. This median outdoor concentration, however, includes many measurements made in source-dominated areas and may be considerably higher than one based on more representative sampling of outdoor air.

  15. Sampling artifacts in measurement of elemental and organic carbon: Low-volume sampling in indoor and outdoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, David A.; Norris, Gary A.

    Experiments were completed to determine the extent of artifacts from sampling elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) under sample conditions consistent with personal sampling. Two different types of experiments were completed; the first examined possible artifacts from oils used in personal environmental monitor (PEM) impactor plates, and the second examined artifacts from microenvironmental sampling using different sampling media combinations (quartz, Teflon, XAD denuder, and electrostatic precipitator). The effectiveness of front and backup filters was evaluated for most sampling configurations. Mean total carbon concentrations from sampling configurations using impactor oils were not statistically different from the control case (using a sharp cut cyclone). Three microenvironments were tested (kitchen, library, and ambient); carbon concentrations were highest in the kitchen using a front quartz filter (mean OC of 16.4 μg m -3). The lowest front quartz filter concentrations were measured in the library using XAD denuders (mean OC of 3.6 μg m -3). Denuder removal efficiencies (average of 82% for total carbon) were lower compared with previous ambient studies and may indicate that indoor sources influenced denuder efficiency during sample collection. The highest carbon concentrations from backup quartz filters were measured using the Teflon-quartz combination.

  16. Airborne fungi and bacteria in indoor and outdoor environment of the Pediatric Unit of Edirne Government Hospital.

    PubMed

    Okten, Suzan; Asan, Ahmet

    2012-03-01

    This study was performed between January 2004 and December 2004 in 13 stations in the Pediatric Unit of Edirne Government Hospital in order to determine the outdoor and indoor airborne microfungal and bacterial contents. The results of air samplings revealed that 1,376 microfungal and 2,429 bacterial colonies in total were isolated. The isolated microfungal specimens were identified and 65 species from 16 genera were determined. Among these, the most frequent genus was Cladosporium with 462 colonies (33.58%) followed by Alternaria with 310 (22.53%) and Penicillium with 280 (20.35%) colonies. The isolated bacterial samples were grouped based on their Gram-staining properties. The most frequent ones were Gram (+) cocci with 1,527 colonies (62.87%) followed by Gram (+) bacilli with 828 colonies (34.09%) and Gram (-) bacilli with 74 colonies (3.05%). Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Corynebacterium, and Microccus appeared to be the common genera isolated for all months. Statistical analyses were performed in order to see if there existed a relationship between meteorological conditions and the microfungal and bacterial species and their concentrations.

  17. NIOSH testimony on indoor air quality: Selected references before the Subcommittee on Superfund, Ocean and Water Protection, Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate by J. Donald Millar, May 26, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has compiled the document in response to an increasing number of requests for information about indoor air quality (IAQ), including sick building syndrome. Included in the publication are: NIOSH Congressional testimony that describes the NIOSH IAQ investigations program and summarizes the results of NIOSH research and findings on IAQ problems, NIOSH guidance for conducting indoor air quality investigations, NIOSH journal article on evaluating building ventilation systems, and list of non-NIOSH publications on indoor air quality. As the Federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for occupational safety and health standards, NIOSH limits its IAQ activities to the occupational environment. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also conducts an IAQ program and can be contacted for information regarding both occupational and non-occupational settings.

  18. Indoor air pollution and airway disease.

    PubMed

    Viegi, G; Simoni, M; Scognamiglio, A; Baldacci, S; Pistelli, F; Carrozzi, L; Annesi-Maesano, I

    2004-12-01

    Scientific interest in indoor pollution has been increasing since the second half of the 1980s. Growing scientific evidence has shown that because people generally spend the majority of their time indoors, indoor pollution plays a significant role in affecting health and is thus an important health issue. Indoor environments include dwellings, workplaces, schools and day care centres, bars, discotheques and vehicles. Common indoor pollutants are environmental tobacco smoke, particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and biological allergens. In developing countries, relevant sources of indoor pollution include biomass and coal burning for cooking and heating. Concentrations of these pollutants can be many times higher indoors than outdoors. Indoor air pollution may increase the risk of irritation phenomena, allergic sensitisation, acute and chronic respiratory disorders and lung function impairment. Recent conservative estimates have shown that 1.5-2 million deaths per year worldwide could be attributed to indoor air pollution. Approximately 1 million of these deaths occur in children aged under 5 years due to acute respiratory infections, and significant proportions of deaths occur due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer in women. Today, indoor air pollution ranks tenth among preventable risk factors contributing to the global burden of disease. Further research is necessary to better evaluate the respiratory health effects of indoor pollution and to implement protective programmes for public health.

  19. Plant leaves as indoor air passive samplers for volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Todd A; Doucette, William J

    2015-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) enter indoor environments through internal and external sources. Indoor air concentrations of VOCs vary greatly but are generally higher than outdoors. Plants have been promoted as indoor air purifiers for decades, but reports of their effectiveness differ. However, while air-purifying applications may be questionable, the waxy cuticle coating on leaves may provide a simple, cost-effective approach to sampling indoor air for VOCs. To investigate the potential use of plants as indoor air VOC samplers, a static headspace approach was used to examine the relationship between leaf and air concentrations, leaf lipid contents and octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) for six VOCs and four plant species. The relationship between leaf and air concentrations was further examined in an actual residence after the introduction of several chlorinated VOC emission sources. Leaf-air concentration factors (LACFs), calculated from linear regressions of the laboratory headspace data, were found to increase as the solvent extractable leaf lipid content and Koa value of the VOC increased. In the studies conducted in the residence, leaf concentrations paralleled the changing air concentrations, indicating a relatively rapid air to leaf VOC exchange. Overall, the data from the laboratory and residential studies illustrate the potential for plant leaves to be used as cost effective, real-time indoor air VOC samplers.

  20. A tale of two cities: Comparison of impacts on CO2 emissions, the indoor environment and health of home energy efficiency strategies in London and Milton Keynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrubsole, C.; Das, P.; Milner, J.; Hamilton, I. G.; Spadaro, J. V.; Oikonomou, E.; Davies, M.; Wilkinson, P.

    2015-11-01

    Dwellings are a substantial source of global CO2 emissions. The energy used in homes for heating, cooking and running electrical appliances is responsible for a quarter of current total UK emissions and is a key target of government policies for greenhouse gas abatement. Policymakers need to understand the potential impact that such decarbonization policies have on the indoor environment and health for a full assessment of costs and benefits. We investigated these impacts in two contrasting settings of the UK: London, a predominantly older city and Milton Keynes, a growing new town. We employed SCRIBE, a building physics-based health impact model of the UK housing stock linked to the English Housing Survey, to examine changes, 2010-2050, in end-use energy demand, CO2 emissions, winter indoor temperatures, airborne pollutant concentrations and associated health impacts. For each location we modelled the existing (2010) housing stock and three future scenarios with different levels of energy efficiency interventions combined with either a business-as-usual, or accelerated decarbonization of the electricity grid approach. The potential for CO2 savings was appreciably greater in London than Milton Keynes except when substantial decarbonization of the electricity grid was assumed, largely because of the lower level of current energy efficiency in London and differences in the type and form of the housing stock. The average net impact on health per thousand population was greater in magnitude under all scenarios in London compared to Milton Keynes and more beneficial when it was assumed that purpose-provided ventilation (PPV) would be part of energy efficiency interventions, but more detrimental when interventions were assumed not to include PPV. These findings illustrate the importance of considering ventilation measures for health protection and the potential variation in the impact of home energy efficiency strategies, suggesting the need for tailored policy

  1. Simulation and Comparison of Particle Injection in an Indoor Environment Using the Species Transport and Discrete Phase Models

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Wei, Zhenglun A.; Bennett, James S.; Yang, Xiaofan

    2012-12-11

    In simulating fluid/solid-particle multiphase -flows, various methods are available. One approach is the combined Euler-Lagrange method, which simulates the fluid phase flow in the Eulerian framework and the discrete phase (particle) motion in the Lagrangian framework simultaneously. The Lagrangian approach, where particle motion is determined by the current state of the fluid phase flow, is also called the discrete phase model (DPM), in the context of numerical flow simulation. In this method, the influence of the particle motions on the fluid flow can be included (two-way interactions) but are more commonly excluded (one-way interactions, when the discrete phase concentration is dilute. The other approach is to treat the particle number concentration as a continuous species, a necessarily passive quantity determined by the fluid flow, with no influences from the particles on the fluid flow (one-way interactions only), except to the extent the discrete phase “continuum” alters the overall fluid properties, such as density. In this paper, we compare these two methods with experimental data for an indoor environmental chamber. The effects of injection particle numbers and the related boundary conditions are investigated. In the Euler-Lagrange interaction or DPM model for incompressible flow, the Eulerian continuous phase is governed by the Reynolds-averaged N-S (RANS) equations. The motions of particles are governed by Newton’s second law. The effects of particle motions are communicated to the continuous phase through a force term in the RANS equations. The second formulation is a pure Eulerian type, where only the particle-number concentration is addressed, rather than the motion of each individual particle. The fluid flow is governed by the same RANS equations without the particle force term. The particle-number concentration is simulated by a species transport equation. Comparisons among the models and with experimental and literature data are presented

  2. Airborne Endotoxin from Indoor and Outdoor Environments:Effect of Sample Dilution on the Kinetic Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airborne endotoxin in occupational environments are a potential respiratory hazard to individuals. In this study, total and inhalable airborne endotoxin samples were collected via filtration from inside animal housing units and downwind from agricultural production sites and a wastewater treatment ...

  3. Extraction of the 3D Free Space from Building Models for Indoor Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakité, A. A.; Zlatanova, S.

    2016-10-01

    For several decades, indoor navigation has been exclusively investigated in a 2D perspective, based on floor plans, projection and other 2D representations of buildings. Nevertheless, 3D representations are closer to our reality and offer a more intuitive description of the space configuration. Thanks to recent advances in 3D modelling, 3D navigation is timidly but increasingly gaining in interest through the indoor applications. But, because the structure of indoor environment is often more complex than outdoor, very simplified models are used and obstacles are not considered for indoor navigation leading to limited possibilities in complex buildings. In this paper we consider the entire configuration of the indoor environment in 3D and introduce a method to extract from it the actual navigable space as a network of connected 3D spaces (volumes). We describe how to construct such 3D free spaces from semantically rich and furnished IFC models. The approach combines the geometric, the topological and the semantic information available in a 3D model to isolate the free space from the rest of the components. Furthermore, the extraction of such navigable spaces in building models lacking of semantic information is also considered. A data structure named combinatorial maps is used to support the operations required by the process while preserving the topological and semantic information of the input models.

  4. Indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Polpong, P; Bovornkitti, S

    1998-01-01

    The naturally radioactive but chemically inert gas, radon, is formed from the radioactive decay of radium which is part of the uranium series. Radon gas, which has a half life of 3.8 days, must escape from soil particles through air-filled pores in order to enter the atmosphere following the decay of radium. The concentration of radon in the atmosphere varies, depending on the place, time, height above the ground and meteorological conditions. It is thus an inescapable source of radiation exposure, both at home and at work. The potential hazards posed by exposure to radiation from indoor radon gas and its daughter products are of great concern worldwide. Noting of an excessive lung cancer risk among several groups of underground miners exposed to radon and its daughter products, studies on radon concentrations in the workplace and in dwellings have been conducted in many countries. The results have shown that the distribution of radon concentrations are approximately lognormal from which population weighted; the arithmetic mean of radon concentration of 40 Bq.m-3 has been adopted worldwide for dwellings and workplaces. The principal methods for reducing a high indoor radon concentration are: reducing the radon supply by reversing the pressure difference between the building and the soil; raising the resistance of the foundations to soil gas entry; removing the radon sources such as water or underlying soil; diluting the concentration by increasing the ventilation rate; and reducing the concentration of radon progeny by filtering and increasing the circulation of indoor air. Buildings which have a radon concentration higher than 200 Bq.m-3 should be investigated by the national authorities concerned; meanwhile, householders should be advised to take simple temporary precautions, such as increasing ventilation, until a permanent remedy can be effected. PMID:9470322

  5. Indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Polpong, P; Bovornkitti, S

    1998-01-01

    The naturally radioactive but chemically inert gas, radon, is formed from the radioactive decay of radium which is part of the uranium series. Radon gas, which has a half life of 3.8 days, must escape from soil particles through air-filled pores in order to enter the atmosphere following the decay of radium. The concentration of radon in the atmosphere varies, depending on the place, time, height above the ground and meteorological conditions. It is thus an inescapable source of radiation exposure, both at home and at work. The potential hazards posed by exposure to radiation from indoor radon gas and its daughter products are of great concern worldwide. Noting of an excessive lung cancer risk among several groups of underground miners exposed to radon and its daughter products, studies on radon concentrations in the workplace and in dwellings have been conducted in many countries. The results have shown that the distribution of radon concentrations are approximately lognormal from which population weighted; the arithmetic mean of radon concentration of 40 Bq.m-3 has been adopted worldwide for dwellings and workplaces. The principal methods for reducing a high indoor radon concentration are: reducing the radon supply by reversing the pressure difference between the building and the soil; raising the resistance of the foundations to soil gas entry; removing the radon sources such as water or underlying soil; diluting the concentration by increasing the ventilation rate; and reducing the concentration of radon progeny by filtering and increasing the circulation of indoor air. Buildings which have a radon concentration higher than 200 Bq.m-3 should be investigated by the national authorities concerned; meanwhile, householders should be advised to take simple temporary precautions, such as increasing ventilation, until a permanent remedy can be effected.

  6. Indoor air quality and health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.

    During the last two decades there has been increasing concern within the scientific community over the effects of indoor air quality on health. Changes in building design devised to improve energy efficiency have meant that modern homes and offices are frequently more airtight than older structures. Furthermore, advances in construction technology have caused a much greater use of synthetic building materials. Whilst these improvements have led to more comfortable buildings with lower running costs, they also provide indoor environments in which contaminants are readily produced and may build up to much higher concentrations than are found outside. This article reviews our current understanding of the relationship between indoor air pollution and health. Indoor pollutants can emanate from a range of sources. The health impacts from indoor exposure to combustion products from heating, cooking, and the smoking of tobacco are examined. Also discussed are the symptoms associated with pollutants emitted from building materials. Of particular importance might be substances known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which arise from sources including paints, varnishes, solvents, and preservatives. Furthermore, if the structure of a building begins to deteriorate, exposure to asbestos may be an important risk factor for the chronic respiratory disease mesothelioma. The health effects of inhaled biological particles can be significant, as a large variety of biological materials are present in indoor environments. Their role in inducing illness through immune mechanisms, infectious processes, and direct toxicity is considered. Outdoor sources can be the main contributors to indoor concentrations of some contaminants. Of particular significance is Radon, the radioactive gas that arises from outside, yet only presents a serious health risk when found inside buildings. Radon and its decay products are now recognised as important indoor pollutants, and their effects are

  7. ASSESSING ALLERGENICITY OF INDOOR AIR FUNGAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing Allergenicity of Indoor Air Fungal Contaminants
    M D W Ward1, M E Viana2, N Haykal-Coates1, L B Copeland1, S H Gavett1, and MJ K Selgrade1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC, USA. 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, USA.
    Rationale: The indoor environment has increased in impor...

  8. Indoor Air Quality: A Guide for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    Indoor air quality is a major concern for educators involved in the development of new school facilities, or the remodeling and maintenance of existing ones. This guide addresses the issue of air quality, the health concerns involved, and procedures for minimizing the impact of pollutants in the school environment. It defines common indoor air…

  9. Prevalence and risk factors associated with nonspecific building-related symptoms in office employees in Japan: relationships between work environment, Indoor Air Quality, and occupational stress.

    PubMed

    Azuma, K; Ikeda, K; Kagi, N; Yanagi, U; Osawa, H

    2015-10-01

    A nationwide cross-sectional study of 3335 employees was conducted in 320 offices in Japan to estimate the prevalence of building-related symptoms (BRSs) and determine the risk factors related to work environment, Indoor Air Quality, and occupational stress. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. The prevalences of general symptoms, eye irritation, and upper respiratory symptoms were 14.4%, 12.1%, and 8.9%, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that eye irritation was significantly associated with carpeting [odds ratio (OR), 1.73; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24-2.41], coldness perception (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.13-1.45), and air dryness perception (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.42-1.82). General symptoms were significantly associated with unpleasant odors (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.13-1.65), amount of work (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06-1.45), and interpersonal conflicts (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.23-1.69). Upper respiratory symptoms were significantly associated with crowded workspaces (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.63), air dryness perception (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.79-2.38), and reported dustiness on the floor (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.16-1.67). Although psychosocial support is important to reduce and control BRSs, maintaining appropriate air-conditioning and a clean and uncrowded workspace is of equal importance. PMID:25244340

  10. Distributions of the particle/gas and dust/gas partition coefficients for seventy-two semi-volatile organic compounds in indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjuan; Mandin, Corinne; Blanchard, Olivier; Mercier, Fabien; Pelletier, Maud; Le Bot, Barbara; Glorennec, Philippe; Ramalho, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    Particle/gas and dust/gas partition coefficients (Kp and Kd) are two key parameters that address the partitioning of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between gas-phase, airborne particles, and settled dust in indoor environment. A number of empirical equations to calculate the values of Kp and Kd have been reported in the literature. Therefore, the difficulty lies in the selection of a specific empirical equation in a given situation. In this study, we retrieved from the literature 38 empirical equations for calculating Kp and Kd values from the SVOC saturation vapor pressure and octanol/air partition coefficient. These values were calculated for 72 SVOCs: 9 phthalates, 9 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), 11 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 22 biocides, 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 3 alkylphenols, 2 synthetic musks, tributylphosphate, and bisphenol A. The mean and median values of log10Kp or log10Kd for most SVOCs were of the same order of magnitude. The distribution of log10Kp values was fitted to either a normal distribution (for 27 SVOCs) or a log-normal distribution (for 45 SVOCs). This work provides a reference distribution of the log10Kp for 72 SVOCs, and its use may reduce the bias associated with the selection of a specific value or equation. PMID:27016817

  11. Prevalence and risk factors associated with nonspecific building-related symptoms in office employees in Japan: relationships between work environment, Indoor Air Quality, and occupational stress.

    PubMed

    Azuma, K; Ikeda, K; Kagi, N; Yanagi, U; Osawa, H

    2015-10-01

    A nationwide cross-sectional study of 3335 employees was conducted in 320 offices in Japan to estimate the prevalence of building-related symptoms (BRSs) and determine the risk factors related to work environment, Indoor Air Quality, and occupational stress. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. The prevalences of general symptoms, eye irritation, and upper respiratory symptoms were 14.4%, 12.1%, and 8.9%, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that eye irritation was significantly associated with carpeting [odds ratio (OR), 1.73; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24-2.41], coldness perception (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.13-1.45), and air dryness perception (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.42-1.82). General symptoms were significantly associated with unpleasant odors (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.13-1.65), amount of work (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06-1.45), and interpersonal conflicts (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.23-1.69). Upper respiratory symptoms were significantly associated with crowded workspaces (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.13-1.63), air dryness perception (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.79-2.38), and reported dustiness on the floor (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.16-1.67). Although psychosocial support is important to reduce and control BRSs, maintaining appropriate air-conditioning and a clean and uncrowded workspace is of equal importance.

  12. Exposure levels due to WLAN devices in indoor environments corrected by a time-amplitude factor of distribution of the quasi-stochastic signals.

    PubMed

    Miclaus, Simona; Bechet, Paul; Stratakis, Dimitrios

    2014-12-01

    With the development of radiofrequency technology, radiating quasi-stochastic signals like the wireless local area networks (WLAN), a proper procedure of exposure level assessment is needed. No standardised procedure exists at the moment. While channel power measurement proved to overestimate the field strength, weighting techniques were proposed. The paper compares the exposure levels determined by three different procedures, two of them correcting the field level by weighting. Twenty-three experimental cases of WLAN traffic load are analysed in an indoor environment in controlled conditions. The results show the differences obtained when the duty cycle (DC) method is applied comparatively with the application of weighting based on an amplitude-time correction. Significant exposure level reductions of 52.6-79.2 % from the field determined by frequency domain method and of 36.5-72.8 % from the field determined by the DC weighting method were obtained by time-amplitude method. Specificities of weighting factors probability density functions were investigated and regression analysis was applied for a detailed characterisation of this procedure. PMID:24591729

  13. An Indoor Mobile Location Estimator in Mixed Line of Sight/Non-Line of Sight Environments Using Replacement Modified Hidden Markov Models and an Interacting Multiple Model

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Jingyu; Wu, Chengdong; Jia, Zixi; Yang, Yufang; Zhang, Yunzhou; Hu, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Localization as a technique to solve the complex and challenging problems besetting line-of-sight (LOS) and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) transmissions has recently attracted considerable attention in the wireless sensor network field. This paper proposes a strategy for eliminating NLOS localization errors during calculation of the location of mobile terminals (MTs) in unfamiliar indoor environments. In order to improve the hidden Markov model (HMM), we propose two modified algorithms, namely, modified HMM (M-HMM) and replacement modified HMM (RM-HMM). Further, a hybrid localization algorithm that combines HMM with an interacting multiple model (IMM) is proposed to represent the velocity of mobile nodes. This velocity model is divided into a high-speed and a low-speed model, which means the nodes move at different speeds following the same mobility pattern. Each moving node continually switches its state based on its probability. Consequently, to improve precision, each moving node uses the IMM model to integrate the results from the HMM and its modified forms. Simulation experiments conducted show that our proposed algorithms perform well in both distance estimation and coordinate calculation, with increasing accuracy of localization of the proposed algorithms in the order M-HMM, RM-HMM, and HMM + IMM. The simulations also show that the three algorithms are accurate, stable, and robust. PMID:26091395

  14. Parent's Guide to School Indoor Air Quality. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution is air pollution, indoors or out. Good indoor air quality (IAQ) contributes to a favorable learning environment for students, protects health, and supports the productivity of school personnel. In schools in poor repair, leaky roofs and crumbling walls have caused additional indoor air quality problems, including contamination with…

  15. Control of a Wheelchair in an Indoor Environment Based on a Brain-Computer Interface and Automated Navigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Yuanqing; Yan, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shaoyu; Yu, Tianyou; Gu, Zhenghui

    2016-01-01

    The concept of controlling a wheelchair using brain signals is promising. However, the continuous control of a wheelchair based on unstable and noisy electroencephalogram signals is unreliable and generates a significant mental burden for the user. A feasible solution is to integrate a brain-computer interface (BCI) with automated navigation techniques. This paper presents a brain-controlled intelligent wheelchair with the capability of automatic navigation. Using an autonomous navigation system, candidate destinations and waypoints are automatically generated based on the existing environment. The user selects a destination using a motor imagery (MI)-based or P300-based BCI. According to the determined destination, the navigation system plans a short and safe path and navigates the wheelchair to the destination. During the movement of the wheelchair, the user can issue a stop command with the BCI. Using our system, the mental burden of the user can be substantially alleviated. Furthermore, our system can adapt to changes in the environment. Two experiments based on MI and P300 were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of our system. PMID:26054072

  16. Control of a Wheelchair in an Indoor Environment Based on a Brain-Computer Interface and Automated Navigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Yuanqing; Yan, Yongyong; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shaoyu; Yu, Tianyou; Gu, Zhenghui

    2016-01-01

    The concept of controlling a wheelchair using brain signals is promising. However, the continuous control of a wheelchair based on unstable and noisy electroencephalogram signals is unreliable and generates a significant mental burden for the user. A feasible solution is to integrate a brain-computer interface (BCI) with automated navigation techniques. This paper presents a brain-controlled intelligent wheelchair with the capability of automatic navigation. Using an autonomous navigation system, candidate destinations and waypoints are automatically generated based on the existing environment. The user selects a destination using a motor imagery (MI)-based or P300-based BCI. According to the determined destination, the navigation system plans a short and safe path and navigates the wheelchair to the destination. During the movement of the wheelchair, the user can issue a stop command with the BCI. Using our system, the mental burden of the user can be substantially alleviated. Furthermore, our system can adapt to changes in the environment. Two experiments based on MI and P300 were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of our system.

  17. [Estimation of the indoor diffusion of asbestos fibers with the diffusion model for the external environment of Pasquill and Gifford].

    PubMed

    Bellassai, Debora; Spinazzola, Antonio; Silvestri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In absence of results of environmental monitoring to proceed with the assessment of occupational exposure, it was developed a model that retraces the one of Pasquill and Gifford, currently used for the estimation of concentrations of pollutants at certain distances from the source in outdoor environment. Purpose of the study is the quantitative estimate of the diffusion of airborne asbestos fibers in function of the distance from the source in an factory where railway carriages were produced during the period when asbestos was sprayed as insulator of the body. The treatment was carried out in a large shed without separation from other operations. The application of the model, given the characteristics of the emitting source, has allowed us to estimate the diffusion of particles inside the shed with an expected decrease in concentration inversely proportional to the distance from the source. By appropriate calculations the concentration by weight has been converted into number offibers by volume, the unit of measure currently used for the definition of asbestos pollution. PMID:26193738

  18. Moving Environmental Justice Indoors: Understanding Structural Influences on Residential Exposure Patterns in Low-Income Communities.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The indoor environment has not been fully incorporated into the environmental justice dialogue. To inform strategies to reduce disparities, we developed a framework to identify the individual and place-based drivers of indoor environment quality. We reviewed empirical evidence...

  19. Source apportionment of indoor air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Ken; Hayward, Steven B.

    An understanding of the relative contributions from important pollutant sources to human exposures is necessary for the design and implementation of effective control strategies. In the past, societal efforts to control air pollution have focused almost exclusively on the outdoor (ambient) environment. As a result, substantial amounts of time and money have been spent to limit airborne discharges from mobile and stationary sources. Yet it is now recognized that exposures to elevated pollutant concentrations often occur as a result of indoor, rather than outdoor, emissions. While the major indoor sources have been identified, their relative impacts on indoor air quality have not been well defined. Application of existing source apportionment models to nonindustrial indoor environments is only just beginning. It is possible that these models might be used to distinguish between indoor and outdoor emissions, as well as to distinguish among indoor sources themselves. However, before the feasibility and suitability of source-apportionment methods for indoor applications can be assessed adequately, it is necessary to take account of model assumptions and associated data requirements. This paper examines the issue of indoor source apportionment and reviews the need for emission characterization studies to support such source-apportionment efforts.

  20. The myths of indoor air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, H.

    1993-03-01

    A popular myth holds that building energy conservation measures, implemented since the oil crises of the 1970s, cause indoor air pollution problems. This myth ignores the fact that most indoor air pollutant sources have little or nothing to do with energy conservation. Air studied inside buildings before 1973 was found to be more polluted than outdoor air even during severe air pollution events. In fact, only two types of conservation measures directly increase indoor air pollutant concentrations: inappropriately reduced ventilation and using sealants and caulks that emit pollutants. The myth ignores the fundamental responsibility (and ability) of architects, engineers, and building operators to create indoor environments that are both extremely habitable and environmentally responsible. Architects and other building design professionals must provide safe, healthy, and comfortable environments; minimize damage to the environment; and conserve energy and other resources. Achieving good indoor air quality (IAQ) is as essential as providing comfortable, healthy thermal conditions and functional, aesthetically sound lighting and acoustical environments. Reducing ventilation to conserve energy certainly increases concentrations of pollutants emitted from indoor sources. Adequate ventilation is essential to achieving and maintaining good IAQ. But there are many factors that determine IAQ and their interdependence is strong. Although ventilation is an important way to limit pollutant concentrations, limiting pollutant sources is far more effective. Pollutants from indoor sources that cannot be eliminated should be minimized by careful planning, design, specification, and construction. The preventive approach costs very little and it saves energy. 6 refs., 7 tabs.

  1. Source characterization of BTEX in indoor microenvironments in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Lee, S. C.; Li, W. M.; Cao, J. J.

    Levels of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the xylenes (BTEX) in different indoor microenvironments such as offices, homes, schools, shopping malls and restaurants were investigated in Hong Kong. Different indoor environments including six offices, six homes, six air-conditioned classrooms, six shopping malls and four restaurants were selected in Hong Kong for indoor and outdoor BTEX measurement. This study is aimed to determine qualitatively or semi-quantitatively sources of BTEX. Source identification is possible by determining the indoor/outdoor ( I/ O) concentration ratio. An I/ O ratio>1 was considered as an indicator for indoor sources. For BTEX in different indoor environments except for schools, some of the pollutants were dominated by outdoor sources while others mainly originated from indoor sources. In schools, however, the BTEX predominantly originated from outdoor sources. The potential sources of BTEX in indoor environments were also identified by using principal component analysis and nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test. The number of variables was reduced to two and one new factors for indoor and outdoor data, respectively. These factors were related to certain source characteristics. It is shown that the type of land use, the use of printers, the traffic condition, the cooking style, the type of gas stove, smoking and internal decoration strongly influence the indoor concentrations of BTEX ( p<0.05). Significant difference of BTEX concentrations in the five types of indoor environments were also observed ( p<0.05).

  2. Chemical characterization of particulate air pollutants Case studies on indoor air quality, cultural heritage and the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horemans, Benjamin

    When attempting to discuss the effects of airborne particulate matter (PM), it is important to address both physical and chemical aspects of this pollutant. This work reports on the results of three separate case studies, each approaching a specific problem of air pollution by evaluating the chemical composition of PM. 1. In the US and Europe, office workers often complain about work-related health symptoms. These symptoms are collectively referred as the 'sick building syndrome'. This work could be considered as one of the largest data collections on particulate pollutants in Belgian offices. It helps to understand the sources as well as the behavior and fate of PM at our workplace environments. Especially the chemical information on PM makes the results unique, since it enables a better evaluation of the health risks connected to office dust. 2. The Alhambra and Generalife bring every year more than 3 million people to Granada in Southern Spain. Recently, the increasing urbanization of Granada and the immense pressure of mass tourism form a threat for this heritage. Despite the fact that atmospheric pollutants are known to he potentially aggressive for our cultural patrimony. this case study is the first to assess the effects of environmental aerosols on the Alhambra monument. The results of this study could help decision-makers at the Alhambra and the city of Granada with the formulation of preventive conservation measures. They show how local vehicular traffic is the main source for atmospheric pollution in and around the Alhambra monument. Targeted strategies are necessary in order to maximally preserve these monuments and their UNESCO world cultural heritage label. 3. Excessive input of nitrogen-containing atmospheric nutrients via dry and wet deposition can cause entrophication of marine regions, which is also a common, seasonal phenomenon along the coasts of the North Sea. This study is the first to give a complete quantitative description of the

  3. Indoor Environment, Productivity in Offices

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, O.; Fisk, W.J.; Wargocki, P.

    2007-12-01

    Heat from radionuclide decay gives rise to coupled thermal(T), hydrological (H), chemical (C), and mechanical (M) processes in therock mass. These coupled processes impact a repository s ability toisolate waste, both by how they affect water seepage intowaste-emplacement drifts, and by how they affect radionuclide transport.This chapter describes the United States Department of Energy s ThermalTesting Program starting in the mid-1990s, consisting of threelarge-scale in situ thermal tests. The main objective of these thermaltests was to gain an in-depth understanding of the coupled THCM processesthat would occur in the repository rock. This objective was met by (1)planning the types of measurements based on the anticipated coupledprocesses, and (2) adopting an approach requiring close integrationbetween measurements and modeling.

  4. Controlling Indoor Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nero, Anthony V, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the health risks posed by indoor air pollutants, such as airborne combustion products, toxic chemicals, and radioactivity. Questions as to how indoor air might be regulated. Calls for new approaches to environmental protection. (TW)

  5. IAQ: an environmental factor in the indoor habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Burroughs, H.E.B.

    1997-02-01

    This is a discussion of the role and impact of indoor air quality issues on the indoor conditioned environment. It is the author`s contention that the design and operating teams of buildings have the technology to prevent, control, or correct most problems of indoor environment. The topics of the article include the building as a habitat, IAQ model links to causes, current issues, and IAQ engineering for prevention.

  6. [Indoor air quality in schools].

    PubMed

    Cartieaux, E; Rzepka, M-A; Cuny, D

    2011-07-01

    Indoor air quality in schools has received particular attention over the past several years. Children are considered as one of the most sensitive groups to atmospheric pollution because their bodies are actively growing and they breathe higher volumes of air relative to their body weights than adults do. They also spend more time in school or group structures (preschools, day nurseries) than in any indoor environments other than the home. The analysis of children's exposure to air pollution at school requires the identification of the main pollutant sources present in these educational institutions. Both a strong contribution of outdoor pollution and a very specific pollution bound to school activities such as the use of paints, markers, glues, and manufactured ink eraser pens, exist. The ventilation in school buildings also plays an important role in air quality. A higher air exchange may improve thermal comfort and air quality. The cause of indoor air pollution is a combinatory effect of physical, chemical, and biological factors, and the adequacy of ventilation in the environment. Several pollutants have been reported to exist in classrooms such as bacteria, molds, volatile organic compounds, persistent organic pollutants and microparticles. There is a correlation between the concentrations of the pollutants and onset of health problems in schoolchildren. We observe predominantly respiratory symptoms as well as a prevalence of respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. This study shows that poor indoor air quality affects children's health. PMID:21621987

  7. [Indoor air quality in schools].

    PubMed

    Cartieaux, E; Rzepka, M-A; Cuny, D

    2011-07-01

    Indoor air quality in schools has received particular attention over the past several years. Children are considered as one of the most sensitive groups to atmospheric pollution because their bodies are actively growing and they breathe higher volumes of air relative to their body weights than adults do. They also spend more time in school or group structures (preschools, day nurseries) than in any indoor environments other than the home. The analysis of children's exposure to air pollution at school requires the identification of the main pollutant sources present in these educational institutions. Both a strong contribution of outdoor pollution and a very specific pollution bound to school activities such as the use of paints, markers, glues, and manufactured ink eraser pens, exist. The ventilation in school buildings also plays an important role in air quality. A higher air exchange may improve thermal comfort and air quality. The cause of indoor air pollution is a combinatory effect of physical, chemical, and biological factors, and the adequacy of ventilation in the environment. Several pollutants have been reported to exist in classrooms such as bacteria, molds, volatile organic compounds, persistent organic pollutants and microparticles. There is a correlation between the concentrations of the pollutants and onset of health problems in schoolchildren. We observe predominantly respiratory symptoms as well as a prevalence of respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. This study shows that poor indoor air quality affects children's health.

  8. Climate change and health: Indoor heat exposure in vulnerable populations

    SciTech Connect

    White-Newsome, Jalonne L.; Sanchez, Brisa N.; Jolliet, Olivier; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Parker, Edith A.; Timothy Dvonch, J.; O'Neill, Marie S.

    2012-01-15

    Introduction: Climate change is increasing the frequency of heat waves and hot weather in many urban environments. Older people are more vulnerable to heat exposure but spend most of their time indoors. Few published studies have addressed indoor heat exposure in residences occupied by an elderly population. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between outdoor and indoor temperatures in homes occupied by the elderly and determine other predictors of indoor temperature. Materials and methods: We collected hourly indoor temperature measurements of 30 different homes; outdoor temperature, dewpoint temperature, and solar radiation data during summer 2009 in Detroit, MI. We used mixed linear regression to model indoor temperatures' responsiveness to weather, housing and environmental characteristics, and evaluated our ability to predict indoor heat exposures based on outdoor conditions. Results: Average maximum indoor temperature for all locations was 34.85 Degree-Sign C, 13.8 Degree-Sign C higher than average maximum outdoor temperature. Indoor temperatures of single family homes constructed of vinyl paneling or wood siding were more sensitive than brick homes to outdoor temperature changes and internal heat gains. Outdoor temperature, solar radiation, and dewpoint temperature predicted 38% of the variability of indoor temperatures. Conclusions: Indoor exposures to heat in Detroit exceed the comfort range among elderly occupants, and can be predicted using outdoor temperatures, characteristics of the housing stock and surroundings to improve heat exposure assessment for epidemiological investigations. Weatherizing homes and modifying home surroundings could mitigate indoor heat exposure among the elderly.

  9. Group housing of Holstein calves in a poor indoor environment increases respiratory disease but does not influence performance or leukocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Cobb, C J; Obeidat, B S; Sellers, M D; Pepper-Yowell, A R; Ballou, M A

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine if group-housing Holstein heifer calves in indoor pens with poor ventilation and drainage influences performance, health, leukocytes, and behavioral responses compared with individually housed calves. Ninety colostrum-fed calves (2 ± 1 d of age) were randomly assigned to 3 treatments: individually housed (G1; n=30 calves), 2 calves per pen (G2; n=30 calves), or 3 calves per pen (G3; n=30 calves). The space allowance per calf was 2.5m(2) for all treatment groups. All calves were fed 747 and 1,010 g/d of dry matter of a 28% CP and 20% fat milk replacer during the first 2 wk and wk 3 to 6, respectively. Weaning was initiated on d 46 by removing the evening feeding, and calves were completely weaned when they consumed 800 g/d of dry matter calf starter for 2 consecutive days after d 54. Calves were randomly commingled at d 90 in groups of 5 calves per pen in outdoors pens with an attached hutch. Peripheral blood was collected during the neonatal (3, 10, 21 d), weaning (46, 48, 54 d), and commingling periods (90, 93, 98 d) and was analyzed for neutrophil oxidative burst capacity when cocultured with an Escherichia coli, neutrophil surface L-selectin protein concentration, and whole blood secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α when cocultured with lipopolysaccharide. Behavior of each calf was assessed using 2 independent tests: an approach response to a human subject and the response of the calf when placed in an isolated cage. Calf starter intake was greater for G2 and G3 during wk 8 and 9, and also at wk 11 for G3 compared with G1. No treatment × time interaction or treatment effect for average daily gain was observed. Additionally, no treatment × time or treatment effect was noted for any leukocyte or biochemical variable of biological significance throughout the entire study. Individually housed calves tended to have a reduced incidence of respiratory disease during the first 90 d of life. No other treatment

  10. Mathematical models for predicting indoor air quality from smoking activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, W R

    1999-01-01

    Much progress has been made over four decades in developing, testing, and evaluating the performance of mathematical models for predicting pollutant concentrations from smoking in indoor settings. Although largely overlooked by the regulatory community, these models provide regulators and risk assessors with practical tools for quantitatively estimating the exposure level that people receive indoors for a given level of smoking activity. This article reviews the development of the mass balance model and its application to predicting indoor pollutant concentrations from cigarette smoke and derives the time-averaged version of the model from the basic laws of conservation of mass. A simple table is provided of computed respirable particulate concentrations for any indoor location for which the active smoking count, volume, and concentration decay rate (deposition rate combined with air exchange rate) are known. Using the indoor ventilatory air exchange rate causes slightly higher indoor concentrations and therefore errs on the side of protecting health, since it excludes particle deposition effects, whereas using the observed particle decay rate gives a more accurate prediction of indoor concentrations. This table permits easy comparisons of indoor concentrations with air quality guidelines and indoor standards for different combinations of active smoking counts and air exchange rates. The published literature on mathematical models of environmental tobacco smoke also is reviewed and indicates that these models generally give good agreement between predicted concentrations and actual indoor measurements. PMID:10350523

  11. THE ALLERGENIC POTENTIAL OF INDOOR AIR FUNGAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The indoor environment has increased in importance to children's health with children now spending more than 90% of their time indoors. Molds are an important component of this environment and have been associated with exacerbation of asthma. Their contribution t...

  12. Secondary organic aerosol formation by limonene ozonolysis: Parameterizing multi-generational chemistry in ozone- and residence time-limited indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, Michael S.

    2016-11-01

    Terpene ozonolysis reactions can be a strong source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) indoors. SOA formation can be parameterized and predicted using the aerosol mass fraction (AMF), also known as the SOA yield, which quantifies the mass ratio of generated SOA to oxidized terpene. Limonene is a monoterpene that is at sufficient concentrations such that it reacts meaningfully with ozone indoors. It has two unsaturated bonds, and the magnitude of the limonene ozonolysis AMF varies by a factor of ∼4 depending on whether one or both of its unsaturated bonds are ozonated, which depends on whether ozone is in excess compared to limonene as well as the available time for reactions indoors. Hence, this study developed a framework to predict the limonene AMF as a function of the ozone [O3] and limonene [lim] concentrations and the air exchange rate (AER, h-1), which is the inverse of the residence time. Empirical AMF data were used to calculate a mixing coefficient, β, that would yield a 'resultant AMF' as the combination of the AMFs due to ozonolysis of one or both of limonene's unsaturated bonds, within the volatility basis set (VBS) organic aerosol framework. Then, β was regressed against predictors of log10([O3]/[lim]) and AER (R2 = 0.74). The β increased as the log10([O3]/[lim]) increased and as AER decreased, having the physical meaning of driving the resultant AMF to the upper AMF condition when both unsaturated bonds of limonene are ozonated. Modeling demonstrates that using the correct resultant AMF to simulate SOA formation owing to limonene ozonolysis is crucial for accurate indoor prediction.

  13. Climate change and health: Indoor heat exposure in vulnerable populations☆

    PubMed Central

    White-Newsome, Jalonne L.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Jolliet, Olivier; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Parker, Edith A.; Dvonch, J. Timothy; O'Neill, Marie S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Climate change is increasing the frequency of heat waves and hot weather in many urban environments. Older people are more vulnerable to heat exposure but spend most of their time indoors. Few published studies have addressed indoor heat exposure in residences occupied by an elderly population. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between outdoor and indoor temperatures in homes occupied by the elderly and determine other predictors of indoor temperature. Materials and methods We collected hourly indoor temperature measurements of 30 different homes; outdoor temperature, dewpoint temperature, and solar radiation data during summer 2009 in Detroit, MI. We used mixed linear regression to model indoor temperatures’ responsiveness to weather, housing and environmental characteristics, and evaluated our ability to predict indoor heat exposures based on outdoor conditions. Results Average maximum indoor temperature for all locations was 34.85 °C, 13.8 °C higher than average maximum outdoor temperature. Indoor temperatures of single family homes constructed of vinyl paneling or wood siding were more sensitive than brick homes to outdoor temperature changes and internal heat gains. Outdoor temperature, solar radiation, and dewpoint temperature predicted 38% of the variability of indoor temperatures. Conclusions Indoor exposures to heat in Detroit exceed the comfort range among elderly occupants, and can be predicted using outdoor temperatures, characteristics of the housing stock and surroundings PMID:22071034

  14. Survey of indoor air monitoring services: is there a private demand for healthful indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, K.

    1985-06-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that indoor air quality in nonindustrial environments is often less healthful than outdoor air quality. The short- and long-term health consequences of indoor exposures are not well defined, yet private citizens and organizations are becoming more concerned about potential adverse health effects. Questions and complaints about indoor environmental hazards are an expanding problem for federal, state, and local health agencies. This paper describes findings from a national survey of fee-for-service companies which make indoor air measurements in nonindustrial settings. Information is presented on the makeup of these firms, the types and numbers of buildings which have been investigated, typical contaminant measurements, and associated costs. Results indicate that a substantial private demand exists for goods and services which aid building occupants in evaluating and improving indoor air quality.

  15. Calculating Least Risk Paths in 3d Indoor Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanclooster, A.; De Maeyer, Ph.; Fack, V.; Van de Weghe, N.

    2013-08-01

    Over the last couple of years, research on indoor environments has gained a fresh impetus; more specifically applications that support navigation and wayfinding have become one of the booming industries. Indoor navigation research currently covers the technological aspect of indoor positioning and the modelling of indoor space. The algorithmic development to support navigation has so far been left mostly untouched, as most applications mainly rely on adapting Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm to an indoor network. However, alternative algorithms for outdoor navigation have been proposed adding a more cognitive notion to the calculated paths and as such adhering to the natural wayfinding behaviour (e.g. simplest paths, least risk paths). These algorithms are currently restricted to outdoor applications. The need for indoor cognitive algorithms is highlighted by a more challenged navigation and orientation due to the specific indoor structure (e.g. fragmentation, less visibility, confined areas…). As such, the clarity and easiness of route instructions is of paramount importance when distributing indoor routes. A shortest or fastest path indoors not necessarily aligns with the cognitive mapping of the building. Therefore, the aim of this research is to extend those richer cognitive algorithms to three-dimensional indoor environments. More specifically for this paper, we will focus on the application of the least risk path algorithm of Grum (2005) to an indoor space. The algorithm as proposed by Grum (2005) is duplicated and tested in a complex multi-storey building. The results of several least risk path calculations are compared to the shortest paths in indoor environments in terms of total length, improvement in route description complexity and number of turns. Several scenarios are tested in this comparison: paths covering a single floor, paths crossing several building wings and/or floors. Adjustments to the algorithm are proposed to be more aligned to the

  16. Indoor exposures to fine aerosols and acid gases.

    PubMed

    Koutrakis, P; Brauer, M; Briggs, S L; Leaderer, B P

    1991-11-01

    Indoor exposures to aerosols and gases are associated with both indoor and outdoor air pollution sources. The identification of sources and the assessment of their relative contribution can be a complicated process due to a) the presence of numerous indoor sources, which can vary from building to building; b) the uncertainties associated with the estimation of the impact of outdoor sources on indoor air quality; c) the interactions between pollutants; and d) the importance of reactions between pollutants and indoor surfaces. It is well established that fine particles (diameter less than or equal to 2.5 microns) originating from outdoor sources such as automobiles, oil and coal combustion, incineration, and diverse industrial activities can penetrate into the indoor environment. Indoor/outdoor ratios, usually varying between 0.4 and 0.8, depend on parameters such as particle size and density, air exchange rate, and the surface-to-volume ratio of the indoor environment. Determining fine particle elemental composition makes it possible to identify the contribution of different outdoor sources. This paper focuses on the origin and the concentration of indoor aerosols and acid gases by highlighting the results from two indoor air quality studies. PMID:1821374

  17. An Automated 3d Indoor Topological Navigation Network Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, A.; Rahman, A. A.; Boguslawski, P.; Gold, C. M.

    2015-10-01

    Indoor navigation is important for various applications such as disaster management and safety analysis. In the last decade, indoor environment has been a focus of wide research; that includes developing techniques for acquiring indoor data (e.g. Terrestrial laser scanning), 3D indoor modelling and 3D indoor navigation models. In this paper, an automated 3D topological indoor network generated from inaccurate 3D building models is proposed. In a normal scenario, 3D indoor navigation network derivation needs accurate 3D models with no errors (e.g. gap, intersect) and two cells (e.g. rooms, corridors) should touch each other to build their connections. The presented 3D modeling of indoor navigation network is based on surveying control points and it is less dependent on the 3D geometrical building model. For reducing time and cost of indoor building data acquisition process, Trimble LaserAce 1000 as surveying instrument is used. The modelling results were validated against an accurate geometry of indoor building environment which was acquired using Trimble M3 total station.

  18. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny's atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

  19. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  20. Evaluating sources of indoor air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, B.A.; Sparks, L.E.; White, J.B.; Jackson, M.D.

    1988-05-01

    This paper discusses a three-phase approach, employing environmental chambers, indoor air quality (IAQ) models, and test-house experiments, that is effective in linking sources of indoor pollutants to measured concentrations. Emission factors developed in test chambers can be used to evaluate full-scale indoor environments. A PC-based IAQ model has been developed that can accurately predict indoor concentrations of specific pollutants under controlled conditions in a test house. The model is also useful in examining the effect of pollutant sinks and variations in ventilation parameters. Pollutants were examined from: (1) para-dichloro-benzene emissions from moth crystal cakes; and, (2) particulate emissions from unvented kerosene heaters. However, the approach has not been validated for other source types, including solvent based materials and aerosol products.

  1. Managing residential sources of indoor air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, B.A.; Sparks, L.E.

    1994-12-31

    Sources of indoor air pollutants in residential environments can be managed to reduce occupant exposures. Techniques for managing indoor air pollution sources include: source elimination, substitution, modification, and pretreatment, and altering the amount, location, or time of use. Intelligent source management requires knowledge of the source`s emission characteristics, including chemical composition, emission rates, and decay rates. In addition, knowledge of outdoor air exchange rates, heating/air-conditioning duct flow rates, and kitchen/batch exhaust fan flow rates is needed to determine pollutant concentrations. Indoor air quality (IAQ) models use this information and occupant activity patterns to determine instantaneous and/or cumulative individual exposure. This paper describes a number of residential scenarios for various indoor air pollution VOC sources, several air flow conditions, and typical occupant activity patterns. IAQ model predictions of occupant exposures for these scenarios are given for selected source management options.

  2. Reactions among indoor pollutants.

    PubMed

    Weschler, C J

    2001-09-13

    This paper reviews recent studies in the field of "indoor chemistry"--reactions among indoor pollutants. Advances have occurred in a number of areas. A mouse bioassay procedure has shown that ozone/terpene reactions produce products that are more irritating than their precursors, although the agents responsible for the deleterious effects remain to be determined. Indoor ozone/terpene reactions have been demonstrated to produce hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, sub-micron particles, and ultrafine particles. New analytical techniques such as LC/MS and thermal desorption mass spectrometry have greatly improved our knowledge of the condensed-phase species associated with such particles. Indeed, the latter approach has identified a number of short-lived or thermally labile species, including organic hydroperoxides, peroxy-hemiacetals, and secondary ozonides, which would be missed by more conventional techniques. Investigators are making inroads into the poorly understood area of indoor heterogeneous chemistry. Systems studied include ozone/HVAC components, ozone/paint, and ozone/carpets. Another heterogeneous process that has been further examined is the indoor formation of nitrous acid through NO2/surface chemistry. Emissions from indoor sources that contribute to, or are altered by, indoor chemistry have also received attention. Researchers have expanded our awareness of reactive chemicals that can emanate from wood coatings and other products commonly used indoors. In a related vein, a number of recent investigations have shown that emissions from materials can be significantly altered by indoor chemistry. On the theoretical side, an outdoor atmospheric chemistry model has been modified for use as an indoor air model, the effects of ventilation rates on indoor chemistry have been simulated, and initial steps have been taken in applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to indoor chemistry.

  3. Quantitative volatile metabolite profiling of common indoor fungi: relevancy for indoor air analysis.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, Sven; Kruse, Hermann

    2009-08-01

    Microorganisms such as bacteria and molds produce an enormous variety of volatile metabolites. To determine whether typical microbial volatile metabolites can be used as indicator compounds for the detection of hidden mold in indoor environments, we examined 14 typical indoor fungal strains for their growth rates and their capability to produce volatile organic compounds (VOC) on standard clinical media and on agar medium made from building materials. Air samples from Headspace Chambers (HSC) were adsorbed daily on Tenax TA tubes and analyzed by thermal desorption gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In parallel, metabolic activity was measured by determining oxygen demand, the microbial biomass was assessed by dry weighing. Profiling of the volatile metabolites showed that VOC production depended greatly on fungal strain, culture medium, biological activity, and time. The laboratory-derived maximum emission rates were extrapolated to approximate indoor air concentrations in a hypothetical mold-infested room. The extrapolated indoor air data suggest that most of the microbial-produced VOC concentrations were below the analytical detection limit for conventional indoor air analysis. Additionally, conducted indoor air analysis in mold homes confirmed these findings for the most part. The present findings raise doubts about the utility of indicator VOC for the detection of hidden mold growth in indoor environments.

  4. [Actual problems of the impact of production and management of industrial waste on the environment and public health (review of literature)].

    PubMed

    Cherniaeva, T K

    2013-01-01

    In the modern society the importance and applicability of the problem concerning the negative effect of production and consumption waste on the objects of the environment and the state sa people's health is related to their daily emergency, large tonnage, storage, and utilization. Wastes and places of their storage and waste burial constitute an toxicological and epidemiological risk. Chemical and biological contamination of solid waste is a threat to its penetration into the soil, air, groundwater and surface water bodies, vegetation, directly or indirectly, cause variations in health status of the population.

  5. Physical-chemical properties and evaluative fate modelling of 'emerging' and 'novel' brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants in the indoor and outdoor environment.

    PubMed

    Liagkouridis, Ioannis; Cousins, Anna Palm; Cousins, Ian T

    2015-08-15

    Several groups of flame retardants (FRs) have entered the market in recent years as replacements for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), but little is known about their physical-chemical properties or their environmental transport and fate. Here we make best estimates of the physical-chemical properties and undertake evaluative modelling assessments (indoors and outdoors) for 35 so-called 'novel' and 'emerging' brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and 22 organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs). A QSPR (Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship) based technique is used to reduce uncertainty in physical-chemical properties and to aid property selection for modelling, but it is evident that more, high quality property data are required for improving future assessments. Evaluative modelling results show that many of the alternative FRs, mainly alternative BFRs and some of the halogenated OPFRs, behave similarly to the PBDEs both indoors and outdoors. These alternative FRs exhibit high overall persistence (Pov), long-range transport potential (LRTP) and POP-like behaviour and on that basis cannot be regarded as suitable replacements to PBDEs. A group of low molecular weight alternative BFRs and non-halogenated OPFRs show a potentially better environmental performance based on Pov and LRTP metrics. Results must be interpreted with caution though since there are significant uncertainties and limited data to allow for thorough model evaluation. Additional environmental parameters such as toxicity and bioaccumulative potential as well as functionality issues should be considered in an industrial substitution strategy.

  6. Measurements of benzene and formaldehyde in a medium sized urban environment. Indoor/outdoor health risk implications on special population groups.

    PubMed

    Pilidis, Georgios A; Karakitsios, Spyros P; Kassomenos, Pavlos A; Kazos, Elias A; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, the results of a measurement campaign aiming to assess cancer risk among two special groups of population: policemen and laboratory technicians exposed to the toxic substances, benzene and formaldehyde are presented. The exposure is compared to general population risk. The results show that policemen working outdoor (traffic regulation, patrol on foot or in vehicles, etc.) are exposed at a significantly higher benzene concentration (3-5 times) than the general population, while the exposure to carbonyls is in general lower. The laboratory technicians appear to be highly exposed to formaldehyde while no significant variation of benzene exposure in comparison to the general population is recorded. The assessment revealed that laboratory technicians and policemen run a 20% and 1% higher cancer risk respectively compared to the general population. Indoor working place air quality is more significant in assessing cancer risk in these two categories of professionals, due to the higher Inhalation Unit Risk (IUR) of formaldehyde compared to benzene. Since the origin of the danger to laboratory technicians is clear (use of chemicals necessary for the experiments), in policemen the presence of carbonyls in indoor air concentrations due to smoking or used materials constitute a danger equal to the exposure to traffic originated air pollutants. PMID:18386150

  7. Measurements of benzene and formaldehyde in a medium sized urban environment. Indoor/outdoor health risk implications on special population groups.

    PubMed

    Pilidis, Georgios A; Karakitsios, Spyros P; Kassomenos, Pavlos A; Kazos, Elias A; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, the results of a measurement campaign aiming to assess cancer risk among two special groups of population: policemen and laboratory technicians exposed to the toxic substances, benzene and formaldehyde are presented. The exposure is compared to general population risk. The results show that policemen working outdoor (traffic regulation, patrol on foot or in vehicles, etc.) are exposed at a significantly higher benzene concentration (3-5 times) than the general population, while the exposure to carbonyls is in general lower. The laboratory technicians appear to be highly exposed to formaldehyde while no significant variation of benzene exposure in comparison to the general population is recorded. The assessment revealed that laboratory technicians and policemen run a 20% and 1% higher cancer risk respectively compared to the general population. Indoor working place air quality is more significant in assessing cancer risk in these two categories of professionals, due to the higher Inhalation Unit Risk (IUR) of formaldehyde compared to benzene. Since the origin of the danger to laboratory technicians is clear (use of chemicals necessary for the experiments), in policemen the presence of carbonyls in indoor air concentrations due to smoking or used materials constitute a danger equal to the exposure to traffic originated air pollutants.

  8. Elderly exposure to indoor air pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida-Silva, M.; Wolterbeek, H. T.; Almeida, S. M.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the indoor air quality in Elderly Care Centers (ECCs) in order to assess the elders' daily exposure to air pollutants. Ten ECCs hosting 384 elderly were selected in Lisbon and Loures. Firstly, a time-budget survey was created based on questionnaires applied in the studied sites. Results showed that in average elders spend 95% of their time indoors splitted between bedrooms and living-rooms. Therefore, a set of physical and chemical parameters were measured continuously during the occupancy period in these two indoor micro-environments and in the outdoor. Results showed that indoor was the main environment contributing for the elders' daily exposure living in ECCs. In the indoor, the principal micro-environment contributing for the elders' daily exposure varied between bedrooms and living-rooms depending not only on the characteristics of the ECCs but also on the pollutants. The concentrations of CO2, VOCt, O3 and PM10 exceeded the limit values predominantly due to the insufficient ventilation preconized in the studied sites.

  9. Indoor Air Quality: Tools for Schools Action Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Indoor Air Div.

    Good indoor air quality contributes to a favorable learning environment for students, productivity for teachers and staff, and a sense of comfort, health, and well-being for all school occupants. The goal of this kit is to provide clear and easily applied guidance that will help prevent Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) problems and resolve such problems…

  10. THE INTERACTION OF VAPOUR PHASE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS WITH INDOOR SINKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of indoor air pollutants with interior surfaces (i.e., sinks) is a well known, but poorly understood, phenomenon. Studies have shown that re-emissions of adsorbed organic vapours can contribute to elevated concentrations of organics in indoor environments. Researc...

  11. Indoor Air Quality Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin Union Free School District, NY.

    This manual identifies ways to improve a school's indoor air quality (IAQ) and discusses practical actions that can be carried out by school staff in managing air quality. The manual includes discussions of the many sources contributing to school indoor air pollution and the preventive planning for each including renovation and repair work,…

  12. Indoor air pollution: an edifice complex.

    PubMed

    Brooks, B O; Utter, G M; DeBroy, J A; Schimke, R D

    1991-01-01

    The collision of escalating technological sophistication and surging environmental awareness has caused the reexamination of many societal paradigms. Horror stories about lethal chemical exposures involving isolated cases of ignorance, carelessness or greed have caused the public to demand constant vigilance to prevent exposure to potentially hazardous substances. Accordingly, much time and resource has been expanded by the U.S. government and citizens to abate and prevent air and water pollution. While these efforts have met with measurable success, there is increasing public concern about a new generation of pollution-related human illness in office, home and transportation environments. New instances of Sick Building Syndrome or Building Related Illness are reported daily by the popular press. Human health effects such as cancer, infectious disease, allergy and irritation have been ascribed to indoor air pollution. The clinical aspects of indoor air pollution are often discounted by consulting engineers and industrial hygienists involved in indoor air quality. Physicians and clinically-trained scientists have received a "Macedonian call" to sift clinical relevance from the emotional aspects of indoor air quality problems. Point sources of pollutants, associated human health effects, and problem solving approaches associated with indoor air pollution are described. Regulatory and litigational aspects of indoor air pollution are also discussed. PMID:1920571

  13. Evaluating sources of indoor air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, B.A.; Sparks, L.A.; White, J.B.; Jackson, M.D. )

    1990-04-01

    Evaluation of indoor air pollution problems requires an understanding of the relationship between sources, air movement, and outdoor air exchange. Research is underway to investigate these relationships. A three-phase program is being implemented: (1) Environmental chambers are used to provide source emission factors for specific indoor pollutants; (2) An IAQ (Indoor Air Quality) model has been developed to calculate indoor pollutant concentrations based on chamber emissions data and the air exchange and air movement within the indoor environment; and (3) An IAQ test house is used to conduct experiments to evaluate the model results. Examples are provided to show how this coordinated approach can be used to evaluate specific sources of indoor air pollution. Two sources are examined: (1) para-dichlorobenzene emissions from solid moth repellant; and (2) emissions from unvented kerosene heaters. The evaluation process for both sources followed the three-phase approach discussed above. Para-dichlorobenzene emission factors were determined by small chamber testing at EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory. Particle emission factors for the kerosene heaters were developed in large chambers at the J.B. Pierce Foundation Laboratory. Both sources were subsequently evaluated in EPA's IAQ test house. The IAQ model predictions showed good agreement with the test house measurements when appropriate values were provided for source emissions, outside air exchange, in-house air movement, and deposition on sink surfaces.

  14. Virtual and Actual: Relative Accuracy of On-Site and Web-based Instruments in Auditing the Environment for Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Joseph, Eran; Lee, Jae Seung; Cromley, Ellen K.; Laden, Francine; Troped, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the relative accuracy and usefulness of web tools in evaluating and measuring street-scale built environment characteristics. Methods A well-known audit tool was used to evaluate 84 street segments at the urban edge of metropolitan Boston, Massachusetts, using on-site visits and three web-based tools. The assessments were compared to evaluate their relative accuracy and usefulness. Results Web-based audits, based-on Google Maps, Google Street View, and MS Visual Oblique, tend to strongly agree with on-site audits on land-use and transportation characteristics (e.g., types of buildings, commercial destinations, and streets). However, the two approaches to conducting audits (web versus on-site) tend to agree only weakly on fine-grain, temporal, and qualitative environmental elements. Among the web tools used, auditors rated MS Visual Oblique as the most valuable. Yet Street View tends to be rated as the most useful in measuring fine-grain features, such as levelness and condition of sidewalks. Conclusion While web-based tools do not offer a perfect substitute for on-site audits, they allow for preliminary audits to be performed accurately from remote locations, potentially saving time and cost and increasing the effectiveness of subsequent on-site visits. PMID:23247423

  15. Investigation of key parameters influencing the efficient photocatalytic oxidation of indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Quici, Natalia; Kibanova, Daria; Vera, Maria Laura; Choi, Hyeok; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Litter, Marta I.; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Destaillats, Hugo

    2008-06-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation of indoor VOCs has the potential to eliminate pollutants from indoor environments, thus effectively improving and/or maintaining indoor air quality while reducing ventilation energy costs. Design and operation of UV photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners requires optimization of various parameters to achieve highest pollutant removal efficiencies while avoiding the formation of harmful secondary byproducts and maximizing catalyst lifetime.

  16. 40 CFR 61.205 - Distribution and use of phosphogypsum for indoor research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for indoor research and development. 61.205 Section 61.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... and use of phosphogypsum for indoor research and development. (a) Phosphogypsum may be lawfully removed from a stack and distributed in commerce for use in indoor research and development...

  17. Examining the relationships between acculturation orientations, perceived and actual norms, and drinking behaviors of short-term american sojourners in foreign environments.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eric R; Cruz, Rick A; Labrie, Joseph W; Hummer, Justin F

    2011-12-01

    As little research has examined factors influencing increased and heavy drinking behavior among American sojourners abroad, this study was designed to examine how acculturation orientations (i.e., separation versus assimilation), host country per capita drinking rates, and perceptions about the drinking behavior among other sojourners and natives in the host country predicted alcohol risk abroad. A sample of 216 American college students completing study abroad programs completed a pre-abroad questionnaire to document their pre-abroad drinking levels, followed by a post-return questionnaire to assess drinking while abroad, acculturation orientations and perceived norms of drinking behavior within the foreign environment. A dichotomous variable was created to compare United States (U.S.) per capita drinking rates with those of the host country. Hierarchical repeated-measures ANOVAs examined the changes in drinking from pre-abroad to abroad levels. Participants studying in countries with higher drinking rates than the U.S. and those with higher perceptions about the drinking behavior in the country increased their drinking to a greater extent. Those with higher separation acculturation orientations and greater perceptions drank at heavier levels while abroad. Participants with a greater assimilation orientation and higher perceptions about native drinking, as well as those with a greater separation orientation and higher perceptions about other students' alcohol use drank the heaviest while abroad. These findings have implications for future preventive work with American students and other sojourning groups to promote pre-abroad knowledge of more accurate drinking norms and greater engagement in the culture to potentially prevent increased and heavier drinking. PMID:21720781

  18. Examining the Relationships Between Acculturation Orientations, Perceived and Actual Norms, and Drinking Behaviors of Short-Term American Sojourners in Foreign Environments

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Rick A.; LaBrie, Joseph W.; Hummer, Justin F.

    2013-01-01

    As little research has examined factors influencing increased and heavy drinking behavior among American sojourners abroad, this study was designed to examine how acculturation orientations (i.e., separation versus assimilation), host country per capita drinking rates, and perceptions about the drinking behavior among other sojourners and natives in the host country predicted alcohol risk abroad. A sample of 216 American college students completing study abroad programs completed a pre-abroad questionnaire to document their pre-abroad drinking levels, followed by a post-return questionnaire to assess drinking while abroad, acculturation orientations and perceived norms of drinking behavior within the foreign environment. A dichotomous variable was created to compare United States (U.S.) per capita drinking rates with those of the host country. Hierarchical repeated-measures ANOVAs examined the changes in drinking from pre-abroad to abroad levels. Participants studying in countries with higher drinking rates than the U.S. and those with higher perceptions about the drinking behavior in the country increased their drinking to a greater extent. Those with higher separation acculturation orientations and greater perceptions drank at heavier levels while abroad. Participants with a greater assimilation orientation and higher perceptions about native drinking, as well as those with a greater separation orientation and higher perceptions about other students’ alcohol use drank the heaviest while abroad. These findings have implications for future preventive work with American students and other sojourning groups to promote pre-abroad knowledge of more accurate drinking norms and greater engagement in the culture to potentially prevent increased and heavier drinking. PMID:21720781

  19. Examining the relationships between acculturation orientations, perceived and actual norms, and drinking behaviors of short-term american sojourners in foreign environments.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Eric R; Cruz, Rick A; Labrie, Joseph W; Hummer, Justin F

    2011-12-01

    As little research has examined factors influencing increased and heavy drinking behavior among American sojourners abroad, this study was designed to examine how acculturation orientations (i.e., separation versus assimilation), host country per capita drinking rates, and perceptions about the drinking behavior among other sojourners and natives in the host country predicted alcohol risk abroad. A sample of 216 American college students completing study abroad programs completed a pre-abroad questionnaire to document their pre-abroad drinking levels, followed by a post-return questionnaire to assess drinking while abroad, acculturation orientations and perceived norms of drinking behavior within the foreign environment. A dichotomous variable was created to compare United States (U.S.) per capita drinking rates with those of the host country. Hierarchical repeated-measures ANOVAs examined the changes in drinking from pre-abroad to abroad levels. Participants studying in countries with higher drinking rates than the U.S. and those with higher perceptions about the drinking behavior in the country increased their drinking to a greater extent. Those with higher separation acculturation orientations and greater perceptions drank at heavier levels while abroad. Participants with a greater assimilation orientation and higher perceptions about native drinking, as well as those with a greater separation orientation and higher perceptions about other students' alcohol use drank the heaviest while abroad. These findings have implications for future preventive work with American students and other sojourning groups to promote pre-abroad knowledge of more accurate drinking norms and greater engagement in the culture to potentially prevent increased and heavier drinking.

  20. Emissions from heated indoor dust.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Ellen Katrine; Bjørseth, Olav; Syversen, Tore; Mathiesen, Mette

    2002-02-01

    Settled indoor dust was collected from a university building, and the fine fraction was heated in the temperature range of 50-250 degrees C. Emissions of compounds were analysed and identified in a system consisting of a thermal desorption unit coupled to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The heating took place in both an oxidative (air) and an inert (He) atmosphere. The results indicate that oxidation of adsorbed compounds occurred, as well as decomposition of the dust itself. The emission in air started somewhere between 150 and 200 degrees C, with aldehydes and ketones as the main compounds. When heated in the inert atmosphere, semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) were emitted at temperatures above 150 degrees C. These compounds were not found in the air system, probably due to oxidation. Based on the obtained results we recommend that the temperature of hot surfaces in indoor environments should be kept below 150 degrees C to avoid oxidation of indoor dust and minimise the emissions.

  1. Assessment of indoor air problems at work with a questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Reijula, K; Sundman-Digert, C

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To assess the extent of indoor air problems in office environments in Finland. Methods: Complaints and symptoms related to the indoor environment experienced by office workers were collected from 122 workplaces in 1996–99 by using the modified Indoor Air Questionnaire established by the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. Altogether 11 154 employees took part in the survey. Results: The most common problems were dry air (35% of the respondents), stuffy air (34%), dust or dirt in the indoor environment (25%), and draught (22%). The most common work related symptoms were irritated, stuffy, or runny nose (20%), itching, burning, or irritation of the eyes (17%), and fatigue (16%). Women reported indoor air problems and work related symptoms more often than men. Allergic persons and smokers reported indoor air problems more often, and experienced work related symptoms more often than non-allergic persons and non-smokers. Conclusions: The complaints and work related symptoms associated with indoor air problems were common in office workers. The present questionnaire is a suitable tool for the occupational health personnel in investigating indoor air problems and the data of the survey can be used as a reference when the results of a survey at work are being analysed. PMID:14691270

  2. Building Ventilation as an Effective Disease Intervention Strategy in a Dense Indoor Contact Network in an Ideal City

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaolei; Lei, Hao; Xu, Pengcheng; Cowling, Benjamin J.; Li, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Emerging diseases may spread rapidly through dense and large urban contact networks, especially they are transmitted by the airborne route, before new vaccines can be made available. Airborne diseases may spread rapidly as people visit different indoor environments and are in frequent contact with others. We constructed a simple indoor contact model for an ideal city with 7 million people and 3 million indoor spaces, and estimated the probability and duration of contact between any two individuals during one day. To do this, we used data from actual censuses, social behavior surveys, building surveys, and ventilation measurements in Hong Kong to define eight population groups and seven indoor location groups. Our indoor contact model was integrated with an existing epidemiological Susceptible, Exposed, Infectious, and Recovered (SEIR) model to estimate disease spread and with the Wells-Riley equation to calculate local infection risks, resulting in an integrated indoor transmission network model. This model was used to estimate the probability of an infected individual infecting others in the city and to study the disease transmission dynamics. We predicted the infection probability of each sub-population under different ventilation systems in each location type in the case of a hypothetical airborne disease outbreak, which is assumed to have the same natural history and infectiousness as smallpox. We compared the effectiveness of controlling ventilation in each location type with other intervention strategies. We conclude that increasing building ventilation rates using methods such as natural ventilation in classrooms, offices, and homes is a relatively effective strategy for airborne diseases in a large city. PMID:27611368

  3. Building Ventilation as an Effective Disease Intervention Strategy in a Dense Indoor Contact Network in an Ideal City.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaolei; Wei, Jianjian; Lei, Hao; Xu, Pengcheng; Cowling, Benjamin J; Li, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Emerging diseases may spread rapidly through dense and large urban contact networks, especially they are transmitted by the airborne route, before new vaccines can be made available. Airborne diseases may spread rapidly as people visit different indoor environments and are in frequent contact with others. We constructed a simple indoor contact model for an ideal city with 7 million people and 3 million indoor spaces, and estimated the probability and duration of contact between any two individuals during one day. To do this, we used data from actual censuses, social behavior surveys, building surveys, and ventilation measurements in Hong Kong to define eight population groups and seven indoor location groups. Our indoor contact model was integrated with an existing epidemiological Susceptible, Exposed, Infectious, and Recovered (SEIR) model to estimate disease spread and with the Wells-Riley equation to calculate local infection risks, resulting in an integrated indoor transmission network model. This model was used to estimate the probability of an infected individual infecting others in the city and to study the disease transmission dynamics. We predicted the infection probability of each sub-population under different ventilation systems in each location type in the case of a hypothetical airborne disease outbreak, which is assumed to have the same natural history and infectiousness as smallpox. We compared the effectiveness of controlling ventilation in each location type with other intervention strategies. We conclude that increasing building ventilation rates using methods such as natural ventilation in classrooms, offices, and homes is a relatively effective strategy for airborne diseases in a large city.

  4. Building Ventilation as an Effective Disease Intervention Strategy in a Dense Indoor Contact Network in an Ideal City.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaolei; Wei, Jianjian; Lei, Hao; Xu, Pengcheng; Cowling, Benjamin J; Li, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    Emerging diseases may spread rapidly through dense and large urban contact networks, especially they are transmitted by the airborne route, before new vaccines can be made available. Airborne diseases may spread rapidly as people visit different indoor environments and are in frequent contact with others. We constructed a simple indoor contact model for an ideal city with 7 million people and 3 million indoor spaces, and estimated the probability and duration of contact between any two individuals during one day. To do this, we used data from actual censuses, social behavior surveys, building surveys, and ventilation measurements in Hong Kong to define eight population groups and seven indoor location groups. Our indoor contact model was integrated with an existing epidemiological Susceptible, Exposed, Infectious, and Recovered (SEIR) model to estimate disease spread and with the Wells-Riley equation to calculate local infection risks, resulting in an integrated indoor transmission network model. This model was used to estimate the probability of an infected individual infecting others in the city and to study the disease transmission dynamics. We predicted the infection probability of each sub-population under different ventilation systems in each location type in the case of a hypothetical airborne disease outbreak, which is assumed to have the same natural history and infectiousness as smallpox. We compared the effectiveness of controlling ventilation in each location type with other intervention strategies. We conclude that increasing building ventilation rates using methods such as natural ventilation in classrooms, offices, and homes is a relatively effective strategy for airborne diseases in a large city. PMID:27611368

  5. Sensitivity of power and RMS delay spread predictions of a 3D indoor ray tracing model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Yu; Guo, Li-Xin; Li, Chang-Long; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Zhen-Wei

    2016-06-13

    This study investigates the sensitivity of a three-dimensional (3D) indoor ray tracing (RT) model for the use of the uniform theory of diffraction and geometrical optics in radio channel characterizations of indoor environments. Under complex indoor environments, RT-based predictions require detailed and accurate databases of indoor object layouts and the electrical characteristics of such environments. The aim of this study is to assist in selecting the appropriate level of accuracy required in indoor databases to achieve good trade-offs between database costs and prediction accuracy. This study focuses on the effects of errors in indoor environments on prediction results. In studying the effects of inaccuracies in geometry information (indoor object layout) on power coverage prediction, two types of artificial erroneous indoor maps are used. Moreover, a systematic analysis is performed by comparing the predictions with erroneous indoor maps and those with the original indoor map. Subsequently, the influence of random errors on RMS delay spread results is investigated. Given the effect of electrical parameters on the accuracy of the predicted results of the 3D RT model, the relative permittivity and conductivity of different fractions of an indoor environment are set with different values. Five types of computer simulations are considered, and for each type, the received power and RMS delay spread under the same circumstances are simulated with the RT model.

  6. Sensitivity of power and RMS delay spread predictions of a 3D indoor ray tracing model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Yu; Guo, Li-Xin; Li, Chang-Long; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Zhen-Wei

    2016-06-13

    This study investigates the sensitivity of a three-dimensional (3D) indoor ray tracing (RT) model for the use of the uniform theory of diffraction and geometrical optics in radio channel characterizations of indoor environments. Under complex indoor environments, RT-based predictions require detailed and accurate databases of indoor object layouts and the electrical characteristics of such environments. The aim of this study is to assist in selecting the appropriate level of accuracy required in indoor databases to achieve good trade-offs between database costs and prediction accuracy. This study focuses on the effects of errors in indoor environments on prediction results. In studying the effects of inaccuracies in geometry information (indoor object layout) on power coverage prediction, two types of artificial erroneous indoor maps are used. Moreover, a systematic analysis is performed by comparing the predictions with erroneous indoor maps and those with the original indoor map. Subsequently, the influence of random errors on RMS delay spread results is investigated. Given the effect of electrical parameters on the accuracy of the predicted results of the 3D RT model, the relative permittivity and conductivity of different fractions of an indoor environment are set with different values. Five types of computer simulations are considered, and for each type, the received power and RMS delay spread under the same circumstances are simulated with the RT model. PMID:27410335

  7. Indoor ozone/terpene reactions as a source of indoor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, Helen C.

    This paper reports effects of reactions between ozone and selected terpenes on the concentrations and size distributions of airborne particles in a typical indoor setting. The studies were conducted in adjacent, identical offices. In the first set of experiments, known concentrations of ozone and a selected terpene (either d-limonene, α-terpinene, or a terpene-based cleaner whose major constituent is α-pinene) were deliberately introduced into one of the offices while the other office served as a control. Subsequent particle formation and redistribution were monitored with an eight-channel optical particle counter. Particle formation was observed in each terpene system, but was greatest in the case of d-limonene. The number of particles in the 0.1-0.2 μm diameter size range was as much as 20 times larger in the office with deliberately supplemented ozone and d-limonene than in the office serving as the control. The concentration differences in the larger size ranges developed with time, indicating the importance of coagulation and condensation processes in this indoor environment. In the second set of experiments, d-limonene was deliberately introduced into one of the offices, but ozone was not supplemented in either office; instead, the indoor ozone concentrations were those that happened to be present (primarily as a consequence of outdoor-to-indoor transport). In the office that contained supplemental d-limonene, the concentrations of the 0.1-0.2 μm particles tracked those of indoor ozone (the limiting reagent) and were as much as 10 times greater than levels measured in the comparable office that did not contain supplemental d-limonene. The results demonstrate that ozone/ terpene reactions can be a significant source of sub-micron particles in indoor settings, and further illustrate the potential for reactions among commonly occurring indoor pollutants to markedly influence indoor environments.

  8. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, May 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. The specific tasks addressed were to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Initial measurements were conducted of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants. A prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon are described. Methodology was developed to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  9. INDOOR/OUTDOOR PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS MEASURED IN SELECT HOMES IN THE RALEIGH-DURHAM-CHAPEL HILL, NC AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle size distributions were measured indoors and outdoors of six residences in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC area to characterize the factors affecting particle concentrations in the indoor environment, including infiltration of outdoor aerosols. Size resolved partic...

  10. My World Indoors: My Health My World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Barbara; Dresden, Judith; Denk, James; Moreno, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for students in grades K-4 is part of the My Health My World series which explores environmental health issues. Focusing on indoor environmental health, it includes (1) an activities guide for teachers which focuses on physical science, life science, and the environment and health, presenting activity based lessons that…

  11. 9 CFR 3.102 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.102 Section 3.102 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... in its natural environment. At no time shall the lighting be such that it will cause the...

  12. 9 CFR 3.126 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.126 Section 3.126 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... control or the protection of the environment....

  13. 9 CFR 3.126 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.126 Section 3.126 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... control or the protection of the environment....

  14. 9 CFR 3.102 - Facilities, indoor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.102 Section 3.102 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... in its natural environment. At no time shall the lighting be such that it will cause the...

  15. Characteristics of trace metals in fine (PM2.5) and inhalable (PM10) particles and its health risk assessment along with in-silico approach in indoor environment of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satsangi, P. Gursumeeran; Yadav, Suman; Pipal, Atar Singh; Kumbhar, Navanath

    2014-08-01

    Indoor concentrations of fine (PM2.5: aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5) and inhalable (PM10: aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm) particles and its associated toxic metals are of concern now-a-days due to its effects on human health and environment. PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected from indoor microenvironments on glass fiber and PTFE filter paper using low volume air sampler in Pune. The average concentration of PM2.5 and PM10 were 89.7 ± 43.2 μg m-3 and 138.2 ± 68.2 μg m-3 at urban site while it was 197.5 ± 84.3 and 287 ± 92 μg m-3 at rural site. Trace metals such as Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Sb and Zn in particulate matter were estimated by ICP-AES. Concentrations of crustal metals were found to be higher than the carcinogenic metals in both the microenvironments. On the contrary the soluble and bio-availability fraction of carcinogenic metals were found higher thus it may cause the higher risk to human health. Therefore, cancer risk assessment of carcinogenic metals; Cr, Ni and Cd was calculated. Among the carcinogenic metals, Ni showed highest cancer risk in indoor PM. The higher cancer risk assessment of Ni has been supported by In-silico study which suggested that Ni actively formed co-ordination complex with histone proteins (i.e. H3-Ni/H4-Ni) by maintaining strong hydrogen bonding interactions with Asp and Glu residues of nucleosomal proteins. Present In-silico study of Ni-histone complexes will help to emphasize the possible role of Asp and Glu residues in DNA methylation, deacetylation and ubiquitinations of nucleosomal proteins. Hence, this study could pave the way to understand the structural consequence of Ni in nucleosomal proteins and its impact on epigenetic changes which ultimately cause lung and nasal cancer.

  16. Mechanisms and characteristics of airway sensitization to indoor allergens.

    PubMed

    Liccardi, G; Cazzola, M; Russo, M; Gilder, J A; D'Amato, M; D'Amato, G

    2001-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of allergic respiratory diseases, and particularly of bronchial asthma, has been linked to changes induced by human activities in outdoor and indoor environments. People living in industrialized countries spend most of their time indoors: in private homes, offices and means of transport. Indoor environments are not a refuge from outdoor air pollution. Modern systems for energy saving such as insulated windows and doors reduce the indoor natural ventilation and consequently increase the rate of indoor humidity. These conditions may determine an increase in the level of indoor pollutants (tobacco smoke, gases produced by cooling processes etc.) and of allergens derived from mites, domestic animals and cockroaches. Upholstered furniture, wall-to-wall carpets, central heating systems and/or humidifiers may also contribute to the growth of mite populations. The increasing levels of exposure to pollutants and allergens in indoor environments represents a risk factor for the development of airway sensitization, especially if these materials are inhaled early in life. The major cat allergen Fel d 1 is considered an ubiquitous allergen, since it has been found in many indoor environments where a cat has never been kept. The clothing of cat owners seems to help spread Fel d 1 in cat-free environments. Sensitization to cockroach allergens is very common in patients living in urban areas where unhygenic conditions may favour the growth of cockroach populations. Monitoring of the levels of allergens and strategies of allergen and pollutant avoidance in indoor environments are the main ways to reduce the prevalence of respiratory allergies induced by these materials.

  17. Indoor Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    We usually think of air pollution as being outdoors, but the air in your house or office could also be polluted. Sources of indoor pollution include Mold and pollen Tobacco smoke Household products ...

  18. QUANTIFYING INDOOR MOLDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing awareness that indoor molds/fungi may be connected to such conditions as asthma, allergies, hemorrhaging, chronic rhinosinusitis, memory loss, and a symptom complex called sick-building-syndrome. In addition, molds cause frequently fatal nosocomical infections. ...

  19. Winter Weather: Indoor Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... cover windows with blankets at night. Monitor Body Temperature Infants less than one year old should never ... infants and try to maintain a warm indoor temperature. If the temperature cannot be maintained, make temporary ...

  20. Form and Actuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitbol, Michel

    A basic choice underlies physics. It consists of banishing actual situations from theoretical descriptions, in order to reach a universal formal construct. Actualities are then thought of as mere local appearances of a transcendent reality supposedly described by the formal construct. Despite its impressive success, this method has left major loopholes in the foundations of science. In this paper, I document two of these loopholes. One is the problem of time asymmetry in statistical thermodynamics, and the other is the measurement problem of quantum mechanics. Then, adopting a broader philosophical standpoint, I try to turn the whole picture upside down. Here, full priority is given to actuality (construed as a mode of the immanent reality self-reflectively being itself) over formal constructs. The characteristic aporias of this variety of "Copernican revolution" are discussed.

  1. The status of indoor air pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Esmen, N A

    1985-01-01

    Indoor air pollution, specifically restricted in its meaning to chemicals in home indoor air environment, presents a new and probably an important challenge to the researchers of the air pollution field. The general overview of this topic suggests that the voluminous data generated in the past ten or so years have only defined the rudiments of the problem, and significant areas of research still exist. Among the important areas where information is lacking, the exposures to contaminants generated by the use of consumer products and through hobbies and crafts represent perhaps the most urgent need for substantial research. PMID:4085429

  2. Demonstration of a high sensitivity GNSS software receiver for indoor positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tao; Ma, Martin; Broumandan, Ali; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-03-01

    Advances in signal processing techniques contributed to the significant improvements of GNSS receiver performance in dense multipath environments and created the opportunities for a new category of high-sensitivity GNSS (HS-GNSS) receivers that can provide GNSS location services in indoor environments. The difficulties in improving the availability, reliability, and accuracy of these indoor capable GNSS receivers exceed those of the receivers designed for the most hostile urban canyon environments. The authors of this paper identified the vector tracking schemes, signal propagation statistics, and parallel processing techniques that are critical to a robust HS-GNSS receiver for indoor environments and successfully incorporated them into a fully functional high-sensitivity software receiver. A flexible vector-based receiver architecture is introduced to combine these key indoor signal processing technologies into GSNRx-hs™ - the high sensitivity software navigation receiver developed at the University of Calgary. The resulting receiver can perform multi-mode vector tracking in indoor environment at various levels of location and timing uncertainties. In addition to the obvious improvements in time-to-first-fix (TTFF) and signal sensitivity, the field test results in indoor environments surrounded by wood, glass, and concrete showed that the new techniques effectively improved the performance of indoor GNSS positioning. With fine GNSS timing, the proposed receiver can consistently deliver indoor navigation solution with the horizontal accuracy of 2-15 m depending on the satellite geometry and the indoor environments. If only the coarse GNSS timing is available, the horizontal accuracy of the indoor navigation solution from the proposed receiver is around 30 m depending on the coarse timing accuracy, the satellite geometry, and the indoor environments. From the preliminary field test results, it has been observed that the signal processing sensitivity is the

  3. Foliage Plants for Improving Indoor Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.

    1988-01-01

    NASA's research with foliage houseplants during the past 10 years has produced a new concept in indoor air quality improvement. This new and exciting technology is quite simple. Both plant leaves and roots are utilized in removing trace levels of toxic vapors from inside tightly sealed buildings. Low levels of chemicals such as carbon monoxide and formaldehyde can be removed from indoor environments by plant leaves alone, while higher concentrations of numerous toxic chemicals can be removed by filtering indoor air through the plant roots surrounded by activated carbon. The activated carbon absorbs large quantities of the toxic chemicals and retains them until the plant roots and associated microorganisms degrade and assimilate these chemicals.

  4. Indoor air quality in Latino homes in Boulder, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Luis E.; Champion, Wyatt M.; Li, Ning; Montoya, Lupita D.

    2014-08-01

    Indoor concentrations of airborne pollutants can be several times higher than those found outdoors, often due to poor ventilation, overcrowding, and the contribution of indoor sources within a home. Americans spend most of their time indoors where exposure to poor indoor air quality (IAQ) can result in diminished respiratory and cardiovascular health. This study measured the indoor air quality in 30 homes of a low-income Latino community in Boulder, Colorado during the summer of 2012. Participants were administered a survey, which included questions on their health conditions and indoor air pollution sources like cigarette smoke, heating fuel, and building materials. Twenty-four hour samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) from the indoor air were collected in each home; ambient PM2.5 samples were collected each day as well. Concurrent air samples were collected onto 47 mm Teflo and Tissuquartz filter at each location. Teflo filters were analyzed gravimetrically to measure PM2.5 and their extracts were used to determine levels of proteins and endotoxins in the fine fraction. The Tissuquartz filters were analyzed for elemental and organic carbon content (EC/OC). Results indicated that the indoor air contained higher concentrations of PM2.5 than the ambient air, and that the levels of OC were much higher than EC in both indoor and outdoor samples. This community showed no smoking in their homes and kept furry pets indoors at very low rates; therefore, cooking is likely the primary source of indoor PM. For responders with significant exposure to PM, it appeared to be primarily from occupational environments or childhood exposure abroad. Our findings indicate that for immigrant communities such as this, it is important to consider not only their housing conditions but also the relevant prior exposures when conducting health assessments.

  5. Comment on “Dioxin inhalation doses from wood combustion in indoor cookingfires” by Amanda L. Northcross, S. Katharine Hammond, Eduardo Canuz, Kirk, R. Smith. Atmospheric Environment 49 (2012), 415-418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umlauf, Gunther; Mariani, Guilio; Cardenas, Beatriz

    2013-12-01

    Methodological weaknesses that lead to an overestimation of the indoor dioxin levels reported in the paper are discussed. Data from a recent study on dioxins in indoor kitchen air where open cooking is performed, which support our hypothesis of an overestimation, are discussed.

  6. Psychosocial dimensions of solving an indoor air problem.

    PubMed

    Lahtinen, Marjaana; Huuhtanen, Pekka; Kähkönen, Erkki; Reijula, Kari

    2002-03-01

    This investigation focuses on the psychological and social dimensions of managing and solving indoor air problems. The data were collected in nine workplaces by interviews (n = 85) and questionnaires (n = 375). Indoor air problems in office environments have traditionally utilized industrial hygiene or technical expertise. However, indoor air problems at workplaces are often more complex issues to solve. Technical questions are inter-related with the dynamics of the work community, and the cooperation and interaction skills of the parties involved in the solving process are also put to the test. In the present study, the interviewees were very critical of the process of solving the indoor air problem. The responsibility for coordinating the problem-managing process was generally considered vague, as were the roles and functions of the various parties. Communication problems occurred and rumors about the indoor air problem circulated widely. Conflicts were common, complicating the process in several ways. The research focused on examining different ways of managing and resolving an indoor air problem. In addition, reference material on the causal factors of the indoor air problem was also acquired. The study supported the hypothesis that psychosocial factors play a significant role in indoor air problems. PMID:11951709

  7. Exploring the consequences of climate change for indoor air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaroff, William W.

    2013-03-01

    Climate change will affect the concentrations of air pollutants in buildings. The resulting shifts in human exposure may influence public health. Changes can be anticipated because of altered outdoor pollution and also owing to changes in buildings effected in response to changing climate. Three classes of factors govern indoor pollutant levels in occupied spaces: (a) properties of pollutants; (b) building factors, such as the ventilation rate; and (c) occupant behavior. Diversity of indoor conditions influences the public health significance of climate change. Potentially vulnerable subpopulations include not only the young and the infirm but also those who lack resources to respond effectively to changing conditions. Indoor air pollutant levels reflect the sum of contributions from indoor sources and from outdoor pollutants that enter with ventilation air. Pollutant classes with important indoor sources include the byproducts of combustion, radon, and volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. Outdoor pollutants of special concern include particulate matter and ozone. To ensure good indoor air quality it is important first to avoid high indoor emission rates for all pollutants and second to ensure adequate ventilation. A third factor is the use of air filtration or air cleaning to achieve further improvements where warranted. Reprinted with permission from Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health (2011) by the National Academy of Sciences, Courtesy of the National Academies Press, Washington, DC.

  8. 3D Network Analysis for Indoor Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiliakou, E.; Dimopoulou, E.

    2016-10-01

    Indoor space differs from outdoor environments, since it is characterized by a higher level of structural complexity, geometry, as well as topological relations. Indoor space can be considered as the most important component in a building's conceptual modelling, on which applications such as indoor navigation, routing or analysis are performed. Therefore, the conceptual meaning of sub spaces or the activities taking place in physical building boundaries (e.g. walls), require the comprehension of the building's indoor hierarchical structure. The scope of this paper is to perform 3D network analysis in a building's interior and is structured as follows: In Section 1 the definition of indoor space is provided and indoor navigation requirements are analysed. Section 2 describes the processes of indoor space modeling, as well as routing applications. In Section 3, a case study is examined involving a 3D building model generated in CityEngine (exterior shell) and ArcScene (interior parts), in which the use of commercially available software tools (ArcGIS, ESRI), in terms of indoor routing and 3D network analysis, are explored. The fundamentals of performing 3D analysis with the ArcGIS Network Analyst extension were tested. Finally a geoprocessing model was presented, which was specifically designed to be used to interactively find the best route in ArcScene. The paper ends with discussion and concluding remarks on Section 4.

  9. Indoor air quality in elementary schools of Lisbon in spring.

    PubMed

    Pegas, P N; Alves, C A; Evtyugina, M G; Nunes, T; Cerqueira, M; Franchi, M; Pio, C A; Almeida, S M; Freitas, M C

    2011-10-01

    Analysis of indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools usually reveals higher levels of pollutants than in outdoor environments. The aims of this study are to measure indoor and outdoor concentrations of NO(2), speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyls at 14 elementary schools in Lisbon, Portugal. The investigation was carried out in May-June 2009. Three of the schools were selected to also measure comfort parameters, such as temperature and relative humidity, carbon dioxide (CO(2)), carbon monoxide (CO), total VOCs, and bacterial and fungal colony-forming units per cubic metre. Indoor concentrations of CO(2) in the three main schools indicated inadequate classroom air exchange rates. The indoor/outdoor (I/O) NO(2) ratio ranged between 0.36 and 0.95. At the three main schools, the total bacterial and fungal colony-forming units (CFU) in both indoor and outdoor air were above the advised maximum value of 500 CFU/m(3) defined by Portuguese legislation. The aromatic compounds benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, followed by ethers, alcohols and terpenes, were usually the most abundant classes of VOCs. In general, the indoor total VOC concentrations were markedly higher than those observed outdoors. At all locations, indoor aldehyde levels were higher than those observed outdoors, particularly for formaldehyde. The inadequate ventilation observed likely favours accumulation of pollutants with additional indoor sources. PMID:21042927

  10. Indoor racquet sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Silko, G J; Cullen, P T

    1994-08-01

    Family physicians can care for most patients injured while participating in indoor racquet sports. However, patients with injuries to the eye usually require ophthalmologic referral. The most common injuries that occur in persons participating in indoor racquet sports include contusions, sprains and strains, lacerations, eye injuries, bursitis and tendinitis. Musculoskeletal injuries that merit special consideration include lateral epicondylitis, DeQuervain's tenosynovitis, wrist intersection syndrome, patellar pain syndrome, meniscal injuries, Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis. The family physician plays a critical role in providing patients with information about preventive measures.

  11. Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: Combustion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This environmental information handbook was prepared to assist both the non-technical reader (i.e., homeowner) and technical persons (such as researchers, policy analysts, and builders/designers) in understanding the current state of knowledge regarding combustion sources of indoor air pollution. Quantitative and descriptive data addressing the emissions, indoor concentrations, factors influencing indoor concentrations, and health effects of combustion-generated pollutants are provided. In addition, a review of the models, controls, and standards applicable to indoor air pollution from combustion sources is presented. The emphasis is on the residential environment. The data presented here have been compiled from government and privately-funded research results, conference proceedings, technical journals, and recent publications. It is intended to provide the technical reader with a comprehensive overview and reference source on the major indoor air quality aspects relating to indoor combustion activities, including tobacco smoking. In addition, techniques for determining potential concentrations of pollutants in residential settings are presented. This is an update of a 1985 study documenting the state of knowledge of combustion-generated pollutants in the indoor environment. 191 refs., 51 figs., 71 tabs.

  12. Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Mobile indoor localization using Kalman filter and trilateration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Abdul; Kim, Su Mi; Choi, Jaeho

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an indoor localization method based on Kalman filtered RSSI is presented. The indoor communications environment however is rather harsh to the mobiles since there is a substantial number of objects distorting the RSSI signals; fading and interference are main sources of the distortion. In this paper, a Kalman filter is adopted to filter the RSSI signals and the trilateration method is applied to obtain the robust and accurate coordinates of the mobile station. From the indoor experiments using the WiFi stations, we have found that the proposed algorithm can provide a higher accuracy with relatively lower power consumption in comparison to a conventional method.

  14. The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Weilin; Dong, Lei; An, Na; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2010-07-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to droplets and aerosol particles emitted from patients' mouths during treatment. We evaluated the effectiveness of an air cleaner in reducing droplet and aerosol contamination by positioning the device in four different locations in an actual dental clinic. We applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to solve the governing equations of airflow, energy and dispersion of different-sized airborne droplets/aerosol particles. In a dental clinic, we measured the supply air velocity and temperature of the ventilation system, the airflow rate and the particle removal efficiency of the air cleaner to determine the boundary conditions for the CFD simulations. Our results indicate that use of an air cleaner in a dental clinic may be an effective method for reducing DHCWs' exposure to airborne droplets and aerosol particles. Further, we found that the probability of droplet/aerosol particle removal and the direction of airflow from the cleaner are both important control measures for droplet and aerosol contamination in a dental clinic. Thus, the distance between the air cleaner and droplet/aerosol particle source as well as the relative location of the air cleaner to both the source and the DHCW are important considerations for reducing DHCWs' exposure to droplets/aerosol particles emitted from the patient's mouth during treatments.

  15. The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Weilin; Dong, Lei; An, Na; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2010-01-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to droplets and aerosol particles emitted from patients' mouths during treatment. We evaluated the effectiveness of an air cleaner in reducing droplet and aerosol contamination by positioning the device in four different locations in an actual dental clinic. We applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to solve the governing equations of airflow, energy and dispersion of different-sized airborne droplets/aerosol particles. In a dental clinic, we measured the supply air velocity and temperature of the ventilation system, the airflow rate and the particle removal efficiency of the air cleaner to determine the boundary conditions for the CFD simulations. Our results indicate that use of an air cleaner in a dental clinic may be an effective method for reducing DHCWs' exposure to airborne droplets and aerosol particles. Further, we found that the probability of droplet/aerosol particle removal and the direction of airflow from the cleaner are both important control measures for droplet and aerosol contamination in a dental clinic. Thus, the distance between the air cleaner and droplet/aerosol particle source as well as the relative location of the air cleaner to both the source and the DHCW are important considerations for reducing DHCWs' exposure to droplets/aerosol particles emitted from the patient's mouth during treatments. PMID:20031985

  16. Indoor Confined Feedlots.

    PubMed

    Grooms, Daniel L; Kroll, Lee Anne K

    2015-07-01

    Indoor confined feedlots offer advantages that make them desirable in northern climates where high rainfall and snowfall occur. These facilities increase the risk of certain health risks, including lameness and tail injuries. Closed confinement can also facilitate the rapid spread of infectious disease. Veterinarians can help to manage these health risks by implementing management practices to reduce their occurrence.

  17. Herbs Indoors. Container Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Duane

    This package consists of two bilingual instructional booklets for use in helping Indochinese refugees learn basic gardening skills. Included in the package are Cambodian, Vietnamese, and English translations of instructions for raising herbs indoors and Cambodian and English translations of guidelines for container gardening. The herb booklet…

  18. Human occupancy as a source of indoor airborne bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hospodsky, Denina; Qian, Jing; Nazaroff, William W; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Bibby, Kyle; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study presents evidence for elevated concentrations of indoor airborne bacteria due to human occupancy, and investigates the sources of these bacteria. Samples were collected in a university classroom while occupied and when vacant. The total particle mass concentration, bacterial genome concentration, and bacterial phylogenetic populations were characterized in indoor, outdoor, and ventilation duct supply air, as well as in the dust of ventilation system filters and in floor dust. Occupancy increased the total aerosol mass and bacterial genome concentration in indoor air PM(10) and PM(2.5) size fractions, with an increase of nearly two orders of magnitude in airborne bacterial genome concentration in PM(10). On a per mass basis, floor dust was enriched in bacterial genomes compared to airborne particles. Quantitative comparisons between bacterial populations in indoor air and potential sources suggest that resuspended floor dust is an important contributor to bacterial aerosol populations during occupancy. Experiments that controlled for resuspension from the floor implies that direct human shedding may also significantly impact the concentration of indoor airborne particles. The high content of bacteria specific to the skin, nostrils, and hair of humans found in indoor air and in floor dust indicates that floors are an important reservoir of human-associated bacteria, and that the direct particle shedding of desquamated skin cells and their subsequent resuspension strongly influenced the airborne bacteria population structure in this human-occupied environment. Inhalation exposure to microbes shed by other current or previous human occupants may occur in communal indoor environments.

  19. A smart indoor air quality sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jin

    2006-03-01

    The indoor air quality (IAQ) has an important impact on public health. Currently, the indoor air pollution, caused by gas, particle, and bio-aerosol pollutants, is considered as the top five environmental risks to public health and has an estimated cost of $2 billion/year due to medical cost and lost productivity. Furthermore, current buildings are especially vulnerable for chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agent contamination because the central air conditioning and ventilation system serve as a nature carrier to spread the released agent from one location to the whole indoor environment within a short time period. To assure the IAQ and safety for either new or existing buildings, real time comprehensive IAQ and CBW measurements are needed. With the development of new sensing technologies, economic and reliable comprehensive IAQ and CBW sensors become promising. However, few studies exist that examine the design and evaluation issues related to IAQ and CBW sensor network. In this paper, relevant research areas including IAQ and CBW sensor development, demand control ventilation, indoor CBW sensor system design, and sensor system design for other areas such as water system protection, fault detection and diagnosis, are reviewed and summarized. Potential research opportunities for IAQ and CBW sensor system design and evaluation are discussed.

  20. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

  1. Indoor Modelling Benchmark for 3D Geometry Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, C.; Boehm, J.

    2014-06-01

    A combination of faster, cheaper and more accurate hardware, more sophisticated software, and greater industry acceptance have all laid the foundations for an increased desire for accurate 3D parametric models of buildings. Pointclouds are the data source of choice currently with static terrestrial laser scanning the predominant tool for large, dense volume measurement. The current importance of pointclouds as the primary source of real world representation is endorsed by CAD software vendor acquisitions of pointcloud engines in 2011. Both the capture and modelling of indoor environments require great effort in time by the operator (and therefore cost). Automation is seen as a way to aid this by reducing the workload of the user and some commercial packages have appeared that provide automation to some degree. In the data capture phase, advances in indoor mobile mapping systems are speeding up the process, albeit currently with a reduction in accuracy. As a result this paper presents freely accessible pointcloud datasets of two typical areas of a building each captured with two different capture methods and each with an accurate wholly manually created model. These datasets are provided as a benchmark for the research community to gauge the performance and improvements of various techniques for indoor geometry extraction. With this in mind, non-proprietary, interoperable formats are provided such as E57 for the scans and IFC for the reference model. The datasets can be found at: indoor-bench.github.io/indoor-bench"target="_blank">http://indoor-bench.github.io/indoor-bench.

  2. Moving Environmental Justice Indoors: Understanding Structural Influences on Residential Exposure Patterns in Low-Income Communities

    PubMed Central

    Zota, Ami R.; Fabian, M. Patricia; Chahine, Teresa; Julien, Rhona; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. The indoor environment has not been fully incorporated into the environmental justice dialogue. To inform strategies to reduce disparities, we developed a framework to identify the individual and place-based drivers of indoor environment quality. Methods. We reviewed empirical evidence of socioeconomic disparities in indoor exposures and key determinants of these exposures for air pollutants, lead, allergens, and semivolatile organic compounds. We also used an indoor air quality model applied to multifamily housing to illustrate how nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) vary as a function of factors known to be influenced by socioeconomic status. Results. Indoor concentrations of multiple pollutants are elevated in low-socioeconomic status households. Differences in these exposures are driven by the combined influences of indoor sources, outdoor sources, physical structures, and residential activity patterns. Simulation models confirmed indoor sources’ importance in determining indoor NO2 and PM2.5 exposures and showed the influence of household-specific determinants. Conclusions. Both theoretical models and empirical evidence emphasized that disparities in indoor environmental exposure can be significant. Understanding key determinants of multiple indoor exposures can aid in developing policies to reduce these disparities. PMID:21836112

  3. 40 CFR 74.22 - Actual SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Actual SO2 emissions rate. 74.22... (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.22 Actual SO2 emissions... actual SO2 emissions rate shall be 1985. (2) For combustion sources that commenced operation...

  4. Indoor air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    A major contribution of the pediatrician is to help families rank the multitude of pollutants according to their known risk for child health. Elimination of household smoking and completely effective venting of indoor heating devices are beneficial to all and mandatory in homes of allergic children. Acute releases of NO/sub 2/ by gas ranges and ovens may be a significant factor in an increased incidence of respiratory infection, especially in children under two years. Despite intensive investigation, immunosuppressive and other health effects have not been defined for indoor levels of PBBs, PCBs, and related halogenated hydrocarbons. The analytic ability to determine nanomolar concentrations of numerous toxic chemicals opens a Pandora's box of inquiry. New methods, particularly immunologic, are urgently needed to quantitate the dose response to multiple combinations of chemicals and determine their significance for the health of the tight-box generation of children. 136 references.

  5. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

  6. State Indoor Tanning Laws and Adolescent Indoor Tanning

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Gery P.; Berkowitz, Zahava; Jones, Sherry Everett; O’Malley Olsen, Emily; Miyamoto, Justin N.; Michael, Shannon L.; Saraiya, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Recently, several state indoor tanning laws, including age restrictions, were promulgated to reduce indoor tanning among minors. We examined the effects of these laws on adolescent indoor tanning. Methods. We used nationally representative data from the 2009 and 2011 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (n = 31 835). Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association between state indoor tanning laws and indoor tanning among US high school students. Results. Female students in states with indoor tanning laws were less likely to engage in indoor tanning than those in states without any laws. We observed a stronger association among female students in states with systems access, parental permission, and age restriction laws than among those in states without any laws. We found no significant association among female students in states with only systems access and parental permission laws or among male students. Conclusions. Indoor tanning laws, particularly those including age restrictions, may be effective in reducing indoor tanning among female high school students, for whom rates are the highest. Such reductions have the potential to reduce the health and economic burden of skin cancer. PMID:24524515

  7. Analyzing the applicability of the least risk path algorithm in indoor space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanclooster, A.; Viaene, P.; Van de Weghe, N.; Fack, V.; De Maeyer, Ph.

    2013-11-01

    Over the last couple of years, applications that support navigation and wayfinding in indoor environments have become one of the booming industries. However, the algorithmic support for indoor navigation has so far been left mostly untouched, as most applications mainly rely on adapting Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm to an indoor network. In outdoor space, several alternative algorithms have been proposed adding a more cognitive notion to the calculated paths and as such adhering to the natural wayfinding behavior (e.g. simplest paths, least risk paths). The need for indoor cognitive algorithms is highlighted by a more challenged navigation and orientation due to the specific indoor structure (e.g. fragmentation, less visibility, confined areas…). Therefore, the aim of this research is to extend those richer cognitive algorithms to three-dimensional indoor environments. More specifically for this paper, we will focus on the application of the least risk path algorithm of Grum (2005) to an indoor space. The algorithm as proposed by Grum (2005) is duplicated and tested in a complex multi-story building. Several analyses compare shortest and least risk paths in indoor and in outdoor space. The results of these analyses indicate that the current outdoor least risk path algorithm does not calculate less risky paths compared to its shortest paths. In some cases, worse routes have been suggested. Adjustments to the original algorithm are proposed to be more aligned to the specific structure of indoor environments. In a later stage, other cognitive algorithms will be implemented and tested in both an indoor and combined indoor-outdoor setting, in an effort to improve the overall user experience during navigation in indoor environments.

  8. Shelter and indoor air.

    PubMed Central

    Stolwijk, J A

    1990-01-01

    Improvements in outdoor air quality that were achieved through the implementation of the Clean Air Act accentuate the quality of the indoor air as an important, if not dominant, factor in the determination of the total population exposure to air contaminants. A number of developments are adding important new determinants of indoor air quality. Energy conservation strategies require reductions in infiltration of outdoor air into buildings. New materials introduced in the construction and in the maintenance of buildings are contributing new air contaminants into the building atmosphere. Larger buildings require more and more complex ventilation systems that are less and less under the individual control of the occupants. All of these factors contribute to the current reality that indoor air contains more pollutants, and often at higher concentrations, than outdoor air. Especially in the larger buildings, it will be necessary to assure that an adequate quantity of fresh air of acceptable quality is provided to each individual space, and that no new sources of pollutants are added to a space or a whole building without appropriate adjustments in the supply of fresh air. PMID:2401264

  9. Indoor mold and Children's health

    PubMed

    Etzel; Rylander

    1999-06-01

    Reactive airways disease in children is increasing in many countries around the world. The clinical diagnosis of asthma or reactive airways disease includes a variable airflow and an increased sensitivity in the airways. This condition can develop after an augmented reaction to a specific agent (allergen) and may cause a life-threatening situation within a very short period of exposure. It can also develop after a long-term exposure to irritating agents that cause an inflammation in the airways in the absence of an allergen. (paragraph) Several environmental agents have been shown to be associated with the increased incidence of childhood asthma. They include allergens, cat dander, outdoor as well as indoor air pollution, cooking fumes, and infections. There is, however, increasing evidence that mold growth indoors in damp buildings is an important risk factor. About 30 investigations from various countries around the world have demonstrated a close relationship between living in damp homes or homes with mold growth, and the extent of adverse respiratory symptoms in children. Some studies show a relation between dampness/mold and objective measures of lung function. Apart from airways symptoms, some studies demonstrate the presence of general symptoms that include fatigue and headache and symptoms from the central nervous system. At excessive exposures, an increased risk for hemorraghic pneumonia and death among infants has been reported. (paragraph) The described effects may have important consequences for children in the early years of life. A child's immune system is developing from birth to adolescence and requires a natural, physiologic stimulation with antigens as well as inflammatory agents. Any disturbances of this normal maturing process will increase the risk for abnormal reactions to inhaled antigens and inflammagenic agents in the environment. (paragraph) The knowledge about health risks due to mold exposure is not widespread and health authorities in

  10. Indoor ozone/terpene reactions as a source of indoor particles

    SciTech Connect

    Weschler, C.J.; Shields, H.C.

    1998-12-31

    The present study examines the effect that a series of reactions between ozone and selected terpenes has on the concentrations and size distributions of airborne particles in a typical office setting. In the first set of experiments, known concentrations of ozone and a selected terpene (either d-limonene, a-terpinene, or a mix of terpenes found in a terpene based cleaner) were deliberately introduced into office air. Subsequent particle formation and redistribution was monitored with an eight-channel optical particle counter. The office with the deliberately supplemented ozone and terpene levels had concentrations of particles in the 0.1--0.2 mm diameter size range that were as much as 20 times larger than those measured in a comparable office without the supplemented ozone. Concentrations in the larger size ranges also were affected, and the magnitude of the effect increased with time, indicating the importance of coagulation and condensation processes. In the second set of experiments, d-limonene was deliberately introduced into office air, but ozone was not supplemented; instead, the indoor ozone concentrations were those that happened to be present (primarily as a consequence of outdoor-to-indoor transport). In these experiments, the concentrations of the 0.1--0.2 mm particles tracked those of indoor ozone (the limiting reagent) and were as much as 10 times greater than levels measured in a comparable office that did not contain d-limonene. The results demonstrate that ozone terpene reactions can be a significant source of sub-micron particles in indoor settings, and further illustrate the potential for reactions among commonly occurring indoor pollutants to markedly influence indoor environments.

  11. Indoor Radon Measurement in Van

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, E.; Osmanlioglu, A. E.; Dogan, I.; Celebi, N.

    2007-04-01

    In this study, indoor radon concentrations obtained from the radon surveys conducted in the Van. Radon monitoring was performed by applying a passive, time-integrating measuring technique. For this purpose, CR-39 nuclear track detectors were installed in dwellings for 2 months. After the monitoring period, detectors were collected. In order to make the alpha tracks visible, chemical etching was applied to the exposed detectors. Nuclear track numbers and the corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. Annual effective dose equivalents and the risk probabilities caused by indoor radon inhalation were calculated, and the found results compared with the indoor radon concentrations' data measured in different provinces of Turkey.

  12. Indoor Radon Measurement in Van

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, E.; Osmanlioglu, A. E.; Celebi, N.; Dogan, I.

    2007-04-23

    In this study, indoor radon concentrations obtained from the radon surveys conducted in the Van. Radon monitoring was performed by applying a passive, time-integrating measuring technique. For this purpose, CR-39 nuclear track detectors were installed in dwellings for 2 months. After the monitoring period, detectors were collected. In order to make the alpha tracks visible, chemical etching was applied to the exposed detectors. Nuclear track numbers and the corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. Annual effective dose equivalents and the risk probabilities caused by indoor radon inhalation were calculated, and the found results compared with the indoor radon concentrations' data measured in different provinces of Turkey.

  13. Indoor Air vs. Indoor Construction: A New Beginning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manicone, Santo

    2000-01-01

    Identifies the steps that can be taken to lessen the impact of indoor air pollution created from indoor renovation projects, including project management tips to help contractors avoid creating unnecessary air pollution. Final comments address air pollution control when installing new furniture, smoking restrictions, occupant relations, and the…

  14. Indoor-Outdoor Detection Using a Smart Phone Sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiping; Chang, Qiang; Li, Qun; Shi, Zesen; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In the era of mobile internet, Location Based Services (LBS) have developed dramatically. Seamless Indoor and Outdoor Navigation and Localization (SNAL) has attracted a lot of attention. No single positioning technology was capable of meeting the various positioning requirements in different environments. Selecting different positioning techniques for different environments is an alternative method. Detecting the users' current environment is crucial for this technique. In this paper, we proposed to detect the indoor/outdoor environment automatically without high energy consumption. The basic idea was simple: we applied a machine learning algorithm to classify the neighboring Global System for Mobile (GSM) communication cellular base station's signal strength in different environments, and identified the users' current context by signal pattern recognition. We tested the algorithm in four different environments. The results showed that the proposed algorithm was capable of identifying open outdoors, semi-outdoors, light indoors and deep indoors environments with 100% accuracy using the signal strength of four nearby GSM stations. The required hardware and signal are widely available in our daily lives, implying its high compatibility and availability. PMID:27669252

  15. Photoenhanced uptakes of NO2 by indoor surfaces: A new HONO source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligorovski, S.; Bartolomei, V.; Soergel, M.; Gomez Alvarez, E.; Zetzsch, C.; Wortham, H.

    2012-12-01

    conversion of NO2 to HONO on lacquer surfaces and on white wall paints is substantially enhanced in the presence of light and at higher relative humidity (RH = 60%). In runs carried out applying experimental conditions typically found indoors, i.e., NO2 mixing ratios of 25 ppb and 60% RH%, the observed NO2 uptakes on a surface coated with lacquer and paint showed an enhancement of one order of magnitude in the presence of light as compared to the uptake observed in the dark. Our results indicate, contrary to other study that claimed that humidity does not influence the NO2 reactions with adsorbed organics, that actually both postulated HONO sources combined i.e. heterogeneous NO2 reactions with adsorbed organics (photosensitizers) in presence of elevated humidity leads to even more pronounced HONO production. Reference: 1. M., Sleiman, L. A., Gundel, J. F., Pankow, P., Jacob, B. C., Singer, H., Destaillats, P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 107, 6576 (2010). 2. B. J. Finlayson-Pitts, L. M. Wingen, A. L. Sumner, D. Syomin, K. A. Ramazan, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 5, 223 (2003). 3. K., Stemmler, M., Ammann, C., Donders, J., Kleffmann, C., George, Nature 440, 195 (2006). 4. E. Gomez Alvarez, H. Wortham, R. Strekowski, C. Zetzsch, S. Gligorovski, Environ. Sci. Technol., 46, 1955 (2012).

  16. Characterization of personal RF electromagnetic field exposure and actual absorption for the general public.

    PubMed

    Joseph, W; Vermeeren, G; Verloock, L; Heredia, Mauricio Masache; Martens, Luc

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, personal electromagnetic field exposure of the general public due to 12 different radiofrequency sources is characterized. Twenty-eight different realistic exposure scenarios based upon time, environment, activity, and location have been defined and a relevant number of measurements were performed with a personal exposure meter. Indoor exposure in office environments can be higher than outdoor exposure: 95th percentiles of field values due to WiFi ranged from 0.36 to 0.58 V m(-1), and for DECT values of 0.33 V m(-1) were measured. The downlink signals of GSM and DCS caused the highest outdoor exposures up to 0.52 V m(-1). The highest total field exposure occurred for mobile scenarios (inside a train or bus) from uplink signals of GSM and DCS (e.g., mobile phones) due to changing environmental conditions, handovers, and higher required transmitted signals from mobile phones due to penetration through windows while moving. A method to relate the exposure to the actual whole-body absorption in the human body is proposed. An application is shown where the actual absorption in a human body model due to a GSM downlink signal is determined. Fiftieth, 95th, and 99 th percentiles of the whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) due to this GSM signal of 0.58 microW kg(-1), 2.08 microW kg(-1), and 5.01 microW kg(-1) are obtained for a 95th percentile of 0.26 V m(-1). A practical usable function is proposed for the relation between the whole-body SAR and the electric fields. The methodology of this paper enables epidemiological studies to make an analysis in combination with both electric field and actual whole-body SAR values and to compare exposure with basic restrictions. PMID:18695413

  17. Indoor Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Takeji

    The reduction of intake of outdoor air volume in air conditioned buildings, adopted as the strategy for saving energy, has caused sick building syndrome abroad. Such symptoms of sick building as headache, stimuli of eye and nose and lethargy, appears to result from cigarette smoke, folmaldehyde and volatile organic carbons. On the other hand, in airtight residences not only carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides from domestic burning appliances but also allergens of mite, fungi, pollen and house dust, have become a subject of discussion. Moreover, asbestos and radon of carcinogen now attract a great deal of attention. Those indoor air pollutants are discussed.

  18. Indoor and Outdoor Allergies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Madhavi; Hays, Amy

    2016-09-01

    In last 30 to 40 years there has been a significant increase in the incidence of allergy. This increase cannot be explained by genetic factors alone. Increasing air pollution and its interaction with biological allergens along with changing lifestyles are contributing factors. Dust mites, molds, and animal allergens contribute to most of the sensitization in the indoor setting. Tree and grass pollens are the leading allergens in the outdoor setting. Worsening air pollution and increasing particulate matter worsen allergy symptoms and associated morbidity. Cross-sensitization of allergens is common. Treatment involves avoidance of allergens, modifying lifestyle, medical treatment, and immunotherapy. PMID:27545734

  19. CFD simulation research on residential indoor air quality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Ye, Miao; He, Bao-Jie

    2014-02-15

    Nowadays people are excessively depending on air conditioning to create a comfortable indoor environment, but it could cause some health problems in a long run. In this paper, wind velocity field, temperature field and air age field in a bedroom with wall-hanging air conditioning running in summer are analyzed by CFD numerical simulation technology. The results show that wall-hanging air conditioning system can undertake indoor heat load and conduct good indoor thermal comfort. In terms of wind velocity, air speed in activity area where people sit and stand is moderate, most of which cannot feel wind flow and meet the summer indoor wind comfort requirement. However, for air quality, there are local areas without ventilation and toxic gases not discharged in time. Therefore it is necessary to take effective measures to improve air quality. Compared with the traditional measurement method, CFD software has many advantages in simulating indoor environment, so it is hopeful for humans to create a more comfortable, healthy living environment by CFD in the future. PMID:24365517

  20. CFD simulation research on residential indoor air quality.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Ye, Miao; He, Bao-Jie

    2014-02-15

    Nowadays people are excessively depending on air conditioning to create a comfortable indoor environment, but it could cause some health problems in a long run. In this paper, wind velocity field, temperature field and air age field in a bedroom with wall-hanging air conditioning running in summer are analyzed by CFD numerical simulation technology. The results show that wall-hanging air conditioning system can undertake indoor heat load and conduct good indoor thermal comfort. In terms of wind velocity, air speed in activity area where people sit and stand is moderate, most of which cannot feel wind flow and meet the summer indoor wind comfort requirement. However, for air quality, there are local areas without ventilation and toxic gases not discharged in time. Therefore it is necessary to take effective measures to improve air quality. Compared with the traditional measurement method, CFD software has many advantages in simulating indoor environment, so it is hopeful for humans to create a more comfortable, healthy living environment by CFD in the future.

  1. 40 CFR 61.205 - Distribution and use of phosphogypsum for indoor research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for indoor research and development. 61.205 Section 61.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Phosphogypsum Stacks § 61.205 Distribution and use of phosphogypsum for indoor research and development. (a) Phosphogypsum may be...

  2. 40 CFR 61.205 - Distribution and use of phosphogypsum for indoor research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for indoor research and development. 61.205 Section 61.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Phosphogypsum Stacks § 61.205 Distribution and use of phosphogypsum for indoor research and development. (a) Phosphogypsum may be...

  3. 40 CFR 61.205 - Distribution and use of phosphogypsum for indoor research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for indoor research and development. 61.205 Section 61.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Phosphogypsum Stacks § 61.205 Distribution and use of phosphogypsum for indoor research and development. (a) Phosphogypsum may be...

  4. 40 CFR 61.205 - Distribution and use of phosphogypsum for indoor research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for indoor research and development. 61.205 Section 61.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Phosphogypsum Stacks § 61.205 Distribution and use of phosphogypsum for indoor research and development. (a) Phosphogypsum may be...

  5. MULTIPOLLUTANT MODEL FOR ESTIMATING THE IMPACT OF POLLUTANTS ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a multipollutant model for estimating the impact of pollutant on indoor air quality (IAQ). [NOTE: Most existing IAQ models are not well suited for analysis of the impacts of sources that emit several pollutants into the indoor environment. These models are als...

  6. i-SVOC -- A simulation program for indoor SVOCs (Version 1.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Program i-SVOC estimates the emissions, transport, and sorption of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment as functions of time when a series of initial conditions is given. This program implements a framework for dynamic modeling of indoor SVOCs develope...

  7. Study of indoor radon distribution using measurements and CFD modeling.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Neetika; Chauhan, R P; Joshi, M; Agarwal, T K; Aggarwal, Praveen; Sahoo, B K

    2014-10-01

    Measurement and/or prediction of indoor radon ((222)Rn) concentration are important due to the impact of radon on indoor air quality and consequent inhalation hazard. In recent times, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based modeling has become the cost effective replacement of experimental methods for the prediction and visualization of indoor pollutant distribution. The aim of this study is to implement CFD based modeling for studying indoor radon gas distribution. This study focuses on comparison of experimentally measured and CFD modeling predicted spatial distribution of radon concentration for a model test room. The key inputs for simulation viz. radon exhalation rate and ventilation rate were measured as a part of this study. Validation experiments were performed by measuring radon concentration at different locations of test room using active (continuous radon monitor) and passive (pin-hole dosimeters) techniques. Modeling predictions have been found to be reasonably matching with the measurement results. The validated model can be used to understand and study factors affecting indoor radon distribution for more realistic indoor environment.

  8. Indoor air pollution aggravates symptoms of atopic dermatitis in children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Soyeon; Lee, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jihyun; Han, Youngshin; Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Gyo-Boong; Jung, Kweon; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Ahn, Kangmo

    2015-01-01

    Most of researches on the impact of indoor air pollutants on atopic dermatitis (AD) have been based upon animal models, in vitro experiments and case-control studies. However, human data to elucidate the role of indoor air pollution on worsening symptoms of pre-existing AD from a longitudinal study are scarce. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the effect of indoor air pollution on AD symptoms in children. We surveyed 30 children with AD in a day-care centre, which moved to a new building during the study. These children stayed there for 8 hours a day Monday through Friday, and their daily symptom scores were recorded. Indoor and outdoor air pollutant levels were continuously measured 24 hours a day for 12 months (Period 1 to 4). Data were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. Compared to the period before moving (Period 1), concentrations of indoor air pollutants mostly increased after moving (Period 2) and decreased by natural ventilation and bake-out (Periods 3 and 4). The rate of positive AD symptom increased from 32.8% (Period 1) up to 43.8% (Period 2) and 50.5% (Period 3), then decreased to 35.4% in Period 4 (P < 0.0001). When the delayed effects of indoor air pollutants on AD symptoms 2 days later were evaluated, AD symptoms significantly increased by 12.7% (95% CI: -0.01 to 27.1) as toluene levels increased by 1 ppb (P = 0.05). In conclusion, indoor air pollutants increase the risk of AD aggravation in children and toluene in the indoor environment might act as an aggravating factor.

  9. Occurrence of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in indoor dust

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Park, Eun-Kee; Young, Thomas M.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure to indoor dust enriched with endocrine-disrupting chemicals released from numerous indoor sources has been a focus of increasing concern. Longer residence times and elevated contaminant concentrations in the indoor environment may increase chances of exposure to these contaminants by 1000-fold compared to outdoor exposure. To investigate the occurrence of semi-volatile endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl ethers), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), phthalates, pyrethroids, DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and its metabolites, and chlordanes, indoor dust samples were collected from household vacuum cleaner bags provided by 10 apartments and 1 community hall in Davis, California, USA. Chemical analyses show that all indoor dust samples are highly contaminated by target analytes measured in the present study. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was the most abundant (104–7630 μg/g) in all samples and higher than other target analytes by 2 to 6 orders of magnitude. PBDEs were also found at high concentrations (1780–25,200 ng/g). Although the use of PCBs has been banned or restricted for decades, some samples had PCBs at levels that are considered to be concerns for human health, indicating that the potential risk posed by PCBs still remains high in the indoor environment, probably due to a lack of dissipation processes and continuous release from the sources. Although the use of some PBDEs is being phased out in some parts of the U.S., this trend may apply to PBDEs as well. We can anticipate that exposure to PBDEs will continue as long as the general public keeps using existing household items such as sofas, mattresses, and carpets that contain PBDEs. This study provides additional information that indoor dust is highly contaminated by persistent and endocrine-disrupting chemicals. PMID:18632138

  10. Indoor air quality: The legal landscape II

    SciTech Connect

    Neet, J.O. Jr.; Smith, T.A.

    1997-12-31

    Today`s office environment is as different from its predecessor as an automobile is from a horse and buggy. A 1950s office typically contained tile floors, painted walls, plaster ceilings, carbon paper, and plentiful fresh air circulating through windows that were usually open when weather permitted. In the 1990s, the decor has shifted to carpeted floors, synthetic wall coverings, ceiling tile and multiple copiers. Sophisticated building materials and motorized office products can emit unwelcome constituents into the indoor air, yet ventilation is limited by windows that do not open. One result of these changes has been an unprecedented and ever-increasing concern about indoor air quality (IAQ). Some studies rank indoor air pollution as today`s number one environmental health risk. Increased media attention to the topic has increased public awareness, which has increased litigation and regulatory activity in the area. This paper explores the legal landscape of IAQ in the US, ranging from legislative to regulatory activity on both the federal and state levels, and from civil litigation to actions brought before administrative boards. Along the way, the paper defines and discusses such IAQ problems as building-related illness (BRI) and sick building syndrome (SBS), examining the magnitude of the problems and their possible causes. Finally, the paper provides suggestions to those potentially liable for alleged injuries from indoor air pollution, including architects, builders, contractors, building product manufacturers, building owners and managers, building sellers, employers, and engineering and environmental consultants. This paper is an update of a paper presented at the Air and Waste Management Association`s Annual Meeting in 1992.

  11. Influenza transmission during extreme indoor conditions in a low-resource tropical setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamerius, James; Ojeda, Sergio; Uejio, Christopher K.; Shaman, Jeffrey; Lopez, Brenda; Sanchez, Nery; Gordon, Aubree

    2016-08-01

    Influenza transmission occurs throughout the planet across wide-ranging environmental conditions. However, our understanding of the environmental factors mediating transmission is evaluated using outdoor environmental measurements, which may not be representative of the indoor conditions where influenza is transmitted. In this study, we examined the relationship between indoor environment and influenza transmission in a low-resource tropical population. We used a case-based ascertainment design to enroll 34 households with a suspected influenza case and then monitored households for influenza, while recording indoor temperature and humidity data in each household. We show that the indoor environment is not commensurate with outdoor conditions and that the relationship between indoor and outdoor conditions varies significantly across homes. We also show evidence of influenza transmission in extreme indoor environments. Specifically, our data suggests that indoor environments averaged 29 °C, 18 g/kg specific humidity, and 68 % relative humidity across 15 transmission events observed. These indoor settings also exhibited significant temporal variability with temperatures as high as 39 °C and specific and relative humidity increasing to 22 g/kg and 85 %, respectively, during some transmission events. However, we were unable to detect differences in the transmission efficiency by indoor temperature or humidity conditions. Overall, these results indicate that laboratory studies investigating influenza transmission and virus survival should increase the range of environmental conditions that they assess and that observational studies investigating the relationship between environment and influenza activity should use caution using outdoor environmental measurements since they can be imprecise estimates of the conditions that mediate transmission indoors.

  12. Toward the development of an in silico human model for indoor environmental design.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    In modern society where people spend more than 90% of their time in indoor spaces, the indoor air quality (IAQ) created by buildings has the potential of greatly influencing quality of life. Because the time spent by workers/residents in indoor spaces has increased over time, the importance of IAQ issues in terms of public health is also increasing. Additionally, the quality of the indoor thermal environment also has great impact on human comfort and performance; hence, the development of a comprehensive prediction method integrating indoor air quality/thermal environment assessment and human physiological responses, is crucial for creating a healthy, comfortable, and productive indoor environment. Accordingly, the overarching objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive and universal computer simulated person (i.e., in silico human model), integrating computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to be used in indoor environmental design and quality assessment. This paper presents and discusses the development of this computer-simulated person and its application to indoor environmental design.

  13. Toward the development of an in silico human model for indoor environmental design.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    In modern society where people spend more than 90% of their time in indoor spaces, the indoor air quality (IAQ) created by buildings has the potential of greatly influencing quality of life. Because the time spent by workers/residents in indoor spaces has increased over time, the importance of IAQ issues in terms of public health is also increasing. Additionally, the quality of the indoor thermal environment also has great impact on human comfort and performance; hence, the development of a comprehensive prediction method integrating indoor air quality/thermal environment assessment and human physiological responses, is crucial for creating a healthy, comfortable, and productive indoor environment. Accordingly, the overarching objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive and universal computer simulated person (i.e., in silico human model), integrating computational fluid dynamics (CFD), to be used in indoor environmental design and quality assessment. This paper presents and discusses the development of this computer-simulated person and its application to indoor environmental design. PMID:27477455

  14. Cooperative Localization Bounds for Indoor Ultra-Wideband Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsindi, Nayef; Pahlavan, Kaveh

    2007-12-01

    In recent years there has been growing interest in ad-hoc and wireless sensor networks (WSNs) for a variety of indoor applications. Localization information in these networks is an enabling technology and in some applications it is the main sought after parameter. The cooperative localization performance of WSNs is constrained by the behavior of the utilized ranging technology in dense cluttered indoor environments. Recently, ultra-wideband (UWB) Time-of-Arrival (TOA) based ranging has exhibited potential due to its large bandwidth and high time resolution. The performance of its ranging and cooperative localization capabilities in dense indoor multipath environments, however, needs to be further investigated. Of main concern is the high probability of non-line of sight (NLOS) and Direct Path (DP) blockage between sensor nodes which biases the TOA estimation and degrades the localization performance. In this paper, based on empirical models of UWB TOA-based Outdoor-to-Indoor (OTI) and Indoor-to-Indoor (ITI) ranging, we derive and analyze cooperative localization bounds for WSNs in different indoor multipath environments: residential, manufacturing floor, old office and modern office buildings. First, we highlight the need for cooperative localization in indoor applications. Then we provide comprehensive analysis of the factors affecting localization accuracy such as network and ranging model parameters.

  15. A Time-Aware Routing Map for Indoor Evacuation †

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haifeng; Winter, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of dynamic environments expires over time. Thus, using static maps of the environment for decision making is problematic, especially in emergency situations, such as evacuations. This paper suggests a fading memory model for mapping dynamic environments: a mechanism to put less trust on older knowledge in decision making. The model has been assessed by simulating indoor evacuations, adopting and comparing various strategies in decision making. Results suggest that fading memory generally improves this decision making. PMID:26797610

  16. A Time-Aware Routing Map for Indoor Evacuation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haifeng; Winter, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of dynamic environments expires over time. Thus, using static maps of the environment for decision making is problematic, especially in emergency situations, such as evacuations. This paper suggests a fading memory model for mapping dynamic environments: a mechanism to put less trust on older knowledge in decision making. The model has been assessed by simulating indoor evacuations, adopting and comparing various strategies in decision making. Results suggest that fading memory generally improves this decision making. PMID:26797610

  17. Indoor Mold, Toxigenic Fungi, and Stachybotrys chartarum: Infectious Disease Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, D. M.; Ghannoum, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    Damp buildings often have a moldy smell or obvious mold growth; some molds are human pathogens. This has caused concern regarding health effects of moldy indoor environments and has resulted in many studies of moisture- and mold-damaged buildings. Recently, there have been reports of severe illness as a result of indoor mold exposure, particularly due to Stachybotrys chartarum. While many authors describe a direct relationship between fungal contamination and illness, close examination of the literature reveals a confusing picture. Here, we review the evidence regarding indoor mold exposure and mycotoxicosis, with an emphasis on S. chartarum. We also examine possible end-organ effects, including pulmonary, immunologic, neurologic, and oncologic disorders. We discuss the Cleveland infant idiopathic pulmonary hemorrhage reports in detail, since they provided important impetus for concerns about Stachybotrys. Some valid concerns exist regarding the relationship between indoor mold exposure and human disease. Review of the literature reveals certain fungus-disease associations in humans, including ergotism (Claviceps species), alimentary toxic aleukia (Fusarium), and liver disease (Aspergillys). While many papers suggest a similar relationship between Stachybotrys and human disease, the studies nearly uniformly suffer from significant methodological flaws, making their findings inconclusive. As a result, we have not found well-substantiated supportive evidence of serious illness due to Stachybotrys exposure in the contemporary environment. To address issues of indoor mold-related illness, there is an urgent need for studies using objective markers of illness, relevant animal models, proper epidemiologic techniques, and examination of confounding factors. PMID:12525430

  18. Impacts of contaminant storage on indoor air quality: Model development

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Hult, Erin L.

    2013-02-26

    A first-order, lumped capacitance model is used to describe the buffering of airborne chemical species by building materials and furnishings in the indoor environment. The model is applied to describe the interaction between formaldehyde in building materials and the concentration of the species in the indoor air. Storage buffering can decrease the effect of ventilation on the indoor concentration, compared to the inverse dependence of indoor concentration on the air exchange rate that is consistent with a constant emission rate source. If the exposure time of an occupant is long relative to the time scale of depletion of the compound from the storage medium, however, the total exposure will depend inversely on the air exchange rate. This lumped capacitance model is also applied to moisture buffering in the indoor environment, which occurs over much shorter depletion timescales of the order of days. This model provides a framework to interpret the impact of storage buffering on time-varying concentrations of chemical species and resulting occupant exposure. Pseudo-steady state behavior is validated using field measurements. Model behavior over longer times is consistent with formaldehyde and moisture concentration measurements in previous studies.

  19. Polyfluorinated compounds in residential and nonresidential indoor air.

    PubMed

    Langer, Vera; Dreyer, Annekatrin; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2010-11-01

    Indoor air concentrations of fifteen volatile per- and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) (five fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs), three fluorotelomer acrylates (FTAs), three perfluorinated sulfonamido ethanols (FASEs), and three perfluorinated sulfonamides (FASAs)) were determined in residential and nonresidential indoor air environments. Air samples were taken with passive samplers, consisting of XAD-4 impregnated polyurethane foam (PUF) disks in steel housings. Impregnated PUF disks were extracted by fluidized bed extraction (FBE) using methyl-tert-butyl ether/acetone (1:1) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total PFC indoor air concentrations ranged from 8.2 to 458 ng m(-3). Individual PFC concentrations were between 42 pg m(-3) (6:2 FTA) and 209 ng m(-3) (8:2 FTOH). Concentrations of total FTOHs, FTAs, and FASAs + FASEs ranged from 0.2 to 152 ng m(-3) (FTAs), from 3.3 to 307 ng m(-3) (FTOHs), and from 4.4 to 148 ng m(-3) (FASAs + FASEs). Most elevated individual, group, and total PFC concentrations were detected in two stores selling outdoor equipment, one furniture shop, and one carpet shop. Indoor air concentrations were several orders of magnitude higher than published outdoor air concentrations indicating indoor air environments as sources for PFCs to the atmosphere. Concentrations were used to estimate human exposure to investigated PFCs.

  20. Ultra Wideband Indoor Positioning Technologies: Analysis and Recent Advances †

    PubMed Central

    Alarifi, Abdulrahman; Al-Salman, AbdulMalik; Alsaleh, Mansour; Alnafessah, Ahmad; Al-Hadhrami, Suheer; Al-Ammar, Mai A.; Al-Khalifa, Hend S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, indoor positioning has emerged as a critical function in many end-user applications; including military, civilian, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions. In comparison with outdoor environments, sensing location information in indoor environments requires a higher precision and is a more challenging task in part because various objects reflect and disperse signals. Ultra WideBand (UWB) is an emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning that has shown better performance compared to others. In order to set the stage for this work, we provide a survey of the state-of-the-art technologies in indoor positioning, followed by a detailed comparative analysis of UWB positioning technologies. We also provide an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to analyze the present state of UWB positioning technologies. While SWOT is not a quantitative approach, it helps in assessing the real status and in revealing the potential of UWB positioning to effectively address the indoor positioning problem. Unlike previous studies, this paper presents new taxonomies, reviews some major recent advances, and argues for further exploration by the research community of this challenging problem space. PMID:27196906

  1. Ultra Wideband Indoor Positioning Technologies: Analysis and Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Alarifi, Abdulrahman; Al-Salman, AbdulMalik; Alsaleh, Mansour; Alnafessah, Ahmad; Al-Hadhrami, Suheer; Al-Ammar, Mai A; Al-Khalifa, Hend S

    2016-05-16

    In recent years, indoor positioning has emerged as a critical function in many end-user applications; including military, civilian, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions. In comparison with outdoor environments, sensing location information in indoor environments requires a higher precision and is a more challenging task in part because various objects reflect and disperse signals. Ultra WideBand (UWB) is an emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning that has shown better performance compared to others. In order to set the stage for this work, we provide a survey of the state-of-the-art technologies in indoor positioning, followed by a detailed comparative analysis of UWB positioning technologies. We also provide an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to analyze the present state of UWB positioning technologies. While SWOT is not a quantitative approach, it helps in assessing the real status and in revealing the potential of UWB positioning to effectively address the indoor positioning problem. Unlike previous studies, this paper presents new taxonomies, reviews some major recent advances, and argues for further exploration by the research community of this challenging problem space.

  2. Ultra Wideband Indoor Positioning Technologies: Analysis and Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Alarifi, Abdulrahman; Al-Salman, AbdulMalik; Alsaleh, Mansour; Alnafessah, Ahmad; Al-Hadhrami, Suheer; Al-Ammar, Mai A; Al-Khalifa, Hend S

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, indoor positioning has emerged as a critical function in many end-user applications; including military, civilian, disaster relief and peacekeeping missions. In comparison with outdoor environments, sensing location information in indoor environments requires a higher precision and is a more challenging task in part because various objects reflect and disperse signals. Ultra WideBand (UWB) is an emerging technology in the field of indoor positioning that has shown better performance compared to others. In order to set the stage for this work, we provide a survey of the state-of-the-art technologies in indoor positioning, followed by a detailed comparative analysis of UWB positioning technologies. We also provide an analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) to analyze the present state of UWB positioning technologies. While SWOT is not a quantitative approach, it helps in assessing the real status and in revealing the potential of UWB positioning to effectively address the indoor positioning problem. Unlike previous studies, this paper presents new taxonomies, reviews some major recent advances, and argues for further exploration by the research community of this challenging problem space. PMID:27196906

  3. Physiologic responses during indoor cycling.

    PubMed

    Battista, Rebecca A; Foster, Carl; Andrew, Jessica; Wright, Glenn; Lucia, Alejandro; Porcari, John P

    2008-07-01

    During the last decade, there has been active interest in indoor cycling (e.g., spinning) as a method of choreographed group exercise. Recent studies have suggested that exercise intensity during indoor cycling may be quite high and may transiently exceed Vo2max. This study sought to confirm these findings, as the apparent high intensity of indoor cycling has implications for both the efficacy and the risk of indoor cycling as an exercise method. Twenty healthy female students performed an incremental exercise test to define Vo2max and performed 2 videotaped indoor exercise classes lasting 45 minutes and 35 minutes. Vo2, heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during the indoor cycling classes, with Vo2 data integrated in 30-second intervals. The mean %Vo2max during the indoor cycling classes was modest (74 +/- 14% Vo2max and 66 +/- 14%Vo2max, respectively). However, 52% and 35% of the time during the 45- and 35-minute classes was spent at intensities greater than the ventilatory threshold (VT). The HR response indicated that 35% and 38% of the session time was above the HR associated with VT. In 10 of the 40 exercise sessions, there were segments in which the momentary Vo2 exceeded Vo2max observed during incremental testing, and the cumulative time with exercise intensity greater than Vo2max ranged from 0.5 to 14.0 minutes. It can be concluded that although the intensity of indoor cycling in healthy, physically active women is moderate, there are frequent observations of transient values of Vo2 exceeding Vo2max, and a substantial portion of the exercise bouts at intensities greater than VT. As such, the data suggest that indoor cycling must be considered a high-intensity exercise mode of exercise training, which has implications for both efficacy and risk. PMID:18545183

  4. Improving Indoor Environmental Quality for Public Health: Impediments and Policy Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia; Jacobs, David; Mitchell, Clifford; Miller, David; Karol, Meryl H.

    2007-01-01

    Background People in modern societies spend more than 90% of their time indoors. Hence, indoor environmental quality (IEQ) has a significant impact on public health. In this article we describe health risks associated with indoor environments, illuminate barriers to overcoming these risks, and provide policy recommendations to achieve healthier indoor environments. Objectives The weight of evidence suggests that indoor environmental contaminants pose significant public health risks, particularly among children and the poor, and the societal costs of illnesses related to indoor environments are considerable. Despite the evidence of harm to human health, poor indoor environments are generally difficult to regulate and not of sufficient concern to the general public. We discuss several reasons for this lack of concern about IEQ, focusing specifically on home environments. Discussion Economics plays a large role both in political inaction and individual-level indifference. Because little effort has been made to quantify the value of the societal and individual costs of poor housing quality, as well as the benefits achievable by simple interventions, policymakers lack motivation to act on IEQ. Similarly, individual homeowners lack the incentive to remediate homes, as other problems may be more pressing than home environmental quality. Conclusions Although the problem of IEQ involves multiple stakeholders and multiple levels of governance, it is possible to establish economic incentives that would set the wheels in motion for action at all levels to achieve healthy home environments. Also important are education and information dissemination on the public health risks associated with indoor environments. These recommendations are intended for all decision makers who have an influence in developing policy to improve indoor environmental quality. PMID:17589606

  5. Indoor air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, D.R. )

    1992-06-01

    This article summarizes the health effects of indoor air pollutants and the modalities available to control them. The pollutants discussed include active and passive exposure to tobacco smoke; combustion products of carbon monoxide; nitrogen dioxide; products of biofuels, including wood and coal; biologic agents leading to immune responses, such as house dust mites, cockroaches, fungi, animal dander, and urine; biologic agents associated with infection such as Legionella and tuberculosis; formaldehyde; and volatile organic compounds. An approach to assessing building-related illness and tight building' syndrome is presented. Finally, the article reviews recent data on hospital-related asthma and exposures to potential respiratory hazards such as antineoplastic agents, anesthetic gases, and ethylene oxide.88 references.

  6. Indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    Possible indoor air contaminants include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulates, bacteria, fungi, and VOCs (volatile organic compounds). Sources comprise paints, pesticides, solvents, sealants, smoke, soils, adhesives, aerosols, dusts, cleansers, and moisture. Health effects can range from simple discomfort, tight-building syndrome symptoms, and dermatitis to much more serious maladies, such as Legionnaire's disease and cancer. Difficulties abound in dealing with IAQ problems. Government standards used in industrial settings-such as the OSHA permissible exposure limits or threshold limit values of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists-are typically designed for heavy, short-term exposures to specific hazardous substances. These frequently prove inadequate in determining the deleterious nature of an IAQ complaint in a home, office, or school where pollutant concentrations may be quite low, exposures long-term, contaminants mixed, and, with some substances, interactions and health effects unknown. Also, government authority and responsibilities in nonindustrial settings are ill-defined.

  7. Achieving indoor air quality through contaminant control

    SciTech Connect

    Katzel, J.

    1995-07-10

    Federal laws outlining industry`s responsibilities in creating a healthy, hazard-free workspace are well known. OSHA`s laws on interior air pollution establish threshold limit values (TLVs) and permissible exposure limits (PELs) for more than 500 potentially hazardous substances found in manufacturing operations. Until now, OSHA has promulgated regulations only for the manufacturing environment. However, its recently-proposed indoor air quality (IAQ) ruling, if implemented, will apply to all workspaces. It regulates IAQ, including environmental tobacco smoke, and requires employers to write and implement IAQ compliance plans.

  8. Development of an indoor location based service test bed and geographic information system with a wireless sensor network.

    PubMed

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Hsu, Li-Ta; Tsai, Wen-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In order to provide the seamless navigation and positioning services for indoor environments, an indoor location based service (LBS) test bed is developed to integrate the indoor positioning system and the indoor three-dimensional (3D) geographic information system (GIS). A wireless sensor network (WSN) is used in the developed indoor positioning system. Considering the power consumption, in this paper the ZigBee radio is used as the wireless protocol, and the received signal strength (RSS) fingerprinting positioning method is applied as the primary indoor positioning algorithm. The matching processes of the user location include the nearest neighbor (NN) algorithm, the K-weighted nearest neighbors (KWNN) algorithm, and the probabilistic approach. To enhance the positioning accuracy for the dynamic user, the particle filter is used to improve the positioning performance. As part of this research, a 3D indoor GIS is developed to be used with the indoor positioning system. This involved using the computer-aided design (CAD) software and the virtual reality markup language (VRML) to implement a prototype indoor LBS test bed. Thus, a rapid and practical procedure for constructing a 3D indoor GIS is proposed, and this GIS is easy to update and maintenance for users. The building of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan is used as an example to assess the performance of various algorithms for the indoor positioning system.

  9. Development of an Indoor Location Based Service Test Bed and Geographic Information System with a Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Shau-Shiun; Hsu, Li-Ta; Tsai, Wen-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In order to provide the seamless navigation and positioning services for indoor environments, an indoor location based service (LBS) test bed is developed to integrate the indoor positioning system and the indoor three-dimensional (3D) geographic information system (GIS). A wireless sensor network (WSN) is used in the developed indoor positioning system. Considering the power consumption, in this paper the ZigBee radio is used as the wireless protocol, and the received signal strength (RSS) fingerprinting positioning method is applied as the primary indoor positioning algorithm. The matching processes of the user location include the nearest neighbor (NN) algorithm, the K-weighted nearest neighbors (KWNN) algorithm, and the probabilistic approach. To enhance the positioning accuracy for the dynamic user, the particle filter is used to improve the positioning performance. As part of this research, a 3D indoor GIS is developed to be used with the indoor positioning system. This involved using the computer-aided design (CAD) software and the virtual reality markup language (VRML) to implement a prototype indoor LBS test bed. Thus, a rapid and practical procedure for constructing a 3D indoor GIS is proposed, and this GIS is easy to update and maintenance for users. The building of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan is used as an example to assess the performance of various algorithms for the indoor positioning system. PMID:22319282

  10. Human Performance: Does Indoor Environmental Quality Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, E. Ken

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that the primary objective of every school must be an indoor environment that creates a sense of wellbeing in order to facilitate learning (e.g., adequate space, good lighting, friendly conditions, an inviting exterior, a consistent climate/temperature, traffic control and parking, and sanitary conditions), noting that the messages sent to…

  11. Pediatricians' perspectives on indoor tanning.

    PubMed

    Hession, Meghan T; Campbell, Shannon M; Balk, Sophie J; Cummins, Deborah L

    2013-01-01

    This report presents results from an online survey of New York State pediatricians regarding their counseling habits and attitudes toward indoor tanning among adolescents, as well as their awareness of current legislation that restricts youth access to tanning beds.

  12. Indoor Tanning Is Not Safe

    MedlinePlus

    ... devices operate on a timer, the exposure to UV rays can vary based on the age and type of light bulbs. Indoor tanning is designed to give you high levels of UV radiation in a short time. You can get ...

  13. Introduction to Indoor Air Quality

    MedlinePlus

    ... as conditions caused by outdoor impacts (such as climate change). Many reports and studies indicate that the following ... Air Duct Cleaning Asthma Health, Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Flood Cleanup Home Remodel Indoor airPLUS Mold Radon ...

  14. Workplace Safety: Indoor Environmental Quality

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Workplace Safety & Health Topics Indoor Environmental Quality Health Hazard Evaluation ... Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH ...

  15. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  16. [Dust particles and metals in outdoor and indoor air of Upper Silesia].

    PubMed

    Górny, R L; Jedrzejczak, A; Pastuszka, J S

    1995-01-01

    This work contains the results of the aerosol mass size distribution and preliminary studies on concentrations and size distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe and Cd) in indoor and outdoor environment in Upper Silesia (the highly industrialized region in the southern part of Poland). In studies, the measurements of aerosol concentration, mass size distribution, and evaluation of heavy metals concentration were made from December 1992 to April 1994 in some apartments in five towns in Upper Silesia and in one village in the Beskidy Mountains in both indoor and outdoor environments. The particles were fractionated in Andersen cascade impactor. The sampling time was 6-7 days and 4-5 days for indoor and outdoor respectively. Aerosol particulates were collected on A-type glass fiber collection substrate used later for determination of heavy concentrations by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS 3, Carl Zeiss Jena). The dust was mineralized by the means of the mixture of hydrofluoric and nitric acids. The results of mass size distribution as well as the measurements of TSP for indoor and outdoor aerosol show that the main source of particulate matter indoors, in this region, are heavy polluted outdoor air and cigarette smoking. It can be said that, except homes in Knurów and Sosnowiec with hard smokers, the indoor levels of particulate pollution were significant lower than the outdoors levels. Whenever in the indoor environment appear additional source of particulate emission situation can changed. When we compare mass size distribution for outdoor aerosol and indoor aerosol contaminated by tobacco smoke, we can observed considerable increase of indoor aerosol level in the 0.33-0.54 microns size range. Besides, indoor aerosol status may be changed by coal stove emission (displacement of maximum peak to direction of coarse particles). The observed differences in concentration of particulate matter may also indicate the important differences in chemical and

  17. AN OVERVIEW OF INDOOR RADON RISK REDUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radon in the indoor environment is a recognized environmental hazard. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established several programs to develop, demonstrate, and transfer radon mitigation technology. Administration and management of these programs are shared by EPA's ...

  18. Indoor Residence Times of Semivolatile Organic Compounds: Model Estimation and Field Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor residence times of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are a major and mostly unavailable input for residential exposure assessment. We calculated residence times for a suite of SVOCs using a fugacity model applied to residential environments. Residence times depend on...

  19. Indoor ozone concentrations: Ventilation rate impacts and mechanisms of outdoor concentration attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Cano-Ruiz, J.A.; Modera, M.P.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1992-07-01

    The classification of outdoor (ambient) air as fresh for the purposes of ventilation is not always appropriate, particularly in urban areas. In many cities of the world, urban air frequently violates health-based air quality standards due to high ozone concentrations. The degree of protection from exposure to ozone offered by the indoor environment depends on the relationship between indoor and outdoor ozone levels. Existing concentration data indicates that indoor/outdoor ozone ratios range between 10 and 80%. This paper analyzes several of the key issues