Science.gov

Sample records for actual operating experience

  1. Selection of the most advantageous gas turbine air filtration system: Comparative study of actual operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Gilani, S.I.; Mehr, M.Z.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses relative merits of three types of air filtration systems used by Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Ltd. (Pakistan), on its gas turbine compressor packages. These Filtration systems are: (i) Two stage inertial plus auto oil bath type multi-duty filters by AAF used on Saturn Mark-1 packages manufactured by Solar Turbines Inc. (ii) Three stage high efficiency barrier filters by AAF used on Centaur packages by Solar. (iii) Single stage pulse-jet self-cleaning filter by Donaldson again used on a Centaur package. The selection is primarily based in package performance data collected over a 15 month period analyzing power loss due to fouling effects and related operation and maintenance costs for the three systems. The Company's operating experience indicates that on new installations the pulse clean system offers the best advantage both in terms of filtration costs as well as availability of additional horse power when operating under moderate to severe environmental conditions.

  2. Lessons Learned from Eight Years' Experience of Actual Operation, and Future Prospects of JMA Earthquake Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshiba, M.; Nishimae, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007, experiences of actual operation of EEW have been gained by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). During this period, we have learned lessons from many M6- and M7-class earthquakes, and the Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake. During the Mw9.0 Tohoku earthquake, JMA system functioned well: it issued a warning message more than 15 s before strong ground shaking in the Tohoku district (relatively near distance from the epicenter). However, it was not perfect: in addition to the problem of large extent of fault rupture, some false warning messages were issued due to the confusion of the system because of simultaneous multiple aftershocks which occurred at the wide rupture area. To address the problems, JMA will introduce two new methods into the operational system this year to start their tests, aiming at practical operation within a couple of years. One is Integrated Particle Filter (IPF) method, which is an integrated algorithm of multiple hypocenter determination techniques with Bayesian estimation, in which amplitude information is also used for hypocenter determination. The other is Propagation of Local Undamped Motion (PLUM) method, in which warning message is issued when strong ground shaking is detected at nearby stations around the target site (e.g., within 30 km). Here, hypocenter and magnitude are not required in PLUM. Aiming at application for several years later, we are investigating a new approach, in which current wavefield is estimated in real time, and then future wavefield is predicted time evolutionally from the current situation using physics of wave propagation. Here, hypocenter and magnitude are not necessarily required, but real-time observation of ground shaking is necessary. JMA also plans to predict long period ground motion (up to 8 s) with the EEW system for earthquake damage mitigation in high-rise buildings. Its test will start using the operational system in the near future.

  3. Experimental study on the regenerator under actual operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2002-05-01

    An experimental apparatus was prepared to investigate thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of the regenerator under its actual operating conditions. The apparatus included a compressor to pressurize and depressurize regenerator with various operating frequencies. Cold end of the regenerator was maintained around 100 K by means of liquid nitrogen container and heat exchanger. Instantaneous gas temperature and mass flow rate were measured at both ends of the regenerator during the whole pressure cycle. Pulsating pressure and pressure drop across the regenerator were also measured. The operating frequency of the pressure cycle was varied between 3 and 60 Hz, which are typical operating frequencies of Gifford-McMahon, pulse tube, and Stirling cryocoolers. First, friction factor for the wire screen mesh was directly determined from room temperature experiments. When the operating frequency was less than 9 Hz, the oscillating flow friction factor was nearly same as the steady flow friction factor for Reynolds number up to 100. For 60 Hz operations, the ratio of oscillating flow friction factor to steady flow one was increased as hydraulic Reynolds number became high. When the Reynolds number was 100, this ratio was about 1.6. Second, ineffectiveness of the regenerator was obtained when the cold-end was maintained around 100 K and the warm-end at 300 K to simulate the actual operating condition of the regenerator in cryocooler. Effect of the operating frequency on ineffectiveness of regenerator was discussed at low frequency range.

  4. Time experiences, self-actualizing values, and creativity.

    PubMed

    Yonge, G D

    1975-12-01

    The Personal Orientation Inventory (POI), the Inventory of Temporal Experiences (ITE), and the Adjective Check List (ACL) were administered to 80 subjects. Sixteen scores were derived from the POI, 4 from the ITE and a Creativity score for the ACL. The resulting intercorrelations were interpreted in the light of the theories of Maslow and Hugenholtz which postulate a convergence of self-actualization, creativity, and certain experiences of time. The present study presents some evidence for the expected convergence and contributes to the construct validity of several of the variables studied. PMID:1202191

  5. Stirling machine operating experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brad; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that Stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and were not expected to operate for any lengthy period of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered.

  6. Stirling machine operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy operating lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and are not expected to operate for lengthy periods of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered. The record in this paper is not complete, due to the reluctance of some organizations to release operational data and because several organizations were not contacted. The authors intend to repeat this assessment in three years, hoping for even greater participation.

  7. White Cliffs: Operating Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneff, S.

    1984-01-01

    The fourteen dish white cliffs solar power station area is remote and subject to extreme environmental conditions, solution of the associated problems required careful and thoughtful attention and the application of resources. Notwithstanding the wide range and harshness of conditions, the difficulties caused by remoteness and the lack of a technological base and the need for relatively rapid demonstration of success, the project has had a very positive outcome. Qualitative and quantitative information and lessons are now available to enable considerable simplifications to be made for a new system, reducing both hardware and operation and maintenance costs. Experience and lessons are presented, particularly in relation to: system performance in various environmental conditions; design philosophies for collectors, the array, control systems, engine and plant; operation and maintenance strategies and cost reducing possibilities. Experience so far gives encouragement for the future of such paraboloidal dish systems in appropriate areas.

  8. MLCMS Actual Use, Perceived Use, and Experiences of Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon; Grönlund, Åke

    2015-01-01

    Mobile learning involves use of mobile devices to participate in learning activities. Most e-learning activities are available to participants through learning systems such as learning content management systems (LCMS). Due to certain challenges, LCMS are not equally accessible on all mobile devices. This study investigates actual use, perceived…

  9. Operational experience at ELBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Lehnert, U.; Seidel, W.

    2015-05-01

    The ELBE center for high power radiation sources is the largest user facility in the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden- Rossendorf. The facility is based on a 36 MeV superconducting RF Linac which can be operated up to 1.6 mA in cw mode. The electron beam is used to generate secondary radiation, such as infrared light (Free Electron Lasers), coherent THz radiation, MeV-Bremsstrahlung, fast neutrons and positrons for a wide range of basic research like semiconductor physics, nuclear astrophysics and radio biological investigations. Two high power laser systems (500 TW Ti:Sa laser, 2 PW diode pumped laser) are under construction for laser acceleration experiments and X-ray generation by Thomson scattering. The FELs are in operation since 2004 (mid-IR FEL, 4-22μm) and 2006 (far-IF FEL, 20-250μm). The fundamental features of the ELBE IR FELs, the FEL instrumentation and advanced beam diagnostics for the photon beam are described. During ten years of user operation experiences and statistical data were collected.

  10. GNF2 Operating Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Schardt, John

    2007-07-01

    GNF's latest generation fuel product, GNF2, is designed to deliver improved nuclear efficiency, higher bundle and cycle energy capability, and more operational flexibility. But along with high performance, our customers face a growing need for absolute fuel reliability. This is driven by a general sense in the industry that LWR fuel reliability has plateaued. Too many plants are operating with fuel leakers, and the impact on plant operations and operator focus is unacceptable. The industry has responded by implementing an INPO-coordinated program aimed at achieving leaker-free reliability by 2010. One focus area of the program is the relationship between fuel performance (i.e., duty) and reliability. The industry recognizes that the right balance between performance and problem-free fuel reliability is critical. In the development of GNF2, GNF understood the requirement for a balanced solution and utilized a product development and introduction strategy that specifically addressed reliability: evolutionary design features supported by an extensive experience base; thoroughly tested components; and defense-in-depth mitigation of all identified failure mechanisms. The final proof test that the balance has been achieved is the application of the design, initially through lead use assemblies (LUAs), in a variety of plants that reflect the diversity of the BWR fleet. Regular detailed surveillance of these bundles provides the verification that the proper balance between performance and reliability has been achieved. GNF currently has GNF2 lead use assemblies operating in five plants. Included are plants that have implemented extended power up-rates, plants on one and two-year operating cycles, and plants with and without NobleChem{sup TM} and zinc injection. The leading plant has undergone three pool-side inspections outages to date. This paper reviews the actions taken to insure GNF2's reliability, and the lead use assembly surveillance data accumulated to date to

  11. Life extension of elevated-temperature reactors considering actual operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, H.H.

    1993-01-01

    Many reactors have experienced operating conditions less severe than those specified in the design. Their actual operating conditions may involve fewer or less severe transients, lower operating temperatures, or a combination of these. Thus the actual operating conditions become important considerations in efforts to extend the life of reactor components. If the number of transients experienced is fewer than the number specified in the design, the actual transients must be reconstructed to determine extended life. When operating temperature is below 800 [degrees]F, fatigue damage becomes the controlling factor in life assessment. At operating temperatures above 800 [degrees]F (e.g., breeder reactors), creep damage becomes another controlling factor because residual stresses have a longer time for relaxation, a fact that will reduce creep damage. This study presents an approach to assessing the life of breeder reactor components when the actual transients are fewer in number than those specified in the design. It also discusses the sensitivity of creep-fatigue damage in such factors when actual operating temperatures and the actual severity of transients fall below the design specifications.

  12. Life extension of elevated-temperature reactors considering actual operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, H.H.

    1993-01-01

    Many reactors have experienced operating conditions less severe than those specified in the design. Their actual operating conditions may involve fewer or less severe transients, lower operating temperatures, or a combination of these. Thus the actual operating conditions become important considerations in efforts to extend the life of reactor components. If the number of transients experienced is fewer than the number specified in the design, the actual transients must be reconstructed to determine extended life. When operating temperature is below 800 {degrees}F, fatigue damage becomes the controlling factor in life assessment. At operating temperatures above 800 {degrees}F (e.g., breeder reactors), creep damage becomes another controlling factor because residual stresses have a longer time for relaxation, a fact that will reduce creep damage. This study presents an approach to assessing the life of breeder reactor components when the actual transients are fewer in number than those specified in the design. It also discusses the sensitivity of creep-fatigue damage in such factors when actual operating temperatures and the actual severity of transients fall below the design specifications.

  13. Droplet Combustion Experiment Operates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 12, 1997, MET:11/07:00 (approximate). DCE used various fuels -- in drops ranging from 1 mm (0.04 inches) to 5 mm (0.2 inches) -- and mixtures of oxidizers and inert gases to learn more about the physics of combustion in the simplest burning configuration, a sphere. The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. The experiment elapsed time is shown at the bottom of the composite image. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (119KB JPEG, 658 x 982 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300171.html.

  14. 33 CFR 142.4 - Duties of lessees, permittees, and persons responsible for actual operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duties of lessees, permittees, and persons responsible for actual operations. 142.4 Section 142.4 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES...

  15. MIT January Operational Internship Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosanac, Natasha; DeVivero, Charlie; James, Jillian; Perez-Martinez, Carla; Pino, Wendy; Wang, Andrew; Willett, Ezekiel; Williams, Kwami

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the MIT January Operational Internship Experience (JOIE) program. The topics include: 1) Landing and Recovery; 2) Transportation; 3) Shuttle Processing; 4) Constellation Processing; 5) External Tank; 6) Launch Pad; 7) Ground Operations; 8) Hypergolic Propellants; 9) Environmental; 10) Logistics; 11) Six Sigma; 12) Systems Engineering; and 13) Human Factors.

  16. Catalog of Apollo experiment operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    This catalog reviews Apollo mission reports, preliminary science reports, technical crew debriefings, lunar surface operations plans, and various relevant lunar experiment documents, collecting engineering- and operation-specific information by experiment. It is organized by discrete experimental and equipment items emplaced or operated on the lunar surface or at zero gravity during the Apollo missions. It also attempts to summarize some of the general problems encountered on the surface and provides guidelines for the design of future lunar surface experiments with an eye toward operations. Many of the problems dealt with on the lunar surface originated from just a few novel conditions that manifested themselves in various nasty ways. Low gravity caused cables to stick up and get caught on feet, and also made it easy for instruments to tip over. Dust was a problem and caused abrasion, visibility, and thermal control difficulties. Operating in a pressure suit limited a person's activity, especially in the hands. I hope to capture with this document some of the lessons learned from the Apollo era to make the jobs of future astronauts, principle investigators, engineers, and operators of lunar experiments more productive.

  17. Project A.M.E.S. (Actualization of Mainstream Experience Skills). Volume I, 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Steve, Ed.; And Others

    The document makes up volume I of a report on the philosophy and activities of Project AMES (Actualization of Mainstream Experience Skills), a model program for vocational training and independent living skills instruction for 34 moderately and severely retarded students (6 to 21 years old). Following an introductory chapter, Chapter 2 briefly…

  18. Comparing PRAs with operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, R.R.; Martz, H.F.

    1998-12-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment is widely used to estimate the frequencies of rare events, such as nuclear power plant accidents. An obvious question concerns the extent to which PRAs conform to operating experience--that is, do PRAs agree with reality? The authors discuss a formal methodology to address this issue and examine its performance using plant-specific data.

  19. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 2 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 2 compares various catagories of flight plans and flight tracking data produced by a simulation system developed for the Federal Aviation Administrations by SRI International. (Flight tracking data simulate actual flight tracks of all aircraft operating at a given time and provide for rerouting of flights as necessary to resolve traffic conflicts.) The comparisons of flight plans on the forecast to flight plans on the verifying analysis confirm Task 1 findings that wind speeds are generally underestimated. Comparisons involving flight tracking data indicate that actual fuel burn is always higher than planned, in either direction, and even when the same weather data set is used. Since the flight tracking model output results in more diversions than is known to be the case, it was concluded that there is an error in the flight tracking algorithm.

  20. Optimization of CCGT power plant and performance analysis using MATLAB/Simulink with actual operational data.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Naimul; Rai, Jitendra Nath; Arora, Bharat Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    In the Modern scenario, the naturally available resources for power generation are being depleted at an alarming rate; firstly due to wastage of power at consumer end, secondly due to inefficiency of various power system components. A Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) integrates two cycles- Brayton cycle (Gas Turbine) and Rankine cycle (Steam Turbine) with the objective of increasing overall plant efficiency. This is accomplished by utilising the exhaust of Gas Turbine through a waste-heat recovery boiler to run a Steam Turbine. The efficiency of a gas turbine which ranges from 28% to 33% can hence be raised to about 60% by recovering some of the low grade thermal energy from the exhaust gas for steam turbine process. This paper is a study for the modelling of CCGT and comparing it with actual operational data. The performance model for CCGT plant was developed in MATLAB/Simulink. PMID:24936394

  1. The SILEX experiment system operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demelenne, B.

    1994-11-01

    The European Space Agency is going to conduct an inter orbit link experiment which will connect a low Earth orbiting satellite and a Geostationary satellite via optical terminals. This experiment has been called SILEX (Semiconductor Inter satellite Link EXperiment). Two payloads will be built. One called PASTEL (PASsager de TELecommunication) will be embarked on the French Earth observation satellite SPOT4. The future European experimental data relay satellite ARTEMIS (Advanced Relay and TEchnology MISsion) will carry the OPALE terminal (Optical PAyload Experiment). The principal characteristic of the mission is a 50 Megabits flow of data transmitted via the optical satellite link. The relay satellite will route the data via its feeder link thus permitting a real time reception in the European region of images taken by the observation satellite. The PASTEL terminal has been designed to cover up to 9 communication sessions per day with an average of 5. The number of daily contact opportunities with the low earth orbiting satellite will be increased and the duration will be much longer than the traditional passes over a ground station. The terminals have an autonomy of 24 hours with respect to ground control. Each terminal will contain its own orbit model and that of its counter terminal for orbit prediction and for precise computation of pointing direction. Due to the very narrow field of view of the communication laser beam, the orbit propagation calculation needs to be done with a very high accuracy. The European Space Agency is responsible for the operation of both terminals. A PASTEL Mission Control System (PMCS) is being developed to control the PASTEL terminal on board SPOT4. The PMCS will interface with the SPOT4 Control Centre for the execution of the PASTEL operations. The PMCS will also interface with the ARTEMIS Mission Control System for the planning and the coordination of the operation. It is the first time that laser technology will be used to support

  2. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This summary report discusses the results of each of the four major tasks of the study. Task 1 compared airline flight plans based on operational forecasts to plans based on the verifying analyses and found that average fuel savings of 1.2 to 2.5 percent are possible with improved forecasts. Task 2 consisted of similar comparisons but used a model developed for the FAA by SRI International that simulated the impact of ATc diversions on the flight plans. While parts of Task 2 confirm the Task I findings, inconsistency with other data and the known impact of ATC suggests that other Task 2 findings are the result of errors in the model. Task 3 compares segment weather data from operational flight plans with the weather actually observed by the aircraft and finds the average error could result in fuel burn penalties (or savings) of up to 3.6 percent for the average 8747 flight. In Task 4 an in-depth analysis of the weather forecast for the 33 days included in the study finds that significant errors exist on 15 days. Wind speeds in the area of maximum winds are underestimated by 20 to 50 kts., a finding confirmed in the other three tasks.

  3. Fermilab SRF cryomodule operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A.L.; Theilacker, J.C.; DeGraff, B.D.; White, M.; Johnson, G.S.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is constructing an Advanced Accelerator Research and Development facility at New Muon Lab. The cryogenic infrastructure in support of the initial phase of the facility consists of two Tevatron style standalone refrigerators, cryogenic distribution system as well as an ambient temperature pumping system to achieve 2K operations with supporting purification systems. During this phase of the project a single Type III plus 1.3 GHz cryomodule was installed, cooled and tested. Design constraints of the cryomodule required that the cryomodule individual circuits be cooled at predetermined rates. These constraints required special design solutions to achieve. This paper describes the initial cooldown and operational experience of a 1.3 GHz cryomodule using the New Muon Lab cryogenic system.

  4. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2009-05-01

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  5. Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

    2008-09-01

    Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

  6. Long-term operating experience for the ATLAS superconducting resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, R.; Zinkann, G.

    1999-12-21

    Portions of the ATLAS accelerator have been operating now for over 21 years. The facility has accumulated several million resonator-hours of operation at this point and has demonstrated the long-term reliability of RF superconductivity. The overall operating performance of the ATLAS facility has established a level of beam quality, flexibility, and reliability not previously achieved with heavy-ion accelerator facilities. The actual operating experience and maintenance history of ATLAS are presented for ATLAS resonators and associated electronics systems. Solutions to problems that appeared in early operation as well as current problems needing further development are discussed.

  7. Actual evapotranspiration modeling using the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Maupin, Molly A.; Kenny, Joan F.; Perry, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Remote-sensing technology and surface-energy-balance methods can provide accurate and repeatable estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) when used in combination with local weather datasets over irrigated lands. Estimates of ETa may be used to provide a consistent, accurate, and efficient approach for estimating regional water withdrawals for irrigation and associated consumptive use (CU), especially in arid cropland areas that require supplemental water due to insufficient natural supplies from rainfall, soil moisture, or groundwater. ETa in these areas is considered equivalent to CU, and represents the part of applied irrigation water that is evaporated and/or transpired, and is not available for immediate reuse. A recent U.S. Geological Survey study demonstrated the application of the remote-sensing-based Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to estimate 10-year average ETa at 1-kilometer resolution on national and regional scales, and compared those ETa values to the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Use Information Program’s 1995 county estimates of CU. The operational version of the operational SSEB (SSEBop) method is now used to construct monthly, county-level ETa maps of the conterminous United States for the years 2000, 2005, and 2010. The performance of the SSEBop was evaluated using eddy covariance flux tower datasets compiled from 2005 datasets, and the results showed a strong linear relationship in different land cover types across diverse ecosystems in the conterminous United States (correlation coefficient [r] ranging from 0.75 to 0.95). For example, r for woody savannas (0.75), grassland (0.75), forest (0.82), cropland (0.84), shrub land (0.89), and urban (0.95). A comparison of the remote-sensing SSEBop method for estimating ETa and the Hamon temperature method for estimating potential ET (ETp) also was conducted, using regressions of all available county averages of ETa for 2005 and 2010, and yielded correlations of r = 0

  8. Operating experience review of an INL gas monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; DeWall, K. G.; Herring, J. S.

    2015-03-12

    This article describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored in the lab room are hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and both actual and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. In addition, some simple calculations are given to estimate the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  9. Operational Amplifier Experiments for the Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    Provides details of experiments that deal with the use of operational amplifiers and are part of a course in instrumental analysis. These experiments are performed after the completion of a set of electricity and electronics experiments. (DDR)

  10. Do Student Evaluations of University Reflect Inaccurate Beliefs or Actual Experience? A Relative Rank Model

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gordon D A; Wood, Alex M; Ogden, Ruth S; Maltby, John

    2015-01-01

    It was shown that student satisfaction ratings are influenced by context in ways that have important theoretical and practical implications. Using questions from the UK's National Student Survey, the study examined whether and how students' expressed satisfaction with issues such as feedback promptness and instructor enthusiasm depends on the context of comparison (such as possibly inaccurate beliefs about the feedback promptness or enthusiasm experienced at other universities) that is evoked. Experiment 1 found strong effects of experimentally provided comparison context—for example, satisfaction with a given feedback time depended on the time's relative position within a context. Experiment 2 used a novel distribution-elicitation methodology to determine the prior beliefs of individual students about what happens in universities other than their own. It found that these beliefs vary widely and that students' satisfaction was predicted by how they believed their experience ranked within the distribution of others' experiences. A third study found that relative judgement principles also predicted students' intention to complain. An extended model was developed to show that purely rank-based principles of judgement can account for findings previously attributed to range effects. It was concluded that satisfaction ratings and quality of provision are different quantities, particularly when the implicit context of comparison includes beliefs about provision at other universities. Quality and satisfaction should be assessed separately, with objective measures (such as actual times to feedback), rather than subjective ratings (such as satisfaction with feedback promptness), being used to measure quality wherever practicable. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25620847

  11. 14 CFR 135.244 - Operating experience.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operating experience. 135.244 Section 135.244 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: COMMUTER AND ON DEMAND OPERATIONS AND...

  12. Assessing daily actual evapotranspiration through energy balance: an experiment to evaluate the selfpreservation hypothesis with acquisition time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.; Rallo, G.

    2013-10-01

    An operational use of the actual evapotranspiration estimates requires the integration from instantaneous to daily values. This can commonly be achieved under the hypothesis of daytime self-preservation of the evaporative fraction. In this study, it has been evaluated the effect of this assumption on the assessment of daily evapotranspiration from proximity sensing images acquired at hourly intervals over a homogeneous olive groove. Results have been validated by comparison with observations made by a micrometeorological (EC-flux tower) and an eco-physiological (sap flux) sensor. SEBAL model has been applied to thermal and multispectral images acquired during a clear day on August 2009 trough a FLIR A320G thermal camera and a Tetracam MCA II multispectral camera, installed on a tethered helium balloon. Thermal and multispectral images were characterized by very high spatial resolution. This experiment aims to analyze two effects: 1) the consistency of the self-preservation hypothesis for daily estimates of the actual evapotranspiration from hourly assessments at different times of the day; 2) the effects of the spatial resolution on the performances of the energy balance model. To evaluate the effects of the spatial resolution, semi-hourly observations made by a flux tower and sap-flow measures were compared to the evapotranspiration estimates performed using downscaled images at resolutions close to canopy sizes (2, 5 and 10 m). Results show that the best estimates are obtained with a spatial resolution comparable to the average size of the canopy with images taken approximately at 10 UTC.

  13. Self-Actualizations and Experience with Zen Meditation: Is a Learning Period Necessary for Meditation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, William C.; Becker, Gordon M.

    1983-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between the practice of Zen meditation and a measure of self-actualization in experienced (N=36) and inexperienced (N=34) meditator groups. Analysis of data showed that a learning period (or selection period) exists for Zen meditation during which there is no increase in group self-actualization. (LLL)

  14. Operational experience with superconducting synchrotron magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.S.

    1987-03-01

    The operational experience with the Fermilab Tevatron is presented, with emphasis on reliability and failure modes. Comprisons are made between the operating efficiencies for the superconducting machine and for he conventional Main Ring.

  15. Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries.

  16. Synthetic Vision Systems - Operational Considerations Simulation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic vision is a computer-generated image of the external scene topography that is generated from aircraft attitude, high-precision navigation information, and data of the terrain, obstacles, cultural features, and other required flight information. A synthetic vision system (SVS) enhances this basic functionality with real-time integrity to ensure the validity of the databases, perform obstacle detection and independent navigation accuracy verification, and provide traffic surveillance. Over the last five years, NASA and its industry partners have developed and deployed SVS technologies for commercial, business, and general aviation aircraft which have been shown to provide significant improvements in terrain awareness and reductions in the potential for Controlled-Flight-Into-Terrain incidents/accidents compared to current generation cockpit technologies. It has been hypothesized that SVS displays can greatly improve the safety and operational flexibility of flight in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) to a level comparable to clear-day Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), regardless of actual weather conditions or time of day. An experiment was conducted to evaluate SVS and SVS-related technologies as well as the influence of where the information is provided to the pilot (e.g., on a Head-Up or Head-Down Display) for consideration in defining landing minima based upon aircraft and airport equipage. The "operational considerations" evaluated under this effort included reduced visibility, decision altitudes, and airport equipage requirements, such as approach lighting systems, for SVS-equipped aircraft. Subjective results from the present study suggest that synthetic vision imagery on both head-up and head-down displays may offer benefits in situation awareness; workload; and approach and landing performance in the visibility levels, approach lighting systems, and decision altitudes tested.

  17. Synthetic vision systems: operational considerations simulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-04-01

    Synthetic vision is a computer-generated image of the external scene topography that is generated from aircraft attitude, high-precision navigation information, and data of the terrain, obstacles, cultural features, and other required flight information. A synthetic vision system (SVS) enhances this basic functionality with real-time integrity to ensure the validity of the databases, perform obstacle detection and independent navigation accuracy verification, and provide traffic surveillance. Over the last five years, NASA and its industry partners have developed and deployed SVS technologies for commercial, business, and general aviation aircraft which have been shown to provide significant improvements in terrain awareness and reductions in the potential for Controlled-Flight-Into-Terrain incidents / accidents compared to current generation cockpit technologies. It has been hypothesized that SVS displays can greatly improve the safety and operational flexibility of flight in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) to a level comparable to clear-day Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), regardless of actual weather conditions or time of day. An experiment was conducted to evaluate SVS and SVS-related technologies as well as the influence of where the information is provided to the pilot (e.g., on a Head-Up or Head-Down Display) for consideration in defining landing minima based upon aircraft and airport equipage. The "operational considerations" evaluated under this effort included reduced visibility, decision altitudes, and airport equipage requirements, such as approach lighting systems, for SVS-equipped aircraft. Subjective results from the present study suggest that synthetic vision imagery on both head-up and head-down displays may offer benefits in situation awareness; workload; and approach and landing performance in the visibility levels, approach lighting systems, and decision altitudes tested.

  18. Analysis of Actual Operating Conditions of an Off-grid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson; Jack Schmid

    2008-12-31

    Fuel cells have been proposed as ideal replacements for other technologies in remote locations such as Rural Alaska. A number of suppliers have developed systems that might be applicable in these locations, but there are several requirements that must be met before they can be deployed: they must be able to operate on portable fuels, and be able to operate with little operator assistance for long periods of time. This project was intended to demonstrate the operation of a 5 kW fuel cell on propane at a remote site (defined as one without access to grid power, internet, or cell phone, but on the road system). A fuel cell was purchased by the National Park Service for installation in their newly constructed visitor center at Exit Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park. The DOE participation in this project as initially scoped was for independent verification of the operation of this demonstration. This project met with mixed success. The fuel cell has operated over 6 seasons at the facility with varying degrees of success, with one very good run of about 1049 hours late in the summer of 2006, but in general the operation has been below expectations. There have been numerous stack failures, the efficiency of electrical generation has been lower than expected, and the field support effort required has been far higher than expected. Based on the results to date, it appears that this technology has not developed to the point where demonstrations in off road sites are justified.

  19. Operational actual wetland evapotranspiration estimation for the Everglades using MODIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melesse, Assefa; Cereon, Cristobal

    2014-05-01

    Wetlands are one of the most important ecosystems with varied functions and structures. Humans have drained wetlands and altered the structure and functions of wetlands for various uses. Wetland restoration efforts require assessment of the level of ecohydrological restoration for the intended functions. Among the various indicators of success in wetland restoration, achieving the desired water level (hydrology) is the most important, faster to achieve and easier to monitor than the establishment of the hydric soils and wetland vegetation. Monitoring wetland hydrology using remote sensing based evapotranspiration (ET) is a useful tool and approach since point measurements for understanding the temporal (before and after restoration) and spatial (impacted and restored) parts of the wetland are not effective for large areas. Evapotranspiration accounts over 80% of the water budget of the wetlands necessitating the need for spatiotemporal monitoring of ET flux. A study employing remotely sensed data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and modeling tools was conducted for a weekly spatial estimation of Everglades ET. Weekly surface temperature data were generated from the MODIS thermal band and evaporative fraction was estimated using the simplified surface energy balance (SSEB) approach. Based on the Simple Method, potential ET (PET) was estimated. Actual weekly wetland ET was computed as the (product of the PET and evaporative fraction). The ET product will be useful information for environmental restoration and wetland hydrology managers. The on-going restoration and monitoring work in the Everglades will benefit from this product and assist in evaluating progress and success in the restoration.

  20. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 3 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 3 compares flight plans developed on the Suitland forecast with actual data observed by the aircraft (and averaged over 10 degree segments). The results show that the average difference between the forecast and observed wind speed is 9 kts. without considering direction, and the average difference in the component of the forecast wind parallel to the direction of the observed wind is 13 kts. - both indicating that the Suitland forecast underestimates the wind speeds. The Root Mean Square (RMS) vector error is 30.1 kts. The average absolute difference in direction between the forecast and observed wind is 26 degrees and the temperature difference is 3 degree Centigrade. These results indicate that the forecast model as well as the verifying analysis used to develop comparison flight plans in Tasks 1 and 2 is a limiting factor and that the average potential fuel savings or penalty are up to 3.6 percent depending on the direction of flight.

  1. Actual operation and regulatory activities on steam generator replacement in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Saeki, Hitoshi

    1997-02-01

    This paper summarizes the operating reactors in Japan, and the status of the steam generators in these plants. It reviews plans for replacement of existing steam generators, and then goes into more detail on the planning and regulatory steps which must be addressed in the process of accomplishing this maintenance. The paper also reviews the typical steps involved in the process of removal and replacement of steam generators.

  2. The JPL telerobot operator control station: Operational experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, Edwin P.

    1990-01-01

    The Operator Control Station of the JPL/NASA Telerobot Demonstration System provides an efficient man-machine interface for the performance of telerobot tasks. Its hardware and software have been designed with high flexibility. It provides a feedback-rich interactive environment in which the Operator performs teleoperation tasks, robotic tasks, and telerobotic tasks with ease. The to-date operational experiences of this system, particularly related to the Object Designate Process and the Voice Input/Output Process are discussed.

  3. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 1 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 1 compares flight plans based on forecasts with plans based on the verifying analysis from 33 days during the summer and fall of 1979. The comparisons show that: (1) potential fuel savings conservatively estimated to be between 1.2 and 2.5 percent could result from using more timely and accurate weather data in flight planning and route selection; (2) the Suitland forecast generally underestimates wind speeds; and (3) the track selection methodology of many airlines operating on the North Atlantic may not be optimum resulting in their selecting other than the optimum North Atlantic Organized Track about 50 percent of the time.

  4. Experimental investigation of panel radiator heat output enhancement for efficient thermal use under actual operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisir, Tamer; Baskaya, Senol; Onur Yazar, Hakan; Yucedag, Sinan

    2015-05-01

    In this study the heat output of a panel-convector-convector-panel radiator (PCCP) under controlled laboratory conditions under Turkish household and especially Ankara conditions was investigated experimentally. In this sense, investigations were performed for different heating water mass flow rates, water inlet temperatures and radiator inlet and outlet connection positions, which are most commonly used in Turkey. An experimental setup was built for this purpose in a test room where temperature was controlled and held constant during the experiments. Inlet and outlet water temperatures and mass flow rates were measured and heat output of the radiator was calculated. Infrared thermal camera visualizations of the steel panel radiator front surface were also performed.

  5. Comparative analysis of operational forecasts versus actual weather conditions in airline flight planning, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keitz, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of more timely and accurate weather data on airline flight planning with the emphasis on fuel savings is studied. This volume of the report discusses the results of Task 4 of the four major tasks included in the study. Task 4 uses flight plan segment wind and temperature differences as indicators of dates and geographic areas for which significant forecast errors may have occurred. An in-depth analysis is then conducted for the days identified. The analysis show that significant errors occur in the operational forecast on 15 of the 33 arbitrarily selected days included in the study. Wind speeds in an area of maximum winds are underestimated by at least 20 to 25 kts. on 14 of these days. The analysis also show that there is a tendency to repeat the same forecast errors from prog to prog. Also, some perceived forecast errors from the flight plan comparisons could not be verified by visual inspection of the corresponding National Meteorological Center forecast and analyses charts, and it is likely that they are the result of weather data interpolation techniques or some other data processing procedure in the airlines' flight planning systems.

  6. MIT January Operational Internship Experience 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLatte, Danielle; Furhmann, Adam; Habib, Manal; Joujon-Roche, Cecily; Opara, Nnaemeka; Pasterski, Sabrina Gonzalez; Powell, Christina; Wimmer, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the 2011 January Operational Internship experience (JOIE) program which allows students to study operational aspects of spaceflight, how design affects operations and systems engineering in practice for 3 weeks. Topics include: (1) Systems Engineering (2) NASA Organization (3) Workforce Core Values (4) Human Factors (5) Safety (6) Lean Engineering (7) NASA Now (8) Press, Media, and Outreach and (9) Future of Spaceflight.

  7. Simulator experiments: effects of NPP operator experience on performance

    SciTech Connect

    Beare, A.N.; Gray, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    During the FY83 research, a simulator experiment was conducted at the control room simulator for a GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) NPP. The research subjects were licensed operators undergoing requalification training and shift technical advisors (STAs). This experiment was designed to investigate the effects of senior reactor operator (SRO) experience, operating crew augmentation with an STA and practice, as a crew, upon crew and individual operator performance, in response to anticipated plant transients. Sixteen two-man crews of licensed operators were employed in a 2 x 2 factorial design. The SROs leading the crews were split into high and low experience groups on the basis of their years of experience as an SRO. One half of the high- and low-SRO experience groups were assisted by an STA. The crews responded to four simulated plant casualties. A five-variable set of content-referenced performance measures was derived from task analyses of the procedurally correct responses to the four casualties. System parameters and control manipulations were recorded by the computer controlling the simulator. Data on communications and procedure use were obtained from analysis of videotapes of the exercises. Questionnaires were used to collect subject biographical information and data on subjective workload during each simulated casualty. For four of the five performance measures, no significant differences were found between groups led by high (25 to 114 months) and low (1 to 17 months as an SRO) experience SROs. However, crews led by low experience SROs tended to have significantly shorter task performance times than crews led by high experience SROs. The presence of the STA had no significant effect on overall team performance in responding to the four simulated casualties. The FY84 experiments are a partial replication and extension of the FY83 experiment, but with PWR operators and simulator.

  8. Nova pulse power design and operational experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, K.; Larson, D.; Merritt, B.; Christie, D.

    1987-01-01

    Nova is a 100 TW Nd++ solid state laser designed for experiments with laser fusion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The pulsed power for Nova includes a 58 MJ capacitor bank driving 5336 flashlamps with millisecond pulses and subnanosecond high voltages for electro optics. This paper summarizes the pulsed power designs and the operational experience to date.

  9. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, C.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Holmes, S.; Louis, W.; Meyer, A.; Moore, Craig D.; Raja, R.; Ramberg, E.; Roser, R.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2004. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2004 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE neutrino experiment, and SY 120 activities.

  10. Actual Performance Prediction of Split-type Room Air Conditioner which Considered Unsteady Operation Concerning Heat Island Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinomiya, Naruaki; Nishimura, Nobuya; Iyota, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Tomohiro

    Split type air conditioners are operated actually in the situation unlike the condition that was described in a product catalog. On the other hand, exhaust heat from air conditioner is considered as one of the causes of heat island problem in urban area, and the air conditioner performance and heat load affect exhaust heat amount. In this study, air conditioner performances in both standard summer day and severe hot day were examined by dynamic simulation which considered outdoor weather changes. As a result, actual performances of the air conditioner were demonstrated as a function of outdoor temperature, heat load and indoor temperature. The higher the outdoor temperature and heat load rise, the smaller influences of indoor temperature against COP became. In standard summer day, relative performance exceeded by 15 to 45% than that of JIS operating condition. Also, COP in severe hot day decreased about 6% at the peak time than that of standard day. As a result, the air conditioner exhaust heat during one day which was predicted by the proposed simulation model became about 16% smaller than the conventional prediction model.

  11. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, S.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Holmes, S.; James, C.; Lee, W.; Louis, W.; Moore, C.; Plunkett, R.; Raja, R.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2006. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2006 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam in neutrino and antineutrino modes, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and SY 120 activities.

  12. Some experiences with BEPCII SRF system operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tong-ming; Lin, Hai-ying; Sun, Yi; Dai, Jian-ping; Wang, Guang-wei; Pan, Wei-min Li, Zhong-quan; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Qun-yao; Zhao, Guang-yuan; Mi, Zheng-hui; Sha, Peng

    2016-06-01

    The Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) system of the upgrade project of the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII) has been in operation for almost 8 years. During operation, many problems have been encountered, such as excessive heating of the power couplers, frequent beam trips during high intensity colliding, false arc interlock trigger and so on. Among them, some has been solved successfully, some have been alleviated. This paper will describe some experiences with BEPCII SRF system operation, including the symptoms, causes and solutions of problems.

  13. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.; Appel, J.A.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Dixon, R.; Escobar, C.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Harris, D.; Henderson, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2010. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2010 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MINOS and MINER?A experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  14. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Bernardi, G.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Dixon, R.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Hahn, S.; Harris, D.; Henderson, S.

    2011-11-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2011. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2011 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MINOS and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  15. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Czarapata, P.

    2015-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2015 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  16. Occupational Work Experience. Manual of Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational and Adult Education.

    This manual is designed to assist school personnel, employers, parents/guardians, and students in understanding the policies and procedures required to operate effective occupational work experience (OWE) programs. The OWE mission statement appears first. Chapter I describes the OWE program, its structure, types of program organization, and…

  17. Neutrino horn power supply operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Stillman, P.; Sandberg, J.; Carroll, A.S.; Leonhardt, W.; Monaghan, R.; Pearson, C.; Pendzich, A.; Ryan, G.; Sims, W.P.; Smith, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The operational experiences required to run the 300 kA pulsed power supply at Brookhaven National Laboratory are given. Various interlocks and monitoring circuits are described and the impact on system reliability are discussed. The initial conditioning process of the power supply during startup is described.

  18. Operational experiences of a downhole steam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, B. W.

    The US Department of Energy supported the development of downhole steam generators for enhanced oil recovery as a part of Project DEEP STEAM. A final step in the development program was to deploy a downhole steam generator in the field to demonstrate its reliable operation and to evaluate the effect of the combined steam/exhaust products effluent on the reservoir. Sandia National Laboratories entered into an agreement with the City of Long Beach to place two direct contact, high pressure combustors in the Wilmington Field in Long Beach, California. These units one downhole and the other on the surface, have now been operated for a few months and gas communication with the production wells measured. The operational experience of this field experiment are discussed.

  19. Operational experiences of a downhole steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.W.

    1982-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has supported the development of downhole steam generators for enhanced oil recovery as a part of Project DEEP STEAM. A final step in the development program was to deploy a downhole steam generator (DHSG) in the field to demonstrate its reliable operation and to evaluate the effect of the combined steam/exhaust products effluent on the reservoir. Sandia National Laboratories entered into an agreement with the City of Long Beach to place two direct contact, high pressure combustors in the Wilmington Field in Long Beach, California. These units one downhole and the other on the surface, have now been operated for a few months and gas communication with the production wells measured. The operational experience of this field experiment are discussed.

  20. Function Transfer in Human Operant Experiments: The Role of Stimulus Pairings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonneau, Francois; Gonzalez, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    Although function transfer often has been studied in complex operant procedures (such as matching to sample), whether operant reinforcement actually produces function transfer in such settings has not been established. The present experiments, with high school students as subjects, suggest that stimulus pairings can promote function transfer in…

  1. The Deep Impact Network Experiment Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, J. Leigh; Clare, Loren; Wang, Shin-Ywan

    2009-01-01

    Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) promises solutions in solving space communications challenges arising from disconnections as orbiters lose line-of-sight with landers, long propagation delays over interplanetary links, and other phenomena. DTN has been identified as the basis for the future NASA space communications network backbone, and international standardization is progressing through both the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) and the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). JPL has developed an implementation of the DTN architecture, called the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION). ION is specifically implemented for space use, including design for use in a real-time operating system environment and high processing efficiency. In order to raise the Technology Readiness Level of ION, the first deep space flight demonstration of DTN is underway, using the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft. Called the Deep Impact Network (DINET), operations are planned for Fall 2008. An essential component of the DINET project is the Experiment Operations Center (EOC), which will generate and receive the test communications traffic as well as "out-of-DTN band" command and control of the DTN experiment, store DTN flight test information in a database, provide display systems for monitoring DTN operations status and statistics (e.g., bundle throughput), and support query and analyses of the data collected. This paper describes the DINET EOC and its value in the DTN flight experiment and potential for further DTN testing.

  2. GRAS NRT Precise Orbit Determination: Operational Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MartinezFadrique, Francisco M.; Mate, Alberto Agueda; Rodriquez-Portugal, Francisco Sancho

    2007-01-01

    EUMETSAT launched the meteorological satellite MetOp-A in October 2006; it is the first of the three satellites that constitute the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) space segment. This satellite carries a challenging and innovative instrument, the GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding (GRAS). The goal of the GRAS instrument is to support the production of atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity with high accuracy, in an operational context, based on the bending of the GPS signals traversing the atmosphere during the so-called occultation periods. One of the key aspects associated to the data processing of the GRAS instrument is the necessity to describe the satellite motion and GPS receiver clock behaviour with high accuracy and within very strict timeliness limitations. In addition to these severe requirements, the GRAS Product Processing Facility (PPF) must be integrated in the EPS core ground segment, which introduces additional complexity from the data integration and operational procedure points of view. This paper sets out the rationale for algorithm selection and the conclusions from operational experience. It describes in detail the rationale and conclusions derived from the selection and implementation of the algorithms leading to the final orbit determination requirements (0.1 mm/s in velocity and 1 ns in receiver clock error at 1 Hz). Then it describes the operational approach and extracts the ideas and conclusions derived from the operational experience.

  3. Experience in operating the Bratsk Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, A.V.

    1984-04-01

    The Bratsk reservoir is the largest in the USSR and second largest in the world. Initially, the reservoir was expected to be filled by the end of 1966. However, the actual filling was not completed until September of 1967. During filling and in the first years of operation it was constantly necessary to deal with floating timber in order to ensure normal operation of the hydrostation, navigation safety, conditions for fishery, and fulfillment of the sanitary requirements. During seasonal variations of the reservoir level about 160 sq km of the shore zone was subjected to variable flooding and waterlogging. Maximum erosion occurred on expanded stretches, and within their limits on slopes composed of loam and sand deposits. Within the narrows, where the banks are composed mainly of hard and soft rocks and wave action is weak, erosion is negligible. Wind setup and setdown cause maximum denivellation of the water surface. The maximum increase of the level during setup reaches 232 cm and the maximum decrease during setdown is 24 cm. Seiche oscillations with various amplitudes and periods are observed on the reservoir surface. The main uses of the complex are hydropower, water transport, timber floating, water supply, and fishery. For the successful development of the shores of reservoirs it is necessary to select the construction sites with consideration of possible occurrence of karstic and landslide processes; the construction of heavy structures requires special karst-control measures. 3 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  4. Operating procedures: Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, R.A.; Carey, R.W.

    1984-03-20

    The Fusion Experiments Analysis Facility (FEAF) is a computer facility based on a DEC VAX 11/780 computer. It became operational in late 1982. At that time two manuals were written to aid users and staff in their interactions with the facility. This manual is designed as a reference to assist the FEAF staff in carrying out their responsibilities. It is meant to supplement equipment and software manuals supplied by the vendors. Also this manual provides the FEAF staff with a set of consistent, written guidelines for the daily operation of the facility.

  5. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, S.; Buchanan, N.; Coleman, R.; Convery, M.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Habig, A.; Holmes, S.; Kissel, W.; Lee, W.; Nakaya, T.; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2007. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2007 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  6. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, Stephen J.; Buehler, M.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Grinstein, S.; Habig, A.; Holmes, S.; Hylen, J.; Kissel, W.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2008. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2008 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  7. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M.N; Appel, J.A.; Brice, S.; Casarsa, M.; Coleman, R.; Denisov, d.; Ginther, G.; Gruenendahl, S.; Holmes, S.; Kissel, W.; Lee, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and accelerator experiment operations for FY 2009. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2009 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the MiniBooNE experiment running in the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120). Each section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was somewhat edited for inclusion in this summary.

  8. Operational experience of the OC-OTEC experiments at NELH

    SciTech Connect

    Link, H

    1989-02-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute, under funding and program direction from the US Department of Energy, has been operating a small-scale test apparatus to investigate key components of open- cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The apparatus started operations in October 1987 and continues to provide valuable information on heat-and mass-transfer processes in evaporators and condensers, gas sorption processes as seawater is depressurized and repressurized, and control and instrumentation characteristics of open-cycle systems. Although other test facilities have been used to study some of these interactions, this is the largest apparatus of its kind to use seawater since Georges Claude`s efforts in 1926. The information obtained from experiments conducted in this apparatus is being used to design a larger scale experiment in which a positive net power production is expected to be demonstrated for the first time with OC-OTEC. This paper describes the apparatus, the major tests conducted during its first 18 months of operation, and the experience gained in OC-OTEC system operation. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Implementation of the SSHAC Guidelines for Level 3 and 4 PSHAs - Experience Gained from Actual Applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanks, Thomas C.; Abrahamson, Norm A.; Boore, David M.; Coppersmith, Kevin J.; Knepprath, Nichole E.

    2009-01-01

    In April 1997, after four years of deliberations, the Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee released its report 'Recommendations for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis: Guidance on Uncertainty and Use of Experts' through the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission as NUREG/CR-6372, hereafter SSHAC (1997). Known informally ever since as the 'SSHAC Guidelines', SSHAC (1997) addresses why and how multiple expert opinions - and the intrinsic uncertainties that attend them - should be used in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analyses (PSHA) for critical facilities such as commercial nuclear power plants. Ten years later, in September 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) entered into a 13-month agreement with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) titled 'Practical Procedures for Implementation of the SSHAC Guidelines and for Updating PSHAs'. The NRC was interested in understanding and documenting lessons learned from recent PSHAs conducted at the higher SSHAC Levels (3 and 4) and in gaining input from the seismic community for updating PSHAs as new information became available. This study increased in importance in anticipation of new applications for nuclear power facilities at both existing and new sites. The intent of this project was not to replace the SSHAC Guidelines but to supplement them with the experience gained from putting the SSHAC Guidelines to work in practical applications. During the course of this project, we also learned that updating PSHAs for existing nuclear power facilities involves very different issues from the implementation of the SSHAC Guidelines for new facilities. As such, we report our findings and recommendations from this study in two separate documents, this being the first. The SSHAC Guidelines were written without regard to whether the PSHAs to which they would be applied were site-specific or regional in scope. Most of the experience gained to date from high-level SSHAC studies has been for site-specific cases, although three

  10. Nova power systems: status and operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Whitham, K.; Merritt, B.T.; Gritton, D.G.; Smart, A.J.; Holloway, R.W.; Oicles, J.A.

    1983-11-28

    This paper describes the pulse power systems that are used in these lasers; the status and the operating experiences. The pulsed power system for the Nova Laser is comprised of several distinct technology areas. The large capacitor banks for driving flashlamps that excite the laser glass is one area, the fast pulsers that drive pockels cell shutters is another area, and the contol system for the pulsed power is a third. This paper discusses the capacitor banks and control systems.

  11. Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

    2008-09-01

    Continuous air monitors (CAMs) are used to sense radioactive particulates in room air of nuclear facilities. CAMs alert personnel of potential inhalation exposures to radionuclides and can also actuate room ventilation isolation for public and environmental protection. This paper presents the results of a CAM operating experience review of the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly reviewed. CAM location selection and operation are briefly discussed. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. Department of Energy and in other literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Power losses, human errors, and mechanical issues cause the majority of failures. The average “all modes” failure rate is 2.65E-05/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 9 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 252 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of CAMs in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER experiment.

  12. Cryogenic system operational experience at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, M.; DeGraff, B.; Kim, S.-H.; Morris, B.; Neustadt, T.; Strong, H.

    2015-12-01

    The helium cryogenic system at Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) provides cooling to 81 superconducting radio frequency cavities. During the first ten years of operation, much operational experience and lessons learned have been gained. The lessons learned include integrated system issues as well as component failures in the areas of mechanical, electrical and controls. Past issues that have been corrected as well as current issues in the system will be detailed in this paper. In 2009, a Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (PFMEA) was completed as a way to identify high risk items and prioritize efforts. Since 2009, the progress on mitigating the identified high risk items has been tracked. The results of the PFMEA and the progress made in reducing risk to the cryogenic system operation will be detailed in this paper.

  13. Operational Experience from Solar Thermal Energy Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past few years, Sandia National Laboratories were involved in the design, construction, and operation of a number of DOE-sponsored solar thermal energy systems. Among the systems currently in operation are several industrial process heat projects and the Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test systems, all of which use parabolic troughs, and the Shenandoah Total Energy Project, which uses parabolic dishes. Operational experience has provided insight to both desirable and undesirable features of the designs of these systems. Features of these systems which are also relevant to the design of parabolic concentrator thermal electric systems are discussed. Other design features discussed are system control functions which were found to be especially convenient or effective, such as local concentrator controls, rainwash controls, and system response to changing isolation. Drive systems are also discussed with particular emphasis of the need for reliability and the usefulness of a manual drive capability.

  14. OTEC-1 test operations experience. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshide, R.K.; Klein, A.; Polino, D.L.; Poucher, F.W.

    1983-07-15

    During Phase III, the complete integrated system was operated, and information was obtained on the performance of the test article, the performance of the seawater and ammonia systems, the operation of the platform and moor systems, the effects of biofouling countermeasures, and the effects of the OTEC cycle on the environment. After several months spent in completing construction of the test system and checking out and repairing the various systems, 4 months of test operations were conducted before funding constraints caused the discontinuation of the test program. Plans were made for long-term storage and/or disposition of the test facility. The OEC test platform is currently located at Pearl Harbor, in the US Navy Inactive Reserve Fleet anchorage. The CWP was placed in underwater storage adjacent to the moor, awaiting a decision on final disposition. In October 1982, the CWP was recovered and custody given to the State of Hawaii. Although the test period lasted only about 4 months, deployment and at-sea operation of a large-scale OTEC plant was demonstrated, and information was obtained towards satisfying each of the objectives of the OTEC-1 project. This document summarizes the OTEC-1 test operations experience, discusses technical lessons learned, and makes recommendations for future OTEC plants.

  15. 14 CFR 121.434 - Operating experience, operating cycles, and consolidation of knowledge and skills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Operating experience, operating cycles, and... Qualifications § 121.434 Operating experience, operating cycles, and consolidation of knowledge and skills. (a... position, the operating experience, operating cycles, and the line operating flight time for...

  16. Experience from operating germanium detectors in GERDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palioselitis, Dimitrios; GERDA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Phase I of the Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) experiment, searching for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge, was completed in September 2013. The most competitive half-life lower limit for the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set (T-0ν1/2 > 2.1 · 1025 yr at 90% C.L.). GERDA operates bare Ge diodes immersed in liquid argon. During Phase I, mainly refurbished semi-coaxial high purity Ge detectors from previous experiments were used. The experience gained with handling and operating bare Ge diodes in liquid argon, as well as the stability and performance of the detectors during GERDA Phase I are presented. Thirty additional new enriched BEGe-type detectors were produced and will be used in Phase II. A subgroup of these detectors has already been used successfully in GERDA Phase I. The present paper gives an overview of the production chain of the new germanium detectors, the steps taken to minimise the exposure to cosmic radiation during manufacturing, and the first results of characterisation measurements in vacuum cryostats.

  17. Assessment of LWR piping design loading based on plant operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, P. O.

    1980-08-01

    The objective of this study has been to: (1) identify current Light Water Reactor (LWR) piping design load parameters, (2) identify significant actual LWR piping loads from plant operating experience, (3) perform a comparison of these two sets of data and determine the significance of any differences, and (4) make an evaluation of the load representation in current LWR piping design practice, in view of plant operating experience with respect to piping behavior and response to loading.

  18. The General Surgery Chief Resident Operative Experience

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Frederick Thurston; Horvath, Karen D.; Goldin, Adam B.; Gow, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The chief resident (CR) year is a pivotal experience in surgical training. Changes in case volume and diversity may impact the educational quality of this important year. OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in operative experience for general surgery CRs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs from 1989–1990 through 2011–2012 divided into 5 periods. Graduates in period 3 were the last to train with unrestricted work hours; those in period 4 were part of a transition period and trained under both systems; and those in period 5 trained fully under the 80-hour work week. Diversity of cases was assessed based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education defined categories. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Total cases and defined categories were evaluated for changes over time. RESULTS The average total CR case numbers have fallen (271 in period 1 vs 242 in period 5, P < .001). Total CR cases dropped to their lowest following implementation of the 80-hour work week (236 cases), but rebounded in period 5. The percentage of residents’ 5-year operative experience performed as CRs has decreased (30% in period 1 vs 25.6% in period 5, P < .001). Regarding case mix: thoracic, trauma, and vascular cases declined steadily, while alimentary and intra-abdominal operations increased. Recent graduates averaged 80 alimentary and 78 intra-abdominal procedures during their CR years. Compared with period 1, in which these 2 categories represented 47.1% of CR experience, in period 5, they represented 65.2% (P < .001). Endocrine experience has been relatively unchanged. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Total CR cases declined especially acutely following implementation of the 80-hour work week but have since rebounded. Chief resident cases contribute less to overall experience, although this proportion stabilized before the 80-hour work week. Case mix has narrowed, with significant increases in alimentary and

  19. OPERATIONS ELECTRONIC LOGBOOK EXPERIENCE AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.; CAMPBELL,I.; MARR,G.; SAMPSON,P.

    2002-06-02

    A web-based system for electronic logbooks, ''elog'', developed at Fermilab (FNAL), has been adopted for use by AGS and RHIC operations and physicists at BNL for the 2001-2 fixed target and collider runs. This paper describes the main functional and technical issues encountered in the first year of electronic logbook use, including security, search and indexing, sequencer integration, archival, and graphics management. We also comment on organizational experience and planned changes for the next facility run starting in September 2002.

  20. Operating experience with the natural bridges national monument photovoltaic power system

    SciTech Connect

    Solman, F. J.; Grossman, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    The 100-kW photovoltaic power system at Natural Bridges National Monument in southwestern Utah has been in operation since May 1980. A comparison of system simulation with actual operation has been performed, good agreement has been found, and results are presented. In addition, conservation measures and their benefits are described. Operating experience with the system is presented, including measured component performance of the arrays, batteries, inverters, and system overhead loads.

  1. Top-up operation experience at APS.

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, L.

    1999-03-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-OeV, third-generation synchrotrons radiation source. To provide more stable beam for users, in September 1998 we began commissioning a new operating mode called ''top-up.'' In this mode, the beam current does not decay but is maintained at a high level using frequent injection, while photon shutters are open and photon beams are delivered to users. The hardware, software, and safety requirements for top-up will be reported. Safety issues related to injection with open photon shutters are covered in companion papers in this conference. Recent operational experience includes testing aspects of top-up injection and delivering beam to X-ray users for a few hours with fractional current stability of 10{sup {minus}3}. We expect to run several top-up operation shifts in Spring 1999. Issues of importance are orbit and emittance transients during the injection and scheduling of injection pulses for the convenience of users.

  2. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  3. The Cngs Facility:. Performance and Operational Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, Edda; Cornelis, Karel; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Ferrari, Alfredo; Pardons, Ans; Vincke, Heinz; Wenninger, Joerg; Sala, Paola; Guglielmi, Alberto

    2010-04-01

    The CNGS facility (CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso) aims at directly detecting muon to tau neutrino oscillations. An intense muon-neutrino beam (1E17 muon neutrinos/day) is generated at CERN and directed over 732 km towards the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, LNGS, in Italy, where two large and complex detectors, OPERA and ICARUS, are located. CNGS is the first long-baseline neutrino facility in which the measurement of the oscillation parameters is performed by observation of tau-neutrino appearance. In this paper, an overview of the CNGS facility is presented. The experience gained in operating this 500 kW neutrino beam facility is described. Major events since the commissioning of the facility in 2006 are summarized. Highlights on CNGS beam performance since the start of physics run in 2008 are given.

  4. Operating experience with a zinc oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayburn, Nathan; Brunkow, Evan; Gay, Timothy

    2016-05-01

    A zinc oven has been constructed and tested. Atomic zinc emitted from this resistively heated oven is subsequently excited by a polarized electron beam in crossed-beam geometry. Light emitted in the decay of the (4s5s)3 S1 state to the (4s4p)3 PJ final state, where J = 0, 1, 2, is then detected by a photomultiplier tube for polarization analysis. The zinc oven apparatus and operating experience with the oven are described in detail. Measures to assure that the oven produces a stable, localized beam which does not adhere to essential components of the apparatus are addressed. Estimates of the zinc density are made. The importance of magnetic field control in the apparatus will be discussed. Funded by NSF PHY-1505794.

  5. SMART-1 operations experience and lessons learnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino, Octavio; Alonso, Maria; Gestal, Daniel; de Bruin, Jurriaan; Rathsman, Peter; Kugelberg, Joakim; Bodin, Per; Ricken, Sascha; Blake, Rick; Voss, Pablo Pardo; Stagnaro, Luca

    2007-06-01

    SMART-1 is the first of a series of ESA Small Missions for Advance Research and Technology where elements of the platform and the payload technology have been conceived as a demonstration for future cornerstone missions and an early opportunity for science. SMART-1 has also been an opportunity to experiment with new ways of conducting ground operations taking advantage of both increased satellite autonomy and ground automation tools. The paper will focus on three areas: The accumulated performance of the technology demonstration components since launch as the electrical propulsion engine, the triple-junction solar cells, the lithium-ion batteries, the 32 bit CPU ERC32 Single Chip, the CAN bus, the DTU Star Trackers and the complex on-board autonomy. The changes implemented on-board and on the ground during the lunar phase to increase the data return. The pros and contras in some of the choices made for SMART-1, the developments and solutions implemented to mitigate the problems, the tools developed to automate the operations and the distribution of data.

  6. Improvements in and actual performance of the Plant Experiment Unit onboard Kibo, the Japanese experiment module on the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Sachiko; Kasahara, Haruo; Masuda, Daisuke; Tanigaki, Fumiaki; Shimazu, Toru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Karahara, Ichirou; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Tayama, Ichiro; Tsuchiya, Yoshikazu; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    2013-03-01

    In 2004, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the engineered model of the Plant Experiment Unit and the Cell Biology Experiment Facility. The Plant Experiment Unit was designed to be installed in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility and to support the seed-to-seed life cycle experiment of Arabidopsis plants in space in the project named Space Seed. Ground-based experiments to test the Plant Experiment Unit showed that the unit needed further improvement of a system to control the water content of a seedbed using an infrared moisture analyzer and that it was difficult to keep the relative humidity inside the Plant Experiment Unit between 70 and 80% because the Cell Biology Experiment Facility had neither a ventilation system nor a dehumidifying system. Therefore, excess moisture inside the Cell Biology Experiment Facility was removed with desiccant bags containing calcium chloride. Eight flight models of the Plant Experiment Unit in which dry Arabidopsis seeds were fixed to the seedbed with gum arabic were launched to the International Space Station in the space shuttle STS-128 (17A) on August 28, 2009. Plant Experiment Unit were installed in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility with desiccant boxes, and then the Space Seed experiment was started in the Japanese Experiment Module, named Kibo, which was part of the International Space Station, on September 10, 2009 by watering the seedbed and terminated 2 months later on November 11, 2009. On April 19, 2010, the Arabidopsis plants harvested in Kibo were retrieved and brought back to Earth by the space shuttle mission STS-131 (19A). The present paper describes the Space Seed experiment with particular reference to the development of the Plant Experiment Unit and its actual performance in Kibo onboard the International Space Station. Downlinked images from Kibo showed that the seeds had started germinating 3 days after the initial watering. The plants continued growing, producing rosette leaves, inflorescence

  7. Medical supply on contingency military operations: experience from Operation GRITROCK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J P; Reeves, P

    2015-01-01

    Medical supply during military operations has the ability to affect the efficacy of the operation being undertaken, either negatively or positively. An appropriately-managed maritime platform with a robust medical supply chain during transit and on arrival in theatre is the main aim. A secure supply chain will reduce any implications that logistics may have with regard to capability, and negate the effects of deficiencies of short shelf life items occurring over time and during use in high tempo operations. PMID:26867409

  8. Operating experiences of retardant bombers during firefighting operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewel, J. W., Jr.; Morris, G. J.; Avery, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Data are presented on operational practices and maneuver accelerations experienced by two Douglas DC-6B airplanes converted to retardant bombers and used in firefighting operations. The data cover two fire seasons in the mountainous regions of the northwestern United States.

  9. Experience and Operational Improvements, Mixer Pump Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Erian, Fadel F.; Mullen, O Dennis; Kellogg, Michael I.

    2002-03-20

    Millions of gallons of radioactive waste are stored in large underground tanks at DOE sites. The waste is made up of settled solids, in sludge form, at the bottom of the tank and a layer of supernatant liquid on top of it. It is necessary to mix the solids in the sludge layer with the supernatant liquid to facilitate their removal from the storage tanks for remediation. Our goal is to improve the mobilization of the settled solids by optimizing mixing with the supernatant liquid and preserving the mobility of the solids. This report investigates whether time-phase separation between pump head oscillations affects overall sludge mobilization. If a mixing jet from one pump happens to follow temporarily the path of the lead mixing jet, it may be possible to prevent or slow down the resettling of the heavy solid particles, maintaining them in suspension. If a retrieval pump were operating at the same time, it could facilitate removal of such particles. Preliminary experiments were carried out to observe whether time-phase separation has some influence on the overall mobilization. A brief account is presented of the successful mobilization and removal of most of the radioactive waste from Tank D8-2 at the West Valley Demonstration Project using time-phase separation techniques.

  10. USA/FBR program status FFTF operations startup experience

    SciTech Connect

    Moffitt, W.C.; Izatt, R.D.

    1981-06-01

    This paper gives highlights of the major Operations evaluations and operational results of the startup acceptance testing program and initiation of normal operating cycles for experiment irradiation in the FFTF. 33 figures. (DLC)

  11. Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Little, D.B.; Gee, J.T.; Barnes, W.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first and the world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. This paper presents the results of the first 9 months of radioactive operations. Topics include: operations of the remote processing equipment reliability, and decontamination facilities for the remote processing equipment. Key equipment discussed includes process pumps, telerobotic manipulators, infrared camera, Holledge{trademark} level gauges and in-cell (remote) cranes. Information is presented regarding equipment at the conclusion of the DWPF test program it also discussed, with special emphasis on agitator blades and cooling/heating coil wear. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Recent operational experiments at the LANSCE facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J

    2010-09-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) consists of a pulsed 800-MeV room-temperature linear accelerator and an 800-MeV accumulator ring. It simultaneously provides H{sup +} and H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have their own distinctive requirements, e.g. intensity, chopping pattern, duty factor, etc.. This multibeam operation presents challenges both from the standpoint of meeting the individual requirements but also achieving good overall performance for the integrated operation. Various aspects of more recent operations including the some of these challenges will be discussed.

  13. Actual Condition Evaluation of Cogeneration System in an Urbanized Hotel, and Study of the Optimal Operation to Minimize the CO2 Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuta, Masafumi; Kaneko, Akira; Yamamoto, Toru

    Recently, there is an important subject to reduce of the CO2 emission discharged from a building. A cogeneration system (CGS) is one of the effective facilities to reduce of the CO2 emission, but prudent consideration is required in design and operation. Because it is necessary to be matching electric demand and heat demand in order to obtain the high efficiency. In this paper, it is evaluated the power generation efficiency and heat recovery one of CGS in the actual urbanized hotel as measurement result. In addition, the optimal operation analysis is carried out in order to minimize CO2 emission in the present facility.

  14. Mod-2 wind turbine field operations experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The three-machine, 7.5 MW Goodnoe Hills located near Goldendale, Washington and is now in a research/experimental operations phase that offers a unique opportunity to study the effects of single and multiple wind turbines interacting with each other, the power grid; and the environment. Following a brief description of the turbine and project history, this paper addresses major problem areas and research and development test results. Field operations, both routine and nonroutine, are discussed. Routine operation to date has produced over 13,379,000 KWh of electrical energy during 11,064 hr of rotation. Nonroutine operation includes suspended activities caused by a crack in the low speed shaft that necessitated a redesign and reinstallation of this assembly on all three turbines. With the world's largest cluster back in full operation, two of the turbines will be operated over the next years to determine their value as energy producer. The third unit will be used primarily for conducting research tests requiring configuration changes to better understand the wind turbine technology. Technical areas summarized pertain to system performance and enhancements. Specific research tests relating to acoustics, TV interference, and wake effects conclude the paper.

  15. Orbiter Kapton wire operational requirements and experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    The agenda of this presentation includes the Orbiter wire selection requirements, the Orbiter wire usage, fabrication and test requirements, typical wiring installations, Kapton wire experience, NASA Kapton wire testing, summary, and backup data.

  16. Operating experience with California's first coal fired enhanced oil recovery steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, G.B.

    1983-11-01

    This article discusses the experiences of operating Pyropower Corporation's ''Pyroflow'' circulating fluidized bed steam generation plant in Bakersfield, California. The Pyroflow plant is shown to be demonstrating its ability to provide a reliable source of steam for enhanced oil recovery. Actual operating problems have been minimal, and those which have occurred have involved plant auxilliary equipment rather than the steam generator itself. Fluidized bed combustion is the only practical means of burning coal in environmentally sensitive areas such as California without the use of flue gas scrubbing for sulfur dioxide control. This plant operates on the circulating bed concept as distinct from conventional fluidized beds which have a fixed bed depth.

  17. Operational experience with light ions at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Barton, D.S.; Beavis, D.; Benjamin, J.; Foelsche, H.; Gardner, C.; Gill, E.; Raka, E.; Sidhu, S.

    1987-03-01

    A new transfer line has joined the Tandem Van de Graaff facility and the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory, permitting the acceleration of light ions (up to sulfur) to 14.5 GeV/nucleon. The Tandem, operating with a pulsed ion source, supplies a fully stripped ion beam at about 7 MeV/nucleon to the AGS. A new low frequency rf system accelerates the beam in the AGS to about 200 MeV/nucleon. The previously existing rf system completes the cycle. High energy ion beams are delivered using standard resonant extraction to four experimental beam lines. Details of techniques and preliminary performance and operational characteristics are discussed.

  18. FFTF operating experience, 1982-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Waldo, J B; Franz, G R; Loika, E F; Krupar, J J

    1984-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 Mwt sodium-cooled fast reactor operating at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Richland, Washington, to conduct fuels and materials testing in support of the US Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. Startup and initial power testing included a comprehensive series of nonnuclear and nuclear tests to verify the thermal, hydraulic, and neutronic characteristics of the plant. A specially designed series of natural circulation tests were then performed to demonstrate the inherent safety features of the plant. Early in 1982, the FFTF began its first 100-day irradiation cycle. Since that time the plant has operated very well, achieving a cycle capacity factor of 94% in the most recent irradiation cycle. Seventy-five specific test assemblies and 25,000 individual fuel pins have been irradiated, some in excess of 80 MWd/Kg.

  19. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Laintz, Kenneth E.

    2012-06-19

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  20. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope's operational mission experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert K.; Scott, Charles P.

    2006-06-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope, the fourth and final of NASA's Great Observatories, and the cornerstone to NASA's Origins Program, launched on 25 August 2003 into an Earth-trailing solar orbit to acquire infrared observations from space. Spitzer has an 85cm diameter beryllium telescope, which operates near absolute zero utilizing a liquid helium cryostat for cooling the telescope. The helium cryostat though designed for a 2.5 year lifetime, through creative usage now has an expected lifetime of 5.5 years. Spitzer has completed its in-orbit checkout/science verification phases and the first two years of nominal operations becoming the first mission to execute astronomical observations from a solar orbit. Spitzer was designed to probe and explore the universe in the infrared utilizing three state of the art detector arrays providing imaging, photometry, and spectroscopy over the 3-160 micron wavelength range. Spitzer is achieving major advances in the study of astrophysical phenomena across the expanses of our universe. Many technology areas critical to future infrared missions have been successfully demonstrated by Spitzer. These demonstrated technologies include lightweight cryogenic optics, sensitive detector arrays, and a high performance thermal system, combining radiation both passive and active cryogenic cooling of the telescope in space following its warm launch. This paper provides an overview of the Spitzer mission, telescope, cryostat, instruments, spacecraft, its orbit, operations and project management approach and related lessons learned.

  1. Flight experiments to improve terminal area operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmirs, S.; Morello, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    A brief description is given of the objectives and activities of the terminal configured vehicle (TCV) program and of some of the airborne facilities. A short analysis of some particular problems in CTOL operations in the terminal area is also presented to show how the program's technical objectives are related to the defined problems. The test aircraft was flown both manually and automatically with manual monitoring over paths including 130 deg intercepts and 2.0 km and 0.8 km finals. Some statistical data are presented from these and other flight profiles designed to address specific terminal area problems. An overview is presented of research studies receiving emphasis in the next biennium and their application to the terminal area. A description of work undertaken to study the addition of adjacent traffic information to present map displays is also given.

  2. Flight experiments to improve terminal area operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmirs, S.; Morello, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    A brief description is given of the objectives and activities of the terminal configured vehicle (TCV) program and of some of the airborne facilities. A short analysis of some particular problems of CTOL operations in the terminal area is also presented to show how the program's technical objectives are related to the defined problems. The test aircraft was flown both manually and automatically with manual monitoring over paths including 130 deg intercepts and 2.0 km (1.1. n. mi.) and 0.8 km (0.44 n. mi.) finals. Some statistical data are presented from these and other flight profiles designed to address specific terminal in the next biennium and their application to the terminal area. A description of work being undertaken to study the addition of adjacent traffic information to present map displays is also given.

  3. Operating experience, economics and wind plant optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, E.V.

    1995-09-01

    The Vestas group has installed more than 4,500 wind turbines (640 MW) world-wide. Experience from this development contradicts several myths about the costs of producing wind energy. The paper will document that it Vestas wind projects: (1) wind turbine availability does not decrease with age; (2) service and maintenance costs do not increase with age; (3) that initial investment costs have decreased dramatically over the last ten years. The relative importance of different project costs are discussed, and sensitivity analysis is performed to illustrate that O and M costs, wind turbine availability, and financing parameters significantly influence the cost of energy production. New Vestas turbine models are introduced, including V42-600 kW and V60-1500 kW turbines.

  4. Operating Experience Review of the INL HTE Gas Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; K. G. DeWall

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored at hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. Some simple statistics are given for the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  5. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

  6. Recycling galvanized steel: Operating experience and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Morgan, W.A.

    1993-08-01

    In response to the increase in consumption of galvanized steel for automobiles in the last decade and the problems associated with remelting larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is recovered electrolytically as dendritic powder. The dezinced ferrous scrap is rinsed and used directly. The process is effective for zinc, lead, and aluminum removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 900 tonnes of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap, with a design capacity of 48,000 tonnes annually, has been in operation in East Chicago, Indiana since early in 1993. The first 450 t of scrap degalvanized in the pilot plant have residual zinc below 0.01% and sodium dragout below 0.01%. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials, environmental compliance, and opportunity costs to steel- and iron-makers. Availability of clean degalvanized scrap may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant and EAF shops to produce flat products without use of high quality scrap alternatives such as DRI, pig iron, or iron carbide. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap. The quantities of zinc available by the year 2000 from prompt and obsolete automotive scrap win approach 25% of zinc consumed in the major automotive production centers of the world. Zinc recycling from galvanized steel scrap, either before or after scrap melting, will have to be implemented.

  7. TSTA Piping and Flame Arrestor Operating Experience Data

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; Willms, R. Scott

    2014-10-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) was a facility dedicated to tritium handling technology and experiment research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility operated from 1984 to 2001, running a prototype fusion fuel processing loop with ~100 grams of tritium as well as small experiments. There have been several operating experience reports written on this facility’s operation and maintenance experience. This paper describes analysis of two additional components from TSTA, small diameter gas piping that handled small amounts of tritium in a nitrogen carrier gas, and the flame arrestor used in this piping system. The operating experiences and the component failure rates for these components are discussed in this paper. Comparison data from other applications are also presented.

  8. Fire protection system operating experience review for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a review of fire protection system operating experiences from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of fire protection system component failure rates and fire accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with these systems are discussed, including spurious operation. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the Engineering Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

  9. Femtosecond Operation of the LCLS for User Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, Josef; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Brachmann, Axel; Coffee, Ryan; Decker, Franz-Josef; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Gilevich, Sasha; Haller, Gunther; Hays, Gregory; Hering, Philippe; Hill, Bruce; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard Kanter, Elliot; Kraessig, Bertold; Loos, Henrik; Miahnahri, Alan; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-09-02

    In addition to its normal operation at 250pC, the LCLS has operated with 20pC bunches delivering X-ray beams to users with energies between 800eV and 2 keV and with bunch lengths below 10 fs FWHM. A bunch arrival time monitor and timing transmission system provide users with sub 50 fs synchronization between a laser and the X-rays for pump/probe experiments. We describe the performance and operational experience of the LCLS for short bunch experiments.

  10. Terminal-area STOL operating systems experiments program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. W.; Watson, D.; Christensen, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    Information which will aid in the choice by the U.S. Government and industry of system concepts, design criteria, operating procedures for STOL aircraft and STOL ports, STOL landing guidance systems, air traffic control systems, and airborne avionics and flight control systems. Ames has developed a terminal-area STOL operating systems experiments program which is a part of the joint DOT/NASA effort is discussed. The Ames operating systems experiments program, its objectives, the program approach, the program schedule, typical experiments, the research facilities to be used, and the program status are described.

  11. Operating Experience Review of Tritium-in-Water Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    S. A. Bruyere; L. C. Cadwallader

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring tritium facility and fusion experiment effluent streams is an environmental safety requirement. This paper presents data on the operating experience of a solid scintillant monitor for tritium in effluent water. Operating experiences were used to calculate an average monitor failure rate of 4E-05/hour for failure to function. Maintenance experiences were examined to find the active repair time for this type of monitor, which varied from 22 minutes for filter replacement to 11 days of downtime while waiting for spare parts to arrive on site. These data support planning for monitor use; the number of monitors needed, allocating technician time for maintenance, inventories of spare parts, and other issues.

  12. The Self Actualized Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Michael; Moylan, Mary Elizabeth

    A study examined the commonalities that "voracious" readers share, and how their experiences can guide parents, teachers, and librarians in assisting children to become self-actualized readers. Subjects, 25 adults ranging in age from 20 to 67 years, completed a questionnaire concerning their reading histories and habits. Respondents varied in…

  13. The Gerbil Jar: A Basic Home Experience in Operant Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plant, L.

    1980-01-01

    Explains how a teaching method such as allowing students to raise gerbils at home can encourage students to gain experience with the fundamental techniques of operant conditioning which are otherwise generally unavailable to students in large introductory psychology courses. (DB)

  14. Terminal-area STOL operating systems experiments program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. W.; Watson, D.; Christensen, J. V.

    1972-01-01

    A system study to determine the application of short takeoff aircraft for a high speed, short haul air transportation service was conducted. The study focused on developing information which will aid in choosing system concepts, design criteria, operating procedures, landing guidance systems, air traffic control systems, and airborne avionics and flight control systems. A terminal area STOL operating system experiments program was developed. The objectives, program approach, program schedule, typical experiments, research facilities to be used, and program status are discussed.

  15. ‘I am actually doing something to keep well. That feels really good’: Experiences of exercise within hospice care

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Karen; Tookman, Adrian; Bristowe, Katherine; Maddocks, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with advanced cancer frequently experience functional impairment and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic exercise can provide benefit and be made accessible through the use of tailored programmes. Most studies examining exercise programmes for people with advanced cancer have used quantitative outcome measures and focussed on objective physical function, therefore offer a limited perspective on the experience of exercise participation. Methods: This qualitative study explored patients' experiences of an exercise programme within a palliative care setting. The interviews focussed on the perceived impact on all aspects of quality of life. Results: Nine people with advanced cancer, attending a hospice-based exercise programme, completed a one-to-one interview with a senior physiotherapist to explore the physical, emotional, and social impacts of their participation. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Patients reported an awareness of the positive physical, psychological, and social consequences of exercising. Their experiences reflected on all dimensions of quality of life, the impact of others and the sense of meaning gained through participation in exercise. Conclusion: Our findings highlight that exercise in palliative care should not be viewed solely a physical intervention, but one that has potential to enhance many aspects of patients' quality of life. PMID:27453639

  16. Perception Shapes Experience: The Influence of Actual and Perceived Classroom Environment Dimensions on Girls' Motivations for Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spearman, Juliette; Watt, Helen M. G.

    2013-01-01

    The classroom environment influences students' academic outcomes, but it is often students' perceptions that shape their classroom experiences. Our study examined the extent to which observed classroom environment features shaped perceptions of the classroom, and explained levels of, and changes in, girls' motivation in junior secondary school…

  17. Unit Operation Experiment Linking Classroom with Industrial Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Tracy J.; Richmond, Peyton C.; LeBlanc, Weldon

    2013-01-01

    An industrial-type distillation column, including appropriate pumps, heat exchangers, and automation, was used as a unit operations experiment to provide a link between classroom teaching and real-world applications. Students were presented with an open-ended experiment where they defined the testing parameters to solve a generalized problem. The…

  18. Shifting from Production to Service to Experience-Based Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelis, Jannis; de Lima, Edson Pinheiro

    This chapter covers the shift in focus of value added business operations from ­production to services, and in turn, to experience-based operations where customer involvement itself becomes part of the offering. The shift has significant implications for how businesses are managed. The greater service focus affects the firm's unique value proposition, which necessitates considerations on strategy, supplier relations, post-sale offerings and so on. Meanwhile, the inclusion of customer ­experiences affect the way operations are designed and employed so that these are structurally systematically captured and capitalised.

  19. Cryogenic system operating experience review for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a review of cryogenic system operating experiences, from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space research, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of cryogenic component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with cryogenic systems are discussed, including ozone formation, effects of spills, and modeling spill behavior. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design.

  20. Operating Experience of the Tritium Laboratory at CRL

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, C.L.; McCrimmon, K.D.

    2005-07-15

    The Chalk River Laboratories Tritium Laboratory has been operating safely and reliably for over 20 years. Safe operations are achieved through proper management, supervision, training and using approved operating procedures and techniques. Reliability is achieved through appropriate equipment selection, routine equipment surveillance testing and routine preventative maintenance. This paper summarizes the laboratory's standard operating protocols and formal compliance programs followed to ensure safe operations. The paper will also review the general set-up of the laboratory and will focus on the experience gained with the operation of various types of equipment such as tritium monitors, tritium analyzers, pumps, purification systems and other systems used in the laboratory during its 20 years of operation.

  1. EBR-II: twenty years of operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, G.L.; Buschman, H.W.; Smith, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. For the last 20 years EBR-II has operated safely, has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, has shown excellent performance of its sodium components, and has had an excellent plant factor. These years of operating experience provide a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future liquid metal fast reactors. This report provides a brief description of the EBR-II plant and its early operating experience, describes some recent problems of interest to the nuclear community, and also mentions some of the significant operating achievements of EBR-II. Finally, a few words and speculations on EBR-II's future are offered. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Recent operating experiences and programs at EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II) is a pool-type, unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt and an electrical generation capability of 20 MW. It has been operated by Argonne National Laboratory for the US government for almost 20 years. During that time, it has operated safely and has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, high availability, and excellent performance of its sodium components. The 20 years of operating experience of EBR-II is a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future LMFBR's. Since past operating experience has been extensively reported, this report will focus on recent programs and events.

  3. Function transfer in human operant experiments: the role of stimulus pairings.

    PubMed Central

    Tonneau, François; González, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    Although function transfer often has been studied in complex operant procedures (such as matching to sample), whether operant reinforcement actually produces function transfer in such settings has not been established. The present experiments, with high school students as subjects, suggest that stimulus pairings can promote function transfer in conditions that closely approximate those of matching to sample. In Experiment 1, the subjects showed transfer of operant responding from three geometric figures (C1, C2, C3) to three colored shapes (B1, B2, B3) when the latter were paired with the former. Experiment 2 involved two groups of subjects. In the matching group, subjects matched the colored shapes with the geometric figures; in the yoked group, the shapes were merely paired with the geometric figures, and the schedule of stimulus pairing was yoked to the performance of the subjects in the matching group. Both groups of subjects showed function transfer. Experiment 3 documented function transfer from C stimuli to B stimuli through indirect stimulus pairings (A-B, A-C). In Experiment 4, function transfer was obtained even though the subjects vocalized continuously during the pairing trials, presumably preventing covert verbalization that might mediate transfer effects. Our results are consistent with a Pavlovian account and raise difficulties for current operant theories of function transfer. PMID:15357508

  4. CTS (Hermes): United States experiments and operations summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, P. L.; Hunczak, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The Communications Technology Satellite, launched in January 1976 and embodying the highest power transmitter in a communications satellite, was considered. As a joint program between the U.S. and Canada, close coordination of the two countries was necessitated since the management and control of experiments were done in real time. Criteria used by NASA for acceptance of the United States experiments are noted and acceptance procedures are discussed. The category for each accepted experiment is given. The modus operandi employed for the U.S. experiments in the areas of management, coordination, liaison, and real time operation are described. Some of the highlights associated with satellite utilization are given.

  5. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  6. Ventilation Systems Operating Experience Review for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles

    1999-12-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for air ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. These experiences are applicable for magnetic and inertial fusion facilities since air ventilation systems are support systems that can be considered generic to nuclear facilities. The report contains descriptions of ventilation system components, operating experiences with these systems, component failure rates, and component repair times. Since ventilation systems have a role in mitigating accident releases in nuclear facilities, these data are useful in safety analysis and risk assessment of public safety. An effort has also been given to identifying any safety issues with personnel operating or maintaining ventilation systems. Finally, the recommended failure data were compared to an independent data set to determine the accuracy of individual values. This comparison is useful for the International Energy Agency task on fusion component failure rate data collection.

  7. Parabolic dish test site: History and operating experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    The parabolic dish test site (PDTS) was established for testing point-focusing solar concentrator systems operating at temperatures approaching 1650 C. Among tests run were evaluation and performance characterization of parabolic dish concentrators, receivers, power conversion units, and solar/fossil-fuel hybrid systems. The PDTS was fully operational until its closure in June, 1984. The evolution of the test program, a chronological listing of the experiments run, and data summaries for most of the tests conducted are presented.

  8. Flight Validation of On-Demand Operations: The Deep Space One Beacon Monitor Operations Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Jay; Sherwood, Rob; Sue, Miles; Szijjarto, John

    2000-01-01

    After a brief overview of the operational concept, this paper will provide a detailed description of the _as-flown_ flight software components, the DS1 experiment plan, and experiment results to date. Special emphasis will be given to experiment results and lessons learned since the basic system design has been previously reported. Mission scenarios where beacon operations is highly applicable will be described. Detailed cost savings estimates for a sample science mission will be provided as will cumulative savings that are possible over the next fifteen years of NASA missions.

  9. Operation MEDIHC (Military Experience Directed into Health Careers). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Hospital Association, Denver.

    This Region VIII Operation MEDIHC (Military Experience Directed into Health Careers) comprehensive report covers the program's efforts to provide a state focal point of advice and assistance to all health-trained veterans seeking entrance into the civilian health services field during the period of June 1, 1970, through December 31, 1978. The…

  10. Target Operational Experience at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Janney, Jim G; Kaminskas, Saulius; McClintock, David A; Rosenblad, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated at unprecedented power levels for a short-pulse spallation source. Target operations have been successful but not without difficulties. Three targets out of the eight used to date have ended life unexpectedly causing interruptions to the neutron science users. The first of a kind mercury target design experiences beam-pulse induced cavitation damage that is suspected in one of the target leaks. The two other targets suffered early failures due to defective welds. Diagnosing the causes of target leaks and understanding of the progression of cavitation erosion and radiation damage effects has made use of post-irradiation examination (PIE) capabilities. As a result of PIE, review of quality assurance practices and related investigations, design changes are being implemented and manufacturing oversight improved. This paper describes SNS target operating experience, including the more important observations and lessons learned.

  11. Vacuum system operating experience review for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    This report presents a review of vacuum system operating experiences from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space simulation chamber, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of vacuum system component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with vacuum systems are discussed, including personnel safety, foreign material intrusion, and factors relevant to vacuum systems being the primary confinement boundary for tritium and activated dusts. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the Engineering Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

  12. Recent operating experiences with steam generators in Japanese NPPs

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, Seiji

    1997-02-01

    In 1994, the Genkai-3 of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. and the Ikata-3 of Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc. started commercial operation, and now 22 PWR plants are being operated in Japan. Since the first PWR plant now 22 PWR plants are being operated in was started to operate, Japanese PWR plants have had an operating experience of approx. 280 reactor-years. During that period, many tube degradations have been experienced in steam generators (SGs). And, in 1991, the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) occurred in the Mihama-2 of Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. However, the occurrence of tube degradation of SGs has been decreased by the instructions of the MITI as regulatory authorities, efforts of Electric Utilities, and technical support from the SG manufacturers. Here the author describes the recent SGs in Japan about the following points. (1) Recent Operating Experiences (2) Lessons learned from Mihama-2 SGTR (3) SG replacement (4) Safety Regulations on SG (5) Research and development on SG.

  13. Does Work Experience Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2012-01-01

    As unemployment levels rise, so education and training move into the policy spotlight. For the government, this is a very uncomfortable place to be right now. A number of large companies have withdrawn from the flagship Work Programme--under which jobseekers are invited to take up unpaid work placements of between two and eight weeks--amid…

  14. Telescience operations with the solar array module plasma interaction experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Lawrence W.; Bibyk, Irene K.

    1995-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. The overall objective of SAMPIE was to determine the adverse environmental interactions within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO) on modern solar cells and space power system materials which are artificially biased to high positive and negative direct current (DC) voltages. The two environmental interactions of interest included high voltage arcing from the samples to the space plasma and parasitic current losses. High voltage arcing can cause physical damage to power system materials and shorten expected hardware life. parasitic current losses can reduce power system efficiency because electric currents generated in a power system drain into the surrounding plasma via parasitic resistance. The flight electronics included two programmable high voltage DC power supplies to bias the experiment samples, instruments to measure the surrounding plasma environment in the STS cargo bay, and the on-board data acquisition system (DAS). The DAS provided in-flight experiment control, data storage, and communications through the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hitchhiker flight avionics to the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The DAS and the SAMPIE POCC computer systems were designed for telescience operations; this paper will focus on the experiences of the SAMPIE team regarding telescience development and operations from the GSFC POCC during STS-62. The SAMPIE conceptual development, hardware design, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). SAMPIE was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology. The IN-STEP Program is sponsored by the Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT).

  15. Telescience operations with the solar array module plasma interaction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, L.W.; Bibyk, I.K.

    1995-09-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. The overall objective of SAMPIE was to determine the adverse environmental interactions within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO) on modern solar cells and space power system materials which are artificially biased to high positive and negative direct current (DC) voltages. The two environmental interactions of interest included high voltage arcing from the samples to the space plasma and parasitic current losses. High voltage arcing can cause physical damage to power system materials and shorten expected hardware life. Parasitic current losses can reduce power system efficiency because electric currents generated in a power system drain into the surrounding plasma via parasitic resistance. The flight electronics included two programmable high voltage DC power supplies to bias the experiment samples, instruments to measure the surrounding plasma environment in the STS cargo bay, and the on-board data acquisition system (DAS). The DAS provided in-flight experiment control, data storage, and communications through the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hitchhiker flight avionics to the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The DAS and the SAMPIE POCC computer systems were designed for telescience operations; this paper will focus on the experiences of the SAMPIE team regarding telescience development and operations from the GSFC POCC during STS-62. The SAMPIE conceptual development, hardware design, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). SAMPIE was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology.

  16. Initial Physics Operation of the National Spherical Torus Experiment- Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Dennis; NSTX-U Team

    2015-11-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) is an experiment designed to study the physics of Spherical Torus (ST) at about twice the toroidal field and neutral beam injection (NBI) power as NSTX for 5 s. at full parameters. In its initial operational period NSTX-U will limit operation to BT <= .75 T but the full complement of 6 neutral beam (NB) sources will be available. Three NB sources added during the upgrade inject more tangentially and will be essential to investigate the physics of neutral beam current drive. In NSTX-U, use of a digital real-time plasma control system and the application of wall conditioning techniques will be used to achieve routine operation with good confinement. The wall conditioning techniques include bakeout to over 300°C, helium glow discharge cleaning, boronization of the plasma facing surfaces using deuterated trimethylboron gas in a helium glow discharge and lithium evaporation onto the walls. Auxiliary heating by up to 6 MW of High Harmonic Fast Waves will be available. The operational experience during the plasma commissioning phase will be discussed. Work Supported by U.S.D.O.E. Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Actual evapotranspiration (water use) assessment of the Colorado River Basin at the Landsat resolution using the operational simplified surface energy balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Bohms, Stefanie; Russell L, Scott; Verdin, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Accurately estimating consumptive water use in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) is important for assessing and managing limited water resources in the basin. Increasing water demand from various sectors may threaten long-term sustainability of the water supply in the arid southwestern United States. We have developed a first-ever basin-wide actual evapotranspiration (ETa) map of the CRB at the Landsat scale for water use assessment at the field level. We used the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model for estimating ETa using 328 cloud-free Landsat images acquired during 2010. Our results show that cropland had the highest ETa among all land cover classes except for water. Validation using eddy covariance measured ETa showed that the SSEBop model nicely captured the variability in annual ETa with an overall R2 of 0.78 and a mean bias error of about 10%. Comparison with water balance-based ETa showed good agreement (R2 = 0.85) at the sub-basin level. Though there was good correlation (R2 = 0.79) between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based ETa (1 km spatial resolution) and Landsat-based ETa (30 m spatial resolution), the spatial distribution of MODIS-based ETa was not suitable for water use assessment at the field level. In contrast, Landsat-based ETa has good potential to be used at the field level for water management. With further validation using multiple years and sites, our methodology can be applied for regular production of ETa maps of larger areas such as the conterminous United States.

  18. Raccoon Mountain pumped-storage plant: Ten years operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, F.E.

    1987-09-01

    Operational experience at the 1 530 MW Raccoon Mountain underground pumped-storage plant can be relevant to other large hydro facilities. A number of unusual features were incorporated and individual unit size was only recently overtaken elsewhere. Direct water cooling of rotor and stator winding has been successfully applied to salient pole machines. A number of problems, including difficulties with oil-filled 161 kV current transformers, and some mechanical aspects, are reported. Designed for remote supervisory control, the plant has required closer attention. Operating statistics are included.

  19. Operations summary for the convection and moisture experiment (CAMEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, V. L.; Guillory, A. R.; Susko, M.; Arnold, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    During the fall of 1993, NASA sponsored a field program called the Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX) at Wallops Island, Virginia. CAMEX was a multidisciplinary experiment design to measure the three dimensional moisture fields over Wallops Island and to characterize the multifrequency radiometric signature of tropical convection over the Gulf Stream and southeastern Atlantic Ocean. This document summarizes the daily CAMEX activities, including ground and aircraft (NASA ER-2) operations, and includes 'quick-look' summaries of data acquisition along with data examples provided by the various CAMEX PI's.

  20. [Results of operator's work during space flight (experiment "pilot") under different work-and-rest cycles].

    PubMed

    Sal'nitskiĭ, V P; Dudukin, A V; Savchenko, É G; Stepanova, S I; Nesterov, V F; Saraev, I F

    2012-01-01

    The correlation between operator's job quality and crew work-rest cycle (WRC) aboard the International space station was studied. The experiment involved 10 Russian members of ISS missions 17-24 at the age of 35 to 51 yrs. Mission duration varied from 163 to 200 days, averaging 180 days. Each cosmonaut carried out several "pilot" test sessions. The number of sessions per mission ranged from 4 to 6. The procedure consisted of simulating manual operation of transport vehicle Soyuz on the stages of hang-up, berthing and docking with the ISS. Objective job quality parameters were accuracy of the Soyuz and ISS relative motion control and time for completion which actually characterized work rate. WRC intensity was judged by the data of monitoring at the Moscow Mission Control Center. The results lend support to the dependence of operator's efficiency on WRC. In operators aimed at the highest accuracy this dependence manifested itself in work rate parameters; work accuracy but not rate was more WRC-dependent in operators aimed at doing their job fast. In other words, WRC intensity impacted mostly those job qualities that operator considered to be of secondary importance. PMID:23402140

  1. The National Flood Interoperability Experiment: Bridging Resesarch and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, F. R.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service's new National Water Center, located on the University of Alabama campus in Tuscaloosa, will become the nation's hub for comprehensive water resources forecasting. In conjunction with its federal partners the US Geological Survey, Army Corps of Engineers and Federal Emergency Management Agency, the National Weather Service will operationally support both short term flood prediction and long term seasonal forecasting of water resource conditions. By summer 2016, the National Water Center will begin evaluating four streamflow data products at the scale of the NHDPlus river reaches (approximately 2.67 million). In preparation for the release of these products, from September 2014 to August 2015, the National Weather Service partnered with the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. to support the National Flood Interoperability Experiment which included a seven week in-residence Summer Institute in Tuscaloosa for university students interested in learning about operational hydrology and flood forecasting. As part of the experiment, 15 hour forecasts from the operational High Resolution Rapid Refresh atmospheric model were used to drive a three kilometer Noah-MP land surface model loosely coupled to a RAPID river routing model operating on the NHDPlus dataset. This workflow was run every three hours during the Summer Institute and the results were made available to those engaged to pursue a range of research topics focused on flood forecasting (e.g. reservoir operations, ensemble forecasting, probabilistic flood inundation mapping, rainfall product evaluation etc.) Although the National Flood Interoperability Experiment was finite in length, it provided a platform through which the academic community could engage federal agencies and vice versa to narrow the gap between research and operations and demonstrate how state of the art research infrastructure, models, services, datasets etc. could be utilized

  2. Experiences with operations and autonomy of the Mars Pathfinder Microrover.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishkin, A. H.; Morrison, J. C.; Nguyen, T. T.; Stone, H. W.; Cooper, B. K.; Wilcox, B. H.

    The Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) is a NASA OACT (Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology) flight experiment which, integrated with the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) lander and spacecraft system, landed on Mars on July 4, 1997. In the succeeding 30 sols (1 sol = 1 Martian day), the Sojourner microrover accomplished all of its primary and extended mission objectives. After completion of the originally planned extended mission, MFEX continued to conduct a series of technology experiments, deploy its alpha proton X-ray spectrometer (APXS) on rocks and soil, and image both terrain features and the lander. This mission was conducted under the constraints of a once-per-sol opportunity for command and telemetry transmissions between the lander and Earth operators. As such, the MFEX rover was required to carry out its mission, including terrain navigation and contingency response, under supervised autonomous control. For example, goal locations were specified daily by human operators; the rover then safely traversed to these locations. During traverses, the rover autonomously detected and avoided rock, slope, and drop-off hazards, changing its path as needed before turning back towards its goal. This capability to operate in an unmodeled environment, choosing actions in response to sensor input to accomplish requested objectives, is unique among robotic space missions to date.

  3. Operator experiences on working in screen-based control rooms

    SciTech Connect

    Salo, L.; Laarni, J.; Savioja, P.

    2006-07-01

    This paper introduces the results of two interview studies carried out in Finland in four conventional power plants and one nuclear power plant. The aim of the studies was to gather data on user experiences on the effects of control room modernization and digital control room technology on operator work Since the number of completed digitalization projects in nuclear power plants is small supplementary information was gathered by interviewing operators in conventional power plants. Our results suggest that even though the modernization processes have been success stories, they have created new challenges for operator personnel. Examples of these challenges are increased requirements for competence and collaboration, problems in trust calibration and development of awareness of the process state. Some major differences in the digitalization of human-system interfaces between conventional and nuclear power plants were discussed. (authors)

  4. Operational experience with CW high gradient and high QL cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Hovater, J. Curt; Allison, Trent L.; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Daly, Edward F.; Drury, Michael A.; Lahti, George E.; Mounts, Clyde I.; Nelson, Richard M.; Plawski, Tomasz E.

    2014-12-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of ten new 100 MV cryomodules (80 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a QL of 3×107. The RF system employs single cavity control using new digital LLRF controls and 13 kW klystrons. Recently, all of the new cryomodules and associated RF hardware and software have been commissioned and operated in the CEBAF accelerator. Electrons at linac currents up to 10 ?A have been successfully accelerated and used for nuclear physics experiments. This paper reports on the commissioning and operation of the cryomodules and RF system.

  5. Five years operating experience at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Baumhardt, R. J.; Bechtold, R. A.

    1987-04-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 Mw(t), loop-type, sodium-cooled, fast neutron reactor. It is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the United States Department of Energy at Richland, Washington. The FFTF is a multipurpose test reactor used to irradiate fuels and materials for programs such as Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) research, fusion research, space power systems, isotope production and international research. FFTF is also used for testing concepts to be used in Advanced Reactors which will be designed to maximize passive safety features and not require complex shutdown systems to assure safe shutdown and heat removal. The FFTF also provides experience in the operation and maintenance of a reactor having prototypic components and systems typical of large LMR (LMFBR) power plants. The 5 year operational performance of the FFTF reactor is discussed in this report. 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Wabash River coal gasification repowering project -- first year operation experience

    SciTech Connect

    Troxclair, E.J.; Stultz, J.

    1997-12-31

    The Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project (WRCGRP), a joint venture between Destec Energy, Inc. and PSI Energy, Inc., began commercial operation in November of 1995. The Project, selected by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Clean Coal Program (Round IV) represents the largest operating coal gasification combined cycle plant in the world. This Demonstration Project has allowed PSI Energy to repower a 1950`s vintage steam turbine and install a new syngas fired combustion turbine to provide 262 MW (net) of electricity in a clean, efficient manner in a commercial utility setting while utilizing locally mined high sulfur Indiana bituminous coal. In doing so, the Project is also demonstrating some novel technology while advancing the commercialization of integrated coal gasification combined cycle technology. This paper discusses the first year operation experience of the Wabash Project, focusing on the progress towards achievement of the demonstration objectives.

  7. Operation Heli-STAR - Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE). Volume 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Operation Heli-STAR (Helicopter Short-Haul Transportation and Aviation Research) was established and operated in Atlanta, Georgia, during the period of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games. Heli-STAR had three major thrusts: (1) the establishment and operation of a helicopter-based cargo transportation system, (2) the management of low-altitude air traffic in the airspace of an urban area, and (3) the collection and analysis of research and development data associated with items 1 and 2. Heli-STAR was a cooperative industry/government program that included parcel package shippers and couriers in the Atlanta area, the helicopter industry, aviation electronics manufacturers, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and support contractors. Several detailed reports have been produced as a result of Operation Heli-STAR. These include four reports on acoustic measurements and associated analyses, and reports on the Heli-STAR tracking data including the data processing and retrieval system, the Heli-STAR cargo simulation, and the community response system. In addition, NASA's Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) program has produced a report describing the Atlanta Communications Experiment (ACE) which produced the avionics and ground equipment using automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) technology. This latter report is restricted to organizations belonging to NASA's AGATE industry consortium. A complete list of these reports is shown on the following page.

  8. DIII-D safety procedures and operational experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Peter I.; Savercool, Richard L.; Taylor, Peter L.

    1989-06-01

    The DIII-D research tokamak, which has near reactor dimensions, has been operating for approximately ten years. The hazards at the facility include high voltages, high currents, cryogenics, radiation, and normal industrial hazards. Procedures have been developed for operating the device, minimizing both the hazards to personnel and the damage caused by equipment failures, and for logging of failures. The machine and the neutral beamlines have been operated in hydrogen and are now starting operation in deuterium to expand the machine capabilities to reactor relevant regimes. Deuterium operation creates a significant amount of neutrons and therefore a neutron shield is being built around the machine area to reduce personnel radiation to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and to keep radiation at the site boundary at or below a limit of 20 mrem per calendar year. Gamma radiation shielding walls have been in place since the initial machine construction. The safety procedures for the DIII-D facility will be outlined and the accident experience will be discussed together with the neutron radiation monitoring program being developed.

  9. The Software Engineering Laboratory: An operational software experience factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.; Caldiera, Gianluigi; Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Page, Gerald; Waligora, Sharon

    1992-01-01

    For 15 years, the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) has been carrying out studies and experiments for the purpose of understanding, assessing, and improving software and software processes within a production software development environment at NASA/GSFC. The SEL comprises three major organizations: (1) NASA/GSFC, Flight Dynamics Division; (2) University of Maryland, Department of Computer Science; and (3) Computer Sciences Corporation, Flight Dynamics Technology Group. These organizations have jointly carried out several hundred software studies, producing hundreds of reports, papers, and documents, all of which describe some aspect of the software engineering technology that was analyzed in the flight dynamics environment at NASA. The studies range from small, controlled experiments (such as analyzing the effectiveness of code reading versus that of functional testing) to large, multiple project studies (such as assessing the impacts of Ada on a production environment). The organization's driving goal is to improve the software process continually, so that sustained improvement may be observed in the resulting products. This paper discusses the SEL as a functioning example of an operational software experience factory and summarizes the characteristics of and major lessons learned from 15 years of SEL operations.

  10. Nuclear unit operating experience: 1985-1986 update: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LeShay, D.W.; Koppe, R.H.; Olson, E.A.J.

    1987-12-01

    This report presents results of a project conducted by the S.M. Stoller Corporation for EPRI. The purpose of the project was to analyze the operational experience of nuclear units within the United States during the calendar years 1985 through 1986 using the Operating Plant Evaluation Code (OPEC-2) System and other available sources of operational data. The report updates and supplements previous EPRI reports NP-1191, NP-2092, NP-3480, and NP-4368. The overall performances of US nuclear units and the availability and capacity factor losses for the constituent systems and components are presented. The problem areas which have impacted most significantly on nuclear unit performance during 1985 to 1986 are discussed in detail. Forced outage rates and scram rates are also investigated. The 92 domestic nuclear units which were considered in this report inlcude all units which are rated 400 MW(e) or greater. Three Mile Island 2 was excluded from all analyses of this report. The performances of BWRs and PWRs in the United States during 1985 through 1986 were compared with similar units operating in foreign countries.

  11. Spallation Neutron Source Operating Experience and Outlook for Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Stuart

    2010-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a MW-class accelerator-driven pulsed neutron source. The SNS began formal operations in October 2006. Since then, the beam power has been increased to 1 MW, the number of operating hours per year has increased to nearly 5000, the availability has increased to 85%, and the number of operating neutron scattering instruments has increased to 13. Plans are in place to increase the beam power and availability to their design values of 1.4 MW and 90% over the next two years, and to continue the build-out of instruments to 16 by 2012. Two upgrade projects are in the planning stages. In the first, the beam power of the SNS is increased to at least 2 MW by raising the beam energy from 1.0 to 1.3 GeV and the beam current by 60%. In the second, a Second Target Station is constructed, and is powered by sharing beam pulses with the first target station. The operating experience will be described, as will the challenges that have been met along the path toward 1 MW beam power. The strategy for upgrades will also be presented.

  12. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapoire, C.; Atlas Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as B-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy is sufficiently low and hit efficiency exceed the design specification.

  13. Superconducting radio-frequency modules test faciilty operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R&D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service Fermilab SRF R&D needs. The first stage of the project has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

  14. Apollo experience report: Communications used during recovery operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Apollo program experience in recovery-support communications is reviewed, and the working relationships among NASA, the Department of Defense, and commercial communications facilities are discussed. The organization, facilities, philosophy, and funding of recovery-support communications are described. The relocation of two recovery control centers is discussed, as are the functions of primary and secondary recovery ships, aircraft, and relay satellities. The possibility of using ships of opportunity for recovery operations is considered. Finally, the means by which money, manpower, and resources have been saved and longlines leased are delineated.

  15. Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) Operations on EO-1 in 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Baker, V.; Castano, R.; Chien, S.; Cichy, B.; Doggett, T.; Dohm, J. M.; Greeley, R.; Lee, R.; Sherwood, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) has been selected for flight demonstration by NASAs New Millennium Program (NMP) as part of the Space Technology 6 (ST6) mission. NASA has identified the development of an autonomously operating spacecraft as a necessity for an expanded program of missions exploring the Solar System. The versatile ASE spacecraft command and control software, image formation software, and science processing software will be uploaded to the Earth Observer 1 (EO-1) spacecraft in early 2004 to detect surface modification related to volcanism, ice formation and retreat, and flooding.

  16. Nevada Experiments and Operations Program (N Program) Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nattrass, L.; Anastasio, M.R.

    2000-02-01

    This plan briefly describes the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) institutional structure and how Nevada Experiments and Operations Program (N Program's) organization fits within this structure, roles and responsibilities, and management processes that govern N Program activities. This plan also serves as the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Implementation Plan for N Program work. This plan applies to all work performed by and for LLNL that falls under the oversight of DOE/NV except LLNL activities in support of the Yucca Mountain Project Office (YMPO).

  17. Skylab Medical Experiments Altitude Test /SMEAT/ facility design and operation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinners, A. H., Jr.; Correale, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the design approaches and test facility operation methods used to successfully accomplish a 56-day test for Skylab to permit evaluation of selected Skylab medical experiments in a ground test simulation of the Skylab environment with an astronaut crew. The systems designed for this test include the two-gas environmental control system, the fire suppression and detection system, equipment transfer lock, ground support equipment, safety systems, potable water system, waste management system, lighting and power system, television monitoring, communications and recreation systems, and food freezer.

  18. Experiments in hand-operated, hypersonic shock tunnel facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments were conducted using the newly developed table-top, hand-operated hypersonic shock tunnel, otherwise known as the Reddy hypersonic shock tunnel. This novel instrument uses only manual force to generate the shock wave in the shock tube, and is designed to generate a freestream flow of Mach 6.5 in the test section. The flow was characterized using stagnation point pressure measurements made using fast-acting piezoelectric transducers. Schlieren visualization was also carried out to capture the bow shock in front of a hemispherical body placed in the flow. Freestream Mach numbers estimated at various points in the test section showed that for a minimum diameter of 46 mm within the test section, the value did not vary by more than 3 % along any cross-sectional plane. The results of the experiments presented here indicate that the device may be successfully employed for basic hypersonic research activities at the university level.

  19. Experience of Pseudospark Switch Operation in Pulse Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitenko, N. V.; Yudin, A. S.; Kuznetsova, N. S.; Bochkov, V. D.

    2015-11-01

    The paper demonstrates the results of TDIl-200k/25SN-P pseudospark switch (PSS) developed by Russian company "Pulsed Technologies Ltd" application. PSS was used in pulsed power unit intended for electric-discharge fracture of rocks and concrete blocks and splitting off from monolith. The pulsed power unit has a pulse current generator with the capacity of 560 μF, stored energy of up to 63 kJ, operating voltage of up to15 kV, current pulse amplitude of up to 200 kA and pulse duration more than 200 μsec. The study also shows the current waveforms determined in the short-circuit experiment of the pulse current generator and in the experiments of the electric-discharge fragmentation of concrete at the charging voltage of 13 kV. PSS was operated in ringing single-pulse mode with the exceedance of more than two maximum permissible parameters: current pulse amplitude, current pulse duration and maximum pulse energy. Internal electrode erosion of PSS is shown and possible reasons of asymmetric current feed are discussed.

  20. Operational Experience with Autonomous Star Trackers on ESA Interplanetary Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Mathias; Jauregui, Libe; Kielbassa, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    Mars Express (MEX), Rosetta and Venus Express (VEX) are ESA interplanetary spacecrafts (S/C) launched in June 2003, March 2004 and November 2005, respectively. Mars Express was injected into Mars orbit end of 2003 with routine operations starting in spring 2004. Rosetta is since launch on its way to rendezvous comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014. It has completed several test and commissioning activities and is performing several planetary swingbys (Earth in spring 2005, Mars in spring 2007, Earth in autumn 2007 and again two years later). Venus Express has also started routine operations since the completion of the Venus orbit insertion maneuver sequence beginning of May 2006. All three S/C are three axes stabilized with a similar attitude and orbit control system (AOCS). The attitude is estimated on board using star and rate sensors and controlled using four reaction wheels. A bipropellant reaction control system with 10N thrusters serves for wheel off loadings and attitude control in safe mode. Mars Express and Venus Express have an additional 400N engine for the planetary orbit insertion. Nominal Earth communication is accomplished through a high gain antenna. All three S/C are equipped with a redundant set of autonomous star trackers (STR) which are based on almost the same hardware. The STR software is especially adapted for the respective mission. This paper addresses several topics related to the experience gained with the STR operations on board the three S/C so far.

  1. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 mission flight experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonan, C. H.; Mcintosh, R. J.; Rowe, J. N.; Defazio, R. L.; Galal, K. F.

    1995-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 spacecraft was launched on April 13, 1994, at 06:04:02 coordinated universal time (UTC), with separation from the Atlas-Centaur launch vehicle occurring at 06:33:05 UTC. The launch was followed by a series of complex, intense operations to maneuver the spacecraft into its geosynchronous mission orbit. The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) was responsible for GOES-8 attitude, orbit maneuver, orbit determination, and station acquisition support during the ascent phase. This paper summarizes the efforts of the FDF support teams and highlights some of the unique challenges the launch team faced during critical GOES-8 mission support. FDF operations experience discussed includes: (1) The abort of apogee maneuver firing-1 (AMF-1), cancellation of AMF-3, and the subsequent replans of the maneuver profile; (2) The unexpectedly large temperature dependence of the digital integrating rate assembly (DIRA) and its effect on GOES-8 attitude targeting in support of perigee raising maneuvers; (3) The significant effect of attitude control thrusting on GOES-8 orbit determination solutions; (4) Adjustment of the trim tab to minimize torque due to solar radiation pressure; and (5) Postlaunch analysis performed to estimate the GOES-8 separation attitude. The paper also discusses some key FDF GOES-8 lessons learned to be considered for the GOES-J launch which is currently scheduled for May 19, 1995.

  2. LANL OPERATING EXPERIENCE WITH THE WAND AND HERCULES PROTOTYPE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    K. M. GRUETZMACHER; C. L. FOXX; S. C. MYERS

    2000-09-01

    The Waste Assay for Nonradioactive Disposal (WAND) and the High Efficiency Radiation Counters for Ultimate Low Emission Sensitivity (HERCULES) prototype systems have been operating at Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) Solid Waste Operation's (SWO'S) non-destructive assay (NDA) building since 1997 and 1998, respectively. These systems are the cornerstone of the verification program for low-density Green is Clean (GIC) waste at the Laboratory. GIC waste includes all non-regulated waste generated in radiological controlled areas (RCAS) that has been actively segregated as clean (i.e., nonradioactive) through the use of waste generator acceptable knowledge (AK). The use of this methodology alters LANL's past practice of disposing of all room trash generated in nuclear facilities in radioactive waste landfills. Waste that is verified clean can be disposed of at the Los Alamos County Landfill. It is estimated that 50-90% of the low-density room trash from radioactive material handling areas at Los Alamos might be free of contamination. This approach avoids the high cost of disposal of clean waste at a radioactive waste landfill. It also reduces consumption of precious space in the radioactive waste landfill where disposal of this waste provides no benefit to the public or the environment. Preserving low level waste (LLW) disposal capacity for truly radioactive waste is critical in this era when expanding existing radioactive waste landfills or permitting new ones is resisted by regulators and stakeholders. This paper describes the operating experience with the WAND and HERCULES since they began operation at SWO. Waste for verification by the WAND system has been limited so far to waste from the Plutonium Facility and the Solid Waste Operations Facility. A total of461 ft3 (13.1 m3) of low-density shredded waste and paper have been verified clean by the WAND system. The HERCULES system has been used to verify waste from four Laboratory facilities. These are the

  3. APS storage ring commissioning and early operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, G.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) uses a 100-mA, 7-GeV positron storage ring to produce high brilliance bending magnet and insertion device x-rays for up to 70 x-ray beamlines. It is 1104 meters in circumference and has a beam liftime designed to exceed 10 hours with 1 nTorr average ring vacuum at 100 mA. The high brilliance required by the synchrotron light users results from the storage ring`s natural emittance of 8.2 nm-rad, together with the requirement that the beam be stable to a level which is less than 5% of its rms size. Real-time closed orbit feedback is employed to achieve the required stability and is discussed elsewhere in these proceedings. Installation of storage ring components was completed early this year, and we report here on the first experiences of commissioning and operation with beam.

  4. The APS booster synchrotron: Commissioning and operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, S.V.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) was constructed to provide a large user community with intense and high brightness synchrotron radiation at x-ray wavelengths. A 7-GeV positron beam is used to generate this light. Acceleration of the beam from 450 MeV to 7 GeV is accomplished at a 2-Hz repetition rate by the booster synchrotron. Commissioning of the booster began in the second quarter of 1994 and continued on into early 1995. The booster is now routinely used to provide beam for the commissioning of the APS storage ring. Reported here are our commissioning and operational experiences with the booster synchrotron.

  5. Using Information from Operating Experience to Inform Human Reliability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce P. Hallbert; David I. Gertman; Julie Marble; Erasmia Lois; Nathan Siu

    2004-06-01

    This paper reports on efforts being sponsored by the U.S. NRC and performed by INEEL to develop a technical basis and perform work to extract information from sources for use in HRA. The objectives of this work are to: 1) develop a method for conducting risk-informed event analysis of human performance information that stems from operating experience at nuclear power plants and for compiling and documenting the results in a structured manner; 2) provide information from these analyses for use in risk-informed and performance-based regulatory activities; 3) create methods for information extraction and a repository for this information that, likewise, support HRA methods and their applications.

  6. Experiment of a centrifugal pump during changing speed operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H. J.; Shao, J.; Wu, Y. L.; Liu, S. H.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, a method of changing rotational speed of impeller periodically as the pulsatile working condition is developed to realize pulse outputs both of flow discharge and of head for a centrifugal pump through experiment. The performance of the centrifugal pump under pulsatile working operation condition is measured which indicates this model pump could produce desired pulse flow under such condition. Flow patterns at four testing points under pulsatile conditions are obtained by means of the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technology both with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) particles and refractive index matched (RIM) fluid. Results of PIV measurement show the distributions of velocity, streamlines, and the principal Reynolds normal stress (PRNS). Under the design flow rate condition, the relative velocity in the blade channel distributes smoothly and decreases from inlet to exit. And at the impeller exit, the relative velocity is lower close to suction side than that near pressure side of blade in most of blade channels.

  7. Operational experience running Hadoop XRootD Fallback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dost, J. M.; Tadel, A.; Tadel, M.; Würthwein, F.

    2015-12-01

    In April of 2014, the UCSD T2 Center deployed hdfs-xrootd-fallback, a UCSD- developed software system that interfaces Hadoop with XRootD to increase reliability of the Hadoop file system. The hdfs-xrootd-fallback system allows a site to depend less on local file replication and more on global replication provided by the XRootD federation to ensure data redundancy. Deploying the software has allowed us to reduce Hadoop replication on a significant subset of files in our cluster, freeing hundreds of terabytes in our local storage, and to recover HDFS blocks lost due to storage degradation. An overview of the architecture of the hdfs-xrootd-fallback system will be presented, as well as details of our experience operating the service over the past year.

  8. Initial Operation of the Maryland Coaxial Gyroklystron Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, W.; Castle, M.; Cheng, J.; Hogan, B.; Saraph, G. P.; Granatstein, V. L.; Reiser, M.

    1997-05-01

    We describe results from the initial operation of our coaxial gyroklystron experiment, which is being evaluated as a potential driver for future linear colliders. The interaction is designed to occur between a 500 kV, 500-700 A beam and a series of coaxial TE_0n1 microwave cavities. Output powers in excess of 100 MW at 8.568 GHz are expected with an efficiency of about 40%. We detail performance of our single anode magnetron injection gun in addition to the stability and amplification properties of our preliminary microwave circuit. We also discuss our designs of near-term future tubes which are expected to have comparable performance at 17.136 GHz. ^* G.P. Saraph, W. Lawson, M. Castle, J. Cheng, J.P. Calame, and G.S. Nusinovich, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 24 (1996) \\underline671.

  9. Operational Experience with the Nb/Pb SRF Photoelectron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Kamps, T; Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Knoblock, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A N; Neumann, A; Quast, T; Rudolph, J; Schubert, S G; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Sekutowicz, J K; Smedley, J; Teichert, J; Volkov, V; Will, I

    2012-07-01

    SRF photoelectron guns offer the promise of high brightness, high average current beam production for the next generation of accelerator driven light sources such as free electron lasers, THz radiation sources or energy-recovery linac driven synchrotron radiation sources. In a first step a fully superconducting RF (SRF) photoelectron gun is under development by a collaboration between HZB, DESY, JLAB, BNL and NCBJ. The aim of the experiment is to understand and improve the performance of a Nb SRF gun cavity coated with a small metallic Pb cathode film on the cavity backplane. This paper describes the highlights from the commissioning and beam parameter measurements. The main focus is on lessons learned from operation of the SRF gun.

  10. Operational experience feedback in the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO).

    PubMed

    Revuelta, Ramon

    2004-07-26

    Operators in high-risk industries need to be learning organisations, learning from themselves and from the others. This presentation will describe how the nuclear industry is dealing in an integrated manner with the feedback of operating experience (OE), both internal and external, to increase the safety and reliability of power plants; it will describe how it; investigates events, reports events and analyses trends, shares information to prevent recurrence, performs corrective action and training, performs assessments to verify effectiveness. The plants have achieved great improvements in performance overall, and to improve further, the industry is evolving. Instead of just learning from past events (reactive) it is now focusing on lower level indications of problems (precursors) through low level events reporting, trending and analysis. A hallmark of the industry is its desire to be self-critical. Emphasis is placed on improving the bottom quartile performing plants. PMID:15231349

  11. Startup Studies and Initial Operations of the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorson, T.; Dannhausen, D.; Fonck, R.; Intrator, T.; Lewicki, B.; Sontag, A.; Tritz, K.; Wilson, C.

    1998-11-01

    Optimization of ohmic flux consumption is an issue for present day spherical toroidal experiments (ST's) due to the relatively small amount of volt-seconds available for devices running at low aspect ratio (A). This is especially true for P EGASUS (A ~ 1.1), where presently up to 60 kW of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) preionization (at 5.5 GHz) along with ohmic induction are used for plasma initiation. Available startup optimization techniques include varying the timing and strength of the inductive voltage, the fields from the internal coils for null formation, and the external vertical field during the plasma current ramp-up phase. Since impurity radiation can be a large power loss during startup, wall conditioning techniques, including He glow discharge cleaning and boronization, will also be used to improve startup efficiency and overall plasma performance. Initial operations of P EGASUS focus on exploring the Extremely Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak (ELART) regime of operation (A < 1.2) with low toroidal field (< 0.1 T on axis). * *Supported by U.S. DoE grant No. DE-FG02-96ER54375

  12. Avoiding Human Error in Mission Operations: Cassini Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Operating spacecraft is a never-ending challenge and the risk of human error is ever- present. Many missions have been significantly affected by human error on the part of ground controllers. The Cassini mission at Saturn has not been immune to human error, but Cassini operations engineers use tools and follow processes that find and correct most human errors before they reach the spacecraft. What is needed are skilled engineers with good technical knowledge, good interpersonal communications, quality ground software, regular peer reviews, up-to-date procedures, as well as careful attention to detail and the discipline to test and verify all commands that will be sent to the spacecraft. Two areas of special concern are changes to flight software and response to in-flight anomalies. The Cassini team has a lot of practical experience in all these areas and they have found that well-trained engineers with good tools who follow clear procedures can catch most errors before they get into command sequences to be sent to the spacecraft. Finally, having a robust and fault-tolerant spacecraft that allows ground controllers excellent visibility of its condition is the most important way to ensure human error does not compromise the mission.

  13. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, C.

    2011-12-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of pico-seconds lifetime particles such as b-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures, timing optimization and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 97.5% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy and hit efficiency exceed the design specification, and a good alignment allows high quality track resolution.

  14. Industrial operating experience of the GTE ceramic recuperator

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, J.M.; Ferri, J.L. ); Rebello, W.J. )

    1990-06-01

    GTE Products Corporation, under a jointly funded program with the US Department of Energy (DOE), developed a compact ceramic high temperature recuperator that could recover heat from a relatively clean exhaust gases at temperatures up to of 2500{degree}F. The DOE program was very successful in that it allowed GTE to improve the technical and economic characteristics of the recuperator and stimulate industrial acceptance of the recuperator as an energy- saving technology. The success of the DOE Program was measured by the fact that from January 1981 to December 1984, 561 recuperators were installed by GTE on new or retrofitted furnaces. One objective of this contract was to conduct a telephone survey of the industrial plants that use the recuperator to determine their operating experience, present status, and common problems, and thus to complete the historical picture. Additionally, recuperators were returned to GTE after operating on industrial furnaces, and a post mortem'' analysis was undertaken with a goal of identifying the potential reason(s) for premature failure of the ceramic matrix. When contamination of the matrix was evident, historical data and spectrographic analysis were used to identify the type of contaminant, and its source. This effort has shown the type of degradation that occurs and has identified system design techniques that can be used to maximize the ceramic recuperator life cycle. 12 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. Operational Experience with the Frontier System in CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Barry; Dykstra, Dave; Kreuzer, Peter; Du, Ran; Wang, Weizhen

    2012-12-01

    The Frontier framework is used in the CMS experiment at the LHC to deliver conditions data to processing clients worldwide, including calibration, alignment, and configuration information. Each central server at CERN, called a Frontier Launchpad, uses tomcat as a servlet container to establish the communication between clients and the central Oracle database. HTTP-proxy Squid servers, located close to clients, cache the responses to queries in order to provide high performance data access and to reduce the load on the central Oracle database. Each Frontier Launchpad also has its own reverse-proxy Squid for caching. The three central servers have been delivering about 5 million responses every day since the LHC startup, containing about 40 GB data in total, to more than one hundred Squid servers located worldwide, with an average response time on the order of 10 milliseconds. The Squid caches deployed worldwide process many more requests per day, over 700 million, and deliver over 40 TB of data. Several monitoring tools of the tomcat log files, the accesses of the Squids on the central Launchpad servers, and the availability of remote Squids have been developed to guarantee the performance of the service and make the system easily maintainable. Following a brief introduction of the Frontier framework, we describe the performance of this highly reliable and stable system, detail monitoring concerns and their deployment, and discuss the overall operational experience from the first two years of LHC data-taking.

  16. Operations of a spaceflight experiment to investigate plant tropisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Kumar, Prem; Millar, Katherine D. L.; Edelmann, Richard E.; Correll, Melanie J.

    2009-10-01

    Plants will be an important component in bioregenerative systems for long-term missions to the Moon and Mars. Since gravity is reduced both on the Moon and Mars, studies that identify the basic mechanisms of plant growth and development in altered gravity are required to ensure successful plant production on these space colonization missions. To address these issues, we have developed a project on the International Space Station (ISS) to study the interaction between gravitropism and phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. These experiments were termed TROPI (for tropisms) and were performed on the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) in 2006. In this paper, we provide an operational summary of TROPI and preliminary results on studies of tropistic curvature of seedlings grown in space. Seed germination in TROPI was lower compared to previous space experiments, and this was likely due to extended storage in hardware for up to 8 months. Video downlinks provided an important quality check on the automated experimental time line that also was monitored with telemetry. Good quality images of seedlings were obtained, but the use of analog video tapes resulted in delays in image processing and analysis procedures. Seedlings that germinated exhibited robust phototropic curvature. Frozen plant samples were returned on three space shuttle missions, and improvements in cold stowage and handing procedures in the second and third missions resulted in quality RNA extracted from the seedlings that was used in subsequent microarray analyses. While the TROPI experiment had technical and logistical difficulties, most of the procedures worked well due to refinement during the project.

  17. CITY OF SANTA FE V. KOMIS REVISITED: AN ANALYSIS OF THE ACTUAL IMPACTS OF CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF THE SANTA FE BYPASS ON THE VALUE OF NEARBY REAL ESTATE

    SciTech Connect

    Bentz, Dr. E. J., Jr.,; Bentz, C. B.; O'Hora, T. D.; Baepler, Dr. D.

    2003-02-27

    The Santa Fe Bypass for transport of transuranic waste (TRU) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico has been constructed and is operational (as of 2000). This paper presents a review of actual empirical data from the sales of real estate in the Santa Fe City/County area since the filing of the City of Santa Fe v. Komis lawsuit in 1988. The data analyzed covers the time period from 1989 through the last quarter of 2001.

  18. "Smart" Magnetic Fluids Experiment Operated on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Lekan, Jack F.

    2004-01-01

    InSPACE is a microgravity fluid physics experiment that was operated on the International Space Station (ISS) in the Microgravity Science Glovebox from late March 2003 through early July 2003. (InSPACE is an acronym for Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates From Colloidal Emulsions.) The purpose of the experiment is to obtain fundamental data of the complex properties of an exciting class of smart materials termed magnetorheological (MR) fluids. MR fluids are suspensions, or colloids, comprised of small (micrometer-sized) superparamagnetic particles in a nonmagnetic medium. Colloids are suspensions of very small particles suspended in a liquid. (Examples of other colloids are blood, milk, and paint.) These controllable fluids can quickly transition into a nearly solid state when exposed to a magnetic field and return to their original liquid state when the magnetic field is removed. Controlling the strength of the magnetic field can control the relative stiffness of these fluids. MR fluids can be used to improve or develop new seat suspensions, robotics, clutches, airplane landing gear, and vibration damping systems. The principal investigator for InSPACE is Professor Alice P. Gast of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The InSPACE hardware was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The InSPACE samples were delivered to the ISS in November 2002, on the Space Shuttle Endeavour, on Space Station Utilization Flight UF-2/STS113. Operations began on March 31, 2003, with the processing of three different particle size samples at multiple test parameters. This investigation focused on determining the structural organization of MR colloidal aggregates when exposed to a pulsing magnetic field. On Earth, the aggregates take the shape of footballs with spiky tips. This characteristic shape may be influenced by the pull of gravity, which causes most particles initially suspended in the fluid to sediment, (i.e., settle and collect at the

  19. Operational and troubleshooting experiences in the SST-1 cryogenic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahesuria, G.; Panchal, P.; Panchal, R.; Patel, R.; Sonara, D.; Gupta, N. C.; Srikanth, G. L. N.; Christian, D.; Garg, A.; Bairagi, N.; Patel, K.; Shah, P.; Nimavat, H.; Sharma, R.; Patel, J. C.; Tank, J.; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the cooldown and current charging campaign have been carried out towards the demonstration of the first successful plasma discharge in the steady state superconducting Tokomak (SST-1). The SST-1 machine consists of cable-in-conduit wound superconducting toroidal as well as poloidal coils, cooled using 1.3 kW at 4.5 K helium refrigerator -cum- liquefier (HRL) system. The cryo system provides the two-phase helium at 0.13 MPa at 4.5 K as well as forced-flow pressurized helium at 0.4 MPa and in addition to 7 g-s-1 liquefaction capacity required for the current leads and other cold mass at 4.5 K. The entire integrated cold masses having different thermo hydraulic resistances cooled with the SST-1 HRL in optimised process parameters. In order to maintain different levels of temperatures and to facilitate smooth and reliable cooldown, warm-up, normal operations as well as to handle abnormal events such as, quench or utilities failures etc., exergy efficient process are adopted for the helium refrigerator-cum-liquefier (HRL) with an installed equivalent capacity of 1.3 kW at 4.5 K. Using the HRL, the cold mass of about 40 tons is being routinely cooled down from ambient temperature to 4.5 K with an average cooldown rate of 0.75 - 1 K-h-1. Long-term cryogenic stable conditions were obtained within 15 days in the superconducting coils and their connecting feeders. Afterwards, all of the cold mass is warmed-up in a controlled manner to ambient temperature. In this paper, we report the recent operational results of the cryogenic system during the first plasma discharge in SST-1 as well as the troubleshooting experiences of the cryogenic plant related hardware.

  20. Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) Test Operations in 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, S.; Davies, A. G.; Baker, V.; Castano, B.; Cichy, B.; Doggett, T.; Dohm, J. M.; Greeley, R.; Sherwood, R.; Williams, K.

    2003-01-01

    NASA has identified the development of an autonomously operating spacecraft as a necessity for an expanded program of missions exploring the Solar System. The Autonomous Sciencecraft Experiment (ASE) has been selected for flight demonstration by NASA s New Millennium Program (NMP) as part of the Space Technology 6 (ST6) mission. ASE is scheduled to fly on the US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Techsat-21 constellation in 2006. Tech- Sat-21 consists of three satellites flying in a variable-geometry formation in Earth orbit. Each satellite is equipped with X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar, yielding high spatial resolution images (approx. 3 m) of the Earth s surface. The constellation will fly at an altitude of 550 km, in a 35.4 inclination circular orbit, yielding exact repeat-track observations every 13 days. Prior to full deployment, elements of the versatile ASE spacecraft command and control software, image formation software and science processing software will be utilized and tested on two very different platforms in 2003: AirSAR and EO-1 (described below). Advantages of Autonomous Operations: ASE will demonstrate advanced autonomous science data acquisition, processing, and product downlink prioritization, as well as autonomous spacecraft command and control, and fault detection. The advantages of spacecraft autonomy are to future missions include: (a) making the best use of reduced downlink; (b) the overcoming of communication delays through decisionmaking in situ, enabling fast reaction to dynamic events; (c) an increase of science content per byte of returned data; and (d) an avoidance of return of null (no-change/no feature) datasets: if there is no change detectable between two scenes of the same target, there is no need to return the second dataset.

  1. Operational Regimes of the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mueller; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; M. Bitter; T. Bigelow; P. Bonoli; M. Carter; J. Ferron; E. Fredrickson; D. Gates; L. Grisham; J.C. Hosea; D. Johnson; R. Kaita; S.M. Kaye; H. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; R. Majeski; R. Maqueda; J. Menard; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; S. Paul; C.K. Phillips; R. Pinsker; R. Raman; S.A. Sabbagh; C.H. Skinner; V.A. Soukhanovskii; D. Stutman; D. Swain; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; J.R. Wilson; G.A. Wurden; S. Zweben

    2002-06-03

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is a proof-of-principle experiment designed to study the physics of Spherical Tori (ST), i.e., low-aspect-ratio toroidal plasmas. Important issues for ST research are whether the high-eta stability and reduced transport theoretically predicted for this configuration can be realized experimentally. In NSTX, the commissioning of a digital real-time plasma control system, the provision of flexible heating systems, and the application of wall conditioning techniques were instrumental in achieving routine operation with good confinement. NSTX has produced plasmas with R/a {approx} 0.85 m/0.68 m, A {approx} 1.25, Ip * 1.1 MA, BT = 0.3-0.45 T, k * 2.2, d * 0.5, with auxiliary heating by up to 4 MW of High Harmonic Fast Waves, and 5 MW of 80 keV D0 Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). The energy confinement time in plasmas heated by NBI has exceeded 100 ms and a toroidal beta (bT = 2m0

    /BT02, where BT0 is the central vacuum toroidal magnetic field) up to 22% has be en achieved. HHFW power of 2.3 MW has increased the electron temperature from an initial 0.4 keV to 0.9 keV both with and without producing a significant density rise in the plasma. The early application of both NBI and HHFW heating has slowed the penetration of the inductively produced plasma current, modifying the current profile and, thereby, the observed MHD stability.

  2. Investigating Novice Teacher Experiences of the Teaching Dynamics Operating in Selected School Communities in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomberg, Seija; Knight, Bruce Allen

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the lived experiences of five novice teachers during their first academic year of teaching. This article analyzes the experiences of new teachers based on long-term data collection throughout a school year as one means of bridging the gap between teacher preparation and actual teaching practice. The findings indicate that…

  3. AH-64 IHADSS aviator vision experiences in Operation Iraqi Freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Keith L.; Rash, Clarence E.; Harris, Eric S.; McGilberry, William H.

    2004-09-01

    Forty AH-64 Apache aviators representing a total of 8564 flight hours and 2260 combat hours during Operation Iraqi Freedom and its aftermath were surveyed for their visual experiences with the AH-64's monocular Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS) helmet-mounted display in a combat environment. A major objective of this study was to determine if the frequencies of reports of visual complaints and illusions reported in the previous studies, addressing mostly benign training environments, differ in the more stressful combat environments. The most frequently reported visual complaints, both while and after flying, were visual discomfort and headache, which is consistent with previous studies. Frequencies of complaints after flying in the current study were numerically lower for all complaint types, but differences from previous studies are statistically significant only for visual discomfort and disorientation (vertigo). With the exception of "brownout/whiteout," reports of degraded visual cues in the current study were numerically lower for all types, but statistically significant only for impaired depth perception, decreased field of view, and inadvertent instrumental meteorological conditions. This study also found statistically lower reports of all static and dynamic illusions (with one exception, disorientation). This important finding is attributed to the generally flat and featureless geography present in a large portion of the Iraqi theater and to the shift in the way that the aviators use the two disparate visual inputs presented by the IHADSS monocular design (i.e., greater use of both eyes as opposed to concentrating primarily on display imagery).

  4. NSLS vacuum system operating experience conditioning and desorption yields

    SciTech Connect

    Halama, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    All straight sections in both the VUV and the X-Ray rings have been filled with various insertion devices, most of them fully operational. Beam lifetime in the VUV ring is limited by the Touschek effect to {approximately}100 minutes at 800 mA due to the small vertical beam size required by users. With no experiments running, X-Ray beam lifetime is >35 hours at 220 mA and is limited by beam gas scattering. During the past several years the U10 beam line was used to measure PSD yields from various metals to study their relative merits for light sources. These yields were also compared to those measured in X-Ray ring dipoles during initial commissioning when desorption was high. Despite the large differences in critical photon energies, agreement was quite good. Both rings are now fully conditioned and their pressures and lifetimes have reached equilibrium. Well established conditioning procedures are followed after every intervention into their vacuum systems.

  5. Operational experience with the ALICE High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, Artur

    2012-12-01

    The ALICE HLT is a dedicated real-time system for online event reconstruction and triggering. Its main goal is to reduce the raw data volume read from the detectors by an order of magnitude, to fit within the available data acquisition bandwidth. This is accomplished by a combination of data compression and triggering. When HLT is enabled, data is recorded only for events selected by HLT. The combination of both approaches allows for flexible data reduction strategies. Event reconstruction places a high computational load on HLT. Thus, a large dedicated computing cluster is required, comprising 248 machines, all interconnected with InfiniBand. Running a large system like HLT in production mode proves to be a challenge. During the 2010 pp and Pb-Pb data-taking period, many problems were experienced that led to a sub-optimal operational efficiency. Lessons were learned and certain crucial changes were made to the architecture and software in preparation for the 2011 Pb-Pb run, in which HLT had a vital role performing data compression for ALICE's largest detector, the TPC. An overview of the status of the HLT and experience from the 2010/2011 production runs are presented. Emphasis is given to the overall performance, showing an improved efficiency and stability in 2011 compared to 2010, attributed to the significant improvements made to the system. Further opportunities for improvement are identified and discussed.

  6. 42 CFR 417.413 - Qualifying condition: Operating experience and enrollment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Qualifying condition: Operating experience and... Qualifying condition: Operating experience and enrollment. (a) Condition. The HMO or CMP must demonstrate that it has operating experience and an enrolled population sufficient to provide a reasonable...

  7. Operational Experience with the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station. The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the NCG. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped NCG to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The purpose of the gas trap is to prevent gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump, and the current gas trap has performed flawlessly in this regard. However, because of actual operational conditions on-orbit, its gas removal performance and operational lifetime have been affected. This paper discusses experiences with several of these dual- membrane gas traps, including on-orbit gas venting rate, effects due to the presence of nickel in the ITCS coolant, and subsequent refurbishing to remove the nickel from the gas trap.

  8. Evaluation of stereoscopic video cameras synchronized with the movement of an operator's head on the teleoperation of the actual backhoe shovel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamoto, Masahiko; Matsunaga, Katsuya

    1999-05-01

    Operator performance while using a remote controlled backhoe shovel is described for three different stereoscopic viewing conditions: direct view, fixed stereoscopic cameras connected to a helmet mounted display (HMD), and rotating stereo camera connected and slaved to the head orientation of a free moving stereo HMD. Results showed that the head- slaved system provided the best performance.

  9. Operational experience with a high speed video data acquisition system in Fermilab experiment E-687

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.E.; Knickerbocker, K.L.; Baumbaugh, B.; Ruchti, R.

    1987-10-21

    Operation of a high speed, triggerable, Video Data Acquisition System (VDAS) including a hardware data compactor and a 16 megabyte First-In-First-Out buffer memory (FIFO) will be discussed. Active target imaging techniques for High Energy Physics are described and preliminary experimental data is reported.. The hardware architecture for the imaging system and experiment will be discussed as well as other applications for the imaging system. Data rates for the compactor is over 30 megabytes/sec and the FIFO has been run at 100 megabytes/sec. The system can be operated at standard video rates or at any rate up to 30 million pixels/second. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  10. [Evoked potentials in intracranial operations: current status and our experiences].

    PubMed

    Nau, H E; Hess, W; Pohlen, G; Marggraf, G; Rimpel, J

    1987-03-01

    Intraoperative neuromonitoring, especially evoked potential monitoring, has gained interest in recent years for both the anesthesiologist evaluating cerebral function and the neurosurgeon wishing to avoid neuronal lesions during intracranial operations. Before evoked potential monitoring can be introduced as a routine method of intraoperative management, experience with this method particularly in intensive care units, is imperative. We recorded evoked potentials with the Compact Four (Nicolet) and Basis 8000 (Schwarzer Picker International) computer systems. Preoperative derivations should be done with the same apparatus used intraoperatively and parameters of peri- and intraoperative derivations should not be changed. The patient's head must be fixed in a Mayfield clamp in order to avoid artefacts during trepanation. The possible artefacts due to apparatus, patient, or anesthesia are summarized in the tables. The derivations of evoked potentials should be supervised by a person who is not involved in the anesthesia or the surgical procedure; this condition may change in the future with full automatization of the recording technique and alarms. Good communication between surgeon, anesthesiologist, and neurophysiological assistant is a prerequisite. The modality is chosen in accordance with the affected neuronal system: visual-evoked potential (VEP) monitoring in the management of processes affecting the visual pathway, brain stem auditory-(BAER) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring in lesions affecting these pathways, in particular space-occupying lesions of the posterior fossa. VEP monitoring may be useful, but we observed alterations of the responses without changes in the level of anesthesia or manipulation of the visual pathways. In space-occupying processes of the cerebellopontine angle, BAER could not be developed in nearly all cases because the large underlying tumor had caused the disappearance of waves II-V. In these cases SSEP monitoring

  11. RendezVous sensor for automatic guidance of transfer vehicles to ISS concept of the operational modes depending on actual optical and geometrical-dynamical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Bettina G.; Kolk, Karl-Hermann

    2000-10-01

    Based on an ATV RendezVous Predevelopment Program initiated by ESTEC, an automatically operating Rendez Vous Sensor has been developed. The sensor--a Scanning Tele-Goniometer--shall guide docking and retreat of the European Automatic Transfer Vehicle as well as berthing and retreat of the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle. The sensor performance will be strongly connected with the properties of cooperative targets, consisting of an arrangement of retro reflectors mounted on ISS each.

  12. New experiments selected for 1980 operational shuttle flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Experiments selected for NASA's Long Duration Exposure Facility mission are described. Technical areas represented by the experiments include materials, thermal control coatings, detectors, power, micrometeoroids, electronics, lubrication, optics, and space debris detection.

  13. Seismic while drilling: Operational experiences in Viet Nam

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.; Einchcomb, C.

    1997-03-01

    The BP/Statoil alliance in Viet Nam has used seismic while drilling on four wells during the last two years. Three wells employed the Western Atlas Tomex system, and the last well, Schlumberger`s SWD system. Perceived value of seismic while drilling (SWD) lies in being able to supply real-time data linking drill bit position to a seismic picture of the well. However, once confidence in equipment and methodology is attained, SWD can influence well design and planning associated with drilling wells. More important, SWD can remove uncertainty when actually drilling wells, allowing risk assessment to be carried out more accurately and confidently.

  14. Lead-bismuth eutectic as advanced reactor collant : operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, K. A.; Watts, V.; Li, N.

    2004-01-01

    Some proposed advanced reactor concepts would be cooled by lead or lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). An LBE test loop was designed and built at Los Alamos to develop the engineering and materials technology necessary to successfully implement LBE as a coolant (Fig. 1). Operational since December 2001, this test loop has been used to develop and demonstrate safe operation, oxygen concentration and metal corrosion control, instrumentation, thermal-hydraulic performance of heat exchangers and recuperators, and free convection and forced pumping. This paper discusses the technology development and lessons learned from the operation of this facility. A LBE test loop has been operational since December 2001. Using procedures, training, and engineering controls, this loop has operated without an accident. Continuous improvements in operation procedures and instrumentation over these years have resulted in a facility of high reliability, providing the groundwork for the use of LBE as a reactor coolant for temperatures up to 550 C.

  15. Operating experience at the Shamokin Culm burning steam generation plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, P.A.; Laukaitis, J.F.; Lockman, H.W.; Samela, D.; Smith, W.G.; Tsoumpas, G.

    1983-06-01

    After 9200 hours of operation it can be concluded that low grade anthracite culm refuse fuel can be properly combusted in a fluidized-bed boiler. The Shamokin Culm Burning Steam Generation Plant has demonstrated environmental compliance while operating over a wide range of operational variables. As changes in equipment and materials are implemented and other fuels are combusted, it is expected that a further demonstration of the Plant's capabilities will be realized.

  16. Operational experience with the SLD CRID at the SLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.; Baltay, C.; Ben-David, R.; Bienz, T.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coller, J.; Coyne, D.; Dima, M.; d'Oliveira, A.; Hallewell, G.; Hasegawa, Y.; Huber, J.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacques, P.; Johnson, R. A.; Kalelkar, M.; Kawahara, H.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Liu, X.; Lu, A.; Manly, S.; Meadows, B.; Müller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Narita, S.; Nussbaum, M.; Pavel, T. J.; Plano, R.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Sen, S.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Snyder, J.; Stamer, P.; Suekane, F.; Turk, J.; Va'vra, J.; Whitaker, J. S.; Williams, D. A.; Williams, S. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, R. J.; Word, G.; Yellin, S.; Yuta, H.

    1996-02-01

    We highlight some problems encountered and lessons learned in obtaining stable operation of the SLD CRID for the past four years. During the 1994-1995 run of the SLC, we achieved stable operation of liquid (C 6F 14) and gas ( {85% C 5F 12}/{15% N 2}) radiators with good UV transparency, and we regularly operate the TPCs with excellent drift lifetimes and good single photo-electron detection efficiency.

  17. Technician support for operation and maintenance of large fusion experiments: the tandem mirror experiment upgrade (TMX-U) approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mattson, G.E.

    1983-12-01

    As experiments continue to grow in size and complexity, a few technicians will no longer be able to maintain and operate the complete experiment. Specialization is becoming the norm. Subsystems are becoming very large and complex, requiring a great deal of experience and training for technicians to become qualified maintenance/operation personnel. Formal in-house and off-site programs supplement on-the-job training to fulfill the qualification criteria. This paper presents the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) approach to manpower staffing, some problems encountered, possible improvements, and safety considerations for the successful operation of a large experimental facility.

  18. Remotely Operated Vehicles under sea ice - Experiences and results from five years of polar operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Lange, Benjamin; Belter, Hans Jakob; Schiller, Martin; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The availability of advanced robotic technologies to the Earth Science community has largely increased in the last decade. Remotely operated vehicles (ROV) enable spatially extensive scientific investigations underneath the sea ice of the polar oceans, covering a larger range and longer diving times than divers with significantly lower risks. Here we present our experiences and scientific results acquired from ROV operations during the last five years in the Arctic and Antarctic sea ice region. Working under the sea ice means to have all obstacles and investigated objects above the vehicle, and thus changes several paradigms of ROV operations as compared to blue water applications. Observations of downwelling spectral irradiance and radiance allow a characterization of the optical properties of sea ice and the spatial variability of the energy partitioning across the atmosphere-ice-ocean boundary. Our results show that the decreasing thickness and age of the sea ice have led to a significant increase in light transmission during summer over the last three decades. Spatially extensive measurements from ROV surveys generally provide more information on the light field variability than single spot measurements. The large number of sampled ice conditions during five cruises with the German research icebreaker RV Polarstern allows for the investigations of the seasonal evolution of light transmittance. Both, measurements of hyperspectral light transmittance through sea ice, as well as classification of upward-looking camera images were used to investigate the spatial distribution of ice-algal biomass. Buoyant ice-algal aggregates were found to be positioned in the stretches of level ice, rather than pressure ridges due to a physical interaction of aggregate-buoyancy and under-ice currents. Synchronous measurements of sea ice thickness by upward looking sonar provides crucial additional information to put light-transmittance and biological observations into context

  19. Design reuse experience of space and hazardous operations robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneil, P. Graham

    1994-01-01

    A comparison of design drivers for space and hazardous nuclear waste operating robots details similarities and differences in operations, performance and environmental parameters for these critical environments. The similarities are exploited to provide low risk system components based on reuse principles and design knowledge. Risk reduction techniques are used for bridging areas of significant differences. As an example, risk reduction of a new sensor design for nuclear environment operations is employed to provide upgradeable replacement units in a reusable architecture for significantly higher levels of radiation.

  20. Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has documented schemes and operations that undergird students' understanding of fractions. This prior research was based, in large part, on small-group teaching experiments. However, written assessments are needed in order for teachers and researchers to assess students' ways of operating on a whole-class scale. In this…

  1. FFTF operating experience with sodium natural circulation: slides included

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, T.M.; Additon, S.L.; Beaver, T.R.; Midgett, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been designed for passive, back-up, safety grade decay heat removal utilizing natural circulation of the sodium coolant. This paper discusses the process by which operator preparation for this emergency operating mode has been assured, in paralled with the design verification during the FFTF startup and acceptance testing program. Over the course of the test program, additional insights were gained through the testing program, through on-going plant analyses and through general safety evaluations performed throughout the nuclear industry. These insights led to development of improved operator training material for control of decay heat removal during both forced and natural circulation as well as improvements in the related plant operating procedures.

  2. Pilot Eye Scanning under Actual Single Pilot Instrument Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinoie, Kenichi; Sunada, Yasuto

    Operations under single pilot instrument flight rules for general aviation aircraft is known to be one of the most demanding pilot tasks. Scanning numerous instruments plays a key role for perception and decision-making during flight. Flight experiments have been done by a single engine light airplane to investigate the pilot eye scanning technique for IFR flights. Comparisons between the results by an actual flight and those by a PC-based flight simulator are made. The experimental difficulties of pilot eye scanning measurements during the actual IFR flight are discussed.

  3. The Pajarito Site operating procedures for the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1991-12-01

    Operating procedures consistent with DOE Order 5480.6, and the American National Standard Safety Guide for the Performance of Critical Experiments are defined for the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These operating procedures supersede and update those previously published in 1983 and apply to any criticality experiment performed at the facility. 11 refs.

  4. Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment: Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, VR

    2010-06-21

    The Ganges Valley region is one of the largest and most rapidly developing sections of the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River, which provides the region with water needed for sustaining life, is fed primarily by snow and rainfall associated with Indian summer monsoons. Impacts of changes in precipitation patterns, temperature, and the flow of the snow-fed rivers can be immense. Recent satellite-based measurements have indicated that the upper Ganges Valley has some of the highest persistently observed aerosol optical depth values. The aerosol layer covers a vast region, extending across the Indo-Gangetic Plain to the Bay of Bengal during the winter and early spring of each year. The persistent winter fog in the region is already a cause of much concern, and several studies have been proposed to understand the economic, scientific, and societal dimensions of this problem. During the INDian Ocean EXperiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from this region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. This is one of the few regions showing a trend toward increasing surface dimming and enhanced mid-tropospheric warming. Increasing air pollution over this region could modify the radiative balance through direct, indirect, and semi-indirect effects associated with aerosols. The consequences of aerosols and associated pollution for surface insolation over the Ganges Valley and monsoons, in particular, are not well understood. The proposed field study is designed for use of (1) the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure relevant radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol optical characteristics over mainland India during an extended period of 9–12 months and (2) the G-1 aircraft and surface sites to measure relevant aerosol chemical, physical, and optical characteristics in the Ganges Valley during a period of 6–12 weeks. The aerosols in this region have complex sources, including burning of coal, biomass, and biofuels; automobile

  5. Special Operations of CERES for Radiation Experiment Tests (SOCRATES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szewczyk, Z. Peter

    The Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System project flew a scanning radiometer (PFM) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission TRMM satellite, and two each aboard the Terra (FM1 FM2) and Aqua spacecraft (FM3 FM4). The primary objectives of the pairs of in-struments were for one to scan cross-track to map the geographical distribution of reflected solar radiation and Earth-emitted radiation and for the other to scan in azimuth as well as in elevation angle to provide data from which to develop models to describe the directionally-dependent dis-tribution of reflected solar radiance and Earth-emitted radiance. The Programmable Azimuth Plane Scan (PAPS) feature of the CERES instrument is a variant of the latter, and enables a scanner to target ground stations, or to match other satellite instruments viewing geometry to generate data sets for various scientific investigations. This paper presents special operations of CERES using the PAPS mode with the objective to collect data for comparison at the radiance level with other Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) instruments, and also shows numerical results of such comparisons. The following campaigns are covered in the paper: (i) In 1998, the CERES instrument (PFM) was rotated in azimuth so its scan plane coincided with the cross-track scan plane of the ScaRAB-2 instrument when the orbits of their spacecraft intersected. In this data set, both instruments viewed the same scenes from the same directions within a few minutes of each other, so the radiance measured by both instruments could be compared. (ii) In March of 2000, the scan plane of CERES Terra (FM1 and FM2) was rotated to coincide with the cross-track scan of the PFM aboard TRMM satellite. Data collected over up to 10 orbital crossings per day are used to compare radiance measurements of PFM and FM1 or FM2. (iii) In July of 2002, radiance measurements of scanners on Terra and Aqua satellites are compared. Since both satellites are in a polar orbit, the scan planes

  6. Entering "A NEW REALM" of KIBO Payload Operations - Continuous efforts for microgravity experiment environment and lessons learned from real time experiment operations in KIBO -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, K.; Goto, M.; Matsumoto, S.; Ohkuma, H.

    2011-12-01

    On January 22nd, 2011(JST), KOUNOTORI2 (H-II Transfer Vehicle: HTV2) was successfully launched from Tanegashima Space Center toward the International Space Station (ISS) and two new JAXA payload racks, Kobairo rack and MSPR (Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack) were transferred to ISS/KIBO (Japanese Experiment Module: JEM). In addition to Saibo rack and Ryutai rack which are already in operation in KIBO, in total 4 Japanese experiment payload racks start operations in KIBO. Then KIBO payload operations embark on a new realm, full utilization phase. While the number and variety of microgravity experiments become increasing, simultaneous operation constraints should be considered to achieve multitask payload operations in ISS/KIBO and ever more complicated cooperative operations between crewmember and flight control team/science team are required. Especially for g-jitter improvement in ISS/KIBO, we have greatly advanced cooperative operations with crewmember in the recent increment based on the microgravity data analysis results. In this paper, newly operating Japanese experiment payloads characteristics and some methods to improve g-jitter environment are introduced from the front line of KIBO payload operations.

  7. Three years of operational experience from Schauinsland CTBT monitoring station.

    PubMed

    Zähringer, M; Bieringer, J; Schlosser, C

    2008-04-01

    Data from three years of operation of a low-level aerosol sampler and analyzer (RASA) at Schauinsland monitoring station are reported. The system is part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The fully automatic system is capable to measure aerosol borne gamma emitters with high sensitivity and routinely quantifies 7Be and 212Pb. The system had a high level of data availability of 90% within the reporting period. A daily screening process rendered 66 tentative identifications of verification relevant radionuclides since the system entered IMS operation in February 2004. Two of these were real events and associated to a plausible source. The remaining 64 cases can consistently be explained by detector background and statistical phenomena. Inter-comparison with data from a weekly sampler operated at the same station shows instabilities of the calibration during the test phase and a good agreement since certification of the system. PMID:18053622

  8. Operational experience from a large EPICS-based accelerator facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ciarlette, D.J.; Gerig, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a third-generation x-ray light source which uses the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) to operate its linear accelerator, positron accumulator ring, booster synchrotron, and storage ring equipment. EPICS has been used at the APS since the beginning of installation and commissioning. Currently, EPICS controls approximately 100 VME crates containing over 100,000 process variables. With this complexity, the APS has had to review some of the methods originally employed and make changes as necessary. In addition, due to commissioning and operational needs, higher-level operator software needed to be created. EPICS has been flexible enough to allow this.

  9. Operating experience in preliminary hydrotreating of naphtha cuts

    SciTech Connect

    Sukharev, V.P.; Zhila, Yu.T.; Krylov, V.A.; Degterev, N.S.

    1987-05-01

    The authors consider the preliminary hydrotreating of naphtha cuts. A significant increase in the degree of sulfur removal was achieved as a result of using the catalysts GO-30-7 and GO-70. A flow plan is provided for hot separation in the L-35-11 unit. When the described measures were implemented, the preliminary hydrotreating sections operated more reliably, the energy consumption in the process was reduced, and the hydrotreated product met the requirements for feed to reformers operating on series KR catalysts.

  10. One year's experience with an operating saturated solar pond

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, T.L.; Stojanoff, C.G.; Day, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    While the saturated non-convecting solar pond concept is not new, the borax pond at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) is the first application of the concept to an operating solar pond. As with any new application there have been experimentally identified problem areas. Four of these problems are discussed: 1) departure from saturation, 2) contamination, 3) bottom crystalization, and 4) covers.

  11. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Lodging. Course: Housekeeping Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuhrman, D.; Egan, B.

    One of three individualized courses included in a lodging curriculum, this course covers basic housekeeping operations and procedures. The course is comprised of seven units: (1) Care of the Room, (2) Working with Staff, (3) Work Improvement Techniques, (4) Organizing, Planning, and Scheduling, (5) Housekeeping Material and Equipment, (6) Floor…

  12. Federated software defined network operations for LHC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongkyun; Byeon, Okhwan; Cho, Kihyeon

    2013-09-01

    The most well-known high-energy physics collaboration, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is based on e-Science, has been facing several challenges presented by its extraordinary instruments in terms of the generation, distribution, and analysis of large amounts of scientific data. Currently, data distribution issues are being resolved by adopting an advanced Internet technology called software defined networking (SDN). Stability of the SDN operations and management is demanded to keep the federated LHC data distribution networks reliable. Therefore, in this paper, an SDN operation architecture based on the distributed virtual network operations center (DvNOC) is proposed to enable LHC researchers to assume full control of their own global end-to-end data dissemination. This may achieve an enhanced data delivery performance based on data traffic offloading with delay variation. The evaluation results indicate that the overall end-to-end data delivery performance can be improved over multi-domain SDN environments based on the proposed federated SDN/DvNOC operation framework.

  13. OPERATING EXPERIENCE WITH EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) MOBILE INCINERATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the recent modifications made to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Mobile Incineration System. These modifications were aimed toward increasing the capacity of the system as well as its on-stream factor. The operation of the modified system was ...

  14. Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.

    2014-02-27

    processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 °C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 °C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 °C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been

  15. A Dust Characterization Experiment for Solar Cells Operating on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Krasowski, Michael; Greer, Lawrence; Wilt, David; Baraona, Cosmo; Scheiman, David; Lekki, John

    2001-01-01

    During the Viking and Pathfinder missions to Mars, significant amounts of dust accumulated on the spacecrafts. In Pathfinder's case, the dust obscured the solar panels on the lander and the rover degrading their output current. The material adherence experiment aboard the Pathfinder rover quantified the rate of decrease in short circuit current at 0.28% per day. This rate is unacceptably high for long duration missions. In response, NASA has developed the Dust Accumulation and Removal Technology (DART) experiment. DART has three instruments for characterizing dust settling out of the atmosphere and tests two methods to keep dust from settling on solar cells.

  16. The Leisure Experience. Leisure Management Module. Operational Management Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Anthony; And Others

    This module on the leisure experience is intended to give the supervisor or manager an understanding of the nature and scope of the leisure market and key trends and developments. The material is presented in a self-instructional format in three sections. At the beginning of each section is a statement of the objectives that will be achieved as a…

  17. SNS Ring Operational Experience and Power Ramp Up Status

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    The SNS Ring has now been operating for about 3.5 years, and our march continues to increase the beam power to the full design value of 1.4 MW. The Ring is a loss-limited machine, and in general the radioactivation levels are good, but there are some unanticipated hot spots that we are working to improve. High intensity collective effects such as space-charge and beam instability have had minimal impact on beam operations to date. The cross plane coupling issue in the ring to target beam transport line has been solved. We will also discuss the status of equipment upgrades in the high-energy beam transport beam line, the injection-dump beam transport line, the ring, and the ring-to-target beam transport line.

  18. Operational experience with heavy ions at BNL: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Cardner, C.; Reece, R.K.; Ahrens, L.A.; Barton, D.S.; Beavis, D.; Benjamin, J.; Foelsche, H.; Gill, E.; Raka, E.; Sidhu, S.

    1989-01-01

    Since May 1986, the heavy ion transfer line (HITL) which joins the Tandem Van de Graaff facility and the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory has permitted the acceleration of heavy ions (up to sulfur) to 14.5 GeV/nucleon. The Tandem, operating with a pulsed ion source, supplies a fully stripped ion beam at about 7 MeV/nucleon which is transported via the HITL to the AGS. A low frequency rf system accelerates the beam in the AGS to about 200 MeV/nucleon and the high frequency rf system, normally used for proton acceleration, completes the acceleration to 14.5 GeV/nucleon. The high energy ion beams are delivered to four experimental beam lines using standard resonant extraction. Following is an update of the performance and operational characteristics associated with the production, transport, and acceleration of these ion beams. 10 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. High power operational experience with the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J

    2008-01-01

    The heart of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a pulsed linear accelerator that is used to simultaneously provide H+ and H- beams to several user facilities. This accelerator contains two Cockcroft-Walton style injectors, a 100-MeV drift tube linac and an 800-MeV coupled cavity linac. This presentation will touch on various aspects of the high power operation including performance, tune-up strategy, beam losses and machine protection.

  20. High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

    2012-09-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this

  1. Elements of Successful and Safe Fusion Experiment Operations

    SciTech Connect

    K. Rule, L. Cadwallader, Y. Takase, T. Norimatsu, O. Kaneko, M. Sato, and R. Savercool

    2009-02-03

    A group of fusion safety professionals contribute to a Joint Working Group (JWG) that performs occupational safety walkthroughs of US and Japanese fusion experiments on a routine basis to enhance the safety of visiting researchers. The most recent walkthrough was completed in Japan in March 2008 by the US Safety Monitor team. This paper gives the general conclusions on fusion facility personnel safety that can be drawn from the series of walkthroughs.

  2. An Experiment on Repetitive Pulse Operation of Microwave Rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Shibata, Teppei; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2008-04-28

    Microwave Rocket was operated with repetitive pulses. The microwave rocket model with forced breathing system was used. The pressure history in the thruster was measured and the thrust impulse was deduced. As a result, the impulse decreased at second pulse and impulses at latter pulses were constant. The dependence of the thrust performance on the partial filling rate of the thruster was compared to the thrust generation model based on the shock wave driven by microwave plasma. The experimental results showed good agreement to the predicted dependency.

  3. The Superconducting RF Photoinjector at ELBE—First Operational Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichert, J.; Arnold, A.; Büttig, H.; Janssen, D.; Justus, M.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Murcek, P.; Schamlott, A.; Schneider, C.; Schurig, R.; Staufenbiel, F.; Xiang, R.; Kamps, T.; Rudolph, J.; Schenk, M.; Klemz, G.; Will, I.

    2009-08-01

    An RF photoinjector with a superconducting cavity (SRF gun) for installation at the Radiation Source ELBE was developed within a collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. This new and promising injector type allows CW operation and has the potential for the production of high-brightness electron beams. The gun cryostat, the electron diagnostic beamline, and the driver laser with optical beamline were installed. In November 2007 the first beam was produced. Results of the beam parameter measurements with Cs2Te photo cathodes are presented.

  4. Operational experience with the CDF Run II Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mondragon, Miguel N.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CDF Run II Silicon Detector is the largest operating silicon detector in High Energy Physics. Its 722,000 channels spread over 7 m{sup 2} of silicon micro-strip sensors allow precision tracking and vertexing. The CDF silicon detector played a critical role in the discovery of B{sub s} mixing and is used extensively for the current Higgs Boson searches. Over the last 7 years, the detector efficiency has remained stable at 95% after the Run II commissioning period. The infrastructure (cooling, power supplies) problems dealt with are discussed.

  5. 14 CFR 121.434 - Operating experience, operating cycles, and consolidation of knowledge and skills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE... length) cabin training device of the type airplane in which they are to serve may substitute this...

  6. Assessing the experience in complex hepatopancreatobiliary surgery among graduating chief residents: Is the operative experience enough?

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, Teviah E.; Ejaz, Aslam; Weiss, Matthew; Spolverato, Gaya; Ahuja, Nita; Makary, Martin A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Hirose, Kenzo; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Resident operative autonomy and case volume is associated with posttraining confidence and practice plans. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements for graduating general surgery residents are four liver and three pancreas cases. We sought to evaluate trends in resident experience and autonomy for complex hepatopancreatobiliary (HPB) surgery over time. Methods We queried the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education General Surgery Case Log (2003–2012) for all cases performed by graduating chief residents (GCR) relating to liver, pancreas, and the biliary tract (HPB); simple cholecystectomy was excluded. Mean (±SD), median [10th–90th percentiles] and maximum case volumes were compared from 2003 to 2012 using R2 for all trends. Results A total of 252,977 complex HPB cases (36% liver, 43% pancreas, 21% biliary) were performed by 10,288 GCR during the 10-year period examined (Mean = 24.6 per GCR). Of these, 57% were performed during the chief year, whereas 43% were performed as postgraduate year 1–4. Only 52% of liver cases were anatomic resections, whereas 71% of pancreas cases were major resections. Total number of cases increased from 22,516 (mean = 23.0) in 2003 to 27,191 (mean = 24.9) in 2012. During this same time period, the percentage of HPB cases that were performed during the chief year decreased by 7% (liver: 13%, pancreas 8%, biliary 4%). There was an increasing trend in the mean number of operations (mean ± SD) logged by GCR on the pancreas (9.1 ± 5.9 to 11.3 ± 4.3; R2 = .85) and liver (8.0 ± 5.9 to 9.4 ± 3.4; R2 = .91), whereas those for the biliary tract decreased (5.9 ± 2.5 to 3.8 ± 2.1; R2 = .96). Although the median number of cases [10th:90th percentile] increased slightly for both pancreas (7.0 [4.0:15] to 8.0 [4:20]) and liver (7.0 [4:13] to 8.0 [5:14]), the maximum number of cases preformed by any given GCR remained stable for pancreas (51 to 53; R2 = .18), but increased for liver (38

  7. Nowcasting with INCA: Scientific developments and operational experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kann, Alexander; Bica, Benedikt; Wastl, Clemens; Suklitsch, Martin; Wang, Yong

    2013-04-01

    The high-resolution analysis and nowcasting system INCA (Integrated Nowcasting through Comprehensive Analysis) provides 3-D hourly fields of temperature, humidity, and wind, and 2-D fields of cloudiness, precipitation rate, and precipitation type at an update frequency of 15 min. The system operates on a horizontal resolution of 1 km and a vertical resolution of 100-200 m. It combines surface station data, remote sensing data (radar, satellite), forecast fields of numerical weather prediction models, and high-resolution topographic data. In the alpine area, the system provides, among others, meteorological input for operational high-resolution flood forecasting and winter road maintenance. INCA employs a new radar/raingauge combination algorithm and includes elevation effects on precipitation using an intensity-dependent parameterization. Current scientific developments focus on the improvement of precipitation nowcasting by simulating convective cell life cycle and on improved parameterizations of wind gusts. Validation results showing the skill of the nowcast compared to NWP will be presented.

  8. "We're Not Slaves--We Are Actually the Future!" A Follow-up Study of Apprentices' Experiences in the Norwegian Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakkevig Dagsland, Åse Helene; Mykletun, Reidar Johan; Einarsen, Ståle

    2015-01-01

    This study addresses the socialisation processes taking place during the apprenticeship period within the hospitality industry, searching for explanations of drop-out and early staff turnover in the personal, social and educational experiences of the apprentices during their organisational socialisation process and vocational training. Data were…

  9. "They're Too Focused on Being Progressive to Actually Be Progressive": Understanding the Lived Experience of Progressivism at a Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Amy; Fraser, Abigail; Eathorne, Jamie; Lawrence, Roxann; Meyer, Kylie; Morton, Brittany; Sullivan, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates to what extent students' experiences at a small liberal arts college reflect the institutional commitment to progressive thinking and practice. Through in-depth interviews across two studies carried out in 2012 and 2014, the authors found students reported that they felt institutional-level multicultural programming can…

  10. "We the Parents Were Actually More Nervous about the Change"--How Parents Experience Their Child's Schooling in Upper Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raty, Hannu; Ruokolainen, Suvi; Kasanen, Kati

    2012-01-01

    The study set out to explore parents' experiences of their child's upper primary schooling. Academically and vocationally educated mothers and fathers (N = 326) were prompted to give positive and negative comments on their child's school years at the end of his/her 7th and 9th grade. It was found that a great majority of the comments were positive…

  11. Operating experience using venturi flow meters at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.C.

    1992-06-01

    Experiences using commercial venturi to measure single phase helium flow near 4 K (degree Kelvin) for cooling superconducting magnets have been presented. The mass flow rate was calculated from the differential pressure and the helium density evaluated from measured pressure and temperature. The venturi flow meter, with a full range of 290 g/s (0.29 Kg/s) at design conditions, has been found to be reliable and accurate. The flow measurements have been used, with great success, for evaluating the performance of a cold centrifugal compressor, the thermal acoustic heat load of a cryogenic system and the cooling of a superconducting magnet after quench.

  12. Operating experience using venturi flow meters at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.C.

    1992-01-01

    Experiences using commercial venturi to measure single phase helium flow near 4 K (degree Kelvin) for cooling superconducting magnets have been presented. The mass flow rate was calculated from the differential pressure and the helium density evaluated from measured pressure and temperature. The venturi flow meter, with a full range of 290 g/s (0.29 Kg/s) at design conditions, has been found to be reliable and accurate. The flow measurements have been used, with great success, for evaluating the performance of a cold centrifugal compressor, the thermal acoustic heat load of a cryogenic system and the cooling of a superconducting magnet after quench.

  13. Experiments and simulation of high current operation at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Merminga, L.; Crawford, K.; Delayen, J.R.; Doolittle, L.; Hovater, C.; Kazimi, R.; Krafft, G.; Reece, C.; Simrock, S.; Tiefenback, M.; Wang, D.X.

    1996-07-01

    The superconducting rf, cw electron accelerator at CEBAF has achieved the design energy of 4 GeV using 5-pass recirculation through a pair of 400 MeV linacs. Stable beam current of 35 {mu}A has been delivered to the Experimental Hall C. The total beam current that has been recirculated so far is 248 {mu}A. Measurements of the performance of the rf control system have been made in both pulsed and cw mode, and a numerical model has been developed which describes the beam-cavity interaction, includes a realistic representation of low level controls, klystron characteristics and microphonic noise. Experimental data and simulation results on transient beam loading, klystron saturation, a new technique for cavity phasing, and heavy beam loading tests are described; in conclusion, an outlook on full current operation is presented.

  14. Operation experience of p-Carbon polarimeter in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; Alekseev, I. G.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atoian, G.; Bazilevsky, A.; Eyser, O.; Kalinkin, D.; Kewisch, J.; Makdisi, Y.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Schmidke, W. B.; Svirida, D.; Steski, D.; Webb, G.; Zelenski, A.; Tip, K.

    2015-05-03

    The spin physics program in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires fast polarimeter to monitor the polarization evolution on the ramp and during stores. Over past decade, the polarimeter has evolved greatly to improve its performance. These include dual chamber design, monitoring camera, Si detector selection (and orientation), target quality control, and target frame modification. The preamp boards have been modified to deal with the high rate problem, too. The ultra thin carbon target lifetime is a concern. Simulations have been carried out on the target interaction with beam. Modification has also been done on the frame design. Extra caution has been put on RF shielding to deal with the pickup noises from the nearby stochastic cooling kickers. This paper summarizes the recent operation performance of this delicate device.

  15. MagLev Cobra: Test Facilities and Operational Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo, G. G.; Dias, D. H. J. N.; de Oliveira, R. A. H.; Ferreira, A. C.; De Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2014-05-01

    The superconducting MagLev technology for transportation systems is becoming mature due to the research and developing effort of recent years. The Brazilian project, named MagLev-Cobra, started in 1998. It has the goal of developing a superconducting levitation vehicle for urban areas. The adopted levitation technology is based on the diamagnetic and the flux pinning properties of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) bulk blocks in the interaction with Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. A laboratory test facility with permanent magnet guideway, linear induction motor and one vehicle module is been built to investigate its operation. The MagLev-Cobra project state of the art is presented in the present paper, describing some construction details of the new test line with 200 m.

  16. The NSLS VUV undulator: Spectral characteristics and operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.D.; Galayda, J.; Hulbert, S.L.; Klaffky, R.W.; Luccio, A.; Vignola, G.; Jacobsen, C.

    1987-01-01

    The design and operating characteristics of the VUV undulator installed on the NSLS VUV ring are presented. Specifically, the spectral output through three circular on-axis pinholes of different diameters has been measured. Near the minimum magnetic gap (40mm), the flux into a 0.25 mrad circular aperture at the peak of the fundamental (h..nu.. = 57 eV) is approx.1 /times/ 10/sup 14/ photonssec0.1A1%BW. We find good agreement in spectral shape between these measured spectra and spectra calculated by integrating the theoretical undulator emission spectrum over the relevant spatial variables and including electron beam emittance. We also show calculated zero-emittance and on-axis flux spectra for comparison. A description is given of the beam line and monochromator currently installed on this undulator for the purpose of performing spin-resolved photoemission.

  17. Relationships between stress corrosion cracking tests and utility operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Allen

    1999-10-22

    Several utility steam generator and stress corrosion cracking databases are synthesized with the view of identifying the crevice chemistry that is most consistent with the plant cracking data. Superheated steam and neutral solution environments are found to be inconsistent with the large variations in the observed SCC between different plants, different support plates within a plant, and different crevice locations. While the eddy current response of laboratory tests performed with caustic chemistries approximates the response of the most extensively affected steam generator tubes, the crack propagation kinetics in these tests differ horn plant experience. The observations suggest that there is a gradual conversion of the environment responsible for most steam generator ODSCC from a concentrated, alkaline-forming solution to a progressively more steam-enriched environment.

  18. Some Operating Experience and Problems Encountered During Operation of a Free-jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaulay, John E; Prince, William R

    1957-01-01

    During a free-jet investigation of a 28-inch ram-jet engine at a Mach number of 2.35, flow pulsation at the engine inlet were discovered which proved to have an effect on the engine performance and operational characteristics, particularly the engine rich blowout limits. This report discusses the finding of the flow pulsations, their elimination, and effect. Other facility characteristics, such as the establishment of flow simulation and the degree of subcritical operation of the diffuser, are also explained.

  19. The NASA Robotic Conjunction Assessment Process: Overview and Operational Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Lauri Kraft

    2008-01-01

    Orbital debris poses a significant threat to spacecraft health and safety. Recent events such as China's anti-satellite test and the Breeze-M rocket explosion have led to an even greater awareness and concern in the satellite community. Therefore, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established requirements that routine conjunction assessment screening shall be performed for all maneuverable spacecraft having perigees less than 2000 km or within 200 km of geosynchronous altitude. NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed an operational collision risk assessment process to protect NASA s high-value unmanned (robotic) assets that has been in use since January 2005. This paper provides an overview of the NASA robotic conjunction assessment process, including descriptions of the new tools developed to analyze close approach data and of the risk mitigation strategies employed. In addition, statistical data describing the number of conjunctions experienced are presented. A debris avoidance maneuver performed by Aura in June of 2008 is described in detail to illustrate the process.

  20. Operating experiences and test results of six cold helium compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. P.; Gibbs, R. J.; Schlafke, A. P.; Sondericker, J. H.; Wu, K. C.

    Three small and three large cold helium centrifugal compressors have been operated at Brookhaven National Laboratory between 1981 and 1986. The three small cold compressors have been installed on a 1000 W refrigerator for testing a string of superconducting magnets and for R and D purposes. The three large units are components of the BNL 24.8 KW refrigerator to be used to provide cooling for the RHIC project. These compressors are used either to circulate a large amount of supercritical helium through a group of magnets or to pump on the helium bath to reduce temperature in the system. One small circulating compressor tested employs tilting-pad gas bearings and is driven by a DC motor. The two small cold vacuum pumps tested use oil bearings and are driven by oil turbines. The three large oil-bearing cold compressors are driven by DC motors through a gear box. A unique feature of the large vacuum pump is the combination of two pumps with a total of four stages on the same shaft. The adiabatic efficiencies are found to be 57% for the large vacuum pumps and close to 50% for the large circulating compressor. Good overall reliability has been experienced.

  1. Operational experience with nanocoulomb bunch charges in the Cornell photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, Adam; Gulliford, Colwyn; Bazarov, Ivan; Cultera, Luca; Dunham, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    Characterization of 9-9.5 MeV electron beams produced in the dc-gun based Cornell photoinjector is given for bunch charges ranging from 20 pC to 2 nC. Comparison of the measured emittances and longitudinal current profiles to optimized 3D space charge simulations yields excellent agreement for bunch charges up to 1 nC when the measured laser distribution is used to generate initial particle distributions in simulation. Analysis of the scaling of the measured emittance with bunch charge shows that the emittance scales roughly as the square root of the bunch charge up to 300 pC, above which the trend becomes linear. These measurements demonstrate that the Cornell photoinjector can produce cathode emittance dominated beams meeting the emittance and peak current specifications for next generation free electron lasers operating at high repetition rate. In addition, the 1 and 2 nC results are relevant to the electron ion collider community.

  2. Operating experience review - Ventilation systems at Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Special Projects (DP-35), formerly Office of Self-Assessment (DP-9), analyzed occurrences caused by problems with equipment and material and recommended the following systems for an in-depth study: (1) Selective Alpha Air Monitor (SAAM), (2) Emergency Diesel Generator, (3) Ventilation System, (4) Fire Alarm System. Further, DP-35 conducted an in-depth review of the problems associated with SAAM and with diesel generators, and made several recommendations. This study focusses on ventilation system. The intent was to determine the causes for the events related to these system that were reported in the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), to identify components that failed, and to provide technical information from the commercial and nuclear industries on the design, operation, maintenance, and surveillance related to the system and its components. From these data, sites can develop a comprehensive program of maintenance management, including surveillance, to avoid similar occurrences, and to be in compliance with the following DOE orders.

  3. Analysis of failure and maintenance experiences of motor operated valves in a Finnish nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simola, Kaisa; Laakso, Kari

    1992-01-01

    Eight years of operating experiences of 104 motor operated closing valves in different safety systems in nuclear power units were analyzed in a systematic way. The qualitative methods used were Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Maintenance Effects and Criticality Analysis (MECA). These reliability engineering methods are commonly used in the design stage of equipment. The successful application of these methods for analysis and utilization of operating experiences was demonstrated.

  4. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

    2009-03-01

    The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

  5. Building and Deploying Remotely Operated Vehicles in the First-Year Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien-Gayes, A.; Fuss, K.; Gayes, P.

    2007-12-01

    Coastal Carolina University has committed to improving student retention and success in Mathematics and Science through a pilot program to engage first-year students in an applied and investigative project as part of the University's First-Year Experience (FYE). During the fall 2007 semester, five pilot sections of FYE classes, consisting of students from the College of Natural and Applied Sciences are building and deploying Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs). These ROV-based classes are designed to: accelerate exploration of the broad fields of science and mathematics; enlist interest in technology by engaging students in a multi-stepped, interdisciplinary problem solving experience; explore science and mathematical concepts; institute experiential learning; and build a culture of active learners to benefit student success across traditional departmental boundaries. Teams of three students (forty teams total) will build, based on the MIT Sea Perch design, and test ROVs in addition to collecting data with their ROVs. Various accessories attached to the vehicles for data collection will include temperature and light sensors, plankton nets and underwater cameras. The first-year students will then analyze the data, and the results will be documented as part of their capstone projects. Additionally, two launch days will take place on two campus ponds. Local middle and high school teachers and their students will be invited to observe this event. The teams of students with the most capable and successful ROVs will participate in a workshop held in November 2007 for regional elementary, middle and high school teachers. These students will give a presentation on the building of the ROVs and also provide a hands-on demonstration for the workshop participants. These activities will ensure an incorporation of service learning into the first semester of the freshmen experience. The desired outcomes of the ROV-based FYE classes are: increased retention at the postsecondary

  6. The Ricor K508 cryocooler operational experience on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Dean L.; Lysek, Mark J.; Morookian, John Michael

    2014-01-29

    The Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity) landed successfully on Mars on August 5, 2012, eight months after launch. The chosen landing site of Gale Crater, located at 4.5 degrees south latitude, 137.4 degrees east longitude, has provided a much more benign environment than was originally planned for during the critical design and integration phases of the MSL Project when all possible landing sites were still being considered. The expected near-surface atmospheric temperatures at the Gale Crater landing site during Curiosity's primary mission (1 Martian year or 687 Earth days) are from −90°C to 0°C. However, enclosed within Curiosity's thermal control fluid loops the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument is maintained at approximately +20°C. The CheMin instrument uses X-ray diffraction spectroscopy to make precise measurements of mineral constituents of Mars rocks and soil. The instrument incorporated the commercially available Ricor K508 Stirling cycle cryocooler to cool the CCD detector. After several months of brushing itself off, stretching and testing out its subsystems, Curiosity began the exploration of the Mars surface in October 2012. The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) received its first soil sample from Curiosity on October 24, and successfully analyzed its first soil sample. After a brief review of the rigorous Ricor K508 cooler qualification tests and life tests based on the original MSL environmental requirements this paper presents final pre-launch instrument integration and testing results, and details the operational data of the CheMin cryocooler, providing a snapshot of the resulting CheMin instrument analytical data.

  7. The Ricor K508 cryocooler operational experience on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dean L.; Lysek, Mark J.; Morookian, John Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity) landed successfully on Mars on August 5, 2012, eight months after launch. The chosen landing site of Gale Crater, located at 4.5 degrees south latitude, 137.4 degrees east longitude, has provided a much more benign environment than was originally planned for during the critical design and integration phases of the MSL Project when all possible landing sites were still being considered. The expected near-surface atmospheric temperatures at the Gale Crater landing site during Curiosity's primary mission (1 Martian year or 687 Earth days) are from -90°C to 0°C. However, enclosed within Curiosity's thermal control fluid loops the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument is maintained at approximately +20°C. The CheMin instrument uses X-ray diffraction spectroscopy to make precise measurements of mineral constituents of Mars rocks and soil. The instrument incorporated the commercially available Ricor K508 Stirling cycle cryocooler to cool the CCD detector. After several months of brushing itself off, stretching and testing out its subsystems, Curiosity began the exploration of the Mars surface in October 2012. The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) received its first soil sample from Curiosity on October 24, and successfully analyzed its first soil sample. After a brief review of the rigorous Ricor K508 cooler qualification tests and life tests based on the original MSL environmental requirements this paper presents final pre-launch instrument integration and testing results, and details the operational data of the CheMin cryocooler, providing a snapshot of the resulting CheMin instrument analytical data.

  8. A study of the perception and experiences of critical care nurses in caring for potential and actual organ donors: implications for nurse education.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, G E

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes a research study designed to explore the knowledge, perceptions and attitudes of practising critical care nurses towards caring for 'brain stem dead' cadaver organ donors and their families. The influence of formal nurse education and experiential learning were investigated together with what nurses felt could better prepare them for this role. Data were collected through self-completion questionnaires from 103 critical care nurses. This was instrumental in forming a semi-structured interview schedule whereby seven respondents were interviewed. The findings of the study suggest that nurses are very favourable towards organ donation and this correlated with their knowledge of brain stem death (P < 0.024). Nurses with between 6 and 10 years critical care experience had a significantly higher knowledge base (P < 0.05) than those of less or greater experience. Nevertheless, when challenged some nurses were less comfortable with the concept of brain stem death and caring for these patients. A degree of cognitive dissonance was identified. Discussion revealed that all nurses need to have a better understanding of their role in organ donation, no mater what nursing discipline they practice. This may help to expel some of the myths that have, undeservedly, become established and given the donor process a rather sinister image. PMID:8568068

  9. International Co-Operation in Control Engineering Education Using Online Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Jim; Schaedel, Herbert M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the international co-operation experience in teaching control engineering with laboratories being conducted remotely by students via the Internet. This paper describes how the students ran the experiments and their personal experiences with the laboratory. A tool for process identification and controller tuning based on…

  10. Operational experience for coupled operation of the Holifield tandem electrostatic accelerator and isochronous cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.A.; Dowling, D.T.; Haynes, D.L.; Hudson, E.D.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.S.; Ludemann, C.A.; Meigs, M.J.; Milner, W.T.

    1986-10-01

    Coupled operation of the 25 MV tandem accelerator and the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility began in January 1981. Since that time the use of the cyclotron in this mode has become routine. Thirty-six different ion species in the range from /sup 9/Be to /sup 150/Nd have been accelerated; 106 separate beam setups have been provided. Since the beginning of coupled operation, significant improvement of cyclotron systems, and setup and operating techniques, have been made. The graphite electrostatic deflector septum formerly used for high-current light ion beams has been replaced by a thin molybdenum septum. Extraction system positioning mechanisms have been refined and recalibrated and more precise and reliable position readouts have been provided. The computer-based control system has been improved. The frequency range of the rf system has been increased to eliminate an energy dead-band. Cyclotron setup calculations have been improved and standardized methods have been developed to consistently achieve well-centered orbits, correct beam extraction system positions, and electrostatic and magnetic strengths. A totally new beam bunching system has been installed. The improvements in the phase-lock system of the beam buncher have been especially effective. A large number of obsolete and unreliable power supplies have been replaced. Beam extraction efficiency has been increased from approx.50% to approx.70%. Accuracy of obtaining the desired energy without fine tuning is now approx.1% compared to 2 to 3% in early coupled operation. Beam setup time (tuning) has been reduced by approx.20%. Unscheduled maintenance has been reduced by a factor of two.

  11. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  12. Operations engineering: Applying hands-on experience to the development process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcott, Gary; Peters, Wende

    1996-01-01

    The concepts behind operations engineering as applied to the requirements, design, development and testing of data processing systems are presented, together with the associated benefits. The objective of operations engineering is to reduce the overall life cycle costs by integrating operations experience with the development process. To achieve this goal, operations engineering seeks to reduce the development costs by that assuring operational requirements are incorporated into the design and development process as early as possible, and reduce the operational costs by decreasing operations staffing requirements and other related costs through improved system capabilities. The areas for improved system capabilities include: system recovery; data recovery; fault isolation; system operability; system flexibility; system automation; and system reporting. It is described how operations engineering is integrated with the development process, and the difficulties and misconceptions experienced in using operations engineering are discussed.

  13. NASA/ESA CT-990 Spacelab simulation. Appendix A: The experiment operator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reller, J. O., Jr.; Neel, C. B.; Haughney, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/ESA endeavor was established to conduct an extensive spacelab simulation using the NASA CV-990 airborne laboratory. The scientific payload was selected to perform studies in upper atmospheric physics and infrared astronomy with principal investigators from France, the Netherlands, England, and several groups from the United States. Two experiment operators from Europe and two from the U.S. were selected to live aboard the aircraft along with a mission manager for a six-day period and operate the experiments in behalf of the principal scientists. This appendix discusses the experiment operators and their relationship to the joint mission under the following general headings: selection criteria, training programs, and performance. The performance of the proxy operators was assessed in terms of adequacy of training, amount of scientific data obtained, quality of data obtained, and reactions to problems that arose in experiment operation.

  14. Utilization of operating experience to prevent piping failures at steam plants

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.S.; Dietrich, E.B.

    1999-11-01

    The key to preventing flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) induced piping failures in steam plants is the development and implementation of a methodical program for assessing plant susceptibility to FAC and managing the effects of FAC. One of the key elements of an effective FAC program is the accurate and comprehensive utilization of plant-specific and industry-wide operating experience. Operating experience should be used to develop the program to identify specific areas for inspection or replacement, and to maintain an effective program. This paper discusses the utilization of operating experience in FAC programs at nuclear power plants, fossil plants and other steam plants.

  15. Design, operations planning and experience from the marine operations for the Europipe jacket with bucket foundations

    SciTech Connect

    Rusaas, P.; Baerheim, M. [Statoil A Giske, S.R.; Barrett, G.; Christiansen, P.E.

    1995-12-01

    The Europipe 16/11-E riser platform was successfully installed in the Norwegian part of the North Sea last summer. Rather than having the traditional piled foundations, the platform has bucket foundations consisting of one inverted 12m diameter bucket in each of the four Jacket corners. After set down of the Jacket on the seabed and self weight penetration, the Jacket legs were waterfilled and the buckets thus gained further penetration. Finally suction within the buckets penetrated them to target penetration. This paper describes the preparatory work and the installation of the structure, discusses the main problem areas and experiences gained from the installation.

  16. First deep space operational experience with simultaneous X- and Ka-bands coherent tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, S.; Herrera, R.; Armstrong, J.; Barbinis, E.; Fleischman, D.; Gatti, M.; Goltz, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the new DSN science capability and highlights of the engineering work that lead to its development. It will also discuss experience with operations along with statistics and data quality.

  17. Operational experience on the MP-200 series commercial wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    The MP-200 wind turbine generator is described. The mechanical system, microprocessor controller, and display devices, are described. Also discussed are modifications to the prototype, operational experience, and MP-600 systems development.

  18. Flight Technical Error Analysis of the SATS Higher Volume Operations Simulation and Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Daniel M.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Adams, Catherine H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of Flight Technical Error (FTE) from recent SATS experiments, called the Higher Volume Operations (HVO) Simulation and Flight experiments, which NASA conducted to determine pilot acceptability of the HVO concept for normal operating conditions. Reported are FTE results from simulation and flight experiment data indicating the SATS HVO concept is viable and acceptable to low-time instrument rated pilots when compared with today s system (baseline). Described is the comparative FTE analysis of lateral, vertical, and airspeed deviations from the baseline and SATS HVO experimental flight procedures. Based on FTE analysis, all evaluation subjects, low-time instrument-rated pilots, flew the HVO procedures safely and proficiently in comparison to today s system. In all cases, the results of the flight experiment validated the results of the simulation experiment and confirm the utility of the simulation platform for comparative Human in the Loop (HITL) studies of SATS HVO and Baseline operations.

  19. Onboard Autonomy and Ground Operations Automation for the Intelligent Payload Experiment (IPEX) CubeSat Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Ortega, Kevin; Tran, Daniel; Bellardo, John; Williams, Austin; Piug-Suari, Jordi; Crum, Gary; Flatley, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The Intelligent Payload Experiment (IPEX) is a cubesat manifested for launch in October 2013 that will flight validate autonomous operations for onboard instrument processing and product generation for the Intelligent Payload Module (IPM) of the Hyperspectral Infra-red Imager (HyspIRI) mission concept. We first describe the ground and flight operations concept for HyspIRI IPM operations. We then describe the ground and flight operations concept for the IPEX mission and how that will validate HyspIRI IPM operations. We then detail the current status of the mission and outline the schedule for future development.

  20. Start-up and initial operating experiences at the Robbins Resource Recovery Facility while maximizing environmental performance

    SciTech Connect

    Studley, B.C.; Moyer, R.

    1998-07-01

    In early November 1996, a new generation of advance combustion technology using Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boilers began continuous operations in Robbins, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. The Robbins Waste-To-Energy and Recycling Facility processes a minimum of 1,600 tons per day of municipal solid waste. Approximately 400 tons per day of waste will be recycled with the remaining 1,200 tons sent to one of two 600 ton per day Circulating Fluidized Bed steam generating units. The Robbins Facility was designed and operates with the most advanced pollution control equipment. Foster Wheeler and facility personnel, in conjunction with the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and Cook County Department of Environmental Control, have undertaken a number of programs to optimize environmental performance at the facility, including an ongoing, aggressive ambient air monitoring program using a chemical mass balance model and ambient air mercury testing. The pretommeling of MSW and the glass recovery system, combined with the proven high efficiency, stable combustion and low emissions of the CFB combustion design give the Robbins Facility several unique attributes when compared to other waste-to-energy projects. These attributes are: Low air emissions; high materials--recovery capabilities; superior energy--recovery efficiency; low ash generation; low overall waste-disposal cost. this paper provides an overview of the design, approach to start-up, actual experiences to date, and the overall operations of the Robbins Facility with emphasis on the monitoring programs and environmental controls.

  1. Operating and maintenance experiences at the Shamokin clum-burning boiler plant

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, H.W.; Laukaitis, J.F.; Fisher, B.L.; Gmeindl, F.D.; Lockman, H.

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of operating and maintenance experience at the Shamokin plant illustrates the feasibility of using anthracite refuse (culm) and fluidized-bed technology. Successful burning of the low-grade fuel took place over a range of operating conditions. The article describes a series of performance tests and the major maintenance items. 2 references, 7 figures.

  2. The impact of team familiarity and surgical experience on operative efficiency: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Duclos, Antoine; Zhou, Charlie D; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Wright, John; Orgill, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives The independent impact of individual surgical experience and team familiarity on surgical performance has been widely studied; however, the interplay of these factors and their relative, quantified, contributions to performance is poorly understood. We determined the impact of team familiarity and surgeon, and cumulative team experience on operative efficiency in total knee replacement. Design Retrospective analysis of all total knee replacements conducted at the host institution in 1996–2009. Multivariate generalised-estimating-equation regression models were used to adjust for patient risk and clustering. Setting Tertiary care academic hospital. Participants All patients undergoing TKR at the host institution in 1996–2009. Main outcome measure Operative efficiency. Results A total of 4276 total knee replacements were completed by 1163 different surgical teams. The median experience level was 17.6 years for consultant surgeons and 3.7 years for trainee surgeons. After patient-risk adjustment, consultant surgical experience (p < 0.0001), trainee surgical experience (p < 0.05), cumulative team operative experience (p < 0.0001) and team familiarity (p < 0.0001) were associated with significant reductions in operative time. Surgical experience and team familiarity demonstrated concave and linear relationships with operative time, respectively. For a consultant surgeon, the expected reduction in operative time after 25 years in practice was 51 min, compared to a 21-min reduction over the span of 40 collaborations with the same team members. Conclusions Surgical experience and team familiarity display important and distinct relationships with operative time in total knee replacement. Appreciation of this interplay may serve to guide implementation and allocation of procedure-specific quality improvement strategies in surgery. PMID:27053357

  3. Operational plans for life science payloads - From experiment selection through postflight reporting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccollum, G. W.; Nelson, W. G.; Wells, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    Key features of operational plans developed in a study of the Space Shuttle era life science payloads program are presented. The data describes the overall acquisition, staging, and integration of payload elements, as well as program implementation methods and mission support requirements. Five configurations were selected as representative payloads: (a) carry-on laboratories - medical emphasis experiments, (b) mini-laboratories - medical/biology experiments, (c) seven-day dedicated laboratories - medical/biology experiments, (d) 30-day dedicated laboratories - Regenerative Life Support Evaluation (RLSE) with selected life science experiments, and (e) Biomedical Experiments Scientific Satellite (BESS) - extended duration primate (Type I) and small vertebrate (Type II) missions. The recommended operational methods described in the paper are compared to the fundamental data which has been developed in the life science Spacelab Mission Simulation (SMS) test series. Areas assessed include crew training, experiment development and integration, testing, data-dissemination, organization interfaces, and principal investigator working relationships.

  4. Actualizing the Learning Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braman, Dave

    Where conditions are right, continuing education (CE) staff working in true collaboration with campus-based credit staff can meet the learning needs of the community and improve instructional quality with greater resource efficiency. CE staff must become learning strategists who bring ideas from their marketplace experience to the instructional…

  5. Operational experience of a large area x-ray camera for protein crystallography.

    SciTech Connect

    Joachimiak, A.; Jorden, A. R.; Loeffen, P. W.; Naday, I.; Sanishvili, R.; Westbrook, E. M.

    1999-07-13

    After 3 years experience of operating very large area (210mm x 210mm) CCD-based detectors at the Advanced Photon Source, operational experience is reported. Four such detectors have been built, two for Structural Biology Center (APS-1 and SBC-2), one for Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotrons Radiation Center (Gold-2) at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source and one for Osaka University by Oxford Instruments, for use at Spring 8 (PX-21O). The detector is specifically designed as a high resolution and fast readout camera for macromolecular crystallography. Design trade-offs for speed and size are reviewed in light of operational experience and future requirements are considered. Operational data and examples of crystallography data are presented, together with plans for more development.

  6. Crystallization in high level waste (HLW) glass melters: Savannah River Site operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.

    2015-06-12

    This paper provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed for design input to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with prototype melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. A review of the crystallization observed with the prototype melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2) is included. Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for a waste treatment and immobilization plant.

  7. Design, commissioning and operating experience of the PSI KA-IV multipurpose helium refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amstutz, Markus; Baumann, Hans U.; Clerc, Roger; Gloor, Walter; Kurtcuoglu, Kirkor; Löhlein, Karl; Schulze, Reinhard M.; Zichy, János A.; Ziegler, Bruno

    Early in 1991 the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Villigen, Switzerland commissioned its fourth helium liquefier/refrigerator. The facility is used for cooling superconducting magnets, purification and liquefaction of helium. It provides 4000 W of refrigeration at ca. 60 K and 900 W at 4.5 K without nitrogen precooling. Its main features are: Reciprocating compressor with labyrinth pistons, three expansion turbines with dynamic gas bearings, fully automatic operation based on a programmable logic controller and graphic process visualization. The paper describes the operating requirements, the refrigerator, the control concept designed to optimize the performance, and finally the operating experience gained during start up and half a year of operation.

  8. Operating experience review for nuclear power plants in the Systematic Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program Branch (SEPB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) whose purpose is to determine the safety margins of the design and operation of the eleven oldest operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. This paper describes the methodology and results of the operational experience review portion of the SEP evaluation. SEPB will combine the results from these operational reviews with other safety topic evaluations to perform an integrated assessment of the SEP plants.

  9. Technology and science from Earth to Moon: SMART-1 experiments and their operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, A. E.; Lumb, R.; Racca, G. D.; Foing, B. H.; Dias-Almeida, M.

    2002-10-01

    SMART-1, the first European mission to the Moon aimed at demonstrating the Solar Electric propulsion hosts 10 Technology and Science experiments. The monitoring of the spacecraft plasma environment and the thruster contamination produced by thruster is carried out by SPEDE (Spacecraft Potential, Electron and Dust Experiment) and EPDP (Electric Propulsion Diagnostic Package). The miniaturised remote sensing instruments on-board SMART-1 are: AMIE (Advanced Moon micro-Imager Experiment), D-CIXS (Demonstration of a Compact Imaging X-ray Spectrometer), supported in its operation by XSM (X-ray Solar Monitor), and SIR (SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer). Technology experiments for deep-space communications and navigation are: KATE (Ka-Band TT&C Experiment), based on X/Kaband transponder which also supports RSIS (Radio-Science Investigations for SMART-1), Laser-link, demonstrating a deep-space laser communication link and OBAN (On-Board Autonomous Navigation experiment). The Experiments will be performed during two distinct phases of the SMART-1 mission, including 17-month Earth escape phase and a nominal 6-month operational phase in elliptical Moon orbit. The SMART-1 STOC (Science and Technology Operations Co-ordination) carries out the planning and co-ordination of the Technology and science experiments.

  10. Construction and operational experience of the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U)

    SciTech Connect

    Chargin, A.K.; Calderon, M.O.; Moore, T.L.

    1983-07-01

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) incorporates two new features at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) tandem mirror program, thermal barriers in the end plugs and injection of the neutral beams at several oblique angles. The thermal barriers isolate the electrons in the end plugs from those in the central cell, making it possible to heat them independently with microwaves. In addition, this innovation produces a large potential gradient in the end plugs with lower magnetic fields and lower neutral-beam energies than would be possible in a conventional tandem mirror device. The TMX-U is also designed to test neutral-beam-injection angles as an experimental parameter. We use angles other than 90/sup 0/ to produce a plasma with improved microstability.

  11. Engineering development of a digital replacement protection system at an operating US PWR nuclear power plant: Installation and operational experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.H.

    1995-04-01

    The existing Reactor Protection Systems (RPSs) at most US PWRs are systems which reflect 25 to 30 year-old designs, components and manufacturing techniques. Technological improvements, especially in relation to modern digital systems, offer improvements in functionality, performance, and reliability, as well as reductions in maintenance and operational burden. The Nuclear power industry and the US nuclear regulators are poised to move forward with the issues that have slowed the transition to modern digital replacements for nuclear power plant safety systems. The electric utility industry is now more than ever being driven by cost versus benefit decisions. Properly designed, engineered, and installed digital systems can provide adequate cost-benefit and allow continued nuclear generated electricity. This paper describes various issues and areas related to an ongoing RPS replacement demonstration project which are pertinant for a typical US nuclear plant to consider cost-effective replacement of an aging analog RPS with a modern digital RPS. The following subject areas relative to the Oconee Nuclear Station ISAT{trademark} Demonstrator project are discussed: Operator Interface Development; Equipment Qualification; Validation and Verification of Software; Factory Testing; Field Changes and Verification Testing; Utility Operational, Engineering and Maintenance; Experiences with Demonstration System; and Ability to operate in parallel with the existing Analog RPS.

  12. 76 FR 72725 - Draft License Renewal Interim Staff Guidance LR-ISG-2011-05: Ongoing Review of Operating Experience

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-25

    ... Guidance (LR-ISG), LR-ISG-2011-05, ``Ongoing Review of Operating Experience.'' This LR-ISG provides... on how the ongoing review of operating experience should be used to ensure the effectiveness of the... their programmatic activities for operating experience reviews are appropriate for considering...

  13. Preparation Status of Payload Operations for the First Experiment in JEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakatsuki, Takao; Nishikawa, Waka; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is now preparing the first utilization activities in “KIBO”. JAXA already completed the hardware productions of the first experiment facilities and succeeded their launch to the International Space Station in March 2008. JAXA plans the fluid physics and material science experiments, several lifescience experiments, measurement of the radiation environment in “KIBO”, demonstration of high definition television system, some educational and commercial programs in 2008. Most of the preparation works of making the operational products for the execution of each activity have already done. The setup of the ground operation system in JAXA Tsukuba Space Center for KIBO operation was completed and the end to end communication data flow was validated. The establishment of a JAXA payload flight controller team are also undergoing right now and the general training of the team has completed.

  14. Pairing Essential Climate Science with Sustainable Energy Information: the "EARTH-The Operators' Manual" experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuginow, E.; Alley, R. B.; Haines-Stiles, G.

    2010-12-01

    considerable challenge of supplying clean energy to a growing population. Additional scenes have been filmed in Brazil, Spain, China, Morocco, Scotland, and across America, including at the National Renewable Energy Lab. in Denver, CO, and New Orleans. Program 3 (presently untitled and targeted for 2012) will feature American communities seeking to increase energy efficiency and minimize carbon emissions. The Fall 2010 AGU presentation will include video clips from the series, initial findings from focus groups (coordinated by project evaluator, Rockman Et Al) as to what information has been found most compelling to potential audiences, and a description of plans being developed by the project's science center partners in San Diego CA, Portland OR, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Fort Worth TX and Raleigh NC. "EARTH-The Operators' Manual" is an experiment to determine the effectiveness of these activities to reach audiences who, according to surveys, have actually become less convinced of anthropogenic climate change, while remaining supportive of investments in advancing clean energy opportunities.

  15. Development and Operation of a MUMPS Laboratory Information System: A Decade's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R. E.; Causey, J. P.; Moore, G. W.; Wilk, G. E.

    1988-01-01

    We describe more than a decade's experience with inhouse development and operation of a clinical laboratory computer system written in the MUMPS programming language for a 1000 bed teaching hospital. The JHLIS is a networked minicomputer system that supports accessioning, instrument monitoring, and result reporting for over 3000 specimens and 30,000 test results daily. Development and operation of the system accounts for 6% of the budget of the laboratories which have had a 70% increase in workload over the past decade. Our experience with purchased MUMPS software maintained and enhanced inhouse suggests an attractive alternative to lengthy inhouse development.

  16. TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment; Part I: Steady-state operation

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, I.; Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A. )

    1994-01-01

    The experimental results of startup tests after reconstruction and modification of the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana are presented. The experiments were performed with a completely fresh, compact, and uniform core. The operating conditions were well defined and controlled, so that the results can be used as a benchmark test case for TRIGA reactor calculations. Both steady-state and pulse mode operation were tested. In this paper, the following steady-state experiments are treated: critical core and excess reactivity, control rod worths, fuel element reactivity worth distribution, fuel temperature distribution, and fuel temperature reactivity coefficient.

  17. On the hitchhiker Robot Operated Materials Processing System: Experiment data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Jenstrom, Del

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Discovery STS-64 mission carried the first American autonomous robot into space, the Robot Operated Materials Processing System (ROMPS). On this mission ROMPS was the only Hitchhiker experiment and had a unique opportunity to utilize all Hitchhiker space carrier capabilities. ROMPS conducted rapid thermal processing of the one hundred semiconductor material samples to study how micro gravity affects the resulting material properties. The experiment was designed, built and operated by a small GSFC team in cooperation with industry and university based principal investigators who provided the material samples and data interpretation. ROMPS' success presents some valuable lessons in such cooperation, as well as in the utilization of the Hitchhiker carrier for complex applications. The motivation of this paper is to share these lessons with the scientific community interested in attached payload experiments. ROMPS has a versatile and intelligent material processing control data system. This paper uses the ROMPS data system as the guiding thread to present the ROMPS mission experience. It presents an overview of the ROMPS experiment followed by considerations of the flight and ground data subsystems and their architecture, data products generation during mission operations, and post mission data utilization. It then presents the lessons learned from the development and operation of the ROMPS data system as well as those learned during post-flight data processing.

  18. U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, RL

    2003-09-18

    The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

  19. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  20. Repeated Cocaine Experience Facilitates Sucrose-Reinforced Operant Responding in Enriched and Isolated Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Emily D.; Gehrke, Brenda J.; Green, Thomas A.; Zentall, Thomas R.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether repeated cocaine exposure differentially affects sucrose-reinforced operant responding in rats raised in an enriched condition (EC) or an isolated condition (IC). Specifically, the performance of EC and IC rats pressing a lever for sucrose under a high fixed-ratio schedule (FR 30)…

  1. MSFC Doppler Lidar Science experiments and operations plans for 1981 airborne test flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Bilbro, J. W.; Kaufman, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The flight experiment and operations plans for the Doppler Lidar System (DLS) are provided. Application of DLS to the study of severe storms and local weather penomena is addressed. Test plans involve 66 hours of flight time. Plans also include ground based severe storm and local weather data acquisition.

  2. Operational experience and reliability of the cryogenic systems for the TRISTAN insertion quadrupole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, K.; Ohuchi, N.; Morita, Y.; Kabe, A.

    1996-12-31

    Four sets of helium cryogenic systems for the mini-beta insertion quadrupole magnets were installed near the interaction points of the TRISTAN main ring in 1990. Each system consists of a helium compressor, a cold box, a subcooler, transfer lines, two magnet-cryostats, two helium gas tanks and a liquid nitrogen storage tank, and its nominal cooling capacity is 140 W at 4.2 K + 25 L/h. The four systems are controlled automatically by a process control computer system. The first operation started in 1991 and by the middle of 1995, the total operating time for each system reached about 28,000 hours. In this paper the authors report the experience gathered during 28,000 x 4 operating hours in running four cryogenic systems together with the control system. Maintenance experience and statistics of failures of different components are also described.

  3. Human Factors Engineering (HFE) insights for advanced reactors based upon operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.; Nasta, K.

    1997-01-01

    The NRC Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (HFE PRM, NUREG-0711) was developed to support a design process review for advanced reactor design certification under 10CFR52. The HFE PRM defines ten fundamental elements of a human factors engineering program. An Operating Experience Review (OER) is one of these elements. The main purpose of an OER is to identify potential safety issues from operating plant experience and ensure that they are addressed in a new design. Broad-based experience reviews have typically been performed in the past by reactor designers. For the HFE PRM the intent is to have a more focussed OER that concentrates on HFE issues or experience that would be relevant to the human-system interface (HSI) design process for new advanced reactors. This document provides a detailed list of HFE-relevant operating experience pertinent to the HSI design process for advanced nuclear power plants. This document is intended to be used by NRC reviewers as part of the HFE PRM review process in determining the completeness of an OER performed by an applicant for advanced reactor design certification. 49 refs.

  4. The Small Aircraft Transportation System Higher Volume Operations (SATS HVO) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Daniel M.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Adams, Catherine H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of conclusions from the Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) Flight Experiment which NASA conducted to determine pilot acceptability of the HVO concept for normal conditions. The SATS HVO concept improves efficiency at non-towered, non-radar airports in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) while achieving a level of safety equal to today s system. Reported are results from flight experiment data that indicate that the SATS HVO concept is viable. The success of the SATS HVO concept is based on acceptable pilot workload, performance, and subjective criteria when compared to the procedural control operations in use today at non-towered, non-radar controlled airfields in IMC. The HVO Flight Experiment, flown on NASA's Cirrus SR22, used a subset of the HVO Simulation Experiment scenarios and evaluation pilots in order to validate the simulation experiment results. HVO and Baseline (today s system) scenarios flown included: single aircraft arriving for a GPS non-precision approach; aircraft arriving for the approach with multiple traffic aircraft; and aircraft arriving for the approach with multiple traffic aircraft and then conducting a missed approach. Results reveal that all twelve low-time instrument-rated pilots preferred SATS HVO when compared to current procedural separation operations. These pilots also flew the HVO procedures safely and proficiently without additional workload in comparison to today s system (Baseline). Detailed results of pilot flight technical error, and their subjective assessments of workload and situation awareness are presented in this paper.

  5. Shipping Remote Handled Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An Operational Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.; Bradford, J.; Clements, T.; Crisp, D.; Sherick, M.; D'Amico, E.; Lattin, W.; Watson, K.

    2008-07-01

    following day. While some of the success of this endeavor can be attributed to the sheer will and determination of the individuals involved, the fact that it was established and managed as a separate sub-project under the ICP, accounts for a majority of the success. Utilizing a structured project management approach, including development of, and management to, a performance baseline, allowed for timely decision making and the flexibility to adapt to changing conditions as the various aspects of the project matured. This paper provides some insight into how this was achieved, in a relatively short time, and provides an overview of the experience of start-up of a new retrieval, characterization, loading, and transportation operation in the midst of an aggressive cleanup project. Additionally, as one might expect, everything within the project did not go as planned, which provides a great opportunity to discuss some lessons learned. Finally, the first shipment was just the beginning. There are 224 additional shipments scheduled. In keeping with the theme of WM 2008, Phoenix Rising: Moving Forward in Waste Management, this paper will address the future opportunities and challenges of RH TRU waste management at the INL. (authors)

  6. Operation Experience and Performance of the First 300MWe CFB Boiler Developed by DBC in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Q.; Zheng, X. S.; Zhou, Q.; Nie, L.; Liu, T. S.; Hu, X. K.; Lu, J. F.

    In this paper, general layout, design, operational experience and performance of the first 300MWe circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler that developed by Dongfang Boiler Group Co., Ltd China, are introduced. The furnace was with large width-depth ratio. The problems occurred during in commissioning were analyzed and the corresponding modifications were presented. Cold-state experiment and operation experience showed that both fluidization quality and circulating flow rate meet the designated value in the frunace. The imbalance of circulating material flow caused by asymmetric layout of three cyclones was very limited. Heating surfaces were safe except wing wall superheater located in upper part of the furnace was overheated at low load. After commissioning, the boiler was correspondingly modified and its performance was excellent.

  7. Operating experience feedback report -- turbine-generator overspeed protection systems: Commercial power reactors. Volume 11

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, H.L.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) review of operating experience of main turbine-generator overspeed and overspeed protection systems. It includes an indepth examination of the turbine overspeed event which occurred on November 9, 1991, at the Salem Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. It also provides information concerning actions taken by other utilities and the turbine manufacturers as a result of the Salem overspeed event. AEOD`s study reviewed operating procedures and plant practices. It noted differences between turbine manufacturer designs and recommendations for operations, maintenance, and testing, and also identified significant variations in the manner that individual plants maintain and test their turbine overspeed protection systems. AEOD`s study provides insight into the shortcomings in the design, operation, maintenance, testing, and human factors associated with turbine overspeed protection systems. Operating experience indicates that the frequency of turbine overspeed events is higher than previously thought and that the bases for demonstrating compliance with NRC`s General Design Criterion (GDC) 4, Environmental and dynamic effects design bases, may be nonconservative with respect to the assumed frequency.

  8. Microwave tokamak experiment (MTX) first year of operation and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.C.

    1989-09-20

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began plasma operations in November 1988, and our main goal is the study of electron-cyclotron heating (ECH) in plasma discharges. The MTX tokamak was relocated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and we have re-created plasma parameters that are similar to those generated while the tokamak was at MIT. After stable ohmic operation was achieved, single-pulse FEL heating experiments began. During this phase, the FEL operated at low power levels on the way to its ultimate goal of 2 GW and 140 GHz with a 30-ns pulse length. We have developed a number of new diagnostics to measure these fast FEL pulses and the resulting plasma effects. In this paper, we present results that show the correlation of MTX data with MIT data, some of the operational modifications and procedures used, results to date from preliminary tokamak operations with the FEL, and our near-term operational plans. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Medical Support for Aircraft Disaster Search and Recovery Operations at Sea: the RSN Experience.

    PubMed

    Teo, Kok Ann Colin; Chong, Tse Feng Gabriel; Liow, Min Han Lincoln; Tang, Kong Choong

    2016-06-01

    The maritime environment presents a unique set of challenges to search and recovery (SAR) operations. There is a paucity of information available to guide provision of medical support for SAR operations for aircraft disasters at sea. The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) took part in two such SAR operations in 2014 which showcased the value of a military organization in these operations. Key considerations in medical support for similar operations include the resultant casualty profile and challenges specific to the maritime environment, such as large distances of area of operations from land, variable sea states, and space limitations. Medical support planning can be approached using well-established disaster management life cycle phases of preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery, which all are described in detail. This includes key areas of dedicated training and exercises, force protection, availability of air assets and chamber support, psychological care, and the forensic handling of human remains. Relevant lessons learned by RSN from the Air Asia QZ8501 search operation are also included in the description of these key areas. Teo KAC , Chong TFG , Liow MHL , Tang KC . Medical support for aircraft disaster search and recovery operations at sea: the RSN experience. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016; 31(3):294-299. PMID:27018529

  10. The LBT experience of adaptive secondary mirror operations for routine seeing- and diffraction-limited science operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, J. C.; Brusa, G.; Christou, J.; Miller, D.; Ricardi, A.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Wagner, M.; Lefebvre, M.; Sosa, R.

    2013-09-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is unique in that it is currently the only large telescope (2 x 8.4m primary mirrors) with permanently mounted adaptive secondary mirrors (ASMs). These ASMs have been used for regular observing since early 2010 on the right side and since late 2011 on the left side. They are currently regularly used for seeing-limited observing as well as for selective diffraction-limited observing and are required to be fully operational every observing night. By comparison the other telescopes using ASMs, the Multi Mirrot Telescope (MMT) and more recently Magellan, use fixed secondaries of seeing-limited observing and switch in the ASMs for diffraction-limited observing. We will discuss the night-to-night operational requirements for ASMs specifically for seeing-limited but also for diffraction-limited observations based on the LBT experience. These will include preparation procedures for observing (mirror flattening and resting as examples); hardware failure statistics and how to deal with them such as for the actuators; observing protocols for; and current limitations of use due to the ASM technology such as the minimum elevation limit (25 degrees) and the hysteresis of the gravity-vector induced astigmatism. We will also discuss the impact of ASM maintenance and preparation

  11. Indicated and actual mass inventory measurements for an inverted U-tube steam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, G.G.; Plessinger, M.P.; Boucher, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of actual versus indicated secondary liquid level in a steam generator at steaming conditions are presented. The experimental investigation was performed in two different small scale U-tube-in-shell steam generators at typical pressurized water reactor operating conditions (5-7 MPa; saturated) in the Semiscale facility. During steaming conditions, the indicated secondary liquid level was found to vary considerably from the actual ''bottled-up'' liquid level. These difference between indicated and actual liquid level are related to the frictional pressure drop associated with the two-phase steaming condition in the riser. Data from a series of bottle-up experiments (Simultaneously, the primary heat source and secondary feed and steam are terminated) are tabulated and the actual liquid level is correlated to the indicated liquid level.

  12. Design, Development and Operational Experience of Demonstration Facility for Cs-137 Source Pencil Production at Trombay - 13283

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, S.B.; Srivastava, P.; Mishra, S.K.; Khan, S.S.; Nair, K.N.S.

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste management is a vital aspect of any nuclear program. The commercial feasibility of the nuclear program largely depends on the efficiency of the waste management techniques. One of such techniques is the separation of high yield radio-nuclides from the waste and making it suitable for medical and industrial applications. This will give societal benefit in addition to revenue generation. Co-60, the isotope presently being used for medical applications, needs frequent replacement because of its short half life. Cs-137, the major constituent of the nuclear waste, is a suitable substitute for Co-60 as a radioactive source because of its longer half life (28 years). Indian nuclear waste management program has given special emphasis on utilization of Cs-137 for such applications. In view of this a demonstration facility has been designed for vitrification of Cs-137 in borosilicate glass, cast in stainless steel pencils, to be used as source pencils of 300 Ci strength for blood irradiation. An induction heated metallic melter of suitable capacity has been custom designed for the application and employed for the Cs-137 pencil fabrication facility. This article describes various systems, design features, experiments and resulting modifications, observations and remote handling features necessary for the actual operation of such facility. The layout of the facility has been planned in such a way that the same can be adopted in a hot cell for commercial production of source pencils. (authors)

  13. Self-Actualization Effects Of A Marathon Growth Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dorothy S.; Medvene, Arnold M.

    1975-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a marathon group experience on university student's level of self-actualization two days and six weeks after the experience. Gains in self-actualization as a result of marathon group participation depended upon an individual's level of ego strength upon entering the group. (Author)

  14. Tritium handling safety and operating experience at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is a facility designed to develop and demonstrate, in full scale, technologies necessary for safe and efficient operation of tokamak fusion reactors. TSTA currently consists of systems for pumping DT gas mixtures; for removing impurities; for separating the isotopes of hydrogen; for storage of hydrogen isotopes; for gas analysis; and for assuring safety by the necessary control, monitoring, and detritiation of effluent gaseous streams. TSTA also has several small scale experiments to develop and test new equipment and processes necessary for fusion reactors. Tritium was introduced into TSTA in June 1984. Current inventory is approximately 100 grams. Approximately 10{sup 9} Curies of tritium have been processed in closed loop operation at TSTA. Total tritium releases from the facility stack have been less than 75 Curies. Total operating personnel exposures are less than 500 person-mrem. Exposures to the general public from TSTA tritium releases are extremely small (less than 10{sup {minus}2} mrem). Total tritium buried as waste is less than 36,000 Curies. In this paper, data on component reliability, failure types and rates, and waste quantities are presented. Operational experience under normal, abnormal, and emergency conditions is presented. The DOE requirements for the operation of a tritium facility like TSTA include personnel training, emergency preparedness, radiation protection, safety analysis, and preoperational appraisals. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. ISAC SC-LINAC PHASE-II HELIUM REFRIGERATOR COMMISSIONING AND FIRST OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Sekachev, I.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2010-04-09

    ISAC Phase-II is an upgrade of the radioactive isotope superconducting linear accelerator, SC-linac, at TRIUMF. The Phase-I section of the accelerator, medium-beta, is operational and is cooled with a 600 W helium refrigerator, commissioned in March 2005. An identical refrigerator is being used with the Phase-II segment of the accelerator; which is now under construction. The second refrigerator has been commissioned and tested with the Phase-I section of the linac and is used for Phase-II linac development, including new SC-cavity performance tests. The commissioning of the Phase-II refrigeration system and recent operational experience is presented.

  16. Operational experience in the Langley expansion tube with various test gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1977-01-01

    A resume' of operating experiences with the Langley Expansion Tube is presented. The driver gas was unheated helium at a nominal pressure of 5000 psi and the majority of the data presented are for air and carbon dioxide test gases. The primary purpose of these data is to illustrate the effects of various parameters on quasi-steady test flow duration, as well as free stream and post-normal shock flow conditions. The discussion shows that the Langley Expansion Tube is an operational facility capable of producing good quality, highly repeatable, quasi-steady flow for test times sufficient to establish flow about blunt axisymmetric and two-dimensional models.

  17. Isac Sc-Linac Phase-II Helium Refrigerator Commissioning and First Operational Experience at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekachev, I.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2010-04-01

    ISAC Phase-II is an upgrade of the radioactive isotope superconducting linear accelerator, SC-linac, at TRIUMF. The Phase-I section of the accelerator, medium-beta, is operational and is cooled with a 600 W helium refrigerator, commissioned in March 2005. An identical refrigerator is being used with the Phase-II segment of the accelerator; which is now under construction. The second refrigerator has been commissioned and tested with the Phase-I section of the linac and is used for Phase-II linac development, including new SC-cavity performance tests. The commissioning of the Phase-II refrigeration system and recent operational experience is presented.

  18. Development and operating experience of a short-period superconducting undulator at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Harkay, K.; Abliz, M.; Boon, L.; Borland, M.; Capatina, D.; Collins, J.; Decker, G.; Dejus, R.; Dooling, J.; Doose, C.; Emery, L.; Fuerst, J.; Gagliano, J.; Hasse, Q.; Jaski, M.; Kasa, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kustom, R.; Lang, J. C.; Liu, J.; Moog, E.; Robinson, D.; Sajaev, V.; Schroeder, K.; Sereno, N.; Shiroyanagi, Y.; Skiadopoulos, D.; Smith, M.; Sun, X.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Vasserman, I.; Vella, A.; Xiao, A.; Xu, J.; Zholents, A.; Gluskin, E.; Lev, V.; Mezentsev, N.; Syrovatin, V.; Tsukanov, V.; Makarov, A.; Pfotenhauer, J.; Potratz, D.

    2015-04-01

    A decade-long effort at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on development of superconducting undulators culminated in December 2012 with the installation of the first superconducting undulator "SCU0" into Sector 6 of the APS storage ring. The device was commissioned in January 2013 and has been in user operation since. This paper presents the magnetic and cryogenic design of the SCU0 together with the results of stand-alone cold tests. The initial commissioning and characterization of SCU0 as well as its operating experience in the APS storage ring are described.

  19. Pilot interaction with cockpit automation - Operational experiences with the Flight Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarter, Nadine B.; Woods, David D.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of two studies on the potential effect of cockpit automation on the pilot's performance, which provide data on pilots' difficulties with understanding and operating one of the core systems of cockpit automation, the Flight Management System (FMS). The results of both studies indicate that, although pilots do become proficient in standard FMS operations through ground training and subsequent flight experience, they still have difficulties tracking the FMS status and behavior in certain flight contexts and show gaps in the understanding of the functional structure of the system. The results suggest that design-related factors such as opaque interfaces contribute to these difficulties, which can affect the pilot's situation awareness.

  20. Deepwater completion/workover riser and control system: Operational experience and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, W.C.; Beebe, D.C.

    1996-12-31

    Sonsub International designed, built and is currently operating a deepwater Completion/Workover (C/WO) Riser and Control System which is being offered to the industry on a lease basis. In an industry partnering approach, Sonsub worked closely with both operating companies and Deepstar participants to develop a system that would meet both current and future requirements for completion/workover operations in deepwater subsea development applications. The C/WO Riser and Control System is designed for use in water depths up to 6,000 ft (but is capable of being extended to 10,000 ft) and is rated for 10,000 psi working pressure. The system includes all of the equipment required for use in well completion operations to run and install the tubing hanger and subsea tree and in workover operations to provide wireline and/or coiled tubing access into the well bore. The C/WO Riser and Control System was used initially by Shell Offshore, Inc. (SOI) to complete two wells in 2,040 ft of water in the Popeye Field in the US Gulf of Mexico (GOM) during the second half of 1995, and a single well in 2,960 ft of water in the Mars field in the GOM in early 1996. It is scheduled for use by SOI in 5,400 ft of water in the Mensa field in the GOM in late 1996/early 1997. This paper discusses the design of the C/WO Riser and Control System and the experience gained from operating this equipment in the Popeye and Mars fields and also discusses some of the lessons learned (both positive and negative). This information is currently being used to enhance the design and operating features of the C/WO Riser and Control System and to further refine the operating procedures to improve operating efficiency and reduce costs.

  1. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  2. Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) team in the SL POCC) during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  3. USA B and W`s IR-CFB coal-fired boiler operating experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Kavidass, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Kanoria, M.; Price, C.S.

    1998-12-31

    This paper updates operating experience of two Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) coal-fired, internal recirculation circulating fluidized-bed (IR-CFB) boilers. The first boiler is located at Southern Illinois University (SIU) in Carbondale, Illinois and is designed for 35 MWt output for cogeneration application, utilizing high sulfur, low ash Illinois coal. The second boiler is located at Kanoria Chemicals and Industries Ltd. (KCIL) in Renukoot, India and is designed for 81 MWt output for captive power requirements, firing high ash, low sulfur coal. This boiler was supplied by Thermax B and W (TBW) Ltd., a joint venture company of B and W and Thermax in India. The CFB technology is selected for these two units based on the fuel and environmental considerations. This paper discusses the various aspects of the two IR-CFB boilers` design features, performance, and operating experience including emissions.

  4. Preliminary analysis of WL experiment number 701: Space environment effects on operating fiber optic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, E. W.; Padden, R. J.; Berry, J. N.; Sanchez, A. D.; Chapman, S. P.

    1991-01-01

    A brief overview of the analysis performed on WL Experiment number 701 is presented, highlighting the successful operation of the first know active fiber optic links orbited in space. Four operating fiber optic links were exposed to the space environment for a period exceeding five years, situated aboard and external to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Despite the prolonged space exposure to radiation, wide temperature extremums, atomic oxygen interactions, and micrometeorite and debris impacts, the optical data links performed well within specification limits. Early Phillips Laboratory tests and analyses performed on the experiment and its recovered magnetic tape data strongly indicate that fiber optic application in space will have a high success rate.

  5. Coordinate Systems, Numerical Objects and Algorithmic Operations of Computational Experiment in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, Alexander; Khramushin, Vasily

    2016-02-01

    The paper deals with the computer implementation of direct computational experiments in fluid mechanics, constructed on the basis of the approach developed by the authors. The proposed approach allows the use of explicit numerical scheme, which is an important condition for increasing the effciency of the algorithms developed by numerical procedures with natural parallelism. The paper examines the main objects and operations that let you manage computational experiments and monitor the status of the computation process. Special attention is given to a) realization of tensor representations of numerical schemes for direct simulation; b) realization of representation of large particles of a continuous medium motion in two coordinate systems (global and mobile); c) computing operations in the projections of coordinate systems, direct and inverse transformation in these systems. Particular attention is paid to the use of hardware and software of modern computer systems.

  6. Operating experience with the 200 kW MOD-OA wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.; Saunders, A. L.; Nyland, T. W.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    The machine configuration and its advantages and disadvantages, particularly as it affects reliability are discussed. The machine performance, both availability and power output characteristics are described. The Mod-OA operational experience is documented. The characteristics of the wind energy generated, the machine performance, and the subsystem strengths and weaknesses are discussed. An assessment of the project success in fulfilling its goals and objectives is also presented.

  7. Design, construction, and operations experience with the SWSA 6 (Solid Waste Storage Area) Tumulus Disposal Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Van Cleve, J.E.; Wylie, A.N.; Williams, L.C.; Bolinsky, J.

    1988-01-01

    Efforts are underway at the Department of Energy facilities in Oak Ridge to improve the performance of radioactive waste disposal facilities. An engineered disposal concept demonstration involving placement of concrete encased waste on a monitored concrete pad with an earthen cover is being conducted. The design, construction, and operations experience with this project, the SWSA 6 Tumulus Disposal Demonstration, is described. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Update of operating experience of B and W IR-CFB coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Belin, F.; Kavidass, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Walker, D.J.; Mandal, A.K.; Price, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    This paper updates the operating experience of two Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) coal-fired, internal recirculation circulating fluidized-bed (IR-CFB) boilers. The first boiler is located at Southern Illinois University (SIU) in Carbondale, Illinois, USA, and is designed for 35 MW{sub th} output for cogeneration application, utilizing high sulfur, low ash Illinois coal. The second boiler is located at Kanoria Chemicals and Industries in Renukoot, India, and is designed for 81 MW{sub th} output for captive power requirement, firing high ash, low sulfur coal. This boiler was supplied by Thermax B and W Ltd., a joint venture company of B and W and Thermax of India. The choice of CFB technology was based on its fuel flexibility, cost effectiveness and environmental benefits for solid fuels. Based on the broad experience in designing utility and industrial boilers for operation worldwide, B and W has developed a cost effective and compact atmospheric pressure IR-CFB boiler. The B and W IR-CFB boiler design is distinctive in its use of U-beam particle separators. Worldwide, B and W offers IF-CFB boilers up to 175 MW{sub th}, both reheat and non-reheat, and is pursuing units up to 350 MW{sub th}. This paper reviews the general description of each IR-CFB boiler, design and performance aspects, as well as overall operating experiences. The boiler availabilities including maintenance aspects and emissions data will be presented.

  9. Experience in operating the hydraulic structures of the Borisoglebsk hydroelectric station

    SciTech Connect

    Yashkul', D.M.

    1985-03-01

    The authors examine the characteristics of the Borisoglebsk hydroelectric station, including: the concrete buttress dams, intake of the hydrostation, the headrace free-flow tunnel, the surge chamber, the penstocks, the water passageway, the powerhouse and the tailrace diversion. They further discuss the operating characteristics of the hydraulic structures and their repair. From the study they conclude: the long operating experience of the hydrostation on the whole shows a sufficiently high level of reliability of the hydraulic structures; most operating difficulties are related to rockfalls in the unsupported parts of the underground workings and seepage into the tunnels and rooms; and, the repair and construction works on the hydro development are distinguished by a great diversity--their necessary volume inevitably increases with time in connection with the constant aging of all structures.

  10. Operating experience during high-level waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, P.J.; Elliott, D.I.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides a summary of operational experiences, component and system performance, and lessons learned associated with the operation of the Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The VF was designed to convert stored high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stable waste form (borosilicate glass) suitable for disposal in a federal repository. Following successful completion on nonradioactive test, HLW processing began in July 1995. Completion of Phase 1 of HLW processing was reached on 10 June 1998 and represented the processing of 9.32 million curies of cesium-137 (Cs-137) and strontium-90 (Sr-90) to fill 211 canisters with over 436,000 kilograms of glass. With approximately 85% of the total estimated curie content removed from underground waste storage tanks during Phase 1, subsequent operations will focus on removal of tank heel wastes.

  11. Coupled operation experience at the Holifield Heavy-Ion research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, R.S.; Ball, J.B.; Hudson, E.D.; Kloeppel, P.K.; Ludemann, C.A.; Martin, J.A.; Mosko, S.W.; Ziegler, N.F.

    1983-01-01

    The 25URC Pelletron tandem electrostatic accelerator and the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) comprise the accelerators of the Holifield Heavy-Ion Research Facility (HHIRF). The two machines may be operated individually or coupled, with ORIC serving as an energy booster for the tandem. In the coupled dode, the ion beam enters the cyclotron through the dee stem and is directed by the inflection magnet so that it is tangent to an orbit suitable for acceleration at a higher charge state. A thin carbon foil, placed at the point of tangency, strips the ions so that a substantial fraction are in the desired higher charge state. This fraction of the beam is then accelerated and extracted in the normal fashion. Full energy performance (25 MeV/A oxygen) was demonstrated during first coupled operation in January 1981. Routine coupled operation for experiments commenced in July 1982.

  12. International Space Station United States Orbital Segment Oxygen Generation System On-Orbit Operational Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Howe, John, Jr.; Kulp, Galen W.; VanKeuren, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) United States Orbital Segment (USOS) Oxygen Generation System (OGS) was originally intended to be installed in ISS Node 3. The OGS rack delivery was accelerated, and it was launched to ISS in July of 2006 and installed in the US Laboratory Module. Various modification kits were installed to provide its interfaces, and the OGS was first activated in July of 2007 for 15 hours, In October of 2007 it was again activated for 76 hours with varied production rates and day/night cycling. Operational time in each instance was limited by the quantity of feedwater in a Payload Water Reservoir (PWR) bag. Feedwater will be provided by PWR bag until the USOS Water Recovery System (WRS) is delivered to SS in fall of 2008. This paper will discuss operating experience and characteristics of the OGS, as well as operational issues and their resolution.

  13. Programmable DSP-based multi-bunch feedback—operational experience from six installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J.; Prabhakar, S.; Teytelman, D.; Young, A.; Stover, G.; Drago, A.; Serio, M.; Khan, S.; Knuth, T.; Kim, Y.; Park, M.

    2000-11-01

    A longitudinal instability control system, originally developed for the PEP-II, DAΦNE and ALS machines has in the last two years been commissioned for use at the PLS and BESSY-II light sources. All of the installations are running identical hardware and use a common software distribution package. This common structure is beneficial in sharing expertise among the labs, and allows rapid commissioning of each new installation based on well-understood diagnostic and operational techniques. While the installations share the common instability control system, there are significant differences in machine dynamics between the various colliders and light sources. These differences require careful specification of the feedback algorithm and system configuration at each installation to achieve good instability control and useful operational margins. This paper highlights some of the operational experience at each installation, using measurements from each facility to illustrate the challenges unique to each machine. Our experience on the opportunities and headaches of sharing development and operational expertise among labs on three continents is also offered.

  14. Programmable DSP-Based Multi-Bunch Feedback - Operating Experience from Six Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, John D

    2000-05-15

    A longitudinal instability control system, originally developed for the PEP-II, DAPHNE and ALS machines has in the last two years been commissioned for use at the PLS and BESSY-II light sources. All of the installations are running identical hardware and use a common software distribution package. This common structure is beneficial in sharing expertise among the labs, and allows rapid commissioning of each new installation based on well-understood diagnostic and operational techniques. While the installations share the common instability control system, there are significant differences in machine dynamics between the various colliders and light sources. These differences require careful specification of the feedback algorithm and system configuration at each installation to achieve good instability control and useful operational margins. This paper highlights some of the operational experience at each installation, using measurements from each facility to illustrate the challenges unique to each machine. The authors experience on the opportunities and headaches of sharing development and operational expertise among labs on three continents is also offered.

  15. New conditioning procedure derived from operating experience with the Common Long-Pulse Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Scoville, B.G.; Madruga, M.; Hong, R.M.; Phillips, J.C.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D neutral beam system utilizes an 80 kV version of the Common Long-Pulse Ion Source designed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) and originally built by RCA. Eight of these ion sources are mounted on four beamlines to provide a total of 20 MW of injected deuterium neutral power to the DIII-D tokamak. To support the DIII-D one-shift operation, neutral beams must be readied in a relatively short period of time each day, typically one hour. During non-operating periods conditioning time for the ion sources is limited, due to the costs of associated support services and the need to perform corrective and preventive maintenance. The experience gained over a six year period has resulted in finely tuned procedures for the conditioning and operation of these ion sources. Recently, an ion source was conditioned which had been accidentally filled with water for several days, resulting in surface corrosion and deconditioning of the grids and surfaces. The method of successful recovery along with data, experience and procedures derived this event and normal operations will be detailed and discussed.

  16. Operational experiences of a commercial helicopter flown in a large metropolitan area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A survey of commercial helicopter-operating experiences was conducted using a helicopter flight recorder in order to provide a basis for extending helicopter design and service-life criteria. These data are representative of 182 flight hours accumulated during 1414 flights comprised of the separate legs of the total route structure employed. The operating experiences are presented in terms of the time spent within different airspeed brackets, within the classifiable flight conditions of climb, en route, and descent, at various rates of climb and descent, and at different rotor rotational speeds. The results indicated that the helicopter spent a majority of the flight time at airspeeds either below 40 knots or above 100 knots. Rates of climb and descent were concentrated at values below 5.1 m/s (1000 ft/min) particularly for higher airspeeds. Normal acceleration experiences were low, both in the total number and peak value realized; however, an extremely large number of pitch angular-velocity experiences were noted. Rotor rotational speeds were normal with no occurrences above the upper red-line limit.

  17. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  18. Practical Experiences with Operational SOA infrastructure for Earth Observation: ECHO and Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, M.

    2009-12-01

    The technical mechanisms for exchange of Earth Observation resources (data, services, clients, applications, etc.) are becoming mature. These mechanisms allow for new and innovative solutions to be assembled from components and services from a diverse group of sources. Standards, technologies and best practices are coalescing, allowing the Earth Observation community to more fully leverage web services, and the principles of a Service Oriented Architecture. NASA’s ECHO program provides a Service Oriented Architecture infrastructure. Through ECHO, users can discover and access over 110 million Earth Observation resources provided by NASA. ECHO has been operational for six years and the ECHO program has many practical experiences in fielding and operating SOA infrastructure for mission critical systems. This presentation will address the real impacts of providing operational SOA infrastructure for the Earth Observing community. There are significant impacts in the areas of performance, robustness, evolvability and usability. Of all of these important operational concerns, we will focus on the identification and mitigation of security risks in an operational SOA infrastructure environment.

  19. The International Space Station: Operations and Assembly - Learning From Experiences - Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Sean; Dillon, William F.

    2006-01-01

    As the Space Shuttle continues flight, construction and assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) carries on as the United States and our International Partners resume the building, and continue to carry on the daily operations, of this impressive and historical Earth-orbiting research facility. In his January 14, 2004, speech announcing a new vision for America s space program, President Bush ratified the United States commitment to completing construction of the ISS by 2010. Since the launch and joining of the first two elements in 1998, the ISS and the partnership have experienced and overcome many challenges to assembly and operations, along with accomplishing many impressive achievements and historical firsts. These experiences and achievements over time have shaped our strategy, planning, and expectations. The continual operation and assembly of ISS leads to new knowledge about the design, development and operation of systems and hardware that will be utilized in the development of new deep-space vehicles needed to fulfill the Vision for Exploration and to generate the data and information that will enable our programs to return to the Moon and continue on to Mars. This paper will provide an overview of the complexity of the ISS Program, including a historical review of the major assembly events and operational milestones of the program, along with the upcoming assembly plans and scheduled missions of the space shuttle flights and ISS Assembly sequence.

  20. Whiteheadian Actual Entitities and String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Joseph A.

    2012-06-01

    In the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the ultimate units of reality are actual entities, momentary self-constituting subjects of experience which are too small to be sensibly perceived. Their combination into "societies" with a "common element of form" produces the organisms and inanimate things of ordinary sense experience. According to the proponents of string theory, tiny vibrating strings are the ultimate constituents of physical reality which in harmonious combination yield perceptible entities at the macroscopic level of physical reality. Given that the number of Whiteheadian actual entities and of individual strings within string theory are beyond reckoning at any given moment, could they be two ways to describe the same non-verifiable foundational reality? For example, if one could establish that the "superject" or objective pattern of self- constitution of an actual entity vibrates at a specific frequency, its affinity with the individual strings of string theory would be striking. Likewise, if one were to claim that the size and complexity of Whiteheadian 'societies" require different space-time parameters for the dynamic interrelationship of constituent actual entities, would that at least partially account for the assumption of 10 or even 26 instead of just 3 dimensions within string theory? The overall conclusion of this article is that, if a suitably revised understanding of Whiteheadian metaphysics were seen as compatible with the philosophical implications of string theory, their combination into a single world view would strengthen the plausibility of both schemes taken separately. Key words: actual entities, subject/superjects, vibrating strings, structured fields of activity, multi-dimensional physical reality.

  1. Nurses' perceptions and experiences of communication in the operating theatre: a focus group interview

    PubMed Central

    Nestel, Debra; Kidd, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Nurses' perceptions and experiences of communication in the operating theatre: a focus group interview Background Communication programmes are well established in nurse education. The focus of programmes is most often on communicating with patients with less attention paid to inter-professional communication or skills essential for working in specialised settings. Although there are many anecdotal reports of communication within the operating theatre, there are few empirical studies. This paper explores communication behaviours for effective practice in the operating theatre as perceived by nurses and serves as a basis for developing training. Methods A focus group interview was conducted with seven experienced theatre nurses from a large London teaching hospital. The interview explored their perceptions of the key as well as unique features of effective communication skills in the operating theatre. Data was transcribed and thematically analysed until agreement was achieved by the two authors. Results There was largely consensus on the skills deemed necessary for effective practice including listening, clarity of speech and being polite. Significant influences on the nature of communication included conflict in role perception and organisational issues. Nurses were often expected to work outside of their role which either directly or indirectly created barriers for effective communication. Perceptions of a lack of collaborative team effort also influenced communication. Conclusion Although fundamental communication skills were identified for effective practice in the operating theatre, there were significant barriers to their use because of confusion over clarity of roles (especially nurses' roles) and the implications for teamwork. Nurses were dissatisfied with several aspects of communication. Future studies should explore the breadth and depth of this dissatisfaction in other operating theatres, its impact on morale and importantly on patient safety

  2. The LHCb Online Framework for Experiment Protection, and Global Operational Control and Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, F.; Jacobsson, R.; Schleich, S.

    2011-12-01

    The complexity and extreme parameters of the LHC, such as the stored energy, the collision frequency, the high risk of adverse background conditions and potentially damaging beam losses have demanded an unprecedented connectivity between the operation of the accelerator and the experiments at both hardware and software level. LHCb has been at the forefront of developing a software framework and hardware which connects to all of the LHC communication interfaces for timing, control and monitoring of the machine and beam parameters, in addition to its own local systems for beam and background monitoring. The framework also includes failsafe connectivity with the beam interlock system. The framework drives the global operation of the detector and is integrated into the readout control. It provides the shifters with the tools needed to take fast and well-guided decisions to run the LHCb experiment safely and efficiently. In particular, it has allowed the detector to be operated with only two shifters already at the LHC pilot run. The requirements include reliability and clarity for the shifters, and the possibility to retrieve the past conditions for offline analysis. All essential parameters are archived and an interactive analysis tool has been developed which provides overviews of the experimental performance and which allows post-analysis of any anomaly in the operation. This paper describes the architecture and the many functions, including the basis of the automation of the LHCb operational procedure and detector controls, and the information exchange between LHCb and the LHC, and finally the shifter and expert tools for monitoring the experimental conditions.

  3. Overview of the SNS Target System Testing and Initial Beam Operation Experience

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, Thomas J; Crabtree, J Allen; DeVore, Joe R; Jacobs, Lorelei L; Lousteau, David C; Rennich, Mark J

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) construction project has been completed including initial beam operation with the mercury target, moderators and associated systems. The project was initiated in 1999, with groundbreaking in December of 1999. Final integrated system testing for the mercury target, cryogenic moderators, shutter systems, water and other utility systems and all control and safety systems were completed in April 2006 and first beam on target delivered April 28, 2006. This paper will give an overview of the system testing conducted in preparation for beam operation and initial operating experience with low power beams. One area of testing was extensive remote handling testing in the Target Service Bay to demonstrate all key operations associated with the target and mercury loop. Many improvements were implemented as a result of this experience. Another set of tests involved bringing the supercritical cryogenic moderator systems on line. Again, lesions learned here resulted in system changes. Testing of the four water loops was very time consuming because of the complexity of the systems and many instrumentation issues had to be resolved. A temporary phosphor view screen was installed on the front of the target which has been extremely useful in evaluating the beam profile on the target. Initial profile results will be presented. Target System performance for initial beam operation will be discussed. In general, all systems performed well with excellent availability. There were some unexpected findings. For example, xenon spallation gas products are believed to have deposited on a downstream gold amalgamation bed designed to remove mercury vapor and increased the local dose rate. A summary of findings and plans for ramping up in power will be given.

  4. An overview of experiences of Wisconsin dairy farmers who modernized their operations.

    PubMed

    Bewley, J; Palmer, R W; Jackson-Smith, D B

    2001-03-01

    Wisconsin dairy producers who modernized their operations between 1994 and 1998 had positive feelings about their expansion experiences, accompanied by increased production and improved profitability and quality of life. The average herd in this survey experienced increased production during the 5-yr period studied. Nearly all producers were satisfied with their expansion experience. The negative effect on milk production normally associated with expansion was minimal for most years and did not exist if all herds were summarized together. Managing labor appeared to be the most daunting challenge facing producers following expansion. Respondents who built all new facilities observed higher production, greater labor efficiency, and satisfaction with measures of profitability and quality of life than respondents who modified facilities or added no new facilities. As herd size increased, milk production, labor efficiency, and satisfaction with herd performance, profitability, and quality of life increased. Producers who built all new facilities spent less time on farm work, more time managing employees, and had less difficulty finding, training, supervising, and keeping farm employees than producers who modified facilities or added new facilities to existing operations. Larger herds were associated with an increased reliance on nonfamily labor. Managing labor appears to be an easier task for managers of larger herds. The most difficult challenges for producers who modernized their operations were with labor management, financing, and loan procurement, construction and cost overruns, and feet and leg health. Difficulties with expansion differed little between expansion types (same type, some new, or all new facilities) or herd sizes. PMID:11286425

  5. Influence of impurity and particle control on Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade plasma operation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.; Yu, T.L.; Foote, J.H.; Pickles, W.L.

    1986-05-01

    A variety of techniques are used in Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U)= to control impurities and reflux: repeated plasma pulses, glow discharge cleaning (GDC), and gettering. We performed a series of experiments under three different plasma-wall conditions: no wall conditioning after a machine maintenance cycle, glow-discharge-cleaned wall, and a gettered wall. We used several plasma diagnostics to determine the effect of these procedures on TMX-U plasma parameters. Spectroscopic measurements show that GDC reduces impurities and increases the electron temperature, enabling full-duration beam-sustained plasma operation without a large number of repeated plasma pulses. Gettering further reduces the impurities and the neutral pressure; this improved condition persists for several shots after gettering is stopped. Measurements from residual gas analyzers and an end-loss ion spectrometer show that hydrogen is present in the plasma during the initial deuterium operation after pumpdown; the hydrogen level decreases after plasma operation with gettering, indicating reduced wall recycling.

  6. Canadian Advanced Nanospace Experiment 2 Orbit Operations: Two Years of Pushing the Nanosatellite Performance Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarda, Karan

    The objective of the Canadian Advanced Nanospace eXperiment (CanX) program is to de-velop highly capable nanospacecraft, i.e. spacecraft under 10 kilograms, in short timeframes of 2-3 years. CanX missions offer low-cost and rapid access to space for scientists, technol-ogy developers and operationally-responsive missions. The Space Flight Laboratory (SFL), at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS) has developed the CanX-2 nanosatellite that launched in April 2008. CanX-2, a 3.5-kg, 10 x 10 x 34 cm satellite, features a collection of scientific and engineering payloads that push the envelope of capability for this class of spacecraft. The primary mission of CanX-2 is to perform a number of university exper-iments. These experiments include a miniature atmospheric spectrometer designed to detect greenhouse gas concentrations, a GPS signal occultation experiment designed to map electron and water vapour concentrations in the ionosphere and troposphere respectively, and a materi-als science experiment which evaluates a novel atomic oxygen resistant coating. The secondary mission of CanX-2 is to test and demonstrate several enabling technologies for precise formation flight. These technologies include a custom cold-gas propulsion system, a nanosatellite reac-tion wheel as part of a three-axis stabilized attitude control subsystem, and a GPS receiver. After two successful years in orbit, the nanosatellite has met or exceeded all mission objectives and continues to demonstrate the cost-effective capabilities of this class of spacecraft. Key achievements to date include a characterization of the propulsion system, a full demonstration of the attitude determination and control subsystem including capabilities in accurate pay-load pointing, unprecedented radio performance for an operational nanosatellite, and hundreds of successful science operations. The mission, the engineering and scientific payloads, and a discussion of notable orbit

  7. Experience in operating and reconstructing the turbine bearings of units of the Sayano-Shushenskoe hydroelectric station

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitenko, G.I.

    1994-10-01

    This article reviews some of the operations and maintenance experiences at the Sayano-Shushenskoe hydroelectric sstation in Russia. In particular, the experiences gained in the operation of the turbines and the reconstruction of the turbine bearings are noted. The compact layout of this facility did not permit the traditional babbitt bearing or rubber ring bearing with water lubrication. Instead, a rubber sugmented bearing with water lubrication was used. The design and construction of this bearing, as well as the operation and maintenance of this bearing, is discussed in this article. The operating experiences have shown that the component is highly reliable.

  8. Glenn's Telescience Support Center Provided Around-the-Clock Operations Support for Space Experiments on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malarik, Diane C.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Telescience Support Center (TSC) allows researchers on Earth to operate experiments onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and the space shuttles. NASA s continuing investment in the required software, systems, and networks provides distributed ISS ground operations that enable payload developers and scientists to monitor and control their experiments from the Glenn TSC. The quality of scientific and engineering data is enhanced while the long-term operational costs of experiments are reduced because principal investigators and engineering teams can operate their payloads from their home institutions.

  9. Space Environment NanoSat Experiment (SENSE) - A New Frontier in Operational Space Environmental Monitoring (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamaroff, K. I.; Thompson, D. C.; Cooke, D. L.; Gentile, L. C.; Bonito, N. A.; La Tour, P.; Sondecker, G.; Bishop, R. L.; Nicholas, A. C.; Doe, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Space Environmental NanoSat Experiment (SENSE) program is a rapid development effort of the USAF Space and Missiles Center Development Planning Directorate (SMC/XR) which will demonstrate the capability of NanoSats to perform space missions in an affordable and resilient manner. The three primary objectives for the SENSE mission are: 1) to develop best practices for operational CubeSat/NanoSat procurement, development, test, and operations; 2) to mature CubeSat bus and sensor component technology readiness levels; and 3) to demonstrate the operational utility of CubeSat measurements by flowing validated, low-latency data into operational space weather models. SENSE consists of two 3-U CubeSats built by Boeing Phantom Works. Both satellites are 3-axis stabilized with star cameras for attitude determination and are equipped with a Compact Total Electron Density Sensor (CTECS) to provide radio occultation measurements of total electron content and L-band scintillation. One satellite has a Cubesat Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (CTIP) monitoring 135.6 nm photons produced by the recombination of O+ ions and electrons. The other satellite has a Wind Ion Neutral Composite Suite (WINCS) to acquire simultaneous co-located, in situ measurements of atmospheric and ionospheric density, composition, temperature and winds/drifts. Mission data will be used to improve current and future space weather models and demonstrate the utility of data from CubeSats for operational weather requirements. Launch is scheduled for November 2013, and we will discuss the first 30 days of on-orbit operations.

  10. The Operation of Magnetically Assisted Fluidized Bed in Microgravity and Variable Gravity: Experiment and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornchamni, T.; Jovanovic, G.; Atwater, J.; Akse, J.; Wheeler, R.

    Typically, the operation of a conventional fluidized bed relies on the balance of gravitational, buoyancy, and drag forces. In the absence of normal gravity, or under microgravity and variable gravity conditions, the gravitational force must be replaced with an alternative force to restore fluidization. Our work has shown that, given a suitable variable magnetic field design, the resulting magnetic field gradient can create sufficient magnetic force acting upon the ferromagnetic particles to replace or supplement the gravitational force. Therefore, the ferromagnetic granular media can be fluidized in either microgravity or hypogravity. In this paper, we present our experimental and theoretical work leading to a) development of theoretical model based on fundamental principles for the design of the Gradient Magnetically Assisted Fluidized Bed (G-MAFB), and b) practical implementation of the G-MAFB in the filtration and destruction of solid biowaste particles from liquid streams. The G-MAFB system consists of a fluidization column and series of Helmholtz electromagnetic coils, with DC power supply. Each Helmholtz ring is powered and controlled separately. Experiments are performed in both 0g (on board NASA KC- 135) and 1g (laboratory) environments. The experiments in 0g are conducted in a two-dimensional, square cross-section, tapered fluidization column. The tapered shape is introduced to provide additional stability to the fluidization particles. The experiments in 0g prove that the magnetic force has a significant role in keeping the particles from extruding out of the bed. Without the magnetic force, it is impossible to have fluidization in space. Solid waste destruction technologies are needed to support long duration human habitation in space. The current technologies, including supercritical water oxidation (SCWO), microwave powered combustion and fluidized bed incineration, have been applied to the destruction of solid wastes, but none are compatible with

  11. Utility operational experience on the NASA/DOE MOD-0A 200-kW wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Robbins, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Mod-0A 200 wind turbine was designed and fabricated as part of the Federal Wind Energy Program. Early wind turbine operation and performance data were obtained while gaining initial experience in the operation of large, horizontal axis wind turbines in typical utility environments. The Mod-0A wind turbine was turned over to the Town of Clayton Light and Water Plant, Clayton, NM, for utility operation and on December 31, 1978, the machine had completed ten months of utility operation. The machine is described and the recent operational experience at Clayton, NMis documented.

  12. PFBC plant operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsinger, F.L. )

    1992-01-01

    By operating a fluidized bed at elevated pressures, known as pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC), advantages can be gained over atmospheric fluidized bed technology. Operating the process at elevated pressures allows electrical production from both the steam and the gas cycles which results in higher plant efficiencies. Additional benefits of operating at elevated pressures include the further reduction of emissions and the reduction in the physical size of the power plant. This paper describes the operation of a PFBC plant and its application at the Tidd clean coal demonstration project. Actual operating experience will be presented.

  13. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  14. First Year Operational Experience with the Cherenkov Detector (DIRC) of BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Spanier, Stefane

    2000-04-21

    The DIRC (acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (light)) is a new type of Cherenkov ring imaging detector based on total internal reflection that is used for the first time in the BaBar detector at PEP-II ring of SLAC. The Cherenkov radiators are long rectangular bars made of synthetic fused silica. The photon detector is a water tank equipped with an array of 10,752 conventional photomultipliers. The first year operational experience in the BaBar detector is presented using cosmic data and collision data in the energy region of the Upsilon(4S) resonance.

  15. Fault-tolerant software - Experiment with the sift operating system. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerance computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunelle, J. E.; Eckhardt, D. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted in the NASA Avionics Integrated Research Laboratory (AIRLAB) to investigate the implementation of fault-tolerant software techniques on fault-tolerant computer architectures, in particular the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) computer. The N-version programming and recovery block techniques were implemented on a portion of the SIFT operating system. The results indicate that, to effectively implement fault-tolerant software design techniques, system requirements will be impacted and suggest that retrofitting fault-tolerant software on existing designs will be inefficient and may require system modification.

  16. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system.

  17. Plasmas, Dielectrics and the Ultrafast: First Science and Operational Experience at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Decker, F.J.; England, R.J.; Erickson, R.; Fisher, A.; Gessner, S.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Li, S.Z.; Lipkowitz, N.; Litos, M.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Tudosa, I.; White, G.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Wu, Z.; /SLAC /UCLA

    2012-09-14

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is an accelerator R&D test facility that has been recently constructed at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The facility provides 20 GeV, 3 nC electron beams, short (20 {micro}m) bunches and small (20 {micro}m wide) spot sizes, producing uniquely high power beams. FACET supports studies from many fields but in particular those of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration and Dielectric Wakefield Acceleration. FACET is also a source of THz radiation for material studies. We present the FACET design, initial operating experience and first science from the facility.

  18. First year operational experience with the Cherenkov Detector (DIRC) of BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, I.; BaBar Collaboration

    2000-04-01

    The DIRC (acronym for Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov (light)) is a new type of Cherenkov ring imaging detector based on total internal reflection that is used for the first time in the BaBar detector at PEP-II ring of SLAC. The Cherenkov radiators are long rectangular bars made of synthetic fused silica. The photon detector is a water tank equipped with an array of 10,752 conventional photomultipliers. The first year operational experience in the BaBar detector is presented using cosmic data and collision data in the energy region of the Y(4s) resonance.

  19. Operational experience using the novel FixCup collecting main valve

    SciTech Connect

    Giertz, J.; Huhn, F.; Spitz, J.

    1996-12-31

    On the occasion of the 1995 AIME conference the new PROven (Pressure Regulated Oven) process to control the pressure in coke ovens individually was introduced. This process was made feasible with a new collecting main valve, termed FixCup, with the aid of this valve a variable flow resistance to the raw gas discharge can be realized using a water immersion system. However, just the application of the FixCup system alone--without any pressure regulation--is very advantageous and cost saving. Thyssen has equipped 30 ovens with the new valve. The special constructive features as well as the operational experience using the FixCup valve are treated.

  20. Tandem mirror experiment-upgrade vacuum system: a new configuration and operating parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, D.D.; Calderon, M.O.; Hunt, A.; Nexsen, W.E.; Pickles, W.L.; Turner, W.C.

    1983-12-02

    The Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) vacuum system has been installed and operating since December 1981. In 1982 and early 1983 the performance of the internal, dynamic pumping system was evaluated during physics experiments. The plasma region gas loads caused the pressure to exceed that allowable for achieving thermal barrier plasmas. The unified, multiple-beamline concept used on TMX-U to pump the neutral-beam injector gas was modified. The modifications to the system were designed to reduce conductance between the injectors and the plasma region to better use the differential pumping in the pumping regions. The modifications made were a smaller cross section neutralizer, replacing apertures with ducts between regions, eliminating the injector scrape-off in the plasma region, relocating the neutral beam dumps, and eliminating the gaps around various penetrations.

  1. STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

    2010-09-29

    During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

  2. Experiences from operation of different expansion devices for application in domestic micro CHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicsz, Dariusz; Mikielewicz, Jarosław; Wajs, Jan

    2010-10-01

    In the paper presented are experiences from operation of three different expansion devices for possible implementation in the domestic micro CHP. These were the modified scroll expander and two designs based on the variable working chamber volume pneumatic devices. Experiments showed the superiority of both "pneumatic devices" over the scroll expander, indicating the possible internal efficiencies in the range of 61 82Such efficiencies are very attractive, especially at the higher end of that range. The volume of these devices is much smaller than the scroll expander which makes it again more suitable for a domestic micro CHP. Small rotational velocities enable to conclude that connection to electricity grid will also be simpler in the case of "pneumatic devices". The "pneumatic devices" under scrutiny here could be an alternative to the typical vapour turbine in the ORC cycle, which is in the process of development at the IFFM.

  3. Progress report on the design of a varying temperature irradiation experiment for operation in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Qualls, A.L.; Muroga, T.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this experiment is to determine effects of temperature variation during irradiation on microstructure and mechanical properties of potential fusion reactor structural materials. A varying temperature irradiation experiment is being performed under the framework of the Japan-USA Program of Irradiation Tests for fusion Research (JUPITER) to study the effects of temperature variation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of candidate fusion reactor structural materials. An irradiation capsule has been designed for operation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will allow four sets of metallurgical test specimens to be irradiated to exposure levels ranging from 5 to 10 dpa. Two sets of specimens will be irradiated at constant temperature of 500{degrees}C and 350{degrees}C. Matching specimen sets will be irradiated to similar exposure levels, with 10% of the exposure to occur at reduced temperatures of 300{degrees}C and 200{degrees}C.

  4. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central element in a metaphysical…

  5. The Deep Impact Network Experiment Operations Center Monitor and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Shin-Ywan (Cindy); Torgerson, J. Leigh; Schoolcraft, Joshua; Brenman, Yan

    2009-01-01

    The Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) software at JPL is an implementation of Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) which has been proposed as an interplanetary protocol to support space communication. The JPL Deep Impact Network (DINET) is a technology development experiment intended to increase the technical readiness of the JPL implemented ION suite. The DINET Experiment Operations Center (EOC) developed by JPL's Protocol Technology Lab (PTL) was critical in accomplishing the experiment. EOC, containing all end nodes of simulated spaces and one administrative node, exercised publish and subscribe functions for payload data among all end nodes to verify the effectiveness of data exchange over ION protocol stacks. A Monitor and Control System was created and installed on the administrative node as a multi-tiered internet-based Web application to support the Deep Impact Network Experiment by allowing monitoring and analysis of the data delivery and statistics from ION. This Monitor and Control System includes the capability of receiving protocol status messages, classifying and storing status messages into a database from the ION simulation network, and providing web interfaces for viewing the live results in addition to interactive database queries.

  6. [Recent experience with reconstruction operations in ruptures of the rotator cuff.].

    PubMed

    Chomiak, J

    1997-01-01

    The author presents his short-term experience with reconstruction operations in ruptures of the rotator cuff which were performed according to principles accepted at present in twenty five patients (26 shoulders) during 1993-1996. Men predominated in the group (16 men) and the majority of patients were in the age bracket from 50-70 years. The follow-up period was 6-36 months. Massive ruptures with a lesion of the cuff exceeding 5 cm (10 times) predominated, followed by ruptures with a lesion under 2 cm (9 times). In the majority of patients the operatoin was made using the Kessel-Gschwend approach. After anterior acromionplasty the tendons of the cuff were released and fixed into the ridge between the articular area of the head of the joint and the large tubercle. The operated extremity was fixed on an abduction splint for 4-6 weeks and this was followed by controlled rehabilitation for 1-2 months. According to Constant's functional score excellent results were achieved in 31 % of the operated patients, a satisfactory result in 11 % and an unsatisfactory result in 23 % of the operated patients. The presented results are consistent above all with the subjective evaluation and evaluation of pain resulting from subacromial decompression. The functional result is consiostent with the achieved extent of mobility of the shoulder. In the majority of patients however marked restriction of strength in abduction persists due to muscular hypotrophy asa result of predominating inveterate massive ruptures. Unsatisfactory results were recorded in six patients in conjunction with the following circumstances: reoperation in the subacromial space, mechanical failure of the suture, deep infection in diabetes mellitus, operation of an occupational injury with attempted compensation and refractory cervicobrachial syndrome with an impact on the shoulder joint. From this initial experience ensues that reconstructions of the rotator cuff are successful provided the indication is correct

  7. School Guidance Counselors' Perceptions of Actual and Preferred Job Duties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, John Dexter

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide process data for school counselors, administrators, and the public, regarding school counselors' actual roles within the guidance counselor preferred job duties and actual job duties. In addition, factors including National Certification or no National Certification, years of counseling experience, and…

  8. Astronaut operations requirements document for the White Light Coronagraph experiment s-052 for the Apollo Telescope Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    Information necessary for successful performance of the observer's function in the White Light Coronagraph portion of the Apollo Telescope Mount experiments is presented. The pre-flight, in-flight, and post-flight operations required to perform the S-052 experiment are described. A discussion of the scientific objectives of the experiment and a description of the hardware are provided.

  9. Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured activities are of the Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  10. Design and operating experience of retrofit fabric filter dust collectors at Public Service Company of Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, D.C.; Larson, R.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCC) installed its first reverse air fabric filter dust collector (FFDC) in 1978 on its Cameo Unite No. 1, a 22 MW unit located near Grand Junction, Colorado. At that time, the use of fabric filter dust collectors on utility boilers was in its infancy. Since that time, PSCC has installed a total of 10 FFDC's, with the 11th currently under construction at its Comanche Station Unit No. 1., and the 12th in the planning stages for Pawnee Unite No. 1. This paper reports that all of these units are on boilers that burn low sulfur western coal. Comanche Unit No. 2 is the first PSCC FFDC on a unit that burns Powder River Basin coal. The remaining existing units burn coal from several western Colorado mines. PSCC's extensive operating experience proves that reverse air FFDC's are a cost effective means to control particulate emissions on power generating units. With experience spanning many years, and with the direct involvement in specifying, designing, constructing, and operating these FFDC's, PSCC has played a significant and active role in advancing FFDC technology to its present state.

  11. Improving INPE'S balloon ground facilities for operation of the protoMIRAX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiello-Francisco, F.; Rinke, E.; Fernandes, J. O.; Cardoso, L.; Cardoso, P.; Braga, J.

    2014-10-01

    The system requirements for reusing the scientific balloon ground facilities available at INPE were a challenge to the ground system engineers involved in the protoMIRAX X-ray astronomy experiment. A significant effort on software updating was required for the balloon ground station. Considering that protoMIRAX is a pathfinder for the MIRAX satellite mission, a ground infrastructure compatible with INPE's satellite operation approach would be useful and highly recommended to control and monitor the experiment during the balloon flights. This approach will make use of the SATellite Control System (SATCS), a software-based architecture developed at INPE for satellite commanding and monitoring. SATCS complies with particular operational requirements of different satellites by using several customized object-oriented software elements and frameworks. We present the ground solution designed for protoMIRAX operation, the Control and Reception System (CRS). A new server computer, properly configured with Ethernet, has extended the existing ground station facilities with switch, converters and new software (OPS/SERVER) in order to support the available uplink and downlink channels being mapped to TCP/IP gateways required by SATCS. Currently, the CRS development is customizing the SATCS for the kernel functions of protoMIRAX command and telemetry processing. Design-patterns, component-based libraries and metadata are widely used in the SATCS in order to extend the frameworks to address the Packet Utilization Standard (PUS) for ground-balloon communication, in compliance with the services provided by the data handling computer onboard the protoMIRAX balloon.

  12. Robotic versus conventional laparoscopic colorectal operations: a-single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Mehmet Abdussamet; Kocataş, Ali; Gemici, Eyüp; Kalaycı, Mustafa Uygar; Alış, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Robotic surgery was first introduced in 2000 especially to overcome the limitations of low rectum cancer surgery. There is still no consensus regarding the standard method for colorectal surgery. The aim of this study was to compare robotic surgery with laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective study. Data of patients with a diagnosis of colon or rectal cancer were analyzed for robotic colorectal surgery and laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Results: The cost of robotic surgery group was statistically higher than the laparoscopic surgery group (p=0.032). The average operation duration was 178 minutes in the laparoscopic surgery group and 228 minutes in the robotic surgery group, and this difference was statistically significant (p=0.044). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding other parameters. Discussion: Disadvantages of robotic surgery seem to be its higher cost and longer operation duration as compared to laparoscopic surgery. We claim that an increase in the number of cases and experience may shorten the operation time while the increase in commercial interest may decrease the cost disadvantage of robotic surgery. PMID:27436931

  13. FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) cesium trap design, installation, and operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, R.A.; Grenard, C.E.

    1988-06-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled reactor located on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, USA. The FFTF is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The FFTF was designed to test fuels and materials for use in liquid metal reactors. Since initial operation in 1982, anticipated breaches of experimental fuel pins have released fission products, including cesium, into the primary sodium. Because of its high volatility, cesium vaporizes into the cover gas space, where it condenses on components and equipment and is transported into the cover gas outlet. Because of the long half-life of /sup 137/Cs, these deposits result in long-term, local radiation levels that make contact maintenance difficult. Thus, a cesium trap was installed in FFTF to reduce the cesium level in the sodium. The trap could also permit a Run Beyond Cladding Breach (RBCB) program without compromising the sodium purity. Approximately 12 years of operating experience with a cesium trap at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), located at Idaho Falls, Idaho provided the design basis for the FFTF cesium trap. 2 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Operational experience with a long-range, multi-channel acoustic telemetry system

    SciTech Connect

    High, G.; Carman, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the design, installation, and long-term operation of a modular subsea acoustic data acquisition system in the Duncan/Argyll field, North Sea. This equipment is presently providing on-demand pressure data from eight satellite locations at ranges in excess of seven kilometres. The discussion covers the use of in-field noise measurements for optimizing system performance in a high noise environment. Two main sections cover firstly platform installation and seabed installation of the subsea transceiver. Secondly at the remote wellhead locations, the acoustic transponders are described. Cost factors, as compared with hardwired or diver-monitored data acquisition systems are discussed. Modular design permits convenient addition of other data channels and/or extra remote subsea units. The surface equipment installed at the platform is software controlled so that display and data logging can be configured according to operator needs. Variations of the same basis system are discussed, as currently in use for subsea pipeline valve actuation, and submersible flowline tow-out instrumentation. Results of several years of operational experience in various offshore applications give confidence that, when properly considered in system design, an acoustic telemetry system can function reliably at useful ranges in the offshore environment.

  15. Compatibility of photomultiplier tube operation with SQUIDs for a neutron EDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libersky, Matthew; nEDM Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    An experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the goal of reducing the experimental limit on the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron will measure the precession frequencies of neutrons when a strong electric field is applied parallel and anti-parallel to a weak magnetic field. A difference in these frequencies would indicate a nonzero neutron EDM. To correct for drifts of the magnetic field in the measurement volume, polarized 3He will be used as a co-magnetometer. In one of the two methods built into the apparatus, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) will be used to read out the 3He magnetization. Photomultiplier tubes will be used concurrently to measure scintillation light from neutron capture by 3He. However, the simultaneous noise-sensitive magnetic field measurement by the SQUIDs makes conventional PMT operation problematic due to the alternating current involved in generating the high voltages needed. Tests were carried out at Los Alamos National Laboratory to study the compatibility of simultaneous SQUID and PMT operation, using a custom battery-powered high-voltage power supply developed by Meyer and Smith (NIM A 647.1) to operate the PMT. The results of these tests will be presented.

  16. Aging assessment of reactor instrumentation and protection system components. Aging-related operating experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, A.C.; Hagen, E.W.

    1992-07-01

    A study of the aging-related operating experiences throughout a five-year period (1984--1988) of six generic instrumentation modules (indicators, sensors, controllers, transmitters, annunciators, and recorders) was performed as a part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The effects of aging from operational and environmental stressors were characterized from results depicted in Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The data are graphically displayed as frequency of events per plant year for operating plant ages from 1 to 28 years to determine aging-related failure trend patterns. Three main conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) Instrumentation and control (I&C) modules make a modest contribution to safety-significant events: 17% of LERs issued during 1984--1988 dealt with malfunctions of the six I&C modules studied, and 28% of the LERs dealing with these I&C module malfunctions were aging related (other studies show a range 25--50%); (2) Of the six modules studied, indicators, sensors, and controllers account for the bulk (83%) of aging-related failures; and (3) Infant mortality appears to be the dominant aging-related failure mode for most I&C module categories (with the exception of annunciators and recorders, which appear to fail randomly).

  17. The foundations of reusability: Successful experience and important conclusions from planning and scheduling of space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Willoughby, J. K.

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Office of Space Communications is sponsoring a combined technical and management initiative to dramatically decrease the cost of preparing for and conducting space operations. The authors present their successful experience and important conclusions from producing generalized and readily reusable solutions and systems for planning and scheduling applications. While generality by itself should enable reuse, generality alone may not produce the desired cost savings. Generality achieved by accumulating numerous special cases within a software system often increases the complexity of the software to the extent that maintenance costs overtake development savings. Because of this phenomenon, the authors have insisted on simplicity, as well as generality, to achieve cost-effective operation reusability. Simplicity and generality can be accomplished simultaneously when the basic 'Building Blocks' for a problem domain, in this paper, planning and scheduling, are discovered and implemented with reuse in mind. The Building Blocks for planning and scheduling are described. The authors also present examples of how these Building Blocks have accommodated various scenarios that were previously treated as mission-peculiar. Two case histories are presented to demonstrate operational reusability and cost effectiveness.

  18. Special operator level clinical ultrasound: an experience in application and training.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Andrew R; Vasios, William N; Hubler, David A; Benson, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades, ultrasound has evolved from a radiology and subspecialist-centric instrument, to a common tool for bedside testing in a variety of specialties. The SOF community is now recognizing the relevancy of training medics to employ this technology for multiple clinical indications in the austere operating environment. In the Fall 2008 issue of Journal of Special Operations Medicine two of the authors described the concept of training SOF medics to employ portable ultrasound as a diagnostic aid. After over two years of concerted effort, the authors trained 29 out of 40 medics of a Special Forces battalion. Retrospective analysis of the quality assurance data for ultrasound studies conducted placed the 109 studies into six categories, allowing inference of trends in clinical indication for ultrasound exams as determined by the SOF medic-ultrasonographer. The resulting distribution suggests that indications for fractures and superficial applications are as prevalent as those for focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) and pneumothorax exams. This analysis focuses on Special Operator Level Clinical Ultrasound (SOLCUS), an ultrasound training curriculum specifically for SOF medics, and helps appropriately prioritize its objectives. Despite the success of this experience, there are several issues requiring resolution before being able to integrate ultrasound training and fielding into the SOF medical armamentarium. PMID:20936599

  19. Construction and Operational Experience with a Superconducting Octupole Used to Trap Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wanderer P.; Escallier, J.; Marone, A.; Parker, B.

    2011-09-06

    A superconducting octupole magnet has seen extensive service as part of the ALPHA experiment at CERN. ALPHA has trapped antihydrogen, a crucial step towards performing precision measurements of anti-atoms. The octupole was made at the Direct Wind facility by the Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The magnet was wound with a six-around-one NbTi cable about 1 mm in diameter. It is about 300 mm long, with a radius of 25 mm and a peak field at the conductor of 4.04 T. Specific features of the magnet, including a minimal amount of material in the coil and coil ends with low multipole content, were advantageous to its use in ALPHA. The magnet was operated for six months a year for five years. During this time it underwent about 900 thermal cycles (between 4K and 100K). A novel operational feature is that during the course of data-taking the magnet was repeatedly shut off from its 950 A operating current. The magnet quenches during the shutoff, with a decay constant of 9 ms. Over the course of the five years, the magnet was deliberately quenched many thousands of times. It still performs well.

  20. Transportable Vitrification System: Operational experience gained during vitrification of simulated mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, J.C.; Burket, P.R.; Crowley, D.A.; Hansen, E.K.; Jantzen, C.M.; Smith, M.E.; Singer, R.P.; Young, S.R.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Overcamp, T.J.; Pence, I.W. Jr.

    1996-11-21

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is a large-scale, fully-integrated, transportable, vitrification system for the treatment of low-level nuclear and mixed wastes in the form of sludges, soils, incinerator ash, and similar waste streams. The TVS was built to demonstrate the vitrification of actual mixed waste at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Currently, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is working with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) to apply field scale vitrification to actual mixed waste at Oak Ridge Reservation`s (ORR) K-25 Site. Prior to the application of the TVS to actual mixed waste it was tested on simulated K-25 B and C Pond waste at Clemson University. This paper describes the results of that testing and preparations for the demonstration on actual mixed waste.

  1. The NOνA experiment, the first 12 months of commissioning, operations and physics data

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, A.

    2015-07-15

    The NOνA experiment is a long baseline neutrino experiment designed to make precision measurements of the oscillation probabilities for ν{sub µ} → ν{sub e} and ν{sub µ} → ν{sub µ} for both neutrinos and anti-neutrinos. These measurements will provide new information on the neutrino mass hierarchy, improve our knowledge of whether θ{sub 23} is non-maximal and possibility provide information on the CP violating phase δ{sub CP} of the PMNS neutrino mixing matrix. We present the observations of the first neutrino event in the NOνA far and near detectors along with data obtained during the first year of detector commissioning and operations. We use the data to demonstrate the detector’s ability to identify electron and muon neutrino events and to reject cosmic ray induced backgrounds at a level of 4 × 10{sup 7}:1. New estimates for the signal and background sensitivities of the NOνA experiment during the first year of full detector running are presented.

  2. Preliminary analyses of WL experiment No. 701, space environment effects on operating fiber optic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, E. W.; Berry, J. N.; Sanchez, A. D.; Padden, R. J.; Chapman, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    A brief overview of the analyses performed to date on WL Experiment-701 is presented. Four active digital fiber optic links were directly exposed to the space environment for a period of 2114 days. The links were situated aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) with the cabled, single fiber windings atop an experimental tray containing instrumentation for exercising the experiment in orbit. Despite the unplanned and prolonged exposure to trapped and galactic radiation, wide temperature extremes, atomic oxygen interactions, and micro-meteorite and debris impacts, in most instances the optical data links performed well within the experimental limits. Analysis of the recorded orbital data clearly indicates that fiber optic applications in space will meet with success. Ongoing tests and analysis of the experiment at the Phillips Laboratory's Optoelectronics Laboratory will expand this premise, and establish the first known and extensive database of active fiber optic link performance during prolonged space exposure. WL Exp-701 was designed as a feasibility demonstration for fiber optic technology in space applications, and to study the performance of operating fiber systems exposed to space environmental factors such as galactic radiation, and wide temperature cycling. WL Exp-701 is widely acknowledged as a benchmark accomplishment that clearly demonstrates, for the first time, that fiber optic technology can be successfully used in a variety of space applications.

  3. The Finnish Forward Surgical Team Experience During EUFOR Operation RD Congo in 2006.

    PubMed

    Handolin, Lauri; Elomaa, Teemu

    2007-06-01

    The army Forward Surgical Team (FST) is a mobile surgical asset designed to provide life- and limbsaving combat surgery in remote and austere terrains. Operation EUFOR RDC in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in 2006 was the first one planned and conducted solely by the European Union Forces (EUFOR). The first two European FSTs reported in the present article were established by the Finnish Defence Forces.The Finnish FSTs were deployed for 4 months in Kinshasa. Three different deployment scenarios were trained; the equipments loaded on two trucks and carried by two C-130 aircrafts, the equipments loaded on two aircraft pallets (no trucks) and carried by one C-130 aircraft, and the equipments loaded on and carried by two CH-53 helicopters. The FSTs were deployed in three tactical and four reconnaissance operations. Due to the peacekeeping nature of the Operation, the surgical medical workload was light. The total number of patients treated by FSTs was 12,5 of them being due to trauma and 7 to medical condition. All trauma cases were of noncombat origin, and only one of them was severe.The European FST concept should be developed for future missions regarding the experiences gained during the reported deployment, the main goals being the mobility and the lightness of the unit. This kind of special trauma surgical asset, designed for remote theatres, will possibly be useful also in other emergency operations taking place in non-conventional circumstances; a concept of FST could easily be deployed in short notice to various accidental and natural disasters. PMID:26814487

  4. Apollo experience report: Photographic equipment and operations during manned space-flight programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehnel, H. A.

    1972-01-01

    The evolution of crew-operated photographic equipment and the procedures for manned space-flight photographic operations are reviewed. The establishment of program requirements is described. Photographic operations are discussed, including preflight testing and inflight operations.

  5. Operating experiences with a molten carbonate fuel cell at Stuttgart-Möhringen wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Locher, C; Meyer, C; Steinmetz, H

    2012-01-01

    Fuel cells on wastewater treatment plants are a relatively new technology to convert biogas from anaerobic digestion into thermal and electrical energy. Since the end of 2007, a type of MCFC fuel cell (>250 kW(el), 180 kW(th)) has been installed at Stuttgart-Möhringen wastewater treatment plant. The goals of this research project are to raise the power self-sufficiency in Stuttgart-Möhringen, to further optimise high temperature fuel cells using biogas and to gain practical experience. After approximately 9,000 h of operation, a mean electrical 'gross'-efficiency of 44% was achieved. To fully exploit this high electrical efficiency, it is essential to keep the energy consumption of peripheral devices (gas pressure unit, gas cleaning unit, etc.) of the fuel cell as low as possible. PMID:22339011

  6. Participation in operation starting line, experience of negative emotions, and incidence of negative behavior.

    PubMed

    Kerley, Kent R; Matthews, Todd L; Schulz, Jeffrey T

    2005-08-01

    The prison industry in the United States has experienced an unprecedented period of growth during the past three decades. Growing dissatisfaction with the monetary investment in the criminal justice system, state-level budget constraints, and high recidivism rates have led many criminal justice professionals to rethink issues of offender resocialization and rehabilitation. Faith-based prison programs are increasingly being used as inexpensive methods for potentially improving the institutional behavior of inmates and reducing their likelihood of postrelease arrest. Unfortunately, however, there is little systematic research on this issue. Using data from Mississippi's largest state prison, the authors explore the relationship between participation in the faith-based prison event, Operation Starting Line, and subsequent experience of negative emotions and incidence of negative behaviors. Descriptive results suggest modest, yet positive, effects of attendance at the event. The article concludes with comments about the potential efficacy of faith-based prison programs and suggestions for future research. PMID:15983055

  7. Initial experience with distributing structural calculations among computers operating in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L., Jr.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1984-01-01

    An existing program is currently being adapted to perform finite element analysis by distributing substructures over a network of four Apple IIe microcomputers connected to a shared disk. In this network, one microcomputer controls the entire process while the others perform the analysis on each substructure in parallel. This substructure analysis is used in an iterative, fully stressed, structural resizing procedure. This procedure allows experimentatation with resizing in which all analyses are not completed during a single iteration. This research gives some insight on how to configure multidiscriplinary analysis and optimization procedures for decomposable engineering systems using either high performance engineering workstations or a parallel processor supercomputer. In addition, the operational experience gained facilitates the implementation of analysis programs on these new computers when they become available in an engineering environment.

  8. Preliminary Report of NRC Twin Otter Operations in the 1997 Southern Great Plains Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacPherson, J. Ian

    1997-01-01

    From June 18 to July 17, 1997, the NRC Twin Otter atmospheric research aircraft was operated from Oklahoma City, U.S.A., in the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97) Hydrology Experiment. The primary role of the aircraft was to measure the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat, CO2, ozone and momentum in the atmospheric boundary layer, along with supporting meteorological and radiometric data. Approximately 400 flux runs and 100 soundings were flown in 27 project flights over rural areas near Oklahoma City. This preliminary report documents the flight program, lists the instrumentation aboard the aircraft, and presents a summary of run-averaged data from each flux run. These data are from the in-field analysis and must be considered preliminary. A re-analysis incorporating updated calibrations is planned for the fall of 1997 followed by a more comprehensive technical report.

  9. Tracer dilution measurements for two-phase geothermal production: Comparative testing and operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hirtz, P.; Lovekin, J.

    1995-12-31

    The tracer dilution technique for the measurement of steam and water mass flowrates and total enthalpy of two-phase geothermal fluids has been in routine use in the U.S.A. for almost three years. The tracer technique was first tested and adopted on a field-wide basis at the Coso geothermal field in California. Validation of the method was performed at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal project in Utah and the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal projects in California by direct comparison to orifice-plate flowmeter measurements of the separated phases. Production well mass flowrates and total enthalpy are now regularly measured by this technique in the Coso, Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields. Implementation of the tracer method is currently underway for the Tiwi and Bulalo geothermal fields in the Philippines. This paper presents the conceptual design of the measurement process, the results of field validations, and operating experience during field-wide testing in Coso.

  10. B&W IR-CFB: Operating Experience and New Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryamchik, M.; Wietzke, D. L.

    The paper provides an update on B&W Internal Recirculation (IR) CFB boiler operating experience, new commercial projects, and developments in boiler design and process. Availability data for two projects in the U.S. will be presented, as well as data collected from two additional projects by a B&W licensee in India. Two new commercial projects are currently going through commissioning. Yet another unit, Great River Energy (being erected), is described in detail. To achieve the required amount of in-furnace heat absorption in higher capacity CFB boilers, a new B&W development is its patented in-bed heat exchanger (IBHX). The IBHX allows control of the bed temperature in the furnace as well as steam temperature in the superheater and reheater surfaces, thus accommodating higher capacities.

  11. Self-Actualization in a Marathon Growth Group: Do the Strong Get Stronger?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Ronald; Gelso, Charles J.

    1974-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a weekend marathon on the level of self-actualization of college students and the relationship between ego strength and extent of change in self-actualization. The group experience did increase self-actualization, but participants' initial level of ego strength was unrelated to changes in self-actualization.…

  12. 77 FR 15818 - License Renewal Interim Staff Guidance LR-ISG-2011-05: Ongoing Review of Operating Experience

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing the final License Renewal Interim Staff Guidance (LR-ISG), LR-ISG-2011-05, ``Ongoing Review of Operating Experience.'' This LR-ISG provides guidance and clarification concerning ongoing reviews of plant-specific and industry-wide operating experience as an attribute of aging management programs used at nuclear power plants as described in......

  13. Design and operation of a cryogenic charge-integrating preamplifier for the MuSun experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, R. A.; Wauters, F.; Gray, F. E.; Kammel, P.; Nadtochy, A.; Peterson, D.; van Wechel, T.; Gross, E.; Gubanich, M.; Kochenda, L.; Kravtsov, P.; Orozco, D.; Osofsky, R.; Murray, M. H.; Petrov, G. E.; Phillips, J. D.; Stroud, J.; Trofimov, V.; Vasilyev, A.; Vznuzdaev, M.

    2014-07-01

    The central detector in the MuSun experiment is a pad-plane time projection ionization chamber that operates without gas amplification in deuterium at 31 K; it is used to measure the rate of the muon capture process μ-+d→n+n+νμ. A new charge-sensitive preamplifier, operated at 140 K, has been developed for this detector. It achieved a resolution of 4.5 keV(D2) or 120 e- RMS with zero detector capacitance at 1.1 μ s integration time in laboratory tests. In the experimental environment, the electronic resolution is 10 keV(D2) or 250 e- RMS at a 0.5 μ s integration time. The excellent energy resolution of this amplifier has enabled discrimination between signals from muon-catalyzed fusion and muon capture on chemical impurities, which will precisely determine systematic corrections due to these processes. It is also expected to improve the muon tracking and determination of the stopping location.

  14. ARIEL E-linac Cryogenic System: Commissioning and First Operational Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koveshnikov, A.; Bylinskii, I.; Hodgson, G.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R.; Ma, Y.; Nagimov, R.; Yosifov, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Rare IsotopE Laboratory (ARIEL) is a major expansion of the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF. A key part of the ARIEL project is a 10 mA 50 MeV continuous-wave superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) electron linear accelerator (e-linac). The 1.3 GHz SRF cavities are operated at 2 K. HELIAL LL helium liquefier by Air Liquide Advanced Technologies (ALAT) with a tuneable liquid helium (LHe) production was installed and commissioned in Q4’2013 [1]. It provides 4 K liquid helium to one injector and one accelerator cryomodules that were installed and tested in 2014. The 4 K to 2 K liquid helium transition is achieved on-board of each cryomodule. The cryoplant, LHe and LN2 distributions, sub-atmospheric (S/A) system and cryomodules were successfully commissioned and integrated into the e-linac cryogenic system. Required pressure regulation for both 4 K cryoplant in the Dewar and 2 K with the S/A system was achieved under simulated load. Final integration tests confirmed overall stable performance of the cryogenic system with two cryomodules installed. The paper presents details of the cryogenic system commissioning tests as well as highlights of the initial operational experience.

  15. Calibration and operational experience with the JET motional Stark effect diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, N. C.; Brix, M.

    2006-10-15

    Motional Stark effect measurements of the magnetic field pitch angle on JET present several difficulties most serious of which is that the injection systems consist of more than one source, each with a different motional stark effect (MSE) angle. Attempts to describe the net polarization angle, within the EFIT equilibrium code, using the weighted sum of Stokes vectors, have proved inaccurate. Instead we rely on spectrally isolating the emission of a single source. Beam power modulation is helpful in differentiating background polarized light, but this technique fails in the presence of strong edge localized mode (ELMs). Calibration is difficult because of the presence of a mirror in the optical system. The mirror introduces a large optical phase shift which means that the polarimeter has to resolve circular as well as linear polarized components. Basic calibration is carried out off the tokamak using a motorized rotary encoder stage and a six-parameter physical model of the optical and electronic systems. This is readjusted using plasma emission, for mirror operation at 300 deg. C. Some of the operating experience obtained with the JET MSE diagnostic will be relevant to ITER, although the lack of independent power or voltage control of the ITER injectors is seen as the chief challenge facing the ITER MSE design.

  16. Planned LMSS propagation experiment using ACTS: Preliminary antenna pointing results during mobile operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, John R.; Goldhirsh, Julius; Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Torrence, Geoffrey W.

    1991-01-01

    An overview and a status description of the planned LMSS mobile K band experiment with ACTS is presented. As a precursor to the ACTS mobile measurements at 20.185 GHz, measurements at 19.77 GHz employing the Olympus satellite were originally planned. However, because of the demise of Olympus in June of 1991, the efforts described here are focused towards the ACTS measurements. In particular, we describe the design and testing results of a gyro controlled mobile-antenna pointing system. Preliminary pointing measurements during mobile operations indicate that the present system is suitable for measurements employing a 15 cm aperture (beamwidth at approximately 7 deg) receiving antenna operating with ACTS in the high gain transponder mode. This should enable measurements with pattern losses smaller than plus or minus 1 dB over more than 95 percent of the driving distance. Measurements with the present mount system employing a 60 cm aperture (beamwidth at approximately 1.7 deg) results in pattern losses smaller than plus or minus 3 dB for 70 percent of the driving distance. Acceptable propagation measurements may still be made with this system by employing developed software to flag out bad data points due to extreme pointing errors. The receiver system including associated computer control software has been designed and assembled. Plans are underway to integrate the antenna mount with the receiver on the University of Texas mobile receiving van and repeat the pointing tests on highways employing a recently designed radome system.

  17. Operational experiences with a miner/bolter in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    At the Freeman United Coal Mining Company`s Orient No. 6 Mine, located in Jefferson County near Waltonville, Illinois, a different concept in continuous mining development for longwall panels is being used. Faced with a common problem in longwall operations, development of territory for the longwall mining system, Freeman instituted a miner/bolter development machine to enhance the mining rates in the longwall panels. At Orient No. 6, mining occurs in the Herrin (Illinois No. 6) Coal seam. The seam has a thickness of about five to six feet; the overburden is 700 to 800 feet. The immediate roof is formed by the dark gray shale and the medium gray shale facies of the Energy Shale Member. While the shale normally forms a stable roof, the historical mining experience indicates that bed separation along the laminations can cause problems at the mining face. In continuous mining sections, the separating layers will fall, or they must be cut down. The floor is formed by clay stone; it is normally stable, except when wet. Because of the roof instability, the enhanced roof control features of the miner/bolter operation became a powerful driving force for this acquisition. Rather than developing the normal 18 to 20 feet before roof control is installed, it is now possible to control the roof immediately. Resin impregnated conventional bolts are used as roof support; lengths of seven to eight feet are used, in concert with a fourteen foot plank or steel plate.

  18. Flight dynamics facility operational orbit determination support for the ocean topography experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolvin, D. T.; Schanzle, A. F.; Samii, M. V.; Doll, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    The Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX/POSEIDON) mission is designed to determine the topography of the Earth's sea surface across a 3 yr period, beginning with launch in June 1992. The Goddard Space Flight Center Dynamics Facility has the capability to operationally receive and process Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) tracking data. Because these data will be used to support orbit determination (OD) aspects of the TOPEX mission, the Dynamics Facility was designated to perform TOPEX operational OD. The scientific data require stringent OD accuracy in navigating the TOPEX spacecraft. The OD accuracy requirements fall into two categories: (1) on orbit free flight; and (2) maneuver. The maneuver OD accuracy requirements are of two types; premaneuver planning and postmaneuver evaluation. Analysis using the Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS) covariance software has shown that, during the first postlaunch mission phase of the TOPEX mission, some postmaneuver evaluation OD accuracy requirements cannot be met. ODEAS results also show that the most difficult requirements to meet are those that determine the change in the components of velocity for postmaneuver evaluation.

  19. Field experiences and guidelines for use of nonviscous fluids in frac-pack operations

    SciTech Connect

    Capra, L.; Ripa, G.; Ferrara, G.; Travis, R.

    1998-03-01

    In the Adriatic offshore area, conventional cased-hole gravel-pack completions have generally produced low flow efficiencies (10 to 50%) from the multilayered reservoirs of low-to-medium gas permeability (1 to 50 md). This has been attributed to the poor communication between the wellbore and the producing layers, caused by limited exposure of the interval and poor filling of the perforation tunnels with gravel. This is confirmed by openhole gravel-pack (OHGP) completions where much higher flow efficiencies are observed. The frac-pack technique, which combines gravel-pack nd fracturing technologies, can improve communication between the layers in perforated completions by creating a vertical fracture with high conductivity and the injectivity necessary to fill the perforation tunnels. In addition, any existing near wellbore damage will be bypassed. This paper reviews the field experience gained from over 80 frac-pack operations that have been performed during the last 2 years in the thin, interbedded layers of poorly consolidated sand and shale commonly found in the Adriatic area. Owing to their relatively low permeability, these formations can be fractured with nonviscosified fluids at pump rates less than 1 bbl/min. Consequently, completion brine was selected as the treating fluid. To reduce operational time and costs, the frac-pack treatments were carried out with the gravel-pack assembly in place and injection rates of up to 7 bbl/min were used with gravel concentrations staged from 1 to 4 lbm/gal. Fluid losses were encountered after the frac-pack treatments and were controlled by spotting a small pill of drill-in fluid (containing calcium carbonate) that was sized to bridge inside the screens. This paper presents the production performance of the frac-pack completions and establishes guidelines for future applications of frac-pack operations in similar reservoirs.

  20. Separated flow operation of the SHARAQ spectrometer for in-flight proton-decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dozono, M.; Uesaka, T.; Michimasa, S.; Takaki, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Matsushita, M.; Ota, S.; Tokieda, H.; Shimoura, S.

    2016-09-01

    A new "separated flow" operating mode has been developed for in-flight proton-decay experiments using the SHARAQ spectrometer. In this mode, the protons and heavy-ion products are separated and measured in coincidence at two different focal planes of the SHARAQ. The ion-optical properties of the new mode were studied using a proton beam at 246 MeV, and the momentum vector was reconstructed from the parameters measured in the focal plane of the SHARAQ. In the experiment with the (16O, 16F) reaction at a beam energy of 247 MeV/u, the outgoing 15O+p produced by the decay of 16F were measured in coincidence with the SHARAQ. High energy resolutions of 100 keV (FWHM) and ∼2 MeV were achieved for a relative energy of 535 keV and a 16F kinetic energy of 3940 MeV, respectively. The mode allows a new form of missing-mass spectroscopy using a reaction probe with a particle-decay channel.

  1. Practical aspects of Devonian shale exploration and development in Western West Virginia: One operator's experience

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, W.G.; Fairchild, M.; Heck, W.A.; Wolfe, R.T.; Woodfork, L.D.

    1984-05-01

    The discovery of new oil production (with associated gas) from the Devonian shales in western West Virginia in 1979 led to a tremendous increase in Devonian shale exploration and development in that area. The records of the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey indicate that over 40% of drilling permits issued in 1982 were for various zones in the Devonian shales. With the decline in the gas market, the number of Devonian shale gas wells has declined in 1983. Nevertheless, activity in Ritchie, Pleasants, and Wood counties has remained very high. That activity is a source of considerable practical information on Devonian shale exploration and development. In fact, that play has provided an active testing ground for a variety of theories and techniques. The information presented in this paper is derived largely from the experience of one operator, Rendova Oil Company of Midland, Texas. That organization has been active in West Virginia since 1980 and, through the end of 1983, has drilled over 40 Devonian shale wells. That effort has been a continuous learning process in all phases of exploration and development. This paper attempts to share that experience by describing the methods and techniques that have been tried as well as Rendova's current practices. The discussion will include exploration rationale, drilling methods, and completion and production practices.

  2. Transportability, distributability and rehosting experience with a kernel operating system interface set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumberg, F. C.; Reedy, A.; Yodis, E.

    1986-01-01

    For the past two years, PRC has been transporting and installing a software engineering environment framework, the Automated Product control Environment (APCE), at a number of PRC and government sites on a variety of different hardware. The APCE was designed using a layered architecture which is based on a standardized set of interfaces to host system services. This interface set called the APCE Interface Set (AIS), was designed to support many of the same goals as the Common Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) Interface Set (CAIS). The APCE was developed to provide support for the full software lifecycle. Specific requirements of the APCE design included: automation of labor intensive administrative and logistical tasks: freedom for project team members to use existing tools: maximum transportability for APCE programs, interoperability of APCE database data, and distributability of both processes and data: and maximum performance on a wide variety of operating systems. A brief description is given of the APCE and AIS, a comparison of the AIS and CAIS both in terms of functionality and of philosophy and approach and a presentation of PRC's experience in rehosting AIS and transporting APCE programs and project data. Conclusions are drawn from this experience with respect to both the CAIS efforts and Space Station plans.

  3. Waste Estimates for a Future Recycling Plant in the US Based Upon AREVA Operating Experience - 13206

    SciTech Connect

    Foare, Genevieve; Meze, Florian; Bader, Sven; McGee, Don; Murray, Paul; Prud'homme, Pascal

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of process and secondary wastes produced by a recycling plant built in the U.S., which is composed of a used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing facility and a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility, are performed as part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored study [1]. In this study, a set of common inputs, assumptions, and constraints were identified to allow for comparison of these wastes between different industrial teams. AREVA produced a model of a reprocessing facility, an associated fuel fabrication facility, and waste treatment facilities to develop the results for this study. These facilities were divided into a number of discrete functional areas for which inlet and outlet flow streams were clearly identified to allow for an accurate determination of the radionuclide balance throughout the facility and the waste streams. AREVA relied primarily on its decades of experience and feedback from its La Hague (reprocessing) and MELOX (MOX fuel fabrication) commercial operating facilities in France to support this assessment. However, to perform these estimates for a U.S. facility with different regulatory requirements and to take advantage of some technological advancements, such as in the potential treatment of off-gases, some deviations from this experience were necessary. A summary of AREVA's approach and results for the recycling of 800 metric tonnes of initial heavy metal (MTIHM) of LWR UNF per year into MOX fuel under the assumptions and constraints identified for this DOE study are presented. (authors)

  4. [The Nutritional Care Experience of a Post-Operative Periampullary Cancer Patient With Cachexia].

    PubMed

    Liou, Yan-Ting; Chiang, Pin-Yi; Shun, Shiow-Ching

    2016-04-01

    Cachexia is one of the most widely overlooked of the syndromes that are experienced by cancer patients. This syndrome is especially prevalent among patients with gastroenterology tract cancer. Although the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) issued palliative-care practice guidelines for cachexia in 2015, guidelines have yet to be issued for the clinical setting. The authors reviewed the literature and applied their clinical experience to create an approach for identifying the degree of cachexia in a post-operative patient with periampullary cancer. This approach assesses the nutritional status, physical status, laboratory results, and gastrointestinal system functions of the patient using the Cachexia Assessment Scale (CAS) and NCCN Practice Guidelines for Cachexia. The patient improved under nursing care with an increase in nutritional intake and physical activity facilitating their process of post-surgical physical recovery. The authors hope that this experience using the combined CAS-NCCN Practice Guidelines will help clinical caregivers better understand how to apply the relevant guidelines in clinical settings. The developed approach may help nurses assess the comprehensive nutrition status of patients and related factors in order to provide interventions that will decrease the progression of cachexia effectively and promote quality of life. PMID:27026565

  5. Experience from the construction and operation of the STAR PXL detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, L.; Anderssen, E. C.; Contin, G.; Schambach, J.; Silber, J.; Stezelberger, T.; Sun, X.; Szelezniak, M.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H. H.; Woodmansee, S.

    2015-04-01

    A new silicon based vertex detector called the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed at the Soleniodal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) experiment for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 2014 heavy ion run to improve the vertex resolution and extend the measurement capabilities of STAR in the heavy flavor domain. The HFT consists of four concentric cylinders around the STAR interaction point composed of three different silicon detector technologies based on strips, pads and for the first time in an accelerator experiment CMOS monolithic active pixels (MAPS) . The two innermost layers at a radius of 2.8 cm and 8 cm from the beam line are constructed with 400 high resolution MAPS sensors arranged in 10-sensor ladders mounted on 10 thin carbon fiber sectors giving a total silicon area of 0.16 m2. Each sensor consists of a pixel array of nearly 1 million pixels with a pitch of 20.7 μm with column-level discriminators, zero-suppression circuitry and output buffer memory integrated into one silicon die with a sensitive area of ~ 3.8 cm2. The pixel (PXL) detector has a low power dissipation of 170 mW/cm2, which allows air cooling. This results in a global material budget of 0.5% radiation length per layer for detector used in this run. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows for the installation and integration of the pixel sub detector within a 12 hour period during an on-going STAR run. The detector specifications, experience from the construction and operation, lessons learned and initial measurements of the PXL performance in the 200 GeV Au-Au run will be presented.

  6. Cold weather operating guidelines and experience for natural draft cooling towers on the American Electric Power system

    SciTech Connect

    Michell, F.L.; Drew, D.H.

    1996-10-01

    American Electric Power`s more than 30 years of experience in operating natural draft cooling towers during freezing winter weather conditions is discussed in the paper. Design features incorporated into the specifications for major rebuild/repack projects for crossflow and counterflow towers to facilitate cold weather operation are also reviewed.

  7. Design and operating experience on the US Department of Energy experimental Mod-0 100-kW wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental wind turbine was designed and fabricated to assess technology requirements and engineering problems of large wind turbines. The machine has demonstrated successful operation in all of its design modes and served as a prototype developmental test bed for the Mod-0A operational wind turbines which are currently used on utility networks. The mechanical and control system are described as they evolved in operational tests and some of the experience with various systems in the downwind rotor configurations are elaborated.

  8. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE: UPGRADED MPC AND A SYSTEMS FOR THE RADIOCHEMICAL PLANT OF THE SIBERIAN CHEMICAL COMBINE

    SciTech Connect

    RODRIGUEZ,C.GOLOSKOKOV,I.FISHBONE,L.GOODEY,K.LOOMIS,M.CRAIN,B.JR.LARSEN,R.

    2003-07-18

    destructive and nondestructive assay equipment to perform neutron and gamma measurements on nuclear materials in process or storage. These MPC&A upgrades have been in operation at the SCC Radiochemical Plant for between 2 and 3 years. The operational experience gained by SCC during this period is currently being evaluated by SCC and ''lessons learned'' will be considered both for continued operation of the Radiochemical Plant MPC&A systems and similar MPC&A systems that are currently being planned for other Plant Sites of the SCC.

  9. Functional brain imaging using near-infrared spectroscopy during actual driving on an expressway

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Kayoko; Oka, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Kouji; Takahashi, Hideki; Kato, Toshinori

    2013-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex is considered to have a significant effect on driving behavior, but little is known about prefrontal cortex function in actual road driving. Driving simulation experiments are not the same, because the subject is in a stationary state, and the results may be different. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is advantageous in that it can measure cerebral hemodynamic responses in a person driving an actual vehicle. We mounted fNIRS equipment in a vehicle to evaluate brain functions related to various actual driving operations while the subjects drove on a section of an expressway that was not yet open to the public. Measurements were recorded while parked, and during acceleration, constant velocity driving (CVD), deceleration, and U-turns, in the daytime and at night. Changes in cerebral oxygen exchange (ΔCOE) and cerebral blood volume were calculated and imaged for each part of the task. Responses from the prefrontal cortex and the parietal cortex were highly reproducible in the daytime and nighttime experiments. Significant increases in ΔCOE were observed in the frontal eye field (FEF), which has not been mentioned much in previous simulation experiments. In particular, significant activation was detected during acceleration in the right FEF, and during deceleration in the left FEF. Weaker responses during CVD suggest that FEF function was increased during changes in vehicle speed. As the FEF contributes to control of eye movement in three-dimensional space, FEF activation may be important in actual road driving. fNIRS is a powerful technique for investigating brain activation outdoors, and it proved to be sufficiently robust for use in an actual highway driving experiment in the field of intelligent transport systems (ITS). PMID:24399949

  10. The LTP Experiment on LISA Pathfinder: Operational Definition of TT Gauge in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, Michele

    2011-10-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are planning the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission in order to detect GW. The need of accurate testing of free-fall and knowledge of noise in a space environment similar to LISA's is considered mandatory a pre-phase for the project. Therefore the LISA Pathfinder mission has been designed by ESA to fly the LISA Technology Package (LTP), aiming at testing free-fall by measuring the residual acceleration between two test-bodies in the dynamical scheme we address as "drag-free". The spectral map of the residual acceleration as function of frequency will convey information on the local noise level, thus producing a picture of the environmental working conditions for LISA itself. The thesis contains abundant material on the problem of compensating static gravity, the development of a theory of orthogonalization of reference and cross-talk for the LTP experiment. The construction of the laser detection procedure starting from GR and differential geometry arguments is carried on. Effort was put in pointing out the physical motivations for the choices made in several other papers by the author and colleagues. In this perspective the thesis is meant as a summary tool for the LTP collaboration. In the second part of the thesis we summarize our contributions for a measurement of G onboard LTP and review on possible tests of fundamental physics the mission might embody. A wide part of the thesis is now part of the LTP Operation Master Plan, describing the real science and operations onboard LISA Pathfinder. This thesis was defended on September 26th, 2006 at the University of Como, Italy.

  11. Lessons Learned During Implementation and Early Operations of the DS1 Beacon Monitor Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Rob; Wyatt, Jay; Hotz, Henry; Schlutsmeyer, Alan; Sue, Miles

    1998-01-01

    A new approach to mission operations will be flight validated on NASA's New Millennium Program Deep Space One (DS1) mission which launched in October 1998. The Beacon Monitor Operations Technology is aimed at decreasing the total volume of downlinked engineering telemetry by reducing the frequency of downlink and the volume of data received per pass. Cost savings are achieved by reducing the amount of routine telemetry processing and analysis performed by ground staff. The technology is required for upcoming NASA missions to Pluto, Europa, and possibly some other missions. With beacon monitoring, the spacecraft will assess its own health and will transmit one of four beacon messages each representing a unique frequency tone to inform the ground how urgent it is to track the spacecraft for telemetry. If all conditions are nominal, the tone provides periodic assurance to ground personnel that the mission is proceeding as planned without having to receive and analyze downlinked telemetry. If there is a problem, the tone will indicate that tracking is required and the resulting telemetry will contain a concise summary of what has occurred since the last telemetry pass. The primary components of the technology are a tone monitoring technology, AI-based software for onboard engineering data summarization, and a ground response system. In addition, there is a ground visualization system for telemetry summaries. This paper includes a description of the Beacon monitor concept, the trade-offs with adapting that concept as a technology experiment, the current state of the resulting implementation on DS1, and our lessons learned during the initial checkout phase of the mission. Applicability to future missions is also included.

  12. Building on 50 Years of Mission Operations Experience for a New Era of Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onken, Jay F.; Singer, Christopher E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. National Space Policy, I the 14-nation Global Exploration Strategy,2 and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) 2006 Strategic Plan3 provide foundational direction for far-ranging missions, from safely flying the Space Shuttle and completing construction of the International Space Station by 2010, to fielding a next generation space transportation system consisting of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle!Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle!Altair Lunar Lander (fig. 1). Transportation beyond low-Earth orbit will open the frontier for a lunar outpost, where astronauts will harness in-situ resources while exploring this 4 billion-year-old archaeological site, which may hold answers to how the Earth and its satellite were formed. Ultimately, this experience will pave the way for the first human footprint on Mars. In October 2007, NASA" announced assignments for this lunar exploration work.4 The Marshall Space Flight Center is responsible for designing, developing, testing, and evaluating the Ares I and Ares V, which are Space Shuttle derived launch vehicles, along with a number of lunar tasks. The Marshall Center's Engineering Directorate provides the skilled workforce and unique manufacturing, testing, and operational infrastructure needed to deliver space transportation solutions that meet the requirements stated in the Constellation Architecture Requirements Document (CARD). While defining design reference missions to the Station and the Moon, the CARD includes goals that include reducing recurring and nonrecurring costs, while increasing safety and reliability. For this reason, future systems are being designed with operability considerations and lifecycle expenses as independent variables in engineering trade studies.

  13. Self-Actualization in a Marathon Growth Group: Do the Strong Get Stronger?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Ronald; Gelso, Charles J.

    This study examined the effects of a weekend marathon on the level of self-actualization of college students one and four weeks following their group experience. It also studied the relationship between ego strength and extent of change in self-actualization during a marathon. Generally, the group experience did increase self-actualization and the…

  14. Utility operational experience on the NASA/DOE Mod-OA 200 kW Wind Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Robbins, W. H.

    1979-01-01

    The Mod-OA 200 kW Wind Turbine was designed and fabricated by the Lewis Research Center of the NASA under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy. The project is a part of the Federal Wind Energy Program and is designed to obtain early wind turbine operation and performance data while gaining initial experience in the operation of large, horizontal axis wind turbines in typical utility environments. On March 6, 1978, the Mod-OA wind turbine was turned over to the Town of Clayton Light and Water Plant, Clayton, NM, for utility operation and on December 31, 1978 the machine had completed ten months of utility operation. This paper describes the machine and documents the recent operational experience at Clayton, NM.

  15. Yield of EBUS-TBNA for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis: impact of operator and cytopathologist experience

    PubMed Central

    Navasakulpong, Asma; Auger, Manon; Gonzalez, Anne V

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have reported a high diagnostic yield of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. We sought to review the yield of EBUS-TBNA for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis at our institution over time, and examine factors that may influence this yield. Methods Patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA for suspected sarcoidosis between December 2008 and November 2011 were identified. EBUS was performed without rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE) of samples. The final diagnosis was based on the results of all invasive diagnostic procedures and/or clinical follow-up. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the effect of various factors on yield. Results 43 patients underwent 45 EBUS-TBNA procedures for suspected sarcoidosis. A total of 115 lymph nodes were sampled. The 21 G needle was used in 51% of procedures. The mean number of lymph node stations sampled was 2.6 (SD 0.7) and the mean number of needle passes per procedure was 7.8 (SD 2.0). Non-necrotising granulomatous inflammation was detected in EBUS-TBNA samples from 34/45 (76%) procedures. The overall diagnostic yield increased to 36/45 (80%) following a cytopathology review for this study. Needle gauge, number of lymph node stations sampled and number of needle passes were not associated with diagnostic yield. The yield of EBUS-TBNA increased significantly after the first 15 procedures performed for suspected sarcoidosis; the 2 additional cases diagnosed after the cytopathology review were part of this early experience. Conclusions EBUS-TBNA is a valuable technique for the diagnosis of sarcoidosis when performed without ROSE. The yield of the procedure improved significantly over time, based on operator and cytopathologist experience. PMID:27547408

  16. DEVELOPMENT IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK OF HYBRID OPERATION SCENARIOS FOR BURNING PLASMA EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    LUCE,TC; WADE,MR; FERRON,JR; HYATT,AW; POLITZER,PA; SIPS,ACC

    2003-08-01

    OAK-B135 The basic parameters of proposed burning plasma experiments such as ITER and FIRE have been chosen based on analysis of multi-machine databases of confinement, stability, and divertor operation. given these specifications, it is of interest to run discharges in present-day machines such as DIII-D to verify the design basis and evaluate the margin available to achieve the mission goals. it is especially important to operate discharges which are stationary with respect to the current relaxation time scale ({tau}{sub R}) since it is well-known that higher performance can be achieved transiently. Attention has been focused on validating the baseline scenario for diverted machines--ELMing H-mode discharges with q{sub 95} = 3 with sawteeth. However, there is also interest in the ITER program to assess the feasibility of operating the tokamak in a mode to maximize the neutron fluence for the purpose of testing the design of various components critical to the nuclear fuel cycle and energy conversion systems in a fusion power plant. It was originally envisioned that these discharges would be intermediate between an inductive burn (baseline) scenario and a fully noninductive (steady state) scenario; therefore, this type of discharge has become known as a hybrid scenario. In the course of investigating these hybrid scenarios in DIII-D, two key results have been obtained. First, stationary discharges with q{sub 95} > 4 have been obtained which project to Q{sub fus} {approx} 10 in ITER. The projected duration of these discharges in ITER when using the full inductive flux capability is > 4000 s. (The significant engineering issues of site heat capacity, activation, and tritium consumption are beyond the scope of this work). Second, utilizing the same plasma initiation techniques as developed for the hybrid scenario, discharges at q{sub 95} = 3.2 project to near ignition in ITER, even with reduced parameters. This indicates the ITER design has significant performance

  17. Drought and water scarcity indicators: experience and operational applications in italian basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzanti, Bernardo; Checcucci, Gaia; Monacelli, Giuseppina; Puma, Francesco; Vezzani, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of River Basin Managment Plans (RBMPs), according to the Water Framework Directive, prevention and mitigation of water scarcity and droughts are some of the most challenging tasks. In the last ten years Italy experienced the highest ever observed frequency of occurrence of drought/water scarcity events. As an example, the damages for the latest, country-wide drought event of summer 2012 exceeded one billion euros. On the other hand, according to the more recent reports on the risks of extreme events, there is evidence, providing a basis for medium confidence, that droughts will intensify over the coming century in southern Europe and in the Mediterranean region (IPCC 2012). Monitoring actions are necessary and extremely effective to "feel the pulse of the situation" about both natural availability and anthropic use of freshwater resources. In this context, referring to the Programmes of Measures of RBMPs, italian River Basin Authorities (RBA) are tackling the issue at different spatial scales, planning an operational use of different indicators, between theme the Water Exploitation Index (EEA, 2009) and some statistical indicators. In this context, Po and Arno River Basin authorities, with the support of ISPRA, are directly involved in the experimental application of some significant indicators combining climatic, hydrological and anthropic factors affecting water availability. Planning and operational experiences for the two main basins (Po and Arno) and for a list of smaller scale subbasins are presented, with a detailed description of data needs, range of application, spatial and temporal scale issues, and threshold definition. For each indicator, a critical analysis of strenghts and weaknesses (at data and response level) is reported, with particular regard to the feasibility of its use within water management and water planning actions at the river basin and district scale. Tests were carried out for the whole Po River and Northern Appennines

  18. Petronas Gas Bhd experiences in accreditation of ISO 9002 quality assurance standard for its pipeline operations division in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M.A.H.

    1996-12-31

    Some companies seek ISO 9000 registration for competitive reasons or because customers require it. Petronas Gas Bhd, pipeline division company TOD or Transmission Operations Division, seek ISO 9000 registrations purely for the benefits since the management believes that a well designed and well implemented quality system has a process which tends to be lean, sensitive to customers needs, highly reactive and efficient. This paper informs how TOD sets out to put ISO 9002 international quality system to work in its operations. A Quality Steering Council was formed in Feb. 1994 and the HSE and Quality Management Manager was appointed as management representative. The current working system was first assessed. Next, an implementation plan was prepared. Training was provided and the quality manual prepared followed by all the necessary work procedures and instructions. Finally there was trial implementation and actual live implementation. In January 1995 TOD ISO 9002 registration was approved.

  19. EXPERIMENT OPERATIONS PLAN FOR A LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACCIDENT SIMULATION IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Russcher, G. E.; Cannon, L. W.; Goodman, R. L.; Hesson, G. M.; King, L. L.; McDuffie, P. N.; Marshall, R. K.; Nealley, C.; Pilger, J. P.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-04-01

    Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship between the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. This document contains both experiment proposal and assembly proposal information. The intent of this document is to supply information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and to identify the planned procedures and data that will be used both to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to operate the experiment. Operating control settings and limits are provided for both experimenter systems and CRNL systems. A hazards review summarizes safety issues that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

  20. Intelligent operations of the data acquisition system of the ATLAS experiment at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, G.; Avolio, G.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Magnoni, L.

    2015-05-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN relies on a complex and highly distributed Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system to gather and select particle collision data obtained at unprecedented energy and rates. The Run Control (RC) system is the component steering the data acquisition by starting and stopping processes and by carrying all data-taking elements through well-defined states in a coherent way. Taking into account all the lessons learnt during LHC's Run 1, the RC has been completely re-designed and re-implemented during the LHC Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) phase. As a result of the new design, the RC is assisted by the Central Hint and Information Processor (CHIP) service that can be truly considered its “brain”. CHIP is an intelligent system able to supervise the ATLAS data taking, take operational decisions and handle abnormal conditions. In this paper, the design, implementation and performances of the RC/CHIP system will be described. A particular emphasis will be put on the way the RC and CHIP cooperate and on the huge benefits brought by the Complex Event Processing engine. Additionally, some error recovery scenarios will be analysed for which the intervention of human experts is now rendered unnecessary.

  1. Operational experience with the supercritical helium during the TF coils tests campaign of SST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Rohitkumar Natvarlal; Patel, Rakesh; Tank, Jignesh; Mahesuria, Gaurang; Sonara, Dashrath; Tanna, Vipul; Patel, Jayant; Srikanth, G. L. N.; Singh, Manoj; Patel, Ketan; Christian, Dikens; Garg, Atul; Bairagi, Nitn; Gupta, Manoj Kumar; Nimavat, Hiren; Shah, Pankil; Sharma, Rajiv; Pradhan, Subrata

    2012-06-01

    Under the 'SST-1 mission mandate' recently, all the sixteen Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) Toroidal Field (TF) magnets have been successfully tested at their nominal currents of 10000 A in cold under supercritical helium (SHe) flow conditions. The TF magnets test campaign have begun in an experimental cryostat since June 2010 with the SST-1 Helium cryogenics facility, which is a 1.3 kW at 4.5 K helium refrigerator-cum-liquefier (HRL) system. The HRL provides ~300 g-s-1supercritical helium (SHe) with cold circulator (CC) as well as ~ 60 g-s-1 without cold circulator to fulfill the forced flow cooling requirements of SST- 1 magnets. In case of single TF coil tests, we can adjust HRL process parameters such that an adequate amount of required supercritical helium is available without the cold circulator. In this paper, the complete process is describing the Process Flow Diagram (PFD) of 1.3 kW at 4.5 K HRL, techniques to generate supercritical helium without using the cold-circulator and the results of the cooldown, steady state characteristics and experience of supercritical helium operations during the TF coils test campaign have been discussed.

  2. Experiments on power optimization for displacement-constrained operation of a vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Binh Duc; Phu Le, Cuong; Halvorsen, Einar

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents experiments on how to approach the physical limits on power from vibration energy harvesting under displacement-constrained operation. A MEMS electrostatic vibration energy harvester with voltage-control of the system stiffness is used for this purpose. The power saturation problem, when the proof mass displacement reaches maximum amplitude for sufficient acceleration amplitude, is shifted to higher accelerations by use of load optimization and tunable electromechanical coupling k2. Measurement results show that harvested power can be made to follow the optimal velocity-damped generator also for a range of accelerations that implies displacement constraints. Comparing to the saturated power, the power increases 1.5 times with the optimal load and an electromechanical coupling k2=8.7%. This value is 2.3 times for a higher coupling k2=17.9%. The obtained system effectiveness is beyond 60% under the optimization. This work also shows a first demonstration of reaching optimal power in the intermediate acceleration-range between the two extremes of maximum efficiency and maximum power transfer.

  3. Design considerations and operating experience in firing refuse derived fuel in a circulating fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Piekos, S.J.; Matuny, M.

    1997-12-31

    The worldwide demand for cleaner, more efficient methods to dispose of municipal solid waste has stimulated interest in processing solid waste to produce refuse derived fuel (RDF) for use in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. The combination of waste processing and materials recovery systems and CFB boiler technology provides the greatest recovery of useful resources from trash and uses the cleanest combustion technology available today to generate power. Foster Wheeler Power Systems along with Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation and several other Foster Wheeler sister companies designed, built, and now operates a 1600 tons per day (TPD) (1450 metric tons) municipal waste-to-energy project located in Robbins, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. This project incorporates waste processing systems to recover recyclable materials and produce RDF. It is the first project in the United States to use CFB boiler technology to combust RDF. This paper will provide an overview of the Robbins, Illinois waste-to-energy project and will examine the technical and environmental reasons for selecting RDF waste processing and CFB combustion technology. Additionally, this paper will present experience with handling and combusting RDF and review the special design features incorporated into the CFB boiler and waste processing system that make it work.

  4. Clinical routine operation of a filmless radiology department: three years experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosser, Hans M.; Paertan, Gerald; Hruby, Walter

    1995-05-01

    This paper communicates the operational implementation of filmless digital radiology in clinical routine, its feasibility and its effect on the radiology profession, based on the three years clinical experience from the filmless digital radiology department of the Danube Hospital, a major teaching hospital in Vienna, Austria, with currently 850 acute-care beds. Since April 1992 all radiological modalities are reported from the monitors of 16 reporting consoles in the radiology department. Images and reports are distributed by the hospital-wide network (Sienet, Siemens Medical Systems, Erlangen), and can be viewed on 60 display consoles throughout the hospital. Filmless radiology primarily is an efficient hospital-wide infrastructure to deliver radiological services along with other medical information, providing safe and fast access to this information anytime and anywhere, necessary for the conduct of the diagnostic and therapeutic task of patient care. In a comparative study of the Danube Hospital with the film based Rudolfstiftung Hospital in Vienna, we found a significant decrease of the mean patient length of hospital stay (1.99 to 3.72 days) that partially might be attributed to the implementation of filmless radiology.

  5. Design and Operation of Cryogenic Distillation Research Column for Ultra-Low Background Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiller, Christopher; Alanson Chiller, Angela; Jasinski, Benjamin; Snyder, Nathan; Mei, Dongming

    2013-04-01

    Motivated by isotopically enriched germanium (76Ge and 73Ge) for monocrystalline crystal growth for neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter experiments, a cryogenic distillation research column was developed. Without market availability of distillation columns in the temperature range of interest with capabilities necessary for our purposes, we designed, fabricated, tested, refined and operated a two-meter research column for purifying and separating gases in the temperature range from 100-200K. Due to interest in defining stratification, purity and throughput optimization, capillary lines were integrated at four equidistant points along the length of the column such that real-time residual gas analysis could guide the investigation. Interior gas column temperatures were monitored and controlled within 0.1oK accuracy at the top and bottom. Pressures were monitored at the top of the column to four significant figures. Subsequent impurities were measured at partial pressures below 2E-8torr. We report the performance of the column in this paper.

  6. Study of the Helicon Source Operation in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molvig, Kim; Batishchev, Oleg

    2003-01-01

    During this research period the following models of the VASIMR helicon discharge have been further developed and applied to analyze the on-going VX- 10 ASPL experiment: A) 1D semi-analytical model for a mixed-collisional propellant flow B) OD power and balance model for the whole helicon discharge In this particular research period we have concentrated on the MW-level performance of the VASIMR helicon source. Favorable high-power scaling and reduced ionization costs were obtained, and presented at the VASIMR NASA review in the Fall '02. This Grant is continuation of the previous NAG9-1224 award. The research results are summarized in 14 publications; they were presented as 20+ talks at the major International Conferences and scientific seminars at the leading Academic and Research Institutions. The reported results allowed helicon discharge characterization, understanding of the several experimental observations, and helped to make predictions and propose structural modifications for the advanced VASIMR helicon source operation.

  7. Operational use of distributed hydrological models. Experiences and challenges at a Norwegian hydropower company (Agder Energi).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viggo Matheussen, Bernt; Andresen, Arne; Weisser, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    The Scandinavian hydropower industry has traditionally adopted the lumped conceptual hydrological model - HBV, as the tool for producing forecasts of inflows and mountain snow packs. Such forecasting systems - based on lumped conceptual models - have several drawbacks. Firstly, a lumped model does not produce spatial data, and comparisons with remote sensed snow cover data (which are now available) are complicated. Secondly, several climate parameters such as wind speed are now becoming more available and can potentially improve forecasts due to improved estimates of precipitation gauge efficiency, and more physically correct calculation of turbulent heat fluxes. At last, when the number of catchments increases, it is cumbersome and slow to run multiple hydrology models compared to running one model for all catchments. With the drawbacks of the lumped hydrology models in mind, and with inspiration from other forecasting systems using distributed models, Agder Energy decided to develop a forecasting system applying a physically based distributed model. In this paper we describe an operational inflow and snowpack forecast system developed for the Scandinavian mountain range. The system applies a modern macroscale land surface hydrology model (VIC) which in combination with historical climate data and weather predictions can be used to produce both short-term, and seasonal forecasts of inflow and mountain snowpack. Experiences with the forecast system are illustrated using results from individual subcatchments as well as aggregated regional forecasts of inflow and snowpack. Conversion of water volumes into effective energy inflow are also presented and compared to data from the Nordic hydropower system. Further on, we document several important "lessons-learned" that may be of interest to the hydrological research community. Specifically a semi-automatic data cleansing system combining spatial and temporal visualization techniques with statistical procedures are

  8. Operation of MRO's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE): Maximizing Science Participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eliason, E.; Hansen, C. J.; McEwen, A.; Delamere, W. A.; Bridges, N.; Grant, J.; Gulich, V.; Herkenhoff, K.; Keszthelyi, L.; Kirk, R.

    2003-01-01

    Science return from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) will be optimized by maximizing science participation in the experiment. MRO is expected to arrive at Mars in March 2006, and the primary science phase begins near the end of 2006 after aerobraking (6 months) and a transition phase. The primary science phase lasts for almost 2 Earth years, followed by a 2-year relay phase in which science observations by MRO are expected to continue. We expect to acquire approx. 10,000 images with HiRISE over the course of MRO's two earth-year mission. HiRISE can acquire images with a ground sampling dimension of as little as 30 cm (from a typical altitude of 300 km), in up to 3 colors, and many targets will be re-imaged for stereo. With such high spatial resolution, the percent coverage of Mars will be very limited in spite of the relatively high data rate of MRO (approx. 10x greater than MGS or Odyssey). We expect to cover approx. 1% of Mars at approx. 1m/pixel or better, approx. 0.1% at full resolution, and approx. 0.05% in color or in stereo. Therefore, the placement of each HiRISE image must be carefully considered in order to maximize the scientific return from MRO. We believe that every observation should be the result of a mini research project based on pre-existing datasets. During operations, we will need a large database of carefully researched 'suggested' observations to select from. The HiRISE team is dedicated to involving the broad Mars community in creating this database, to the fullest degree that is both practical and legal. The philosophy of the team and the design of the ground data system are geared to enabling community involvement. A key aspect of this is that image data will be made available to the planetary community for science analysis as quickly as possible to encourage feedback and new ideas for targets.

  9. Initial operation and checkout of stratospheric aerosol gas experiment and Meteor-3M satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Shahid; Makridenko, Leonid; Chu, William P.; Salikhov, Rashid; Moore, Alvah S., Jr.; Trepte, Charles R.; Cisewski, Michael S.

    2003-04-01

    Under a joint agreement between the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) and the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (RASA), the Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument was launched in low earth orbit on December 10, 2001 aboard the Russian Meteor-3M(1) satellite from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. SAGE III is a spectrometer that measures attenuated radiation in the 282 nm to 1550 nm wavelength range to obtain the vertical profiles of ozone, aerosols, and other chemical species that are critical in studying the trends for the global climate change phenomena. This instrument version is more advanced than any of the previous versions and has more spectral bands, elaborate data gathering and storage, and intelligent terrestrial software. There are a number of Russian scientific instruments aboard the Meteor satellite in addition to the SAGE III instrument. These instruments deal with land imaging and biomass changes, hydro-meteorological monitoring, and helio-geophysical research. This mission was under development for over a period of six years and offered a number of unique technical and program management challenges for both Agencies. SAGE III has a long space heritage, and four earlier versions of this instrument have flown in space for nearly two decades now. In fact, SAGE II, the fourth instrument, is still flying in space on NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), and has been providing important atmospheric data over the last 18 years. It has provided vital ozone and aerosol data in the mid latitudes and has contributed vastly in ozone depletion research. Ball Aerospace built the instrument under Langley Research Center's (LaRC) management. This paper presents the process and approach deployed by the SAGE III and the Meteor teams in performing the initial on-orbit checkout. It further documents a number of early science results obtained by deploying low risk, carefully coordinated procedures in resolving the serious operational

  10. Initial Operation and Checkout of Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment and Meteor-3M Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shahid; Makridenko, L.; Chu, W.; Salikhov, R.; Moore, A.; Trepte, C.; Cisewski, M.

    2002-01-01

    Under a joint agreement between the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) and the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (RASA), the Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument was launched in low earth orbit on December 10,2001 aboard the Russian Meteor-3M satellite from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. SAGE III is a spectrometer that measures attenuated radiation in the 282 nm to 1550 nm wavelength range to obtain the vertical profiles of ozone, aerosols, and other chemical species that are critical in studying the trends for the global climate change phenomena. This instrument version is more advanced than any of the previous versions and has more spectral bands, elaborate data gathering and storage, and intelligent terrestrial software. There are a number of Russian scientific instruments aboard the Meteor satellite in addition to the SAGE III instrument. These instruments deal with land imaging and biomass changes, hydro-meteorological monitoring, and helio-geophysical research. This mission was under development for over a period of six years and offered a number of unique technical and program management challenges for both Agencies. SAGE III has a long space heritage, and four earlier versions of this instrument have flown in space for nearly two decades now. In fact, SAGE II, the fourth instrument, is still flying in space on NASA s Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), and has been providing important atmospheric data over the last 18 years. It has provided vital ozone and aerosol data in the mid latitudes and has contributed vastly in ozone depletion research. Ball Aerospace built the instrument under Langley Research Center s (LaRC) management. This paper presents innovative approaches deployed by the SAGE III and the Meteor teams in performing the initial on-orbit checkout. It further documents a number of early science results obtained by deploying low risk, carefully coordinated procedures in resolving the serious operational issues

  11. [Validation of knowledge acquired from experience: opportunity or threat for nurses working in operating theatres?].

    PubMed

    Chauvat-Bouëdec, Cécile

    2005-06-01

    The law n 2002-73, dated 17 January 2002, of social modernisation, as it is called, reformed continuing professional training in France. It established a new system of professional certification, the validation of the knowledge acquired from experience (VAE in French). Since 2003, the Health Ministry has been studying a project to set up the VAE for health professions, among which, in particular, the profession of the state registered nurse working in operating theatres (IBODES in French). A state diploma sanctions the training enabling to practise this profession. In the future, the VAE will open a new access way to this diploma. Does this evolution constitute a threat for the profession, and a risk or an opportunity for individual people? The aim of this thesis is to characterise the impacts of the VAE on the IBODE profession and its current system of training. Two sociological and educational approaches are comforted by a field survey. A historical background of the IBODE profession develops the evolution of the caring practices, and presents the evolution of the training systems. A sociological approach enables to analyse the vocational focus of the IBODE on looking at functionalist theories. Therefore, the study enables to think that the VAE will have no consequences on the vocational focus of the IBODE. The VAE is then the object of an educational approach within the context of continuing professional training. The topics on which it could apply and the resistances it causes are studied. Some examples are taken within other Ministries. This study shows that the VAE involves an adaptation of training centres. The VAE constitutes a genuine opportunity for the IBODE profession. However, to manage its setting up in a delicate human context, the field professionals should be involved as early as possible in the reflection initiated by the Ministry. PMID:16008137

  12. Modeling and experiments on differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, H. J. N. van; Koppers, W. R.; Rooij, G. J. van; Goedheer, W. J.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes; Kleyn, A. W.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C.

    2009-03-15

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to investigate the efficiency of differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows. Skimmers are used to separate the neutrals from the plasma beam, which is guided from the source to the target by a strong axial magnetic field. In this way, the neutrals are prevented to reach the target region. The neutral flux to the target must be lower than the plasma flux to enable ITER relevant plasma-surface interaction (PSI) studies. It is therefore essential to control the neutral gas dynamics. The DSMC method was used to model the expansion of a hot gas in a low pressure vessel where a small discrepancy in shock position was found between the simulations and a well-established empirical formula. Two stage differential pumping was modeled and applied in the linear plasma devices Pilot-PSI and PLEXIS. In Pilot-PSI a factor of 4.5 pressure reduction for H{sub 2} has been demonstrated. Both simulations and experiments showed that the optimum skimmer position depends on the position of the shock and therefore shifts for different gas parameters. The shape of the skimmer has to be designed such that it has a minimum impact on the shock structure. A too large angle between the skimmer and the forward direction of the gas flow leads to an influence on the expansion structure. A pressure increase in front of the skimmer is formed and the flow of the plasma beam becomes obstructed. It has been shown that a skimmer with an angle around 53 deg. gives the best performance. The use of skimmers is implemented in the design of the large linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI. Here, a three stage differentially pumped vacuum system is used to reach low enough neutral pressures near the target, opening a door to PSI research in the ITER relevant regime.

  13. Experiences in implementation and publication of operations research interventions: gaps and a way forward

    PubMed Central

    Kalibala, Samuel; Woelk, Godfrey B; Gloyd, Stephen; Jani, Nrupa; Kay, Lynnette; Sarna, Avina; Okal, Jerry; Ndwiga, Charity; Haberland, Nicole; Sinai, Irit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction According to UNAIDS, the world currently has an adequate collection of proven HIV prevention, treatment and diagnostic tools, which, if scaled up, can lay the foundation for ending the AIDS epidemic. HIV operations research (OR) tests and promotes the use of interventions that can increase the demand for and supply of these tools. However, current publications of OR mainly focus on outcomes, leaving gaps in reporting of intervention characteristics, which are essential to address for the utilization of OR findings. This has prompted WHO and other international public health agencies to issue reporting requirements for OR studies. The objective of this commentary is to review experiences in HIV OR intervention design, implementation, process data collection and publication in order to identify gaps, contribute to the body of knowledge and propose a way forward to improve the focus on “implementation” in implementation research. Discussion Interventions in OR, like ordinary service delivery programmes, are subject to the programme cycle, which continually uses insights from implementation and the local context to modify service delivery modalities. Given that some of these modifications in the intervention may influence study outcomes, the documentation of process data becomes vital in OR. However, a key challenge is that study resources tend to be skewed towards documentation and the reporting of study outcomes to the detriment of process data, even though process data is vital for understanding factors influencing the outcomes. Conclusions Interventions in OR should be viewed using the lens of programme evaluation, which includes formative assessment (to determine concept and design), followed by process evaluation (to monitor inputs and outputs) and effectiveness evaluation (to assess outcomes and effectiveness). Study resources should be equitably used between process evaluation and outcome measurement to facilitate inclusion of data about

  14. [Efficiency of Embosphere in the Pre-Operative Embolization of Meningioma:Clinical Experience].

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yusuke; Osanai, Toshiya; Terasaka, Syunsuke; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Endo, Shogo; Hatanaka, Kanako; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-07-01

    Embosphere® was approved in Japan for embolizing intracranial arteries for the reduction of intraoperative bleeding in January 2014. Until August 2015, we performed embolization for four meningiomas using Embosphere®. We performed an initial evaluation of all the cases, including evaluation of the clinical courses, change in the maximum tumor diameters and volumes, alteration in the appearance on magnetic resonance imaging(MRI), amount of intraoperative bleeding, complications, and histopathological findings. After embolization, the maximum tumor diameters and volumes slightly decreased on MRI, whereas the signal change on diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI)or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery(FLAIR)varied in each case. One case demonstrated a partial signal change on DWI one day after the initial procedure, and another case demonstrated a decrease in perifocal edema on FLAIR. Among our patients, least bleeding was recorded at 6 days after the embolization. Histopathological analysis revealed coagulative necrotic lesions in two cases. The von Kossa stain was used to distinguish Embosphere® from the psammoma body. One case involved a thromboembolic complication of the retinocentral artery caused by an Embosphere® of 100-300 μm. Our early-stage experience suggests that an Embosphere® of 300-500 μm should be used for safe embolization before resection to avoid thromboembolic complications because an Embosphere® of 100-300 μm can pass through the dangerous anastomosis. Our present strategy was to resect the tumor approximately seven days after the embolization using Embosphere®. However, further studies and discussion on the size of Embosphere®, and the interval between pre-operative embolization and surgical removal are needed. PMID:27384115

  15. Extended operating cycles in ethylene plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bruin, C.J. de

    1994-12-31

    Length of ethylene plant operating cycles is mainly determined by: legislative requirements for statutory inspection, need for periodic major maintenance, and fouling depending on operating conditions and plant design provisions. After consultations with local authorities the authors were led to believe that requirement and scope of inspection may be relaxed. Equipment fouling is the principal operating cause for scheduled shutdowns. Based on actual experience in the Moerdijk Lower Olefins Plants key operating and design aspects influencing equipment fouling are discussed.

  16. Operation of bare HPGe detectors in LAr/LN2 for the GERDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnabé Heider, M.; Cattadori, C.; Chkvorets, O.; di Vacri, A.; Gusev, K.; Schönert, S.; Shirchenko, M.

    2008-11-01

    GERDA is designed to search for 0νββ-decay of 76Ge using high purity germanium detectors (HPGe), enriched (~ 85%) in 76Ge, directly immersed in LAr which acts both as shield against γ radiation and as cooling medium. The cryostat is located in a stainless steel water tank providing an additional shield against external background. The GERDA experiment aims at a background (b) lessapprox10-3 cts/(kg-y-keV) and energy resolution (FWHM) <= 4 keV at Qββ = 2039 keV. GERDA experiment is foreseen to proceed in two phases. For Phase I, eight reprocessed enriched HPGe detectors from the past HdM [C Balysh et al., Phys. Rev. D 66 (1997) 54] and IGEX [C E Aalseth et al., Phys. of Atomic Nuclei 63 (2000) 1225] experiments (~ 18 kg) and six reprocessed natural HPGe detectors (~ 15 kg) from the Genius Test-Facility [H V Klapdor et al., HIM A 481 (2002) 149] will be deployed in strings. GERDA aims at b lessapprox 10-2 cts/(kg·keV·y). With an exposure of ~ 15 kg·y of 76Ge and resolution ~ 3.6 keV, the sensitivity on the half-life will be T0ν1/2 3 · 1025 y (90 % C.L.) corresponding to mee < 270 meV [V A Rodin et al., Nucl. Phys. A 766 (2006) 107]. In Phase II, new diodes, able to discriminate between single- and multi-site events, will be added (~ 20 kg of 76Ge with intrinsic b ~ 10-2 cts/(kg·keV·y). With an exposure of ~ 120 kg·y, it is expected T0ν1/2 > 1.5 · 1026 y (90% C.L.) corresponding to mee < 110 meV [V A Rodin et al., Nucl. Phys. A 766 (2006) 107]. Three natural p-type HPGe prototypes (different passivation layer designs) are available in the GERDA underground facility at LNGS to investigate the effect of the detector assembly (low-mass low-activity holder), of the handling procedure and of the refurbishment technology on long term stability and spectroscopy performance. The study started on prototype 1 (fully passivated on the borehole side). 60Co γ-irradiation of the detector in LAr resulted in an increase of the leakage current (LC), depending on the

  17. Operational experience with ultrasonic bolt seals for safeguards containment of multielement bottles in THORP spent-fuel storage ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Hatt, C.D.; Reynolds, A.F.; Jeffrey, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the operational experience gained by British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) at the THORP spent-fuel storage facility in the application and verification of ultra-sonic bolt seals to light water reactor fuel containers and multielement bottles while in the storage ponds. Additionally, it discusses BNFL`s cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, Euratom, and Joint Research Council-Ispra to facilitate the development and design modifications of the remote-handling tools used. Finally, it summarizes the benefits, from an operator`s point of view, of using the bolt seals as a safeguards/containment device.

  18. Experimental philosophy of actual and counterfactual free will intuitions.

    PubMed

    Feltz, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Five experiments suggested that everyday free will and moral responsibility judgments about some hypothetical thought examples differed from free will and moral responsibility judgments about the actual world. Experiment 1 (N=106) showed that free will intuitions about the actual world measured by the FAD-Plus poorly predicted free will intuitions about a hypothetical person performing a determined action (r=.13). Experiments 2-5 replicated this result and found the relations between actual free will judgments and free will judgments about hypothetical determined or fated actions (rs=.22-.35) were much smaller than the differences between them (ηp(2)=.2-.55). These results put some pressure on theoretical accounts of everyday intuitions about freedom and moral responsibility. PMID:26126174

  19. Experience in judging intent to harm modulates parahippocampal activity: an fMRI study with experienced CCTV operators.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Karin; McAleer, Phil; Neary, Catherine; Gillard, Julia; Pollick, Frank E

    2014-08-01

    Does visual experience in judging intent to harm change our brain responses? And if it does, what are the mechanisms affected? We addressed these questions by studying the abilities of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) operators, who must identify the presence of hostile intentions using only visual cues in complex scenes. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess which brain processes are modulated by CCTV experience. To this end we scanned 15 CCTV operators and 15 age and gender matched novices while they watched CCTV videos of 16 sec, and asked them to report whether each clip would end in violence or not. We carried out four separate whole-brain analyses including 3 model-based analyses and one analysis of intersubject correlation to examine differences between the two groups. The three model analyses were based on 1) experimentally pre-defined clip activity labels of fight, confrontation, playful, and neutral behaviour, 2) participants' reports of violent outcomes during the scan, and 3) visual saliency within each clip, as pre-assessed using eye-tracking. The analyses identified greater activation in the right superior frontal gyrus for operators than novices when viewing playful behaviour, and reduced activity for operators in comparison with novices in the occipital and temporal regions, irrespective of the type of clips viewed. However, in the parahippocampal gyrus, all three model-based analyses consistently showed reduced activity for experienced CCTV operators. Activity in the anterior part of the parahippocampal gyrus (uncus) was found to increase with years of CCTV experience. The intersubject correlation analysis revealed a further effect of experience, with CCTV operators showing correlated activity in fewer brain regions (superior and middle temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule and the ventral striatum) than novices. Our results indicate that long visual experience in action observation, aimed to predict harmful behaviour

  20. Investigation of and experience with the operation of cryogenic helium installations

    SciTech Connect

    Krakovskii, B.D.; Davydov, A.B.; Shubin, G.S.

    1985-07-01

    The authors investigated the operation of the prototype of a new series of cryogenic helium installations (CHIs) and also analyzed the operation of three installations with a turboexpansion engine running on gas and oil-gas. They conclude that, for CHIs with turboexpansion engines running on oil-gas, breakdowns connected with incomplete cleaning of the system, imperfect technology of controlling the installation, and hidden defects occurred during the first hundred running hours. After that the systems operated for more than 1000 h without trouble. The operating time to breakdown of turboexpansion engines running on gas is approximately half of the time for those running on oil-gas.

  1. Overview of physics results from the conclusive operation of the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Allain, J.; Andre, R.; Balbaky, A.; Bastasz, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Belova, E.; Berkery, J.; Betti, R.; Bialek, J.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Boedo, J.; Bonoli, P.; Boozer, A.; Bortolon, A.; Boyle, D.; Brennan, D.; Breslau, J.; Buttery, R.; Canik, J.; Caravelli, G.; Chang, C.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D.; Davis, B.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diallo, A.; Ding, S.; D'Ippolito, D.; Domier, C.; Dorland, W.; Ethier, S.; Evans, T.; Ferron, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Fonck, R.; Frazin, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Glasser, A.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gray, T.; Guo, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hahm, T.; Harvey, R.; Hassanein, A.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hirooka, Y.; Hooper, E. B.; Hosea, J.; Humphreys, D.; Indireshkumar, K.; Jaeger, F.; Jarboe, T.; Jardin, S.; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Katsuro-Hopkins, O.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J.; Kolemen, E.; Kramer, G.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R. J.; Lao, L.; LeBlanc, B.; Lee, W.; Lee, K.; Leuer, J.; Levinton, F.; Liang, Y.; Liu, D.; Lore, J.; Luhmann, N., Jr.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.; Maqueda, R.; Mazzucato, E.; McLean, A.; McCune, D.; McGeehan, B.; McKee, G.; Medley, S.; Meier, E.; Menard, J.; Menon, M.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D.; Miloshevsky, G.; Mueller, D.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J.; Nelson, B.; Nishino, N.; Nygren, R.; Ono, M.; Osborne, T.; Park, H.; Park, J.; Park, Y. S.; Paul, S.; Peebles, W.; Penaflor, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Podesta, M.; Preinhaelter, J.; Raman, R.; Ren, Y.; Rewoldt, G.; Rognlien, T.; Ross, P.; Rowley, C.; Ruskov, E.; Russell, D.; Ruzic, D.; Ryan, P.; Schaffer, M.; Schuster, E.; Scotti, F.; Shaing, K.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Sizyuk, V.; Skinner, C. H.; Smirnov, A.; Smith, D.; Snyder, P.; Solomon, W.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Takahashi, H.; Takase, Y.; Tamura, N.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, C.; Tritz, K.; Tsarouhas, D.; Umansky, M.; Urban, J.; Untergberg, E.; Walker, M.; Wampler, W.; Wang, W.; Whaley, J.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Wilson, R.; Wong, K. L.; Wright, J.; Xia, Z.; Youchison, D.; Yu, G.; Yuh, H.; Zakharov, L.; Zemlyanov, D.; Zimmer, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2013-10-01

    Research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment, NSTX, targets physics understanding needed for extrapolation to a steady-state ST Fusion Nuclear Science Facility, pilot plant, or DEMO. The unique ST operational space is leveraged to test physics theories for next-step tokamak operation, including ITER. Present research also examines implications for the coming device upgrade, NSTX-U. An energy confinement time, τE, scaling unified for varied wall conditions exhibits a strong improvement of BTτE with decreased electron collisionality, accentuated by lithium (Li) wall conditioning. This result is consistent with nonlinear microtearing simulations that match the experimental electron diffusivity quantitatively and predict reduced electron heat transport at lower collisionality. Beam-emission spectroscopy measurements in the steep gradient region of the pedestal indicate the poloidal correlation length of turbulence of about ten ion gyroradii increases at higher electron density gradient and lower Ti gradient, consistent with turbulence caused by trapped electron instabilities. Density fluctuations in the pedestal top region indicate ion-scale microturbulence compatible with ion temperature gradient and/or kinetic ballooning mode instabilities. Plasma characteristics change nearly continuously with increasing Li evaporation and edge localized modes (ELMs) stabilize due to edge density gradient alteration. Global mode stability studies show stabilizing resonant kinetic effects are enhanced at lower collisionality, but in stark contrast have almost no dependence on collisionality when the plasma is off-resonance. Combined resistive wall mode radial and poloidal field sensor feedback was used to control n = 1 perturbations and improve stability. The disruption probability due to unstable resistive wall modes (RWMs) was surprisingly reduced at very high βN/li > 10 consistent with low frequency magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy measurements of mode stability. Greater

  2. Operating experience feedback report: Assessment of spent fuel cooling. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F.; Ornstein, H.L.; Pullani, S.V.

    1997-02-01

    This report documents the results of an independent assessment by a team from the Office of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data of spent-fuel-pool (SFP) cooling in operating nuclear power plants. The team assessed the likelihood and consequences of an extended loss of SFP cooling and suggested corrective actions, based on their findings.

  3. Mountain Plains Learning Experience Guide: Appliance Repair. Course: Motor-Operated Appliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziller, T.

    One of two individualized courses included in an appliance repair curriculum, this course is designed to prepare students to operate, diagnose malfunctions, repair, and service motor operated appliances. The course is comprised of seven units: (1) Mixers and Blenders, (2) Vacuum Cleaners and Floor Polishers, (3) Washing Machines, (4) Garbage…

  4. Operation of Direct Drive Systems: Experiments in Peak Power Tracking and Multi-Thruster Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, John Steven; Brophy, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Direct-drive power and propulsion systems have the potential to significantly reduce the mass of high-power solar electric propulsion spacecraft, among other advantages. Recent experimental direct-drive work has significantly mitigated or retired the technical risks associated with single-thruster operation, so attention is now moving toward systems-level areas of interest. One of those areas is the use of a Hall thruster system as a peak power tracker to fully use the available power from a solar array. A simple and elegant control based on the incremental conductance method, enhanced by combining it with the unique properties of Hall thruster systems, is derived here and it is shown to track peak solar array power very well. Another area of interest is multi-thruster operation and control. Dualthruster operation was investigated in a parallel electrical configuration, with both thrusters operating from discharge power provided by a single solar array. Startup and shutdown sequences are discussed, and it is shown that multi-thruster operation and control is as simple as for a single thruster. Some system architectures require operation of multiple cathodes while they are electrically connected together. Four different methods to control the discharge current emitted by individual cathodes in this configuration are investigated, with cathode flow rate control appearing to be advantageous. Dual-parallel thruster operation with equal cathode current sharing at total powers up to 10 kW is presented.

  5. Testing and checkout experiences in the National Transonic Facility since becoming operational

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, W. E., Jr.; Gloss, B. B.; Mckinney, L. W.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. National Transonic Facility, constructed by NASA to meet the national needs for High Reynolds Number Testing, has been operational in a checkout and test mode since the operational readiness review (ORR) in late 1984. During this time, there have been problems centered around the effect of large temperature excursions on the mechanical movement of large components, the reliable performance of instrumentation systems, and an unexpected moisture problem with dry insulation. The more significant efforts since the ORR are reviewed and NTF status concerning hardware, instrumentation and process controls systems, operating constraints imposed by the cryogenic environment, and data quality and process controls is summarized.

  6. The SCORPIO core surveillance system - operational experience and new methods development

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, T.; Berg, O.; Hval, S.

    1995-12-31

    The main motivation behind the development of SCORPIO is to make a practical tool for reactor operators that can increase the quality and quantity of information presented on core status and dynamic behavior. This can first of all improve plant safety because undesired core conditions are detected and prevented. Second, a more flexible and efficient operation of the plant is made possible. The improvement in surveillance is obtained partly by better surveillance of core instrumentation and by running detailed core simulators on-line. The complete system has two parallel modes of operation: the Core Follow Mode and the Predictive Mode.

  7. Design, construction, operation and performance of a Hadron Blind Detector for the PHENIX experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.; Azmoun, B.; Cherlin, A.; Chi, C.Y.; Citron, Z.; Connors, M.; Dubey, A.; Durham, J.M.; Fraenkel, Z.; Hemmick, T.; Kamin, J.; Kozlov, A.; Lewis, B.; Makek, M.; Milov, A.; Naglis, M.; Pantuev, V.; Pisani, R.; Proissl, M.; Ravinovich, I.; Rolnick, S.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sharma, D.; Stoll, S.; Sun, J.; Tserruya, I.; Woody, C.

    2011-04-15

    A Hadron Blind Detector (HBD) has been developed, constructed and successfully operated within the PHENIX detector at RHIC. The HBD is a Cherenkov detector operated with pure CF{sub 4}. It has a 50 cm long radiator directly coupled in a windowless configuration to a readout element consisting of a triple GEM stack, with a CsI photocathode evaporated on the top surface of the top GEM and pad readout at the bottom of the stack. This paper gives a comprehensive account of the construction, operation and in-beam performance of the detector.

  8. [Experiences with interlocking nails in the femur. A retrospective analysis of 99 operated femur shaft fractures].

    PubMed

    Strømsøe, K; Thoresen, B O; Ekeland, A; Follerås, G; Alho, A

    1990-06-01

    In 95 patients 99 femoral fractures treated with an intramedullary locking nail were followed-up for median 22 months (12-60). 62 results were classified as excellent, 19 as good and 16 results as fair. A poor result was registered in 2 patients. We had 13 operation-related complications. Four of these complications required a new operation and one ended up with a poor end-result. Operative-technical complications do not necessarily need to impair the result if the surgeon is aware of them and knows how they are to be handled. PMID:2364783

  9. Coherent operation of detector systems and their readout electronics in a complex experiment control environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestner, Stefan

    2009-09-01

    With the increasing size and degree of complexity of today's experiments in high energy physics the required amount of work and complexity to integrate a complete subdetector into an experiment control system is often underestimated. We report here on the layered software structure and protocols used by the LHCb experiment to control its detectors and readout boards. The experiment control system of LHCb is based on the commercial SCADA system PVSS II. Readout boards which are outside the radiation area are accessed via embedded credit card sized PCs which are connected to a large local area network. The SPECS protocol is used for control of the front end electronics. Finite state machines are introduced to facilitate the control of a large number of electronic devices and to model the whole experiment at the level of an expert system.

  10. Initial Operation of the High Temperature Electrolysis Integrated Laboratory Scale Experiment at INL

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Stoots; J. E. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

    2008-06-01

    An integrated laboratory scale, 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other “integral” issues. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation.

  11. Scrubbing up: my first experience as a student nurse in the operating theatre.

    PubMed

    Gracia, Michelle

    2016-06-01

    Michelle Gracia, Nursing student at St Bernard's Hospital, Gibraltar, recalls her 'sheer panic' in the operating theatre when asked to assist the surgeon by passing the instruments. OK, she told herself, I can do this…. PMID:27281598

  12. Actualities and Perspectives in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Iencean, SM; Brehar, FM

    2008-01-01

    In the field of neurosurgery, like in other surgical specialties, the last decades have brought major achievements. The series of revolutionary discoveries has started during the last century in the fifties, with stereotactic radiosurgery, then continued with the implementation of operative microscope (during the seventies), the endovascular embolisation in the nineties and finally with the major improvement in robotic neurosurgery and molecular neurosurgery at the beginning of this century. The major innovation has been brought not only in the field of therapeutical measures but also in the field of neuro– imaging. Thus, the modern MRI with more than 3 Tesla, can reveal to the neurosurgeon the most intimate structures of the nervous system. Several important areas in neurosurgery like: vascular neurosurgery, functional neurosurgery and brain tumors pathology, benefit from the modern technology and from the latest discoveries from genetic and molecular biology. In conclusion, summarizing the discoveries of the last decade, we emphasize that the related areas like genetics, molecular biology, computer technology become more and more important in the future progress of the neurosurgery. PMID:20108475

  13. Platelet apheresis in a deployed maritime environment: experiences from Operation GRITROCK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M A; Bailey, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    When the Primary Casualty Receiving Facility (PCRF) on Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) ARGUS deployed to Operation GRITROCK in October 2014, platelet apheresis had yet to be proven as a sustainable and usable capability for improving provision of blood products on a maritime platform. This paper explores the difficulties encountered by nurses tasked with setting up this capability once deployed and the requirements needed to ensure that this capability is maintained for future operations. PMID:26867408

  14. Review of operating experience at the Los Alamos Plutonium Electrorefining Facility, 1963-1977

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, L.J.; Morgan, A.N.

    1981-12-01

    This report reviews the operation of the Los Alamos Plutonium Electrorefining Plant at Technical Area 21 for the period 1964 through 1977. During that period, approximately 1568 kg of plutonium metal, > 99.95% pure, was produced in 653 runs from 1930 kg of metal fabrication scrap, 99% pure. General considerations of the electrorefining process and facility operation and recommendations for further improvement of the process are discussed.

  15. Early operating experience with the Brookhaven National Laboratory radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H.; Clifford, T.; Giordano, S.; Khiari, F.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Puglisi, M.; Warner, P.

    1984-05-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory polarized H/sup -/ injection program for the AGS utilizes a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) for acceleration between the polarized H/sup -/ source and the Alvarez Linac. The RFQ accelerator is now in operation with low beam currents. The results of low and high power rf testing will be reported together with initial results of operation in the polarized H/sup -/ beam line.

  16. Operational experience of a commercial scale plant of electron beam purification of flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Yoshitaka; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Konno, Yoshihide

    2000-03-01

    A commercial scale plant using electron beam irradiation was constructed to clean the flue gas from a coal fired thermal power plant at Chengdu in China. Operations began in September 1997 and the plant achieved its design performance with the satisfactory recovery of by-product fertilizer for agricultural use. Another commercial plant is now under construction at Nagoya, Japan and the operation will be started in November, 1999.

  17. Research and operational efforts in support of Skylab experiment M093

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    The objectives of Skylab Experiment M093 were to measure electrocardiographic signals during spaceflight, to elucidate the electrophysiological basis for the changes observed, and to assess the effect of the change on the human cardiovascular system. Vectorcardiographic methods were used to quantitate changes, standardize data collection, and to facilitate reduction and statistical analysis of data. In this report the authors describe the M093 experiment design, the data transmission system, data reduction methods, and the analysis of data from the three Skylab missions. The report also includes clinical applications of the techniques developed for Skylab Experiment M093.

  18. Operational Experience: Integration of ASPR Data into ESSENCE-FL during the RNC

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Carrie; Passman, Dina; Chern, Aaron; Spector, Dara; Kite-Powell, Aaron; Davis, Tim; Loschen, Wayne; Lombardo, Joe; Char, Douglas; Hamilton, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Florida Department of Health (FDOH), Bureau of Epidemiology, partnered with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) to improve surveillance methods in post disaster or response events. A new process was implemented for conducting surveillance to monitor injury and illness for those presenting for care to ASPR assets such as Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) sites when they are operational in the state. The purpose of the current work was to field test and document the operational experience of the newly implemented ASPR data module in ESSENCE-FL (syndromic surveillance system) to receive near real-time automated data feeds when ASPR federal assets were deployed in Florida during the 2012 Republican National Convention (RNC). Introduction Florida has implemented various surveillance methods to augment existing sources of surveillance data and enhance decision making with timely evidence based assessments to guide response efforts post-hurricanes. Historically, data collected from deployed federal assets have been an integral part of this effort. However, a number of factors have made this type of surveillance challenging: logistical issues of field work in a post-disaster environment, the resource intensive manual data collection process from DMAT sites, and delayed analysis and interpretation of these data to inform decision makers. The ESSENCE-FL system is an automated and secure web-based application accessed by FDOH epidemiologists and staff at participating hospitals. Methods ESSENCE-FL was configured by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to receive ASPR electronic medical record (EMR) data. A scheduled program to generate data files for FDOH was created using SAS Enterprise Business Intelligence (EBI) software and a script was set up on the ASPR server to send an updated file via secure file transfer protocol (sftp) every 15

  19. Dr. Peter Cavanaugh Explains the Need and Operation of the FOOT Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This video clip is an interview with Dr. Peter Cavanaugh, principal investigator for the FOOT experiment. He explains the reasoning behind the experiment and shows some video clips of the FOOT experiment being calibrated and conducted in orbit. The heart of the FOOT experiment is an instrumented suit called the Lower Extremity Monitoring Suit (LEMS). This customized garment is a pair of Lycra cycling tights incorporating 20 carefully placed sensors and the associated wiring control units, and amplifiers. LEMS enables the electrical activity of the muscles, the angular motions of the hip, knee, and ankle joints, and the force under both feet to be measured continuously. Measurements are also made on the arm muscles. Information from the sensors can be recorded up to 14 hours on a small, wearable computer.

  20. The human operator in manual preview tracking /an experiment and its modeling via optimal control/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomizuka, M.; Whitney, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    A manual preview tracking experiment and its results are presented. The preview drastically improves the tracking performance compared to zero-preview tracking. Optimal discrete finite preview control is applied to determine the structure of a mathematical model of the manual preview tracking experiment. Variable parameters in the model are adjusted to values which are consistent to the published data in manual control. The model with the adjusted parameters is found to be well correlated to the experimental results.

  1. Operating experience with the southwire 30-meter high-temperature superconducting power cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, J. P.; Lue, J. W.; Demko, J. A.; Fisher, P. W.; Gouge, M. J.; Hawsey, R. A.; Armstrong, J. W.; Hughey, R. L.; Lindsay, D. T.; Roden, M. L.; Sinha, U. K.; Tolbert, J. C.

    2002-05-01

    Southwire Company is operating a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable system at its corporate headquarters. The 30-m long, 3-phase cable system is powering three Southwire manufacturing plants and is rated at 12.4-kV, 1250-A, 60-Hz. Cooling is provided by a pressurized liquid nitrogen system operating at 70-80 K. The cables were energized on January 5, 2000 for on-line testing and operation and in April 2000 were placed into extended service. As of June 1, 2001, the HTS cables have provided 100% of the customer load for 8000 hours. The cryogenic system has been in continuous operation since November 1999. The HTS cable system has not been the cause of any power outages to the average 20 MW industrial load served by the cable. The cable has been exposed to short-circuit currents caused by load-side faults without damage. Based upon field measurements described herein, the cable critical current-a key performance parameter-remains the same and has not been affected by the hours of real-world operation, further proving the viability of this promising technology.

  2. COGEMA Experience on Retrieving and Automatically Remote Cutting Large Metallic Structures Using Special Saw During Nuclear Decommissioning Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, F.; Barandas, C.

    2002-02-26

    Used spent fuel baskets have been stored in the La Hague North-West concrete-lined pits until decommissioning. In 1998, COGEMA decided to retrieve, cut and condition these spent fuel baskets. This paper describes the experience gained, since the start up of this operation in 1999, discusses resulting dosimetry and waste produced, during retrieving and remotely cutting of LL activity large metallic structures. This process result in significantly lower exposures to workers in the D and D operations. In addition the work was carried out in an environmentally safe manner with reasonable financial costs.

  3. Operational experience in the Langley expansion tube with various test gases. [for atmospheric entry simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1977-01-01

    The Langley Expansion Tube is an operational facility capable of producing good quality, highly repeatable, quasi-steady flow for test times sufficient to establish flow about blunt axisymmetric and two-dimensional models. Due to the capability of testing with arbitrary test gases, a wide range of real-gas, hypersonic-hypervelocity flow conditions may be generated. However, for a given test gas, the range of operating conditions producing useful flow is shown to be rather limited; hence, the facility yields a given flow condition for a given test gas, and variation in flow conditions comes about by using different test gases. Data are presented for operations using air and carbon dioxide as test gases. The driver gas was unheated helium at a nominal pressure of 5000 psi (34.5 MN sq m).

  4. Preparation of Flight Operations and IWS Integration of the CELIAS Experiment on the SOHO Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, Fred

    1996-01-01

    During this reporting time period, the following activities took place: (1) generation of several versions of the CELIAS (STOF/SEM/CTOF/MTOF/DPU) commissioning timeline for the first 180 days after launch; (2) identification of several problems with the CELIAS portion of the Project Data Base (PDB); (3) attendance of the Science Operations Working Group (SOWG) Meetings (November 1994, February 1995, May 1995) and Flight Operations Review Meeting (July 1995); (4) participation in Flight Operation Simulations SIM 1 (November 14-18, 1994), SIM 2 (May 1-4, 1995) and SIM3 (August 7-11, 1995); and (5) participation in the Ground System Compatibility Test Rehearsal (April 24-28) 1995), GSCT #2 (May 30-June 14, 1995), GSCT #3 (September 12-22 1995), and GSCT #4b (October 30-November 5, 1995).

  5. Operation of magnetically assisted fluidized beds in microgravity and variable gravity: experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornchamni, T.; Jovanovic, G. N.; Reed, B. P.; Atwater, J. E.; Akse, J. R.; Wheeler, R. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion of solid waste into useful resources in support of long duration manned missions in space presents serious technological challenges. Several technologies, including supercritical water oxidation, microwave powered combustion and fluidized bed incineration, have been tested for the conversion of solid waste. However, none of these technologies are compatible with microgravity or hypogravity operating conditions. In this paper, we present the gradient magnetically assisted fluidized bed (G-MAFB) as a promising operating platform for fluidized bed operations in the space environment. Our experimental and theoretical work has resulted in both the development of a theoretical model based on fundamental principles for the design of the G-MAFB, and also the practical implementation of the G-MAFB in the filtration and destruction of solid biomass waste particles from liquid streams.

  6. Operation of magnetically assisted fluidized beds in microgravity and variable gravity: experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sornchamni, T.; Jovanovic, G. N.; Reed, B. P.; Atwater, J. E.; Akse, J. R.; Wheeler, R. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion of solid waste into useful resources in support of long duration manned missions in space presents serious technological challenges. Several technologies, including supercritical water oxidation, microwave powered combustion and fluidized bed incineration, have been tested for the conversion of solid waste. However, none of these technologies are compatible with microgravity or hypogravity operating conditions. In this paper, we present the gradient magnetically assisted fluidized bed (G-MAFB) as a promising operating platform for fluidized bed operations in the space environment. Our experimental and theoretical work has resulted in both the development of a theoretical model based on fundamental principles for the design of the G-MAFB, and also the practical implementation of the G-MAFB in the filtration and destruction of solid biomass waste particles from liquid streams. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Online monitoring for the CDF Run II experiment and the remote operation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Arisawa, T.; Fabiani, D.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Ikado, K.; Kubo, T.; Kusakabe, Y.; Maeshima, K.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Plager, C.; Schmidt, E.; /Fermilab /INFN, Pisa /Karlsruhe U.

    2007-01-01

    The foundation of the CDF Run II online event monitoring framework, placed well before the physics runs start, allowed to develop coherent monitoring software across all the different subsystems which consequently made maintenance and operation simple and efficient. Only one shift person is needed to monitor the entire CDF detector, including the trigger system. High data quality check is assured in real time and well defined monitoring results are propagated coherently to offline datasets used for physics analyzes. We describe the CDF Run II online event monitoring system and operation, with emphasis on the remote monitoring shift operation started since November 2006 with Pisa-INFN as pilot Institution and exploiting the WEB based access to the data.

  8. Light rail transit: Planning, design, and operating experience. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Partial Contents: Part 1--Overview--Status of North American LRT Systems: 1992 Update; Rail Transit Performance; Part 2--Planning and Finance--Key Issues in Light Rail Transit Station Planning and Design; Planning and Design of On-Street Light Rail Transit Stations; Coordination of Intermodal Transfers at LRT Stations; Part 3--Management and Staffing--Recent Developments in LRT Staffing and Productivity; Preparation and Training for First-Time Light Rail Operations and Maintenance; Part 4--Design and Engineering--Creating a Light Rail Transitway Within Existing Arterial Street Right-of-Way; New Standards for Control of At-Grade Light Rail Transit Crossings; Light Rail Transit Bridge Design Issues; Part 5--Operations and Maintenance--Multiple-Phase Start-up: Headache or Opportunity; Dwell Time Relationships for Light Rail Systems; Part 6--Vintage Trolley Operations--Vintage Trolleys: A National Overview.

  9. Operational experience with a free-electron laser driven by an rf photoinjector linac

    SciTech Connect

    O`Shea, P.G.

    1993-10-01

    For a number of years Los Alamos National Laboratory has been developing photocathode sources of high-brightness electron beams for FEL applications. The APEX FEL, which has been operational for over two years, was the first FEL to use a custom designed rf photoinjector as its electron source. The system consists of a 1.3 GHz, 6 MeV photoinjector with a multi-alkali photocathode illuminated by a frequency doubled ND:YLF drive-laser, followed by three separately powered accelerating structures that give a final electron energy of 40-MeV. The FEL has operated as an oscillator with either a permanent magnet or pulsed electromagnetic wigglers. Originally the FEL was designed to operate at a wavelengths near 3{mu}m, however the electron beam emittance and brightness are sufficient for harmonic lasing at much shorter wavelengths. We have demonstrated the tunability of the device from 0.37 to 11 {mu}m.

  10. Initial Experience With a Miniaturized Multiplane Transesophageal Probe in Small Infants Undergoing Cardiac Operations

    PubMed Central

    Zyblewski, Sinai C.; Shirali, Girish S.; Forbus, Geoffrey A.; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Bradley, Scott M.; Atz, Andrew M.; Cohen, Meryl S.; Graham, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There has been reluctance to use intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in small infants. We assessed the utility and safety of a new miniaturized multiplane micro-TEE probe in small infants undergoing cardiac operations. Description Hemodynamic and ventilation variables were prospectively recorded before and after micro-TEE insertion and removal in infants weighing 5 kg or less undergoing cardiac operations. Evaluation The study included 42 patients with a mean weight of 3.6 ± 0.9 kg (range, 1.7 to 5 kg). All probe insertions were successful. There were no complications or clinically significant changes in hemodynamic or ventilation variables. Information provided by TEE resulted in surgical revision in 6 of the 42 patients. Conclusions The micro-TEE provides high quality, useful diagnostic images without hemodynamic or ventilation compromise in small infants undergoing cardiac operations. This advance is important with the growing trend towards complete repair of complex structural heart disease in small infants. PMID:20494062

  11. Some criteria for teleoperators and virtual environments from experiences with vehicle/operator simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, Henry R.

    1991-01-01

    A review is given of a wide range of simulations in which operator steering control of a vehicle is involved and the dominant-clues, closed-loop bandwidth, measured operator effective time-delay, and ratio of bandwidth-to-inverse delay are summarized. A correlation of kinetosis with dynamic scene field-of-view is shown. The use of moving base simulators to improve the validity of locomotion teleoperations is discussed. some rules-of-thumb for good 'feel-system' simulation, such as for control manipulanda are given. Finally, simulation tests of teleoperators and virtual environments should include three types of measures: system performance, operator (or robot) 'behavior', and mental workload evaluations.

  12. Operational Experience with the Scattering Matrix Arc Detection System on the JET ITER-Like Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrancken, M.; Lerche, E.; Blackman, T.; Dumortier, P.; Durodié, F.; Evrard, M.; Goulding, R. H.; Graham, M.; Huygen, S.; Jacquet, P.; Kaye, A.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Nightingale, M. P. S.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Weynants, R.

    2009-11-01

    The Scattering Matrix Arc Detection System (SMAD) has been fully deployed on all 4 sets of Resonant Double Loop (RDL), Vacuum Transmission Line (VTL) and Antenna Pressurised Transmission Lines (APTL) of the JET ICRF ITER-Like Antenna (ILA) and this has been indispensable for operating at low (real) T-point impedance values to investigate ELM tolerance. This paper describes the necessity of the SMAD vs VSWR (Voltage Standing Wave Ratio) protection system, SMAD commissioning, problems and a number of typical events detected by the SMAD system during operation on plasma.

  13. Operational Experience with the Scattering Matrix Arc Detection System on the JET ITER-Like Antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Vrancken, M.; Lerche, E.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Evrard, M.; Huygen, S.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Weynants, R.

    2009-11-26

    The Scattering Matrix Arc Detection System (SMAD) has been fully deployed on all 4 sets of Resonant Double Loop (RDL), Vacuum Transmission Line (VTL) and Antenna Pressurised Transmission Lines (APTL) of the JET ICRF ITER-Like Antenna (ILA) and this has been indispensable for operating at low (real) T-point impedance values to investigate ELM tolerance. This paper describes the necessity of the SMAD vs VSWR (Voltage Standing Wave Ratio) protection system, SMAD commissioning, problems and a number of typical events detected by the SMAD system during operation on plasma.

  14. Bunch coalescing and bunch rotation in the Fermilab Main Ring: Operational experience and comparison with simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.S.; Wildman, D.W.

    1988-07-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron I proton-antiproton collider project requires that the Fermilab Main Ring produce intense bunches of protons and antiprotons for injection into the Tevatron. The process of coalescing a small number of harmonic number h=1113 bunches into a single bunch by bunch-rotating in a lower harmonic rf system is described.The Main Ring is also required to extract onto the antiproton production target bunches with as narrow a time spread as possible. This operation is also discussed. The operation of the bunch coalescing and bunch rotation are compared with simulations using the computer program ESME. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Construction, commissioning and operational experience of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.; Arnold, N.; Berg, W.

    1996-10-01

    The Advanced Photon Source linear accelerator system consists of a 200 MeV, 2856 MHz S-Band electron linac and a 2-radiation-thick tungsten target followed by a 450 MeV positron linac. The linac system has operated 24 hours per day for the past year to support accelerator commissioning and beam studies and to provide beam for the user experimental program. It achieves the design goal for positron current of 8 mA and produces electron energies up to 650 MeV without the target in place. The linac is described and its operation and performance are discussed.

  16. High Temperature Electrolysis 4 kW Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-09-01

    This report provides results of long-term stack testing completed in the new high-temperature steam electrolysis multi-kW test facility recently developed at INL. The report includes detailed descriptions of the piping layout, steam generation and delivery system, test fixture, heat recuperation system, hot zone, instrumentation, and operating conditions. This facility has provided a demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis operation at the 4 kW scale with advanced cell and stack technology. This successful large-scale demonstration of high-temperature steam electrolysis will help to advance the technology toward near-term commercialization.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration operations: Remote sensing experiments in the New York Bight, 7-17 April 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Hall, J. B., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of remote sensing experiments conducted in the New York Bight between April 7-17, 1975, to evaluate the role of remote sensing technology to aid in monitoring ocean dumping. Remote sensors were flown on the C-54, U-2, and C-130 aircraft while the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration obtained concurrent in situ sea truth data using helicopters and surface platforms. The test site, aircraft platforms, experiments, and supporting sensors are described. The operation of each aircraft are discussed and aircraft flight lines, flight parameters, and data identification parameters are presented in figures and tables.

  18. The METOP-A Orbit Acquisition Strategy and its LEOP Operational Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merz, K.; Serrano, M. A. Martin; Kuijper, D.; Matatoros, M. A. Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Europe's first polar-orbiting weather satellite, METOPA, was launched by a Soyuz launcher from Baikonur Cosmodrome on the 19th of October of 2006. The routine operations of METOP-A are conducted by EUMETSAT (European Organization for Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites) in the frame of the European Polar System mission (EPS). The METOP-A Launch and Early Orbit Phase (LEOP) operations have been performed by ESA/ESOC. The Flight Dynamics Orbit Determination and Control team (OD&C) at ESOC was in charge of correcting the S/C orbit as delivered by the launcher in such a way that EUMETSAT would be able to acquire the reference orbit with a drift-stop manoeuvre approximately two weeks after a LEOP of 3 days and Hand-Over to the EUMETSAT Control Centre (EUMETSAT-CC) in Darmstadt, Germany. The various strict constraints and the short amount of time available for ESOC operations made this task challenging. Several strategies were prepared before launch and analysed during LEOP based on the achieved injection orbit. This paper presents the different manoeuvre strategies investigated and finally applied to acquire the operational orbit, reporting as well the details of its execution and final achieved state.

  19. Pre-operative radionuclide localization of intracerebral lesions: a five-year experience.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J G; Coakham, H B; Russell, T; Smith, P A

    1987-06-01

    Intracerebral lesions demonstrated by computerized tomography usually require histological confirmation to determine subsequent management. Tissue samples are generally obtained by craniotomy or burr hole biopsy; either procedure can prove negative if a lesion is small, deep, or very superficial. Pre-operative imaging and localization reduce biopsy failures. Before the introduction of this straight forward radionuclide technique, our biopsy success rate using conventional localization methods was 88%. In a 5-year period, 200 patients underwent pre-operative radionuclide localization, with an improvement in the overall biopsy success rate to 92.7% (95.5% for lesions which took up radionuclide). Patients have benefitted from reduced operating time and improved post-operative recovery rates. About 85% of all intracerebral lesions may be expected to accumulate radionuclide. However in our series, 93.2% were sufficiently well visualized for a siting marker to be placed with confidence. Within this group, low grade astrocytomas (Kernohan Grades I and II) showed a predictably low incidence of imaging (30.8%). For the majority of lesions which present difficulties in biopsy due to size or site, the radionuclide method is a simple procedure which increases the chance of obtaining positive tissue with the minimum of surgical intervention. PMID:3696626

  20. Operational Experience with Long Duration Wildfire Mapping: UAS Missions Over the Western United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip; Cobleigh, Brent; Buoni, Greg; Howell, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration, United States Forest Service, and National Interagency Fire Center have developed a partnership to develop and demonstrate technology to improve airborne wildfire imaging and data dissemination. In the summer of 2007, a multi-spectral infrared scanner was integrated into NASA's Ikhana Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) (a General Atomics Predator-B) and launched on four long duration wildfire mapping demonstration missions covering eight western states. Extensive safety analysis, contingency planning, and mission coordination were key to securing an FAA certificate of authorization (COA) to operate in the national airspace. Infrared images were autonomously geo-rectified, transmitted to the ground station by satellite communications, and networked to fire incident commanders within 15 minutes of acquisition. Close coordination with air traffic control ensured a safe operation, and allowed real-time redirection around inclement weather and other minor changes to the flight plan. All objectives of the mission demonstrations were achieved. In late October, wind-driven wildfires erupted in five southern California counties. State and national emergency operations agencies requested Ikhana to help assess and manage the wildfires. Four additional missions were launched over a 5-day period, with near realtime images delivered to multiple emergency operations centers and fire incident commands managing 10 fires.

  1. Preparation of Flight Operations and IWS Integration of the CELIAS Experiment on the SOHO Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, Fred

    1996-01-01

    During this annual progress report time period, the following activities took place: (1) Generation of several versions of the CELIAS (STOF/SEM/CTOF/MTOF/DPU) commissioning timeline for the first 180 days after launch. These were written and submitted by A. Galvin after consultation (phone, fax, e-mail, meetings) with the CELIAS Instrument Manager and Lead-Co-I's. (2) Identification of several problems with the CELIAS portion of the Project Data Base (PDB). (3) Meetings with the Flight Operations Team regarding PDB, critical commands, etc. (4) Attend Science Operations Working Group (SOWG) Meetings (November 1994, February 1995, May 1995) and Flight Operations Review Meeting (July 1995). (5) Participate in Flight Operation Simulations SIM 1 (November 14-18, 1994), SIM 2 (May 1-4, 1995) and SIM3 (August 7-11, 1995). (6) Participate in the Ground System Compatibility Test Rehearsal (April 24- 28, 1995), GSCT #2 (May 30-June 14, 1995), GSCT #3 (September 12-22, 1995), and GSCT #4b (October 30-November 5, 1995). A small portion of the documentation for the above cited activities is appended.

  2. Operating experience and plant betterment to improve capacity factor and reduce scrams at Maanshan

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, S.H.; Shih, A.H.C.; Chen, P.T. ); Chu, E.N. )

    1992-01-01

    Maanshan Nuclear Power Station, a twin-unit PWR plant with Westinghouse 3-loop NSSS and General Electric TC-4F turbine generator, has been in commercial operation over 7 years. This paper reports the significant events, equipment and material failures, design shortcomings encountered during this period and the corresponding betterments performed and planned to eliminate the recurrence of equipment failures and unit trips.

  3. Design considerations for remotely operated welding in space: Task definition and visual weld monitoring experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynerson, Charles M.

    1993-05-01

    This thesis explores the concept of welding in a space environment with the use of automation. Since the amount of time astronauts can work outside a spacecraft is limited, future construction and repair tasks will likely be assisted by automation. It is also likely that remote space welding will be needed for the construction of large-scale space structures in earth orbit as well as for lunar and Martian ground-based structures. Due to the complex nature of the tasks to be accomplished, the equipment will probably not be fully autonomous but instead supervised by a human operator. The welding fabrication problem in space is examined in a broad sense including some of the considerations for designing a human supervisory remote welding system. The history of space welding processes is examined, as well as current research in the field. A task definition and functional analysis is provided to assist future designers in outlining typical operational sequences for such a remote welding system. Such analysis is important when deciding whether the human operator should perform certain tasks or if the operator should supervise the automated system while it performs the tasks.

  4. FERMI magnet power supplies: design strategies and five years of operational experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visintini, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    FERMI is the FEL-based light source in operation for external users since 2011 at the Elettra Research Center in Trieste, Italy. FERMI@Elettra is the name of the project for the construction and commissioning of this source. The design strategies adopted in the project had to consider the extremely close presence and the routine operation for users of the synchrotron-based source Elettra. There are more than 350 magnets and coils distributed along the linear accelerator, the two chains of undulators and the electron beam dump. Almost each magnetic element requires a dedicated DC power supply. Magnets, power supplies, and the connecting cables constitute a system, strongly interconnected with the remote control system, the machine and personnel safety system, and the infrastructure. All this has to fulfill the requirements from the particle physics specialists. We adopted a "systemic" approach in the design of new magnets and the re-use of the old ones, as well as the choice and the design of the associated power supplies. The commissioning of the systems started early 2010 and almost all magnet power supplies are in operation since then. During these 5 years, we introduced few minor upgrades and patches while the adopted solutions proved their soundness in terms of performance and reliability, causing very little downtime to the FERMI operations.

  5. Design and operating experiences of full-scale municipal membrane bioreactors in Japan.

    PubMed

    Itokawa, H; Tsuji, K; Yamashita, K; Hashimoto, T

    2014-01-01

    In Japan, membrane bioreactor (MBRs) have been installed in 17 small-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the past 8 years, together with two recently installed MBRs for larger-scale WWTPs. In this study, design and operating data were collected from 17 of them as part of a follow-up survey, and aspects including system design, biological treatment, membrane operation, problems and costs were overviewed. Because most of the MBRs were designed according to standardized guidance, system configuration of the plants was similar; pre-denitrification using the Modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) process with membrane units submerged in aerobic tanks, following a fine screen and flow equalization tank. This led to effluent quality with biochemical oxygen demand and T-N of less than 3.5 and 7.4 mg/L, respectively, for nine plants on an annual average basis. It was a common practice in extremely under-loaded plants to operate the membrane systems intermittently. Frequency of recovery cleaning events was plant-specific, mostly ranging from 1 to 5 times/year. Cost evaluation revealed that specific construction costs for the small-scale MBRs were no more than for oxidation ditch plants. Although specific energy consumption values tended to be high in the under-loaded plants, the demonstration MBR, where several energy reducing measures had been incorporated, attained specific energy consumption of 0.39 kWh/m(3) under full-capacity operation. PMID:24622560

  6. Initial operating experience of the 12-MW La Ola photovoltaic system.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Abraham; Lenox, Carl; Johnson, Jay; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2011-10-01

    The 1.2-MW La Ola photovoltaic (PV) power plant in Lanai, Hawaii, has been in operation since December 2009. The host system is a small island microgrid with peak load of 5 MW. Simulations conducted as part of the interconnection study concluded that unmitigated PV output ramps had the potential to negatively affect system frequency. Based on that study, the PV system was initially allowed to operate with output power limited to 50% of nameplate to reduce the potential for frequency instability due to PV variability. Based on the analysis of historical voltage, frequency, and power output data at 50% output level, the PV system has not significantly affected grid performance. However, it should be noted that the impact of PV variability on active and reactive power output of the nearby diesel generators was not evaluated. In summer 2011, an energy storage system was installed to counteract high ramp rates and allow the PV system to operate at rated output. The energy storage system was not fully operational at the time this report was written; therefore, analysis results do not address system performance with the battery system in place.

  7. Experiences with a compost biofilter for VOC control from batch chemical manufacturing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, G.L.; Briggs, T.G.

    1997-12-31

    The Synthetic Chemicals Division of Eastman Kodak Company makes a large number of complex organic chemicals using batch reactor syntheses. Exhaust gas, resulting from batch reactor operations, typically contains many different volatile organic chemicals with dynamic concentration profiles. Exhaust streams of this type have been considered difficult to treat effectively by biofiltration. Eastman Kodak Company was interested in exploring the applicability of biofiltration to treat these types of off-gas streams as an alternative to more costly control technologies. To this end, a 20,000 cfm capacity BIOTON{reg_sign} biofilter was installed in December 1995 in Kodak Park, Rochester, New York. A study was initiated to determine the overall efficiency of the biofilter, as well as the chemical specific efficiencies for a number of organic compounds. Flame ionization detectors operated continuously on the inlet and outlet of the biofilter to measure total hydrocarbon concentrations. A process mass spectrometer was installed to simultaneously monitor the concentrations of seven organics in the inlet and outlet of the biofilter. In addition, the process control software for the biofilter continuously recorded pressure drop, temperature, and moisture content of the bed. This paper presents operating and performance data for the BIOTON biofilter from start-up through about eleven months of continuous operation. Included are data collected over a wide range of loading conditions, during initial start-up, and during start-up after shutdown periods. Data for total hydrocarbons, methanol, acetone, and heptane are presented. The relationship between organic loading and removal efficiency is discussed in the biofilter, which typically operates significantly below its design loading specification. The overall control efficiency of the biofilter at design loadings exceeds the design control efficiency of 90%.

  8. CTS /Hermes/ - United States experiments and operations summary. [Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, P. L.; Hunczak, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. experiments conducted with the Communications Technology Satellite, a joint Canadian-U.S. venture launched in 1976, are discussed. The 14/12 GHz frequencies employed by the 200-W transmitter on board the satellite provide two-way television and voice communications. Applications of the satellite in the categories of health care, community services and education are considered; experiments have also made use of the special properties of the super-high frequency band (e.g. link characterization and digital communications). Time-sharing of the 14/12 GHz communication between the U.S. and Canada has functioned well.

  9. Health education telecommunications experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Health/Education Telecommunications Experiment (HET) was conducted jointly by NASA and HEW on NASA's ATS-6 communications satellite. This experiment actually consisted of six experiments testing health and education applications of a communication spacecraft producing a broadcast of color television directly from space to over 120 low-cost receivers located in remote rural areas throughout the U.S. (including Alaska). The experiments were conducted over the period from 2 July 1974 to 20 May 1975 and operated on an almost daily basis. The overall telecommunications system to support these experiments consisted of many elements: The ATS-6 spacecraft; five different types of earth stations consisting of 120 video receive terminals, 51 telephony tranceivers and eight video originating terminals of three different types. Actual performance of the equipment as measured in the field was shown to equal or exceed predicted values.

  10. A summary of the test procedures and operational details of an ocean dumping pollution monitoring experiment conducted 7 October 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hypes, W. D.; Wallace, J. W.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    A remote sensor experiment was conducted at a sewage sludge dump site off the Delaware/Maryland coast. Two aircraft serving as remote sensor platforms flew over the dump site during a sludge dump. One aircraft carried a multispectral scanner and the other aircraft carried a rapid scanning spectrometer. Data from sea-truth stations were collected concurrent with overpasses of the aircraft. All sensors were operational and produced good digital data.

  11. 40 CFR 63.5335 - How do I determine the actual HAP loss?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations... information and procedures you must use to determine the actual HAP loss from your leather finishing operation. By the fifteenth of each month, you must determine the actual HAP loss in pounds from your...

  12. Solar Energy School Heating Augmentation Experiment. Design, Construction and Initial Operation. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    InterTechnology Corp., Warrenton, VA.

    This report describes an experimental solar heating system, complete with thermal storage and controls, that has met all the heating requirements of five detached classrooms of the Fauquier High School in Warrenton, Virginia. The objectives of the experiment were to (1) demonstrate that solar energy can be used to provide a substantial part of the…

  13. PLASMA-F experiment: Three years of on-orbit operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, L. M.; Zastenker, G. N.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Chesalin, L. S.; Nazarov, V. N.; Prokhorenko, V. I.; Balaz, J.; Kudela, K.; Strgarski, I.; Slivka, M.; Gladyshev, V. A.; Kirpichev, I. P.; Sarris, E.; Sarris, T.; Lakutina, E. V.; Minskaya, L. K.; Krukovskaya, E. V.; Beznos, A. V.; Markov, Y. I.; Tretyakov, A. E.; Batanov, O. V.; Korotkov, F. V.; Melnik, A. P.; Konoplev, V. V.; Ryabova, A. D.; Gevorkova, E. V.; Klimenchenko, M. V.; Bazhenov, A. G.; Belova, I. E.; Gavrilova, E. A.; Ananenkova, A. N.; Rudnevskaya, L. V.; Dyachkov, A. V.; Starostina, O. A.; Ryazanova, E. E.; Eismont, N. A.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Prech, L.; Cermak, I.; Vaverka, J.; Komarek, A.; Vojta, J.; Karimov, B. T.; Agafonov, Y. N.; Borodkova, N. L.; Gagua, T. I.; Gagua, I. T.; Koloskova, I. V.; Leibov, A. V.; Parhomov, V. A.; Ryazanceva, M. O.; Khrapchenkov, V. V.; Chugunova, O. M.

    2015-12-01

    Composition and tasks of the PLAZMA-F experiment onboard the SPEKTR-R satellite are described in this paper. A record high time resolution is a feature of solar wind plasma flux and energetic particle flux measurements. It allowed detecting a number of new and significant properties and parameters.

  14. The Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Correlation (HSQC) Experiment: Vectors versus Product Operators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Vega-Herna´ndez, Karen; Antuch, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A vectorial representation of the full sequence of events occurring during the 2D-NMR heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) experiment is presented. The proposed vectorial representation conveys an understanding of the magnetization evolution during the HSQC pulse sequence for those who have little or no quantum mechanical background.…

  15. Linking Science Education to the Rural Environment: Some Experiences. Report of a Mobile Field Operational Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    Described is a seminar designed to promote inter-country exchange of experiences on innovations in science and technology education. Countries involved include Afghanistan, India, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, and Sri Lanka. Each country's program is described pertaining to school levels, teacher training, science teaching, in-service training,…

  16. The influence of impurity and particle control on TMX-U (Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade) plasma operation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.L.; Yu, T.L.; Foote, J.H.; Pickles, W.L.

    1985-11-01

    A variety of techniques are used in TMX-U to control impurities and reflux: repeated plasma pulses, glow discharge cleaning (GDC), and gettering. A series of experiments under three different plasma-wall conditions was performed: no wall conditioning after a machine maintenance cycle, a glow-discharge-cleaned wall, and a gettered wall. Several plasma diagnostics to determine the effect of these procedures on TMX-U plasma parameters were used. Spectroscopic measurements indicated that GDC reduced impurities and increased the electron temperature, enabling full-duration beam-sustained plasma operation without a large number of repeated plasma pulses. Gettering further reduced the impurities and the neutral pressure, and this improved condition persisted for several shots after gettering was stopped. Measurements from residual gas analyzers and an end-loss ion spectrometer indicated that hydrogen is present in the plasma during the initial deuterium operation after pumpdown; the hydrogen level decreased after plasma operation with gettering, indicating reduced wall recycling.

  17. On the delights of being an ex-cataract patient: Visual experiences before and after cataract operations; what they indicate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nes, Floris L.

    2014-02-01

    This paper is about changes in the author's visual perception over most of his lifetime, but in particular in the period before and after cataract operations. The author was myopic (-3D) until the operations, and emmetropic afterwards - with mild astigmatic aberrations that can be compensated with cylindrical spectacles, but in his case rarely are, because of the convenience of not needing to wear distance glasses in daily life anymore. The perceptual changes concern color vision, stereopsis and visual acuity. The post-cataract changes were partly expected, for example less yellow and more blue images, but partly wholly unexpected, and accompanied by feelings of excitement and pleasure; even delight. These unexpected changes were a sudden, strongly increased depth vision and the sensation of seeing suddenly sharper than ever before, mainly at intermediate viewing distances. The visual acuity changes occur after, exceptionally, his distance glasses are put on. All these sensations lasted or last only for a short time. Those concerning stereopsis were dubbed 'super depth', and were confined to the first two months after the second cataract operation. Those concerning acuity were termed 'super-sharpness impression'; SSI. These can be elicited more or less at will, by putting on the spectacles described; but will then disappear again, although the spectacles are kept on. Ten other ex-cataract patients have been interviewed on their post-operation experiences. The 'super-depth' and SSI experiences may be linked to assumed neurophysiological mechanisms such as the concept of Bayesian reweighting of perceptual criteria.

  18. Operational experience of electronic active personal dosemeter and comparison with CaSo4:Dy TL dosemeter in Indian PHWR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishwanath P; Managanvi, S S; Bihari, R R; Bhat, H R

    2013-01-01

    Direct reading dosemeter has been used for day-to-day radiation exposure control and management for last four decades in Indian nuclear power plants (NPPs). Recently new real time, alarm and pre-alarm on equivalent dose/dose rate, storage of dose/dose rate and maximum dose rate, user-friendly electronic active personal dosemeter (APD) has been implemented into practice for the first time at Kaiga Atomic Power Station-3&4,  of Indian NPPs. The dosemeter showed tolerance level (L) 0.1085±0.0450 compared with 0.1869±0.0729 (average±SD) for CaSO4:Dy, TL dosemeter, having narrow range trumpet curve, nil electromagnetic interference. Records of >29 000 for APD and TL dosemeter were analysed for comparasion of the measurement of the individual dose. APD followed general acceptance rule of ±25 % for dose >1 mSv. Monthly Station collective dose by TL dosemeters and APD for normal reactor operation as well as outage are found in good agreement. Operational experiences and statistical analysis support that an APD dosemeter is reasonably equivalent to CaSO4:Dy TL dosemeter. The accuracy, reproducibility and repeatability of the measurement of radiation for (137)Cs are comparable with CaSO4:Dy, TL dosemeter. Operational experience of APD during the normal operation as well as outage showed as one of the best ALARA tool for occupational dose monitoring, control, management and future outage planning. PMID:23528326

  19. Operation of a multiple cell array detector in plasma experiments with a heavy ion beam diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves, B.; Malaquias, A.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Pereira, L.; Silva, C.; Varandas, C.A.F.; Cabral, J.A.C.; Khrebtov, S.M.; Dreval, N.B.; Krupnik, L.I.; Hidalgo, C.; Depablos, J.

    2004-10-01

    A multiple cell array detector (MCAD) has been developed to investigate the spatial structure of plasma turbulence in fusion plasmas. This system is expected to provide simultaneous measurements of edge and core density fluctuations with both temporal and spatial resolution, extending the range and number of the sample volumes simultaneously recorded by a heavy ion beam diagnostic (HIBD). Since the detector (usually located close to the vessel wall of a plasma device) operates in a strong plasma radiation environment, the effective shielding of the detector presents a special problem. This article describes and compares the MCAD operation conditions on ISTTOK tokamak and TJ-II stellarator. Experimental results of the detector performance are presented together with the first measurements of n{sub e}{sigma}{sub eff} in the TJ-II plasmas.

  20. Vehicle operating experience with methanol as a substitute for petrol and diesel

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, R.J.; Natusch, D.F.S.; Richardson, D.W.

    1983-11-01

    Blends of 15% methanol with petrol containing 1% isobutanol have been utilised by 45 vehicles operated for a period of two years. An additional 907 vehicles have been operated for approximately one year to obtain information about the distribution of M15 blends, about necessary co-solvent concentrations, and about general vehicle driveability. Initial studies have also been conducted using 15-20% emulsions of methanol with diesel in diesel-cycle engines. High methanol fuels ranging from M85 to M100 have been tested in six purpose-built vehicles and 45 retrofitted vehicles involving four different types of retrofit systems. In addition, high methanol fuels have also been tested in dieselcycle engines involving two different types of purpose-built engines, together with unmodified engines.

  1. Pre-Study Walkthrough with a Commercial Pilot for a Preliminary Single Pilot Operations Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor-Dreher, Ryan; Roberts, Z.; Ziccardi, J.; Vu, K-P. L.; Strybel, T.; Koteskey, Robert William; Lachter, Joel B.; Vi Dao, Quang; Johnson, Walter W.; Battiste, V.

    2013-01-01

    The number of crew members in commercial flights has decreased to two members, down from the five-member crew required 50 years ago. One question of interest is whether the crew should be reduced to one pilot. In order to determine the critical factors involved in safely transitioning to a single pilot, research must examine whether any performance deficits arise with the loss of a crew member. With a concrete understanding of the cognitive and behavioral role of a co-pilot, aeronautical technologies and procedures can be developed that make up for the removal of the second aircrew member. The current project describes a pre-study walkthrough process that can be used to help in the development of scenarios for testing future concepts and technologies for single pilot operations. Qualitative information regarding the tasks performed by the pilots can be extracted with this technique and adapted for future investigations of single pilot operations.

  2. Operational experience and maintenance programs of Transamerica Delaval, Inc., diesel generators

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, J.R.

    1994-05-01

    Concerns regarding the reliability of large-bore, medium-speed diesel generators manufactured by Transamerica Delaval, Inc. (TDI) for application at domestic nuclear plants were first prompted by a crankshaft failure at Shoreham Nuclear Power Station in August 1983. A number of diesel generator components were identified which had potential deficiencies from a manufacturing and operational standpoint. In response to these problems, 11 (now 8) U.S. nuclear utility owners formed a TDI Diesel Generator Owners Group (Owners Group) to address operational and regulatory issues relative to diesel generator sets used for standby emergency power. The Owners` Group performed extensive design reviews of all key engine components and developed recommendations to be implemented by the individual owners concerning needed component replacements and modifications, component inspections to validate the {open_quotes}as-manufactured{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}as-assembled{close_quotes} quality of key engine components, engine testing, and an enhanced maintenance and surveillance program.

  3. The photovoltaic-powered water desalination plant 'SORO' design, start up, operating experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaeusser, G.; Mohn, J.; Petersen, G.

    Design features, operational parameters, and test results of a year of operation of the SORO prototype photovoltaic (PV) reverse osmosis salt water desalinization plant are described. Chemicals are added to the salt water to control the pH, prevent formation of compounds which could plug the flow system, and kill bacteria and slime which might grow in the solution. The water is pressurized and forced into contact with membranes which separate the fresh water from the brackish or sea water. The flow rate in the project was 180 l/h, with the main electrical energy load being the high pressure pump and the well pump. Batteries are charged before current is switched to power the desalinization system. The plant yielded 1.50 cu of fresh water/day and is concluded to be a viable design for scale-up to larger production figures, besides being economically competitive with solar desalinization installations where the salt content is 2000 ppm.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A CROSSFLOW FILTER TO REMOVE SOLIDS FROM RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE: COMPARISON OF TEST DATA WITH OPERATING EXPERIENCE - 9119

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Samuel Fink, S; Julius Lacerna, J

    2009-03-01

    In 2008, the Savannah River Site (SRS) began treatment of liquid radioactive waste from its Tank Farms. To treat waste streams containing {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and actinides, SRS developed the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The Actinide Removal Process contacts the waste with monosodium titanate (MST) to sorb strontium and select actinides. After MST contact, the process filters the resulting slurry to remove the MST (with sorbed strontium and actinides) and any entrained sludge. The filtrate is transported to the MCU to remove cesium. The solid particle removed by the filter are concentrated to {approx} 5 wt %, washed to reduce the concentration of dissolved sodium, and transported to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. The authors conducted tests with 0.5 {micro} and 0.1 {micro} Mott sintered stainless steel crossflow filter at bench-scale (0.19 ft{sup 2} surface area) and pilot-scale (11.2 ft{sup 2}). The collected data supported design of the filter for the process and identified preferred operating conditions for the full-scale process (230 ft{sup 2}). The testing investigated the influence of operating parameters, such as filter pore size, axial velocity, transmembrane pressure, and solids loading, on filter flux, and validated the simulant used for pilot-scale testing. The conclusions from this work follow: (1) The 0.1 {micro} Mott sintered stainless steel filter produced higher flux than the 0.5 {micro} filter. (2) The filtrate samples collected showed no visible solids. (3) The filter flux with actual waste is comparable to the filter flux with simulated waste, with the simulated waste being conservative. This result shows the simulated sludge is representative of the actual sludge. (4) When the data is adjusted for differences in transmembrane pressure, the filter flux in the Actinide Removal Process is comparable to the filter flux in the bench-scale and pilot

  5. Alabama Ground Operations during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Blakeslee, Richard; Koshak, William; Bain, Lamont; Rogers, Ryan; Kozlowski, Danielle; Sherrer, Adam; Saari, Matt; Bigelbach, Brandon; Scott, Mariana; Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Chris; Gatlin, Patrick; Wingo, Matt; Phillips, Dustin; Phillips, Chris; Peterson, Harold; Bailey, Jeff; Frederickson, Terryn; Hall, John; Bart, Nicole; Becker, Melissa; Pinkney, Kurtis; Rowe, Scott; Starzec, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign investigates the impact of deep, midlatitude convective clouds, including their dynamical, physical and lighting processes, on upper tropospheric composition and chemistry. DC3 science operations took place from 14 May to 30 June 2012. The DC3 field campaign utilized instrumented aircraft and ground ]based observations. The NCAR Gulfstream ]V (GV) observed a variety of gas ]phase species, radiation and cloud particle characteristics in the high ]altitude outflow of storms while the NASA DC ]8 characterized the convective inflow. Groundbased radar networks were used to document the kinematic and microphysical characteristics of storms. In order to study the impact of lightning on convective outflow composition, VHF ]based lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) provided detailed three ]dimensional measurements of flashes. Mobile soundings were utilized to characterize the meteorological environment of the convection. Radar, sounding and lightning observations were also used in real ]time to provide forecasting and mission guidance to the aircraft operations. Combined aircraft and ground ]based observations were conducted at three locations, 1) northeastern Colorado, 2) Oklahoma/Texas and 3) northern Alabama, to study different modes of deep convection in a variety of meteorological and chemical environments. The objective of this paper is to summarize the Alabama ground operations and provide a preliminary assessment of the ground ]based observations collected over northern Alabama during DC3. The multi ] Doppler, dual ]polarization radar network consisted of the UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR), the UAHuntsville Mobile Alabama X ]band (MAX) radar and the Hytop (KHTX) Weather Surveillance Radar 88 Doppler (WSR ]88D). Lightning frequency and structure were observed in near real ]time by the NASA MSFC Northern Alabama LMA (NALMA). Pre ]storm and inflow proximity

  6. Implementation experiences of NASTRAN on CDC CYBER 74 SCOPE 3.4 operating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, J. C.; Hill, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    The implementation of the NASTRAN system on the CDC CYBER 74 SCOPE 3.4 Operating System is described. The flexibility of the NASTRAN system made it possible to accomplish the change with no major problems. Various sizes of benchmark and test problems, ranging from two hours to less than one minute CP time were run on the CDC CYBER SCOPE 3.3, Univac EXEC-8, and CDC CYBER SCOPE 3.4. The NASTRAN installation deck is provided.

  7. Midterm results after arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries: a single centre experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The arterial switch operation (ASO) has become the surgical approach of choice for d-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA). There is, however an increased incidence of midterm and longterm adverse sequelae in some survivors. In order to evaluate operative risk and midterm outcome in this population, we reviewed patients who underwent ASO for TGA at our centre. Methods In this retrospective study 52 consecutive patients with TGA who underwent ASO between 04/1991 and 12/1999 were included. To analyze the predictors for mortality and adverse events (coronary stenoses, distortion of the pulmonary arteries, dilatation of the neoaortic root, and aortic regurgitation), a multivariate analysis was performed. The follow-up time was ranged from 1–10 years (mean 5 years, cumulative 260 patient-years). Results All over mortality rate was 15.4% and was only observed in the early postoperative period till 1994. The predictors for poor operative survival were low APGAR-score, older age at surgery, and necessity of associated surgical procedures. Late re-operations were necessary in 6 patients (13.6%) and included a pulmonary artery patch enlargement due to supravalvular stenosis (n = 3), coronary revascularisation due to coronary stenosis in a coronary anatomy type E, aortic valve replacement due to neoaortic valve regurgitation (n = 2), and patch-plasty of a pulmonary vein due to obstruction (n = 1). The dilatation of neoaortic root was not observed in the follow up. Conclusions ASO remains the procedure of choice for TGA with acceptable early and late outcome in terms of overall survival and freedom of reoperation. Although ASO is often complex and may be associated with morbidity, most patients survived without major complications even in a small centre. PMID:22958234

  8. Post-Operative Complications in Living Liver Donors: A Single-Center Experience in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songfeng; Chen, Jihao; Wang, Jingqiao; Yang, Cheng; Jin, Mengmeng; Yan, Sheng; Zhang, Mangli; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    The gap between the growing demand for available organs and the cadaveric organs facilitates the adoption of living donor liver transplantation. We retrospectively identified and evaluated the post-operative complications as per the modified Clavien classification system in 152 living liver donors at at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University between December, 2006 and June, 2014. Post-operative complications were observed in 61 patients (40.1%) in the present study, but no mortality was reported. Complications developed in 58 (40.0%) right, 1 (33.3%) left, and 2 (66.7%) lateral left hepatectomy donors. The prevalence of re-operation was 1.3%. Grade I and II complications were observed in 38 (25.0%) and 11 (7.2%) donors, respectively. Grade IIIa complications developed in 9 (5.9%) donors and only 3 (2.0%) patients reported grade IIIb complications. The most common complication was pleural effusion that occurred in 31 (20.4%) donors. No significant prognostic baseline factor was identified in this study. In conclusion, living donors experienced various complications, which were usually mild and had a good prognosis. PMID:26270475

  9. Experimental design, operation, and results of a 4 kW high temperature steam electrolysis experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; O'Brien, James E.; Tao, Greg; Zhou, Can; Housley, Gregory K.

    2015-11-01

    High temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) is a promising technology for large-scale hydrogen production. However, research on HTSE performance above the kW level is limited. This paper presents the results of 4 kW HTSE long-term test completed in a multi-kW test facility recently developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The 4 kW HTSE unit consisted of two solid oxide electrolysis stacks electrically connected in parallel, each of which included 40 electrode-supported planar cells. A current density of 0.41 A cm-2 was used for the long-term operating at a constant current mode, resulting in a theoretical hydrogen production rate about 23 slpm. A demonstration of 830 h stable operation was achieved with a degradation rate of 3.1% per 1000 h. The paper also includes detailed descriptions of the piping layout, steam generation and delivery system, test fixture, heat recuperation system, hot zone, instrumentation, and operating conditions. This successful demonstration of multi-kW scale HTSE unit will help to advance the technology toward near-term commercialization.

  10. 800 Hours of Operational Experience from a 2 kW(sub e) Solar Dynamic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Mason, Lee S.

    1999-01-01

    From December 1994 to September 1998, testing with a 2 kW(sub e) Solar Dynamic power system resulted in 33 individual tests, 886 hours of solar heating, and 783 hours of power generation. Power generation ranged from 400 watts to over 2 kW(sub e), and SD system efficiencies have been measured up to 17 per cent, during simulated low-Earth orbit operation. Further, the turbo-alternator-compressors successfully completed 100 start/stops on foil bearings. Operation was conducted in a large thermal/vacuum facility with a simulated Sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Solar Dynamic system featured a closed Brayton conversion unit integrated with a solar heat receiver, which included thermal energy storage for continuous power output through a typical low-Earth orbit. Two power conversion units and three alternator configurations were used during testing. This paper will review the test program, provide operational and performance data, and review a number of technology issues.

  11. Flying SATS Higher Volume Operations: Training, Lessons Learned, and Pilots' Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Sheila; Williams, Dan; Adams, Catherine; Consiglio, Maria; Murdoch, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Developments in aviation, including new surveillance technologies and quicker, more economical small aircraft, have been identified as driving factors in a potential expansion of the use of non-towered, non-radar airports. The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) project has developed the Higher Volume Operations (HVO) concept that enables pilots to safely arrive and depart these airports in instrument conditions at an increased rate as compared to today's procedures. This is achieved by transferring some traffic management tasks to centralized, ground-based automation, while assigning others to participating pilots aided by on-board tools. This paper describes strategies and lessons learned while training pilots to fly these innovative operations. Pilot approaches to using the experimental displays and dynamic altering systems during training are discussed. Potential operational benefits as well as pit-falls and frustrations expressed by subjects while learning to fly these new procedures are presented. Generally, pilots were comfortable with the procedures and the training process, and expressed interest in its near-term implementation.

  12. Biodegradable fixation for craniomaxillofacial surgery: a 10-year experience involving 761 operations and 745 patients

    PubMed Central

    Turvey, T. A.; Proffit, W. P.; Phillips, C.

    2011-01-01

    Patient acceptance, safety, and efficacy of poly-L/DL-lactic acid (PLLDL) bone plates and screws in craniomaxillofacial surgery are reported in this article. Included in the sample are 745 patients who underwent 761 separate operations, including more than 1400 surgical procedures (orthognathic surgery (685), bone graft reconstruction (37), trauma (191) and transcranial surgery (20)). The success (no breakage or inflammation requiring additional operating room treatment) was 94%. Failure occurred because of breakage (14) or exuberant inflammation (31). All breakage occurred at mandibular sites and the majority of inflammatory failure occurred in the maxilla or orbit (29), with only two in the mandible. Failures were evenly distributed between the two major vendors. PLLDL 70/30 bone plates and screws may be used successfully in a variety of craniomaxillofacial surgical applications. The advantages include the gradual transference of physiological forces to the healing bone, the reduced need for a second operation to remove the material and its potential to serve as a vehicle to deliver bone-healing proteins to fracture/osteotomy sites. Bone healing was noted at all sites, even where exuberant inflammation required a second surgical intervention. PMID:21185695

  13. Moral Reasoning in Hypothetical and Actual Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumprer, Gerard F.; Butter, Eliot J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of this investigation suggest that moral reasoning of college students, when assessed using the DIT format, is the same whether the dilemmas involve hypothetical or actual situations. Subjects, when presented with hypothetical situations, become deeply immersed in them and respond as if they were actual participants. (Author/BEF)

  14. Factors Related to Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, H. Wayne; McWilliams, Jettie M.

    1978-01-01

    Provides data to further support the notions that females score higher in self-actualization measures and that self-actualization scores correlate inversely to the degree of undesirability individuals assign to their heights and weights. Finds that, contrary to predictions, greater androgyny was related to lower, not higher, self-actualization…

  15. Comparisons of interdisciplinary ballast water treatment systems and operational experiences from ships.

    PubMed

    Bakalar, Goran

    2016-01-01

    There are high functioning and low functioning ballast water treatment systems on board ships. In this study, five systems were analysed so as to methodically examine the operational difficulties for ship crew members while giving important consideration to sustainable environment practices. Multi-criteria analysis, a questionnaire, survey and interviews were used as the research method so as to ascertain and corroborate existing problems on board ships, and the reliability of the systems was calculated. The co-insistency, maintenance and the efficiency of the systems, were shown as being the major problem as there are no systems for tracking ship ballast operations from land. The treatment system that used oxidants was, through multi criteria analysis, evaluated as being the best and was ranked first. However, the survey results showed that the ship's crew had serious problems with this system which difficult to solve during the ship's operations with cargo. The deoxygenation system was the most appropriate according to ballast water treatment criteria in the port or at sea. The treatment system which used electrolysis with oxidant was better in terms of efficacy and the treatment system electrolysis with ultra violet light was better in terms of the criterion environment pollution footprint. During further research, it was shown that 7 % of the surveyed crew members had major problems with operating ballast water treatment systems, including the system which was ranked first through multi criteria analysis. They by-passed these systems while continuing to ballast or de-ballast. It was calculated that of the total time needed for the ballast water treatment system operation, 9 % of this time was used for repairs or maintenance of the systems. Some examples are changing a used UV bulb, cleaning the filter or controlling the amount of oxidant which would be discharged into the sea. A conclusion was made and solution was suggested. The study results emphasised

  16. Operating experience with a 250 kW el molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Manfred; Huppmann, Gerhard

    The MTU MCFC program is carried out by a European consortium comprising the German companies MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH, Ruhrgas AG and RWE Energie AG as well as the Danish company Energi E2 S/A. MTU acts as consortium leader. The company shares a license and technology exchange agreement with Fuel Cell Energy Inc., Danbury, CT, USA (formerly Energy Research Corp., ERC). The program was started in 1990 and covers a period of about 10 years. The highlights of this program to date are: Considerable improvements regarding component stability have been demonstrated on laboratory scale. Manufacturing technology has been developed to a point which enables the consortium to fabricate the porous components on a 250 cm 2 scale. Several large area stacks with 5000-7660 cm 2 cell area and a power range of 3-10 kW have been tested at the facilities in Munich (Germany) and Kyndby (Denmark). These stacks have been supplied by FCE. As far as the system design is concerned it was soon realized that conventional systems do not hold the promise for competitive power plants. A system analysis led to the conclusion that a new innovative design approach is required. As a result the "Hot Module" system was developed by the consortium. A Hot Module combines all the components of a MCFC system operating at the similar temperatures and pressures into a common thermally insulated vessel. In August 1997 the consortium started its first full size Hot Module MCFC test plant at the facilities of Ruhrgas AG in Dorsten, Germany. The stack was assembled in Munich using 292 cell packages purchased from FCE. The plant is based on the consortium's unique and proprietary "Hot Module" concept. It operates on pipeline natural gas and was grid connected on 16 August 1997. After a total of 1500 h of operation, the plant was intentionally shut down in a controlled manner in April 1998 for post-test analysis. The Hot Module system concept has demonstrated its functionality. The safety concept has been

  17. Information gathering, data reduction, and information dissemination for residential experiment station operations

    SciTech Connect

    Raghurman, P.; Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1981-09-01

    The Residential Experiment Stations (RESs) of the Solar Photovoltaic Residential Project have been designed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Department of Energy sponsorship to develop residential photovoltaic systems and to disseminate information to the photovoltaic community, cognizant institutions and, ultimately, the public. The residential data systems are discussed that have been designed specifically for the RESs to gather and process the physical data required. The specific reports are covered which will be issued by the project and the contents of each report are listed. A sample format for each report is also presented. The appendices describe the quantities that will be measured at the Monitored Houses, Prototype Systems and Initial System Evaluation Experiments. They also include a description of the data processing.

  18. The Nimbus-4 backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) atmospheric ozone experiment two years operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Mateer, C. L.; Krueger, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) experiment aboard the Nimbus-4 satellite is discussed. This double monochromator experiment measures ultraviolet terrestrial radiance at 12 discrete wavelengths between 2550 A and 3400 A. Approximately 100 scans covering a 230 kilometer square are made between terminator crossings on the daylight side of the earth. A colinear photometer channel with the same field of view is used to derive the Lambert reflectivity of the lower boundary of the scattering atmosphere. The extraterrestrial solar irradiance is measured at the northern terminator. The instrument has currently produced almost three years of nearly continuous data which are being used to infer the high-level ozone distribution and total ozone on a global basis. The high-level ozone data have been verified by independent coincident rocket ozone soundings, and the total ozone values show good agreement with Dobson spectrophotometer determinations as well as those made with the Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer also on Nimbus-4.

  19. Design, installation and operating experience of 20 photovoltaic medical refrigerator systems on four continents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, G. F.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center in cooperation with the World Health Organization, U.S.A. I.D., the Pan American Health Organization and national government agencies in some developing countries sponsored the installation of twenty photovoltaic powered medical vaccine storage refrigerator-freezer (R/F) systems. The Solar Power Corporation was selected as the contractor to perform the design, development and installation of these twenty units. Solar Power's experiences are described herein.

  20. Design and operating experience of a 40 MW, highly-stabilized power supply

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Ferner, J.A.; Bogdan, F.; Morris, G.C.; Rumrill, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    Four 10 MW, highly-stabilized power supply modules have been installed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, FL, to energize water-cooled, resistive, high-field research magnets. The power supply modules achieve a long term current stability if 10 ppM over a 12 h period with a short term ripple and noise variation of <10 ppM over a time period of one cycle. The power supply modules can operate independently, feeding four separate magnets, or two, three or four modules can operate in parallel. Each power supply module consists of a 12.5 kV vacuum circuit breaker, two three-winding, step-down transformers, a 24-pulse rectifier with interphase reactors, and a passive and an active filter. Two different transformer tap settings allow rated dc supply output voltages of 400 and 500 V. The rated current of a supply module is 17 kA and each supply module has a one-hour overload capability of 20 kA. The isolated output terminals of each power supply module are connected to a reversing switch. An extensive high-current bus system allows the modules to be connected to 16 magnet cells. This paper presents the detailed design of the power supply components. Various test results taken during the commissioning phase with a 10 MW resistive load and results taken with the research magnets are shown. The effects of the modules on the electrical supply system and the operational behavior of the power factor correction/harmonic filters are described. Included also are results of a power supply module feeding a superconducting magnet during quench propagation tests. Problems with the power supply design and solutions are presented. Some suggestions on how to improve the performance of these supplies are outlined.