Science.gov

Sample records for actual radiation model

  1. MODIS Solar Diffuser: Modelled and Actual Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Xiong, Xiao-Xiong; Esposito, Joe; Wang, Xin-Dong; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument's solar diffuser is used in its radiometric calibration for the reflective solar bands (VIS, NTR, and SWIR) ranging from 0.41 to 2.1 micron. The sun illuminates the solar diffuser either directly or through a attenuation screen. The attenuation screen consists of a regular array of pin holes. The attenuated illumination pattern on the solar diffuser is not uniform, but consists of a multitude of pin-hole images of the sun. This non-uniform illumination produces small, but noticeable radiometric effects. A description of the computer model used to simulate the effects of the attenuation screen is given and the predictions of the model are compared with actual, on-orbit, calibration measurements.

  2. Radiation Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, W. G. G.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of both the wave and the corpuscular photon model of light. Suggests that students should be informed that the two models are complementary and that each model successfully describes a wide range of radiation phenomena. Cites 19 references which might be of interest to physics teachers and students. (LC)

  3. Photovoltaic performance models: an evaluation with actual field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TamizhMani, Govindasamy; Ishioye, John-Paul; Voropayev, Arseniy; Kang, Yi

    2008-08-01

    Prediction of energy production is crucial to the design and installation of the building integrated photovoltaic systems. This prediction should be attainable based on the commonly available parameters such as system size, orientation and tilt angle. Several commercially available as well as free downloadable software tools exist to predict energy production. Six software models have been evaluated in this study and they are: PV Watts, PVsyst, MAUI, Clean Power Estimator, Solar Advisor Model (SAM) and RETScreen. This evaluation has been done by comparing the monthly, seasonaly and annually predicted data with the actual, field data obtained over a year period on a large number of residential PV systems ranging between 2 and 3 kWdc. All the systems are located in Arizona, within the Phoenix metropolitan area which lies at latitude 33° North, and longitude 112 West, and are all connected to the electrical grid.

  4. Estimating the actual dose delivered by intravascular coronary brachytherapy using geometrically correct 3D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Andreas; Lopez, John J.; Pennington, Edward C.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Braddy, Kathleen C.; Fox, James M.; Brennan, Theresa M. H.; Buatti, John M.; Rossen, James D.; Sonka, Milan

    2003-05-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy has shown to reduce re-occurrence of in-stent restenosis in coronary arteries. For beta radiation, application time is determined from source activity and the angiographically estimated vessel diameter. Conventionally used dosing models assume a straight vessel with the catheter centered and a constant-diameter circular cross section. Aim of this study was to compare the actual dose delivered during in-vivo intravascular brachytherapy with the target range determined from the patient's prescribed dose. Furthermore, differences in dose distribution between a simplified tubular model (STM) and a geometrically correct 3-D model (GCM) obtained from fusion between biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound were quantified. The tissue enclosed by the segmented lumen/plaque and media/adventitia borders was simulated using a structured finite-element mesh. The beta-radiation sources were modeled as 3-D objects in their angiographically determined locations. The accumulated dose was estimated using a fixed distance function based on the patient-specific radiation parameters. For visualization, the data was converted to VRML with the accumulated doses represented by color encoding. The statistical comparison between STM and GCM models in 8 patients showed that the STM significantly underestimates the dose delivered and its variability. The analysis revealed substantial deviations from the target dose range in curved vessels.

  5. Saturn Radiation (SATRAD) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Saturnian radiation belts have not received as much attention as the Jovian radiation belts because they are not nearly as intense-the famous Saturnian particle rings tend to deplete the belts near where their peak would occur. As a result, there has not been a systematic development of engineering models of the Saturnian radiation environment for mission design. A primary exception is that of Divine (1990). That study used published data from several charged particle experiments aboard the Pioneer 1 1, Voyager 1, and Voyager 2 spacecraft during their flybys at Saturn to generate numerical models for the electron and proton radiation belts between 2.3 and 13 Saturn radii. The Divine Saturn radiation model described the electron distributions at energies between 0.04 and 10 MeV and the proton distributions at energies between 0.14 and 80 MeV. The model was intended to predict particle intensity, flux, and fluence for the Cassini orbiter. Divine carried out hand calculations using the model but never formally developed a computer program that could be used for general mission analyses. This report seeks to fill that void by formally developing a FORTRAN version of the model that can be used as a computer design tool for missions to Saturn that require estimates of the radiation environment around the planet. The results of that effort and the program listings are presented here along with comparisons with the original estimates carried out by Divine. In addition, Pioneer and Voyager data were scanned in from the original references and compared with the FORTRAN model s predictions. The results were statistically analyzed in a manner consistent with Divine s approach to provide estimates of the ability of the model to reproduce the original data. Results of a formal review of the model by a panel of experts are also presented. Their recommendations for further tests, analyses, and extensions to the model are discussed.

  6. ATHENA radiation model

    SciTech Connect

    Shumway, R.W.

    1987-10-01

    The ATHENA computer program has many features that make it desirable to use as a space reactor evaluation tool. One of the missing features was a surface-to-surface thermal radiation model. A model was developed that allows any of the regular ATHENA heat slabs to radiate to any other heat slab. The view factors and surface emissivities must be specified by the user. To verify that the model was properly accounting for radiant energy transfer, two different types of test calculations were performed. Both calculations have excellent results. The updates have been used on both the INEL CDC-176 and the Livermore Cray. 7 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Acute radiation risk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Olga

    Biologically motivated mathematical models, which describe the dynamics of the major hematopoietic lineages (the thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems) in acutely/chronically irradiated humans are developed. These models are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations, which variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning. It is shown that the developed models are capable of reproducing clinical data on the dynamics of these systems in humans exposed to acute radiation in the result of incidents and accidents, as well as in humans exposed to low-level chronic radiation. Moreover, the averaged value of the "lethal" dose rates of chronic irradiation evaluated within models of these four major hematopoietic lineages coincides with the real minimal dose rate of lethal chronic irradiation. The demonstrated ability of the models of the human thrombocytopoietic, lymphocytopoietic, granulocytopoietic, and erythropoietic systems to predict the dynamical response of these systems to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates implies that these mathematical models form an universal tool for the investigation and prediction of the dynamics of the major human hematopoietic lineages for a vast pattern of irradiation scenarios. In particular, these models could be applied for the radiation risk assessment for health of astronauts exposed to space radiation during long-term space missions, such as voyages to Mars or Lunar colonies, as well as for health of people exposed to acute/chronic irradiation due to environmental radiological events.

  8. Status of LDEF radiation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, John W.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    The current status of model prediction and comparison with LDEF radiation dosimetry measurements is summarized with emphasis on major results obtained in evaluating the uncertainties of present radiation environment model. The consistency of results and conclusions obtained from model comparison with different sets of LDEF radiation data (dose, activation, fluence, LET spectra) is discussed. Examples where LDEF radiation data and modeling results can be utilized to provide improved radiation assessments for planned LEO missions (e.g., Space Station) are given.

  9. Predicting which patients actually receive radiation following breast conserving therapy in Canadian populations

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Keegan; Lock, Michael; Richard, Lucie; Boldt, Gabriel; Brackstone, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Canadian women with breast cancer may choose breast conserving therapy as their course of treatment, requiring both breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy. However, more than 15% of Canadian women fail to receive the appropriate radiation therapy, putting them at increased risk for recurrence. Age, distance from their radiation therapy centre and stage of disease affect patients’ likelihood of receiving prescribed radiation therapy. We propose a nomogram that allows physicians to predict which patients will and will not receive radiation. This nomogram, once validated, could be used to guide decision making when choosing between breast conserving therapy and mastectomy as the treatment course and thereby change the practice of breast cancer management. PMID:27438052

  10. Intention to use and actual use of electronic information resources: further exploring Technology Acceptance Model (TAM).

    PubMed

    Tao, Donghua

    2009-11-14

    Following up a previous study that examined public health students' intention to use e-resources for completing research paper assignments, the present study proposed two models to investigate whether or not public health students actually used the e-resources they intended to use and whether or not the determinants of intention to use predict actual use of e-resources. Focus groups and pre- and post-questionnaires were used to collect data. Descriptive analysis, data screening, and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) techniques were used for data analysis. The study found that the determinants of intention-to-use significantly predict actual use behavior. Direct impact of perceived usefulness and indirect impact of perceived ease of use to both behavior intention and actual behavior indicated the importance of ease of use at the early stage of technology acceptance. Non-significant intention-behavior relationship prompted thoughts on the measurement of actual behavior and multidimensional characteristics of the intention construct.

  11. Feedback Loop of Data Infilling Using Model Result of Actual Evapotranspiration from Satellites and Hydrological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdi Hartanto, Isnaeni; Alexandridis, Thomas K.; van Andel, Schalk Jan; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2014-05-01

    Using satellite data in a hydrological model has long been occurring in modelling of hydrological processes, as a source of low cost regular data. The methods range from using satellite products as direct input, model validation, and data assimilation. However, the satellite data frequently face the missing value problem, whether due to the cloud cover or the limited temporal coverage. The problem could seriously affect its usefulness in hydrological model, especially if the model uses it as direct input, so data infilling becomes one of the important parts in the whole modelling exercise. In this research, actual evapotranspiration product from satellite is directly used as input into a spatially distributed hydrological model, and validated by comparing the catchment's end discharge with measured data. The instantaneous actual evapotranspiration is estimated from MODIS satellite images using a variation of the energy balance model for land (SEBAL). The eight-day cumulative actual evapotranspiration is then obtained by a temporal integration that uses the reference evapotranspiration calculated from meteorological data [1]. However, the above method cannot fill in a cell if the cell is constantly having no-data value during the eight-day periods. The hydrological model requires full set of data without no-data cells, hence, the no-data cells in the satellite's evapotranspiration map need to be filled in. In order to fills the no-data cells, an output of hydrological model is used. The hydrological model is firstly run with reference evapotranspiration as input to calculate discharge and actual evapotranspiration. The no-data cells in the eight-day cumulative map from the satellite are then filled in with the output of the first run of hydrological model. The final data is then used as input in a hydrological model to calculate discharge, thus creating a loop. The method is applied in the case study of Rijnland, the Netherlands where in the winter, cloud cover is

  12. Involved field radiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma: The actual dose to breasts in close proximity

    SciTech Connect

    Dabaja, Bouthaina; Wang Zhonglo; Stovall, Marilyn; Baker, Jamie S.; Smith, Susan A.; Khan, Meena; Ballas, Leslie; Salehpour, Mohammad R.

    2012-01-01

    To decrease the risk of late toxicities in Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) (HL), involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) has largely replaced the extended fields. To determine the out-of-field dose delivered from a typical IFRT to surrounding critical structures, we measured the dose at various points in an anthropomorphic phantom. The phantom is divided into 1-inch-thick slices with the ability to insert TLDs at 3-cm intervals grid spacing. Two treatment fields were designed, and a total of 45 TLDs were placed (equally spaced) at the margin of the each of the 2 radiation fields. After performing a computed tomography simulation, 2 treatment plans targeting the mediastinum, a typical treatment field in patients with early stage HL, were generated. A total dose of 3060 cGy was delivered to the gross tumor volume for each field consecutively. The highest measured dose detected at 1 cm from the field edge in the planning target volume was 496 cGy, equivalent to 16% of the isocentric dose. The dose dropped significantly with increasing distance from the field edge. It ranged from 1.1-3.9% of the isocentric dose at a distance of 3.2-4 cm to <1.6% at a distance of >6 cm. Although the computer treatment planning system (CTPS) frequently underestimated the dose delivered, the difference in dose between measured and generated by CTPS was <2.5% in 90 positions measured. The collateral dose of radiation to breasts from IFRT is minimal. The out-of-field dose, although mildly underestimated by CTPS, becomes insignificant at >3 cm from the field edge of the radiation field.

  13. Radiative models for the evaluation of the UV radiation at the ground.

    PubMed

    Koepke, P

    2009-12-01

    The variety of radiative models for solar UV radiation is discussed. For the evaluation of measured UV radiation at the ground the basic problem is the availability of actual values of the atmospheric parameters that influence the UV radiation. The largest uncertainties are due to clouds and aerosol, which are highly variable. In the case of tilted receivers, like the human skin for most orientations, and for conditions like a street canyon or tree shadow, besides the classical radiative transfer in the atmosphere additional modelling is necessary.

  14. [Actuality of Wallon's emotional model: toward a "body-psychosocial" model of emotions].

    PubMed

    Santiago Delefosse, M

    2000-01-01

    Author focuses on qualitative approach of emotions with their human function. She postulates that emotions would be one of the way of the mind's body-inscription. A short presentation of the actual discussion, within psychoneurology and cognitive psychology, shows the lack of a developmental perspective. From the Wallon's emotions theory, the author presents a model that allows to go beyond this limit and to redefine the primary function of emotions: the "body-psycho-social Wallon's model" of emotions. Wallon's emotional model focuses on the interaction between body-image and psycho-social construction. This model: a) fixes the emotions into automatisms, but these automatisms are already in link with the social world (through the sense of the mother's language), b) establishes the integrative function of antagonisms (between mind and automatisms, between emotions and mind, between emotions and automatisms). This model shows that emotion's function cannot be reduce to the adaptative response to an unpredictable situation (cognitive or motor). The initial function of emotions concerns the communication system, or better, the first function of emotions is a search for action on family circle, by means of mimicry with ambient and emotional contagion. This emotional system is completely dependent (addicted) on the environment. It gives a "tool" to put in coordination with its environment: a) it favours the setting up of an instant empathy within infant and family circle, b) it makes easier the mind and motor accommodation, c) it put in the necessary plasticity for the emergence of the consciousness. PMID:10875058

  15. Generalized Weierstrass-Mandelbrot Function Model for Actual Stocks Markets Indexes with Nonlinear Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Yu, C.; Sun, J. Q.

    2015-03-01

    It is difficult to simulate the dynamical behavior of actual financial markets indexes effectively, especially when they have nonlinear characteristics. So it is significant to propose a mathematical model with these characteristics. In this paper, we investigate a generalized Weierstrass-Mandelbrot function (WMF) model with two nonlinear characteristics: fractal dimension D where 2 > D > 1.5 and Hurst exponent (H) where 1 > H > 0.5 firstly. And then we study the dynamical behavior of H for WMF as D and the spectrum of the time series γ change in three-dimensional space, respectively. Because WMF and the actual stock market indexes have two common features: fractal behavior using fractal dimension and long memory effect by Hurst exponent, we study the relationship between WMF and the actual stock market indexes. We choose a random value of γ and fixed value of D for WMF to simulate the S&P 500 indexes at different time ranges. As shown in the simulation results of three-dimensional space, we find that γ is important in WMF model and different γ may have the same effect for the nonlinearity of WMF. Then we calculate the skewness and kurtosis of actual Daily S&P 500 index in different time ranges which can be used to choose the value of γ. Based on these results, we choose appropriate γ, D and initial value into WMF to simulate Daily S&P 500 indexes. Using the fit line method in two-dimensional space for the simulated values, we find that the generalized WMF model is effective for simulating different actual stock market indexes in different time ranges. It may be useful for understanding the dynamical behavior of many different financial markets.

  16. Modeling the Space Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    There has been a renaissance of interest in space radiation environment modeling. This has been fueled by the growing need to replace long time standard AP-9 and AE-8 trapped particle models, the interplanetary exploration initiative, the modern satellite instrumentation that has led to unprecedented measurement accuracy, and the pervasive use of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) microelectronics that require more accurate predictive capabilities. The objective of this viewgraph presentation was to provide basic understanding of the components of the space radiation environment and their variations, review traditional radiation effects application models, and present recent developments.

  17. Are GIS-modelled routes a useful proxy for the actual routes followed by commuters?

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Alice M; Jones, Andrew P; Panter, Jenna; Ogilvie, David

    2015-01-01

    Active commuting offers the potential to increase physical activity among adults by being built into daily routines. Characteristics of the route to work may influence propensity to walk or cycle. Geographic information system (GIS) software is often used to explore this by modelling routes between home and work. However, if the validity of modelled routes depends on the mode of travel used, studies of environmental determinants of travel may be biased. We aimed to understand how well modelled routes reflect those actually taken, and what characteristics explain these differences. We compared modelled GIS shortest path routes with actual routes measured using QStarz BT-Q1000X Global Positioning System (GPS) devices in a free-living sample of adults working in Cambridge and using varying travel modes. Predictors of differences, according to length and percentage overlap, between the two route sets were assessed using multilevel regression models and concordance coefficients. The 276 trips, made by 51 participants, were on average 27% further than modelled routes, with an average geographical overlap of 39%. However, predictability of the route depended on travel mode. For route length, there was moderate-to-substantial agreement for journeys made on foot and by bicycle. Route overlap was lowest for trips made by car plus walk (22%). The magnitude of difference depended on other journey characteristics, including travelling via intermediate destinations, distance, and use of busy roads. In conclusion, GIS routes may be acceptable for distance estimation and to explore potential routes, particularly active commuting. However, GPS should be used to obtain accurate estimates of environmental contexts in which commuting behaviour actually occurs. Public health researchers should bear these considerations in mind when studying the geographical determinants and health implications of commuting behaviour, and when recommending policy changes to encourage active travel. PMID

  18. High-Dose 131I-Tositumomab (Anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Adjusting Radiation Absorbed Dose to Actual Organ Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, A K.; Durack, L. D.; Press, O. W.; Eary, Janet F.

    2004-06-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I-tositumomab has been used successfully to treat relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgin's lymphoma (NHL). Our approach to treatment planning has been to determine limits on radiation absorbed close to critical nonhematopoietic organs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using CT to adjust for actual organ volumes in calculating organ-specific absorbed dose estimates. Methods: Records of 84 patients who underwent biodistribution studies after a trace-labeled infusion of 131I-tositumomab for RIT (January 1990 and April 2003) were reviewed. Serial planar -camera images and whole-body Nal probe counts were obtained to estimate 131I-antibody source-organ residence times as recommended by the MIRD Committee. The source-organ residence times for standard man or woman were adjusted by the ratio of the MIRD phantom organ mass to the CT-derived organ mass. Results: The mean radiation absorbed doses (in mGy/MBq) for our data using the MIRD model were lungs= 1.67; liver= 1.03; kidneys= 1.08; spleen= 2.67; and whole body= 0.3; and for CT volume-adjusted organ volumes (in mGy/MBq) were lungs= 1.30; liver= 0.92; kidneys= 0.76; spleen= 1.40; and whole body= 0.22. We determined the following correlation coefficients between the 2 methods for the various organs; lungs, 0.49; (P= 0.0001); liver, 0.64 (P= 0.004); kidneys, 0.45 (P= 0.0001), for the residence times. For therapy, patients received mean 131I administered activities of 19.2 GBq (520 mCi) after adjustment for CT-derived organ mass compared with 16.0 GBq (433 mCi) that would otherwise have been given had therapy been based only using standard MIRD organ volumes--a statistically significant difference (P= 0.0001). Conclusion: We observed large variations in organ masses among our patients. Our treatments were planned to deliver the maximally tolerated radiation dose to the dose-limiting normal organ. This work provides a simplified method for calculating patient-specific radiation

  19. Radiative transfer models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, James L.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assist with the development of analytical techniques for the interpretation of infrared observations. We have done the following: (1) helped to develop models for continuum absorption calculations for water vapor in the far infrared spectral region; (2) worked on models for pressure-induced absorption for O2 and N2 and their comparison with available observations; and (3) developed preliminary studies of non-local thermal equilibrium effects in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere for infrared gases. These new techniques were employed for analysis of balloon-borne far infrared data by a group at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The empirical continuum absorption model for water vapor in the far infrared spectral region and the pressure-induced N2 absorption model were found to give satisfactory results in the retrieval of the mixing ratios of a number of stratospheric trace constituents from balloon-borne far infrared observations.

  20. Applicability of a Micromechanics Model Based on Actual Microstructure for Failure Prediction of DP Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, various micromechanics models based on actual microstructures of DP steels are examined in order to determine the reasonable range of martensite volume fraction where the methodology described in this study can be applied. For this purpose, various micromechanics-based finite element models are first created based on the actual microstructures of DP steels with different martensite volume fractions. These models are, then, used to investigate the influence of ductility of the constituent ferrite and martensite phases and also the influence of voids in the ferrite phase on the overall ductility of DP steels. The computational results indicate that there is a range of martensite volume fraction where the phase inhomogeneity between the ferrite and martensite phases has dominant effect on the overall ductility of DP steels, defeating the influence of the ductility of each phase and the voids in the ferrite phase, and that this phase inhomogeneity dominant region includes the range of marteniste volume fraction between 15% and 40%. Therefore, the methodology, adopted in this study, may be applied to DP steels within the phase inhomogeneity dominant region in tailoring the DP steel design for its intended purpose and desired properties.

  1. Bowen ratio measurements above various vegetation covers and its comparison with actual evapotranspiration estimated by SoilClim model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavinka, P.; Trnka, M.; Fischer, M.; Kucera, J.; Mozny, M.; Zalud, Z.

    2010-09-01

    The principle of Bowen ratio is one of the available techniques for measurements of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) as one of essential water balance fractions. The main aims of submitted study were: (i) to compare the water balance of selected crops, (ii) to compare outputs of SoilClim model with observed parameters (including ETa on Bowen ratio basis). The measurements were conducted at two experimental stations in the Czech Republic (Polkovice 49°23´ (N), 17°17´ (E), 205 m a.s.l.; Domanínek 49°32´ (N), 16°15´ (E), 544 m a.s.l.) during the years 2009 and 2010. Together with Bowen ratio the global solar radiation, radiation balance, soil heat flux, volumetric soil moisture and temperature within selected depths, precipitation and wind speed were measured. The measurements were conducted simultaneously above various covers within the same soil conditions: spring barley vs. winter wheat, spring barley vs. winter rape; grass vs. poplars; harvested field after tillage vs. harvested field after cereals without any tillage. The observed parameters from different covers were compared with SoilClim estimates. SoilClim model is modular software for water balance and soil temperature modelling and finally could be used for soil Hydric and Thermic regimes (according to USDA classification) identification. The core of SoilClim is based on modified FAO Penman-Monteith methodology. Submitted study proved the applicability of SoilClim model for ETa, soil moisture within two defined layers and soil temperature (in 0.5 m depth) estimates for various crops, covers, selected soil types and climatic conditions. Acknowledgement: We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic (no. 521/09/P479) and the project NAZV QI91C054. The study was also supported by Research plan No. MSM6215648905 "Biological and technological aspects of sustainability of controlled ecosystems and their adaptability to climate change".

  2. Radiation Belt Analysis and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, J. N.; Dasgupta, U.; Hein, C. A.; Griffin, J. M.; Reynolds, D. S.

    1995-04-01

    Efforts have been conducted in modeling of radiation belts, and cosmic radiation, principally in connection with the CRRES mission. Statistical studies of solar particle events have been conducted in a search for predictors of the occurrence of geomagnetic storms. Certain spectral and temporal properties of protons and electrons were found to correlate with the occurrence of storms. Comparative studies of solar proton fluxes observed at locations inside (using CRRES and GOES-7) and outside (using INP-8) the inner magnetosphere were performed in an attempt to measure penetration of solar protons to various L shells as functions of time during a proton event and the subsequent magnetic storm. The failure to observe large increases in proton fluxes at the sudden commencement of the great magnetic storm of March, 1991, indicates a magnetospheric process was involved. An attempt was made to model the acceleration of radiation belt protons by magnetospheric compression during this event. The access of Helium into the inner magnetosphere was studied during this event. Modeling of instrument contamination and dosage were performed to enhance interpretation of measurements by the Proton Telescope and the Space Radiation Dosimeter. Support software packages developed include a science summary data base, a data processing system for the microelectronics package, and software to analyze measurements by the Low Energy Plasma Analyzer to produce a three dimensional plasma distribution function.

  3. Modelling of radiation exposure at high altitudes during solar storms.

    PubMed

    Al Anid, H; Lewis, B J; Bennett, L G I; Takada, M

    2009-10-01

    A transport code analysis using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code, MCNPX, has been used to propagate an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere to estimate radiation exposure during solar storms at high altitudes. Neutron monitor count rate data from stations around the world were used to benchmark the model calculations during a ground-level event (GLE). A comparison was made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during GLE 60. A computer code has been developed to implement the model for routine analysis.

  4. Radiation dosimetry and biophysical models of space radiation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu; Shavers, Mark R.; George, Kerry

    2003-01-01

    Estimating the biological risks from space radiation remains a difficult problem because of the many radiation types including protons, heavy ions, and secondary neutrons, and the absence of epidemiology data for these radiation types. Developing useful biophysical parameters or models that relate energy deposition by space particles to the probabilities of biological outcomes is a complex problem. Physical measurements of space radiation include the absorbed dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. In contrast to conventional dosimetric methods, models of radiation track structure provide descriptions of energy deposition events in biomolecules, cells, or tissues, which can be used to develop biophysical models of radiation risks. In this paper, we address the biophysical description of heavy particle tracks in the context of the interpretation of both space radiation dosimetry and radiobiology data, which may provide insights into new approaches to these problems.

  5. Radiation dosimetry and biophysical models of space radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Wu, Honglu; Shavers, Mark R; George, Kerry

    2003-06-01

    Estimating the biological risks from space radiation remains a difficult problem because of the many radiation types including protons, heavy ions, and secondary neutrons, and the absence of epidemiology data for these radiation types. Developing useful biophysical parameters or models that relate energy deposition by space particles to the probabilities of biological outcomes is a complex problem. Physical measurements of space radiation include the absorbed dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra. In contrast to conventional dosimetric methods, models of radiation track structure provide descriptions of energy deposition events in biomolecules, cells, or tissues, which can be used to develop biophysical models of radiation risks. In this paper, we address the biophysical description of heavy particle tracks in the context of the interpretation of both space radiation dosimetry and radiobiology data, which may provide insights into new approaches to these problems. PMID:12959127

  6. EXAMPLES OF RADIATION SHIELDING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Willison, J

    2006-07-27

    The attached pictures are examples of shielding models used by WSMS. The models were used in shielding evaluations for Tank 50 pump replacement. They show the relative location of shielding to radiation sources for pumps and pipes. None of the calculations that were associated with these models involved UCNI. The last page contains two pictures from a shielding calculation for the saltstone area. The upper picture is a conceptual drawing. The lower picture is an image copied from the website of a supplier for the project.

  7. Slot Region Radiation Environment Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Ingmar; Daglis, Ioannis; Heynderickx, Daniel; Evans, Hugh; Nieminen, Petteri

    2013-04-01

    Herein we present the main characteristics and first results of the Slot Region Radiation Environment Models (SRREMs) project. The statistical models developed in SRREMs aim to address the variability of trapped electron and proton fluxes in the region between the inner and the outer electron radiation belt. The energetic charged particle fluxes in the slot region are highly dynamic and are known to vary by several orders of magnitude on both short and long timescales. During quiet times, the particle fluxes are much lower than those found at the peak of the inner and outer belts and the region is considered benign. During geospace magnetic storms, though, this region can fill with energetic particles as the peak of the outer belt is pushed Earthwards and the fluxes can increase drastically. There has been a renewed interest in the potential operation of commercial satellites in orbits that are at least partially contained within the Slot Region. Hence, there is a need to improve the current radiation belt models, most of which do not model the extreme variability of the slot region and instead provide long-term averages between the better-known low and medium Earth orbits (LEO and MEO). The statistical models developed in the SRREMs project are based on the analysis of a large volume of available data and on the construction of a virtual database of slot region particle fluxes. The analysis that we have followed retains the long-term temporal, spatial and spectral variations in electron and proton fluxes as well as the short-term enhancement events at altitudes and inclinations relevant for satellites in the slot region. A large number of datasets have been used for the construction, evaluation and inter-calibration of the SRREMs virtual dataset. Special emphasis has been given on the use and analysis of ESA Standard Radiation Environment Monitor (SREM) data from the units on-board PROBA-1, INTEGRAL, and GIOVE-B due to the sufficient spatial and long temporal

  8. Models for infrared atmospheric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    Line and band models for infrared spectral absorption are discussed. Radiative transmittance and integrated absorptance of Lorentz, Doppler, and voigt line profiles were compared for a range of parameters. It was found that, for the intermediate path lengths, the combined Lorentz-Doppler (Voigt) profile is essential in calculating the atmospheric transmittance. Narrow band model relations for absorptance were used to develop exact formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Several continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model were compared with the numerical solutions of the wide band models. By employing the line-by-line and quasi-random band model formulations, computational procedures were developed for evaluating transmittance and upwelling atmospheric radiance. Homogeneous path transmittances were calculated for selected bands of CO, CO2, and N2O and compared with experimental measurements. The upwelling radiance and signal change in the wave number interval of the CO fundamental band were also calculated.

  9. A comparison of NEAR actual spacecraft costs with three parametric cost models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Todd J.; Lao, Norman Y.; Davalos, Evelyn T.; Bearden, David A.

    1999-11-01

    Costs for modern (post-1990) U.S.-built small planetary spacecraft have been shown to exhibit significantly different trends from those of larger spacecraft. These differences cannot be accounted for simply by the change in size alone. Some have attributed this departure to NASA's "faster, better, cheaper" design approach embodied by the efficiency of smaller teams, reduced government oversight, increased focus on cost, and short development periods. With the Discovery, Mars Surveyor and New Millennium programs representing the new approach to planetary exploration, it is important to understand these current cost trends and to be able to estimate costs of future proposed missions. To address this issue, The Aerospace Corporation (hereafter referred to as Aerospace) performed a study to compare the actual costs of the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft bus (instruments were not estimated) using three different cost models; the U.S. Air Force Unmanned Spacecraft Cost Model, Version 7 (USCM-7), the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) NASA/Air Force Cost Model 1996 (NAFCOM96) and The Aerospace Corporation's Small Satellite Cost Model 1998 (SSCM98). The NEAR spacecraft was chosen for comparison because it was the first Discovery mission launched, and recently recognized with a Laurel award by Aviation Week and Space Technology as a benchmark for NASA's Discovery program [North, 1997]. It was also selected because the cost data has been released into the public domain [Hemmings, 1996]which makes it easy to discuss in a public forum. This paper summarizes the NEAR program, provides a short synopsis of each of the three cost models, and demonstrates how they were applied for this study.

  10. Space shuttle main engine plume radiation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reardon, J. E.; Lee, Y. C.

    1978-01-01

    The methods are described which are used in predicting the thermal radiation received by space shuttles, from the plumes of the main engines. Radiation to representative surface locations were predicted using the NASA gaseous plume radiation GASRAD program. The plume model is used with the radiative view factor (RAVFAC) program to predict sea level radiation at specified body points. The GASRAD program is described along with the predictions. The RAVFAC model is also discussed.

  11. Transformation of a nursing culture through actualization of a nursing professional practice model.

    PubMed

    Jost, Sandra G; Rich, Victoria L

    2010-01-01

    Leading and effecting meaningful change in a nursing division culture, such as the type required to achieve Magnet designation, entails senior nurse executives to be well-acquainted not only with the facts and figures of their business but also with the nuances, myths, and cultures that either enable or block a change from occurring. Expert nurse leaders embrace the story being told by data on dashboards and the quality outcomes achieved and look beyond those points of information out to the edges of their division. These nurse executives also seek to understand the pivotal, perhaps seemingly inconsequential things (notions, beliefs, cultural beliefs, and stories) that will block or tip a culture to change and achieve success. At the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP), a Magnet-designated organization, the road to Magnet was not straightforward. Instead, the path was a winding, learning journey. Through authentic leadership and the conception and actualization of a professional practice model, the HUP Nursing Excellence in Professional Practice (HUP NEPP) model, Magnet designation was achieved and a nursing culture was transformed.

  12. Surface energy balance and actual evapotranspiration of the transboundary Indus Basin estimated from satellite measurements and the ETLook model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Cheema, M. J. M.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Miltenburg, I. J.; Pelgrum, H.

    2012-11-01

    The surface energy fluxes and related evapotranspiration processes across the Indus Basin were estimated for the hydrological year 2007 using satellite measurements. The new ETLook remote sensing model (version 1) infers information on actual Evaporation (E) and actual Transpiration (T) from combined optical and passive microwave sensors, which can observe the land-surface even under persistent overcast conditions. A two-layer Penman-Monteith equation was applied for quantifying soil and canopy evaporation. The novelty of the paper is the computation of E and T across a vast area (116.2 million ha) by using public domain microwave data that can be applied under all weather conditions, and for which no advanced input data are required. The average net radiation for the basin was estimated as being 112 Wm-2. The basin average sensible, latent and soil heat fluxes were estimated to be 80, 32, and 0 Wm-2, respectively. The average evapotranspiration (ET) and evaporative fraction were 1.2 mm d-1 and 0.28, respectively. The basin wide ET was 496 ± 16.8 km3 yr-1. Monte Carlo analysis have indicated 3.4% error at 95% confidence interval for a dominant land use class. Results compared well with previously conducted soil moisture, lysimeter and Bowen ratio measurements at field scale (R2 = 0.70; RMSE = 0.45 mm d-1; RE = -11.5% for annual ET). ET results were also compared against earlier remote sensing and modeling studies for various regions and provinces in Pakistan (R2 = 0.76; RMSE = 0.29 mmd-1; RE = 6.5% for annual ET). The water balance for all irrigated areas together as one total system in Pakistan and India (26.02 million ha) show a total ET value that is congruent with the ET value from the ETLook surface energy balance computations. An unpublished validation of the same ETLook model for 23 jurisdictional areas covering the entire Australian continent showed satisfactory results given the quality of the watershed data and the diverging physiographic and climatic

  13. Do Student Evaluations of University Reflect Inaccurate Beliefs or Actual Experience? A Relative Rank Model

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gordon D A; Wood, Alex M; Ogden, Ruth S; Maltby, John

    2015-01-01

    It was shown that student satisfaction ratings are influenced by context in ways that have important theoretical and practical implications. Using questions from the UK's National Student Survey, the study examined whether and how students' expressed satisfaction with issues such as feedback promptness and instructor enthusiasm depends on the context of comparison (such as possibly inaccurate beliefs about the feedback promptness or enthusiasm experienced at other universities) that is evoked. Experiment 1 found strong effects of experimentally provided comparison context—for example, satisfaction with a given feedback time depended on the time's relative position within a context. Experiment 2 used a novel distribution-elicitation methodology to determine the prior beliefs of individual students about what happens in universities other than their own. It found that these beliefs vary widely and that students' satisfaction was predicted by how they believed their experience ranked within the distribution of others' experiences. A third study found that relative judgement principles also predicted students' intention to complain. An extended model was developed to show that purely rank-based principles of judgement can account for findings previously attributed to range effects. It was concluded that satisfaction ratings and quality of provision are different quantities, particularly when the implicit context of comparison includes beliefs about provision at other universities. Quality and satisfaction should be assessed separately, with objective measures (such as actual times to feedback), rather than subjective ratings (such as satisfaction with feedback promptness), being used to measure quality wherever practicable. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Behavioral Decision Making published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25620847

  14. Impact of potential and (scintillometer-based) actual evapotranspiration estimates on the performance of a lumped rainfall-runoff model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samain, B.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2013-11-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) plays a key role in hydrological impact studies and operational flood forecasting models as ET represents a loss of water from a catchment. Although ET is a major component of the catchment water balance, the evapotranspiration input for rainfall-runoff models is often simplified in contrast to the detailed estimates of catchment averaged precipitation. In this study, an existing conceptual rainfall-runoff model calibrated for and operational in the Bellebeek catchment in Belgium firstly has been validated and its sensitivity to different available potential ET input has been studied. It has been shown that when applying a calibrated rainfall-runoff model, the model input should be consistent with the input used for the calibration process, not only on the volume of ET, but also on the seasonal pattern. Secondly, estimates of the actual evapotranspiration based on measurements of a large aperture scintillometer (LAS) have been used as model forcing in the rainfall-runoff model. From this analysis, it has been shown that the actual evapotranspiration is a crucial factor in simulating the catchment water balance and the resulting stream flow. Regarding the actual evapotranspiration estimates from the LAS, it has been concluded that they can be considered realistic in summer months. In the months where stable conditions prevail (autumn, winter and (early) spring), an underestimation of the actual evapotranspiration is made, which has an important impact on the catchment's water balance.

  15. Estimating solar radiation for plant simulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, T.; French, V.; Leduc, S.

    1985-01-01

    Five algorithms producing daily solar radiation surrogates using daily temperatures and rainfall were evaluated using measured solar radiation data for seven U.S. locations. The algorithms were compared both in terms of accuracy of daily solar radiation estimates and terms of response when used in a plant growth simulation model (CERES-wheat). Requirements for accuracy of solar radiation for plant growth simulation models are discussed. One algorithm is recommended as being best suited for use in these models when neither measured nor satellite estimated solar radiation values are available.

  16. Validation of an improved energy balance model to estimate actual evapotranspiration in irrigated cotton ecosystems of Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoefel, Patrick; Conrad, Christopher; Falk, Ulrike; Bauer-Marschallinger, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    The understanding of the hydrological and the energy cycles are essential in order to describe the complex interactions within the climate system of the earth. Being recognized as an essential component of both the water and the energy cycle, reliable estimation of actual evapotranspiration and its spatial distribution is one outstanding challenge in this context. For instance, in irrigation systems of arid regions, artificial locations of evapotranspiration have been created. An in-depth process understanding is of paramount importance, as irrigated agriculture consumes about 70 % of the available freshwater resources worldwide, with a significant but unsatisfyingly quantified impact on the water cycle, especially on regional scale. Moreover, an exact quantification of ET inside these artificial ecosystems enables assessments of crop water consumptions and hence about water use efficiency (WUE). The withdrawal of water for agricultural use in the countries of Central Asia is more than 90%. Khorezm region in Uzbekistan is a case study region for the problems of irrigated agriculture in CA. For Khorezm the seasonal actual ET was calculated for the years 2003 - 2010 using the partly modified surface energy balance algorithm for land (SEBAL). SEBAL was implemented based on MODIS time series to calculate the energy balance components like net radiation (Rn), sensible heat (H), latent heat (LE), and soil heat flux (G). Whilst SEBAL is using an empirical equation for estimating G, a more physically based method was introduced in this study. This method uses microwave soil moisture products (ASAR-SSM and ASCAT-SSM) as additional input information. The modelled energy balance components were intensively validated by field measurements with an eddy covariance system and soil sensors. For turbulent heat fluxes the RMSE is about 40 W/m² for H and 80 W/m² for LE with a coefficient of determination (r²) of 0.64 for H and 0.52 for LE. Soil heat flux estimation could be

  17. Actual evapotranspiration modeling using the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Maupin, Molly A.; Kenny, Joan F.; Perry, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Remote-sensing technology and surface-energy-balance methods can provide accurate and repeatable estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) when used in combination with local weather datasets over irrigated lands. Estimates of ETa may be used to provide a consistent, accurate, and efficient approach for estimating regional water withdrawals for irrigation and associated consumptive use (CU), especially in arid cropland areas that require supplemental water due to insufficient natural supplies from rainfall, soil moisture, or groundwater. ETa in these areas is considered equivalent to CU, and represents the part of applied irrigation water that is evaporated and/or transpired, and is not available for immediate reuse. A recent U.S. Geological Survey study demonstrated the application of the remote-sensing-based Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to estimate 10-year average ETa at 1-kilometer resolution on national and regional scales, and compared those ETa values to the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Use Information Program’s 1995 county estimates of CU. The operational version of the operational SSEB (SSEBop) method is now used to construct monthly, county-level ETa maps of the conterminous United States for the years 2000, 2005, and 2010. The performance of the SSEBop was evaluated using eddy covariance flux tower datasets compiled from 2005 datasets, and the results showed a strong linear relationship in different land cover types across diverse ecosystems in the conterminous United States (correlation coefficient [r] ranging from 0.75 to 0.95). For example, r for woody savannas (0.75), grassland (0.75), forest (0.82), cropland (0.84), shrub land (0.89), and urban (0.95). A comparison of the remote-sensing SSEBop method for estimating ETa and the Hamon temperature method for estimating potential ET (ETp) also was conducted, using regressions of all available county averages of ETa for 2005 and 2010, and yielded correlations of r = 0

  18. Increasing the Reliability of Circulation Model Validation: Quantifying Drifter Slip to See how Currents are Actually Moving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean circulation forecasts can help answer questions regarding larval dispersal, passive movement of injured sea animals, oil spill mitigation, and search and rescue efforts. Circulation forecasts are often validated with GPS-tracked drifter paths, but how accurately do these drifters actually move with ocean currents? Drifters are not only moved by water, but are also forced by wind and waves acting on the exposed buoy and transmitter; this imperfect movement is referred to as drifter slip. The quantification and further understanding of drifter slip will allow scientists to differentiate between drifter imperfections and actual computer model error when comparing trajectory forecasts with actual drifter tracks. This will avoid falsely accrediting all discrepancies between a trajectory forecast and an actual drifter track to computer model error. During multiple deployments of drifters in Nantucket Sound and using observed wind and wave data, we attempt to quantify the slip of drifters developed by the Northeast Fisheries Science Center's (NEFSC) Student Drifters Program. While similar studies have been conducted previously, very few have directly attached current meters to drifters to quantify drifter slip. Furthermore, none have quantified slip of NEFSC drifters relative to the oceanographic-standard "CODE" drifter. The NEFSC drifter archive has over 1000 drifter tracks primarily off the New England coast. With a better understanding of NEFSC drifter slip, modelers can reliably use these tracks for model validation.

  19. Modelling bulk surface resistance from MODIS time series data to estimate actual regional evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autovino, Dario; Minacapilli, Mario; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Estimation of actual evapotraspiration by means of Penman-Monteith (P-M) equation requires the knowledge of the so-called 'bulk surface resistance', rc,act, representing the vapour flow resistance through the transpiring crop and evaporating soil surface. The accurate parameterization of rc,act still represents an unexploited topic, especially in the case of heterogeneous land surface. In agro-hydrological applications, the P-M equation commonly used to evaluate reference evapotranspiration (ET0) of a well-watered 'standardized crop' (grass or alfalfa), generally assumes for the bulk surface resistance a value of 70 s m-1. Moreover, specific crop coefficients have to be used to estimate maximum and/or actual evapotranspiration based on ET0. In this paper, a simple procedure for the indirect estimation of rc,act as function of a vegetation index computed from remote acquisition of Land Surface Temperature (LST), is proposed. An application was carried out in an irrigation district located near Castelvetrano, in South-West of Sicily, mainly cultivated with olive groves, in which actual evapotranspiration fluxes were measured during two years (2010-2011) by an Eddy Covariance flux tower (EC). Evapotranspiration measurements allowed evaluating rc,actbased on the numerical inversion of the P-M equation. In the same study area, a large time series of MODIS LST data, characterized by a spatial resolution of 1x1 km and a time step of 8-days, was also acquired for the period from 2000 to 2014. A simple Vegetation Index Temperatures (VTI), with values ranging from 0 to 1, was computed using normalized LST values. Evapotranspiration fluxes measured in 2010 were used to calibrate the relationship between rc,act and VTI, whereas data from 2011 were used for its validation. The preliminary results evidenced that, for the considered crop, an almost constant value of rc,act, corresponding to about 250 s m-1, can be considered typical of periods in which the crop is well

  20. Predictive models of radiative neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julio, J.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss two models of radiative neutrino mass generation. The first model features one-loop Zee model with Z4 symmetry. The second model is the two-loop neutrino mass model with singly- and doubly-charged scalars. These two models fit neutrino oscillation data well and predict some interesting rates for lepton flavor violation processes.

  1. Near-Earth Space Radiation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Michael A.; O'Neill, Patrick M.; O'Brien, T. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Review of models of the near-Earth space radiation environment is presented, including recent developments in trapped proton and electron, galactic cosmic ray and solar particle event models geared toward spacecraft electronics applications.

  2. Comparison of Statistically Modeled Contaminated Soil Volume Estimates and Actual Excavation Volumes at the Maywood FUSRAP Site - 13555

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, James; Hays, David; Quinn, John; Johnson, Robert; Durham, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    As part of the ongoing remediation process at the Maywood Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) properties, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) assisted the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) New York District by providing contaminated soil volume estimates for the main site area, much of which is fully or partially remediated. As part of the volume estimation process, an initial conceptual site model (ICSM) was prepared for the entire site that captured existing information (with the exception of soil sampling results) pertinent to the possible location of surface and subsurface contamination above cleanup requirements. This ICSM was based on historical anecdotal information, aerial photographs, and the logs from several hundred soil cores that identified the depth of fill material and the depth to bedrock under the site. Specialized geostatistical software developed by Argonne was used to update the ICSM with historical sampling results and down-hole gamma survey information for hundreds of soil core locations. The updating process yielded both a best guess estimate of contamination volumes and a conservative upper bound on the volume estimate that reflected the estimate's uncertainty. Comparison of model results to actual removed soil volumes was conducted on a parcel-by-parcel basis. Where sampling data density was adequate, the actual volume matched the model's average or best guess results. Where contamination was un-characterized and unknown to the model, the actual volume exceeded the model's conservative estimate. Factors affecting volume estimation were identified to assist in planning further excavations. (authors)

  3. A rapid radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiang, X.; Smith, E. A.; Justus, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over alternative two-stream solutions is that in addition to yielding the irradiance components, which turn out to be mathematically equivalent to the delta-Eddington approximation, the radiance field can also be expanded in a mathematically consistent fashion. Tests with the model against a more precise multistream discrete ordinate model over a wide range of input parameters demonstrate that the new approximate method typically produces average radiance differences of less than 5%, with worst average differences of approximately 10%-15%. By the same token, the computational speed of the new model is some tens to thousands times faster than that of the more precise model when its stream resolution is set to generate precise calculations.

  4. A Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for Reflection of Solar Radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, X.; Smith, E. A.; Justus, C. G.

    1994-07-01

    A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over alternative two-stream solutions is that in addition to yielding the irradiance components, which turn out to be mathematically equivalent to the delta-Eddington approximation, the radiance field can also be expanded in a mathematically consistent fashion. Tests with the model against a more precise multistream discrete ordinate model over a wide range of input parameters demonstrate that the new approximate method typically produces average radiance differences of less than 5%, with worst average differences of 10%-15%. By the same token, the computational speed of the new model is some tens to thousands times faster than that of the more precise model when its stream resolution is set to generate precise calculations.

  5. The dynamic radiation environment assimilation model (DREAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Geoffrey D; Koller, Josef; Tokar, Robert L; Chen, Yue; Henderson, Michael G; Friedel, Reiner H

    2010-01-01

    The Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) is a 3-year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to provide global, retrospective, or real-time specification of the natural and potential nuclear radiation environments. The DREAM model uses Kalman filtering techniques that combine the strengths of new physical models of the radiation belts with electron observations from long-term satellite systems such as GPS and geosynchronous systems. DREAM includes a physics model for the production and long-term evolution of artificial radiation belts from high altitude nuclear explosions. DREAM has been validated against satellites in arbitrary orbits and consistently produces more accurate results than existing models. Tools for user-specific applications and graphical displays are in beta testing and a real-time version of DREAM has been in continuous operation since November 2009.

  6. Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J Iacono

    2011-04-07

    This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

  7. COMPARISON OF MEDIUM CONCENTRATION VS. ACTUAL TISSUE DOSE IN IN VITRO NEUROTOXICANT MODELS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro methods have long been used to model the effects of toxicants on the nervous system. Generally, it is assumed that concentrations of toxicant present in the medium surrounding cells in in vitro models are an adequate biomarker of cell or tissue levels. However, this assu...

  8. Guide to Modeling Earth's Trapped Radiation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H.

    1999-01-01

    The report will close with a detailed discussion of the current status of modeling of the radiation environment and recommend a long range plan for enhancing capabilities in this important environmental area.

  9. Evaluation of the interactive chemistry of coal-petroleum systems using model and actual reactants

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Chung, Wook Jin )

    1988-01-01

    The coprocessing of coal with petroleum residuum simultaneously liquefies coal and upgrades petroleum residuum into higher value products. However, coal and petroleum residuum manifest very different chemical properties with coal being more aromatic with a H/C ratio of 0.6 - 0.8 and petroleum residuum more aliphatic with a H/C ratio of 1.4 to 1.6. Although a number of studies have demonstrated the feasibility of coprocessing on the basis of product selectivity and metals reduction, the interactive chemistry involved between the coal and petroleum materials during coprocessing has not yet been determined. In this study, the interactive chemistry between coal and petroleum molecules has been examined: first by using model compound types representative of coal and residuum and then by combining the model systems with Illinois No. 6 coal and Maya topped long residuum (TLR). The model systems, composed of naphthalene (NAPH) representing aromatics, 1,4-dimethylcyclohexane (DMC) representing saturated compounds, phenol (PN) representing phenolics, benzothiophene (BZT) representing sulfur compounds, and quinoline (QN) representing nitrogen compounds, were reacted thermally and catalytically using a Shell 324 NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The model systems were reacted individually and then combined together to ascertain the effect of the different components on the thermal and catalytic reactions of the different model systems. Illinois No. 6 coal and Maya TLR were each, respectively, added to the model compound systems and reacted thermally and catalytically.

  10. Evaluation of the interactive chemistry of coal-petroleum systems using model and actual reactants

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.; Chung, W.J. )

    1988-06-01

    The coprocessing of coal with petroleum residuum simultaneously liquefies coal and upgrades petroleum residuum into higher value products. However, coal and petroleum residuum manifest very different chemical properties with coal being more aromatic with a H/C ratio of 0.6 - 0.8 and petroleum residuum more aliphatic with a H/C ratio of 1.4 to 1.6. Although a number of studies have demonstrated the feasibility of coprocessing on the basis of product selectivity and metals reduction (1-8), the interactive chemistry involved between the coal and petroleum materials during coprocessing has not yet been determined. In this study, the interactive chemistry between coal and petroleum molecules have been examined: first by using model compound types representative of coal and residuum and then by combining the model systems will Illinois No. 6 coal and Maya topped long residuum (TLR). The model systems, composed of napthalene (NAPH) representing aromatics, 1,4- dimethylcyclohexane (DMC) representing saturated compounds, phenol (PN) representing phenolics, benzothiophene (BZT) representing suflur compounds, and quinoline (QN) representing nitrogen compounds, were reacted thermally and catalytically using a Shell 324 NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst. The model systems were reacted individually and then combined together to ascertain the effect of the different components on the thermal and catalytic reactions of the different model systems. Illinois No. 6 coal and Maya TLR were each, respectively, added to the model compound systems and reacted thermally and catalytically.

  11. Band models and correlations for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption of infrared radiation by various line and band models are briefly reviewed. Narrow band model relations for absorptance are used to develop 'exact' formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Application of a wide band model to a particular gas largely depends upon the spectroscopic characteristic of the absorbing-emitting molecule. Seven continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model are presented and each one of these is compared with the exact (numerical) solutions of the wide band models. Comparison of these results indicate the validity of a correlation for a particular radiative transfer application. In radiative transfer analyses, use of continuous correlations for total band absorptance provides flexibilities in various mathematical operations.

  12. An Earth radiation budget climate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, Fred L.

    1988-01-01

    A 2-D Earth Radiation Budget Climate Model has been constructed from an OLWR (Outgoing Longwave Radiation) model and an Earth albedo model. Each of these models uses the same cloud cover climatology modified by a factor GLCLC which adjusts the global annual average cloud cover. The two models are linked by a set of equations which relate the cloud albedos to the cloud top temperatures of the OLWR model. These equations are derived from simultaneous narrow band satellite measurements of cloud top temperature and albedo. Initial results include global annual average values of albedo and latitude/longitude radiation for 45 percent and 57 percent global annual average cloud cover and two different forms of the cloud albedo-cloud top temperature equations.

  13. Estimation of Actual Crop ET of Paddy Using the Energy Balance Model SMARET and Validation with Field Water Balance Measurements and a Crop Growth Model (ORYZA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallasamy, N. D.; Muraleedharan, B. V.; Kathirvel, K.; Narasimhan, B.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainable management of water resources requires reliable estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ET) at fine spatial and temporal resolution. This is significant in the case of rice based irrigation systems, one of the major consumers of surface water resources and where ET forms a major component of water consumption. However huge tradeoff in the spatial and temporal resolution of satellite images coupled with lack of adequate number of cloud free images within a growing season act as major constraints in deriving ET at fine spatial and temporal resolution using remote sensing based energy balance models. The scale at which ET is determined is decided by the spatial and temporal scale of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which form inputs to energy balance models. In this context, the current study employed disaggregation algorithms (NL-DisTrad and DisNDVI) to generate time series of LST and NDVI images at fine resolution. The disaggregation algorithms aimed at generating LST and NDVI at finer scale by integrating temporal information from concurrent coarse resolution data and spatial information from a single fine resolution image. The temporal frequency of the disaggregated images is further improved by employing composite images of NDVI and LST in the spatio-temporal disaggregation method. The study further employed half-hourly incoming surface insolation and outgoing long wave radiation obtained from the Indian geostationary satellite (Kalpana-1) to convert the instantaneous ET into daily ET and subsequently to the seasonal ET, thereby improving the accuracy of ET estimates. The estimates of ET were validated with field based water balance measurements carried out in Gadana, a subbasin predominated by rice paddy fields, located in Tamil Nadu, India.

  14. The NIAID Radiation Countermeasures Program Business Model

    PubMed Central

    Hafer, Nathaniel; Maidment, Bert W.

    2010-01-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Radiation/Nuclear Medical Countermeasures Development Program has developed an integrated approach to providing the resources and expertise required for the research, discovery, and development of radiation/nuclear medical countermeasures (MCMs). These resources and services lower the opportunity costs and reduce the barriers to entry for companies interested in working in this area and accelerate translational progress by providing goal-oriented stewardship of promising projects. In many ways, the radiation countermeasures program functions as a “virtual pharmaceutical firm,” coordinating the early and mid-stage development of a wide array of radiation/nuclear MCMs. This commentary describes the radiation countermeasures program and discusses a novel business model that has facilitated product development partnerships between the federal government and academic investigators and biopharmaceutical companies. PMID:21142762

  15. The NIAID Radiation Countermeasures Program business model.

    PubMed

    Hafer, Nathaniel; Maidment, Bert W; Hatchett, Richard J

    2010-12-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Radiation/Nuclear Medical Countermeasures Development Program has developed an integrated approach to providing the resources and expertise required for the research, discovery, and development of radiation/nuclear medical countermeasures (MCMs). These resources and services lower the opportunity costs and reduce the barriers to entry for companies interested in working in this area and accelerate translational progress by providing goal-oriented stewardship of promising projects. In many ways, the radiation countermeasures program functions as a "virtual pharmaceutical firm," coordinating the early and mid-stage development of a wide array of radiation/nuclear MCMs. This commentary describes the radiation countermeasures program and discusses a novel business model that has facilitated product development partnerships between the federal government and academic investigators and biopharmaceutical companies.

  16. Radiation Environment Modeling for Spacecraft Design: New Model Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; Xapsos, Mike; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Ladbury, Ray

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on various new space radiation environment models for spacecraft design is described. The topics include: 1) The Space Radiatio Environment; 2) Effects of Space Environments on Systems; 3) Space Radiatio Environment Model Use During Space Mission Development and Operations; 4) Space Radiation Hazards for Humans; 5) "Standard" Space Radiation Environment Models; 6) Concerns about Standard Models; 7) Inadequacies of Current Models; 8) Development of New Models; 9) New Model Developments: Proton Belt Models; 10) Coverage of New Proton Models; 11) Comparison of TPM-1, PSB97, AP-8; 12) New Model Developments: Electron Belt Models; 13) Coverage of New Electron Models; 14) Comparison of "Worst Case" POLE, CRESELE, and FLUMIC Models with the AE-8 Model; 15) New Model Developments: Galactic Cosmic Ray Model; 16) Comparison of NASA, MSU, CIT Models with ACE Instrument Data; 17) New Model Developmemts: Solar Proton Model; 18) Comparison of ESP, JPL91, KIng/Stassinopoulos, and PSYCHIC Models; 19) New Model Developments: Solar Heavy Ion Model; 20) Comparison of CREME96 to CREDO Measurements During 2000 and 2002; 21) PSYCHIC Heavy ion Model; 22) Model Standardization; 23) Working Group Meeting on New Standard Radiation Belt and Space Plasma Models; and 24) Summary.

  17. Modeling water retention of sludge simulants and actual saltcake tank wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.S.

    1996-07-01

    The Ferrocyanide Tanks Safety Program managed by Westinghouse hanford Company has been concerned with the potential combustion hazard of dry tank wastes containing ferrocyanide chemical in combination with nitrate salts. Pervious studies have shown that tank waste containing greater than 20 percent of weight as water could not be accidentally ignited. Moreover, a sustained combustion could not be propagated in such a wet waste even if it contained enough ferrocyanide to burn. Because moisture content is a key critical factor determining the safety of ferrocyanide-containing tank wastes, physical modeling was performed by Pacific Northwest National laboratory to evaluate the moisture-retaining behavior of typical tank wastes. The physical modeling reported here has quantified the mechanisms by which two main types of tank waste, sludge and saltcake, retain moisture in a tank profile under static conditions. Static conditions usually prevail after a tank profile has been stabilized by pumping out any excess interstitial liquid, which is not naturally retained by the waste as a result of physical forces such as capillarity.

  18. Modeling and testing of fractionation effects with refrigerant blends in an actual residential heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Biancardi, F.R.; Pandy, D.R.; Sienel, T.H.; Michels, H.H.

    1997-12-31

    The heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry is actively evaluating and testing hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant blends as a means of complying with current and impending national and international environmental regulations restricting the use and disposal of conventional chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerants that contribute to the global ozone-depletion effects. While analyses and system performance tools have shown that HFC refrigerant blends offer certain performance, capacity, and operational advantages, there are significant possible service and operational issues that are raised by the use of blends. Many of these issues occur due to the fractionation of the blends. Therefore, the objective of this program was to conduct analyses and experimental tests aimed at understanding these issues, develop approaches or techniques to predict these effects, and convey to the industry safe and reliable approaches. As a result, analytical models verified by laboratory data have been developed that predict the fractionation effects of HFC refrigerant blends (1) when exposed to selected POE lubricants, (2) during the system charging process from large liquid containers, and (3) during system start-up, operation, and shutdown within various system components (where two-phase refrigerant exists) and during selected system and component leakage scenarios. Model predictions and experimental results are presented for HFC refrigerant blends containing R-32, R-134a, and R-125 and the data are generalized for various operating conditions and scenarios.

  19. Modeling Impaired Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-03-01

    Radiation impairment of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of several factors associated with cognitive detriments after treatment of brain cancers in children and adults with radiation therapy. Mouse models have been used to study radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis, however the models are limited in the number of doses, dose fractions, age and time after exposure conditions that have been studied. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel predictive mathematical model of radiation-induced changes to neurogenesis using a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to represent the time, age and dose-dependent changes to several cell populations participating in neurogenesis as reported in mouse experiments exposed to low-LET radiation. We considered four compartments to model hippocampal neurogenesis and, consequently, the effects of radiation treatment in altering neurogenesis: (1) neural stem cells (NSCs), (2) neuronal progenitor cells or neuroblasts (NB), (3) immature neurons (ImN) and (4) glioblasts (GB). Because neurogenesis is decreasing with increasing mouse age, a description of the age-related dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis is considered in the model, which is shown to be an important factor in comparisons to experimental data. A key feature of the model is the description of negative feedback regulation on early and late neuronal proliferation after radiation exposure. The model is augmented with parametric descriptions of the dose and time after irradiation dependences of activation of microglial cells and a possible shift of NSC proliferation from neurogenesis to gliogenesis reported at higher doses (∼10 Gy). Predictions for dose-fractionation regimes and for different mouse ages, and prospects for future work are then discussed.

  20. Modeling Impaired Hippocampal Neurogenesis after Radiation Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cacao, Eliedonna; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-03-01

    Radiation impairment of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is one of several factors associated with cognitive detriments after treatment of brain cancers in children and adults with radiation therapy. Mouse models have been used to study radiation-induced changes in neurogenesis, however the models are limited in the number of doses, dose fractions, age and time after exposure conditions that have been studied. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel predictive mathematical model of radiation-induced changes to neurogenesis using a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to represent the time, age and dose-dependent changes to several cell populations participating in neurogenesis as reported in mouse experiments exposed to low-LET radiation. We considered four compartments to model hippocampal neurogenesis and, consequently, the effects of radiation treatment in altering neurogenesis: (1) neural stem cells (NSCs), (2) neuronal progenitor cells or neuroblasts (NB), (3) immature neurons (ImN) and (4) glioblasts (GB). Because neurogenesis is decreasing with increasing mouse age, a description of the age-related dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis is considered in the model, which is shown to be an important factor in comparisons to experimental data. A key feature of the model is the description of negative feedback regulation on early and late neuronal proliferation after radiation exposure. The model is augmented with parametric descriptions of the dose and time after irradiation dependences of activation of microglial cells and a possible shift of NSC proliferation from neurogenesis to gliogenesis reported at higher doses (∼10 Gy). Predictions for dose-fractionation regimes and for different mouse ages, and prospects for future work are then discussed. PMID:26943452

  1. Localization of a small change in a multiple scattering environment without modeling of the actual medium.

    PubMed

    Rakotonarivo, S T; Walker, S C; Kuperman, W A; Roux, P

    2011-12-01

    A method to actively localize a small perturbation in a multiple scattering medium using a collection of remote acoustic sensors is presented. The approach requires only minimal modeling and no knowledge of the scatterer distribution and properties of the scattering medium and the perturbation. The medium is ensonified before and after a perturbation is introduced. The coherent difference between the measured signals then reveals all field components that have interacted with the perturbation. A simple single scatter filter (that ignores the presence of the medium scatterers) is matched to the earliest change of the coherent difference to localize the perturbation. Using a multi-source/receiver laboratory setup in air, the technique has been successfully tested with experimental data at frequencies varying from 30 to 60 kHz (wavelength ranging from 0.5 to 1 cm) for cm-scale scatterers in a scattering medium with a size two to five times bigger than its transport mean free path.

  2. The JPL Uranian Radiation Model (UMOD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry; Martinez-Sierra, Luz Maria; Evans, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is the development of a comprehensive radiation model (UMOD) of the Uranian environment for JPL mission planning. The ultimate goal is to provide a description of the high energy electron and proton environments and the magnetic field at Uranus that can be used for engineering design. Currently no model exists at JPL. A preliminary electron radiation model employing Voyager 2 data was developed by Selesnick and Stone in 1991. The JPL Uranian Radiation Model extends that analysis, which modeled electrons between 0.7 MeV and 2.5 MeV based on the Voyager Cosmic Ray Subsystem electron telescope, down to an energy of 0.022 MeV for electrons and from 0.028 MeV to 3.5 MeV for protons. These latter energy ranges are based on measurements by the Applied Physics Laboratory Low Energy Charged Particle Detector on Voyager 2. As in previous JPL radiation models, the form of the Uranian model is based on magnetic field coordinates and requires a conversion from spacecraft coordinates to Uranian-centered magnetic "B-L" coordinates. Two magnetic field models have been developed for Uranus: 1) a simple "offset, tilted dipole" (OTD), and 2) a complex, multi-pole expansion model ("Q3"). A review of the existing data on Uranus and a search of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS) were completed to obtain the latest, up to date descriptions of the Uranian high energy particle environment. These data were fit in terms of the Q3 B-L coordinates to extend and update the original Selesnick and Stone electron model in energy and to develop the companion proton flux model. The flux predictions of the new model were used to estimate the total ionizing dose for the Voyager 2 flyby, and a movie illustrating the complex radiation belt variations was produced to document the uses of the model for planning purposes.

  3. Radiation budget measurement/model interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonderhaar, T. H.; Ciesielski, P.; Randel, D.; Stevens, D.

    1983-01-01

    This final report includes research results from the period February, 1981 through November, 1982. Two new results combine to form the final portion of this work. They are the work by Hanna (1982) and Stevens to successfully test and demonstrate a low-order spectral climate model and the work by Ciesielski et al. (1983) to combine and test the new radiation budget results from NIMBUS-7 with earlier satellite measurements. Together, the two related activities set the stage for future research on radiation budget measurement/model interfacing. Such combination of results will lead to new applications of satellite data to climate problems. The objectives of this research under the present contract are therefore satisfied. Additional research reported herein includes the compilation and documentation of the radiation budget data set a Colorado State University and the definition of climate-related experiments suggested after lengthy analysis of the satellite radiation budget experiments.

  4. Parotid Glands Dose–Effect Relationships Based on Their Actually Delivered Doses: Implications for Adaptive Replanning in Radiation Therapy of Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Fernandes, Laura L.; Vineberg, Karen A.; McShan, Daniel; Antonuk, Alan E.; Cornwall, Craig; Feng, Mary; Schipper, Mathew J.; Balter, James M.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Doses actually delivered to the parotid glands during radiation therapy often exceed planned doses. We hypothesized that the delivered doses correlate better with parotid salivary output than the planned doses, used in all previous studies, and that determining these correlations will help make decisions regarding adaptive radiation therapy (ART) aimed at reducing the delivered doses. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, oropharyngeal cancer patients treated definitively with chemoirradiation underwent daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with clinical setup alignment based on the C2 posterior edge. Parotid glands in the CBCTs were aligned by deformable registration to calculate cumulative delivered doses. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured separately from each parotid gland pretherapy and periodically posttherapy. Results: Thirty-six parotid glands of 18 patients were analyzed. Average mean planned doses was 32 Gy, and differences from planned to delivered mean gland doses were −4.9 to +8.4 Gy, median difference +2.2 Gy in glands in which delivered doses increased relative to planned. Both planned and delivered mean doses were significantly correlated with posttreatment salivary outputs at almost all posttherapy time points, without statistically significant differences in the correlations. Large dispersions (on average, SD 3.6 Gy) characterized the dose–effect relationships for both. The differences between the cumulative delivered doses and planned doses were evident at first fraction (r=.92, P<.0001) because of complex setup deviations (eg, rotations and neck articulations), uncorrected by the translational clinical alignments. Conclusions: After daily translational setup corrections, differences between planned and delivered doses in most glands were small relative to the SDs of the dose–saliva data, suggesting that ART is not likely to gain measurable salivary output improvement in most cases. These differences were

  5. The simplest models of radiative neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Sandy S. C.; McDonald, Kristian L.

    2014-04-01

    The complexity of radiative neutrino-mass models can be judged by: (i) whether they require the imposition of ad hoc symmetries, (ii) the number of new multiplets they introduce and (iii) the number of arbitrary parameters that appear. Considering models that do not employ new symmetries, the simplest models have two new multiplets and a minimal number of new parameters. With this in mind, we search for the simplest models of radiative neutrino mass. We are led to two models, containing a real scalar triplet and a charged scalar doublet (respectively), in addition to the charged singlet scalar considered by Zee [h+ (1, 1, 2)]. These models are essentially simplified versions of the Zee model and appear to be the simplest models of radiative neutrino mass. However, despite successfully generating nonzero masses, present-day data is sufficient to rule these simple models out. The Zee and Zee-Babu models therefore remain as the simplest viable models. Moving beyond the minimal cases, we find a new model of two-loop masses that employs the charged doublet Φ (1, 2, 3) and the doubly-charged scalar k++ (1, 1, 4). This is the sole remaining model that employs only three new noncolored multiplets.

  6. String Fragmentation Model in Space Radiation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Alfred; Johnson, Eloise (Editor); Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    String fragmentation models such as the Lund Model fit experimental particle production cross sections very well in the high-energy limit. This paper gives an introduction of the massless relativistic string in the Lund Model and shows how it can be modified with a simple assumption to produce formulas for meson production cross sections for space radiation research. The results of the string model are compared with inclusive pion production data from proton-proton collision experiments.

  7. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A.

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  8. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratz, David P.; Ces, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchy of line-by-line, narrow-band, and broadband infrared radiation models are discussed for ozone, a radiatively important atmospheric trace gas. It is shown that the narrow-band (Malkmus) model is in near-precise agreement with the line-by-line model, thus providing a means of testing narrow-band Curtis-Godson scaling, and it is found that this scaling procedure leads to errors in atmospheric fluxes of up to 10 percent. Moreover, this is a direct consequence of the altitude dependence of the ozone mixing ratio. Somewhat greater flux errors arise with use of the broadband model, due to both a lesser accuracy of the broadband scaling procedure and to inherent errors within the broadband model, despite the fact that this model has been tuned to the line-by-line model.

  9. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of a forest stand in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The approach tested for calculating the water consumption by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time-series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results show that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  10. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-09-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of forest stands in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The tested approach for calculating the water use by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results reveal that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  11. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  12. Radiative transfer model: matrix operator method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Ruprecht, E

    1996-07-20

    A radiative transfer model, the matrix operator method, is discussed here. The matrix operator method is applied to a plane-parallel atmosphere within three spectral ranges: the visible, the infrared, and the microwave. For a homogeneous layer with spherical scattering, the radiative transfer equation can be solved analytically. The vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere can be subdivided into a set of homogeneous layers. The solution of the radiative transfer equation for the vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere is obtained recurrently from the analytical solutions for the subdivided layers. As an example for the application of the matrix operator method, the effects of the cirrus and the stratocumulus clouds on the net radiation at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere are investigated. The relationship between the polarization in the microwave range and the rain rates is also studied. Copies of the FORTRAN program and the documentation of the FORTRAN program on a diskette are available.

  13. Atmospheric radiation model for water surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Gaskill, D. W.; Lierzer, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    An atmospheric correction model was extended to account for various atmospheric radiation components in remotely sensed data. Components such as the atmospheric path radiance which results from singly scattered sky radiation specularly reflected by the water surface are considered. A component which is referred to as the virtual Sun path radiance, i.e. the singly scattered path radiance which results from the solar radiation which is specularly reflected by the water surface is also considered. These atmospheric radiation components are coded into a computer program for the analysis of multispectral remote sensor data over the Great Lakes of the United States. The user must know certain parameters, such as the visibility or spectral optical thickness of the atmosphere and the geometry of the sensor with respect to the Sun and the target elements under investigation.

  14. Modeling of Radiative Transfer in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonAllmen, Paul; Turner, Neal

    2007-01-01

    This program implements a spectral line, radiative transfer tool for interpreting Spitzer Space Telescope observations by matching them with models of protostellar disks for improved understanding of planet and star formation. The Spitzer Space Telescope detects gas phase molecules in the infrared spectra of protostellar disks, with spectral lines carrying information on the chemical composition of the material from which planets form. Input to the software includes chemical models developed at JPL. The products are synthetic images and spectra for comparison with Spitzer measurements. Radiative transfer in a protostellar disk is primarily affected by absorption and emission processes in the dust and in molecular gases such as H2, CO, and HCO. The magnitude of the optical absorption and emission is determined by the population of the electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels. The population of the molecular level is in turn determined by the intensity of the radiation field. Therefore, the intensity of the radiation field and the population of the molecular levels are inter-dependent quantities. To meet the computational challenges of solving for the coupled radiation field and electronic level populations in disks having wide ranges of optical depths and spatial scales, the tool runs in parallel on the JPL Dell Cluster supercomputer with C++ and Fortran compiler with a Message Passing Interface. Because this software has been developed on a distributed computing platform, the modeling of systems previously beyond the reach of available computational resources is possible.

  15. Dynamic model of Earth's radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Koshiishi, Hideki; Goka, Tateo; Obara, Takahiro

    The radiation belts are the region that energetic charged particles are trapped by Earth's magnetic field. It is well known that the energetic particle flux vary during geomagnetic distur-bances, and, the relativistic electrons in the outer radiation belt change with solar wind speed. Many researches have been studied about the flux variation of radiation belt, but the mecha-nism of the variation has not been understood in detail. We have developed a new dynamic model of energetic particles trapped in the based on the data from the MDS-1 spacecraft. This model reproduces the dynamic of radiation belt by running average using magnetic activity index(AP) and running average solar wind speed. This model covers the energy ranges of 0.4-2MeV for electrons, 0.9-210 MeV for protons, and 6-140 MeV for helium ions, and it is valid from low altitudes (approximately 500km) to geosynchronous orbit altitude. We discuss the advantage of the new model, and comparisons between MDS-1 data and our new model.

  16. Radiative Torques: Analytical Model And Basic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.

    2007-05-01

    We attempt to get a physical insight into grain alignment processes by studying basic properties of radiative torques (RATs). For this purpose we consider a simple toy model of a helical grain that reproduces well the basic features of RATs. The model grain consists of a reflecting spheroidal body with a reflecting mirror attached at an angle to it. Being very simple, the model allows analytical description of RATs that act upon it. We show a good correspondence of RATs obtained for this model and those of irregular grains calculated by DDSCAT. Our analysis of the role of different torque components for grain alignment reveals that one of the three RAT components does not affect the alignment, but induces only for grain precession. The other two components provide a generic alignment with grain long axes perpendicular to the light radiation, if the radiation dominates the grain precession, and perpendicular to magnetic field, otherwise. The latter coincides with the famous predictions of the Davis-Greenstein process, but our model does not invoke paramagnetic relaxation. In addition, we find that a substantial part of grains subjected to RATs gets aligned with low angular momentum, which testifies, that most of the grains in diffuse interstellar medium do not rotate fast, i.e. rotate with thermal or even sub-thermal velocities. For the radiation-dominated environments, we find that the alignment can take place on the time scale much shorter than the time of gaseous damping of grain rotation.

  17. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Kratz, D. P.; Caldwell, J.; Kim, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Mutually consistent line-by-line, narrow-band and broad-band infrared radiation models are presented for methane, a potentially important anthropogenic trace gas within the atmosphere. Comparisons of the modeled band absorptances with existing laboratory data produce the best agreement when, within the band models, spurious band intensities are used which are consistent with the respective laboratory data sets, but which are not consistent with current knowledge concerning the intensity of the infrared fundamental band of methane. This emphasizes the need for improved laboratory band absorptance measurements. Since, when applied to atmospheric radiation calculations, the line-by-line model does not require the use of scaling approximations, the mutual consistency of the band models provides a means of appraising the accuracy of scaling procedures. It is shown that Curtis-Godson narrow-band and Chan-Tien broad-band scaling provide accurate means of accounting for atmospheric temperature and pressure variations.

  18. Jovian S emission: Model of radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, B. P.

    1994-04-01

    A physical model of the radiation source and an excitation mechanism have been suggested for the S component in Jupiter's sporadic radio emission. The model provides a unique explanation for most of the interrelated phenomena observed, allowing a consistent interpretation of the emission cone structure, behavior of the integrated radio spectrum, occurrence probability of S bursts, location and size of the radiation source, and fine structure of the dynamic spectra. The mechanism responsible for the S bursts is also discussed in connection with the L type emission. Relations are traced between parameters of the radio emission and geometry of the Io flux tube. Fluctuations in the current amplitude through the tube are estimated, along with the refractive index value and mass density of the plasma near the radiation source.

  19. Modeling the radiation pattern of LEDs.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ivan; Sun, Ching-Cherng

    2008-02-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) come in many varieties and with a wide range of radiation patterns. We propose a general, simple but accurate analytic representation for the radiation pattern of the light emitted from an LED. To accurately render both the angular intensity distribution and the irradiance spatial pattern, a simple phenomenological model takes into account the emitting surfaces (chip, chip array, or phosphor surface), and the light redirected by both the reflecting cup and the encapsulating lens. Mathematically, the pattern is described as the sum of a maximum of two or three Gaussian or cosine-power functions. The resulting equation is widely applicable for any kind of LED of practical interest. We accurately model a wide variety of radiation patterns from several world-class manufacturers.

  20. Shuttle Spacesuit (Radiation) Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brooke M.; Nealy, J. E.; Qualls, G. D.; Staritz, P. J.; Wilson, J. W.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Atwell, W.; DeAngelis, G.; Ware, J.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed spacesuit computational model is being developed at the Langley Research Center for exposure evaluation studies. The details of the construction of the spacesuit are critical to an estimate of exposures and for assessing the health risk to the astronaut during extravehicular activity (EVA). Fine detail of the basic fabric structure, helmet, and backpack is required to assure a valid evaluation. The exposure fields within the Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) and Female (CAF) are evaluated at 148 and 156 points, respectively, to determine the dose fluctuations within critical organs. Exposure evaluations for ambient environments will be given and potential implications for geomagnetic storm conditions discussed.

  1. Modelling of aircrew radiation exposure during solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Anid, Hani Khaled

    show a very different response during anisotropic events, leading to variations in aircrew radiation doses that may be significant for dose assessment. To estimate the additional exposure due to solar flares, a model was developed using a Monte-Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX. The model transports an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere using the MCNPX analysis. This code produces the estimated flux at a specific altitude where radiation dose conversion coefficients are applied to convert the particle flux into effective and ambient dose-equivalent rates. A cut-off rigidity model accounts for the shielding effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during Ground Level Enhancements 60 and 65. An anisotropy analysis that uses neutron monitor responses and the pitch angle distribution of energetic solar particles was used to identify particle anisotropy for a solar event in December 2006. In anticipation of future commercial use, a computer code has been developed to implement the radiation dose assessment model for routine analysis. Keywords: Radiation Dosimetry, Radiation Protection, Space Physics.

  2. Status of Galileo interim radiation electron model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Ratliff, J. M.; Evans, R. W.; Clough, G. A.; McEntire, R. W.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the high energy, omni-directional electron environment by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EDP) were used to develop a new model of Jupiter's trapped electron radiation in the jovian equatorial plane for the range 8 to 16 Jupiter radii.

  3. Some analytical models of radiating collapsing spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A; Ospino, J.

    2006-08-15

    We present some analytical solutions to the Einstein equations, describing radiating collapsing spheres in the diffusion approximation. Solutions allow for modeling physical reasonable situations. The temperature is calculated for each solution, using a hyperbolic transport equation, which permits to exhibit the influence of relaxational effects on the dynamics of the system.

  4. Radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a radiatively induced quark and lepton mass model in the first and second generation with extra U (1) gauge symmetry and vector-like fermions. Then we analyze the allowed regions which simultaneously satisfy the FCNCs for the quark sector, LFVs including μ- e conversion, the quark mass and mixing, and the lepton mass and mixing. Also we estimate the typical value for the (g - 2) μ in our model.

  5. Development of an infrared radiative heating model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Helmle, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared radiative transfer solution algorithms used in global circulation models were assessed. Computation techniques applicable to the Ames circulation model are identified. Transmission properties of gaseous CO2, H2O, and O3 are gathered, and a computer program is developed, using the line parameter tape and Voight profile subroutine, which computes the transmission of CO2, H2O, and O3. A computer code designed to compute atmospheric cooling rates was developed.

  6. The NSSDC trapped radiation model facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, John D., Jr.; Bilitza, D.

    1990-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) trapped radiation models calculate the integral and differential electron and proton flux for given values of the particle energy E, drift shell parameter L, and magnetic field strength B for either solar maximum or solar minimum. The most recent versions of the series of models, which have been developed and continuously improved over several decades by Dr. James Vette and coworkers at NSSDC, are AE-8 for electrons and AP-8 for protons. The present status of the NSSDC trapped particle models is discussed. The limits of validity of the models are described.

  7. Ab Initio Modeling of Molecular Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David

    2014-01-01

    Radiative emission from excited states of atoms and molecules can comprise a significant fraction of the total heat flux experienced by spacecraft during atmospheric entry at hypersonic speeds. For spacecraft with ablating heat shields, some of this radiative flux can be absorbed by molecular constituents in the boundary layer that are formed by the ablation process. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations are carried out to predict the strengths of these emission and absorption processes. This talk will describe the methods used in these calculations using, as examples, the 4th positive emission bands of CO and the 1g+ 1u+ absorption in C3. The results of these calculations are being used as input to NASA radiation modeling codes like NeqAir, HARA and HyperRad.

  8. Radiative torques: analytical model and basic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.; Hoang, Thiem

    2007-07-01

    We attempt to get a physical insight into grain alignment processes by studying basic properties of radiative torques (RATs). For this purpose we consider a simple toy model of a helical grain that reproduces well the basic features of RATs. The model grain consists of a spheroidal body with a mirror attached at an angle to it. Being very simple, the model allows analytical description of RATs that act upon it. We show a good correspondence of RATs obtained for this model and those of irregular grains calculated by DDSCAT. Our analysis of the role of different torque components for grain alignment reveals that one of the three RAT components does not affect the alignment, but induces only for grain precession. The other two components provide a generic alignment with grain long axes perpendicular to the radiation direction, if the radiation dominates the grain precession, and perpendicular to magnetic field, otherwise. The latter coincides with the famous predictions of the Davis-Greenstein process, but our model does not invoke paramagnetic relaxation. In fact, we identify a narrow range of angles between the radiation beam and the magnetic field, for which the alignment is opposite to the Davis-Greenstein predictions. This range is likely to vanish, however, in the presence of thermal wobbling of grains. In addition, we find that a substantial part of grains subjected to RATs gets aligned with low angular momentum, which testifies that most of the grains in diffuse interstellar medium do not rotate fast, that is, rotate with thermal or even subthermal velocities. This tendency of RATs to decrease grain angular velocity as a result of the RAT alignment decreases the degree of polarization, by decreasing the degree of internal alignment, that is, the alignment of angular momentum with the grain axes. For the radiation-dominated environments, we find that the alignment can take place on the time-scale much shorter than the time of gaseous damping of grain rotation

  9. A radiation briefer's guide to the PIKE Model

    SciTech Connect

    Steadman, Jr, C R

    1990-03-01

    Gamma-radiation-exposure estimates to populations living immediately downwind from the Nevada Test Site have been required for many years by the US Department of Energy (DOE) before each containment-designed nuclear detonation. A highly unlikely worst-case'' scenario is utilized which assumes that there will be an accidental massive venting of radioactive debris into the atmosphere shortly after detonation. The Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) has supplied DOE with such estimates for the last 25 years using the WSNSO Fallout Scaling Technique (FOST), which employs a worst-case analog event that actually occurred in the past. The PIKE Model'' is the application of the FOST using the PIKE nuclear event as the analog. This report, which is primarily intended for WSNSO meteorologists who derive radiation estimates, gives a brief history of the model,'' presents the mathematical, radiological, and meteorological concepts upon which it is based, states its limitations, explains it apparent advantages over more sophisticated models, and details how it is used operationally. 10 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Seasonal radiative modeling of Titan's stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bézard, Bruno; Vinatier, Sandrine; Achterberg, Richard

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a seasonal radiative model of Titan's stratosphere to investigate the time variation of stratospheric temperatures in the 10-3 - 5 mbar range as observed by the Cassini/CIRS spectrometer. The model incorporates gas and aerosol vertical profiles derived from Cassini/CIRS spectra to calculate the heating and cooling rate profiles as a function of time and latitude. In the equatorial region, the radiative equilibrium profile is warmer than the observed one. Adding adiabatic cooling in the energy equation, with a vertical velocity profile decreasing with depth and having w ≈ 0.4 mm sec-1 at 1 mbar, allows us to reproduce the observed profile. The model predicts a 5 K decrease at 1 mbar between 2008 and 2016 as a result of orbit eccentricity, in relatively good agreement with the observations. At other latitudes, as expected, the radiative model predicts seasonal variations of temperature larger than observed, pointing to latitudinal redistribution of heat by dynamics. Vertical velocities seasonally varying between -0.4 and 1.2 mm sec-1 at 1 mbar provide adiabatic cooling and heating adequate to reproduce the time variation of 1-mbar temperatures from 2005 to 2016 at 30°N and S. The model is also used to investigate the role of the strong compositional changes observed at high southern latitudes after equinox in the concomitant rapid cooling of the stratosphere.

  11. Mouse models for radiation-induced cancers.

    PubMed

    Rivina, Leena; Davoren, Michael J; Schiestl, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    Potential ionising radiation exposure scenarios are varied, but all bring risks beyond the simple issues of short-term survival. Whether accidentally exposed to a single, whole-body dose in an act of terrorism or purposefully exposed to fractionated doses as part of a therapeutic regimen, radiation exposure carries the consequence of elevated cancer risk. The long-term impact of both intentional and unintentional exposure could potentially be mitigated by treatments specifically developed to limit the mutations and precancerous replication that ensue in the wake of irradiation The development of such agents would undoubtedly require a substantial degree of in vitro testing, but in order to accurately recapitulate the complex process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, well-understood animal models are necessary. Inbred strains of the laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, present the most logical choice due to the high number of molecular and physiological similarities they share with humans. Their small size, high rate of breeding and fully sequenced genome further increase its value for use in cancer research. This chapter will review relevant m. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animals of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast and lung cancers. Method of cancer induction and associated molecular pathologies will also be described for each model. PMID:27209205

  12. Principles of the radiative ablation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saillard, Yves; Arnault, Philippe; Silvert, Virginie

    2010-12-01

    Indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) rests on the setting up of a radiation temperature within a laser cavity and on the optimization of the capsule implosion ablated by this radiation. In both circumstances, the ablation of an optically thick medium is at work. The nonlinear radiation conduction equations that describe this phenomenon admit different kinds of solutions called generically Marshak waves. In this paper, a completely analytic model is proposed to describe the ablation in the subsonic regime relevant to ICF experiments. This model approximates the flow by a deflagrationlike structure where Hugoniot relations are used in the stationary part from the ablation front up to the isothermal sonic Chapman-Jouguet point and where the unstationary expansion from the sonic point up to the external boundary is assumed quasi-isothermal. It uses power law matter properties. It can also accommodate arbitrary boundary conditions provided the ablation wave stays very subsonic and the surface temperature does not vary too quickly. These requirements are often met in realistic situations. Interestingly, the ablated mass rate, the ablation pressure, and the absorbed radiative energy depend on the time history of the surface temperature, not only on the instantaneous temperature values. The results compare very well with self-similar solutions and with numerical simulations obtained by hydrodynamic code. This analytic model gives insight into the physical processes involved in the ablation and is helpful for optimization and sensitivity studies in many situations of interest: radiation temperature within a laser cavity, acceleration of finite size medium, and ICF capsule implosion, for instance.

  13. Principles of the radiative ablation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Saillard, Yves; Arnault, Philippe; Silvert, Virginie

    2010-12-15

    Indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) rests on the setting up of a radiation temperature within a laser cavity and on the optimization of the capsule implosion ablated by this radiation. In both circumstances, the ablation of an optically thick medium is at work. The nonlinear radiation conduction equations that describe this phenomenon admit different kinds of solutions called generically Marshak waves. In this paper, a completely analytic model is proposed to describe the ablation in the subsonic regime relevant to ICF experiments. This model approximates the flow by a deflagrationlike structure where Hugoniot relations are used in the stationary part from the ablation front up to the isothermal sonic Chapman-Jouguet point and where the unstationary expansion from the sonic point up to the external boundary is assumed quasi-isothermal. It uses power law matter properties. It can also accommodate arbitrary boundary conditions provided the ablation wave stays very subsonic and the surface temperature does not vary too quickly. These requirements are often met in realistic situations. Interestingly, the ablated mass rate, the ablation pressure, and the absorbed radiative energy depend on the time history of the surface temperature, not only on the instantaneous temperature values. The results compare very well with self-similar solutions and with numerical simulations obtained by hydrodynamic code. This analytic model gives insight into the physical processes involved in the ablation and is helpful for optimization and sensitivity studies in many situations of interest: radiation temperature within a laser cavity, acceleration of finite size medium, and ICF capsule implosion, for instance.

  14. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of epidemiologic studies using multistage

  15. Radiation attenuation characteristics of pyrolysis volatiles of solid fuels and their effect for radiant ignition model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yupeng; Yang, Lizhong; Dai, Jiakun; Wang, Yafei; Deng, Zhihua

    2010-01-15

    Radiation attenuation characteristics of pyrolysis volatiles from heated solid fuels, a neglected physical effect in radiant ignition process, are studied by simulated experiment and mathematical models. Firstly, it is experimentally found the radiation attenuation of an incident heat flux when pine or Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) is heated occurs before flaming ignition (6-14%), especially for the one in the experiment of the Cone Calorimeter style apparatus with a shorter test radiation distance (D < 100 mm). Then, a more reasonable parameter using Beer's law for determining the radiation absorptivity of pyrolysis volatiles of different fuels is presented. It is found the radiation absorptivity of pyrolysis volatiles of PMMA is actually larger than the one of pine and the ignition of PMMA more depends on the gas-phase heating by radiation absorption. Finally, the calculated results with the experimental radiation attenuation data illustrates that consideration of the radiation attenuation by pyrolysis volatiles in radiant ignition models is necessary. A constant radiation attenuation coefficient G = 0.1 is approximately accepted for the general calculation of radiant ignition model. (author)

  16. Analytical modeling of the steady radiative shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boireau, L.; Bouquet, S.; Michaut, C.; Clique, C.

    2006-06-01

    In a paper dated 2000 [1], a fully analytical theory of the radiative shock has been presented. This early model had been used to design [2] radiative shock experiments at the Laboratory for the Use of Intense Lasers (LULI) [3 5]. It became obvious from numerical simulations [6, 7] that this model had to be improved in order to accurately recover experiments. In this communication, we present a new theory in which the ionization rates in the unshocked (bar{Z_1}) and shocked (bar{Z_2} neq bar{Z_1}) material, respectively, are included. Associated changes in excitation energy are also taken into account. We study the influence of these effects on the compression and temperature in the shocked medium.

  17. Comparing Models of Helper Behavior to Actual Practice in Telephone Crisis Intervention: A Silent Monitoring Study of Calls to the U.S. 1-800-SUICIDE Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishara, Brian L.; Chagnon, Francois; Daigle, Marc; Balan, Bogdan; Raymond, Sylvaine; Marcoux, Isabelle; Bardon, Cecile; Campbell, Julie K.; Berman, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Models of telephone crisis intervention in suicide prevention and best practices were developed from a literature review and surveys of crisis centers. We monitored 2,611 calls to 14 centers using reliable behavioral ratings to compare actual interventions with the models. Active listening and collaborative problem-solving models describe help…

  18. Modeling Early Galaxies Using Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    This simulation uses a flux-limited diffusion solver to explore the radiation hydrodynamics of early galaxies, in particular, the ionizing radiation created by Population III stars. At the time of this rendering, the simulation has evolved to a redshift of 3.5. The simulation volume is 11.2 comoving megaparsecs, and has a uniform grid of 10243 cells, with over 1 billion dark matter and star particles. This animation shows a combined view of the baryon density, dark matter density, radiation energy and emissivity from this simulation. The multi-variate rendering is particularly useful because is shows both the baryonic matter ("normal") and dark matter, and the pressure and temperature variables are properties of only the baryonic matter. Visible in the gas density are "bubbles", or shells, created by the radiation feedback from young stars. Seeing the bubbles from feedback provides confirmation of the physics model implemented. Features such as these are difficult to identify algorithmically, but easily found when viewing the visualization. Simulation was performed on Kraken at the National Institute for Computational Sciences. Visualization was produced using resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory.

  19. Nuisance Source Population Modeling for Radiation Detection System Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sokkappa, P; Lange, D; Nelson, K; Wheeler, R

    2009-10-05

    A major challenge facing the prospective deployment of radiation detection systems for homeland security applications is the discrimination of radiological or nuclear 'threat sources' from radioactive, but benign, 'nuisance sources'. Common examples of such nuisance sources include naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), medical patients who have received radioactive drugs for either diagnostics or treatment, and industrial sources. A sensitive detector that cannot distinguish between 'threat' and 'benign' classes will generate false positives which, if sufficiently frequent, will preclude it from being operationally deployed. In this report, we describe a first-principles physics-based modeling approach that is used to approximate the physical properties and corresponding gamma ray spectral signatures of real nuisance sources. Specific models are proposed for the three nuisance source classes - NORM, medical and industrial. The models can be validated against measured data - that is, energy spectra generated with the model can be compared to actual nuisance source data. We show by example how this is done for NORM and medical sources, using data sets obtained from spectroscopic detector deployments for cargo container screening and urban area traffic screening, respectively. In addition to capturing the range of radioactive signatures of individual nuisance sources, a nuisance source population model must generate sources with a frequency of occurrence consistent with that found in actual movement of goods and people. Measured radiation detection data can indicate these frequencies, but, at present, such data are available only for a very limited set of locations and time periods. In this report, we make more general estimates of frequencies for NORM and medical sources using a range of data sources such as shipping manifests and medical treatment statistics. We also identify potential data sources for industrial source frequencies, but leave the task of

  20. Introductory Tools for Radiative Transfer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Kuai, L.; Natraj, V.; Yung, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite data are currently so voluminous that, despite their unprecedented quality and potential for scientific application, only a small fraction is analyzed due to two factors: researchers' computational constraints and a relatively small number of researchers actively utilizing the data. Ultimately it is hoped that the terabytes of unanalyzed data being archived can receive scientific scrutiny but this will require a popularization of the methods associated with the analysis. Since a large portion of complexity is associated with the proper implementation of the radiative transfer model, it is reasonable and appropriate to make the model as accessible as possible to general audiences. Unfortunately, the algorithmic and conceptual details that are necessary for state-of-the-art analysis also tend to frustrate the accessibility for those new to remote sensing. Several efforts have been made to have web- based radiative transfer calculations, and these are useful for limited calculations, but analysis of more than a few spectra requires the utilization of home- or server-based computing resources. We present a system that is designed to allow for easier access to radiative transfer models with implementation on a home computing platform in the hopes that this system can be utilized in and expanded upon in advanced high school and introductory college settings. This learning-by-doing process is aided through the use of several powerful tools. The first is a wikipedia-style introduction to the salient features of radiative transfer that references the seminal works in the field and refers to more complicated calculations and algorithms sparingly5. The second feature is a technical forum, commonly referred to as a tiki-wiki, that addresses technical and conceptual questions through public postings, private messages, and a ranked searching routine. Together, these tools may be able to facilitate greater interest in the field of remote sensing.

  1. A Radiative Transfer Model for Climate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Clough, Shepard A.; Toon, Owen B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a radiative transfer model developed to accurately predict the atmospheric radiant flux in both the infrared and the solar spectrum with a minimum of computational effort. We use a newly developed k-distribution model for both the thermal and solar parts of the spectrum. We employ a generalized two-stream approximation for the scattering by aerosol and clouds. To assess the accuracy of the model, the results are compared to other more detailed models for several standard cases in the solar and thermal spectrum. We perform several calculations focussing primarily on the question of absorption of solar radiation by gases and aerosols. We estimate the accuracy of the k-distribution to be approx. 1 W/sq m for the gaseous absorption in the solar spectrum. We estimate the accuracy of the two-stream method to be 3-12 W/sq m for the downward solar flux and 1-5 W/sq m for the upward solar flux at the top of atmosphere depending on the optical depth of the aerosol layer. We also show that the effect of ignoring aerosol absorption on the downward solar flux at the surface is 50 W/sq m for the TARFOX aerosol for an optical depth of 0.5 and 150 W/sq m for a highly absorbing mineral aerosol. Thus, we conclude that the uncertainty introduced by the aerosol solar radiative properties (and merely assuming some "representative" model) can be considerably larger than the error introduced by the use of a two-stream method.

  2. An Earth longwave radiation climate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    An Earth outgoing longwave radiation (OLWR) climate model was constructed for radiation budget study. Required information is provided by on empirical 100mb water vapor mixing ratio equation of the mixing ratio interpolation scheme. Cloud top temperature is adjusted so that the calculation would agree with NOAA scanning radiometer measurements. Both clear sky and cloudy sky cases are calculated and discussed for global average, zonal average and world-wide distributed cases. The results agree well with the satellite observations. The clear sky case shows that the OLWR field is highly modulated by water vapor, especially in the tropics. The strongest longitudinal variation occurs in the tropics. This variation can be mostly explained by the strong water vapor gradient. Although in the zonal average case the tropics have a minimum in OLWR, the minimum is essentially contributed by a few very low flux regions, such as the Amazon, Indonesian and the Congo.

  3. Radiative equilibrium model of Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelson, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The present global radiative equilibrium model for the Saturn satellite Titan is restricted to the two-stream approximation, is vertically homogeneous in its scattering properties, and is spectrally divided into one thermal and two solar channels. Between 13 and 33% of the total incident solar radiation is absorbed at the planetary surface, and the 30-60 ratio of violet to thermal IR absorption cross sections in the stratosphere leads to the large temperature inversion observed there. The spectrally integrated mass absorption coefficient at thermal wavelengths is approximately constant throughout the stratosphere, and approximately linear with pressure in the troposphere, implying the presence of a uniformly mixed aerosol in the stratosphere. There also appear to be two regions of enhanced opacity near 30 and 500 mbar.

  4. Galactic cosmic radiation model and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; O'Neill, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    A model for the differential energy spectra of galactic cosmic radiation as a function of solar activity is described. It is based on the standard diffusion-convection theory of solar modulation. Estimates of the modulation potential based on fitting this theory to observed spectral measurements from 1954 to 1989 are correlated to the Climax neutron counting rates and to the sunspot numbers at earlier times taking into account the polarity of the interplanetary magnetic field at the time of observations. These regression lines then provide a method for predicting the modulation at later times. The results of this model are quantitatively compared to a similar Moscow State University (MSU) model. These model cosmic ray spectra are used to predict the linear energy transfer spectra, differential energy spectra of light (charge less than or = 2) ions, and single event upsets rates in memeory devices. These calculations are compared to observations made aboard the Space Shuttle.

  5. Defining climate modeling user needs: which data are actually required to support impact analysis and adaptation policy development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, R. J.; Pagé, C.

    2010-12-01

    Until recently, the policy applications of Earth System Models in general and climate models in particular were focusing mainly on the potential future changes in the global and regional climate and attribution of observed changes to anthropogenic activities. Is climate change real? And if so, why do we have to worry about it? Following the broad acceptance of the reality of the risks by the majority of governments, particularly after the publication of IPCC’s 4th Assessment Report and the increasing number of observations of changes in ecological and socio-economic systems that are consistent with the observed climatic changes, governments, companies and other societal groups have started to evaluate their own vulnerability in more detail and to develop adaptation and mitigation strategies. After an early focus on the most vulnerable developing countries, recently, an increasing number of industrialized countries have embarked on the design of adaptation and mitigation plans, or on studies to evaluate the level of climate resilience of their development plans and projects. Which climate data are actually required to effectively support these activities? This paper reports on the efforts of the IS-ENES project, the infrastructure project of the European Network for Earth System Modeling, to address this question. How do we define user needs and can the existing gap between the climate modeling and impact research communities be bridged in support of the ENES long-term strategy? In contrast from the climate modeling community, which has a relatively long history of collaboration facilitated by a relatively uniform subject matter, commonly agreed definitions of key terminology and some level of harmonization of methods, the climate change impacts research community is very diverse and fragmented, using a wide variety of data sources, methods and tools. An additional complicating factor is that researchers working on adaptation usually closely collaborate with non

  6. Modeling the Impact of Vegetation Structure on Canopy Radiative Transfer for a Global Vegetation Dynamic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni-Meister, W.; Kiang, N.; Yang, W.

    2007-12-01

    The transmission of light through plant canopies results in vertical profiles of light intensity that affect the photosynthetic activity and gas exchange of plants, their competition for light, and the canopy energy balance. The accurate representation of the canopy light profile is then important for predicting ecological dynamics. The study presents a simple canopy radiative transfer scheme to characterize the impact of the horizontal and vertical vegetation structure heterogeneity on light profiles. Actual vertical foliage profile and a clumping factor which are functions of tree geometry, size and density and foliage density are used to characterize the vertical and horizontal vegetation structure heterogeneity. The simple scheme is evaluated using the ground and airborne lidar data collected in deciduous and coniferous forests and was also compared with the more complex Geometric Optical and Radiative Transfer (GORT) model and the two-stream scheme currently being used to describe light interactions with vegetation canopy in most GCMs. The simple modeled PAR profiles match well with the ground data, lidar and full GORT model prediction, it performs much better than the simple Beer's&plaw used in two stream scheme. This scheme will have the same computation cost as the current scheme being used in GCMs, but provides better photosynthesis, radiative fluxes and surface albedo estimates, thus is suitable for a global vegetation dynamic model embedded in GCMs.

  7. A cloud-radiation climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, C.; Wu, R.

    1996-12-31

    Choosing the global average surface temperature T and cloudiness n as state variables, the relations of planetary albedo {alpha} and the atmospheric effective emissivity {epsilon} with the state variables are developed to study the important feedback processes in the climate system. They lead to a highly simplified nonlinear climate model which shows a self organization mechanism for cloud-radiation interaction. Solar radiation directly affects the surface temperature by which cloudiness changes are driven. The cloudiness changes in turn react on the surface temperature by the planetary albedo {alpha} and the atmospheric effective emittance {epsilon}. In the processes of cooperation and competition between the two subsystems, the surface temperature dominates and cloudiness responds rapidly to the surface temperature. Near the Hopf bifurcation, the analytical solutions of the limit cycle are obtained which are in agreement with numerical solutions. With these analytical solutions, the effects of solar radiation and carbon dioxide on the amplitude, period and phase lag are examined. The authors find that in addition to increasing temperature, an increase in concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide could enhance sharply the amplitudes of climate oscillation. This implies that increasing carbon dioxide could periodically bring about hazardous impacts.

  8. Polar firn layering in radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linow, Stefanie; Hoerhold, Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many applications in the geosciences, remote sensing is the only feasible method of obtaining data from large areas with limited accessibility. This is especially true for the cryosphere, where light conditions and cloud coverage additionally limit the use of optical sensors. Here, instruments operating at microwave frequencies become important, for instance in polar snow parameters / SWE (snow water equivalent) mapping. However, the interaction between snow and microwave radiation is a complex process and still not fully understood. RT (radiative transfer) models to simulate snow-microwave interaction are available, but they require a number of input parameters such as microstructure and density, which are partly ill-constrained. The layering of snow and firn introduces an additional degree of complexity, as all snow parameters show a strong variability with depth. Many studies on RT modeling of polar firn deal with layer variability by using statistical properties derived from previous measurements, such as the standard deviations of density and microstructure, to configure model input. Here, the variability of microstructure parameters, such as density and particle size, are usually assumed to be independent of each other. However, in the case of the firn pack of the polar ice sheets, we observe that microstructure evolution depends on environmental parameters, such as temperature and snow deposition. Accordingly, density and microstructure evolve together within the snow and firn. Based on CT (computer tomography) microstructure measurements of antarctic firn, we can show that: first, the variability of density and effective grain size are linked and can thus be implemented in the RT models as a coupled set of parameters. Second, the magnitude of layering is captured by the measured standard deviation. Based on high-resolution density measurements of an Antarctic firn core, we study the effect of firn layering at different microwave wavelengths. By means of

  9. [Dose loads on and radiation risk values for cosmonauts on a mission to Mars estimated from actual Martian vehicle engineering development].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Kolomenskiĭ, A V; Mitrikas, V G; Petrov, V M

    2010-01-01

    The current design philosophy of a Mars orbiting vehicle, takeoff and landing systems and the transport return vehicle was taken into consideration for calculating the equivalent doses imparted to cosmonaut's organs and tissues by galactic cosmic rays, solar rays and the Earth's radiation belts, values of the total radiation risk over the lifespan following the mission and over the whole career period, and possible shortening of life expectancy. There are a number of uncertainties that should be evaluated, and radiation limits specified before setting off to Mars.

  10. [Dose loads on and radiation risk values for cosmonauts on a mission to Mars estimated from actual Martian vehicle engineering development].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Kolomenskiĭ, A V; Mitrikas, V G; Petrov, V M

    2010-01-01

    The current design philosophy of a Mars orbiting vehicle, takeoff and landing systems and the transport return vehicle was taken into consideration for calculating the equivalent doses imparted to cosmonaut's organs and tissues by galactic cosmic rays, solar rays and the Earth's radiation belts, values of the total radiation risk over the lifespan following the mission and over the whole career period, and possible shortening of life expectancy. There are a number of uncertainties that should be evaluated, and radiation limits specified before setting off to Mars. PMID:20803991

  11. Evaluation of radiation partitioning models at Bushland, Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop growth and soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum energy transfer models often require estimates of net radiation components, such as photosynthetic, solar, and longwave radiation to both the canopy and soil. We evaluated the 1998 radiation partitioning model of Campbell and Norman, herein referr...

  12. Radiative effects in the standard model extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, V. Ch.; Lobanov, A. E.; Murchikova, E. M.

    2006-03-01

    The possibility of radiative effects induced by the Lorentz and CPT noninvariant interaction term for fermions in the standard model extension is investigated. In particular, electron-positron photo production and photon emission by electrons and positrons are studied. The rates of these processes are calculated in the Furry picture. It is demonstrated that the rates obtained in the framework of the model adopted strongly depend on the polarization states of the particles involved. As a result, ultrarelativistic particles produced should occupy states with a preferred spin orientation, i.e., photons have the sign of polarization opposite to the sign of the effective potential, while charged particles are preferably in the state with the helicity coinciding with the sign of the effective potential. This leads to evident spatial asymmetries which may have certain consequences observable at high energy accelerators, and in astrophysical and cosmological studies.

  13. Monitoring of radiation fields in a waste tank model: Virtual radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tulenko, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The University of Florida (UF) has developed a coupled radiation computation and three-dimensional modeling simulation code package. This package combines the Deneb Robotics` IGRIP three-dimensional solid modeling robotic simulation code with the UF developed VRF (Virtual Radiation Field) Monte Carlo based radiation computation code. The code package allows simulated radiation dose monitors to be placed anywhere on simulated robotic equipment to record the radiation doses which would be sustained when carrying out tasks in radiation environments. Comparison with measured values in the Hanford Waste Tank C-106 shows excellent results. The code shows promise of serving as a major tool in the design and operation of robotic equipment in radiation environments to ensure freedom from radiation caused failure.

  14. A new radiation model for Baltic Sea ecosystem modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Thomas; Siegel, Herbert; Gerth, Monika

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) is one of the key requirements for primary production in the ocean. The ambient PAR is determined by incoming solar radiation and optical properties of sea water and the optically active water constituents along the radiation pathway. Especially in coastal waters, the optical properties are affected by terrigenous constituents like yellow substances as well as high primary production. Numerical models for marine ecosystems account for the optical attenuation process in different ways and details. For the consideration of coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and shading effects of phytoplankton particles, we propose a dynamic parametrization for the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, products from biological turnover processes are implemented. Besides PAR and its attenuation coefficient, the model calculates the Secchi disk depth, a simple measurable parameter describing the transparency of the water column and a water quality parameter in the European Water Framework Directive. The components of the proposed optical model are partly implemented from other publications respectively derived from our own measurements for the area of investigation. The model allows a better representation of PAR with a more realistic spatial and temporal variability compared to former parametrizations. The effect is that regional changes of primary production, especially in the northern part of the Baltic Sea, show reduced productivity due to higher CDOM concentrations. The model estimates for Secchi disk depth are much more realistic now. In the northern Baltic Sea, simulated oxygen concentrations in deep water have improved considerably.

  15. Implications of Self-Deception for Self-Reported Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivational Dispositions and Actual Learning Performance: A Higher Order Structural Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschfeld, Robert R.; Thomas, Christopher H.; McNatt, D. Brian

    2008-01-01

    The authors explored implications of individuals' self-deception (a trait) for their self-reported intrinsic and extrinsic motivational dispositions and their actual learning performance. In doing so, a higher order structural model was developed and tested in which intrinsic and extrinsic motivational dispositions were underlying factors that…

  16. Pragmatic validity of the combined model of expert system for assessment and analysis of the actual quality overall structure of basketball players.

    PubMed

    Trninić, S; Dizdar, D; Dezman, B

    2002-06-01

    The authors presumed that it was possible to replace certain criteria of the expert system aimed at evaluating actual quality of basketball players, proposed by Trninić et al., with the corresponding indicators of situation-related efficiency (official statistics of the game). Hence, the aim of this study is to verify the potential of establishing such a combined model of expert system that would consist of both the evaluation criteria and certain number of objectively measurable aspects of actual quality (player's partial performance or playing efficiency) and to determine its pragmatic validity. To achieve the aim the sample comprised of 60 basketball players that were competing in the Croatian First Division League in the 1998/99 season was tested. The sample and their quality of play was described by the two different types of data: 1) the 13 situation-related efficiency data (FIBA statistics of the game) utilized to objectively assess performance or playing effectiveness of players, collected at 132 games played by 12 teams, and 2) the evaluation data, subjectively assessing actual quality of players, i.e. their perceived overall performance, collected at the end of the season from the 10 basketball trainers. On the basis of relatively high correlations within the 7 pairs of mutually equivalent variables (from 0.63 to 0.84) and the extremely high correlation (0.97) obtained between the perceived overall performance (actual quality), subjectively assessed with respect to the 19 criteria of the original expert evaluation system, and the overall performance (actual quality) assessed by the combined model (where the 8 evaluation criteria had been replaced by the 7 corresponding indicators ofplaying efficiency), it is feasible to consider the combined model of expert system as an acceptable tool for more objective and economical assessment of actual quality of basketball players.

  17. Angular radiation models for earth-atmosphere system. Volume 2: Longwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suttles, J. T.; Green, R. N.; Smith, G. L.; Wielicki, B. A.; Walker, I. J.; Taylor, V. R.; Stowe, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    The longwave angular radiation models that are required for analysis of satellite measurements of Earth radiation, such as those from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are presented. The models contain limb-darkening characteristics and mean fluxes. Limb-darkening characteristics are the longwave anisotropic factor and the standard deviation of the longwave radiance. Derivation of these models from the Nimbus 7 ERB (Earth Radiation Budget) data set is described. Tabulated values and computer-generated plots are included for the limb-darkening and mean-flux models.

  18. Future directions for LDEF ionizing radiation modeling and assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    A calculational program utilizing data from radiation dosimetry measurements aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite to reduce the uncertainties in current models defining the ionizing radiation environment is in progress. Most of the effort to date has been on using LDEF radiation dose measurements to evaluate models defining the geomagnetically trapped radiation, which has provided results applicable to radiation design assessments being performed for Space Station Freedom. Plans for future data comparisons, model evaluations, and assessments using additional LDEF data sets (LET spectra, induced radioactivity, and particle spectra) are discussed.

  19. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    SciTech Connect

    Grimes, David Robert

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  20. A Comparison between High-Energy Radiation Background Models and SPENVIS Trapped-Particle Radiation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krizmanic, John F.

    2013-01-01

    We have been assessing the effects of background radiation in low-Earth orbit for the next generation of X-ray and Cosmic-ray experiments, in particular for International Space Station orbit. Outside the areas of high fluxes of trapped radiation, we have been using parameterizations developed by the Fermi team to quantify the high-energy induced background. For the low-energy background, we have been using the AE8 and AP8 SPENVIS models to determine the orbit fractions where the fluxes of trapped particles are too high to allow for useful operation of the experiment. One area we are investigating is how the fluxes of SPENVIS predictions at higher energies match the fluxes at the low-energy end of our parameterizations. I will summarize our methodology for background determination from the various sources of cosmogenic and terrestrial radiation and how these compare to SPENVIS predictions in overlapping energy ranges.

  1. Flavour dependent gauged radiative neutrino mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwon; Okada, Hiroshi; Yagyu, Kei

    2015-04-01

    We propose a one-loop induced radiative neutrino mass model with anomaly free flavour dependent gauge symmetry: μ minus τ symmetry U(1) μ- τ . A neutrino mass matrix satisfying current experimental data can be obtained by introducing a weak isospin singlet scalar boson that breaks U(1) μ- τ symmetry, an inert doublet scalar field, and three right-handed neutrinos in addition to the fields in the standard model. We find that a characteristic structure appears in the neutrino mass matrix: two-zero texture form which predicts three non-zero neutrino masses and three non-zero CP-phases from five well measured experimental inputs of two squared mass differences and three mixing angles. Furthermore, it is clarified that only the inverted mass hierarchy is allowed in our model. In a favored parameter set from the neutrino sector, the discrepancy in the muon anomalous magnetic moment between the experimental data and the the standard model prediction can be explained by the additional neutral gauge boson loop contribution with mass of order 100 MeV and new gauge coupling of order 10-3.

  2. Theoretical model of Saturn's kilometric radiation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galopeau, P.; Zarka, P.; Le Queau, D.

    1989-07-01

    A model was developed, which allowed the theoretical derivation of an envelope for the average spectrum of the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR), assuming that the SKR is generated by the cyclotron maser instability. The theoretical SKR spectrum derived was found to exhibit the same spectral features as the observed mean spectra. Namely, the overall shape of both calculated and measured spectra are similar, with the fluxes peaking at frequencies of 100,000 Hz and decreasing abruptly at high frequencies, and more slowly at lower frequencies. The calculated spectral intensity levels exceed the most intense observed intensities by up to 1 order of magnitude, suggesting that the SKR emission is only marginally saturated by nonlinear processes.

  3. Radiative Effects in the Standard Model Extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, V. Ch.; Lobanov, A. E.; Murchikova, E. M.

    2006-10-01

    The possibility of radiative effects that are due to interaction of fermions with the constant axial-vector background in the standard model extension is investigated. Electron-positron photo-production and photon emission by electrons and positrons were studied. The rates of these processes were calculated in the Furry picture. It was demonstrated that the rates obtained strongly depend on the polarization states of the particles involved. In consequence of this fact ultra-relativistic particles should occupy states with a preferred spin orientation, i.e., photons have the sign of polarization opposite to the sign of the effective potential, while charged particle are preferably in the state with the helicity coinciding with the sign of the effective potential. This leads to evident spatial asymmetries.

  4. Statistical Modeling for Radiation Hardness Assurance: Toward Bigger Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, R.; Campola, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    New approaches to statistical modeling in radiation hardness assurance are discussed. These approaches yield quantitative bounds on flight-part radiation performance even in the absence of conventional data sources. This allows the analyst to bound radiation risk at all stages and for all decisions in the RHA process. It also allows optimization of RHA procedures for the project's risk tolerance.

  5. Angular radiation models for Earth-atmosphere system. Volume 1: Shortwave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suttles, J. T.; Green, R. N.; Minnis, P.; Smith, G. L.; Staylor, W. F.; Wielicki, B. A.; Walker, I. J.; Young, D. F.; Taylor, V. R.; Stowe, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    Presented are shortwave angular radiation models which are required for analysis of satellite measurements of Earth radiation, such as those fro the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The models consist of both bidirectional and directional parameters. The bidirectional parameters are anisotropic function, standard deviation of mean radiance, and shortwave-longwave radiance correlation coefficient. The directional parameters are mean albedo as a function of Sun zenith angle and mean albedo normalized to overhead Sun. Derivation of these models from the Nimbus 7 ERB (Earth Radiation Budget) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data sets is described. Tabulated values and computer-generated plots are included for the bidirectional and directional modes.

  6. Radiative Transfer Modeling and Retrievals for Advanced Hyperspectral Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L., Sr.; Mango, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    A novel radiative transfer model and a physical inversion algorithm based on principal component analysis will be presented. Instead of dealing with channel radiances, the new approach fits principal component scores of these quantities. Compared to channel-based radiative transfer models, the new approach compresses radiances into a much smaller dimension making both forward modeling and inversion algorithm more efficient.

  7. Predictive model of radiative neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. S.; Julio, J.

    2014-03-01

    We present a simple and predictive model of radiative neutrino masses. It is a special case of the Zee model which introduces two Higgs doublets and a charged singlet. We impose a family-dependent Z4 symmetry acting on the leptons, which reduces the number of parameters describing neutrino oscillations to four. A variety of predictions follow: the hierarchy of neutrino masses must be inverted; the lightest neutrino mass is extremely small and calculable; one of the neutrino mixing angles is determined in terms of the other two; the phase parameters take CP-conserving values with δCP=π; and the effective mass in neutrinoless double beta decay lies in a narrow range, mββ=(17.6-18.5) meV. The ratio of vacuum expectation values of the two Higgs doublets, tanβ, is determined to be either 1.9 or 0.19 from neutrino oscillation data. Flavor-conserving and flavor-changing couplings of the Higgs doublets are also determined from neutrino data. The nonstandard neutral Higgs bosons, if they are moderately heavy, would decay dominantly into μ and τ with prescribed branching ratios. Observable rates for the decays μ →eγ and τ→3μ are predicted if these scalars have masses in the range of 150-500 GeV.

  8. The bubble coalescence model of radiation blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, R. D. S.

    1981-05-01

    The existence of overpressurized gas bubbles, and a suitable mechanism for bubble growth during low temperature ion implantations, are the essential ingredients for the validity of a gas-driven blister formation mechanism. In this paper, taking into account the difference between the formation energy of helium interstitials and the free energy change of a bubble per helium atom added, we have theoretically shown that such bubbles indeed exist, and their growth is driven by their bias for vacancies and anti-bias for interstitials which arise because of the overpressure-induced compressive stress field around them. The relations for helium density in bubbles and the bubble overpressure are derived. The role of interbubble interaction and the effect of bubbles on the elastic properties of the material have been taken into account to determine the dose dependence of the integrated lateral stress and the critical conditions for interbubble coalescence/fracture. It is shown that the observed sublinearity and the relief of integrated lateral stress are a natural consequence of the attractive interbubble interaction and do not uniquely relate to the blister formation as considered in the stress model. The derived conditions for coalescence agree well with the available data. It is argued that the present treatment provides a sound theoretical basis for the gas pressure model of radiation blistering.

  9. Effective UV radiation from model calculations and measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feister, Uwe; Grewe, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Model calculations have been made to simulate the effect of atmospheric ozone and geographical as well as meteorological parameters on solar UV radiation reaching the ground. Total ozone values as measured by Dobson spectrophotometer and Brewer spectrometer as well as turbidity were used as input to the model calculation. The performance of the model was tested by spectroradiometric measurements of solar global UV radiation at Potsdam. There are small differences that can be explained by the uncertainty of the measurements, by the uncertainty of input data to the model and by the uncertainty of the radiative transfer algorithms of the model itself. Some effects of solar radiation to the biosphere and to air chemistry are discussed. Model calculations and spectroradiometric measurements can be used to study variations of the effective radiation in space in space time. The comparability of action spectra and their uncertainties are also addressed.

  10. Computer modelling of statistical properties of SASE FEL radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1997-06-01

    The paper describes an approach to computer modelling of statistical properties of the radiation from self amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL). The present approach allows one to calculate the following statistical properties of the SASE FEL radiation: time and spectral field correlation functions, distribution of the fluctuations of the instantaneous radiation power, distribution of the energy in the electron bunch, distribution of the radiation energy after monochromator installed at the FEL amplifier exit and the radiation spectrum. All numerical results presented in the paper have been calculated for the 70 nm SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility being under construction at DESY.

  11. Modelling of Radiation Heat Transfer in Reacting Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thellmann, A.; Mundt, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the interaction between a turbulent flow including chemical reactions and radiation transport is investigated. As a first step, the state-of-the art radiation models P1 based on the moment method and Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) based on the discrete ordinate method are used in conjunction with the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The absorbing and emitting medium (water vapor) is modeled by Weighted Sum of Gray Gases. For the chemical reactions the standard Eddy dissipation model combined with the two equation turbulence model k-epsilon is employed. A demonstration experiment is identified which delivers temperature distribution, species concentration and radiative intensity distribution in the investigated combustion enclosure. The simulation results are compared with the experiment and reveals that the P1 model predicts the location of the maximal radiation intensity unphysically. On the other hand the DTM model does better but over predicts the maximum value of the radiation intensity. This radiation sensitivity study is a first step on the way to identify a suitable radiation transport and spectral model in order to implement both in an existing 3D Navier-Stokes Code. Including radiation heat transfer we intend to investigate the influence on the overall energy balance in a hydrogen/oxygen rocket combustion chamber.

  12. Shock Layer Radiation Modeling and Uncertainty for Mars Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Sutton, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    A model for simulating nonequilibrium radiation from Mars entry shock layers is presented. A new chemical kinetic rate model is developed that provides good agreement with recent EAST and X2 shock tube radiation measurements. This model includes a CO dissociation rate that is a factor of 13 larger than the rate used widely in previous models. Uncertainties in the proposed rates are assessed along with uncertainties in translational-vibrational relaxation modeling parameters. The stagnation point radiative flux uncertainty due to these flowfield modeling parameter uncertainties is computed to vary from 50 to 200% for a range of free-stream conditions, with densities ranging from 5e-5 to 5e-4 kg/m3 and velocities ranging from of 6.3 to 7.7 km/s. These conditions cover the range of anticipated peak radiative heating conditions for proposed hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (HIADs). Modeling parameters for the radiative spectrum are compiled along with a non-Boltzmann rate model for the dominant radiating molecules, CO, CN, and C2. A method for treating non-local absorption in the non-Boltzmann model is developed, which is shown to result in up to a 50% increase in the radiative flux through absorption by the CO 4th Positive band. The sensitivity of the radiative flux to the radiation modeling parameters is presented and the uncertainty for each parameter is assessed. The stagnation point radiative flux uncertainty due to these radiation modeling parameter uncertainties is computed to vary from 18 to 167% for the considered range of free-stream conditions. The total radiative flux uncertainty is computed as the root sum square of the flowfield and radiation parametric uncertainties, which results in total uncertainties ranging from 50 to 260%. The main contributors to these significant uncertainties are the CO dissociation rate and the CO heavy-particle excitation rates. Applying the baseline flowfield and radiation models developed in this work, the

  13. Measuring and modeling near-surface reflected and emitted radiation fluxes at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blad, Blaine L.; Walter-Shea, Elizabeth A.; Starks, Patrick J.; Vining, Roel C.; Hays, Cynthia J.; Mesarch, Mark A.

    1990-01-01

    Information is presented pertaining to the measurement and estimation of reflected and emitted components of the radiation balance. Information is included about reflectance and transmittance of solar radiation from and through the leaves of some grass and forb prairie species, bidirectional reflectance from a prairie canopy is discussed and measured and estimated fluxes are described of incoming and outgoing longwave and shortwave radiation. Results of the study showed only very small differences in reflectances and transmittances for the adaxial and abaxial surfaces of grass species in the visible and infrared wavebands, but some differences in the infrared wavebands were noted for the forbs. Reflectance from the prairie canopy changed as a function of solar and view zenith angles in the solar principal plane with definite asymmetry about nadir. The surface temperature of prairie canopies was found to vary by as much as 5 C depending on view zenith and azimuth position and on the solar azimuth. Aerodynamic temperature calculated from measured sensible heat fluxes ranged from 0 to 3 C higher than nadir-viewed temperatures. Models were developed to estimate incoming and reflected shortwave radiation from data collected with a Barnes Modular Multiband Radiometer. Several algorithms for estimating incoming longwave radiation were evaluated and compared to actual measures of that parameter. Net radiation was calculated using the estimated components of the shortwave radiation streams, determined from the algorithms developed, and from the longwave radiation streams provided by the Brunt, modified Deacon, and the Stefan-Boltzmann models. Estimates of net radiation were compared to measured values and found to be within the measurement error of the net radiometers used in the study.

  14. 3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Howard Barker; Jason Cole

    2012-05-17

    Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

  15. The effects of TV commercials using less thin models on young women's mood, body image and actual food intake.

    PubMed

    Anschutz, Doeschka J; Engels, Rutger C M E; Becker, Eni S; Van Strien, Tatjana

    2009-09-01

    This study experimentally tested the effects of exposure to television commercials using less thin models on mood, body focused anxiety and food intake, as compared to the effects of commercials using thin models. In a naturalistic setting, 110 young women were exposed to a neutral movie, interrupted by two commercial breaks. The commercial breaks contained real commercials using either less thin (n=32) or thin models (n=39), or neutral commercials (n=39). During watching television, participants could freely eat snack food. Further, their mood and body focused anxiety was assessed. ANOVAs revealed no effects on body focused anxiety, but women reported a more negative mood and ate less after exposure to commercials using less thin models than after exposure to commercials using thin models. These results imply that using less thin models in commercials explicitly referring to the thin ideal does not make women feel better. PMID:19699160

  16. Radiation exposure modeling and project schedule visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Jaquish, W.R.; Enderlin, V.R.

    1995-10-01

    This paper discusses two applications using IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) to assist environmental remediation efforts at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. In the first application, IGRIP is used to calculate the estimated radiation exposure to workers conducting tasks in radiation environments. In the second, IGRIP is used as a configuration management tool to detect interferences between equipment and personnel work areas for multiple projects occurring simultaneously in one area. Both of these applications have the capability to reduce environmental remediation costs by reducing personnel radiation exposure and by providing a method to effectively manage multiple projects in a single facility.

  17. Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhuravleva, Tatiana; Marshak, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to validation of the Poisson stochastic radiative transfer method is proposed. In contrast to other validations of stochastic models, the main parameter of the Poisson model responsible for cloud geometrical structure - cloud aspect ratio - is determined entirely by matching measurements and calculations of the direct solar radiation. If the measurements of the direct solar radiation is unavailable, it was shown that there is a range of the aspect ratios that allows the stochastic model to accurately approximate the average measurements of surface downward and cloud top upward fluxes. Realizations of the fractionally integrated cascade model are taken as a prototype of real measurements.

  18. Radiative Forcing by Long-Lived Greenhouse Gases: Calculations with the AER Radiative Transfer Models

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, William; Iacono, Michael J.; Delamere, Jennifer S.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shephard, Mark W.; Clough, Shepard A.; Collins, William D.

    2008-04-01

    A primary component of the observed, recent climate change is the radiative forcing from increased concentrations of long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs). Effective simulation of anthropogenic climate change by general circulation models (GCMs) is strongly dependent on the accurate representation of radiative processes associated with water vapor, ozone and LLGHGs. In the context of the increasing application of the Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) radiation models within the GCM community, their capability to calculate longwave and shortwave radiative forcing for clear sky scenarios previously examined by the radiative transfer model intercomparison project (RTMIP) is presented. Forcing calculations with the AER line-by-line (LBL) models are very consistent with the RTMIP line-by-line results in the longwave and shortwave. The AER broadband models, in all but one case, calculate longwave forcings within a range of -0.20 to 0.23 W m{sup -2} of LBL calculations and shortwave forcings within a range of -0.16 to 0.38 W m{sup -2} of LBL results. These models also perform well at the surface, which RTMIP identified as a level at which GCM radiation models have particular difficulty reproducing LBL fluxes. Heating profile perturbations calculated by the broadband models generally reproduce high-resolution calculations within a few hundredths K d{sup -1} in the troposphere and within 0.15 K d{sup -1} in the peak stratospheric heating near 1 hPa. In most cases, the AER broadband models provide radiative forcing results that are in closer agreement with high 20 resolution calculations than the GCM radiation codes examined by RTMIP, which supports the application of the AER models to climate change research.

  19. Characteristics of biological effects of cosmic radiation, model investigations.

    PubMed

    Parin, V V; Grigoryev, Y G; Kovalev, E E; Ryzhov, N I; Derbeneva, N N; Popov, V I; Petrovnin, M G

    1969-01-01

    In view of the probability of the influence of ionizing radiation on crewmen and the appropriate problem of creating adequate anti-radiation protection, it is necessary to investigate the peculiarities of biological effects of cosmic radiation. Under actual space flight conditions, cosmic radiation will affect the human organism in the complex along with other factors. Full imitation of cosmic radiation on the ground is impossible but it can exert influence on the human radiosensibilty. In this connection, the successful solution of the problem of obtaining appropriate information can be made by a reasonable combination of both ground radiobiological and medical-hygienic investigations and those carried out by using artificial earth satellites. The available experience in carrying out such research and its results are given in this report. Information on investigating the peculiarities of biological effects of protons in the wide spectrum of energy is also included. The report contains the data of observing immediate and later effects of radiation influence on higher animals and also on many biological objects arranged in various levels of evolution and biological organizations. The values of the RBE for protons are given.

  20. Canopy radiation transmission for an energy balance snowmelt model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahat, Vinod; Tarboton, David G.

    2012-01-01

    To better estimate the radiation energy within and beneath the forest canopy for energy balance snowmelt models, a two stream radiation transfer model that explicitly accounts for canopy scattering, absorption and reflection was developed. Upward and downward radiation streams represented by two differential equations using a single path assumption were solved analytically to approximate the radiation transmitted through or reflected by the canopy with multiple scattering. This approximation results in an exponential decrease of radiation intensity with canopy depth, similar to Beer's law for a deep canopy. The solution for a finite canopy is obtained by applying recursive superposition of this two stream single path deep canopy solution. This solution enhances capability for modeling energy balance processes of the snowpack in forested environments, which is important when quantifying the sensitivity of hydrologic response to input changes using physically based modeling. The radiation model was included in a distributed energy balance snowmelt model and results compared with observations made in three different vegetation classes (open, coniferous forest, deciduous forest) at a forest study area in the Rocky Mountains in Utah, USA. The model was able to capture the sensitivity of beneath canopy net radiation and snowmelt to vegetation class consistent with observations and achieve satisfactory predictions of snowmelt from forested areas from parsimonious practically available information. The model is simple enough to be applied in a spatially distributed way, but still relatively rigorously and explicitly represent variability in canopy properties in the simulation of snowmelt over a watershed.

  1. A model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis in space.

    PubMed

    Esposito, R D; Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Pugliese, M; Scampoli, P; Jones, T D

    2001-01-01

    Astronauts' radiation exposure limits are based on experimental and epidemiological data obtained on Earth. It is assumed that radiation sensitivity remains the same in the extraterrestrial space. However, human radiosensitivity is dependent upon the response of the hematopoietic tissue to the radiation insult. It is well known that the immune system is affected by microgravity. We have developed a mathematical model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis which includes the effect of microgravity on bone marrow kinetics. It is assumed that cellular radiosensitivity is not modified by the space environment, but repopulation rates of stem and stromal cells are reduced as a function of time in weightlessness. A realistic model of the space radiation environment, including the HZE component, is used to simulate the radiation damage. A dedicated computer code was written and applied to solar particle events and to the mission to Mars. The results suggest that altered myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis in microgravity might increase human radiosensitivity in space. PMID:11771552

  2. 3ARM: A Fast, Accurate Radiative Transfer Model for Use in Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Kinne, S.; Sokolik, I. N.; Toon, O. B.; Mlawer, E. J.; Clough, S. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Mather, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new radiative transfer model combining the efforts of three groups of researchers is discussed. The model accurately computes radiative transfer in a inhomogeneous absorbing, scattering and emitting atmospheres. As an illustration of the model, results are shown for the effects of dust on the thermal radiation.

  3. 3ARM: A Fast, Accurate Radiative Transfer Model for use in Climate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Kinne, S.; Sokolik, I. N.; Toon, O. B.; Mlawer, E. J.; Clough, S. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Mather, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new radiative transfer model combining the efforts of three groups of researchers is discussed. The model accurately computes radiative transfer in a inhomogeneous absorbing, scattering and emitting atmospheres. As an illustration of the model, results are shown for the effects of dust on the thermal radiation.

  4. Radiative accelerations for evolutionary model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Richer, J.; Michaud, G.; Rogers, F.; Iglesias, C.; Turcotte, S.; LeBlanc, F.

    1998-01-01

    Monochromatic opacities from the OPAL database have been used to calculate radiative accelerations for the 21 included chemical species. The 10{sup 4} frequencies used are sufficient to calculate the radiative accelerations of many elements for T{gt}10{sup 5}K, using frequency sampling. This temperature limit is higher for less abundant elements. As the abundances of Fe, He, or O are varied, the radiative acceleration of other elements changes, since abundant elements modify the frequency dependence of the radiative flux and the Rosseland opacity. Accurate radiative accelerations for a given element can only be obtained by allowing the abundances of the species that contribute most to the Rosseland opacity to vary during the evolution and recalculating the radiative accelerations and the Rosseland opacity during the evolution. There are physical phenomena that cannot be included in the calculations if one uses only the OPAL data. For instance, one should correct for the momentum given to the electron in a photoionization. Such effects are evaluated using atomic data from Opacity Project, and correction factors are given. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  5. Experience-based demand scheduling: a more efficient model for radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Beitler, J J; Garcia, A; Vikram, B

    1999-12-01

    The supply of radiation therapists has increased, whereas reimbursements have decreased. One hypothesis is that if we choose to employ as permanent staff sufficient therapists to handle the low-volume periods and scheduled temporary staff as the demand for radiation therapy services warrants, we would increase efficiency. Using current economic assumptions and the treatments delivered during the past 12 months, we analyzed the labor expense and revenue consequences of both full staffing and a lower level of staffing with per diem supplementation based on the scheduled patient load. We then correlated the scheduled treatments with the actual treatments delivered and finally, reexamined both the full-staffing model and the per diem supplementation model based on the predictions of our scheduling model. The reduction in full-time therapists and per diem supplementation did not produce substantial incremental revenue. However, examining the relationship between patients scheduled for treatment on the next day and patients actually treated, revealed an 11% "no show" rate with a 95% confidence interval of 1%. Our new, experienced-based model demonstrated considerable revenues to be realized by using the no-show factor to better use therapists by more aggressive scheduling of outpatients, therapists, and more flexible transportation of inpatients. We conclude that the experience-based model predicts the marginal revenue, but is silent on the quality of the medical care provided.

  6. Summary of the Manufacture, Testing and Model Validation of a Full-Scale Radiator for Fission Surface Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Calder, James; Siamidis, John

    2011-01-01

    A full-scale radiator for a lunar fission surface power application was manufactured by Material innovations, Inc., for the NASA Glenn Research Center. The radiator was designed to reject 6 kWt with an inlet water temperature of 400 K and a water mass flow rate of 0.5 kg/s. While not flight hardware, the radiator incorporated many potential design features and manufacturing techniques for future flight hardware. The radiator was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center for heat rejection performance. The results showed that the radiator design was capable of rejecting over 6 kWt when operating at the design conditions. The actual performance of the radiator as a function of operational manifolds, inlet water temperature and facility sink temperature was compared to the predictive model developed by NASA Glenn Research Center. The results showed excellent agreement with the model with the actual average face sheet temperature being within 1% of the predicted value. The results will be used in the design and production of NASA s next generation fission power heat rejection systems. The NASA Glenn Research Center s Technology Demonstration Unit will be the first project to take advantage of the newly developed manufacturing techniques and analytical models.

  7. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M.

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  8. Trapped Radiation Model Uncertainties: Model-Data and Model-Model Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    The standard AP8 and AE8 models for predicting trapped proton and electron environments have been compared with several sets of flight data to evaluate model uncertainties. Model comparisons are made with flux and dose measurements made on various U.S. low-Earth orbit satellites (APEX, CRRES, DMSP, LDEF, NOAA) and Space Shuttle flights, on Russian satellites (Photon-8, Cosmos-1887, Cosmos-2044), and on the Russian Mir Space Station. This report gives the details of the model-data comparisons-summary results in terms of empirical model uncertainty factors that can be applied for spacecraft design applications are given in a combination report. The results of model-model comparisons are also presented from standard AP8 and AE8 model predictions compared with the European Space Agency versions of AP8 and AE8 and with Russian-trapped radiation models.

  9. Trapped Radiation Model Uncertainties: Model-Data and Model-Model Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    The standard AP8 and AE8 models for predicting trapped proton and electron environments have been compared with several sets of flight data to evaluate model uncertainties. Model comparisons are made with flux and dose measurements made on various U.S. low-Earth orbit satellites (APEX, CRRES, DMSP. LDEF, NOAA) and Space Shuttle flights, on Russian satellites (Photon-8, Cosmos-1887, Cosmos-2044), and on the Russian Mir space station. This report gives the details of the model-data comparisons -- summary results in terms of empirical model uncertainty factors that can be applied for spacecraft design applications are given in a companion report. The results of model-model comparisons are also presented from standard AP8 and AE8 model predictions compared with the European Space Agency versions of AP8 and AE8 and with Russian trapped radiation models.

  10. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., <1000 km) where many robotic and human space flights occur. The availability of radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  11. NASA Space Radiation Program Integrative Risk Model Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hu, Shaowen; Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Sandridge, Chris

    2015-01-01

    NASA Space Radiation Program Element scientists have been actively involved in development of an integrative risk models toolkit that includes models for acute radiation risk and organ dose projection (ARRBOD), NASA space radiation cancer risk projection (NSCR), hemocyte dose estimation (HemoDose), GCR event-based risk model code (GERMcode), and relativistic ion tracks (RITRACKS), NASA radiation track image (NASARTI), and the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation in Space (OLTARIS). This session will introduce the components of the risk toolkit with opportunity for hands on demonstrations. The brief descriptions of each tools are: ARRBOD for Organ dose projection and acute radiation risk calculation from exposure to solar particle event; NSCR for Projection of cancer risk from exposure to space radiation; HemoDose for retrospective dose estimation by using multi-type blood cell counts; GERMcode for basic physical and biophysical properties for an ion beam, and biophysical and radiobiological properties for a beam transport to the target in the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory beam line; RITRACKS for simulation of heavy ion and delta-ray track structure, radiation chemistry, DNA structure and DNA damage at the molecular scale; NASARTI for modeling of the effects of space radiation on human cells and tissue by incorporating a physical model of tracks, cell nucleus, and DNA damage foci with image segmentation for the automated count; and OLTARIS, an integrated tool set utilizing HZETRN (High Charge and Energy Transport) intended to help scientists and engineers study the effects of space radiation on shielding materials, electronics, and biological systems.

  12. Early HAART Initiation May Not Reduce Actual Reproduction Number and Prevalence of MSM Infection: Perspectives from Coupled within- and between-Host Modelling Studies of Chinese MSM Populations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaodan; Xiao, Yanni; Tang, Sanyi; Peng, Zhihang; Wu, Jianhong; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Having a thorough understanding of the infectivity of HIV, time of initiating treatment and emergence of drug resistant virus variants is crucial in mitigating HIV infection. There are many challenges to evaluating the long-term effect of the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) on disease transmission at the population level. We proposed an individual based model by coupling within-host dynamics and between-host dynamics and conduct stochastic simulation in the group of men who have sex with men (MSM). The mean actual reproduction number is estimated to be 3.6320 (95% confidence interval: [3.46, 3.80]) for MSM group without treatment. Stochastic simulations show that given relatively high (low) level of drug efficacy after emergence of drug resistant variants, early initiation of treatment leads to a less (greater) actual reproduction number, lower (higher) prevalence and less (more) incidences, compared to late initiation of treatment. This implies early initiation of HAART may not always lower the actual reproduction number and prevalence of infection, depending on the level of treatment efficacy after emergence of drug resistant virus variants, frequency of high-risk behaviors and etc. This finding strongly suggests early initiation of HAART should be implemented with great care especially in the settings where the effective drugs are limited. Coupling within-host dynamics with between-host dynamics can provide critical information about impact of HAART on disease transmission and thus help to assist treatment strategy design and HIV/AIDS prevention and control.

  13. Weight-related actual and ideal self-states, discrepancies, and shame, guilt, and pride: examining associations within the process model of self-conscious emotions.

    PubMed

    Castonguay, Andree L; Brunet, Jennifer; Ferguson, Leah; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the associations between women's actual:ideal weight-related self-discrepancies and experiences of weight-related shame, guilt, and authentic pride using self-discrepancy (Higgins, 1987) and self-conscious emotion (Tracy & Robins, 2004) theories as guiding frameworks. Participants (N=398) completed self-report questionnaires. Main analyses involved polynomial regressions, followed by the computation and evaluation of response surface values. Actual and ideal weight self-states were related to shame (R2 = .35), guilt (R2 = .25), and authentic pride (R2 = .08). When the discrepancy between actual and ideal weights increased, shame and guilt also increased, while authentic pride decreased. Findings provide partial support for self-discrepancy theory and the process model of self-conscious emotions. Experiencing weight-related self-discrepancies may be important cognitive appraisals related to shame, guilt, and authentic pride. Further research is needed exploring the relations between self-discrepancies and a range of weight-related self-conscious emotions.

  14. Early HAART Initiation May Not Reduce Actual Reproduction Number and Prevalence of MSM Infection: Perspectives from Coupled within- and between-Host Modelling Studies of Chinese MSM Populations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaodan; Xiao, Yanni; Tang, Sanyi; Peng, Zhihang; Wu, Jianhong; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Having a thorough understanding of the infectivity of HIV, time of initiating treatment and emergence of drug resistant virus variants is crucial in mitigating HIV infection. There are many challenges to evaluating the long-term effect of the Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) on disease transmission at the population level. We proposed an individual based model by coupling within-host dynamics and between-host dynamics and conduct stochastic simulation in the group of men who have sex with men (MSM). The mean actual reproduction number is estimated to be 3.6320 (95% confidence interval: [3.46, 3.80]) for MSM group without treatment. Stochastic simulations show that given relatively high (low) level of drug efficacy after emergence of drug resistant variants, early initiation of treatment leads to a less (greater) actual reproduction number, lower (higher) prevalence and less (more) incidences, compared to late initiation of treatment. This implies early initiation of HAART may not always lower the actual reproduction number and prevalence of infection, depending on the level of treatment efficacy after emergence of drug resistant virus variants, frequency of high-risk behaviors and etc. This finding strongly suggests early initiation of HAART should be implemented with great care especially in the settings where the effective drugs are limited. Coupling within-host dynamics with between-host dynamics can provide critical information about impact of HAART on disease transmission and thus help to assist treatment strategy design and HIV/AIDS prevention and control. PMID:26930406

  15. Radiative seesaw in left-right symmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Peihong; Sarkar, Utpal

    2008-10-01

    There are some radiative origins for the neutrino masses in the conventional left-right symmetric models with the usual bidoublet and triplet Higgs scalars. These radiative contributions could dominate over the tree-level seesaw and could explain the observed neutrino masses.

  16. Freezable Radiator Model Correlation Improvements and Fluids Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Navarro, Moses

    2011-01-01

    Freezable radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the space craft s surroundings and because of different thermal rejection requirements during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recovering) a radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. To attempt to improve this, tests were conducted in 2009 to determine whether the behavior of a simple stagnating radiator could be predicted or emulated in a Thermal Desktop(trademark) numerical model. A 50-50 mixture of DowFrost HD and water was used as the working fluid. Efforts to scale this model to a full scale design, as well as efforts to characterize various thermal control fluids at low temperatures are also discussed. Previous testing and modeling efforts showed that freezable radiators could be operated as intended, and be fairly, if not perfectly predicted by numerical models. This paper documents the improvements made to the numerical model, and outcomes of fluid studies that were determined necessary to go forward with further radiator testing.

  17. A new one-dimensional radiative equilibrium model for investigating atmospheric radiation entropy flux.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Liu, Yangang

    2010-05-12

    A new one-dimensional radiative equilibrium model is built to analytically evaluate the vertical profile of the Earth's atmospheric radiation entropy flux under the assumption that atmospheric longwave radiation emission behaves as a greybody and shortwave radiation as a diluted blackbody. Results show that both the atmospheric shortwave and net longwave radiation entropy fluxes increase with altitude, and the latter is about one order in magnitude greater than the former. The vertical profile of the atmospheric net radiation entropy flux follows approximately that of the atmospheric net longwave radiation entropy flux. Sensitivity study further reveals that a 'darker' atmosphere with a larger overall atmospheric longwave optical depth exhibits a smaller net radiation entropy flux at all altitudes, suggesting an intrinsic connection between the atmospheric net radiation entropy flux and the overall atmospheric longwave optical depth. These results indicate that the overall strength of the atmospheric irreversible processes at all altitudes as determined by the corresponding atmospheric net entropy flux is closely related to the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

  18. Transferring rainfall runoff model parameters to ungauged catchments: Does the metric by which hydrologic similarity is defined actually matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Archfield, S. A.; Wagener, T.; Vogel, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    Daily streamflow information is critical for solving any number of hydrologic problems. Because most of the world's stream reaches are ungauged, this data is commonly needed for rivers that have no readily available measurements of streamflow. One approach to estimating daily streamflow time series at ungauged catchments transfers a set of model parameters resulting from the calibration of a rainfall-runoff model at a gauged catchment (or set of gauged catchments) to an ungauged site of interest. Central to this approach is the selection of a gauged donor catchment that is considered hydrologically similar to the ungauged catchment. A number of published studies compare various methods to define hydrologic similarity, typically using distance between the catchments or similarity in catchments characteristics; however, no one metric of hydrologic similarity has been demonstrated to provide a consistent approach to select a suitable donor catchment. For 16 unregulated catchments in the mid-Atlantic United States, this study shows that the similarity metric matters little if the catchments are classified as good receivers, which we define as catchments having more than two donor catchments that result in reasonable models of daily streamflow. Rainfall-runoff models were calibrated at each of the 16 study catchments and then the study catchments were treated as ungauged and model parameters from each of the other 15 catchments were transferred to the ungauged catchment. For catchments that are good receivers, combining the model output from several donors - no matter whether the donors were selected using distance or similarity in catchment characteristics - resulted in estimated daily streamflow comparable to the observed streamflow at the ungauged location. However, none of the similarity metrics were useful for selecting a suitable donor catchment when the ungauged catchment is considered to be a poor receiver (defined as a catchment with only one donor catchment

  19. Treatment of Solar and Thermal Radiation in Global Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacis, A. A.; Oinas, V.

    2015-12-01

    It is the interaction of solar and thermal radiation with the climate system constituents that determines the prevailing climate on Earth. The principal radiative constituents of the climate system are clouds, aerosols, greenhouse gases, and the ground surface. Accurate rendering of their interaction with the incident solar radiation and the outgoing thermal radiation is required if a climate model is to be capable of simulating and predicting the complex changes that take place in the terrestrial climate system. In the GISS climate model, these radiative tasks are accomplished with a GCM radiation model that utilizes the correlated k-distribution treatment that closely matches Line-by-Line accuracy (Lacis and Oinas, 1991) for the gaseous absorbers, and an adaptation of the doubling/adding method (Lacis and Hansen, 1974) to compute multiple scattering by clouds and aerosols. The radiative parameters to model the spectral dependence of solar and longwave radiation (UV to microwave) utilizes Mie scattering and T-matrix calculations covering the broad range of particle sizes and compositions encountered in the climate system. Cloud treatment also incorporates an empirical representation of sub-grid inhomogeneity and space-time variability of cloud optical properties (derived from ISCCP data) that utilizes a Monte Carlo-based re-scaling parameterization of the cloud plane-parallel radiative parameters (Cairns et al, 2001). The longwave calculations compute correlated k-distribution radiances at three quadrature points (without scattering), and include the effects of cloud scattering in parameterized form for the outgoing and downwelling LW fluxes. For hygroscopic aerosols (e.g., sulfates, nitrates, sea salt), the effects of changing relative humidity on particle size and refractive index are explicitly taken into account. In this way, the GISS GCM radiation model calculates the SW and LW radiative fluxes, and the corresponding radiative heating and cooling rates in

  20. Testing an Energy Balance Model for Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration Using Remotely Sensed Data. [Hannover, West Germany barley and wheat fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurney, R. J.; Camillo, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An energy-balance model is used to estimate daily evapotranspiration for 3 days for a barley field and a wheat field near Hannover, Federal Republic of Germany. The model was calibrated using once-daily estimates of surface temperatures, which may be remotely sensed. The evaporation estimates were within the 95% error bounds of independent eddy correlation estimates for the daytime periods for all three days for both sites, but the energy-balance estimates are generally higher; it is unclear which estimate is biassed. Soil moisture in the top 2 cm of soil, which may be remotely sensed, may be used to improve these evaporation estimates under partial ground cover. Sensitivity studies indicate the amount of ground data required is not excessive.

  1. Future directions for LDEF ionizing radiation modeling and assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the ionizing radiation dosimetry aboard LDEF provide a unique opportunity for assessing the accuracy of current space radiation models and in identifying needed improvements for future mission applications. Details are given of the LDEF data available for radiation model evaluations. The status is given of model comparisons with LDEF data, along with future directions of planned modeling efforts and data comparison assessments. The methodology is outlined which is related to modeling being used to help insure that the LDEF ionizing radiation results can be used to address ionizing radiation issues for future missions. In general, the LDEF radiation modeling has emphasized quick-look predictions using simplified methods to make comparisons with absorbed dose measurements and induced radioactivity measurements of emissions. Modeling and LDEF data comparisons related to linear energy transfer spectra are of importance for several reasons which are outlined. The planned modeling and LDEF data comparisons for LET spectra is discussed, including components of the LET spectra due to different environment sources, contribution from different production mechanisms, and spectra in plastic detectors vs silicon.

  2. Solar radiation pressure model for the relay satellite of SELENE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo-Oka, T.; Sengoku, A.

    1999-09-01

    A new radiation pressure model of the relay satellite of SELENE has been developed. The shape of the satellite was assumed to be a combination of a regular octagonal pillar and a column. Radiation forces acting on each part of the spacecraft were calculated independently and summed vectorially to obtain the mean acceleration of the satellite center of mass. We incorporated this new radiation pressure model into the orbit analysis software GEODYN-II and simulated the tracking data reduction process of the relay satellite. We compared two models: one is the new radiation pressure model developed in this work and the other a so-called "cannonball model" where the shape of the satellite is assumed to be a sphere. By the analysis of simulated two-way Doppler tracking data, we found that the new radiation pressure model reduces the observation residuals compared to the cannonball model. Moreover, we can decrease errors in the estimated lunar gravity field coefficients significantly by use of the new radiation pressure model.

  3. Solar Radiation Modeling and Measurements for Renewable Energy Applications: Data and Model Quality; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2003-03-01

    Measurement and modeling of broadband and spectral terrestrial solar radiation is important for the evaluation and deployment of solar renewable energy systems. We discuss recent developments in the calibration of broadband solar radiometric instrumentation and improving broadband solar radiation measurement accuracy. An improved diffuse sky reference and radiometer calibration and characterization software and for outdoor pyranometer calibrations is outlined. Several broadband solar radiation model approaches, including some developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, for estimating direct beam, total hemispherical and diffuse sky radiation are briefly reviewed. The latter include the Bird clear sky model for global, direct beam, and diffuse terrestrial solar radiation; the Direct Insolation Simulation Code (DISC) for estimating direct beam radiation from global measurements; and the METSTAT (Meteorological and Statistical) and Climatological Solar Radiation (CSR) models that estimate solar radiation from meteorological data. We conclude that currently the best model uncertainties are representative of the uncertainty in measured data.

  4. Implementing Badhwar-O'Neill Galactic Cosmic Ray Model for the Analysis of Space Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; O'Neill, Patrick M.; Slaba, Tony C.

    2014-01-01

    For the analysis of radiation risks to astronauts and planning exploratory space missions, accurate energy spectrum of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is necessary. Characterization of the ionizing radiation environment is challenging because the interplanetary plasma and radiation fields are modulated by solar disturbances and the radiation doses received by astronauts in interplanetary space are likewise influenced. A model of the Badhwar-O'Neill 2011 (BO11) GCR environment, which is represented by GCR deceleration potential theta, has been derived by utilizing all of the GCR measurements from balloons, satellites, and the newer NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE). In the BO11 model, the solar modulation level is derived from the mean international sunspot numbers with time-delay, which has been calibrated with actual flight instrument measurements to produce better GCR flux data fit during solar minima. GCR fluxes provided by the BO11 model were compared with various spacecraft measurements at 1 AU, and further comparisons were made for the tissue equivalent proportional counters measurements at low Earth orbits using the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code and various GCR models. For the comparison of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent calculations with the measurements by Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) at Gale crater on Mars, the intensities and energies of GCR entering the heliosphere were calculated by using the BO11 model, which accounts for time-dependent attenuation of the local interstellar spectrum of each element. The BO11 model, which has emphasized for the last 24 solar minima, showed in relatively good agreement with the RAD data for the first 200 sols, but it was resulted in to be less well during near the solar maximum of solar cycle 24 due to subtleties in the changing heliospheric conditions. By performing the error analysis of the BO11 model and the optimization in reducing overall uncertainty, the resultant BO13 model

  5. High fidelity chemistry and radiation modeling for oxy -- combustion scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Sater, Hassan A.

    To account for the thermal and chemical effects associated with the high CO2 concentrations in an oxy-combustion atmosphere, several refined gas-phase chemistry and radiative property models have been formulated for laminar to highly turbulent systems. This thesis examines the accuracies of several chemistry and radiative property models employed in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of laminar to transitional oxy-methane diffusion flames by comparing their predictions against experimental data. Literature review about chemistry and radiation modeling in oxy-combustion atmospheres considered turbulent systems where the predictions are impacted by the interplay and accuracies of the turbulence, radiation and chemistry models. Thus, by considering a laminar system we minimize the impact of turbulence and the uncertainties associated with turbulence models. In the first section of this thesis, an assessment and validation of gray and non-gray formulations of a recently proposed weighted-sum-of-gray gas model in oxy-combustion scenarios was undertaken. Predictions of gas, wall temperatures and flame lengths were in good agreement with experimental measurements. The temperature and flame length predictions were not sensitive to the radiative property model employed. However, there were significant variations between the gray and non-gray model radiant fraction predictions with the variations in general increasing with decrease in Reynolds numbers possibly attributed to shorter flames and steeper temperature gradients. The results of this section confirm that non-gray model predictions of radiative heat fluxes are more accurate than gray model predictions especially at steeper temperature gradients. In the second section, the accuracies of three gas-phase chemistry models were assessed by comparing their predictions against experimental measurements of temperature, species concentrations and flame lengths. The chemistry was modeled employing the Eddy

  6. Models of Jovian decametric radiation. [astronomical models of decametric waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A critical review is presented of theoretical models of Jovian decametric radiation, with particular emphasis on the Io-modulated emission. The problem is divided into three broad aspects: (1) the mechanism coupling Io's orbital motion to the inner exosphere, (2) the consequent instability mechanism by which electromagnetic waves are amplified, and (3) the subsequent propagation of the waves in the source region and the Jovian plasmasphere. At present there exists no comprehensive theory that treats all of these aspects quantitatively within a single framework. Acceleration of particles by plasma sheaths near Io is proposed as an explanation for the coupling mechanism, while most of the properties of the emission may be explained in the context of cyclotron instability of a highly anisotropic distribution of streaming particles.

  7. Host Model Uncertainties in Aerosol Radiative Forcing Estimates: Results from the AeroCom Prescribed Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Stier, Phillip; Schutgens, Nick A.; Bellouin, N.; Bian, Huisheng; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, Mian; Ghan, Steven J.; Huneeus, N.; Kinne, Stefan; Lin, G.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Myhre, G.; Penner, J. E.; Randles, Cynthia; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Takemura, T.; Yu, Fangqun; Yu, Hongbin; Zhou, Cheng

    2013-03-20

    Simulated multi-model "diversity" in aerosol direct radiative forcing estimates is often perceived as mea- sure of aerosol uncertainty. However, current models used for aerosol radiative forcing calculations vary considerably in model components relevant for forcing calculations and the associated "host-model uncertainties" are generally convoluted with the actual aerosol uncertainty. In this AeroCom Prescribed intercomparison study we systematically isolate and quantify host model uncertainties on aerosol forcing experiments through prescription of identical aerosol radiative properties in nine participating models. Even with prescribed aerosol radiative properties,simulated clear-sky and all-sky aerosol radiative forcings show significant diversity. For a purely scattering case with globally constant optical depth of 0.2, the global-mean all-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing is -4.51 Wm-2 and the inter-model standard deviation is 0.70 Wm-2, corresponding to a relative standard deviation of 15%. For a case with partially absorbing aerosol with an aerosol optical depth of 0.2 and single scattering albedo of 0.8, the forcing changes to 1.26 Wm-2, and the standard deviation increases to 1.21 W-2, corresponding to a significant relative standard deviation of 96%. However, the top-of-atmosphere forcing variability owing to absorption is low, with relative standard deviations of 9% clear-sky and 12% all-sky. Scaling the forcing standard deviation for a purely scattering case to match the sulfate radiative in the AeroCom Direct Effect experiment, demonstrates that host model uncertain- ties could explain about half of the overall sulfate forcing diversity of 0.13 Wm-2 in the AeroCom Direct Radiative Effect experiment. Host model errors in aerosol radiative forcing are largest in regions of uncertain host model components, such as stratocumulus cloud decks or areas with poorly constrained.

  8. Preliminary results of a three-dimensional radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hirok, W.

    1995-09-01

    Clouds act as the primary modulator of the Earth`s radiation at the top of the atmosphere, within the atmospheric column, and at the Earth`s surface. They interact with both shortwave and longwave radiation, but it is primarily in the case of shortwave where most of the uncertainty lies because of the difficulties in treating scattered solar radiation. To understand cloud-radiative interactions, radiative transfer models portray clouds as plane-parallel homogeneous entities to ease the computational physics. Unfortunately, clouds are far from being homogeneous, and large differences between measurement and theory point to a stronger need to understand and model cloud macrophysical properties. In an attempt to better comprehend the role of cloud morphology on the 3-dimensional radiation field, a Monte Carlo model has been developed. This model can simulate broadband shortwave radiation fluxes while incorporating all of the major atmospheric constituents. The model is used to investigate the cloud absorption anomaly where cloud absorption measurements exceed theoretical estimates and to examine the efficacy of ERBE measurements and cloud field experiments. 3 figs.

  9. MODELING ACUTE EXPOSURE TO SOLAR RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the major technical challenges in calculating solar flux on the human form has been the complexity of the surface geometry (i.e., the surface normal vis a vis the incident radiation). The American Cancer Society reports that over 80% of skin cancers occur on the face, he...

  10. A Physical Model of Electron Radiation Belts of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzato, L.; Sicard-Piet, A.; Bourdarie, S.

    2012-04-01

    Radiation belts causes irreversible damages on on-board instruments materials. That's why for two decades, ONERA proposes studies about radiation belts of magnetized planets. First, in the 90's, the development of a physical model, named Salammbô, carried out a model of the radiation belts of the Earth. Then, for few years, analysis of the magnetosphere of Jupiter and in-situ data (Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo) allow to build a physical model of the radiation belts of Jupiter. Enrolling on the Cassini age and thanks to all information collected, this study permits to adapt Salammbô jovian radiation belts model to the case of Saturn environment. Indeed, some physical processes present in the kronian magnetosphere are similar to those present in the magnetosphere of Jupiter (radial diffusion; interaction of energetic electrons with rings, moons, atmosphere; synchrotron emission). However, some physical processes have to be added to the kronian model (compared to the jovian model) because of the particularity of the magnetosphere of Saturn: interaction of energetic electrons with neutral particles from Enceladus, and wave-particle interaction. This last physical process has been studied in details with the analysis of CASSINI/RPWS (Radio and Plasma Waves Science) data. The major importance of the wave particles interaction is now well known in the case of the radiation belts of the Earth but it is important to investigate on its role in the case of Saturn. So, importance of each physical process has been studied and analysis of Cassini MIMI-LEMMS and CAPS data allows to build a model boundary condition (at L = 6). Finally, results of this study lead to a kronian electrons radiation belts model including radial diffusion, interactions of energetic electrons with rings, moons and neutrals particles and wave-particle interaction (interactions of electrons with atmosphere particles and synchrotron emission are too weak to be taken into account in this model). Then, to

  11. Radiative Transfer Model for Translucent Slab Ice on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrieu, F.; Schmidt, F.; Douté, S.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.

    2016-09-01

    We developed a radiative transfer model that simulates in VIS/NIR the bidirectional reflectance of a contaminated slab layer of ice overlaying a granular medium, under geometrical optics conditions to study martian ices.

  12. Idealized radiation efficiency model for a porous radiant burner

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, X.; Viskanta, R.; Gore, J.P.

    1999-07-01

    A simple, highly idealized radiation efficiency model has been developed for a porous radiant burner with or without a screen to assess the thermal performance of an ideal porous burner that yields the highest radiation efficiency and against which test results and/or more realistic model predictions could be benchmarked. The model is based on thermodynamics principles (first law of thermodynamics) with idealizations made for some of the physical processes. Empirical information, where necessary, is then used to close the model equations. The maximum radiation efficiency at a given firing rate is predicted. The effects of input parameters such as the firing rate, the equivalence ratio, and the effective emittance of the burner on the radiation efficiency of the porous radiant burner are reported.

  13. A space radiation shielding model of the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE).

    PubMed

    Atwell, W; Saganti, P; Cucinotta, F A; Zeitlin, C J

    2004-01-01

    The 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft was launched towards Mars on April 7, 2001. Onboard the spacecraft is the Martian radiation environment experiment (MARIE), which is designed to measure the background radiation environment due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar protons in the 20-500 MeV/n energy range. We present an approach for developing a space radiation-shielding model of the spacecraft that includes the MARIE instrument in the current mapping phase orientation. A discussion is presented describing the development and methodology used to construct the shielding model. For a given GCR model environment, using the current MARIE shielding model and the high-energy particle transport codes, dose rate values are compared with MARIE measurements during the early mapping phase in Mars orbit. The results show good agreement between the model calculations and the MARIE measurements as presented for the March 2002 dataset.

  14. Parameterization of clouds and radiation in climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Roeckner, E.

    1995-09-01

    Clouds are a very important, yet poorly modeled element in the climate system. There are many potential cloud feedbacks, including those related to cloud cover, height, water content, phase change, and droplet concentration and size distribution. As a prerequisite to studying the cloud feedback issue, this research reports on the simulation and validation of cloud radiative forcing under present climate conditions using the ECHAM general circulation model and ERBE top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes.

  15. Form and Actuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitbol, Michel

    A basic choice underlies physics. It consists of banishing actual situations from theoretical descriptions, in order to reach a universal formal construct. Actualities are then thought of as mere local appearances of a transcendent reality supposedly described by the formal construct. Despite its impressive success, this method has left major loopholes in the foundations of science. In this paper, I document two of these loopholes. One is the problem of time asymmetry in statistical thermodynamics, and the other is the measurement problem of quantum mechanics. Then, adopting a broader philosophical standpoint, I try to turn the whole picture upside down. Here, full priority is given to actuality (construed as a mode of the immanent reality self-reflectively being itself) over formal constructs. The characteristic aporias of this variety of "Copernican revolution" are discussed.

  16. An Improved Radiative Transfer Model for Climate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Sokolik, Irina N.; Clough, Shepard A.; Toon, Owen B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a radiative transfer model that has been developed to accurately predict the atmospheric radiant flux in both the infrared and the solar spectrum with a minimum of computational effort. The model is designed to be included in numerical climate models To assess the accuracy of the model, the results are compared to other more detailed models for several standard cases in the solar and thermal spectrum. As the thermal spectrum has been treated in other publications, we focus here on the solar part of the spectrum. We perform several example calculations focussing on the question of absorption of solar radiation by gases and aerosols.

  17. Radiative transfer model validations during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Breon, Francois-Marie; Gautier, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    Two simple radiative transfer models, the 5S model based on Tanre et al. (1985, 1986) and the wide-band model of Morcrette (1984) are validated by comparing their outputs with results obtained during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment on concomitant radiosonde, aerosol turbidity, and radiation measurements and sky photographs. Results showed that the 5S model overestimates the short-wave irradiance by 13.2 W/sq m, whereas the Morcrette model underestimated the long-wave irradiance by 7.4 W/sq m.

  18. Solar Radiation Estimated Through Mesoscale Atmospheric Modeling over Northeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Menezes Neto, Otacilio Leandro; Costa, Alexandre Araújo; Ramalho, Fernando Pinto; de Maria, Paulo Henrique Santiago

    2009-03-01

    The use of renewable energy sources, like solar, wind and biomass is rapidly increasing in recent years, with solar radiation as a particularly abundant energy source over Northeast Brazil. A proper quantitative knowledge of the incoming solar radiation is of great importance for energy planning in Brazil, serving as basis for developing future projects of photovoltaic power plants and solar energy exploitation. This work presents a methodology for mapping the incoming solar radiation at ground level for Northeast Brazil, using a mesoscale atmospheric model (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System—RAMS), calibrated and validated using data from the network of automatic surface stations from the State Foundation for Meteorology and Water Resources from Ceará (Fundação Cearense de Meteorologia e Recursos Hídricos- FUNCEME). The results showed that the model exhibits systematic errors, overestimating surface radiation, but that, after the proper statistical corrections, using a relationship between the model-predicted cloud fraction, the ground-level observed solar radiation and the incoming solar radiation estimated at the top of the atmosphere, a correlation of 0.92 with a confidence interval of 13.5 W/m2 is found for monthly data. Using this methodology, we found an estimate for annual average incoming solar radiation over Ceará of 215 W/m2 (maximum in October: 260 W/m2).

  19. Mechanisms from models--actual effects from real life: the zero-calorie drink-break option.

    PubMed

    Booth, D A

    1988-01-01

    Animal and human laboratory models show that the suppression of appetite by a modest amount of readily assimilable energy, such as a caloric sweetener, is not likely to last longer than an hour. The transience of their satiating effect constitutes a mechanism whereby the sugars, starch, alcohol and fats in drinks and the snackfoods eaten with them could add to energy intake which is subsequently uncompensated and so contributes to weight gain. Conversely, if those in the habit of consuming such energy-containing drinks and accompaniments avoided such items or replaced them by low-calorie substitutes, this might help in weight reduction and even perhaps in prevention of obesity. The effectiveness of this "zero-calorie drink-break option" can be tested by correlating separately reported real-life eating habits and weight changes across people whose circumstances are similar. The existing field data indicate that the fatter a person is the more likely they are to use the conventional undifferentiated sugar-substitution strategies and also that these usually do not help weight reduction. PMID:3056269

  20. Evaluation of simple model for net radiation estimates above various vegetation covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavinka, P.; Trnka, M.; Fischer, M.; Kucera, J.; Mozny, M.; Zalud, Z.

    2010-09-01

    The main objective of submitted study was to calibrate and verify the simple model for net radiation (Rn) estimates during the growing periods of selected agricultural crops. In the same time the soil heat flux (G) measurements were analysed. The model needs incoming solar radiation, air temperature, vapor pressure measurements and information about albedo as input. The net radiation is determined as difference between the incoming net shortwave radiation (Rns) and the outgoing net longwave radiation (Rnl). The Rns is estimated from incoming solar radiation using albedo. The Rnl is estimated from daily maximum and minimum temperature, vapour pressure, incoming solar radiation and derived clear-sky radiation. The accuracy of the model was assessed on the basis of radiation balance measurements (by Net radiometer Schenk 8110) at two experimental stations in the Czech Republic (i.e. Polkovice 49°23´ (N), 17°17´ (E), 205 m a.s.l.; Domanínek 49°32´ (N), 16°15´ (E), 544 m a.s.l.) during the years 2009 and 2010. The parameter G was measured by Hukseflux Thermal Sensor HFP01. For the purpose of mentioned analyses the measurements were conducted during the growing season of spring barley, winter wheat, winter rape, grass, poplars and above field after harvest of cereals (after/without tillage). These covers are very common type of surface within agricultural landscape in Central Europe. The enhanced method of Rn and G estimation were then used for the SoilClim model runs. The present version of SoilClim uses very simple algorithm for radiation balance and should be modified to be closer to reality. Namely the estimates of reference evapotranspiration (ETo), actual evapotranspiration (ETa) and soil water content could be substantially improved by this way. Acknowledgement: We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic (no. 521/09/P479) and Research plan No. MSM6215648905 "Biological and technological aspects of sustainability of

  1. Diffusion models for Jupiter's radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacques, S. A.; Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Solutions are given for the diffusion of trapped particles in a planetary magnetic field in which the first and second adiabatic invariants are preserved but the third is not, using as boundary conditions a fixed density at the outer boundary (the magnetopause) and a zero density at an inner boundary (the planetary surface). Losses to an orbiting natural satellite are included and an approximate evaluation is made of the effects of the synchrotron radiation on the energy of relativistic electrons. Choosing parameters appropriate to Jupiter, the electrons required to produce the observed synchrotron radiation are explained. If a speculative mechanism in which the diffusion is driven by ionospheric wind is the true explanation of the electrons producing the synchrotron emission it can be concluded that Jupiter's inner magnetosphere is occupied by an energetic proton flux that would be a serious hazard to spacecraft.

  2. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling - part A: Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.J.

    1997-06-01

    The need to understand how particle radiation (high-energy photons and electrons) from a variety of sources affects materials and electronics has motivated the development of sophisticated computer codes that describe how radiation with energies from 1.0 keV to 100.0 GeV propagates through matter. Predicting radiation transport is the necessary first step in predicting radiation effects. The radiation transport codes that are described here are general-purpose codes capable of analyzing a variety of radiation environments including those produced by nuclear weapons (x-rays, gamma rays, and neutrons), by sources in space (electrons and ions) and by accelerators (x-rays, gamma rays, and electrons). Applications of these codes include the study of radiation effects on electronics, nuclear medicine (imaging and cancer treatment), and industrial processes (food disinfestation, waste sterilization, manufacturing.) The primary focus will be on coupled electron-photon transport codes, with some brief discussion of proton transport. These codes model a radiation cascade in which electrons produce photons and vice versa. This coupling between particles of different types is important for radiation effects. For instance, in an x-ray environment, electrons are produced that drive the response in electronics. In an electron environment, dose due to bremsstrahlung photons can be significant once the source electrons have been stopped.

  3. Evaluating a three dimensional model of diffuse photosynthetically active radiation in maize canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiping; Guo, Yan; Li, Baoguo; Wang, Xiyong; Ma, Yuntao

    2006-07-01

    Diffuse photosynthetically active radiation (DPAR) is important during overcast days and for plant parts shaded from the direct beam radiation. Simulation of DPAR interception by individual plant parts of a canopy, separately from direct beam photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), may give important insights into plant ecology. This paper presents a model to simulate the interception of DPAR in plant canopies. A sub-model of a virtual maize canopy was reconstructed. Plant surfaces were represented as small triangular facets positioned according to three-dimensionally (3D) digitized data collected in the field. Then a second sub-model to simulate the 3D DPAR distribution in the canopy was developed by dividing the sky hemisphere into a grid of fine cells that allowed for the anisotropic distribution of DPAR over the sky hemisphere. This model, DSHP (Dividing Sky Hemisphere with Projecting), simulates which DSH (Divided Sky Hemisphere) cells are directly visible from a facet in the virtual canopy, i.e. not obscured by other facets. The DPAR reaching the center of a facet was calculated by summing the amounts of DPAR present in every DSH cell. The distribution of DPAR in a canopy was obtained from the calculated DPARs intercepted by all facets in the canopy. This DSHP model was validated against DPAR measurements made in an actual maize ( Zea mays L.) canopy over selected days during the early filling stage. The simulated and measured DPAR at different canopy depths showed a good agreement with a R 2 equaling 0.78 ( n=120).

  4. Parametric plate-bridge dynamic filter model of violin radiativity.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid, deterministic-statistical, parametric "dynamic filter" model of the violin's radiativity profile [characterized by an averaged-over-sphere, mean-square radiativity (R(ω)(2))] is developed based on the premise that acoustic radiation depends on (1) how strongly it vibrates [characterized by the averaged-over-corpus, mean-square mobility (Y(ω)(2))] and (2) how effectively these vibrations are turned into sound, characterized by the radiation efficiency, which is proportional to (R(ω)(2))/(Y(ω)(2)). Two plate mode frequencies were used to compute 1st corpus bending mode frequencies using empirical trend lines; these corpus bending modes in turn drive cavity volume flows to excite the two lowest cavity modes A0 and A1. All widely-separated, strongly-radiating corpus and cavity modes in the low frequency deterministic region are then parameterized in a dual-Helmholtz resonator model. Mid-high frequency statistical regions are parameterized with the aid of a distributed-excitation statistical mobility function (no bridge) to help extract bridge filter effects associated with (a) bridge rocking mode frequency changes and (b) bridge-corpus interactions from 14-violin-average, excited-via-bridge (Y(ω)(2)) and (R(ω)(2)). Deterministic-statistical regions are rejoined at ~630 Hz in a mobility-radiativity "trough" where all violin quality classes had a common radiativity. Simulations indicate that typical plate tuning has a significantly weaker effect on radiativity profile trends than bridge tuning.

  5. Uses and Abuses of Models in Radiation Risk Management

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    1998-12-10

    This paper is a high-level overview of managing risks to workers, public, and the environment. It discusses the difference between a model and a hypothesis. The need for models in risk assessment is justified, and then it is shown that radiation risk models that are useable in risk management are highly simplistic. The weight of evidence is considered for and against the linear non-threshold (LNT) model for carcinogenesis and heritable ill-health that is currently the basis for radiation risk management. Finally, uses and misuses of this model are considered. It is concluded that the LNT model continues to be suitable for use as the basis for radiation protection.

  6. Improved Solar-Radiation-Pressure Models for GPS Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Kuang, Da

    2006-01-01

    A report describes a series of computational models conceived as an improvement over prior models for determining effects of solar-radiation pressure on orbits of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. These models are based on fitting coefficients of Fourier functions of Sun-spacecraft- Earth angles to observed spacecraft orbital motions.

  7. Frequency Integrated Radiation Models for Absorbing and Scattering Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripoll, J. F.; Wray, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to contribute to the simplification of existing radiation models used in complex emitting, absorbing, scattering media. The application in view is the computation of flows occurring in such complex media, such as certain stellar interiors or combusting gases. In these problems, especially when scattering is present, the complexity of the radiative transfer leads to a high numerical cost, which is often avoided by simply neglecting it. The complexity lies partly in the strong dependence of the spectral coefficients on frequency. Models are then needed to capture the effects of the radiation when one cannot afford to directly solve for it. In this work, the frequency dependence will be modeled and integrated out in order retain only the average effects. A frequency-integrated radiative transfer equation (RTE) will be derived.

  8. Recent Developments in the Radiation Belt Environment Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Glocer, A.; Zheng, Q.; Horne, R. B.; Meredith, N. P.; Albert, J. M.; Nagai, T.

    2010-01-01

    The fluxes of energetic particles in the radiation belts are found to be strongly controlled by the solar wind conditions. In order to understand and predict the radiation particle intensities, we have developed a physics-based Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model that considers the influences from the solar wind, ring current and plasmasphere. Recently, an improved calculation of wave-particle interactions has been incorporated. In particular, the model now includes cross diffusion in energy and pitch-angle. We find that the exclusion of cross diffusion could cause significant overestimation of electron flux enhancement during storm recovery. The RBE model is also connected to MHD fields so that the response of the radiation belts to fast variations in the global magnetosphere can be studied.Weare able to reproduce the rapid flux increase during a substorm dipolarization on 4 September 2008. The timing is much shorter than the time scale of wave associated acceleration.

  9. Occultation Modeling for Radiation Obstruction Effects on Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Carufel, Guy; Li, Zu Qun; Harvey, Jason; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A geometric occultation model has been developed to determine line-of-sight obstruction of radiation sources expected for different NASA space exploration mission designs. Example applications includes fidelity improvements for surface lighting conditions, radiation pressure, thermal and power subsystem modeling. The model makes use of geometric two dimensional shape primitives to most effectively model space vehicles. A set of these primitives is used to represent three dimensional obstructing objects as a two dimensional outline from the perspective of an observing point of interest. Radiation sources, such as the Sun or a Moon's albedo is represented as a collection of points, each of which is assigned a flux value to represent a section of the radiation source. Planetary bodies, such as a Martian moon, is represented as a collection of triangular facets which are distributed in spherical height fields for optimization. These design aspects and the overall model architecture will be presented. Specific uses to be presented includes a study of the lighting condition on Phobos for a possible future surface mission, and computing the incident flux on a spacecraft's solar panels and radiators from direct and reflected solar radiation subject to self-shadowing or shadowing by third bodies.

  10. Modeling and parameterization of horizontally inhomogeneous cloud radiative properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    One of the fundamental difficulties in modeling cloud fields is the large variability of cloud optical properties (liquid water content, reflectance, emissivity). The stratocumulus and cirrus clouds, under special consideration for FIRE, exhibit spatial variability on scales of 1 km or less. While it is impractical to model individual cloud elements, the research direction is to model a statistical ensembles of cloud elements with mean-cloud properties specified. The major areas of this investigation are: (1) analysis of cloud field properties; (2) intercomparison of cloud radiative model results with satellite observations; (3) radiative parameterization of cloud fields; and (4) development of improved cloud classification algorithms.

  11. AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Catling, David C.

    2012-09-20

    We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

  12. Radiative and non-radiative recombinations in tensile strained Ge microstrips: Photoluminescence experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Virgilio, M.; Schroeder, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Capellini, G.

    2015-12-21

    Tensile germanium microstrips are candidate as gain material in Si-based light emitting devices due to the beneficial effect of the strain field on the radiative recombination rate. In this work, we thoroughly investigate their radiative recombination spectra by means of micro-photoluminescence experiments at different temperatures and excitation powers carried out on samples featuring different tensile strain values. For sake of comparison, bulk Ge(001) photoluminescence is also discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in light of a numerical modeling based on a multi-valley effective mass approach, taking in to account the depth dependence of the photo-induced carrier density and of the self-absorption effect. The theoretical modeling allowed us to quantitatively describe the observed increase of the photoluminescence intensity for increasing values of strain, excitation power, and temperature. The temperature dependence of the non-radiative recombination time in this material has been inferred thanks to the model calibration procedure.

  13. Radiative and non-radiative recombinations in tensile strained Ge microstrips: Photoluminescence experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgilio, M.; Schroeder, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Capellini, G.

    2015-12-01

    Tensile germanium microstrips are candidate as gain material in Si-based light emitting devices due to the beneficial effect of the strain field on the radiative recombination rate. In this work, we thoroughly investigate their radiative recombination spectra by means of micro-photoluminescence experiments at different temperatures and excitation powers carried out on samples featuring different tensile strain values. For sake of comparison, bulk Ge(001) photoluminescence is also discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in light of a numerical modeling based on a multi-valley effective mass approach, taking in to account the depth dependence of the photo-induced carrier density and of the self-absorption effect. The theoretical modeling allowed us to quantitatively describe the observed increase of the photoluminescence intensity for increasing values of strain, excitation power, and temperature. The temperature dependence of the non-radiative recombination time in this material has been inferred thanks to the model calibration procedure.

  14. Cloud and solar radiation biases over the Southern Ocean in climate models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodas-Salcedo, A.; Williams, K. D.; Hyder, P.; Edwards, J. M.; Copsey, D.

    2013-12-01

    Current climate models generally reflect too little solar radiation over the Southern Ocean, which may be the leading cause of the prevalent sea-surface temperature biases in climate models. We study the role of clouds on the solar radiation biases in atmosphere-only simulations of the Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project phase 2 (CFMIP2), which is part of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The CFMIP2 protocol requests additional diagnostics that are useful to investigate the causes of cloud and radiation biases in models, and their relation with cloud feedbacks. We composite AMIP daily data around cyclone centres in the latitude band between 40S and 70S during the summer. Most of the model biases occur in the cold air side of the cyclone composite, away from the cold front. We show that the cyclone composite accounts for most of the climatological error in that latitudinal band. We then use cloud property estimates from the International Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) to classify clouds into different regimes, following the clustering technique of Williams and Webb (2009). The cloud regime labelled as 'mid-level' is the main contributor to the Southern Ocean shortwave radiation biases. We use information from the CALIPSO lidar to investigate in more detail the properties of the 'mid-level' cloud regime. CALIPSO shows that the 'mid-level' cloud regime is dominated by two main cloud types; cloud with tops actually at mid-level, and low-level cloud. We will also present initial analyses of biases in air-sea fluxes over the Southern Ocean in the most recent configuration of the Met Office coupled model.

  15. Radiation dose modeling using IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, D.S.; Davis, K.R.; Breazeal, N.L.; Watson, R.A.; Ford, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans in radiation environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO (Ergonomics) simulation software products. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide the radiation exposure information to and collect the radiation dose information from the workcell simulations. The emphasis of this paper is on the IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO parts of REMS, since that represents the extension to existing capabilities developed by the authors. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these database files to compute and accumulate dose to human devices (Deneb`s ERGO human) during simulated operations around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. REMS was developed because the proposed reduction in the yearly radiation exposure limit will preclude or require changes in many of the manual operations currently being utilized in the Weapons Complex. This is particularly relevant in the area of dismantlement activities at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX. Therefore, a capability was needed to be able to quantify the dose associated with certain manual processes so that the benefits of automation could be identified and understood.

  16. Modeling of Radiation Risks for Human Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Prior to any human space flight, calculations of radiation risks are used to determine the acceptable scope of astronaut activity. Using the supercomputing facilities at NASA Ames Research Center, Ames researchers have determined the damage probabilities of DNA functional groups by space radiation. The data supercede those used in the current Monte Carlo model for risk assessment. One example is the reaction of DNA with hydroxyl radical produced by the interaction of highly energetic particles from space radiation with water molecules in the human body. This reaction is considered an important cause of DNA mutations, although its mechanism is not well understood.

  17. Planetary and interplanetary environmental models for radiation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    In this introductory talk the essence of environmental modeling is presented as suited for radiation analysis purposes. The variables of fundamental importance for radiation environmental assessment are discussed. The characterization is performed by dividing modeling into three areas, namely the interplanetary medium, the circumplanetary environment, and the planetary or satellite surface. In the first area, the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and their modulation by the heliospheric magnetic field as well as solar particle events (SPE) are considered, in the second area the magnetospheres are taken into account, and in the third area the effect of the planetary environment is also considered. Planetary surfaces and atmospheres are modeled based on results from the most recent targeted spacecraft. The results are coupled with suited visualization techniques and radiation transport models in support of trade studies of spacecraft and crew health risks for future exploration missions.

  18. Retaining space and time coherence in radiative transfer models.

    PubMed

    Rosato, J

    2015-05-01

    A recent model for radiative transfer that accounts for spatial coherence is extended in such a way as to retain temporal coherence. The method employs Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy techniques. Both spatial and temporal coherence are shown to affect the formation of atomic line spectra. Calculations of Lyman α radiation transport in optically thick divertor plasma conditions are reported as an illustration of the model. A possible extension of the formalism to dense media involving correlations between atoms is discussed in an appendix. A link to partial frequency redistribution modeling is also discussed.

  19. MCNP model for the many KE-Basin radiation sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rittmann, P.D.

    1997-05-21

    This document presents a model for the location and strength of radiation sources in the accessible areas of KE-Basin which agrees well with data taken on a regular grid in September of 1996. This modelling work was requested to support dose rate reduction efforts in KE-Basin. Anticipated fuel removal activities require lower dose rates to minimize annual dose to workers. With this model, the effects of component cleanup or removal can be estimated in advance to evaluate their effectiveness. In addition, the sources contributing most to the radiation fields in a given location can be identified and dealt with.

  20. Chromosome aberrations as biomarkers of radiation exposure: Modelling basic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Ottolenghi, A.

    The space radiation environment is a mixed field consisting of different particles having different energies, including high charge and energy (HZE) ions. Conventional measurements of absorbed doses may not be sufficient to completely characterise the radiation field and perform reliable estimates of health risks. Biological dosimetry, based on the observation of specific radiation-induced endpoints (typically chromosome aberrations), can be a helpful approach in case of monitored exposure to space radiation or other mixed fields, as well as in case of accidental exposure. Furthermore, various ratios of aberrations (e.g. dicentric chromosomes to centric rings and complex exchanges to simple exchanges) have been suggested as possible fingerprints of radiation quality, although all of them have been subjected to some criticisms. In this context a mechanistic model and a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of chromosome aberration induction were developed. The model, able to provide dose-responses for different aberrations (e.g. dicentrics, rings, fragments, translocations, insertions and other complex exchanges), was further developed to assess the dependence of various ratios of aberrations on radiation quality. The predictions of the model were compared with available data, whose experimental conditions were faithfully reproduced. Particular attention was devoted to the scoring criteria adopted in different laboratories and to possible biases introduced by interphase death and mitotic delay. This latter aspect was investigated by taking into account both metaphase data and data obtained with Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC).

  1. Chromosome aberrations as biomarkers of radiation exposure: modelling basic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Ottolenghi, A

    2003-01-01

    The space radiation environment is a mixed field consisting of different particles having different energies, including high charge and energy (HZE) ions. Conventional measurements of absorbed doses may not be sufficient to completely characterise the radiation field and perform reliable estimates of health risks. Biological dosimetry, based on the observation of specific radiation-induced endpoints (typically chromosome aberrations), can be a helpful approach in case of monitored exposure to space radiation or other mixed fields, as well as in case of accidental exposure. Furthermore, various ratios of aberrations (e.g. dicentric chromosomes to centric rings and complex exchanges to simple exchanges) have been suggested as possible fingerprints of radiation quality, although all of them have been subjected to some criticisms. In this context a mechanistic model and a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of chromosome aberration induction were developed. The model, able to provide dose-responses for different aberrations (e.g. dicentrics, rings, fragments, translocations, insertions and other complex exchanges), was further developed to assess the dependence of various ratios of aberrations on radiation quality. The predictions of the model were compared with available data, whose experimental conditions were faithfully reproduced. Particular attention was devoted to the scoring criteria adopted in different laboratories and to possible biases introduced by interphase death and mitotic delay. This latter aspect was investigated by taking into account both metaphase data and data obtained with Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC). PMID:12971411

  2. Modeling quasar central engine as a relativistic radiating star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ksh. Newton; Pant, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Long ago Hoyle & Fowler attempted to model the central engine of quasars as hot super-massive stars supported by radiation pressure. Whereas the model of Hoyle & Fowler was Newtonian, here we make a toy model of quasar central engines as ultra relativistic ultrahot plasma or as a ball of radiation. Accordingly, we consider general relativistic gravitational collapse including emission of radiation. More specifically, we discuss a new class of radiating fluid ball exact solution in conformally-flat metric which is quasi-static and contracting at negligible rate. The problem is solved by assuming that the metric potential is separable in to radial and time dependent parts. It is found the gravitational mass of the radiating ball M→0 as comoving time t→∞ in conformity of the idea of an "Eternally Collapsing Object" (ECO) which has been claimed to be the true nature of the so-called "Black Holes". In particular, we consider here a quasi-static radiation ball having M≈9.507×107 M ⊙, a radius of ≈2×1014 km, and a luminosity L ∞≈9.1×1046 erg/s. Prima-facie, such an ECO solution is compatible with the central compact object of a quasar having comoving lifetime of ≈107 yr and a distantly observed lifetime ( u) which could be higher by many orders of magnitude.

  3. Six-Tube Freezable Radiator Testing and Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Navarro, Moses

    2011-01-01

    Freezable radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the spacecraft s surroundings and because of different thermal loads rejected during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recovering) a freezable radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. These predictions are a critical step in gaining the capability to quickly design and produce optimized freezable radiators for a range of mission requirements. This paper builds upon previous efforts made to correlate a Thermal Desktop(TradeMark) model with empirical testing data from two test articles, with additional model modifications and empirical data from a sub-component radiator for a full scale design. Two working fluids were tested, namely MultiTherm WB-58 and a 50-50 mixture of DI water and Amsoil ANT.

  4. Six-Tube Freezable Radiator Testing and Model Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilibridge, Sean T.; Navarro, Moses

    2012-01-01

    Freezable Radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the spacecraft?s surroundings and because of different thermal loads rejected during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recov ering) a freezable radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. These predictions are a critical step in gaining the capability to quickly design and produce optimized freezable radiators for a range of mission requirements. This paper builds upon previous efforts made to correlate a Thermal Desktop(TM) model with empirical testing data from two test articles, with additional model modifications and empirical data from a sub-component radiator for a full scale design. Two working fluids were tested: MultiTherm WB-58 and a 50-50 mixture of DI water and Amsoil ANT.

  5. Radiation Belt Modeling for Spacecraft Design: Model Comparisons for Common Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, J.-M.; Barth, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    We present the current status of radiation belt modeling, providing model details and comparisons with AP-8 and AE-8 for commonly used orbits. Improved modeling of the particle environment enables smarter space system design.

  6. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Meier, Matthias M.; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B.; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis suggests

  7. Radiation-Induced Leukemia at Doses Relevant to Radiation Therapy: Modeling Mechanisms and Estimating Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Hlatky, Lynn; Mark P. Little; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Brenner, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Because many cancer patients are diagnosed earlier and live longer than in the past, second cancers induced by radiation therapy have become a clinically significant issue. An earlier biologically based model that was designed to estimate risks of high-dose radiation induced solid cancers included initiation of stem cells to a premalignant state, inactivation of stem cells at high radiation doses, and proliferation of stem cells during cellular repopulation after inactivation. This earlier model predicted the risks of solid tumors induced by radiation therapy but overestimated the corresponding leukemia risks. Methods: To extend the model to radiation-induced leukemias, we analyzed in addition to cellular initiation, inactivation, and proliferation a repopulation mechanism specific to the hematopoietic system: long-range migration through the blood stream of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from distant locations. Parameters for the model were derived from HSC biologic data in the literature and from leukemia risks among atomic bomb survivors v^ ho were subjected to much lower radiation doses. Results: Proliferating HSCs that migrate from sites distant from the high-dose region include few preleukemic HSCs, thus decreasing the high-dose leukemia risk. The extended model for leukemia provides risk estimates that are consistent with epidemiologic data for leukemia risk associated with radiation therapy over a wide dose range. For example, when applied to an earlier case-control study of 110000 women undergoing radiotherapy for uterine cancer, the model predicted an excess relative risk (ERR) of 1.9 for leukemia among women who received a large inhomogeneous fractionated external beam dose to the bone marrow (mean = 14.9 Gy), consistent with the measured ERR (2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.2 to 6.4; from 3.6 cases expected and 11 cases observed). As a corresponding example for brachytherapy, the predicted ERR of 0.80 among women who received an inhomogeneous low

  8. Radiative neutrino model with an inert triplet scalar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    We study a one-loop induced radiative neutrino model with an inert isospin triplet scalar field in the general framework of U (1 )Y , in which we discuss current neutrino oscillation data, lepton flavor violations, a muon anomalous magnetic moment, and a dark matter candidate depending on the number of hypercharges. We show global analysis combining all the constraints and discuss the model.

  9. Predicting Chandra CCD Degradation with the Chandra Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Blackwell, William C.; DePasquale, Joseph M.; Grant, Catherine E.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Wolk, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Not long after launch of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, it was discovered that the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detector was rapidly degrading due to radiation. Analysis by Chandra personnel showed that this degradation was due to 10w energy protons (100 - 200 keV) that scattered down the optical path onto the focal plane. In response to this unexpected problem, the Chandra Team developed a radiation-protection program that has been used to manage the radiation damage to the CCDs. This program consists of multiple approaches - scheduled sating of the ACIS detector from the radiation environment during passage through radiation belts, real-time monitoring of space weather conditions, on-board monitoring of radiation environment levels, and the creation of a radiation environment model for use in computing proton flux and fluence at energies that damage the ACIS detector. This radiation mitigation program has been very successful. The initial precipitous increase in the CCDs' charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) resulting from proton damage has been slowed dramatically, with the front-illuminated CCDS having an increase in CTI of only 2.3% per year, allowing the ASIS detector's expected lifetime to exceed requirements. This paper concentrates on one aspect of the Chandra radiation mitigation program, the creation of the Chandra Radiation Model (CRM). Because of Chandra's highly elliptical orbit, the spacecraft spends most of its time outside of the trapped radiation belts that present the severest risks to the ACIS detector. However, there is still a proton flux environment that must be accounted for in all parts of Chandra's orbit. At the time of Chandra's launch there was no engineering model of the radiation environment that could be used in the outer regions of the spacecraft's orbit, so the CRM was developed to provide the flux environment of 100 - 200 keV protons in the outer magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and solar wind regions of geospace. This

  10. GPU acceleration experience with RRTMG long wave radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Erik; Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, HungLung A.; Lee, Tsengdar

    2013-10-01

    An Atmospheric radiative transfer model calculates radiative transfer of electromagnetic radiation through a planetary atmosphere. Both shortwave radiance and longwave radiance parameterizations in an atmospheric model calculate radiation fluxes and heating rates in the earth-atmospheric system. One radiative transfer model is the rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM), which calculates of longwave and shortwave atmospheric radiative fluxes and heating rates. Longwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM. The RRTMG is a validated, correlated k-distribution band model for the calculation of longwave and shortwave atmospheric radiative fluxes and heating rates. The focus of this paper is on the RRTMG long wave (RRTMG_LW) model. In order to improve computational efficiency, RRTMG_LW incorporates several modifications compared to RRTM. In RRTM_LW there are 16 g points in each of the spectral bands for a total of 256 g points. In RRTMG_LW, the number of g points in each spectral band varies from 2 to 16 depending on the absorption in each band. RRTMG_LW employs a computationally efficient correlated-k method for radiative transfer calculations. It contains 16 spectral bands with various number of quadrature points (g points) in each of the bands. In total, there are 140 g points. The radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases are included in RRTMG_LW. Active gas absorbers include H2O, O3, CO2, CH4, N2O, O2 and four types of halocarbons: CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-22, and CCL4. RRTMG_LW also treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. For cloudysky radiative transfer, a maximum-random cloud overlapping scheme is used. Small scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds can be represented using a statistical technique in RRTMG_LW. Due to its accuracy, RRTMG_LW has been implemented operationally

  11. Highly physical penumbra solar radiation pressure modeling with atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Robert; Flury, Jakob; Bandikova, Tamara; Schilling, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for highly physical solar radiation pressure (SRP) modeling in Earth's penumbra. The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. However, we aim to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. We present new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the high spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. Modeled penumbra SRP accelerations for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are compared to the sub-nm/s2 precision GRACE accelerometer data. Comparisons to accelerometer data and a traditional penumbra SRP model illustrate the improved accuracy which our methods provide. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the significance of various atmospheric parameters and modeled effects on penumbra SRP. While this model is more complex than a traditional penumbra SRP model, we demonstrate its utility and propose that a highly physical model which considers atmospheric effects should be the basis for any simplified approach to penumbra SRP modeling.

  12. A Statistical Model for Generating a Population of Unclassified Objects and Radiation Signatures Spanning Nuclear Threats

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K; Sokkappa, P

    2008-10-29

    This report describes an approach for generating a simulated population of plausible nuclear threat radiation signatures spanning a range of variability that could be encountered by radiation detection systems. In this approach, we develop a statistical model for generating random instances of smuggled nuclear material. The model is based on physics principles and bounding cases rather than on intelligence information or actual threat device designs. For this initial stage of work, we focus on random models using fissile material and do not address scenarios using non-fissile materials. The model has several uses. It may be used as a component in a radiation detection system performance simulation to generate threat samples for injection studies. It may also be used to generate a threat population to be used for training classification algorithms. In addition, we intend to use this model to generate an unclassified 'benchmark' threat population that can be openly shared with other organizations, including vendors, for use in radiation detection systems performance studies and algorithm development and evaluation activities. We assume that a quantity of fissile material is being smuggled into the country for final assembly and that shielding may have been placed around the fissile material. In terms of radiation signature, a nuclear weapon is basically a quantity of fissile material surrounded by various layers of shielding. Thus, our model of smuggled material is expected to span the space of potential nuclear weapon signatures as well. For computational efficiency, we use a generic 1-dimensional spherical model consisting of a fissile material core surrounded by various layers of shielding. The shielding layers and their configuration are defined such that the model can represent the potential range of attenuation and scattering that might occur. The materials in each layer and the associated parameters are selected from probability distributions that span the

  13. Modelling thermal radiation in buoyant turbulent diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consalvi, J. L.; Demarco, R.; Fuentes, A.

    2012-10-01

    This work focuses on the numerical modelling of radiative heat transfer in laboratory-scale buoyant turbulent diffusion flames. Spectral gas and soot radiation is modelled by using the Full-Spectrum Correlated-k (FSCK) method. Turbulence-Radiation Interactions (TRI) are taken into account by considering the Optically-Thin Fluctuation Approximation (OTFA), the resulting time-averaged Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) being solved by the Finite Volume Method (FVM). Emission TRIs and the mean absorption coefficient are then closed by using a presumed probability density function (pdf) of the mixture fraction. The mean gas flow field is modelled by the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes (FANS) equation set closed by a buoyancy-modified k-ɛ model with algebraic stress/flux models (ASM/AFM), the Steady Laminar Flamelet (SLF) model coupled with a presumed pdf approach to account for Turbulence-Chemistry Interactions, and an acetylene-based semi-empirical two-equation soot model. Two sets of experimental pool fire data are used for validation: propane pool fires 0.3 m in diameter with Heat Release Rates (HRR) of 15, 22 and 37 kW and methane pool fires 0.38 m in diameter with HRRs of 34 and 176 kW. Predicted flame structures, radiant fractions, and radiative heat fluxes on surrounding surfaces are found in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data across all the flames. In addition further computations indicate that, for the present flames, the gray approximation can be applied for soot with a minor influence on the results, resulting in a substantial gain in Computer Processing Unit (CPU) time when the FSCK is used to treat gas radiation.

  14. Radiative neutralino production in low energy supersymmetric models

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Rahul; Sharma, Chandradew; Pandita, P. N.

    2008-06-01

    We study the production of the lightest neutralinos in the radiative process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{chi}-tilde{sub 1}{sup 0}{chi}-tilde{sub 1}{sup 0}{gamma} in low energy supersymmetric models for the International Linear Collider energies. This includes the minimal supersymmetric standard model as well as its extension with an additional chiral Higgs singlet superfield, the nonminimal supersymmetric standard model. We compare and contrast the dependence of the signal cross section on the parameters of the neutralino sector of the minimal and nonminimal supersymmetric standard model. We also consider the background to this process coming from the standard model process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{nu}{nu}{gamma}, as well as from the radiative production of the scalar partners of the neutrinos (sneutrinos) e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{nu}-tilde{nu}-tilde*{gamma}, which can be a background to the radiative neutralino production when the sneutrinos decay invisibly. In low energy supersymmetric models radiative production of the lightest neutralinos may be the only channel to study supersymmetric partners of the standard model particles at the first stage of a linear collider, since heavier neutralinos, charginos, and sleptons may be too heavy to be pair produced at a e{sup +}e{sup -} machine with {radical}(s)=500 GeV.

  15. Statistical Modeling for Radiation Hardness Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladbury, Raymond L.

    2014-01-01

    We cover the models and statistics associated with single event effects (and total ionizing dose), why we need them, and how to use them: What models are used, what errors exist in real test data, and what the model allows us to say about the DUT will be discussed. In addition, how to use other sources of data such as historical, heritage, and similar part and how to apply experience, physics, and expert opinion to the analysis will be covered. Also included will be concepts of Bayesian statistics, data fitting, and bounding rates.

  16. Numerical model of solar dynamic radiator for parametric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.

    1989-01-01

    Growth power requirements for Space Station Freedom will be met through addition of 25 kW solar dynamic (SD) power modules. The SD module rejects waste heat from the power conversion cycle to space through a pumped-loop, multi-panel, deployable radiator. The baseline radiator configuration was defined during the Space Station conceptual design phase and is a function of the state point and heat rejection requirements of the power conversion unit. Requirements determined by the overall station design such as mass, system redundancy, micrometeoroid and space debris impact survivability, launch packaging, costs, and thermal and structural interaction with other station components have also been design drivers for the radiator configuration. Extensive thermal and power cycle modeling capabilities have been developed which are powerful tools in Station design and analysis, but which prove cumbersome and costly for simple component preliminary design studies. In order to aid in refining the SD radiator to the mature design stage, a simple and flexible numerical model was developed. The model simulates heat transfer and fluid flow performance of the radiator and calculates area mass and impact survivability for many combinations of flow tube and panel configurations, fluid and material properties, and environmental and cycle variations. A brief description and discussion of the numerical model, it's capabilities and limitations, and results of the parametric studies performed is presented.

  17. Cloud-radiation interactions and their parameterization in climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains papers from the International Workshop on Cloud-Radiation Interactions and Their Parameterization in Climate Models met on 18-20 October 1993 in Camp Springs, Maryland, USA. It was organized by the Joint Working Group on Clouds and Radiation of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences. Recommendations were grouped into three broad areas: (1) general circulation models (GCMs), (2) satellite studies, and (3) process studies. Each of the panels developed recommendations on the themes of the workshop. Explicitly or implicitly, each panel independently recommended observations of basic cloud microphysical properties (water content, phase, size) on the scales resolved by GCMs. Such observations are necessary to validate cloud parameterizations in GCMs, to use satellite data to infer radiative forcing in the atmosphere and at the earth's surface, and to refine the process models which are used to develop advanced cloud parameterizations.

  18. Cloud-radiation interactions and their parameterization in climate models

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This report contains papers from the International Workshop on Cloud-Radiation Interactions and Their Parameterization in Climate Models met on 18--20 October 1993 in Camp Springs, Maryland, USA. It was organized by the Joint Working Group on Clouds and Radiation of the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences. Recommendations were grouped into three broad areas: (1) general circulation models (GCMs), (2) satellite studies, and (3) process studies. Each of the panels developed recommendations on the. themes of the workshop. Explicitly or implicitly, each panel independently recommended observations of basic cloud microphysical properties (water content, phase, size) on the scales resolved by GCMs. Such observations are necessary to validate cloud parameterizations in GCMs, to use satellite data to infer radiative forcing in the atmosphere and at the earth`s surface, and to refine the process models which are used to develop advanced cloud parameterizations.

  19. Atmospheric transmittance model for photosynthetically active radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulescu, Marius; Stefu, Nicoleta; Gravila, Paul; Paulescu, Eugenia; Boata, Remus; Pacurar, Angel; Mares, Oana; Pop, Nicolina; Calinoiu, Delia

    2013-11-13

    A parametric model of the atmospheric transmittance in the PAR band is presented. The model can be straightforwardly applied for calculating the beam, diffuse and global components of the PAR solar irradiance. The required inputs are: air pressure, ozone, water vapor and nitrogen dioxide column content, Ångström's turbidity coefficient and single scattering albedo. Comparison with other models and ground measured data shows a reasonable level of accuracy for this model, making it suitable for practical applications. From the computational point of view the calculus is condensed into simple algebra which is a noticeable advantage. For users interested in speed-intensive computation of the effective PAR solar irradiance, a PC program based on the parametric equations along with a user guide are available online at http://solar.physics.uvt.ro/srms.

  20. Wayward Field Lines Challenge Solar Radiation Models

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video compares the two models for particle distribution over the course of just three hours after an SEP event. The white line represents a magnetic field line, the general path that the SEPs ...

  1. Radiative transfer modeling of surface chemical deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2016-05-01

    Remote detection of a surface-bound chemical relies on the recognition of a pattern, or "signature," that is distinct from the background. Such signatures are a function of a chemical's fundamental optical properties, but also depend upon its specific morphology. Importantly, the same chemical can exhibit vastly different signatures depending on the size of particles composing the deposit. We present a parameterized model to account for such morphological effects on surface-deposited chemical signatures. This model leverages computational tools developed within the planetary and atmospheric science communities, beginning with T-matrix and ray-tracing approaches for evaluating the scattering and extinction properties of individual particles based on their size and shape, and the complex refractive index of the material itself. These individual-particle properties then serve as input to the Ambartsumian invariant imbedding solution for the reflectance of a particulate surface composed of these particles. The inputs to the model include parameters associated with a functionalized form of the particle size distribution (PSD) as well as parameters associated with the particle packing density and surface roughness. The model is numerically inverted via Sandia's Dakota package, optimizing agreement between modeled and measured reflectance spectra, which we demonstrate on data acquired on five size-selected silica powders over the 4-16 μm wavelength range. Agreements between modeled and measured reflectance spectra are assessed, while the optimized PSDs resulting from the spectral fitting are then compared to PSD data acquired from independent particle size measurements.

  2. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  3. 1-D Radiative-Convective Model for Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Cecilia W. S.; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a one dimensional radiative-convective model to study the thermal structure of terrestrial exoplanetary atmospheres. The radiative transfer and equilibrium chemistry in our model is based on similar methodologies in models used for studying Extrasolar Giant Planets (Fortney et al. 2005b.) We validated our model in the optically thin and thick limits, and compared our pressure-temperature profiles against the analytical solutions of Robinson & Catling (2012). For extrasolar terrestrial planets with pure hydrogen atmospheres, we evaluated the effects of H2-H2 collision induced absorption and identified the purely roto-translational band in our modeled spectra. We also examined how enhanced atmospheric metallicities affect the temperature structure, chemistry, and spectra of terrestrial exoplanets. For a terrestrial extrasolar planet whose atmospheric compostion is 100 times solar orbiting a sun-like star at 2 AU, our model resulted in a reducing atmosphere with H2O, CH4, and NH3 as the dominant greenhouse gases.

  4. Radiation Hydrodynamics Modeling of Hohlraum Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Mauche, Christopher W.; Jones, Ogden S.; Scott, Howard A.

    2015-11-01

    Attempts to model the energetics in NIF Hohlraums have been made with varying degrees of success, with discrepancies of 0-25% being reported for the X-ray flux (10-25% for the NIC ignition platform hohlraums). To better understand the cause(s) of these discrepancies, the effects of uncertainties in modeling thermal conduction, laser-plasma interactions, atomic mixing at interfaces, and NLTE kinetics of the high-Z wall plasma must be quantified. In this work we begin by focusing on the NLTE kinetics component. We detail a simulation framework for developing an integrated HYDRA hohlraum model with predefined tolerances for energetics errors due to numerical discretization errors or statistical fluctuations. Within this framework we obtain a model for a converged 1D spherical hohlraum which is then extended to 2D. The new model is used to reexamine physics sensitivities and improve estimates of the energetics discrepancy. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Parametric plate-bridge dynamic filter model of violin radiativity.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid, deterministic-statistical, parametric "dynamic filter" model of the violin's radiativity profile [characterized by an averaged-over-sphere, mean-square radiativity (R(ω)(2))] is developed based on the premise that acoustic radiation depends on (1) how strongly it vibrates [characterized by the averaged-over-corpus, mean-square mobility (Y(ω)(2))] and (2) how effectively these vibrations are turned into sound, characterized by the radiation efficiency, which is proportional to (R(ω)(2))/(Y(ω)(2)). Two plate mode frequencies were used to compute 1st corpus bending mode frequencies using empirical trend lines; these corpus bending modes in turn drive cavity volume flows to excite the two lowest cavity modes A0 and A1. All widely-separated, strongly-radiating corpus and cavity modes in the low frequency deterministic region are then parameterized in a dual-Helmholtz resonator model. Mid-high frequency statistical regions are parameterized with the aid of a distributed-excitation statistical mobility function (no bridge) to help extract bridge filter effects associated with (a) bridge rocking mode frequency changes and (b) bridge-corpus interactions from 14-violin-average, excited-via-bridge (Y(ω)(2)) and (R(ω)(2)). Deterministic-statistical regions are rejoined at ~630 Hz in a mobility-radiativity "trough" where all violin quality classes had a common radiativity. Simulations indicate that typical plate tuning has a significantly weaker effect on radiativity profile trends than bridge tuning. PMID:22779493

  6. Radiation Background and Attenuation Model Validation and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Douglas E.; Santiago, Claudio P.

    2015-08-05

    This report describes the initial results of a study being conducted as part of the Urban Search Planning Tool project. The study is comparing the Urban Scene Simulator (USS), a one-dimensional (1D) radiation transport model developed at LLNL, with the three-dimensional (3D) radiation transport model from ORNL using the MCNP, SCALE/ORIGEN and SCALE/MAVRIC simulation codes. In this study, we have analyzed the differences between the two approaches at every step, from source term representation, to estimating flux and detector count rates at a fixed distance from a simple surface (slab), and at points throughout more complex 3D scenes.

  7. Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Patrinos, A.A. ); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. ); Ellingson, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

  8. Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Patrinos, A.A.; Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M.; Ellingson, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

  9. Accurate spectral modeling for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Gupta, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    Direct line-by-line integration and quasi-random band model techniques are employed to calculate the spectral transmittance and total band absorptance of 4.7 micron CO, 4.3 micron CO2, 15 micron CO2, and 5.35 micron NO bands. Results are obtained for different pressures, temperatures, and path lengths. These are compared with available theoretical and experimental investigations. For each gas, extensive tabulations of results are presented for comparative purposes. In almost all cases, line-by-line results are found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental values. The range of validity of other models and correlations are discussed.

  10. Nonequilibrium radiation and chemistry models for aerocapture vehicle flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1994-01-01

    The primary accomplishments of the project were as follows: (1) From an overall standpoint, the primary accomplishment of this research was the development of a complete gasdynamic-radiatively coupled nonequilibrium viscous shock layer solution method for axisymmetric blunt bodies. This method can be used for rapid engineering modeling of nonequilibrium re-entry flowfields over a wide range of conditions. (2) Another significant accomplishment was the development of an air radiation model that included local thermodynamic nonequilibrium (LTNE) phenomena. (3) As part of this research, three electron-electronic energy models were developed. The first was a quasi-equilibrium electron (QEE) model which determined an effective free electron temperature and assumed that the electronic states were in equilibrium with the free electrons. The second was a quasi-equilibrium electron-electronic (QEEE) model which computed an effective electron-electronic temperature. The third model was a full electron-electronic (FEE) differential equation model which included convective, collisional, viscous, conductive, vibrational coupling, and chemical effects on electron-electronic energy. (4) Since vibration-dissociation coupling phenomena as well as vibrational thermal nonequilibrium phenomena are important in the nonequilibrium zone behind a shock front, a vibrational energy and vibration-dissociation coupling model was developed and included in the flowfield model. This model was a modified coupled vibrational dissociation vibrational (MCVDV) model and also included electron-vibrational coupling. (5) Another accomplishment of the project was the usage of the developed models to investigate radiative heating. (6) A multi-component diffusion model which properly models the multi-component nature of diffusion in complex gas mixtures such as air, was developed and incorporated into the blunt body model. (7) A model was developed to predict the magnitude and characteristics of the shock

  11. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures. PMID:26581473

  12. Radiative heating in global climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, F.; Arsky, N.; Rocque, K.

    1996-04-01

    LWR algorithms from various GCMs vary significantly from one another for the same clear sky input data. This variability becomes pronounced when clouds are included. We demonstrate this effect by intercomparing the various models` output using observed data including clouds from ARM/CART data taken in Oklahoma.

  13. Radiative transfer model for contaminated rough slabs.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, François; Douté, Sylvain; Schmidt, Frédéric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    We present a semi-analytical model to simulate the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a rough slab layer containing impurities. This model has been optimized for fast computation in order to analyze massive hyperspectral data by a Bayesian approach. We designed it for planetary surface ice studies but it could be used for other purposes. It estimates the bidirectional reflectance of a rough slab of material containing inclusions, overlaying an optically thick media (semi-infinite media or stratified media, for instance granular material). The inclusions are assumed to be close to spherical and constituted of any type of material other than the ice matrix. It can be any other type of ice, mineral, or even bubbles defined by their optical constants. We assume a low roughness and we consider the geometrical optics conditions. This model is thus applicable for inclusions larger than the considered wavelength. The scattering on the inclusions is assumed to be isotropic. This model has a fast computation implementation and thus is suitable for high-resolution hyperspectral data analysis. PMID:26560577

  14. A biokinetic model for zinc for use in radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of the essential trace element zinc has been studied extensively in human subjects using kinetic analysis of time-dependent measurements of administered zinc tracers. A number of biokinetic models describing zinc exchange between plasma and tissues and loss of systemic zinc in excreta have been developed from the derived data. More rudimentary biokinetic models for zinc have been developed to estimate radiation doses from internally deposited radioisotopes of zinc. The latter models are designed to provide broadly accurate estimates of cumulative decays of zinc radioisotopes in tissues and are not intended as realistic descriptions of the directions of movement of zinc in the body. This paper reviews biokinetic data for zinc and proposes a physiologically meaningful biokinetic model for systemic zinc for use in radiation protection. The proposed model bears some resemblance to zinc models developed in physiological studies but depicts a finer division of systemic zinc and is based on a broader spectrum of data than previous models. The proposed model and current radiation protection model for zinc yield broadly similar estimates of effective dose from internally deposited radioisotopes of zinc but substantially different dose estimates for several individual tissues, particularly the liver.

  15. Treatment of an actual slaughterhouse wastewater by integration of biological and advanced oxidation processes: Modeling, optimization, and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Bustillo-Lecompte, Ciro Fernando; Mehrvar, Mehrab

    2016-11-01

    Biological and advanced oxidation processes are combined to treat an actual slaughterhouse wastewater (SWW) by a sequence of an anaerobic baffled reactor, an aerobic activated sludge reactor, and a UV/H2O2 photoreactor with recycle in continuous mode at laboratory scale. In the first part of this study, quadratic modeling along with response surface methodology are used for the statistical analysis and optimization of the combined process. The effects of the influent total organic carbon (TOC) concentration, the flow rate, the pH, the inlet H2O2 concentration, and their interaction on the overall treatment efficiency, CH4 yield, and H2O2 residual in the effluent of the photoreactor are investigated. The models are validated at different operating conditions using experimental data. Maximum TOC and total nitrogen (TN) removals of 91.29 and 86.05%, respectively, maximum CH4 yield of 55.72%, and minimum H2O2 residual of 1.45% in the photoreactor effluent were found at optimal operating conditions. In the second part of this study, continuous distribution kinetics is applied to establish a mathematical model for the degradation of SWW as a function of time. The agreement between model predictions and experimental values indicates that the proposed model could describe the performance of the combined anaerobic-aerobic-UV/H2O2 processes for the treatment of SWW. In the final part of the study, the optimized combined anaerobic-aerobic-UV/H2O2 processes with recycle were evaluated using a cost-effectiveness analysis to minimize the retention time, the electrical energy consumption, and the overall incurred treatment costs required for the efficient treatment of slaughterhouse wastewater effluents. PMID:27568982

  16. Assessing the impact of end-member selection on the accuracy of satellite-based spatial variability models for actual evapotranspiration estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Di; Singh, Vijay P.

    2013-05-01

    This study examines the impact of end-member (i.e., hot and cold extremes) selection on the performance and mechanisms of error propagation in satellite-based spatial variability models for estimating actual evapotranspiration, using the triangle, surface energy balance algorithm for land (SEBAL), and mapping evapotranspiration with high resolution and internalized calibration (METRIC) models. These models were applied to the soil moisture-atmosphere coupling experiment site in central Iowa on two Landsat Thematic Mapper/Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus acquisition dates in 2002. Evaporative fraction (EF, defined as the ratio of latent heat flux to availability energy) estimates from the three models at field and watershed scales were examined using varying end-members. Results show that the end-members fundamentally determine the magnitudes of EF retrievals at both field and watershed scales. The hot and cold extremes exercise a similar impact on the discrepancy between the EF estimates and the ground-based measurements, i.e., given a hot (cold) extreme, the EF estimates tend to increase with increasing temperature of cold (hot) extreme, and decrease with decreasing temperature of cold (hot) extreme. The coefficient of determination between the EF estimates and the ground-based measurements depends principally on the capability of remotely sensed surface temperature (Ts) to capture EF (i.e., depending on the correlation between Ts and EF measurements), being slightly influenced by the end-members. Varying the end-members does not substantially affect the standard deviation and skewness of the EF frequency distributions from the same model at the watershed scale. However, different models generate markedly different EF frequency distributions due to differing model physics, especially the limiting edges of EF defined in the remotely sensed vegetation fraction (fc) and Ts space. In general, the end-members cannot be properly determined because (1) they do not

  17. Infrared radiation parameterizations in numerical climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Kratz, David P.; Ridgway, William

    1991-01-01

    This study presents various approaches to parameterizing the broadband transmission functions for utilization in numerical climate models. One-parameter scaling is applied to approximate a nonhomogeneous path with an equivalent homogeneous path, and the diffuse transmittances are either interpolated from precomputed tables or fit by analytical functions. Two-parameter scaling is applied to parameterizing the carbon dioxide and ozone transmission functions in both the lower and middle atmosphere. Parameterizations are given for the nitrous oxide and methane diffuse transmission functions.

  18. Method for modeling radiative transport in luminescent particulate media.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael D; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; Kaminski, Deborah A

    2016-04-20

    Modeling radiative transport in luminescent particulate media is important to a variety of applications, from biomedical imaging to solar power harvesting. When absorption and scattering from individual particles must be considered, the description of radiative transport is not straightforward. For large particles and interparticle spacing, geometrical optics can be employed. However, this approach requires accurate knowledge of several particle properties, such as index of refraction and absorption coefficient, along with particle geometry and positioning. Because the determination of these variables is often nontrivial, we developed an approach for modeling radiative transport in such media, which combines two simple experiments with Monte Carlo simulations to determine the particle extinction coefficient (Γ) and the probability of absorption of light by a particle (PA). The method is validated on samples consisting of luminescent phosphor powder dispersed in a silicone matrix. PMID:27140095

  19. Biological-Based Modeling of Low Dose Radiation Risks

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Bobby R., Ph.D.

    2006-11-08

    The objective of this project was to refine a biological-based model (called NEOTRANS2) for low-dose, radiation-induced stochastic effects taking into consideration newly available data, including data on bystander effects (deleterious and protective). The initial refinement led to our NEOTRANS3 model which has undergone further refinement (e.g., to allow for differential DNA repair/apoptosis over different dose regions). The model has been successfully used to explain nonlinear dose-response curves for low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation-induced mutations (in vivo) and neoplastic transformation (in vitro). Relative risk dose-response functions developed for neoplastic transformation have been adapted for application to cancer relative risk evaluation for irradiated humans. Our low-dose research along with that conducted by others collectively demonstrate the following regarding induced protection associated with exposure to low doses of low-LET radiation: (1) protects against cell killing by high-LET alpha particles; (2) protects against spontaneous chromosomal damage; (3) protects against spontaneous mutations and neoplastic transformations; (4) suppresses mutations induced by a large radiation dose even when the low dose is given after the large dose; (5) suppresses spontaneous and alpha-radiation-induced cancers; (6) suppresses metastasis of existing cancer; (7) extends tumor latent period; (8) protects against diseases other than cancer; and (9) extends life expectancy. These forms of radiation-induced protection are called adapted protection as they relate to induced adaptive response. Thus, low doses and dose rates of low-LET radiation generally protect rather than harm us. These findings invalidate the linear not threshold (LNT) hypothesis which is based on the premise that any amount of radiation is harmful irrespective of its type. The hypothesis also implicates a linear dose-response curve for cancer induction that has a positive slope and no

  20. Turbulence radiation interaction modeling in hydrocarbon pool fire simulations

    SciTech Connect

    BURNS,SHAWN P.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of turbulent fluctuations in temperature and species concentration in thermal radiation transport modeling for combustion applications is well accepted by the radiation transport and combustion communities. A number of experimental and theoretical studies over the last twenty years have shown that fluctuations in the temperature and species concentrations may increase the effective emittance of a turbulent flame by as much as 50% to 300% over the value that would be expected from the mean temperatures and concentrations. With the possibility of such a large effect on the principal mode of heat transfer from a fire, it is extremely important for fire modeling efforts that turbulence radiation interaction be well characterized and possible modeling approaches understood. Toward this end, this report seeks to accomplish three goals. First, the principal turbulence radiation interaction closure terms are defined. Second, an order of magnitude analysis is performed to understand the relative importance of the various closure terms. Finally, the state of the art in turbulence radiation interaction closure modeling is reviewed. Hydrocarbon pool fire applications are of particular interest in this report and this is the perspective from which this review proceeds. Experimental and theoretical analysis suggests that, for this type of heavily sooting flame, the turbulent radiation interaction effect is dominated by the nonlinear dependence of the Planck function on the temperature. Additional effects due to the correlation between turbulent fluctuations in the absorptivity and temperature may be small relative to the Planck function effect for heavily sooting flames. This observation is drawn from a number of experimental and theoretical discussions. Nevertheless, additional analysis and data is needed to validate this observation for heavily sooting buoyancy dominated plumes.

  1. Considering the oxygen effect: Further development of a volumetric model of tumor response to radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stephanie S.

    Mathematical modeling of tumor response to radiation therapy (RT) has great potential for designing therapy plans that are more personalized, more adaptive, and more reliable for outcome predictions. A preexisting model of tumor response to radiation therapy for cervical cancer has been shown to generate model parameters that correlate strongly with both tumor local control and disease-specific survival. This model is further developed through incorporation of another effect of RT not previously accounted for: the oxygen effect. An easily obtainable form of input data, hemoglobin level, enables simulation of the oxygen effect simultaneously with the other major model effects. For the Local Control (LC) patient group, the changes in the model parameters caused by incorporation of the oxygen effect are found to significantly improve the agreement of those parameters with actual patient data. For the Local Failure (LF) group and the overall patient group, the oxygen effect is incorporated without significant change to the agreement between the model-simulated output parameters and the actual patient data. Also, a strategy is presented for solving the main model equations to obtain analytic expressions for surviving cell fraction and regression volume ratio as functions of time.

  2. Nonequilibrium radiation and chemistry models for aerocapture vehicle flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1993-01-01

    The period from Jan. 1993 thru Aug. 1993 is covered. The primary tasks during this period were the development of a single and multi-vibrational temperature preferential vibration-dissociation coupling model, the development of a normal shock nonequilibrium radiation-gasdynamic coupling model based upon the blunt body model, and the comparison of results obtained with these models with experimental data. In addition, an extensive series of computations were conducted using the blunt body model to develop a set of reference results covering a wide range of vehicle sizes, altitudes, and entry velocities.

  3. Modelling spatial connectivity in epidemiological systems, dengue fever in Thailand on networks from radiation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stollenwerk, Nico; Götz, Thomas; Mateus, Luis; Wijaya, Putra; Willems, David; Skwara, Urszula; Marguta, Ramona; Ghaffari, Peyman; Aguiar, Maíra

    2016-06-01

    We model the connectivity between Thai provinces in terms of human mobility via a radiation model in order to describe dengue fever spreading in Thailand, for which long term epidemiological data are available.

  4. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations - II. Radiative models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembolini, Federico; Elahi, Pascal Jahan; Pearce, Frazer R.; Power, Chris; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T.; Cui, Weiguang; Yepes, Gustavo; Beck, Alexander M.; Borgani, Stefano; Cunnama, Daniel; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Giuseppe; Newton, Richard D. A.; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Saro, Alexandro; Schaye, Joop; Teyssier, Romain

    2016-07-01

    We have simulated the formation of a massive galaxy cluster (M_{200}^crit = 1.1 × 1015 h-1 M⊙) in a Λ cold dark matter universe using 10 different codes (RAMSES, 2 incarnations of AREPO and 7 of GADGET), modelling hydrodynamics with full radiative subgrid physics. These codes include smoothed-particle hydrodynamics (SPH), spanning traditional and advanced SPH schemes, adaptive mesh and moving mesh codes. Our goal is to study the consistency between simulated clusters modelled with different radiative physical implementations - such as cooling, star formation and thermal active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We compare images of the cluster at z = 0, global properties such as mass, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. We find that, with respect to non-radiative simulations, dark matter is more centrally concentrated, the extent not simply depending on the presence/absence of AGN feedback. The scatter in global quantities is substantially higher than for non-radiative runs. Intriguingly, adding radiative physics seems to have washed away the marked code-based differences present in the entropy profile seen for non-radiative simulations in Sembolini et al.: radiative physics + classic SPH can produce entropy cores, at least in the case of non cool-core clusters. Furthermore, the inclusion/absence of AGN feedback is not the dividing line -as in the case of describing the stellar content - for whether a code produces an unrealistic temperature inversion and a falling central entropy profile. However, AGN feedback does strongly affect the overall stellar distribution, limiting the effect of overcooling and reducing sensibly the stellar fraction.

  5. Solar Radiation Pressure and Attitude Modeling of GNSS Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Solano, C.; Hugentobler, U.; Steigenberger, P.

    2011-12-01

    The main non-gravitational orbit perturbation acting on GNSS satellites is the solar radiation pressure. There are two main approaches to model this force: 1) adjusting empirical parameters that fit best the GNSS tracking data, and 2) computing the a priori force from analytical models based on the detailed satellite structure and information available on ground. The first approach is not based on the physical interaction between solar radiation and the satellite, while the second one cannot be easily adjusted to the real on-orbit behaviour of the satellites, e.g., changes due to aging of optical properties or deviations from nominal attitude. We use here an intermediate approach, an analytical box-wing model based on the physical interaction between the solar radiation and a satellite consisting of a bus (box shape) and solar panels. Furthermore, some of the parameters of the box-wing model can be adjusted to fit the GNSS tracking data, namely the optical properties of the satellite surfaces. It was found that a pure box-wing model interacting with solar radiation is not sufficient for precise orbit determination. In particular a rotation lag angle of the solar panels was identified. This deviation of the solar panels from nominal attitude is a key factor to obtain precise GNSS orbits. Moreover, the yaw attitude of GNSS satellites during eclipse seasons deviates from nominal attitude due to maneuvers performed by the satellites. As mentioned in other studies, the phase measurements are degraded if these maneuvers are not taken into account since the modelled position of the navigation antenna may differ from the true position. In this study we focus on the impact of the yaw attitude on the solar radiation pressure parameters and the benefits for precise orbit determination and prediction.

  6. Nuclear model calculations and their role in space radiation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Heilbronn, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    Proper assessments of spacecraft shielding requirements and concomitant estimates of risk to spacecraft crews from energetic space radiation requires accurate, quantitative methods of characterizing the compositional changes in these radiation fields as they pass through thick absorbers. These quantitative methods are also needed for characterizing accelerator beams used in space radiobiology studies. Because of the impracticality/impossibility of measuring these altered radiation fields inside critical internal body organs of biological test specimens and humans, computational methods rather than direct measurements must be used. Since composition changes in the fields arise from nuclear interaction processes (elastic, inelastic and breakup), knowledge of the appropriate cross sections and spectra must be available. Experiments alone cannot provide the necessary cross section and secondary particle (neutron and charged particle) spectral data because of the large number of nuclear species and wide range of energies involved in space radiation research. Hence, nuclear models are needed. In this paper current methods of predicting total and absorption cross sections and secondary particle (neutrons and ions) yields and spectra for space radiation protection analyses are reviewed. Model shortcomings are discussed and future needs presented. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All right reserved.

  7. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily time scales. We also demonstrate that the ambient CO2 concentration influences daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  8. A Comparison of EAST Shock-Tube Radiation Measurements with a New Air Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Christopher O.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between the recent EAST shock tube radiation measurements (Grinstead et al., AIAA 2008-1244) and the HARA radiation model. The equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation measurements are studied for conditions relevant to lunar-return shock-layers; specifically shock velocities ranging from 9 to 11 kilometers per second at initial pressures of 0.1 and 0.3 Torr. The simulated shock-tube flow is assumed one-dimensional and is calculated using the LAURA code, while a detailed nonequilibrium radiation prediction is obtained in an uncoupled manner from the HARA code. The measured and predicted intensities are separated into several spectral ranges to isolate significant spectral features, mainly strong atomic line multiplets. The equations and physical data required for the prediction of these strong atomic lines are reviewed and their uncertainties identified. The 700-1020 nm wavelength range, which accounts for roughly 30% of the radiative flux to a peak-heating lunar return shock-layer, is studied in detail and the measurements and predictions are shown to agree within 15% in equilibrium. The plus or minus 1.5% uncertainty on the measured shock velocity is shown to cause up to a plus or minus 30% difference in the predicted radiation. This band of predictions contains the measured values in almost all cases. For the highly nonequilibrium 0.1 Torr cases, the nonequilibrium radiation peaks are under-predicted by about half. This under-prediction is considered acceptable when compared to the order-of-magnitude over-prediction obtained using a Boltzmann population of electronic states. The reasonable comparison in the nonequilibrium regions provides validation for both the non-Boltzmann modeling in HARA and the thermochemical nonequilibrium modeling in LAURA. The N2 (+)(1-) and N2(2+) molecular band systems are studied in the 290 480 nm wavelength range for both equilibrium and nonequilibrium regimes. The non-Boltzmann rate models for these

  9. Solid rocket booster thermal radiation model. Volume 2: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    A user's manual was prepared for the computer program of a solid rocket booster (SRB) thermal radiation model. The following information was included: (1) structure of the program, (2) input information required, (3) examples of input cards and output printout, (4) program characteristics, and (5) program listing.

  10. Radiation therapy: model standards for determination of need

    SciTech Connect

    Lagasse, L.G.; Devins, T.B.

    1982-03-01

    Contents: Health planning process; Health care requirements (model for projecting need for megavoltage radiation therapy); Operational objectives (manpower, megavoltage therapy and treatment planning equipment, support services, management and evaluation of patient care, organization and administration); Compliance with other standards imposed by law; Financial feasibility and capability; Reasonableness of expenditures and costs; Relative merit; Environmental impact.

  11. Radiative breaking of conformal symmetry in the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, A. B.; Nazmitdinov, R. G.; Pavlov, A. E.; Pervushin, V. N.; Zakharov, A. F.

    2016-02-01

    Radiative mechanism of conformal symmetry breaking in a comformal-invariant version of the Standard Model is considered. The Coleman-Weinberg mechanism of dimensional transmutation in this system gives rise to finite vacuum expectation values and, consequently, masses of scalar and spinor fields. A natural bootstrap between the energy scales of the top quark and Higgs boson is suggested.

  12. Radiation effects in a model ceramic for nuclear waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.

    2007-04-01

    The safe immobilization of nuclear waste in geological repositories is one of the major scientific challenges facing humanity today. Crystalline ceramics hold the promise of locking up actinides from nuclear fuel and excess weapons plutonium in their structure thereby isolating them from the environment. This paper presents the atomistic details of radiation damage in a model ceramic, zircon.

  13. A new Mars radiation environment model with visualization.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, G; Clowdsley, M S; Singleterry, R C; Wilson, J W

    2004-01-01

    A new model for the radiation environment to be found on the planet Mars due to Galactic Cosmic Rays (OCR) has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Solar modulated primary particles rescaled for Mars conditions are transported through the Martian atmosphere, with temporal properties modeled with variable timescales, down to the surface, with altitude and backscattering patterns taken into account. The Martian atmosphere has been modeled by using the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model--version 2001 (Mars-GRAM 2001). The altitude to compute the atmospheric thickness profile has been determined by using a model for the topography based on the data provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. The Mars surface composition has been modeled based on averages over the measurements obtained from orbiting spacecraft and at various landing sites, taking into account the possible volatile inventory (e.g., CO2 ice, H2O ice) along with its time variation throughout the Martian year. Particle transport has been performed with the HZETRN heavy ion code. The Mars Radiation Environment Model has been made available worldwide through the Space Ionizing Radiation Effects and Shielding Tools (SIREST) website, a project of NASA Langley Research Center.

  14. Simple classical model for Fano statistics in radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, David V.; Renholds, Andrea S.; Jaffe, John E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; René Corrales, L.; Peurrung, Anthony J.

    2008-02-01

    A simple classical model that captures the essential statistics of energy partitioning processes involved in the creation of information carriers (ICs) in radiation detectors is presented. The model pictures IC formation from a fixed amount of deposited energy in terms of the statistically analogous process of successively sampling water from a large, finite-volume container ("bathtub") with a small dipping implement ("shot or whiskey glass"). The model exhibits sub-Poisson variance in the distribution of the number of ICs generated (the "Fano effect"). Elementary statistical analysis of the model clarifies the role of energy conservation in producing the Fano effect and yields Fano's prescription for computing the relative variance of the IC number distribution in terms of the mean and variance of the underlying, single-IC energy distribution. The partitioning model is applied to the development of the impact ionization cascade in semiconductor radiation detectors. It is shown that, in tandem with simple assumptions regarding the distribution of energies required to create an (electron, hole) pair, the model yields an energy-independent Fano factor of 0.083, in accord with the lower end of the range of literature values reported for silicon and high-purity germanium. The utility of this simple picture as a diagnostic tool for guiding or constraining more detailed, "microscopic" physical models of detector material response to ionizing radiation is discussed.

  15. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  16. A new Mars radiation environment model with visualization.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, G; Clowdsley, M S; Singleterry, R C; Wilson, J W

    2004-01-01

    A new model for the radiation environment to be found on the planet Mars due to Galactic Cosmic Rays (OCR) has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Solar modulated primary particles rescaled for Mars conditions are transported through the Martian atmosphere, with temporal properties modeled with variable timescales, down to the surface, with altitude and backscattering patterns taken into account. The Martian atmosphere has been modeled by using the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model--version 2001 (Mars-GRAM 2001). The altitude to compute the atmospheric thickness profile has been determined by using a model for the topography based on the data provided by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. The Mars surface composition has been modeled based on averages over the measurements obtained from orbiting spacecraft and at various landing sites, taking into account the possible volatile inventory (e.g., CO2 ice, H2O ice) along with its time variation throughout the Martian year. Particle transport has been performed with the HZETRN heavy ion code. The Mars Radiation Environment Model has been made available worldwide through the Space Ionizing Radiation Effects and Shielding Tools (SIREST) website, a project of NASA Langley Research Center. PMID:15880920

  17. A new dynamical atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) model for epidemiological studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Angelis, G.; Clem, J. M.; Goldhagen, P. E.; Wilson, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    A new Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) model is currently being developed for use in radiation dose evaluation in epidemiological studies targeted to atmospheric flight personnel such as civilian airlines crewmembers. The model will allow computing values for biologically relevant parameters, e.g. dose equivalent and effective dose, for individual flights from 1945. Each flight is described by its actual three dimensional flight profile, i.e. geographic coordinates and altitudes varying with time. Solar modulated primary particles are filtered with a new analytical fully angular dependent geomagnetic cut off rigidity model, as a function of latitude, longitude, arrival direction, altitude and time. The particle transport results have been obtained with a technique based on the three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport code FLUKA, with a special procedure to deal with HZE particles. Particle fluxes are transformed into dose-related quantities and then integrated all along the flight path to obtain the overall flight dose. Preliminary validations of the particle transport technique using data from the AIR Project ER-2 flight campaign of measurements are encouraging. Future efforts will deal with modeling of the effects of the aircraft structure as well as inclusion of solar particle events. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  18. Geometric Modeling, Radiation Simulation, Rendering, Analysis Package

    1995-01-17

    RADIANCE is intended to aid lighting designers and architects by predicting the light levels and appearance of a space prior to construction. The package includes programs for modeling and translating scene geometry, luminaire data and material properties, all of which are needed as input to the simulation. The lighting simulation itself uses ray tracing techniques to compute radiance values (ie. the quantity of light passing through a specific point in a specific direction), which aremore » typically arranged to form a photographic quality image. The resulting image may be analyzed, displayed and manipulated within the package, and converted to other popular image file formats for export to other packages, facilitating the production of hard copy output.« less

  19. Phenomenological modelling of second cancer incidence for radiation treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Pfaffenberger, Asja; Schneider, Uwe; Poppe, Björn; Oelfke, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    It is still an unanswered question whether a relatively low dose of radiation to a large volume or a higher dose to a small volume produces the higher cancer incidence. This is of interest in view of modalities like IMRT or rotation therapy where high conformity to the target volume is achieved at the cost of a large volume of normal tissue exposed to radiation. Knowledge of the shape of the dose response for radiation-induced cancer is essential to answer the question of what risk of second cancer incidence is implied by which treatment modality. This study therefore models the dose response for radiation-induced second cancer after radiation therapy of which the exact mechanisms are still unknown. A second cancer risk estimation tool for treatment planning is presented which has the potential to be used for comparison of different treatment modalities, and risk is estimated on a voxel basis for different organs in two case studies. The presented phenomenological model summarises the impact of microscopic biological processes into effective parameters of mutation and cell sterilisation. In contrast to other models, the effective radiosensitivities of mutated and non-mutated cells are allowed to differ. Based on the number of mutated cells present after irradiation, the model is then linked to macroscopic incidence by summarising model parameters and modifying factors into natural cancer incidence and the dose response in the lower-dose region. It was found that all principal dose-response functions discussed in the literature can be derived from the model. However, from the investigation and due to scarcity of adequate data, rather vague statements about likelihood of dose-response functions can be made than a definite decision for one response. Based on the predicted model parameters, the linear response can probably be rejected using the dynamics described, but both a flattening response and a decrease appear likely, depending strongly on the effective cell

  20. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-10-31

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: 1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and 2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  1. Anatomical models for space radiation applications: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwell, W.

    1994-10-01

    Extremely detailed computerized anatomical male (CAM) and female (CAF) models that have been developed for use in space radiation analyses are discussed and reviewed. Recognizing that the level of detail may currently be inadequate for certain radiological applications, one of the purposes of this paper is to elicit specific model improvements or requirements from the scientific user-community. Methods and rationale are presented which describe the approach used in the Space Shuttle program to extrapolate dosimetry measurements (skin doses) to realistic astronaut body organ doses. Several mission scenarios are presented which demonstrate the utility of the anatomical models for obtaining specific body organ exposure estimates and can be used for establishing cancer morbidity and mortality risk assessments. These exposure estimates are based on the trapped Van Allen belt and galactic cosmic radiation environment models and data from the major historical solar particle events.

  2. Post-workshop models of Jupiter's radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divine, N.

    1972-01-01

    Models for the charged particle populations of Jupiter's trapped radiation belts were derived at the Jupiter Radiation Belt Workshop on the basis of several assumptions which represented a consensus of opinion. It was possible to improve the models on the basis of work performed after the workshop concluded. These improvements affect the models in two ways. The effects of special relativity on the particle energy and flux dependences in the magnetosphere were included in a derivation based on L-shell diffusion with conservation of the magnetic moment. Quantitative conclusions are available for the limit which ion cyclotron instability places on the proton population. A set of models which incorporates these developments in a way consistent with the original workshop assumptions and conclusions is described.

  3. New Modeling Approaches to Investigate Cell Signaling in Radiation Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem L.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation damages individual cells and tissues leading to harmful biological effects. Among many radiation-induced lesions, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are considered the key precursors of most early and late effects [1] leading to direct mutation or aberrant signal transduction processes. In response to damage, a flow of information is communicated to cells not directly hit by the radiation through signal transduction pathways [2]. Non-targeted effects (NTE), which includes bystander effects and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells and tissues, may be particularly important for space radiation risk assessment [1], because astronauts are exposed to a low fluence of heavy ions and only a small fraction of cells are traversed by an ion. NTE may also have important consequences clinical radiotherapy [3]. In the recent years, new simulation tools and modeling approaches have become available to study the tissue response to radiation. The simulation of signal transduction pathways require many elements such as detailed track structure calculations, a tissue or cell culture model, knowledge of biochemical pathways and Brownian Dynamics (BD) propagators of the signaling molecules in their micro-environment. Recently, the Monte-Carlo simulation code of radiation track structure RITRACKS was used for micro and nano-dosimetry calculations [4]. RITRACKS will be used to calculate the fraction of cells traversed by an ion and delta-rays and the energy deposited in cells in a tissue model. RITRACKS also simulates the formation of chemical species by the radiolysis of water [5], notably the .OH radical. This molecule is implicated in DNA damage and in the activation of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF), a signaling molecule involved in NTE. BD algorithms for a particle near a membrane comprising receptors were also developed and will be used to simulate trajectories of signaling molecules in the micro-environment and characterize autocrine

  4. A Fast Infrared Radiative Transfer Model for Overlapping Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Jianguo; Yang, Ping; Huang, Huang-Lung; Davies, James E.; Li, Jun; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.

    2006-01-01

    A fast infrared radiative transfer model (FIRTM2) appropriate for application to both single-layered and overlapping cloud situations is developed for simulating the outgoing infrared spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In FIRTM2 a pre-computed library of cloud reflectance and transmittance values is employed to account for one or two cloud layers, whereas the background atmospheric optical thickness due to gaseous absorption can be computed from a clear-sky radiative transfer model. FIRTM2 is applicable to three atmospheric conditions: 1) clear-sky, 2) single-layered ice or water cloud, and 3) two simultaneous cloud layers in a column (e.g., ice cloud overlying water cloud). Moreover, FIRTM2 outputs the derivatives (i.e., Jacobians) of the TOA brightness temperature with respect to cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out to assess the performance of FIRTM2 for two spectral regions, namely the longwave (LW) band (587.3 - 1179.5/cm) and the short-to-medium wave (SMW) band (1180.1 - 2228.9/cm). The assessment is carried out in terms of brightness temperature differences (BTD) between FIRTM2 and the well-known discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT), henceforth referred to as BTD (F-D). The BTD (F-D) values for single-layered clouds are generally less than 0.8 K. For the case of two cloud layers (specifically ice cloud over water cloud), the BTD(F-D) values are also generally less than 0.8 K except for the SMW band for the case of a very high altitude (>15 km) cloud comprised of small ice particles. Note that for clear-sky atmospheres, FIRTM2 reduces to the clear-sky radiative transfer model that is incorporated into FIRTM2, and the errors in this case are essentially those of the clear-sky radiative transfer model.

  5. Analytic model of an IR radiation heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Pamela J.

    1990-01-01

    An IR radiation heat pipe made from multilayer insulation blankets and proposed to be used aboard spacecraft to transfer waste heat was modeled analytically. A circular cross section pipe 9-in. in diameter, 10-ft long, with a specular reflectivity of 0.94 was found to have an efficiency of 58.6 percent. Several key parameters were varied for the circular model to understand their significance. In addition, square and triangular cross section pipes were investigated.

  6. Collisional Radiative Models for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartgers, Bart; van Dijk, Jan; van der Mullen, Joost

    1999-10-01

    Collisional Radiative models are a useful tool for studying plasmas. In their simplest form, they are used to calculate an atomic state distribution function (ASDF) from given electron and neutral densities and an electron temperature. Additionally, global ionization and recombination coefficients can be calculated as a function of electron density and temperature. In turn, these coefficients are used as input for the general plasma model

  7. Signal Processing Model for Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H

    2008-07-28

    This note describes the design of a simplified gamma ray transport model for use in designing a sequential Bayesian signal processor for low-count detection and classification. It uses a simple one-dimensional geometry to describe the emitting source, shield effects, and detector (see Fig. 1). At present, only Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption are implemented for the shield and the detector. Other effects may be incorporated in the future by revising the expressions for the probabilities of escape and absorption. Pair production would require a redesign of the simulator to incorporate photon correlation effects. The initial design incorporates the physical effects that were present in the previous event mode sequence simulator created by Alan Meyer. The main difference is that this simulator transports the rate distributions instead of single photons. Event mode sequences and other time-dependent photon flux sequences are assumed to be marked Poisson processes that are entirely described by their rate distributions. Individual realizations can be constructed from the rate distribution using a random Poisson point sequence generator.

  8. Absorption of solar radiation by clouds: observations versus models.

    PubMed

    Cess, R D; Zhang, M H; Minnis, P; Corsetti, L; Dutton, E G; Forgan, B W; Garber, D P; Gates, W L; Hack, J J; Harrison, E F; Jing, X; Kiehi, J T; Long, C N; Morcrette, J J; Potter, G L; Ramanathan, V; Subasilar, B; Whitlock, C H; Young, D F; Zhou, Y

    1995-01-27

    There has been a long history of unexplained anomalous absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Collocated satellite and surface measurements of solar radiation at five geographically diverse locations showed significant solar absorption by clouds, resulting in about 25 watts per square meter more global-mean absorption by the cloudy atmosphere than predicted by theoretical models. It has often been suggested that tropospheric aerosols could increase cloud absorption. But these aerosols are temporally and spatially heterogeneous, whereas the observed cloud absorption is remarkably invariant with respect to season and location. Although its physical cause is unknown, enhanced cloud absorption substantially alters our understanding of the atmosphere's energy budget.

  9. Absorption of Solar Radiation by Clouds: Observations Versus Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, M. H.; Minnis, P.; Corsetti, L.; Dutton, E. G.; Forgan, B. W.; Garber, D. P.; Gates, W. L.; Hack, J. J.; Harrison, E. F.; Jing, X.; Kiehl, J. T.; Long, C. N.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Potter, G. L.; Ramanathan, V.; Subasilar, B.; Whitlock, C. H.; Young, D. F.; Zhou, Y.

    1995-01-01

    There has been a long history of unexplained anomalous absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Collocated satellite and surface measurements of solar radiation at five geographically diverse locations showed significant solar absorption by clouds, resulting in about 25 watts per square meter more global-mean absorption by the cloudy atmosphere than predicted by theoretical models. It has often been suggested that tropospheric aerosols could increase cloud absorption. But these aerosols are temporally and spatially heterogeneous, whereas the observed cloud absorption is remarkably invariant with respect to season and location. Although its physical cause is unknown, enhanced cloud absorption substantially alters our understanding of the atmosphere's energy budget.

  10. Solid rocket booster thermal radiation model, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, G. H.; Lee, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    A solid rocket booster (SRB) thermal radiation model, capable of defining the influence of the plume flowfield structure on the magnitude and distribution of thermal radiation leaving the plume, was prepared and documented. Radiant heating rates may be calculated for a single SRB plume or for the dual SRB plumes astride the space shuttle. The plumes may be gimbaled in the yaw and pitch planes. Space shuttle surface geometries are simulated with combinations of quadric surfaces. The effect of surface shading is included. The computer program also has the capability to calculate view factors between the SRB plumes and space shuttle surfaces as well as surface-to-surface view factors.

  11. Modeling and Control of the Automated Radiator Inspection Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Darren

    1991-01-01

    Many of the operations performed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are dangerous and repetitive tasks which make them ideal candidates for robotic applications. For one specific application, KSC is currently in the process of designing and constructing a robot called the Automated Radiator Inspection Device (ARID), to inspect the radiator panels on the orbiter. The following aspects of the ARID project are discussed: modeling of the ARID; design of control algorithms; and nonlinear based simulation of the ARID. Recommendations to assist KSC personnel in the successful completion of the ARID project are given.

  12. Simple classical model for Fano statistics in radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Renholds, Andrea S.; Jaffe, John E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Corrales, L. Rene; Peurrung, Anthony J.

    2008-02-01

    A simple classical model that captures the essential statistics of energy partitioning processes involved in the creation of information carriers (ICs) in radiation detectors is presented. The model pictures IC formation from a fixed amount of deposited energy in terms of the statistically analogous process of successively sampling water from a large, finite-volume container (“bathtub”) with a small dipping implement (“shot glass”). The model exhibits sub-Poisson variance in the distribution of the number of ICs generated (the “Fano e_ect”). Elementary statistical analysis of the model clarifies the role of energy conservation in producing the Fano e_ect and yields Fano’s prescription for relating the IC number distribution to the mean and variance of the underlying IC energy distribution. The connection between the model and energy partitioning in semiconductor radiation detectors is illustrated, and the implications of this simple picture for guiding or constraining more detailed, “microscopic” physical models of detector material response to ionizing radiation are discussed.

  13. Freezable Radiator Model Correlation and Full Scale Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean T.; Navarro, Moses

    2010-01-01

    Freezable radiators offer an attractive solution to the issue of thermal control system scalability. As thermal environments change, a freezable radiator will effectively scale the total heat rejection it is capable of as a function of the thermal environment and flow rate through the radiator. Scalable thermal control systems are a critical technology for spacecraft that will endure missions with widely varying thermal requirements. These changing requirements are a result of the space craft s surroundings and because of different thermal loads during different mission phases. However, freezing and thawing (recovering) a radiator is a process that has historically proven very difficult to predict through modeling, resulting in highly inaccurate predictions of recovery time. This paper summarizes efforts made to correlate a Thermal Desktop (TM) model with empirical testing data from two test articles. A 50-50 mixture of DowFrost HD and water is used as the working fluid. Efforts to scale this model to a full scale design, as well as efforts to characterize various thermal control fluids at low temperatures are also discussed.

  14. IPRT polarized radiative transfer model intercomparison project - Phase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emde, Claudia; Barlakas, Vasileios; Cornet, Céline; Evans, Frank; Korkin, Sergey; Ota, Yoshifumi; Labonnote, Laurent C.; Lyapustin, Alexei; Macke, Andreas; Mayer, Bernhard; Wendisch, Manfred

    2015-10-01

    The polarization state of electromagnetic radiation scattered by atmospheric particles such as aerosols, cloud droplets, or ice crystals contains much more information about the optical and microphysical properties than the total intensity alone. For this reason an increasing number of polarimetric observations are performed from space, from the ground and from aircraft. Polarized radiative transfer models are required to interpret and analyse these measurements and to develop retrieval algorithms exploiting polarimetric observations. In the last years a large number of new codes have been developed, mostly for specific applications. Benchmark results are available for specific cases, but not for more sophisticated scenarios including polarized surface reflection and multi-layer atmospheres. The International Polarized Radiative Transfer (IPRT) working group of the International Radiation Commission (IRC) has initiated a model intercomparison project in order to fill this gap. This paper presents the results of the first phase A of the IPRT project which includes ten test cases, from simple setups with only one layer and Rayleigh scattering to rather sophisticated setups with a cloud embedded in a standard atmosphere above an ocean surface. All scenarios in the first phase A of the intercomparison project are for a one-dimensional plane-parallel model geometry. The commonly established benchmark results are available at the IPRT website.

  15. Nonequilibrium radiation and chemistry models for aerocapture vehicle flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1990-01-01

    The primary tasks during January 1990 to June 1990 have been the development and evaluation of various electron and electron-electronic energy equation models, the continued development of improved nonequilibrium radiation models for molecules and atoms, and the continued development and investigation of precursor models and their effects. In addition, work was initiated to develop a vibrational model for the viscous shock layer (VSL) nonequilibrium chemistry blunt body engineering code. Also, an effort was started associated with the effects of including carbon species, say from an ablator, in the flowfield.

  16. Analysis of Terminal Deletions using a Generalized Time-Dependent Model of Radiation-Induced Formation of Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; George, K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a model that can simulate different types of radiation induced chromosomal aberrations (CA's) and can provide predictions on the frequency and size of chromosomes with terminal deletions. Chromosomes with terminal deletions lack telomeres and this can elicit sister chromatid unions and the prolonged breakage/fusion/bridge (B/F/B) cycles that have been observed in mammalian tumors. The loss of a single telomere has been shown to cause extensive genomic instability through the B/F/B cycle process. Our model uses a stochastic process of DNA broken end joining, in which a realistic spectrum of CA's is created from improperly joined DNA free ends formed by DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). The distribution of the DNA free ends is given by a mechanistic model that takes into account the chromatin structure and track structure for high-LET radiation. The model allows for DSB clustering from high-LET radiation and simulates the formation of CA's in stages that correspond to the actual time after radiation exposure. The time scale for CA formation is derived from experimental data on DSB repair kinetics. At any given time a nucleus may have intact chromosomes, CA's, and/or unrepaired fragments, some of which are defined as terminal deletions, if they are capped by one telomere. The model produces a spectrum of terminal deletions with their corresponding probabilities and size distributions for different heavy ions exposures for the first division after exposure. This data provides valuable information because there is limited experimental data available in the literature on the on the actual size of terminal deletions. We compare our model output to the available experimental data and make a reasonable extrapolation on the number of chromosomes lacking telomeres in human lymphocytes exposed to heavy ions. This model generates data which may lead to predictions on the rate of genomic instability in cells after exposure to high charge and energy nuclei

  17. NAIRAS aircraft radiation model development, dose climatology, and initial validation

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Christopher J; Meier, Matthias M; Brown, Steven; Norman, Ryan B; Xu, Xiaojing

    2013-01-01

    [1] The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a real-time, global, physics-based model used to assess radiation exposure to commercial aircrews and passengers. The model is a free-running physics-based model in the sense that there are no adjustment factors applied to nudge the model into agreement with measurements. The model predicts dosimetric quantities in the atmosphere from both galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic particles, including the response of the geomagnetic field to interplanetary dynamical processes and its subsequent influence on atmospheric dose. The focus of this paper is on atmospheric GCR exposure during geomagnetically quiet conditions, with three main objectives. First, provide detailed descriptions of the NAIRAS GCR transport and dosimetry methodologies. Second, present a climatology of effective dose and ambient dose equivalent rates at typical commercial airline altitudes representative of solar cycle maximum and solar cycle minimum conditions and spanning the full range of geomagnetic cutoff rigidities. Third, conduct an initial validation of the NAIRAS model by comparing predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates with tabulated reference measurement data and recent aircraft radiation measurements taken in 2008 during the minimum between solar cycle 23 and solar cycle 24. By applying the criterion of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on acceptable levels of aircraft radiation dose uncertainty for ambient dose equivalent greater than or equal to an annual dose of 1 mSv, the NAIRAS model is within 25% of the measured data, which fall within the ICRU acceptable uncertainty limit of 30%. The NAIRAS model predictions of ambient dose equivalent rate are generally within 50% of the measured data for any single-point comparison. The largest differences occur at low latitudes and high cutoffs, where the radiation dose level is low. Nevertheless, analysis

  18. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Plante, Paul; Trac, Hy

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled N-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyα forest and baryon temperature-density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models includes two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function given a halo catalog from an N-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurements from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, we find that the characteristic mass of quasar hosts is {M}h˜ 2.5× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}⊙ for the lightbulb model, and {M}h˜ 2.3× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}⊙ for the exponential model. In the latter model, the peak quasar luminosity for a given halo mass is larger than that in the former, typically by a factor of 1.5-2. The effective lifetime for quasars in the lightbulb model is 59 Myr, and in the exponential case, the effective time constant is about 15 Myr. We include semi-analytic calculations of helium reionization, and discuss how to include these quasars as sources of ionizing radiation for full hydrodynamics with radiative transfer simulations in order to study helium reionization.

  19. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Plante, Paul; Trac, Hy

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled N-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyα forest and baryon temperature–density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models includes two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function given a halo catalog from an N-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurements from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, we find that the characteristic mass of quasar hosts is {M}h∼ 2.5× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}ȯ for the lightbulb model, and {M}h∼ 2.3× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}ȯ for the exponential model. In the latter model, the peak quasar luminosity for a given halo mass is larger than that in the former, typically by a factor of 1.5–2. The effective lifetime for quasars in the lightbulb model is 59 Myr, and in the exponential case, the effective time constant is about 15 Myr. We include semi-analytic calculations of helium reionization, and discuss how to include these quasars as sources of ionizing radiation for full hydrodynamics with radiative transfer simulations in order to study helium reionization.

  20. Estimating shortwave solar radiation using net radiation and meteorological measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shortwave radiation has a wide variety of uses in land-atmosphere interactions research. Actual evapotranspiration estimation that involves stomatal conductance models like Jarvis and Ball-Berry require shortwave radiation to estimate photon flux density. However, in most weather stations, shortwave...

  1. Modeling silica aerogel optical performance by determining its radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Yang, Sungwoo; Bhatia, Bikram; Strobach, Elise; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-02-01

    Silica aerogel has been known as a promising candidate for high performance transparent insulation material (TIM). Optical transparency is a crucial metric for silica aerogels in many solar related applications. Both scattering and absorption can reduce the amount of light transmitted through an aerogel slab. Due to multiple scattering, the transmittance deviates from the Beer-Lambert law (exponential attenuation). To better understand its optical performance, we decoupled and quantified the extinction contributions of absorption and scattering separately by identifying two sets of radiative properties. The radiative properties are deduced from the measured total transmittance and reflectance spectra (from 250 nm to 2500 nm) of synthesized aerogel samples by solving the inverse problem of the 1-D Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The obtained radiative properties are found to be independent of the sample geometry and can be considered intrinsic material properties, which originate from the aerogel's microstructure. This finding allows for these properties to be directly compared between different samples. We also demonstrate that by using the obtained radiative properties, we can model the photon transport in aerogels of arbitrary shapes, where an analytical solution is difficult to obtain.

  2. Plasma and Radiation Modelling of EUV Sources for Micro Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruecken, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Future extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography will require very high radiation intensities in a narrow wavelength range around 13.5 nm, which is most efficiently emitted as line radiation by highly ionized heavy particles. Currently the most intense EUV sources are based on Xenon or Tin discharges. After having investigated the limits of a hollow cathode triggered Xenon pinch discharge a Laser triggered Tin vacuum spark discharge is favored by Philips Extreme UV. Plasma and radiation properties of these highly transient discharges will be compared. Besides simple MHD-models the ADAS software package has been used to generate important atomic and spectral data of the relevant ion stages. To compute excitation and radiation properties, collisional radiative equilibria of individual ion stages are computed. For many lines opacity effects cannot be neglected. The optical depths, however, allow for a treatment based on escape factors. Due to the rapid change of plasma parameters the abundances of the different ionization stages must be computed dynamically. This requires effective ionization and recombination rates, which can also be supplied by ADAS.

  3. Modelling of radiation field around spent fuel container.

    PubMed

    Kryuchkov, E F; Opalovsky, V A; Tikhomirov, G V

    2005-01-01

    Operation of nuclear reactors leads to the production of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). There are two basic strategies of SNF management: ultimate disposal of SNF in geological formations and recycle or repeated utilisation of reprocessed SNF. In both options, there is an urgent necessity to study radiation properties of SNF. Information about SNF radiation properties is required at all stages of SNF management. In order to reach more effective utilisation of nuclear materials, new fuel cycles are under development based on uranium-plutonium, uranium-thorium and some other types of nuclear fuel. These promising types of nuclear fuel are characterised by quite different radiation properties at all the stages of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) listed above. So, comparative analysis is required for radiation properties of different nuclear fuel types at different NFC stages. The results presented here were obtained from the numerical analysis of the radiation field around transport containers of different SNF types and in SNF storage. The calculations are carried out with the application of the computer code packages SCALE-4.3 and MCNP-4C. Comparison of the dose parameters obtained for different models of the transport container with experimental data allowed us to make certain conclusions about the errors of numerical results caused by the approximate geometrical description of the transport container. PMID:16604702

  4. Plasma and Radiation Modelling of EUV Sources for Micro Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kruecken, Thomas

    2007-04-06

    Future extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography will require very high radiation intensities in a narrow wavelength range around 13.5 nm, which is most efficiently emitted as line radiation by highly ionized heavy particles. Currently the most intense EUV sources are based on Xenon or Tin discharges. After having investigated the limits of a hollow cathode triggered Xenon pinch discharge a Laser triggered Tin vacuum spark discharge is favored by Philips Extreme UV.Plasma and radiation properties of these highly transient discharges will be compared. Besides simple MHD-models the ADAS software package has been used to generate important atomic and spectral data of the relevant ion stages. To compute excitation and radiation properties, collisional radiative equilibria of individual ion stages are computed. For many lines opacity effects cannot be neglected. The optical depths, however, allow for a treatment based on escape factors. Due to the rapid change of plasma parameters the abundances of the different ionization stages must be computed dynamically. This requires effective ionization and recombination rates, which can also be supplied by ADAS.

  5. Radiatively driven convection in marine stratocumulus clouds: Numerical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, P.M.; Rogers, D.P.

    1994-12-31

    The entrainment of warm dry air from above the inversion into a stratocumulus deck may play an important role in the dissipation of the cloud. A quantitative understanding of radiatively induced convection at cloud top is necessary in order to produce accurate entrainment rates and predictions of the diurnal evolution of a cloud layer. A three dimensional numerical model is used to study such convection. The model has been used extensively to study Rayleigh-Benard convection in an approximate geophysical setting. Here the authors model an idealized, non-sheared, nocturnal marine boundary layer to investigate the development of convection generated by cloud radiative cooling. Cloud forcing rather than surface forcing is investigated.

  6. A stochastic model of radiation-induced bone marrow damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, G.; Blue, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic model, based on consensus principles from radiation biology, is used to estimate bone-marrow stem cell pool survival (CFU-S and stroma cells) after irradiation. The dose response model consists of three coupled first order linear differential equations which quantitatively describe time dependent cellular damage, repair, and killing of red bone marrow cells. This system of differential equations is solved analytically through the use of a matrix approach for continuous and fractionated irradiations. The analytic solutions are confirmed through the dynamical solution of the model equations using SIMULINK. Rate coefficients describing the cellular processes of radiation damage and repair, extrapolated to humans from animal data sets and adjusted for neutron-gamma mixed fields, are employed in a SIMULINK analysis of criticality accidents. The results show that, for the time structures which may occur in criticality accidents, cell survival is established mainly by the average dose and dose rate.

  7. Actual evapotranspiration (water use) assessment of the Colorado River Basin at the Landsat resolution using the operational simplified surface energy balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Bohms, Stefanie; Russell L, Scott; Verdin, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Accurately estimating consumptive water use in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) is important for assessing and managing limited water resources in the basin. Increasing water demand from various sectors may threaten long-term sustainability of the water supply in the arid southwestern United States. We have developed a first-ever basin-wide actual evapotranspiration (ETa) map of the CRB at the Landsat scale for water use assessment at the field level. We used the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model for estimating ETa using 328 cloud-free Landsat images acquired during 2010. Our results show that cropland had the highest ETa among all land cover classes except for water. Validation using eddy covariance measured ETa showed that the SSEBop model nicely captured the variability in annual ETa with an overall R2 of 0.78 and a mean bias error of about 10%. Comparison with water balance-based ETa showed good agreement (R2 = 0.85) at the sub-basin level. Though there was good correlation (R2 = 0.79) between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based ETa (1 km spatial resolution) and Landsat-based ETa (30 m spatial resolution), the spatial distribution of MODIS-based ETa was not suitable for water use assessment at the field level. In contrast, Landsat-based ETa has good potential to be used at the field level for water management. With further validation using multiple years and sites, our methodology can be applied for regular production of ETa maps of larger areas such as the conterminous United States.

  8. Mathematical modeling of acid deposition due to radiation fog

    SciTech Connect

    Pandis, S.N.; Seinfeld, J.H. )

    1989-09-20

    A Lagrangian model has been developed to study acidic deposition due to radiation fog. The model couples submodels describing the development and dissipation of radiation fog, the gas-phase chemistry and transfer, and the aqueous-phase chemistry. The model is applied to a radiation fog episode in Bakersfield in the San Joaquin Valley of California over the period January 4--5 1985. Model predictions for temperature profile, fog development, liquid water content, gas-phase concentrations of SO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, and NH{sub 3}, {ital p}H, aqueous-phase concentrations of OS{sup 2{minus}}{sub 4}, NH{sup +}{sub 4}, and NO{sup {minus}}{sub 3}, and finally deposition rates of the above ions are compared with the observed values. The deposition rates of the major ions are predicted to increase significantly during the fog episode, the most notable being the increase of sulfate deposition. Pathways for sulfate production that are of secondary importance in a cloud environment may become signficant in a fog. Expressing the mean droplet settling velocity as a function of liquid water content is found to be quite influential in the model's predictions. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  9. Radiation Hydrodynamical Models of the Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Mario

    2016-06-01

    Many stars host planets orbiting within one astronomical unit (AU). These close planets’ origins are a mystery that motivates investigating protoplanetary disks’ central regions. A key factor governing the conditions near the star is the silicate sublimation front, which largely determines where the starlight is absorbed, and which is often called the inner rim. We present the first radiation hydrodynamical modeling of the sublimation front in the disks around the young intermediate-mass stars called Herbig Ae stars. The models are axisymmetric, and include starlight heating, silicate grains sublimating and condensing to equilibrium at the local, timedependent temperature and density, and accretion stresses parametrizing the results of MHD magneto-rotational turbulence models. The results compare well with radiation hydrostatic solutions, and prove to be dynamically stable. Passing the model disks into Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that the models satisfy observational constraints on the inner rims’s location. A small optically-thin halo of hot dust naturally arises between the inner rim and the star. The inner rim has a substantial radial extent, corresponding to several disk scale heights. While the front’s overall position varies with the stellar luminosity, its radial extent depends on the mass accretion rate. A pressure maximum develops at the position of thermal ionization at temperatures about 1000 K. The pressure maximum is capable of halting solid pebbles’ radial drift and concentrating them in a zone where temperatures are su ciently high for annealing to form crystalline silicates.

  10. An Assessment of Radiation Damage Models and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Mansur, Louis K

    2005-05-01

    The current state of development of the primary models used for investigating and simulating irradiation effects in structural alloys of interest to the U.S. DOE's Generation-IV reactor program are discussed. The underlying theory that supports model development is also described where appropriate. First, the key processes that underlie radiation-induced changes in material properties are summarized, and the types of radiation effects that subsequently arise are described. Future development work needed in order for theory, modeling, and computational materials science to support and add value to the Gen IV reactor materials program are then outlined. The expected specific outcomes and overall benefits of the required effort are: the knowledge to extrapolate material behavior to conditions for which there are no experimental data; systematic understanding of mechanisms and processes to enable confident interpolation between point-by-point experimental observations; acceleration of the development, selection, and qualification of materials for reactor service; and prediction of material response to real-world operating load histories which often involve a complicated superposition of time, temperature, radiation dose rate, and mechanical loading conditions. Opportunities for international collaboration to accelerate progress in all of the required research areas are briefly discussed, particularly in the context of two well coordinated, broad-based research projects on modeling and simulation of radiation effects on materials that are currently funded in Europe. In addition to providing the opportunity for substantial leveraging of the DOE-funded activities in this area, these projects may serve as models for future development within the Gen-IV program. The larger of these two projects, which involves 12 European research laboratories and 16 universities, is called PERFECT and is funded by the European Union. A smaller effort focusing on developing predictive

  11. Modeling Gravitational Radiation Waveforms from Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. G.; Centrelia, J. M.; Choi, D.; Koppitz, M.; VanMeter, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational radiation from merging binary black hole systems is anticipated as a key source for gravitational wave observations. Ground-based instruments, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) may observe mergers of stellar-scale black holes, while the space-based Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) observatory will be sensitive to mergers of massive galactic-center black holes over a broad range of mass scales. These cataclysmic events may emit an enormous amount of energy in a brief time. Gravitational waves from comparable mass mergers carry away a few percent of the system's mass-energy in just a few wave cycles, with peak gravitational wave luminosities on the order of 10^23 L_Sun. Optimal analysis and interpretation of merger observation data will depend on developing a detailed understanding, based on general relativistic modeling, of the radiation waveforms. We discuss recent progress in modeling radiation from equal mass mergers using numerical simulations of Einstein's gravitational field equations, known as numerical relativity. Our simulations utilize Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to allow high-resolution near the black holes while simultaneously keeping the outer boundary of the computational domain far from the black holes, and making it possible to read out gravitational radiation waveforms in the weak-field wave zone. We discuss the results from simulations beginning with the black holes orbiting near the system's innermost stable orbit, comparing the recent simulations with earlier "Lazarus" waveform estimates based on an approximate hybrid numerical/perturbative technique.

  12. Development of a Combined Radiation and Burn Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jessica L.; Deburghgraeve, Cory R.; Bird, Melanie D.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Combined radiation and burn injuries are likely to occur after nuclear events, such as a meltdown accident at a nuclear energy plant or a nuclear attack. Little is known about the mechanisms by which combined injuries result in higher mortality than by either insult alone, and few animal models exist for combined radiation and burn injury. Herein, the authors developed a murine model of radiation and scald burn injury. Mice were given a single dose of 0, 2, 4, 5, 6, or 9 Gray (Gy) alone, followed by a 15% TBSA scald burn. All mice receiving ≤4 Gy of radiation with burn survived combined injury. Higher doses of radiation (5, 6, and 9 Gy) followed by scald injury had a dose-dependent increase in mortality (34, 67, and 100%, respectively). Five Gy was determined to be the ideal dose to use in conjunction with burn injury for this model. There was a decrease in circulating white blood cells in burn, irradiated, and combined injury (5 Gy and burn) mice by 48 hours postinjury compared with sham (49.7, 11.6, and 57.3%, respectively). Circulating interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α were increased in combined injury at 48 hours postinjury compared with all other treatment groups. Prolonged overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines could contribute to subsequent organ damage. Decreased leukocytes might exacerbate immune impairment and susceptibility to infections. Future studies will determine whether there are long lasting consequences of this early proinflammatory response and extended decrease in leukocytes. (J Burn Care Res 2011;32:317–323) PMID:21233728

  13. KREAM: Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model for Aviation Route Dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.; Dokgo, K.; Choi, E. J.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, H. P.; Cho, K. S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Since Korean Air has begun to use the polar route from Seoul/ICN airport to New York/JFK airport on August 2006, there are explosive needs for the estimation and prediction against cosmic radiation exposure for Korean aircrew and passengers in South Korea from public. To keep pace with those needs of public, Korean government made the law on safety standards and managements of cosmic radiation for the flight attendants and the pilots in 2013. And we have begun to develop our own Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model (KREAM) for aviation route dose since last year funded by Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). GEANT4 model and NRLMSIS 00 model are used for calculation of the energetic particles' transport in the atmosphere and for obtaining the background atmospheric neutral densities depending on altitude. For prediction the radiation exposure in many routes depending on the various space weather effects, we constructed a database from pre-arranged simulations using all possible combinations of R, S, and G, which are the space weather effect scales provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To get the solar energetic particles' spectrum at the 100 km altitude which we set as a top of the atmospheric layers in the KREAM, we use ACE and GOES satellites' proton flux observations. We compare the results between KREAM and the other cosmic radiation estimation programs such as CARI-6M which is provided by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA). We also validate KREAM's results by comparison with the measurement from Liulin-6K LET spectrometer onboard Korean commercial flights and Korean Air Force reconnaissance flights.

  14. Analysis of Radiation Pneumonitis Risk Using a Generalized Lyman Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L. Liu, H. Helen; Liao Zhongxing; Wei Xiong; Wang Shulian; Jin Hekun; Komaki, Ritsuko; Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To introduce a version of the Lyman normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model adapted to incorporate censored time-to-toxicity data and clinical risk factors and to apply the generalized model to analysis of radiation pneumonitis (RP) risk. Methods and Materials: Medical records and radiation treatment plans were reviewed retrospectively for 576 patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy. The time to severe (Grade {>=}3) RP was computed, with event times censored at last follow-up for patients not experiencing this endpoint. The censored time-to-toxicity data were analyzed using the standard and generalized Lyman models with patient smoking status taken into account. Results: The generalized Lyman model with patient smoking status taken into account produced NTCP estimates up to 27 percentage points different from the model based on dose-volume factors alone. The generalized model also predicted that 8% of the expected cases of severe RP were unobserved because of censoring. The estimated volume parameter for lung was not significantly different from n = 1, corresponding to mean lung dose. Conclusions: NTCP models historically have been based solely on dose-volume effects and binary (yes/no) toxicity data. Our results demonstrate that inclusion of nondosimetric risk factors and censored time-to-event data can markedly affect outcome predictions made using NTCP models.

  15. Acceleration and Radiation Model of Particles in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Dauphin, Cyril; Vilmer, Nicole

    2006-08-01

    Cellular Automata (CA) models have successfully reproduced several statistical properties of solar flares such as the peak flux or the total flux distribution. We are using a CA model based on the concept of self organized criticality (SOC) to model the evolution of the magnetic energy released in a solar flare. Each burst of magnetic energy released is assumed to be the consequence of a magnetic reconnection process, where the particles are accelerated by a direct electric field. We relate the difference of energy gain of particles (alpha particles, protons and electrons) to the magnetic energy released and we calculate the resulting kinetic energy distributions and the emitted radiation.

  16. Radiation force modeling for ICESat precision orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Charles Edward

    2007-12-01

    Precision orbit determination (POD) for the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) relies on an epoch-state batch filter, in which the dynamic models play a central role. Its implementation in the Multi-Satellite Orbit Determination Program (MSODP) originally included a box-and-wing model, representing the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite, to compute solar radiation forces. This "macro-model" has been adapted to the ICESat geometry, and additionally, extended to the calculation of forces induced by radiation reflected and emitted from the Earth. To determine the area and reflectivity parameters of the ICESat macro-model surfaces, a high-fidelity simulation of the radiation forces in low-Earth orbit was first developed, using a detailed model of the satellite, called the "micro-model". In this effort, new algorithms to compute such forces were adapted from a Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method originally designed to determine incident heating rates. After working with the vendor of the Thermal Synthesizer System (TSS) to implement these algorithms, a modified version of this software was employed to generate solar and Earth radiation forces for all ICESat orbit and attitude geometries. Estimates of the macro-model parameters were then obtained from a least-squares fit to these micro-model forces, applying an algorithm that also incorporated linear equality and inequality constraints to ensure feasible solutions. Three of these fitted solutions were selected for post-launch evaluation. Two represented conditions at the start and at the end of the mission, while the third comprised four separate solutions, one for each of the nominal satellite attitudes. In addition, three other sets of macro-model parameters were derived from area-weighted averaging of the micro-model reflectivities. They included solar-only and infrared-only spectral parameters, as well as a set combining these parameters. Daily POD solutions were generated with each of these macro-model sets

  17. Multi-Scale Distributed Sensitivity Analysis of Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, M.; Mohanty, B.

    2015-12-01

    Amidst nature's great variability and complexity and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission aims to provide high resolution soil moisture products for earth sciences applications. One of the biggest challenges still faced by the remote sensing community are the uncertainties, heterogeneities and scaling exhibited by soil, land cover, topography, precipitation etc. At each spatial scale, there are different levels of uncertainties and heterogeneities. Also, each land surface variable derived from various satellite mission comes with their own error margins. As such, soil moisture retrieval accuracy is affected as radiative model sensitivity changes with space, time, and scale. In this paper, we explore the distributed sensitivity analysis of radiative model under different hydro-climates and spatial scales, 1.5 km, 3 km, 9km and 39km. This analysis is conducted in three different regions Iowa, U.S.A (SMEX02), Arizona, USA (SMEX04) and Winnipeg, Canada (SMAPVEX12). Distributed variables such as soil moisture, soil texture, vegetation and temperature are assumed to be uncertain and are conditionally simulated to obtain uncertain maps, whereas roughness data which is spatially limited are assumed a probability distribution. The relative contribution of the uncertain model inputs to the aggregated model output is also studied, using various aggregation techniques. We use global sensitivity analysis (GSA) to conduct this analysis across spatio-temporal scales. Keywords: Soil moisture, radiative transfer, remote sensing, sensitivity, SMEX02, SMAPVEX12.

  18. Modeling of radiation effects on nuclear waste package materials

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.A.

    1988-09-01

    A methodology is developed for the assessment of radiation effects on nuclear waste package materials. An assessment of the current status of understanding with regard to waste package materials and their behavior in radiation environments is presented. The methodology is used to make prediction as to the chemically induced changes in the groundwater surrounding nuclear waste packages in a repository in tuff. The predictions indicate that mechanisms not currently being pursued by the Department of Energy may be a factor in the long-term performance of nuclear waste packages. The methodology embodies a physical model of the effects of radiation on aqueous solutions. Coupled to the physical model is a method for analyzing the complex nature of the physical model using adjoint sensitivity analysis. The sensitivity aid in both the physical understanding of the processes involved as well as aiding in eliminating portions of the model that have no bearing on the desired results. A computer implementation of the methodology is provided. 128 refs.

  19. Development of a new Global RAdiation Belt model: GRAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard-Piet, Angelica; Lazaro, Didier; Maget, Vincent; Rolland, Guy; Ecoffet, Robert; Bourdarie, Sébastien; Boscher, Daniel; Standarovski, Denis

    2016-07-01

    The well known AP8 and AE8 NASA models are commonly used in the industry to specify the radiation belt environment. Unfortunately, there are some limitations in the use of these models, first due to the covered energy range, but also because in some regions of space, there are discrepancies between the predicted average values and the measurements. Therefore, our aim is to develop a radiation belt model, covering a large region of space and energy, from LEO altitudes to GEO and above, and from plasma to relativistic particles. The aim for the first version is to correct the AP8 and AE8 models where they are deficient or not defined. At geostationary, we developed ten years ago for electrons the IGE-2006 model which was proven to be more accurate than AE8, and used commonly in the industry, covering a broad energy range, from 1keV to 5MeV. From then, a proton model for geostationary orbit was also developed for material applications, followed by the OZONE model covering a narrower energy range but the whole outer electron belt, a SLOT model to asses average electron values for 2model, which provides high energy proton flux values at low altitudes. As most of these models were developed using more than a solar cycle of measurements, these measurements being checked, cross calibrated and filtered, we have no doubt that the obtained averages are more accurate than AP8 and AE8 for these particular locations. These local models were validated along different orbit with independent data sets or effect measurements. We will use a cache file system to switch between models, in order to obtain at each location in space and energy point the most reliable value. Of course, the way the model is developed is well suited to add new local developments or to include international partnership. This model will be called the GRAB model, as Global Radiation Belt model. We will present first beta version during this conference.

  20. Modeling radiation loads to detectors in a SNAP mission

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov et al.

    2004-05-12

    In order to investigate degradation of optical detectors of the Supernova Acceleration Project (SNAP) space mission due to irradiation, a three-dimensional model of the satellite has been developed. Realistic radiation environment at the satellite orbit, including both galactic and trapped in radiation belts cosmic rays, has been taken into account. The modeling has been performed with the MARS14 Monte Carlo code. In a current design, the main contribution to dose accumulated in the photodetectors is shown to be due to trapped protons. A contribution of primary {alpha}-particles is estimated. Predicted performance degradation for the photo-detector for a 4-year space mission is 40% and can be reduced further by means of shielding optimization.

  1. ADAS tools for collisional-radiative modelling of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, F.; O'Mullane, M.; Summers, H. P.

    2013-07-01

    New theoretical and computational tools for molecular collisional-radiative models are presented. An application to the hydrogen molecule system has been made. At the same time, a structured database has been created where fundamental cross sections and rates for individual processes as well as derived data (effective coefficients) are stored. Relative populations for the vibrational states of the ground electronic state of H2 are presented and this vibronic resolution model is compared electronic resolution where vibronic transitions are summed over vibrational sub-states. Some new reaction rates are calculated by means of the impact parameter approximation. Computational tools have been developed to automate process and simplify the data assembly. Effective (collisional-radiative) rate coefficients versus temperature and density are presented.

  2. A field test of a simple stochastic radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, N.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of determining the effect of clouds on the radiative energy balance of the globe is of well-recognized importance. One can in principle solve the problem for any given configuration of clouds using numerical techniques. This knowledge is not useful however, because of the amount of input data and computer resources required. Besides, we need only the average of the resulting solution over the grid scale of a general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we are interested in estimating the average of the solutions of such fine-grained problems using only coarse grained data, a science or art called stochastic radiation transfer. Results of the described field test indicate that the stochastic description is a somewhat better fit to the data than is a fractional cloud cover model, but more data are needed. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  3. Singular Limits in a Model of Radiative Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducomet, Bernard; Nečasová, Šárka

    2015-06-01

    We consider a "semi-relativistic" model of radiative viscous compressible Navier-Stokes-Fourier system coupled to the radiative transfer equation extending the classical model introduced in Ducomet et al. (Ann Inst Henri Poincarè AN 28:797-812, 2011) and we study some of its singular limits (low Mach and diffusion) in the case of well-prepared initial data and Dirichlet boundary condition for the velocity field. In the low Mach number case we prove the convergence toward the incompressible Navier-Stokes system coupled to a system of two stationary transport equations. In the diffusion case we prove the convergence toward the compressible Navier-Stokes with modified state functions (equilibrium case) or toward the compressible Navier-Stokes coupled to a diffusion equation (non equilibrium case).

  4. Quantum nonthermal radiation of nonstationary rotating de Sitter cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitei, Irom Ablu; Singh, T. Ibungochouba; Singh, K. Yugindro

    2014-08-01

    Using the Hamilton-Jacobi method a study of quantum nonthermal radiation of nonstationary rotating de Sitter cosmological model is carried out. It is shown that there exist seas of positive and negative energy states in the vicinity of the cosmological event horizon and there also exists a forbidden energy gap between the two seas. The forbidden energy gap vanishes on the surface of the cosmological event horizon so that the positive and negative energy levels overlap. The width of the forbidden energy gap and the energy of the particle at the cosmological event horizon are found to depend on the cosmological constant, the rotation parameter, positions of the particle and the cosmological event horizon, angular momentum of the particle, evaporation rate and shape of the cosmological event horizon. The tunneling probability of the emitted particles constituting Hawking radiation is also deduced for stationary nonrotating de Sitter cosmological model and the standard Hawking temperature is recovered.

  5. Thermal scale modeling of radiation-conduction-convection systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of thermal scale modeling applied to radiation-conduction-convection systems with particular emphasis on the spacecraft cabin atmosphere/cabin wall thermal interface. The 'modified material preservation,' 'temperature preservation,' 'scaling compromises,' and 'Nusselt number preservation' scale modeling techniques and their inherent limitations and problem areas are described. The compromised scaling techniques of mass flux preservation and heat transfer coefficient preservation show promise of giving adequate thermal similitude while preserving both gas and temperature in the scale model. The use of these compromised scaling techniques was experimentally demonstrated in tests of full scale and 1/4 scale models. Correlation of test results for free and forced convection under various test conditions shows the effectiveness of these scaling techniques. It is concluded that either mass flux or heat transfer coefficient preservation may result in adequate thermal similitude depending on the system to be modeled. Heat transfer coefficient preservation should give good thermal similitude for manned spacecraft scale modeling applications.

  6. Structural acoustics model of the violin radiativity profile.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2008-12-01

    Violin radiativity profiles are dominated by the Helmholtz-like A0 cavity mode ( approximately 280 Hz), first corpus bending modes B1(-) and B1(+) ( approximately 500 Hz), and BH and bridge-filter peaks ( approximately 2.4 kHz and approximately 3.5 kHz, respectively), with falloff above approximately 4 kHz. The B1 modes-dependent on two low-lying free-plate modes--are proposed to excite A0 via coupling to B1-driven in-phase f-hole volume flows. VIOCADEAS data show that A0 radiativity increases primarily as A0-B1(-) frequency difference decreases, consistent with Meinel's 1937 experiment for too-thick/too-thin plate thicknesses, plus sound post removal and violin octet baritone results. The vibration-->acoustic energy filter, F(RAD), computed from shape-material-independent radiation and total damping, peaks at the critical frequency f(crit), estimated from a free-plate mode by analogy to flat-plate bending. Experimentally, f(crit) decreased as this plate mode (and B1(+)) frequency increased. Simulations show that increasing plate thicknesses lowers f(crit), reduces F(RAD), and moves the spectral balance toward lower frequencies. Incorporating string-->corpus filters (including bridge versus bridge-island impedances) provides a model for overall violin radiativity. This model-with B1 and A0-B1 couplings, and f(crit) (computed from a free-plate mode important to B1) strongly affecting the lowest and highest parts of the radiativity profile-substantiates prior empirical B1--sound quality linkages. PMID:19206824

  7. Structural acoustics model of the violin radiativity profile.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2008-12-01

    Violin radiativity profiles are dominated by the Helmholtz-like A0 cavity mode ( approximately 280 Hz), first corpus bending modes B1(-) and B1(+) ( approximately 500 Hz), and BH and bridge-filter peaks ( approximately 2.4 kHz and approximately 3.5 kHz, respectively), with falloff above approximately 4 kHz. The B1 modes-dependent on two low-lying free-plate modes--are proposed to excite A0 via coupling to B1-driven in-phase f-hole volume flows. VIOCADEAS data show that A0 radiativity increases primarily as A0-B1(-) frequency difference decreases, consistent with Meinel's 1937 experiment for too-thick/too-thin plate thicknesses, plus sound post removal and violin octet baritone results. The vibration-->acoustic energy filter, F(RAD), computed from shape-material-independent radiation and total damping, peaks at the critical frequency f(crit), estimated from a free-plate mode by analogy to flat-plate bending. Experimentally, f(crit) decreased as this plate mode (and B1(+)) frequency increased. Simulations show that increasing plate thicknesses lowers f(crit), reduces F(RAD), and moves the spectral balance toward lower frequencies. Incorporating string-->corpus filters (including bridge versus bridge-island impedances) provides a model for overall violin radiativity. This model-with B1 and A0-B1 couplings, and f(crit) (computed from a free-plate mode important to B1) strongly affecting the lowest and highest parts of the radiativity profile-substantiates prior empirical B1--sound quality linkages.

  8. Analytic solution of a five-direction radiation transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    In order to test certain spatial and angular dependent Monte Carlo biasing techniques, a one-dimensional, one energy, two-media, five-direction radiation transport model has been devised for which an analytic solution exists. Although this solution is too long to be conveniently expressed in an explicit form, it can be easily evaluated on the smallest of computers. This solution is discussed in this paper. 1 ref.

  9. Predictive modeling of terrestrial radiation exposure from geologic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Daniel A.

    Aerial gamma ray surveys are an important tool for national security, scientific, and industrial interests in determining locations of both anthropogenic and natural sources of radioactivity. There is a relationship between radioactivity and geology and in the past this relationship has been used to predict geology from an aerial survey. The purpose of this project is to develop a method to predict the radiologic exposure rate of the geologic materials in an area by creating a model using geologic data, images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), geochemical data, and pre-existing low spatial resolution aerial surveys from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Survey. Using these data, geospatial areas, referred to as background radiation units, homogenous in terms of K, U, and Th are defined and the gamma ray exposure rate is predicted. The prediction is compared to data collected via detailed aerial survey by our partner National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), allowing for the refinement of the technique. High resolution radiation exposure rate models have been developed for two study areas in Southern Nevada that include the alluvium on the western shore of Lake Mohave, and Government Wash north of Lake Mead; both of these areas are arid with little soil moisture and vegetation. We determined that by using geologic units to define radiation background units of exposed bedrock and ASTER visualizations to subdivide radiation background units of alluvium, regions of homogeneous geochemistry can be defined allowing for the exposure rate to be predicted. Soil and rock samples have been collected at Government Wash and Lake Mohave as well as a third site near Cameron, Arizona. K, U, and Th concentrations of these samples have been determined using inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laboratory counting using radiation detection equipment. In addition, many sample locations also have

  10. Collisional radiative coarse-grain model for ionization in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesi, Marco; Lani, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    We present a reduced kinetic mechanism for the modeling of the behavior of the electronic states of the atomic species in air mixtures. The model is built by lumping the electronically excited states of the atomic species and by performing Maxwell-Boltzmann averages of the rate constants describing the elementary kinetic processes of the individual states within each group. The necessary reaction rate coefficients are taken from the model compiled by Bultel et al. ["Collisional-radiative model in air for earth re-entry problems," Phys. Plasmas 13, 043502 (2006), 10.1063/1.2194827]. The reduced number of pseudo-states considered leads to a significant reduction of the computational cost, thus enabling the application of the state of the art collisional radiative models to bi-dimensional and three-dimensional problems. The internal states of the molecular species are assumed to be in equilibrium. The rotational energy mode is assumed to quickly equilibrate with the translational energy mode at the kinetic temperature of the heavy species as opposed to the electronic and the vibrational modes, assumed to be in Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium at a common temperature TV. In a first step we validate the model by using simple zero- and one-dimensional test cases for which the full kinetic mechanism can be run efficiently. Finally, the reduced kinetic model is used to analyze the strong non-equilibrium flow surrounding the FIRE II flight experiment during the early part of its re-entry trajectory. It is found that the reduced kinetic mechanism is capable of reproducing the ionizational non-equilibrium phenomena, responsible for the drastic reduction of the radiative heat loads on the space capsules during the re-entry phase.

  11. Interplanetary Radiation and Internal Charging Environment Models for Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Altstatt, Richard L.; NeegaardParker, Linda

    2005-01-01

    A Solar Sail Radiation Environment (SSRE) model has been developed for defining charged particle environments over an energy range from 0.01 keV to 1 MeV for hydrogen ions, helium ions, and electrons. The SSRE model provides the free field charged particle environment required for characterizing energy deposition per unit mass, charge deposition, and dose rate dependent conductivity processes required to evaluate radiation dose and internal (bulk) charging processes in the solar sail membrane in interplanetary space. Solar wind and energetic particle measurements from instruments aboard the Ulysses spacecraft in a solar, near-polar orbit provide the particle data over a range of heliospheric latitudes used to derive the environment that can be used for radiation and charging environments for both high inclination 0.5 AU Solar Polar Imager mission and the 1.0 AU L1 solar missions. This paper describes the techniques used to model comprehensive electron, proton, and helium spectra over the range of particle energies of significance to energy and charge deposition in thin (less than 25 micrometers) solar sail materials.

  12. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  13. Comparisons of Air Radiation Model with Shock Tube Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; McCorkle, Evan; Bogdanoff, David W.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the predictive capability of shock layer radiation model appropriate for NASA s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle lunar return entry. A detailed set of spectrally resolved radiation intensity comparisons are made with recently conducted tests in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The spectral range spanned from vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 115 nm to infrared wavelength of 1400 nm. The analysis is done for 9.5-10.5 km/s shock passing through room temperature synthetic air at 0.2, 0.3 and 0.7 Torr. The comparisons between model and measurements show discrepancies in the level of background continuum radiation and intensities of atomic lines. Impurities in the EAST facility in the form of carbon bearing species are also modeled to estimate the level of contaminants and their impact on the comparisons. The discrepancies, although large is some cases, exhibit order and consistency. A set of tests and analyses improvements are proposed as forward work plan in order to confirm or reject various proposed reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  14. Evaluation of a total dissolved solids model in comparison to actual field data measurements in the Cheyenne River, South Dakota, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Berdanier, Bruce W; Ziadat, Anf H

    2006-06-01

    During the summers of 2002 and 2004, in-stream integrated flow and concentration measurements for the total dissolved solids in the Cheyenne River, South Dakota, USA was conducted in order to compare the obtained actual field measurements with the predictions values made by the Bureau of Reclamation in the Environmental Impact Statement. In comparison to the actual field measurements conducted in this study, The Bureau of Reclamation extension of a small database used in the analysis for the impact of operations at the Angostura Unit over the past 50 years and into the future to predict the annual total dissolved solid loadings doesn't represent the actual loading values and various conditions in the study area. Additional integrated flow and concentration sampling is required to characterize the impact of the current Angostura Dam operations and Angostura Irrigation District return flows on the Cheyenne River in different seasons of the year. PMID:16917716

  15. Theoretical models for duct acoustic propagation and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eversman, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The development of computational methods in acoustics has led to the introduction of analysis and design procedures which model the turbofan inlet as a coupled system, simultaneously modeling propagation and radiation in the presence of realistic internal and external flows. Such models are generally large, require substantial computer speed and capacity, and can be expected to be used in the final design stages, with the simpler models being used in the early design iterations. Emphasis is given to practical modeling methods that have been applied to the acoustical design problem in turbofan engines. The mathematical model is established and the simplest case of propagation in a duct with hard walls is solved to introduce concepts and terminologies. An extensive overview is given of methods for the calculation of attenuation in uniform ducts with uniform flow and with shear flow. Subsequent sections deal with numerical techniques which provide an integrated representation of duct propagation and near- and far-field radiation for realistic geometries and flight conditions.

  16. Mathematical modeling the radiation effects on humoral immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O. A.

    A mathematical model of humoral immune response in nonirradiated and irradiated mammals is developed. It is based on conventional theories and experimental facts in this field. The model is a system of nonlinear differential equations which describe the dynamics of concentrations of antibody and antigen molecules, immunocompetent B lymphocytes, and the rest blood lymphocytes, as well as the bone-marrow lymphocyte precursors. The interaction of antigen molecules with antibodies and with antibody-like receptors on immunocompetent cells is also incorporated. The model quantitatively reproduces the dynamics of the humoral immune response to the T-independent antigen (capsular antigen of plague microbe) in nonirradiated mammals (CBA mice). It describes the peculiarities of the humoral immune response in CBA mice exposed to acute radiation before or after introducing antigen. The model predicts an adaptation of humoral immune system to low dose rate chronic irradiation in the result of which the intensity of immune response relaxes to a new, lower than normal, stable level. The mechanisms of this phenomenon are revealed. The results obtained show that the developed model, after the appropriate identification, can be used to predict the effects of acute and low-level long-term irradiation on the system of humoral immunity in humans. Employment of the mathematical model identified in the proper way should be important in estimating the radiation risk for cosmonauts and astronauts on long space missions such as a voyage to Mars or a lunar colony.

  17. A cloud model-radiative model combination for determining microwave TB-rain rate relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szejwach, Gerard; Adler, Robert F.; Jobard, Esabelle; Mack, Robert A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a cloud model-radiative transfer model combination for computing average brightness temperature, T(B), is discussed. The cloud model and radiative transfer model used in this study are described. The relations between rain rate, cloud and rain water, cloud and precipitation ice, and upwelling radiance are investigated. The effects of the rain rate relations on T(B) under different climatological conditions are examined. The model-derived T(B) results are compared to the 92 and 183 GHz aircraft observations of Hakkarinen and Adler (1984, 1986) and the radar-estimated rain rate of Hakkarinen and Adler (1986); good correlation between the data is detected.

  18. Radiation cooler for 10 micrometer wavelength engineering model receiver model no. 7172, serial no. 201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a radiative cooler are described. This cooler is an engineering model suitable for bench testing in the laboratory as a part of the 10-micrometer wavelength engineering model receiver, and conforms to the standard radiative cooler configuration, except that the inner stage and its support system were redesigned to accommodate the larger, heavier SAT detector. This radiative cooler will cool the detector to cryogenic temperature levels when the receiver is in a space environment or in a suitable thermal vacuum chamber. Equipment specifications are given along with the results of thermal tests, vibration tests, and electrical integrity tests.

  19. Martian Radiation Environment: Model Calculations and Recent Measurements with "MARIE"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saganti, P. B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; zeitlin, C. J.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Galactic Cosmic Ray spectra in Mars orbit were generated with the recently expanded HZETRN (High Z and Energy Transport) and QMSFRG (Quantum Multiple-Scattering theory of nuclear Fragmentation) model calculations. These model calculations are compared with the first eighteen months of measured data from the MARIE (Martian Radiation Environment Experiment) instrument onboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft that is currently in Martian orbit. The dose rates observed by the MARIE instrument are within 10% of the model calculated predictions. Model calculations are compared with the MARIE measurements of dose, dose-equivalent values, along with the available particle flux distribution. Model calculated particle flux includes GCR elemental composition of atomic number, Z = 1-28 and mass number, A = 1-58. Particle flux calculations specific for the current MARIE mapping period are reviewed and presented.

  20. Classically conformal radiative neutrino model with gauged B - L symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroshi; Orikasa, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    We propose a classically conformal model in a minimal radiative seesaw, in which we employ a gauged B - L symmetry in the standard model that is essential in order to work the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism well that induces the B - L symmetry breaking. As a result, nonzero Majorana mass term and electroweak symmetry breaking simultaneously occur. In this framework, we show a benchmark point to satisfy several theoretical and experimental constraints. Here theoretical constraints represent inert conditions and Coleman-Weinberg condition. Experimental bounds come from lepton flavor violations (especially μ → eγ), the current bound on the Z‧ mass at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, and neutrino oscillations.

  1. Stagnation Point Nonequilibrium Radiative Heating and the Influence of Energy Exchange Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartung, Lin C.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    A nonequilibrium radiative heating prediction method has been used to evaluate several energy exchange models used in nonequilibrium computational fluid dynamics methods. The radiative heating measurements from the FIRE II flight experiment supply an experimental benchmark against which different formulations for these exchange models can be judged. The models which predict the lowest radiative heating are found to give the best agreement with the flight data. Examination of the spectral distribution of radiation indicates that despite close agreement of the total radiation, many of the models examined predict excessive molecular radiation. It is suggested that a study of the nonequilibrium chemical kinetics may lead to a correction for this problem.

  2. Dynamic Electrothermal Model of a Sputtered Thermopile Thermal Radiation Detector for Earth Radiation Budget Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weckmann, Stephanie

    1997-01-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a program sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aimed at evaluating the global energy balance. Current scanning radiometers used for CERES consist of thin-film thermistor bolometers viewing the Earth through a Cassegrain telescope. The Thermal Radiation Group, a laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, is currently studying a new sensor concept to replace the current bolometer: a thermopile thermal radiation detector. This next-generation detector would consist of a thermal sensor array made of thermocouple junction pairs, or thermopiles. The objective of the current research is to perform a thermal analysis of the thermopile. Numerical thermal models are particularly suited to solve problems for which temperature is the dominant mechanism of the operation of the device (through the thermoelectric effect), as well as for complex geometries composed of numerous different materials. Feasibility and design specifications are studied by developing a dynamic electrothermal model of the thermopile using the finite element method. A commercial finite element-modeling package, ALGOR, is used.

  3. Model formulation of non-equilibrium gas radiation for hypersonic flight vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Ing

    1989-01-01

    Several radiation models for low density nonequilibrium hypersonic flow are studied. It is proposed that these models should be tested by the 3-D VRFL code developed at NASA/JSC. A modified and optimized radiation model may be obtained from the testing. Then, the current VRFL code could be expanded to solve hypersonic flow problems with nonequilibrium thermal radiation.

  4. A Model for Shear Layer Effects on Engine Noise Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Farassat, F.; Pope, D. Stuart; Vatsa, V.

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of aircraft engine noise is an important aspect of addressing the issues of community noise and cabin noise control. The development of physics based methodologies for performing such predictions has been a focus of Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA). A recent example of code development in this area is the ducted fan noise propagation and radiation code CDUCT-LaRC. Included within the code is a duct radiation model that is based on the solution of FfowcsWilliams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation with a penetrable data surface. Testing of this equation for many acoustic problems has shown it to provide generally better results than the Kirchhoff formula for moving surfaces. Currently, the data surface is taken to be the inlet or exhaust plane for inlet or aft-fan cases, respectively. While this provides reasonable results in many situations, these choices of data surface location lead to a few limitations. For example, the shear layer between the bypass ow and external stream can refract the sound waves radiated to the far field. Radiation results can be improved by including this effect, as well as the rejection of the sound in the bypass region from the solid surface external to the bypass duct surrounding the core ow. This work describes the implementation, and possible approximation, of a shear layer boundary condition within CDUCT-LaRC. An example application also illustrates the improvements that this extension offers for predicting noise radiation from complex inlet and bypass duct geometries, thereby providing a means to evaluate external treatments in the vicinity of the bypass duct exhaust plane.

  5. Martian Radiative Transfer Modeling Using the Optimal Spectral Sampling Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Uymin, G.; Moncet, J.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The large volume of existing and planned infrared observations of Mars have prompted the development of a new martian radiative transfer model that could be used in the retrievals of atmospheric and surface properties. The model is based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) method [1]. The method is a fast and accurate monochromatic technique applicable to a wide range of remote sensing platforms (from microwave to UV) and was originally developed for the real-time processing of infrared and microwave data acquired by instruments aboard the satellites forming part of the next-generation global weather satellite system NPOESS (National Polarorbiting Operational Satellite System) [2]. As part of our on-going research related to the radiative properties of the martian polar caps, we have begun the development of a martian OSS model with the goal of using it to perform self-consistent atmospheric corrections necessary to retrieve caps emissivity from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra. While the caps will provide the initial focus area for applying the new model, it is hoped that the model will be of interest to the wider Mars remote sensing community.

  6. Analytical probabilistic modeling for radiation therapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, Mark; Hennig, Philipp; Oelfke, Uwe

    2013-08-01

    This paper introduces the concept of analytical probabilistic modeling (APM) to quantify uncertainties in quality indicators of radiation therapy treatment plans. Assuming Gaussian probability densities over the input parameters of the treatment plan quality indicators, APM enables the calculation of the moments of the induced probability density over the treatment plan quality indicators by analytical integration. This paper focuses on analytical probabilistic dose calculation algorithms and the implications of APM regarding treatment planning. We derive closed-form expressions for the expectation value and the (co)variance of (1) intensity-modulated photon and proton dose distributions based on a pencil beam algorithm and (2) the standard quadratic objective function used in inverse planning. Complex correlation models of high dimensional uncertain input parameters and the different nature of random and systematic uncertainties in fractionated radiation therapy are explicitly incorporated into APM. APM variance calculations on phantom data sets show that the correlation assumptions and the difference of random and systematic uncertainties of the input parameters have a crucial impact on the uncertainty of the resulting dose. The derivations regarding the quadratic objective function show that APM has the potential to enable robust planning at almost the same computational cost like conventional inverse planning after a single probabilistic dose calculation. Beneficial applications of APM in the context of radiation therapy treatment planning are feasible.

  7. Global sensitivity analysis of the radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelam, Maheshwari; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2015-04-01

    With the recently launched Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, it is very important to have a complete understanding of the radiative transfer model for better soil moisture retrievals and to direct future research and field campaigns in areas of necessity. Because natural systems show great variability and complexity with respect to soil, land cover, topography, precipitation, there exist large uncertainties and heterogeneities in model input factors. In this paper, we explore the possibility of using global sensitivity analysis (GSA) technique to study the influence of heterogeneity and uncertainties in model inputs on zero order radiative transfer (ZRT) model and to quantify interactions between parameters. GSA technique is based on decomposition of variance and can handle nonlinear and nonmonotonic functions. We direct our analyses toward growing agricultural fields of corn and soybean in two different regions, Iowa, USA (SMEX02) and Winnipeg, Canada (SMAPVEX12). We noticed that, there exists a spatio-temporal variation in parameter interactions under different soil moisture and vegetation conditions. Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) behaves more non-linearly in SMEX02 and linearly in SMAPVEX12, with average parameter interactions of 14% in SMEX02 and 5% in SMAPVEX12. Also, parameter interactions increased with vegetation water content (VWC) and roughness conditions. Interestingly, soil moisture shows an exponentially decreasing sensitivity function whereas parameters such as root mean square height (RMS height) and vegetation water content show increasing sensitivity with 0.05 v/v increase in soil moisture range. Overall, considering the SMAPVEX12 fields to be water rich environment (due to higher observed SM) and SMEX02 fields to be energy rich environment (due to lower SM and wide ranges of TSURF), our results indicate that first order as well as interactions between the parameters change with water and energy rich environments.

  8. Radiation Hydrodynamics Models of the Inner Rim in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, M.; Fromang, S.; Turner, N. J.; Benisty, M.

    2016-08-01

    Many stars host planets orbiting within a few astronomical units (AU). The occurrence rate and distributions of masses and orbits vary greatly with the host star’s mass. These close planets’ origins are a mystery that motivates investigating protoplanetary disks’ central regions. A key factor governing the conditions near the star is the silicate sublimation front, which largely determines where the starlight is absorbed, and which is often called the inner rim. We present the first radiation hydrodynamical modeling of the sublimation front in the disks around the young intermediate-mass stars called Herbig Ae stars. The models are axisymmetric and include starlight heating silicate grains sublimating and condensing to equilibrium at the local, time-dependent temperature and density and accretion stresses parameterizing the results of MHD magnetorotational turbulence models. The results compare well with radiation hydrostatic solutions and prove to be dynamically stable. Passing the model disks into Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that the models satisfy observational constraints on the inner rim’s location. A small optically thin halo of hot dust naturally arises between the inner rim and the star. The inner rim has a substantial radial extent, corresponding to several disk scale heights. While the front’s overall position varies with the stellar luminosity, its radial extent depends on the mass accretion rate. A pressure maximum develops near the location of thermal ionization at temperatures of about 1000 K. The pressure maximum is capable of halting solid pebbles’ radial drift and concentrating them in a zone where temperatures are sufficiently high for annealing to form crystalline silicates.

  9. Radioactive Doses - Predicted and Actual - and Likely Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, S; Takamura, N

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Stations on 11 March 2011. Here we refer to reports from international organisations as sources of predicted values obtained from environmental monitoring and dose estimation models, and reports from various institutes in Japan are used as sources of individual actual values. The World Health Organization, based on information available up to 11 September 2011 (and published in 2012), reported that characteristic effective doses in the first year after the accident, to all age groups, were estimated to be in the 10-50 mSv dose band in example locations in evacuation areas. Estimated characteristic thyroid doses to infants in Namie Town were within the 100-200 mSv dose band. A report from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation published in 2014 shows that the effective dose received by adults in evacuation areas during the first year after the accident was 1.1-13 mSv. The absorbed dose to the thyroid in evacuated settlements was 7.2-35 mSv in adults and 15-83 mSv in 1-year-old infants. Individual external radiation exposure in the initial 4 months after the accident, estimated by superimposing individual behaviour data on to a daily dose rate map, was less than 3 mSv in 93.9% of residents (maximum 15 mSv) in evacuation areas. Actual individual thyroid equivalent doses were less than 15 mSv in 98.8% of children (maximum 25 mSv) in evacuation areas. When uncertainty exists in dose estimation models, it may be sensible to err on the side of caution, and final estimated doses are often much greater than actual radiation doses. However, overestimation of the dose at the time of an accident has a great influence on the psychology of residents. More than 100 000 residents have not returned to the evacuation areas 5 years after the Fukushima accident because of the social and mental effects during the initial period of the disaster. Estimates of

  10. Radioactive Doses - Predicted and Actual - and Likely Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Nagataki, S; Takamura, N

    2016-04-01

    Five years have passed since the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Stations on 11 March 2011. Here we refer to reports from international organisations as sources of predicted values obtained from environmental monitoring and dose estimation models, and reports from various institutes in Japan are used as sources of individual actual values. The World Health Organization, based on information available up to 11 September 2011 (and published in 2012), reported that characteristic effective doses in the first year after the accident, to all age groups, were estimated to be in the 10-50 mSv dose band in example locations in evacuation areas. Estimated characteristic thyroid doses to infants in Namie Town were within the 100-200 mSv dose band. A report from the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation published in 2014 shows that the effective dose received by adults in evacuation areas during the first year after the accident was 1.1-13 mSv. The absorbed dose to the thyroid in evacuated settlements was 7.2-35 mSv in adults and 15-83 mSv in 1-year-old infants. Individual external radiation exposure in the initial 4 months after the accident, estimated by superimposing individual behaviour data on to a daily dose rate map, was less than 3 mSv in 93.9% of residents (maximum 15 mSv) in evacuation areas. Actual individual thyroid equivalent doses were less than 15 mSv in 98.8% of children (maximum 25 mSv) in evacuation areas. When uncertainty exists in dose estimation models, it may be sensible to err on the side of caution, and final estimated doses are often much greater than actual radiation doses. However, overestimation of the dose at the time of an accident has a great influence on the psychology of residents. More than 100 000 residents have not returned to the evacuation areas 5 years after the Fukushima accident because of the social and mental effects during the initial period of the disaster. Estimates of

  11. APPLICATIONS OF THE PHOTONUCLEAR FRAGMENTATION MODEL TO RADIATION PROTECTION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Degtiarenko

    1996-01-01

    In order to provide radiation protection systems for high energy electron accelerators it is necessary to define the yields of hadrons produced when the electron beam interacts with a fixed target. In practical terms this will occur when any beam or fraction of the beam is lost from the accelerator orbit or when any fraction of the beam is intercepted by a target inserted in the path of the beam or when the beam is totally absorbed by a beam dump. The electron and gamma yields from these interactions are well characterized and amenable to calculation utilizing Monte Carlo shower codes. However, the yield of hadrons has been less well defined. Neutron production has received most attention because of its importance to radiation shielding. Production mechanisms such as the giant dipole and the quasi-deuteron resonances have provided valuable information for total neutron yields for electron beams at energies less than about 400 MeV. For electron beams at energies extending to 10 GeV it is necessary to include the higher energy resonance structures and the various intranuclear production channels that are available for the production of higher energy neutrons. The production model described in this paper permits the calculation of laboratory angle and energy of all hadrons produced when an electron beam of energy between 100 MeV and 10 GeV interacts with a fixed target. This model can be used as an event generator for Monte Carlo codes used for many radiation protection purposes including calculation of radiation shielding.

  12. Collisional-radiative modelling of an Ar helicon plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Stuart

    2005-10-01

    We report on recent modelling results of emission observed from a helicon plasma, comparing theoretical and observed line intensities and line ratios of Ar, Ar^+ and Ar^2+. Our Helicon plasma is from the ASTRAL device at Auburn University, with spectral measurements from 275 nm through to 1015 nm. We concentrate on the Ar^+ ion stage, and present the results of a collisional-radiative model using various qualities of atomic data. In particular, we compare the modelling results using Plane-Wave Born, Distorted-Wave and R-matrix electron impact excitation data with those observed from the plasma. As part of the modelling work, we investigate the potential use of various lines as plasma diagnostic tools.

  13. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  14. Cloud Radiative Effect by Cloud Types Based on Radiative Transfer Model Calculations and Collocated A-Train Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Q.; Fetzer, E. J.; Schreier, M. M.; Kahn, B. H.; Huang, X.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud radiative effect is sensitive to both cloud types and the atmospheric conditions that are correspondent with the clouds. It is important to separate the radiative effects due to the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds and the impact of clouds on clear atmosphere radiation. To better quantify these components of cloud radiative effects, we construct a data record of water vapor, temperature, TOA shortwave and long-wave radiations, and cloud properties from collocated A-Train satellite observations and NASA MERRA reanalysis, stratified according to cloud types determined by MODIS observations. The sensitivity of cloud radiative effects on the properties of cloud is investigated in this study using the observation data. The cloud masking effect is quantified for different cloud types using the Fu and Liou radiative transfer model and the observed cloudy and clear atmospheric conditions. The sampling biases of the satellite observed temperature and water vapor vertical distributions are quantified based on comparisons between satellite observations and reanalysis, and then incorporated into the radiative transfer calculations to study the impact of these observational biases on cloud radiative effect estimation from the temperature and water vapor profiles obtained from satellite.

  15. Lee-Wick radiation induced bouncing universe models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Cai, Yi-Fu; Das, Suratna

    2013-04-01

    The present article discusses the effect of a Lee-Wick partner infested radiation phase of the early universe. As Lee-Wick partners can contribute negative energy density it is always possible that at some early phase of the universe when the Lee-Wick partners were thermalized the total energy density of the universe became very small making the effective Hubble radius very big. This possibility gives rise to the probability of a bouncing universe. As will be shown in the article a simple Lee-Wick radiation is not enough to produce a bounce. There can be two possibilities which can produce a bounce in the Lee-Wick radiation phase. One requires a cold dark matter candidate to trigger the bounce and the other possibility requires the bouncing temperature to be fine-tuned such as all the Lee-Wick partners of the standard fields are not thermalized at the bounce temperature. Both the possibilities give rise to a blue-tilted power spectrum of metric perturbations. Moreover the bouncing universe model can predict the lower limit of the masses of the Lee-Wick partners of chiral fermions and massless gauge bosons. The mass limit intrinsically depends upon the bounce temperature.

  16. Comparison between observed and modelled radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhian; Pethick, David

    2002-10-01

    Measurements of radiative and microphysical characteristics of stratocumulus clouds in a coastal region of South Australia are reported. The measurements were taken on 14 April 1999 using two aircraft from Airborne Research Australia based at the Flinders University of South Australia during the Kangaroo Island Radiation and Cloud Experiments (KIRCE). The measurements include radiation, cloud liquid-water content, ambient temperature and humidity. A new method to process the measurements is described. Cloud albedo and absorption were determined using the observed solar irradiances at the cloud top and base and the results were compared with theoretical calculations. Five water-cloud optical parametrization schemes were tested against the observations. In addition, some observational data from the Joint Air-Sea Interaction (JASIN) experiment were used in the comparisons. It has been found that measured cloud properties from the KIRCE experiment are very similar to those of the JASIN experiment. The modelled results from most schemes are compatible and generally in good agreement with the measurements.

  17. Theoretical model of infrared radiation of dressed human body indoors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zonglong; Yang, Kuntao

    2008-02-01

    The human body detecting by infrared thermography plays an important role in the field of medical treatment, scout and rescuing work after disaster occuring. The infrared image theoretical model is a foundation for a human body detecting because it can improve the ability and efficiency. The essence and significance of the information on the temperature field of the human body in indoor environment is systematically discussed on the basis of physical structure and thermoregulation system. The various factors that influence the body temperature are analyzed, then the method for the calculation of temperature distribution of the surface temperature is introduced. On the basis of the infrared radiation theory, a theoretical model is proposed to calculate the radiant flux intensity of the human body. This model can be applied to many fields.

  18. On a radiative origin of the Standard Model from trinification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo-Molina, José Eliel; Morais, António P.; Pasechnik, Roman; Wessén, Jonas

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present a trinification-based grand unified theory incorporating a global SU(3) family symmetry that after a spontaneous breaking leads to a left-right symmetric model. Already at the classical level, this model can accommodate the matter content and the quark Cabbibo mixing in the Standard Model (SM) with only one Yukawa coupling at the unification scale. Considering the minimal low-energy scenario with the least amount of light states, we show that the resulting effective theory enables dynamical breaking of its gauge group down to that of the SM by means of radiative corrections accounted for by the renormalisation group evolution at one loop. This result paves the way for a consistent explanation of the SM breaking scale and fermion mass hierarchies.

  19. Radiative transfer theory applied to ocean bottom modeling.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Jorge E; Zurk, Lisa M

    2009-10-01

    Research on the propagation of acoustic waves in the ocean bottom sediment is of interest for active sonar applications such as target detection and remote sensing. The interaction of acoustic energy with the sea floor sublayers is usually modeled with techniques based on the full solution of the wave equation, which sometimes leads to mathematically intractable problems. An alternative way to model wave propagation in layered media containing random scatterers is the radiative transfer (RT) formulation, which is a well established technique in the electromagnetics community and is based on the principle of conservation of energy. In this paper, the RT equation is used to model the backscattering of acoustic energy from a layered elastic bottom sediment containing distributions of independent scatterers due to a constant single frequency excitation in the water column. It is shown that the RT formulation provides insight into the physical phenomena of scattering and conversion of energy between waves of different polarizations.

  20. Suomi NPP VIIRS Striping Analysis using Radiative Transfer Model Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Cao, C.

    2015-12-01

    Modern satellite radiometers such as VIIRS have many detectors with slightly different relative spectral response (RSR). These differences can introduce artifacts such as striping in the imagery. In recent studies we have analyzed the striping pattern related to the detector level RSR difference in VIIRS Thermal Emissive Bands (TEB) M15 and M16, which includes line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) detector level response study and onboard detector stability evaluation using the solar diffuser. Now we extend these analysis to the Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) using MODTRAN atmospheric radiative transfer model (RTM) for detector level radiance simulation. Previous studies analyzed the striping pattern in the images of VIIRS ocean color and reflectance in RSB, further studies about the root cause for striping are still needed. In this study, we will use the MODTRAN model at spectral resolution of 1 cm^-1 under different atmospheric conditions for VIIRS RSB, for example band M1 centered at 410nm which is used for Ocean Color product retrieval. The impact of detector level RSR difference, atmospheric dependency, and solar geometry on the striping in VIIRS SDR imagery will be investigated. The cumulative histogram method used successfully for the TEB striping analysis will be used to quantify the striping. These analysis help S-NPP and J1 to better understand the root cause for VIIRS image artifacts and reduce the uncertainties in geophysical retrievals to meet the user needs.

  1. Analysis of a Radiation Model of the Shuttle Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brooke M.; Nealy, John E.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Qualls, Garry D.; Wilson, John W.

    2003-01-01

    The extravehicular activity (EVA) required to assemble the International Space Station (ISS) will take approximately 1500 hours with 400 hours of EVA per year in operations and maintenance. With the Space Station at an inclination of 51.6 deg the radiation environment is highly variable with solar activity being of great concern. Thus, it is important to study the dose gradients about the body during an EVA to help determine the cancer risk associated with the different environments the ISS will encounter. In this paper we are concerned only with the trapped radiation (electrons and protons). Two different scenarios are looked at: the first is the quiet geomagnetic periods in low Earth orbit (LEO) and the second is during a large solar particle event in the deep space environment. This study includes a description of how the space suit's computer aided design (CAD) model was developed along with a description of the human model. Also included is a brief description of the transport codes used to determine the total integrated dose at several locations within the body. Finally, the results of the transport codes when applied to the space suit and human model and a brief description of the results are presented.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann model for a steady radiative transfer equation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-Liang; Yao, Feng-Ju; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    A complete lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) is proposed for the steady radiative transfer equation (RTE). The RTE can be regarded as a pure convection equation with a source term. To derive the expressions for the equilibrium distribution function and the relaxation time, an artificial isotropic diffusion term is introduced to form a convection-diffusion equation. When the dimensionless relaxation time has a value of 0.5, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) is exactly applicable to the original steady RTE. We also perform a multiscale analysis based on the Chapman-Enskog expansion to recover the macroscopic RTE from the mesoscopic LBE. The D2Q9 model is used to solve the LBE, and the numerical results obtained by the LBM are comparable to the results obtained by other methods or analytical solutions, which demonstrates that the proposed model is highly accurate and stable in simulating multidimensional radiative transfer. In addition, we find that the convergence rate of the LBM depends on the transport properties of RTE: for diffusion-dominated RTE with a large optical thickness, the LBM shows a second-order convergence rate in space, while for convection-dominated RTE with a small optical thickness, a lower convergence rate is observed. PMID:27627417

  3. Lattice Boltzmann model for a steady radiative transfer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hong-Liang; Yao, Feng-Ju; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    A complete lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) is proposed for the steady radiative transfer equation (RTE). The RTE can be regarded as a pure convection equation with a source term. To derive the expressions for the equilibrium distribution function and the relaxation time, an artificial isotropic diffusion term is introduced to form a convection-diffusion equation. When the dimensionless relaxation time has a value of 0.5, the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) is exactly applicable to the original steady RTE. We also perform a multiscale analysis based on the Chapman-Enskog expansion to recover the macroscopic RTE from the mesoscopic LBE. The D2Q9 model is used to solve the LBE, and the numerical results obtained by the LBM are comparable to the results obtained by other methods or analytical solutions, which demonstrates that the proposed model is highly accurate and stable in simulating multidimensional radiative transfer. In addition, we find that the convergence rate of the LBM depends on the transport properties of RTE: for diffusion-dominated RTE with a large optical thickness, the LBM shows a second-order convergence rate in space, while for convection-dominated RTE with a small optical thickness, a lower convergence rate is observed.

  4. 3D Monte Carlo radiation transfer modelling of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. Louise; Christison, Craig; Brown, C. Tom A.; Wood, Kenneth; Valentine, Ronan M.; Moseley, Harry

    2015-06-01

    The effects of ageing and skin type on Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) for different treatment methods have been theoretically investigated. A multilayered Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer model is presented where both daylight activated PDT and conventional PDT are compared. It was found that light penetrates deeper through older skin with a lighter complexion, which translates into a deeper effective treatment depth. The effect of ageing was found to be larger for darker skin types. The investigation further strengthens the usage of daylight as a potential light source for PDT where effective treatment depths of about 2 mm can be achieved.

  5. Image-based modeling of radiation-induced foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costes, Sylvain; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Chen, James; Chou, William; Gascard, Philippe

    Several proteins involved in the response to DNA double strand breaks (DSB) form microscopically visible nuclear domains, or foci, after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiation-induced foci (RIF) are believed to be located where DNA damage occurs. To test this assumption, we used Monte Carlo simulations to predict the spatial distribution of DSB in human nuclei exposed to high or low-LET radiation. We then compared these predictions to the distribution patterns of three DNA damage sensing proteins, i.e. 53BP1, phosphorylated ATM and γH2AX in human mammary epithelial. The probability to induce DSB can be derived from DNA fragment data measured experimentally by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. We first used this probability in Monte Carlo simulations to predict DSB locations in synthetic nuclei geometrically described by a complete set of human chromosomes, taking into account microscope optics from real experiments. Simulations showed a very good agreement for high-LET, predicting 0.7 foci/µm along the path of a 1 GeV/amu Fe particle against measurement of 0.69 to 0.82 foci/µm for various RIF 5 min following exposure (LET 150 keV/µm). On the other hand, discrepancies were shown in foci frequency for low-LET, with measurements 20One drawback using a theoretical model for the nucleus is that it assumes a simplistic and static pattern for DNA densities. However DNA damage pattern is highly correlated to DNA density pattern (i.e. the more DNA, the more likely to have a break). Therefore, we generalized our Monte Carlo approach to real microscope images, assuming pixel intensity of DAPI in the nucleus was directly proportional to the amount of DNA in that pixel. With such approach we could predict DNA damage pattern in real images on a per nucleus basis. Since energy is randomly deposited along high-LET particle paths, RIF along these paths should also be randomly distributed. As expected, simulations produced DNA-weighted random (Poisson) distributions. In

  6. Development of response models for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) sensors. Part 1: Dynamic models and computer simulations for the ERBE nonscanner, scanner and solar monitor sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Choi, Sang H.; Chrisman, Dan A., Jr.; Samms, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    Dynamic models and computer simulations were developed for the radiometric sensors utilized in the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The models were developed to understand performance, improve measurement accuracy by updating model parameters and provide the constants needed for the count conversion algorithms. Model simulations were compared with the sensor's actual responses demonstrated in the ground and inflight calibrations. The models consider thermal and radiative exchange effects, surface specularity, spectral dependence of a filter, radiative interactions among an enclosure's nodes, partial specular and diffuse enclosure surface characteristics and steady-state and transient sensor responses. Relatively few sensor nodes were chosen for the models since there is an accuracy tradeoff between increasing the number of nodes and approximating parameters such as the sensor's size, material properties, geometry, and enclosure surface characteristics. Given that the temperature gradients within a node and between nodes are small enough, approximating with only a few nodes does not jeopardize the accuracy required to perform the parameter estimates and error analyses.

  7. Advanced Electronics Technologies: Challenges for Radiation Effects Testing, Modeling, and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2005-01-01

    Emerging Electronics Technologies include: 1) Changes in the commercial semiconductor world; 2) Radiation Effects Sources (A sample test constraint); and 3) Challenges to Radiation Testing and Modeling: a) IC Attributes-Radiation Effects Implication b) Fault Isolation c) Scaled Geometry d) Speed e) Modeling Shortfall f) Knowledge Status

  8. Verification of snowpack radiation transfer models using actinometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Gavin J.; Simpson, William R.

    2005-04-01

    Actinometric measurements of photolysis rate coefficients within artificial snow have been used to test calculations of these coefficients by two radiative transfer models. The models used were based upon the delta-Eddington method or the discrete ordinate method, as implemented in the tropospheric ultraviolet and visible snow model, and were constrained by irradiance measurements and light attenuation profiles within the artificial snow. Actinometric measurements of the photolysis rate coefficient were made by observing the unimolecular conversion of 2-nitrobenzaldehyde (NBA) to its photoproduct under ultraviolet irradiation. A control experiment using liquid solutions of NBA determined that the quantum yield for conversion was ϕ = 0.41 ± 0.04 (±2σ). Measured photolysis rate coefficients in the artificial snow are enhanced in the near-surface layer, as predicted in the model calculations. The two models yielded essentially identical results for the depth-integrated photolysis rate coefficient of NBA, and their results quantitatively agreed with the actinometric measurements within the experimental precision of the measurement (±10%, ±2σ). The study shows that these models accurately determine snowpack actinic fluxes. To calculate in-snow photolysis rates for a molecule of interest, one must also have knowledge of the absorption spectrum and quantum yield for the specific photoprocess in addition to the actinic flux. Having demonstrated that the actinic flux is well determined by these models, we find that the major remaining uncertainty in prediction of snowpack photochemical rates is the measurement of these molecular photophysical properties.

  9. Enhanced solar radiation pressure modeling for Galileo satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenbruck, O.; Steigenberger, P.; Hugentobler, U.

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for modeling solar radiation pressure (SRP) effects on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). It focuses on the Galileo In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites, for which obvious SRP modeling deficits can be identified in presently available precise orbit products. To overcome these problems, the estimation of empirical accelerations in the Sun direction (D), solar panel axis (Y) and the orthogonal (B) axis is complemented by an a priori model accounting for the contribution of the rectangular spacecraft body. Other than the GPS satellites, which comprise an almost cubic body, the Galileo IOV satellites exhibit a notably rectangular shape with a ratio of about 2:1 for the main body axes. Use of the a priori box model allows to properly model the varying cross section exposed to the Sun during yaw-steering attitude mode and helps to remove systematic once-per-revolution orbit errors that have so far affected the Galileo orbit determination. Parameters of a simple a priori cuboid model suitable for the IOV satellites are established from the analysis of a long-term set of GNSS observations collected with the global network of the Multi-GNSS Experiment of the International GNSS Service. The model is finally demonstrated to reduce the peak magnitude of radial orbit errors from presently 20 cm down to 5 cm outside eclipse phases.

  10. Global climate modeling of Saturn’s atmosphere. Part I: Evaluation of the radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerlet, S.; Spiga, A.; Sylvestre, M.; Indurain, M.; Fouchet, T.; Leconte, J.; Millour, E.; Wordsworth, R.; Capderou, M.; Bézard, B.; Forget, F.

    2014-08-01

    We have developed and optimized a seasonal, radiative-convective model of Saturn’s upper troposphere and stratosphere. It is used to investigate Saturn’s radiatively-forced thermal structure between 3 and 10-6 bar, and is intended to be included in a Saturn global climate model (GCM), currently under development. The main elements of the radiative transfer model are detailed as well as the sensitivity to spectroscopic parameters, hydrocarbon abundances, aerosol properties, oblateness, and ring shadowing effects. The vertical temperature structure and meridional seasonal contrasts obtained by the model are then compared to Cassini/CIRS observations. Several significant model-observation mismatches reveal that Saturn’s atmosphere departs from radiative equilibrium. For instance, we find that the modeled temperature profile is close to isothermal above the 2-mbar level, while the temperature retrieved from ground-based or Cassini/CIRS data continues to increase with altitude. Also, no local temperature minimum associated to the ring shadowing is observed in the data, while the model predicts stratospheric temperatures 10 K to 20 K cooler than in the absence of rings at winter tropical latitudes. These anomalies are strong evidence that processes other that radiative heating and cooling control Saturn’s stratospheric thermal structure. Finally, the model is used to study the warm stratospheric anomaly triggered after the 2010 Great White Spot. Comparison with recent Cassini/CIRS observations suggests that the rapid cooling phase of this warm “beacon” in May-June 2011 can be explained by radiative processes alone. Observations on a longer timeline are needed to better characterize and understand its long-term evolution.

  11. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

    2011-03-04

    Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library

  12. Single-Dose Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Maria, Osama Muhammad; Syme, Alasdair; Eliopoulos, Nicoletta; Muanza, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The generation of a self-resolved radiation-induced oral mucositis (RIOM) mouse model using the highest possibly tolerable single ionizing radiation (RT) dose was needed in order to study RIOM management solutions. We used 10-week-old male BALB/c mice with average weight of 23 g for model production. Mice were treated with an orthovoltage X-ray irradiator to induce the RIOM ulceration at the intermolar eminence of the animal tongue. General anesthesia was injected intraperitoneally for proper animal immobilization during the procedure. Ten days after irradiation, a single RT dose of 10, 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy generated a RIOM ulcer at the intermolar eminence (posterior upper tongue surface) with mean ulcer floor (posterior epithelium) heights of 190, 150, 25, 10, and 10 μm, respectively, compared to 200 μm in non-irradiated animals. The mean RIOM ulcer size % of the total epithelialized upper surface of the animal tongue was RT dose dependent. At day 10, the ulcer size % was 2, 5, 27, and 31% for 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy RT, respectively. The mean relative surface area of the total epithelialized upper surface of the tongue was RT dose dependent, since it was significantly decreased to 97, 95, 88, and 38% with 15, 18, 20, and 25 Gy doses, respectively, at day 10 after RT. Subcutaneous injection of 1 mL of 0.9% saline/6 h for 24 h yielded a 100% survival only with 18 Gy self-resolved RIOM, which had 5.6 ± 0.3 days ulcer duration. In conclusion, we have generated a 100% survival self-resolved single-dose RIOM male mouse model with long enough duration for application in RIOM management research. Oral mucositis ulceration was radiation dose dependent. Sufficient hydration of animals after radiation exposure significantly improved their survival. PMID:27446800

  13. Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Mather, Jim H.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2007-07-31

    Vertical distribution of radiative heating in the atmosphere is an important driver of atmospheric circulation, especially in the tropics. Evaluation of model simulations of the Earth's radiation balance typically focus on performance at the top of the atmosphere or at the surface. This study compares the vertical distribution of clouds and radiative heating rates calculated from observations at the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites on the islands of Nauru and Manus to simulations performed using the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) and the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). There are significant differences between the model vertical profiles of cloud properties and radiative heating and those calculated from the ARM observations. The MMF simulation results in better representation of the observed variability in ice cloud condensed water content and resulting upper tropospheric radiative heating rates than the CAM; more realistic diurnal variability in the radiative heating profiles; and a significantly lower level of zero net radiative heating.

  14. The development of early pediatric models and their application to radiation absorbed dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, J.W.

    1989-12-31

    This presentation will review and describe the development of pediatric phantoms for use in radiation dose calculations . The development of pediatric models for dose calculations essentially paralleled that of the adult. In fact, Snyder and Fisher at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory reported on a series of phantoms for such calculations in 1966 about two years before the first MIRD publication on the adult human phantom. These phantoms, for a newborn, one-, five-, ten-, and fifteen-year old, were derived from the adult phantom. The ``pediatric`` models were obtained through a series of transformations applied to the major dimensions of the adult, which were specified in a Cartesian coordinate system. These phantoms suffered from the fact that no real consideration was given to the influence of these mathematical transformations on the actual organ sizes in the other models nor to the relation of the resulting organ masses to those in humans of the particular age. Later, an extensive effort was invested in designing ``individual`` pediatric phantoms for each age based upon a careful review of the literature. Unfortunately, the phantoms had limited use and only a small number of calculations were made available to the user community. Examples of the phantoms, their typical dimensions, common weaknesses, etc. will be discussed.

  15. The development of early pediatric models and their application to radiation absorbed dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This presentation will review and describe the development of pediatric phantoms for use in radiation dose calculations . The development of pediatric models for dose calculations essentially paralleled that of the adult. In fact, Snyder and Fisher at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory reported on a series of phantoms for such calculations in 1966 about two years before the first MIRD publication on the adult human phantom. These phantoms, for a newborn, one-, five-, ten-, and fifteen-year old, were derived from the adult phantom. The pediatric'' models were obtained through a series of transformations applied to the major dimensions of the adult, which were specified in a Cartesian coordinate system. These phantoms suffered from the fact that no real consideration was given to the influence of these mathematical transformations on the actual organ sizes in the other models nor to the relation of the resulting organ masses to those in humans of the particular age. Later, an extensive effort was invested in designing individual'' pediatric phantoms for each age based upon a careful review of the literature. Unfortunately, the phantoms had limited use and only a small number of calculations were made available to the user community. Examples of the phantoms, their typical dimensions, common weaknesses, etc. will be discussed.

  16. Modeling of Sub-Grid Heterogeneity and its Impact on GCM Global Radiation Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew; Cairns, B.; Rossow, W. B.

    1999-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of high, low, and mid-level clouds is obtained from ISCCP D1 data. Monthly mean global maps of the observed cloud variability are used to re-scale GCM prognostic cloud optical depths and radiative parameters via the Monte Carlo cloud heterogeneity parameterization that utilizes the existing plane-parallel GCM radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes for inhomogeneous cloud distributions. The GCM radiative fluxes at TOA and the ground surface are then compared to ERBE and GEBA results. These comparisons show that including sub-grid cloud variability in the GCM radiative model improves agreement between the GCM radiative energy budget components and observations,

  17. ESTIMATING SOLAR RADIATION EXPOSURE IN WETLANDS USING RADIATION MODELS, FIELD DATA, AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This seminar will describe development of methods for the estimation of solar radiation doses in wetlands. The methodology presents a novel approach to incorporating aspects of solar radiation dosimetry that have historically received limited attention. These include effects of a...

  18. Estimating the economic impact of a repository from scenario-based surveys: Models of the relation of stated intent to actual behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, D.; Morwitz, V.; Kunreuther, H.

    1990-12-01

    The task of estimating the economic impact of a facility as novel and long-lived as a high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository is fraught with uncertainty. One approach to the forecasting problems is to survey economic agents as to how they would respond when confronted with hypothetical repository scenarios. A series of such studies conducted for the state of Nevada have examined the potential impact of a Yucca Mountain repository on behavior such as planning conventions, attending conventions, vacationing, outmigration, immigration, and business location. In each case, respondents drawn from a target population report on whether a particular repository event (either some form of an accident, or simply the presence of the facility) would cause them to act any differently than they otherwise would. The responses to such a survey provide an indication of whether or not economic behavior would be altered. However, the analysis is inevitably plagued with the question of how much credence to place in the reports of intended behavior; can we believe what people report they would do in a hypothetical situation? The present study examines a more precise version of this question regarding the validity of stated intent data. After reviewing a variety of literature in the area of intent versus actual behavior, we provide an answer to the question, ``What levels of actual behavior are consistent with the intent data that have been observed in the repository surveys?`` More formally, we assume that we are generally interested in predicting the proportion of a sample who will actually perform a target behavior. 86 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Modeling Radiative Forcing by Aerosols: How Good is Good Enough?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    Radiative forcing of climate change by anthropogenic aerosols is now recognized as the largest uncertainty in climate forcing F over the industrial period. This uncertainty limits inference of Earth's climate sensitivity λ either empirically or by comparison of observed temperature change over the industrial period Δ T with modeled temperature change obtained by imposing a time-dependent forcing in a climate model. Either way, for a desired uncertainty in λ of, say, 30% (e.g., temperature increase resulting from doubling atmospheric CO2 Δ T2x = 3 +/- 1 K), the required uncertainty in F is about 20%. The resultant required uncertainty in aerosol forcing depends on the magnitude of this for cing. If total aerosol forcing is small, the requisite uncertainty can be quite large, e.g., a factor of 2 for aerosol forcing -0.4 W m-2. However as aerosol forcing magnitude increases the requirement is much more stringent, e.g., for aerosol for c ing -1.2 W m-2, 10%, comparable to present uncertainty in greenhouse gas forcing. This talk examines quantifiable uncertainties in aerosol forcing and apportions them between contributions from atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric radiation, and c l ou d microphysics. Unless and until present uncertainties are greatly reduced it will not be possible to place confident limits on Earth's climate sensitivity, limiting society's ability to confidently plan to adapt to or mitigate future climate chang e arising from increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. n

  20. Modeling of clouds and radiation for developing parameterizations for general circulation models. Annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Toon, O.B.; Westphal, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    We have used a hierarchy of numerical models for cirrus and stratus clouds and for radiative transfer to improve the reliability of general circulation models. Our detailed cloud microphysical model includes all of the physical processes believed to control the lifecycles of liquid and ice clouds in the troposphere. We have worked on specific GCM parameterizations for the radiative properties of cirrus clouds, making use of a mesocale model as the test-bed for the parameterizations. We have also modeled cirrus cloud properties with a detailed cloud physics model to better understand how the radiatively important properties of cirrus are controlled by their environment. We have used another cloud microphysics model to investigate of the interactions between aerosols and clouds. This work is some of the first to follow the details of interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets and has shown some unexpected relations between clouds and aerosols. We have also used line-by- line radiative transfer results verified with ARM data, to derive a GCMS.

  1. GERMcode: A Stochastic Model for Space Radiation Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2012-01-01

    A new computer model, the GCR Event-based Risk Model code (GERMcode), was developed to describe biophysical events from high-energy protons and high charge and energy (HZE) particles that have been studied at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) for the purpose of simulating space radiation biological effects. In the GERMcode, the biophysical description of the passage of HZE particles in tissue and shielding materials is made with a stochastic approach that includes both particle track structure and nuclear interactions. The GERMcode accounts for the major nuclear interaction processes of importance for describing heavy ion beams, including nuclear fragmentation, elastic scattering, and knockout-cascade processes by using the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model. The QMSFRG model has been shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections. For NSRL applications, the GERMcode evaluates a set of biophysical properties, such as the Poisson distribution of particles or delta-ray hits for a given cellular area and particle dose, the radial dose on tissue, and the frequency distribution of energy deposition in a DNA volume. By utilizing the ProE/Fishbowl ray-tracing analysis, the GERMcode will be used as a bi-directional radiation transport model for future spacecraft shielding analysis in support of Mars mission risk assessments. Recent radiobiological experiments suggest the need for new approaches to risk assessment that include time-dependent biological events due to the signaling times for activation and relaxation of biological processes in cells and tissue. Thus, the tracking of the temporal and spatial distribution of events in tissue is a major goal of the GERMcode in support of the simulation of biological processes important in GCR risk assessments. In order to validate our approach, basic radiobiological responses such as cell survival curves, mutation, chromosomal

  2. Three-dimensional radiation transfer modeling in a dicotyledon leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Yves M.; Jacquemoud, Stéphane; Verstraete, Michel M.; Ustin, Susan L.

    1996-11-01

    The propagation of light in a typical dicotyledon leaf is investigated with a new Monte Carlo ray-tracing model. The three-dimensional internal cellular structure of the various leaf tissues, including the epidermis, the palisade parenchyma, and the spongy mesophyll, is explicitly described. Cells of different tissues are assigned appropriate morphologies and contain realistic amounts of water and chlorophyll. Each cell constituent is characterized by an index of refraction and an absorption coefficient. The objective of this study is to investigate how the internal three-dimensional structure of the tissues and the optical properties of cell constituents control the reflectance and transmittance of the leaf. Model results compare favorably with laboratory observations. The influence of the roughness of the epidermis on the reflection and absorption of light is investigated, and simulation results confirm that convex cells in the epidermis focus light on the palisade parenchyma and increase the absorption of radiation.

  3. Modeling topographic influences on solar radiation: A manual for the SOLARFLUX Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, P.M.; Hetrick, W.A.; Saving, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    SOLARFLUX is a geographical information system (GIS) based computer program (running under ARC/INFO and GRID) that models incoming solar radiation based on surface orientation (slope and aspect), solar angle (azimuth and zenith) as it shifts over time, shadows caused by topographic features, and atmospheric conditions. A convenient user interface allows specification of program parameters including latitude, time interval for simulation, file name of a topographic surface, atmospheric conditions (transmittivity), and file names for output. The user specifies a topographic surface as an array of elevation values (GRID). SOLARFLUX generates five basic types of output: 1) total direct radiation, 2) duration of direct sunlight, 3) total diffuse radiation, 4) skyview factor, and 5) hemispherical viewsheds of sky obstruction for specified surface locations. This manual serves as the comprehensive guide to SOLARFLUX. Included are discussions on modeling insolation on complex surfaces, our theoretical approach, program setup and operation, and a set of applications illustrating characteristics of topographic insolation modeling.

  4. Competing Risk Analysis of Neurologic versus Nonneurologic Death in Patients Undergoing Radiosurgical Salvage After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Failure: Who Actually Dies of Their Brain Metastases?

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, John T.; Colmer, Hentry G.; White, Lance; Fitzgerald, Nora; Isom, Scott; Bourland, John D.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Chan, Michael D.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To estimate the hazard for neurologic (central nervous system, CNS) and nonneurologic (non-CNS) death associated with patient, treatment, and systemic disease status in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) failure, using a competing risk model. Patients and Methods: Of 757 patients, 293 experienced recurrence or new metastasis following WBRT. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified covariates for consideration in the multivariate model. Competing risks multivariable regression was performed to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for both CNS and non-CNS death after adjusting for patient, disease, and treatment factors. The resultant model was converted into an online calculator for ease of clinical use. Results: The cumulative incidence of CNS and non-CNS death at 6 and 12 months was 20.6% and 21.6%, and 34.4% and 35%, respectively. Patients with melanoma histology (relative to breast) (aHR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.0), brainstem location (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), and number of metastases (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.2) had increased aHR for CNS death. Progressive systemic disease (aHR 0.55, 95% CI 0.4-0.8) and increasing lowest margin dose (aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.9-0.99) were protective against CNS death. Patients with lung histology (aHR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) and progressive systemic disease (aHR 2.14, 95% CI 1.5-3.0) had increased aHR for non-CNS death. Conclusion: Our nomogram provides individual estimates of neurologic death after salvage stereotactic radiosurgery for patients who have failed prior WBRT, based on histology, neuroanatomical location, age, lowest margin dose, and number of metastases after adjusting for their competing risk of death from other causes.

  5. A fast all-sky radiative transfer model and its implications for solar energy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer models simulating broadband solar radiation, e.g. Rapid Radiation Transfer Model (RRTM) and its GCM applications, have been widely used by atmospheric scientists to model solar resource for various energy applications such as operational forecasting. Due to the complexity of solving the radiative transfer equation, simulating solar radiation under cloudy conditions can be extremely time consuming though many approximations, e.g. two-stream approach and delta-M truncation scheme, have been utilized. To provide a new option to approximate solar radiation, we developed a Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) using simulated cloud transmittance and reflectance from 16-stream RRTM model runs. The solar irradiances at the land surface were simulated by combining parameterized cloud properties with a fast clear-sky radiative transfer model. Using solar radiation measurements from the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) central facility in Oklahoma as a benchmark against the model simulations, we were able to demonstrate that the accuracy of FARMS was comparable to the two-stream approach. However, FARMS is much more efficient since it does not explicitly solve the radiative transfer equation for each individual cloud condition. We further explored the use of FARMS to promote solar resource assessment and forecasting research through the increased ability to accommodate higher spatial and temporal resolution calculations for the next generation of satellite and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  6. Computational Modeling of Radiative, Thermal, and Kinetic Regimes of Flame Spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsek, Aslihan

    The purpose of this thesis presented is to analyze flame spread over thermally thin solid fuels in three regimes of flame spread process; radiative, thermal, and kinetic regimes. The analyses have been performed using a comprehensive two dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model written in Fortran language developed by Bhattacharjee. Flame spread over thermally thin fuels in quiescent and opposing flow microgravity environments is investigated. An extinction study is performed with different computational domain sizes for a set of fuel thicknesses to understand the effect of domain size on the extinction velocities in the radiative and kinetic regimes. The effect of development length boundary layer is studied in both radiative and kinetic regimes. It is found that flame spread rate, flame size, flame temperature, blow-off and radiative extinction velocities depend on the development length and the boundary layer created by the opposing flow. A correlation between the extinction development length and opposed flow velocity is established. Flame spread over open cell phenolic foam is investigated in detail in a quiescent microgravity environment. The critical fuel thickness is found at different oxygen concentrations and compared to those for PMMA. Pressure, oxygen concentration, and radiation studies are also performed to analyze the flame spread over foam. To understand the effect of radiation on flame spread, the CFD model is coupled with two different radiation models in a microgravity environment. The first radiation model includes gas to surface conduction, gas to environment radiation loss, gas to surface feedback radiation, and surface to environment radiation loss. The second model only excludes gas to surface radiation feedback. The results obtained using these two models are compared with the CFD results; one with radiation completely neglected, and one with only gas to surface radiation feedback neglected. Flame spread in downward

  7. Applications of amorphous track models in radiation biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D. T.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The average or amorphous track model uses the response of a system to gamma-rays and the radial distribution of dose about an ion's path to describe survival and other cellular endpoints from proton, heavy ion, and neutron irradiation. This model has been used for over 30 years to successfully fit many radiobiology data sets. We review several extensions of this approach that address objections to the original model, and consider applications of interest in radiobiology and space radiation risk assessment. In the light of present views of important cellular targets, the role of target size as manifested through the relative contributions from ion-kill (intra-track) and gamma-kill (inter-track) remains a critical question in understanding the success of the amorphous track model. Several variations of the amorphous model are discussed, including ones that consider the radial distribution of event-sizes rather than average electron dose, damage clusters rather than multiple targets, and a role for repair or damage processing.

  8. Modeling Planet-Building Stellar Disks with Radiative Transfer Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swearingen, Jeremy R.; Sitko, Michael L.; Whitney, Barbara; Grady, Carol A.; Wagner, Kevin Robert; Champney, Elizabeth H.; Johnson, Alexa N.; Warren, Chelsea C.; Russell, Ray W.; Hammel, Heidi B.; Lisse, Casey M.; Cure, Michel; Kraus, Stefan; Fukagawa, Misato; Calvet, Nuria; Espaillat, Catherine; Monnier, John D.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Wilner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the many planetary systems found outside of our own solar system cannot be completed without knowledge of the beginnings these systems. By detecting planets in very young systems and modeling the disks of material around stars from which they form, we can gain a better understanding of planetary origin and evolution. The efforts presented here have been in modeling two pre-transitional disk systems using a radiative transfer code. With the first of these systems, V1247 Ori, a model that fits the spectral energy distribution (SED) well and whose parameters are consistent with existing interferometry data (Kraus et al 2013) has been achieved. The second of these two systems, SAO 206462, has presented a different set of challenges but encouraging SED agreement between the model and known data gives hope that the model can produce images that can be used in future interferometry work. This work was supported by NASA ADAP grant NNX09AC73G, and the IR&D program at The Aerospace Corporation.

  9. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  10. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Ullrich, Robert L.; Petrache, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u 56Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u 28Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy 56Fe or 28Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  11. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions.

  12. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m-1 to 697.41 Fμ m-1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m-1 to 566.11 Fμ m-1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis.

  13. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m‑1 to 697.41 Fμ m‑1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m‑1 to 566.11 Fμ m‑1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis.

  14. A physical model of the photo- and radiation-induced degradation of ytterbium-doped silica optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Mady, Franck Duchez, Jean-Bernard Mebrouk, Yasmine Benabdesselam, Mourad

    2014-10-21

    We propose a model to describe the photo- or/and the radiation-induced darkening of ytterbium-doped silica optical fibers. This model accounts for the well-established experimental features of photo-darkening. Degradation behaviors predicted for fibers pumped in harsh environments are also fully confirmed by experimental data reported in the work by Duchez et al. (this proceeding), which gives a detailed characterization of the interplay between the effects of the pump and those of a superimposed ionizing irradiation (actual operation conditions in space-based applications for instance). In particular, dependences of the darkening build-up on the pump power, the total ionizing dose and the dose rate are all correctly reproduced. The presented model is a ‘sufficient’ one, including the minimal physical ingredients required to reproduce experimental features. Refinements could be proposed to improve, e.g., quantitative kinetics.

  15. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  16. Radiative type III seesaw model and its collider phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Pahlen, Federico; Palacio, Guillermo; Restrepo, Diego; Zapata, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the present bounds of a scotogenic model, the radiative type III seesaw, in which an additional scalar doublet and at least two fermion triplets of S U (2 )L are added to the Standard Model. In the radiative type III seesaw, the new physics (NP) sector is odd under an exact global Z2 symmetry. This symmetry guaranties that the lightest NP neutral particle is stable, providing a natural dark matter candidate, and leads to naturally suppressed neutrino masses generated by a one-loop realization of an effective Weinberg operator. We focus on the region with the highest sensitivity in present and future LHC searches, with light scalar dark matter and at least one NP fermion triplet at the sub-TeV scale. This region allows for significant production cross sections of NP fermion pairs at the LHC. We reinterpret a set of searches for supersymmetric particles at the LHC obtained using the package CheckMATE, to set limits on our model as a function of the masses of the NP particles and their Yukawa interactions. The most sensitive search channel is found to be dileptons plus missing transverse energy. In order to target the case of tau enhanced decays and the case of compressed spectra, we reinterpret the recent slepton and chargino search bounds by ATLAS. For a lightest NP fermion triplet with a maximal branching ratio to either electrons or muons, we exclude NP fermion masses of up to 650 GeV, while this bound is reduced to approximately 400 GeV in the tau-philic case. Allowing for a general flavor structure, we set limits on the Yukawa couplings, which are directly related to the neutrino flavor structure.

  17. The Chandra X-Ray Observatory Radiation Environment Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, W. C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Smith, Shawn; Swift, Wesley R.; ODell, Stephen L.; Cameron, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    CRMFLX (Chandra Radiation Model of ion FluX) is an environmental risk mitigation tool for use as a decision aid in planning the operations times for Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detector. The accurate prediction of the proton flux environment with energies of 100 - 200 keV is needed in order to protect the ACIS detector against proton degradation. Unfortunately, protons of this energy are abundant in the region of space Chandra must operate, and the on-board Electron, Proton, and Helium Instrument (EPHIN) does not measure proton flux levels of the required energy range. In addition to the concerns arising from the radiation belts, substorm injections of plasma from the magnetotail may increase the protons flux by orders of magnitude in this energy range. The Earth's magnetosphere is a dynamic entity, with the size and location of the magnetopause driven by the highly variable solar wind parameters (number density, velocity, and magnetic field components). Operational times for the telescope must be made weeks in advance, decisions which are complicated by the variability of the environment. CRMFLX is an engineering model developed to address these problems and provides proton flux and fluence statistics for the terrestrial outer magnetosphere, magnetosheath, and solar wind for use in scheduling ACIS operations. CRMFLX implements a number of standard models to predict the bow shock, magnetopause, and plasma sheet boundaries based on the sampling of historical solar wind data sets. Measurements from the GEOTAIL and POLAR spacecraft are used to create the proton flux database. This paper describes the recently released CRMFLX v2 implementation that includes an algorithm that propagates flux from an observation location to other regions of the magnetosphere based on convective ExB and VB-curvature particle drift motions in electric and magnetic fields. This technique has the advantage of more completely filling out the database and makes maximum

  18. Forming chondrules in impact splashes. I. Radiative cooling model

    SciTech Connect

    Dullemond, Cornelis Petrus; Stammler, Sebastian Markus; Johansen, Anders

    2014-10-10

    The formation of chondrules is one of the oldest unsolved mysteries in meteoritics and planet formation. Recently an old idea has been revived: the idea that chondrules form as a result of collisions between planetesimals in which the ejected molten material forms small droplets that solidify to become chondrules. Pre-melting of the planetesimals by radioactive decay of {sup 26}Al would help produce sprays of melt even at relatively low impact velocity. In this paper we study the radiative cooling of a ballistically expanding spherical cloud of chondrule droplets ejected from the impact site. We present results from numerical radiative transfer models as well as analytic approximate solutions. We find that the temperature after the start of the expansion of the cloud remains constant for a time t {sub cool} and then drops with time t approximately as T ≅ T {sub 0}[(3/5)t/t {sub cool} + 2/5]{sup –5/3} for t > t {sub cool}. The time at which this temperature drop starts t {sub cool} depends via an analytical formula on the mass of the cloud, the expansion velocity, and the size of the chondrule. During the early isothermal expansion phase the density is still so high that we expect the vapor of volatile elements to saturate so that no large volatile losses are expected.

  19. Cloud cover models derived from satellite radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, S. J.; Somerville, P. N.

    1979-01-01

    Using daily measurement of day and night infrared and incoming and absorbed solar radiation obtained from a TIROS satellite over a period of approximately 45 months, and integrated over 2.5 degree latitude-longitude grids, the proportion of cloud cover over each grid each day was derived for the entire period. For each of four three-month periods, estimates a and b of the two parameters of the best-fit beta distribution were obtained for each grid location. The (a,b) plane was divided into a number of regions. All the geographical locations whose (a,b) estimates were in the same region in the (a,b) plane were said to have the same cloud cover type for that season. For each season, the world was thus divided into separate cloud cover types. Using estimates of mean cloud cover for each season, the world was again divided into separate cloud cover types. The process was repeated for standard deviations. Thus for each season, three separate cloud cover models were obtained using the criteria of shape of frequency distribution, mean cloud cover, and variability of cloud cover. The cloud cover statistics were derived from once-a-day, near-local-noon satellite radiation measurements.

  20. Incorporation of multiple cloud layers for ultraviolet radiation modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charache, Darryl H.; Abreu, Vincent J.; Kuhn, William R.; Skinner, Wilbert R.

    1994-01-01

    Cloud data sets compiled from surface observations were used to develop an algorithm for incorporating multiple cloud layers into a multiple-scattering radiative transfer model. Aerosol extinction and ozone data sets were also incorporated to estimate the seasonally averaged ultraviolet (UV) flux reaching the surface of the Earth in the Detroit, Michigan, region for the years 1979-1991, corresponding to Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) version 6 ozone observations. The calculated UV spectrum was convolved with an erythema action spectrum to estimate the effective biological exposure for erythema. Calculations show that decreasing the total column density of ozone by 1% leads to an increase in erythemal exposure by approximately 1.1-1.3%, in good agreement with previous studies. A comparison of the UV radiation budget at the surface between a single cloud layer method and a multiple cloud layer method presented here is discussed, along with limitations of each technique. With improved parameterization of cloud properties, and as knowledge of biological effects of UV exposure increase, inclusion of multiple cloud layers may be important in accurately determining the biologically effective UV budget at the surface of the Earth.

  1. JITTER RADIATION MODEL OF THE CRAB GAMMA-RAY FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Teraki, Yuto; Takahara, Fumio

    2013-02-15

    The gamma-ray flares of the Crab nebula detected by the Fermi and AGILE satellites challenge our understanding of the physics of pulsars and their nebulae. The central problem is that the peak energy of the flares exceeds the maximum energy E {sub c} determined by synchrotron radiation loss. However, when turbulent magnetic fields exist with scales {lambda}{sub B} smaller than 2{pi}mc {sup 2}/eB, jitter radiation can emit photons with energies higher than E {sub c}. The scale required for the Crab flares is about two orders of magnitude less than the wavelength of the striped wind. We discuss a model in which the flares are triggered by plunging the high-density blobs into the termination shock. The observed hard spectral shape may be explained by the jitter mechanism. We make three observational predictions: first, the polarization degree will become lower in flares; second, no counterpart will be seen in TeV-PeV range; and third, the flare spectrum will not be harder than {nu}F {sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup 1}.

  2. Assessment of a differential total absorptivity solution to the radiative transfer equation as applied in the discrete transfer radiation model

    SciTech Connect

    Bressloff, N.W.; Moss, J.B.; Rubini, P.A.

    1996-04-01

    A differential total absorptivity (DTA) solution to the radiative transfer equation is assessed for application in the discrete transfer radiation model (DTRM). The new solution technique treats the source temperature dependence of adsorption explicitly, without the need for spectral integration. Predictions are presented for the radiative intensity across single lines of sight, and for the volumetric source variations in a full DTRM calculation between solid walls. DTA exhibits superior performance relative to a differential total transmissivity solution and the weighted sum of gray gases solution. Additionally, gray gas solutions and a homogeneous isothermal path solution are shown to be unsatisfactory.

  3. An Integer Batch Scheduling Model for a Single Machine with Simultaneous Learning and Deterioration Effects to Minimize Total Actual Flow Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusriski, R.; Sukoyo; Samadhi, T. M. A. A.; Halim, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    In the manufacturing industry, several identical parts can be processed in batches, and setup time is needed between two consecutive batches. Since the processing times of batches are not always fixed during a scheduling period due to learning and deterioration effects, this research deals with batch scheduling problems with simultaneous learning and deterioration effects. The objective is to minimize total actual flow time, defined as a time interval between the arrival of all parts at the shop and their common due date. The decision variables are the number of batches, integer batch sizes, and the sequence of the resulting batches. This research proposes a heuristic algorithm based on the Lagrange Relaxation. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is determined by comparing the resulting solutions of the algorithm to the respective optimal solution obtained from the enumeration method. Numerical experience results show that the average of difference among the solutions is 0.05%.

  4. Modeling Background Radiation in our Environment Using Geochemical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Malchow, Russell L.; Marsac, Kara; Burnley, Pamela; Hausrath, Elisabeth; Haber, Daniel; Adcock, Christopher

    2015-02-01

    Radiation occurs naturally in bedrock and soil. Gamma rays are released from the decay of the radioactive isotopes K, U, and Th. Gamma rays observed at the surface come from the first 30 cm of rock and soil. The energy of gamma rays is specific to each isotope, allowing identification. For this research, data was collected from national databases, private companies, scientific literature, and field work. Data points were then evaluated for self-consistency. A model was created by converting concentrations of U, K, and Th for each rock and soil unit into a ground exposure rate using the following equation: D=1.32 K+ 0.548 U+ 0.272 Th. The first objective of this research was to compare the original Aerial Measurement System gamma ray survey to results produced by the model. The second objective was to improve the method and learn the constraints of the model. Future work will include sample data analysis from field work with a goal of improving the geochemical model.

  5. Mesoscale modeling of smoke radiative feedback over the Sahel region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Wang, J.; Ichoku, C. M.; Ellison, L.; Zhang, F.; Yue, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This study employs satellite observations and a fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model, Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) to study the smoke radative feedback on surface energy budget, boundary layer processes, and atmospheric lapse rate in February 2008 over the Sahel region. The smoke emission inventories we use come from various sources, including but not limited to the Fire Locating and Modeling of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) developed by NRL and the Fire Energetic and Emissions Research (FEER) developed by NASA GSFC. Model performance is evaluated using numerous satellite and ground-based datasets: MODIS true color images, ground-based Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) measurements from AERONET, MODIS AOD retrievals, and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar data with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) atmospheric backscattering and extinction products. Specification of smoke injection height of 650 m in WRF-Chem yields aerosol vertical profiles that are most consistent with CALIOP observations of aerosol layer height. Statistically, 5% of the CALIPSO valid measurements of aerosols in February 2008 show aerosol layers either above the clouds or between the clouds, reinforcing the importance of the aerosol vertical distribution for quantifying aerosol impact on climate in the Sahel region. The results further show that the smoke radiative feedbacks are sensitive to assumptions of black carbon and organic carbon ratio in the particle emission inventory. Also investigated is the smoke semi-direct effect as a function of cloud fraction.

  6. Gravitational radiation in Bianchi Type V cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of the theory of embedding gravitational radiation fields in expanding universes pioneered by Hawking. The problem of embedding such fields in the expanding Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker dust-filled universe, considered by Hawking, is reexamined in a new formalism which permits an easy analysis, in particular, of the relationship between the boundary conditions and the satisfaction, by the Weyl tensor, of the conventional peeling-off behavior. Since gravity wave detectors are expected to pick up plane-fronted gravitational waves, the main thrust of this paper concerns the development of a formulation of Bianchi Type V cosmological models which enables the embedding of such plane-fronted waves to be carried out. This is worked out explicitly in the case of a perfect fluid, with pressure proportional to energy density, and with the histories of the fluid particles orthogonal to the surfaces of homogeneity. 18 references.

  7. RESRAD benchmarking against six radiation exposure pathway models

    SciTech Connect

    Faillace, E.R.; Cheng, J.J.; Yu, C.

    1994-10-01

    A series of benchmarking runs were conducted so that results obtained with the RESRAD code could be compared against those obtained with six pathway analysis models used to determine the radiation dose to an individual living on a radiologically contaminated site. The RESRAD computer code was benchmarked against five other computer codes - GENII-S, GENII, DECOM, PRESTO-EPA-CPG, and PATHRAE-EPA - and the uncodified methodology presented in the NUREG/CR-5512 report. Estimated doses for the external gamma pathway; the dust inhalation pathway; and the soil, food, and water ingestion pathways were calculated for each methodology by matching, to the extent possible, input parameters such as occupancy, shielding, and consumption factors.

  8. Radiative-convective equilibrium models of Uranus and Neptune

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, J.F.

    1986-03-01

    The present study of Uranus and Neptune radiative-convective equilibrium models gives emphasis to such aspects of the stratospheric energy balance as the influence of aerosol heating and convective penetration. The results obtained for Uranus imply that a continuum absorber may be a significant factor in the stratosphere despite the great distance from the sun. The results obtained for Neptune show that such a continuum absorber could significantly contribute to the energy balance within a localized stratospheric region, although it probably cannot furnish sufficient power to account for the observed IR spectrum irrespective of its vertical distribution. Attention is accordingly given to the convective penetration that could arise under such rapid vertical mixing that CH4's condensation cannot occur before the gas is carried above the condensation region. 64 references.

  9. Radiative energy balance of Venus based on improved models of the middle and lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Tellmann, S.; Arnold, G.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.; Häusler, B.

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of sources and sinks of radiative energy forces the atmospheric dynamics. The radiative transfer simulation model described by Haus et al. (2015b) is applied to calculate fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km) covering the energetic significant spectral range 0.125-1000 μm. The calculations rely on improved models of atmospheric parameters (temperature profiles, cloud parameters, trace gas abundances) retrieved from Venus Express (VEX) data (mainly VIRTIS-M-IR, but also VeRa and SPICAV/SOIR with respect to temperature results). The earlier observed pronounced sensitivity of the radiative energy balance of Venus to atmospheric parameter variations is confirmed, but present detailed comparative analyses of possible influence quantities ensure unprecedented insights into radiative forcing on Venus by contrast with former studies. Thermal radiation induced atmospheric cooling rates strongly depend on temperature structure and cloud composition, while heating rates are mainly sensitive to insolation conditions and UV absorber distribution. Cooling and heating rate responses to trace gas variations and cloud mode 1 abundance changes are small, but observed variations of cloud mode 2 abundances and altitude profiles reduce cooling at altitudes 65-80 km poleward of 50°S by up to 30% compared to the neglect of cloud parameter changes. Cooling rate variations with local time below 80 km are in the same order of magnitude. Radiative effects of the unknown UV absorber are modeled considering a proxy that is based on a suitable parameterization of optical properties, not on a specific chemical composition, and that is independent of the used cloud model. The UV absorber doubles equatorial heating near 68 km. Global average radiative equilibrium at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is characterized by the net flux balance of 156 W/m2, the Bond albedo of 0.76, and the effective planetary emission temperature of 228

  10. Radiative characteristics for atmospheric models from lidar sounding and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapunov, Maxim; Kuznetsov, Anatoly; Efremenko, Dmitry; Bochalov, Valentin; Melnikova, Irina; Samulenkov, Dimity; Vasilyev, Alexander; Poberovsky, Anatoly; Frantsuzova, Inna

    2016-04-01

    Optical models of atmospheric aerosols above of St. Petersburg are constraint on the base of the results of lidar sounding. The lidar system of the Resource Center "Observatory of environmental safety" of the St. Petersburg University Research Park is situated the city center, Vasilievsky Island. The measurements of the vertical profile of velocity and wind direction in the center of St. Petersburg for 2014 -2015 are fulfilled in addition. Height of laser sounding of aerosols is up to 25 km and wind up to 12 km. Observations are accomplished in the daytime and at night and mapped to vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and pressure obtained from radiosounding in Voeikovo (St. Petersburg suburb). Results of wind observations are compared with those of upper-air measurements of meteorological service in Voeikovo. The distance between the points of observation is 25 km. Statistics of wind directions at different heights are identified. The comparison is based on the assumption of homogeneity of the wind field on such a scale. In most cases, good agreement between the observed vertical profiles of wind, obtained by both methods is appeared. However, there were several cases, when the results differ sharply or at high altitudes, or, on the contrary, in the surface layer. The analysis of the impact of wind, temperature, and humidity profiles in the atmosphere on the properties and dynamics of solid impurities is implemented. Comparison with AOT results from AERONET observations in St. Petersburg suburb Peterhof is done. It is shown that diurnal and seasonal variations of optical and morphological parameters of atmospheric aerosols in the pollution cap over the city to a large extent determined by the variability of meteorological parameters. The results of the comparison are presented and possible explanation of the differences is proposed. Optical models of the atmosphere in day and night time in different seasons are constructed from lidar and AERONET

  11. "Inner electron" radiation belt: problems of model creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnyi, V.

    The contents of intensive fluxes of trapped electrons J_e with energies E_e>40 keV in center of the inner terrestrial radiation belt is remains uncertain in model Vette AE-8, 1991. It is explained by methodical difficulties of discrete measurements of electrons by narrow-angle spectrometers with background from omnidirectional penetrating protons with energies E_p>40 MeV and electrons with E_e>1 MeV after STARFISH burst. The results of integral measurements of trapped electrons by 2 groups: Krassovsky V.I. on III Soviet satellite (May 1958) and J. Van Allen on EXPLORER-IV (July-August 1958) and on INJUN-1 (1961) heave given a performances concerning electron energy fluxes I_e(E_e>20 keV) ˜ (20-100) erg cm-2 c-1 into inner radiation belt. Improved integral measurements of electrons by Krassovsky group on satellites KOSMOS-3,-5 and ELECTRON-1,-3 (1962-1964) allow to determine the distributions of their intensities in the whole inner belt. They can add the central part of inner belt of AE-8 model (see report Bolunova et al., COSPAR-1965, publ. in SPACE RESEARCH VI, 1967, p. 649-661). From these data a maximum of trapped electrons J_e(E_e>40 keV)=2\\cdot10^9 cm-2 c-1 is placed on L=1,6, B/B_0=1. Intensities up to 2\\cdot10^7 cm-2 c-1 are determined only by coordinates (L, B). For smaller intensities become essential dependence from longitude along a drift shell. So, in the center of the inner radiation belt the energy fluxes I_e(E_e>40 keV) reach 500 erg cm-2 c-1 and density n_e=0,2 cm-3 while for trapped protons I_p(E_p>40 MeV) is less than 3 erg cm-2 c-1 and n_p< 5\\cdot10-6 cm-3. It forces to search a more powerful sources trapped electron than beta-decay of neutrons albedo of cosmic rays.

  12. Enhancing Cloud Radiative Processes and Radiation Efficiency in the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model

    SciTech Connect

    Iacono, Michael J.

    2015-03-09

    The objective of this research has been to evaluate and implement enhancements to the computational performance of the RRTMG radiative transfer option in the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Efficiency is as essential as accuracy for effective numerical weather prediction, and radiative transfer is a relatively time-consuming component of dynamical models, taking up to 30-50 percent of the total model simulation time. To address this concern, this research has implemented and tested a version of RRTMG that utilizes graphics processing unit (GPU) technology (hereinafter RRTMGPU) to greatly improve its computational performance; thereby permitting either more frequent simulation of radiative effects or other model enhancements. During the early stages of this project the development of RRTMGPU was completed at AER under separate NASA funding to accelerate the code for use in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Goddard Earth Observing System GEOS-5 global model. It should be noted that this final report describes results related to the funded portion of the originally proposed work concerning the acceleration of RRTMG with GPUs in WRF. As a k-distribution model, RRTMG is especially well suited to this modification due to its relatively large internal pseudo-spectral (g-point) dimension that, when combined with the horizontal grid vector in the dynamical model, can take great advantage of the GPU capability. Thorough testing under several model configurations has been performed to ensure that RRTMGPU improves WRF model run time while having no significant impact on calculated radiative fluxes and heating rates or on dynamical model fields relative to the RRTMG radiation. The RRTMGPU codes have been provided to NCAR for possible application to the next public release of the WRF forecast model.

  13. ICRCCM (InterComparison of Radiation Codes used in Climate Models) Phase 2: Verification and calibration of radiation codes in climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, R.G.; Wiscombe, W.J.; Murcray, D.; Smith, W.; Strauch, R.

    1990-01-01

    Following the finding by the InterComparison of Radiation Codes used in Climate Models (ICRCCM) of large differences among fluxes predicted by sophisticated radiation models that could not be sorted out because of the lack of a set of accurate atmospheric spectral radiation data measured simultaneously with the important radiative properties of the atmosphere, our team of scientists proposed to remedy the situation by carrying out a comprehensive program of measurement and analysis called SPECTRE (Spectral Radiance Experiment). SPECTRE will establish an absolute standard against which to compare models, and will aim to remove the hidden variables'' (unknown humidities, aerosols, etc.) which radiation modelers have invoked to excuse disagreements with observation. The data to be collected during SPECTRE will form the test bed for the second phase of ICRCCM, namely verification and calibration of radiation codes used to climate models. This should lead to more accurate radiation models for use in parameterizing climate models, which in turn play a key role in the prediction of trace-gas greenhouse effects. Overall, the project is proceeding much as had been anticipated in the original proposal. The most significant accomplishments to date include the completion of the analysis of the original ICRCCM calculations, the completion of the initial sensitivity analysis of the radiation calculations for the effects of uncertainties in the measurement of water vapor and temperature and the acquisition and testing of the inexpensive spectrometers for use in the field experiment. The sensitivity analysis and the spectrometer tests given us much more confidence that the field experiment will yield the quality of data necessary to make a significant tests of and improvements to radiative transfer models used in climate studies.

  14. Application of Interval Predictor Models to Space Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy,Daniel P.; Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops techniques for predicting the uncertainty range of an output variable given input-output data. These models are called Interval Predictor Models (IPM) because they yield an interval valued function of the input. This paper develops IPMs having a radial basis structure. This structure enables the formal description of (i) the uncertainty in the models parameters, (ii) the predicted output interval, and (iii) the probability that a future observation would fall in such an interval. In contrast to other metamodeling techniques, this probabilistic certi cate of correctness does not require making any assumptions on the structure of the mechanism from which data are drawn. Optimization-based strategies for calculating IPMs having minimal spread while containing all the data are developed. Constraints for bounding the minimum interval spread over the continuum of inputs, regulating the IPMs variation/oscillation, and centering its spread about a target point, are used to prevent data over tting. Furthermore, we develop an approach for using expert opinion during extrapolation. This metamodeling technique is illustrated using a radiation shielding application for space exploration. In this application, we use IPMs to describe the error incurred in predicting the ux of particles resulting from the interaction between a high-energy incident beam and a target.

  15. Animal Models for Medical Countermeasures to Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jacqueline P.; Brown, Stephen L.; Georges, George E.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Hill, Richard P.; Huser, Amy K.; Kirsch, David G.; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Mason, Kathy A.; Medhora, Meetha M.; Moulder, John E.; Okunieff, Paul; Otterson, Mary F.; Robbins, Michael E.; Smathers, James B.; McBride, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Since September 11, 2001, there has been the recognition of a plausible threat from acts of terrorism, including radiological or nuclear attacks. A network of Centers for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation (CMCRs) has been established across the U.S.; one of the missions of this network is to identify and develop mitigating agents that can be used to treat the civilian population after a radiological event. The development of such agents requires comparison of data from many sources and accumulation of information consistent with the “Animal Rule” from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Given the necessity for a consensus on appropriate animal model use across the network to allow for comparative studies to be performed across institutions, and to identify pivotal studies and facilitate FDA approval, in early 2008, investigators from each of the CMCRs organized and met for an Animal Models Workshop. Working groups deliberated and discussed the wide range of animal models available for assessing agent efficacy in a number of relevant tissues and organs, including the immune and hematopoietic systems, gastrointestinal tract, lung, kidney and skin. Discussions covered the most appropriate species and strains available as well as other factors that may affect differential findings between groups and institutions. This report provides the workshop findings. PMID:20334528

  16. Local stem cell depletion model for radiation myelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Yaes, R.J.; Kalend, A.

    1988-06-01

    We propose a model for normal tissue damage based on the assumption that adult mammalian stem cells have limited mobility and, consequently, for each organ, there is a maximum volume (the critical volume, Vc), that can be repopulated and repaired by a single surviving stem cell. This concept is applied to a simple, 1-dimensional model of the spinal cord, where the critical volume is a slice of thickness, t, assumed to be small compared to lengths of spinal cord usually irradiated clinically. The probability of myelitis is explicitly obtained as a function of the dose, dose per fraction, length of cord irradiated, slice thickness, number of stem cells per slice and parameters alpha and beta of the stem cell survival curve. The complication probability is expressed as a triple negative exponential function of dose analogous to the double negative exponential function for tumor control, resulting in a steep dose-response curve with short tails in both the high dose and low dose regions. We show that the model predictions are compatible with the experimental data for radiation myelitis in the rat. We discuss how this concept can be applied to other organs such as skin and to organs composed of structurally and functionally distinct subunits, such as the kidney.

  17. Multiscale modeling of radiation effects in fcc and bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, E; Caturla, M; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Felter, T; Fluss, M; Perlado, J; Wall, M; Wirth, B

    1999-07-15

    The prospect of using computer simulations to calculate radiation-induced defect production and its influence on microstructure evolution and mechanical property changes during prolonged irradiation of nuclear materials has been a beckoning, yet elusive goal for many years. However, the enormous progress achieved in computational physics for calculating reliable, yet tractable interatomic potentials, coupled with vast improvements in computational power have brought this hope to near reality. In order to develop modeling and simulation tools for predicting the irradiation response of nuclear structural materials, models must be implemented and tested across all relevant length and time scales. We discuss the development and implementation of a modeling methodology that consists of the linkage and hierarchical use of ab initio electronic structure calculations, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations. This methodology can describe length and time scales from nanometers to hundreds of microns and from picoseconds to years, respectively. The ideas are demonstrated in two applications. First, we describe simulations that describe the irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing of Pb, a low melting point fcc metal, and compare the results to experiments. Second, we show how these methods can be used to investigate damage production and freely migrating defect formation in irradiated V, the key component of candidate low activation alloys for fusion energy applications.

  18. Nonequilibrium radiation and chemistry models for aerocapture vehicle flowfields, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: the development of detailed nonequilibrium radiation models for molecules along with appropriate models for atoms; the inclusion of nongray radiation gasdynamic coupling in the VSL (Viscous Shock Layer) code; the development and evaluation of various electron-electronic energy models; and an examination of the effects of shock slip.

  19. Guidelines for effective radiation transport for cable SGEMP modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, Clifton Russell; Fan, Wesley C.; Turner, C. David

    2014-07-01

    This report describes experiences gained in performing radiation transport computations with the SCEPTRE radiation transport code for System Generated ElectroMagnetic Pulse (SGEMP) applications. SCEPTRE is a complex code requiring a fairly sophisticated user to run the code effectively, so this report provides guidance for analysts interested in performing these types of calculations. One challenge in modeling coupled photon/electron transport for SGEMP is to provide a spatial mesh that is sufficiently resolved to accurately model surface charge emission and charge deposition near material interfaces. The method that has been most commonly used to date to compute cable SGEMP typically requires a sub-micron mesh size near material interfaces, which may be difficult for meshing software to provide for complex geometries. We present here an alternative method for computing cable SGEMP that appears to substantially relax this requirement. The report also investigates the effect of refining the energy mesh and increasing the order of the angular approximation to provide some guidance on determining reasonable parameters for the energy/angular approximation needed for x-ray environments. Conclusions for -ray environments may be quite different and will be treated in a subsequent report. In the course of the energy-mesh refinement studies, a bug in the cross-section generation software was discovered that may cause under prediction of the result by as much as an order of magnitude for the test problem studied here, when the electron energy group widths are much smaller than those for the photons. Results will be presented and compared using cross sections generated before and after the fix. We also describe adjoint modeling, which provides sensitivity of the total charge drive to the source energy and angle of incidence, which is quite useful for comparing the effect of changing the source environment and for determining most stressing angle of incidence and

  20. Coupling of an average-atom model with a collisional-radiative equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.

    2014-11-15

    We present a method to combine a collisional-radiative equilibrium model and an average-atom model to calculate bound and free electron wavefunctions in hot dense plasmas by taking into account screening. This approach allows us to calculate electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity as well as pressure in non local thermodynamic equilibrium plasmas. Illustrations of the method are presented for dilute titanium plasma.

  1. Detailed modeling analysis for soot formation and radiation in microgravity gas jet diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Tong, LI; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation heat transfer in combustion systems has been receiving increasing interest. In the case of hydrocarbon fuels, a significant portion of the radiation comes from soot particles, justifying the need for detailed soot formation model and radiation transfer calculations. For laminar gas jet diffusion flames, results from this project (4/1/91 8/22/95) and another NASA study show that flame shape, soot concentration, and radiation heat fluxes are substantially different under microgravity conditions. Our emphasis is on including detailed soot transport models and a detailed solution for radiation heat transfer, and on coupling them with the flame structure calculations. In this paper, we will discuss the following three specific areas: (1) Comparing two existing soot formation models, and identifying possible improvements; (2) A simple yet reasonably accurate approach to calculating total radiative properties and/or fluxes over the spectral range; and (3) Investigating the convergence of iterations between the flame structure solver and the radiation heat transfer solver.

  2. Estimation of Asian Dust Aerosol Effect on Cloud Radiation Forcing Using Fu-Liou Radiative Model and CERES Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Jing; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang; Minnis, Patrick; Ge, Jinming; Bi, Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    The impact of Asian dust on cloud radiative forcing during 2003-2006 is studied by using the Earth's Radiant Energy Budget Scanner (CERES) data and the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model. Analysis of satellite data shows that the dust aerosol significantly reduced the cloud cooling effect at TOA. In dust contaminated cloudy regions, the 4-year mean values of the instantaneous shortwave, longwave and net cloud radiative forcing are -138.9, 69.1, and -69.7 Wm(sup -2), which are 57.0, 74.2, and 46.3%, respectively, of the corresponding values in more pristine cloudy regions. The satellite-retrieved cloud properties are significantly different in the dusty regions and can influence the radiative forcing indirectly. The contributions to the cloud radiation forcing by the dust direct, indirect and semi-direct effects are estimated using combined satellite observations and Fu-Liou model simulation. The 4-year mean value of combination of indirect and semi-direct shortwave radiative forcing (SWRF) is 82.2 Wm(sup -2), which is 78.4% of the total dust effect. The direct effect is only 22.7 Wm(sup -2), which is 21.6% of the total effect. Because both first and second indirect effects enhance cloud cooling, the aerosol-induced cloud warming is mainly the result of the semi-direct effect of dust.

  3. Precise model of Hawking radiation from the tunnelling mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corda, Christian

    2015-10-01

    We recently improved the famous result of Parikh and Wilczek, who found a probability of emission of Hawking radiation that is compatible with a non-strictly thermal spectrum, showing that such a probability of emission is really associated with two non-strictly thermal distributions for bosons and fermions. Here, we finalize the model by finding the correct value of the pre-factor of the Parikh and Wilczek probability of emission. In fact, that expression has a ˜ sign instead of the equality. In general, in this kind of leading order tunneling calculation, the exponent indeed arises from the classical action, and the pre-factor is an order of Planck constant correction. But in the case of emissions of Hawking quanta, the variation of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy is of the order of 1 for an emitted particle with energy of the order of the Hawking temperature. As a consequence, the exponent in the Parikh and Wilczek probability of emission is of the order of unity and one asks, what is the real significance of that scaling if the pre-factor is unknown? Here we solve the problem assuming the unitarity of the black hole (BH) quantum evaporation and considering the natural correspondence between Hawking radiation and quasi-normal modes (QNMs) of excited BHs, in a ‘Bohr-like model’ that we recently discussed in a series of papers. In those papers, QNMs are interpreted as natural BH quantum levels (the ‘electron states’ in the ‘Bohr-like model’). Here we find the intriguing result that, although in general it is well approximated by 1, the pre-factor of the Parikh and Wilczek probability of emission depends on the BH quantum level n. We also write down an elegant expression of the probability of emission in terms of the BH quantum levels.

  4. Classification and radiative-transfer modeling of meteorite spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentikäinen, H.; Penttilä, A.; Peltoniemi, J.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    The interpretation of asteroid spectra is closely tied to surface structure and composition. Asteroid surfaces are usually assumed to be covered with a regolith, which is a mixture of mineral grains ranging from micrometers to centimeters in size. The inverse problem of deducing the characteristics of the grains from the scattering of light (e.g., using photometric and polarimetric observations) is difficult. Meteorite spectroscopy can be a valuable alternative source of information considering that unweathered meteoritic ''falls'' are almost pristine samples of their parent bodies. Reflectance spectra of 18 different meteorite samples were measured with the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO) covering a wavelength range of 450--2250 nm [1,2]. The measurements expand the database of reflectance spectra obtained by Paton et al. [3] and Gaffey [4]. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) performed on the spectra indicates a separation of the undifferentiated ordinary chondrites and the differentiated achondrites. The principal components also suggest a discrimination between the spectra of ordinary chondrites with petrologic grades 5 and 6. The distinction is not present when the data are supplemented with the spectra from the two other data sets obtained with differing measuring techniques. To further investigate the different classifications, the PCA is implemented with selected spectral features contrary to the previous analyses, which encompassed the complete spectra. Single-scattering albedos for meteoritic fundamental scatterers were derived with a Monte Carlo radiative-transfer model [1]. In the derivation, realistic scattering phase functions were utilized. The functions were obtained by fitting triple Henyey-Greenstein functions to the measured scattering phase functions of olivine powder for two different size distributions [5,6]. The simulated reflectances for different scattering phase functions were matched to the measured meteorite

  5. A mechanical model for giant radiating dike swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Alexander; Yarushina, Viktoriya; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2016-04-01

    The Large Igneous Provinces (LIP) is believed to form as results of plume-lithosphere interaction. A recognizable diagnostic feature of the LIP is a swarm of dikes (100 - 1000 km -long) radiating from a single or several focal regions. The models for formation of these dike swarms are mainly based on Venusian analogues (associated with coronae structures) since on Earth these paleo-structures are presumably less likely to preserve due to erosion and later tectonics. The existing explanation for the geometry of dikes (in horizontal plane) is based on assumption that in a far-field shear stress the dikes are normal to the least principal stress. A small overpressure related to the lithospheric magma reservoir is also assumed. However, this type of models implies several limitations: 1) the dike emplacement is considered as a purely elastic process, 2) all dikes are assumed to intrude simultaneously (no interaction with neighboring dikes). On the other hand, recent geophysical observations suggest that the dikes that apparently belong to the same magmatic event can intersect and can be affected by each other and local crustal heterogeneity. In this study, we attribute the geometry of dikes to irreversible plastic deformation including the path-dependence. We use finite-element elastoplastic simulations to predict the fracture pattern related to the plume-lithosphere interaction. The rheology is governed by a non-associated Mohr-Coulomb plastic flow law. The accuracy of the numerical results is benchmarked versus 2D plane strain analytical solutions for combined shear and internal pressure loads. We apply our model to the case of the High Arctic LIP. Here, the location of the dike intrusions is based on the interpretation of magnetic anomalies supported by geological and seismic data in the Barents Sea together with timing constraints using U-Pb isotopic ages. The developed model provides a framework for future high-resolution structural and geochronological studies to

  6. Magnetic field and radiative transfer modelling of a quiescent prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, S.; Schwartz, P.; Dudík, J.; Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, P.; Jurčák, J.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to analyse the multi-instrument observations of the June 22, 2010 prominence to study its structure in detail, including the prominence-corona transition region and the dark bubble located below the prominence body. Methods: We combined results of the 3D magnetic field modelling with 2D prominence fine structure radiative transfer models to fully exploit the available observations. Results: The 3D linear force-free field model with the unsheared bipole reproduces the morphology of the analysed prominence reasonably well, thus providing useful information about its magnetic field configuration and the location of the magnetic dips. The 2D models of the prominence fine structures provide a good representation of the local plasma configuration in the region dominated by the quasi-vertical threads. However, the low observed Lyman-α central intensities and the morphology of the analysed prominence suggest that its upper central part is not directly illuminated from the solar surface. Conclusions: This multi-disciplinary prominence study allows us to argue that a large part of the prominence-corona transition region plasma can be located inside the magnetic dips in small-scale features that surround the cool prominence material located in the dip centre. We also argue that the dark prominence bubbles can be formed because of perturbations of the prominence magnetic field by parasitic bipoles, causing them to be devoid of the magnetic dips. Magnetic dips, however, form thin layers that surround these bubbles, which might explain the occurrence of the cool prominence material in the lines of sight intersecting the prominence bubbles. Movie and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Expansion of Collisional Radiative Model for Helium line ratio spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinquegrani, David; Cooper, Chris; Forest, Cary; Milhone, Jason; Munoz-Borges, Jorge; Schmitz, Oliver; Unterberg, Ezekial

    2015-11-01

    Helium line ratio spectroscopy is a powerful technique of active plasma edge spectroscopy. It enables reconstruction of plasma edge parameters like electron density and temperature by use of suitable Collisional Radiative Models (CRM). An established approach is successful at moderate plasma densities (~1018m-3 range) and temperature (30-300eV), taking recombination and charge exchange to be negligible. The goal of this work is to experimentally explore limitations of this approach to CRM. For basic validation the Madison Plasma Dynamo eXperiment (MPDX) will be used. MPDX offers a very uniform plasma and spherical symmetry at low temperature (5-20 eV) and low density (1016 -1017m-3) . Initial data from MPDX shows a deviation in CRM results when compared to Langmuir probe data. This discrepancy points to the importance of recombination effects. The validated model is applied to first time measurement of electron density and temperature in front of an ICRH antenna at the TEXTOR tokamak. These measurements are important to understand RF coupling and PMI physics at the antenna limiters. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the UW - Madison, USA and NSF CAREER award PHY-1455210.

  8. Competing species system as a qualitative model of radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendykier, Jacek; Bieniasiewicz, Marcin; Lipowski, Adam; Pawlak, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    To examine complex features of tumor dynamics we analyze a competing-species lattice model that takes into account the competition for nutrients or space as well as interaction with therapeutic factors such as drugs or radiation. Our model might be interpreted as a certain prey-predator system having three trophic layers: (i) the basal species that might be interpreted as nutrients; (ii) normal and tumor cells that consume nutrients, and (iii) therapeutic factors that might kill either nutrient, normal or tumor cells. Using a wide spectrum of parameters we examined survival of our species and tried to identify the corresponding dynamical regimes. It was found that the radiotherapy influences mainly the limit of starvation i.e. the value of an update probability where the tumor cells go extinct as a result of insufficient nutrient supply and competition with normal cells. The other limiting value of this probability, corresponding to the coexistence of the normal and tumor cells in abundance of nutrients, is almost not affected by radiotherapy. We have also found the coexistence of all species on the phase diagrams.

  9. Radiative energy balance of Venus based on improved models of the middle and lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Tellmann, S.; Arnold, G.; Piccioni, G.; Drossart, P.; Häusler, B.

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of sources and sinks of radiative energy forces the atmospheric dynamics. The radiative transfer simulation model described by Haus et al. (2015b) is applied to calculate fluxes and temperature change rates in the middle and lower atmosphere of Venus (0-100 km) covering the energetic significant spectral range 0.125-1000 μm. The calculations rely on improved models of atmospheric parameters (temperature profiles, cloud parameters, trace gas abundances) retrieved from Venus Express (VEX) data (mainly VIRTIS-M-IR, but also VeRa and SPICAV/SOIR with respect to temperature results). The earlier observed pronounced sensitivity of the radiative energy balance of Venus to atmospheric parameter variations is confirmed, but present detailed comparative analyses of possible influence quantities ensure unprecedented insights into radiative forcing on Venus by contrast with former studies. Thermal radiation induced atmospheric cooling rates strongly depend on temperature structure and cloud composition, while heating rates are mainly sensitive to insolation conditions and UV absorber distribution. Cooling and heating rate responses to trace gas variations and cloud mode 1 abundance changes are small, but observed variations of cloud mode 2 abundances and altitude profiles reduce cooling at altitudes 65-80 km poleward of 50°S by up to 30% compared to the neglect of cloud parameter changes. Cooling rate variations with local time below 80 km are in the same order of magnitude. Radiative effects of the unknown UV absorber are modeled considering a proxy that is based on a suitable parameterization of optical properties, not on a specific chemical composition, and that is independent of the used cloud model. The UV absorber doubles equatorial heating near 68 km. Global average radiative equilibrium at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is characterized by the net flux balance of 156 W/m2, the Bond albedo of 0.76, and the effective planetary emission temperature of 228

  10. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central element in a metaphysical…

  11. El Observatorio Gemini - Status actual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levato, H.

    Se hace una breve descripción de la situación actual del Observatorio Gemini y de las últimas decisiones del Board para incrementar la eficiencia operativa. Se hace también una breve referencia al uso argentino del observatorio.

  12. Modeling and analyzing characteristics of self-infrared radiation on airplane-skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaozhao; Wu, Wenyuan; Wu, Chengguo; Yang, Yuntao; Huang, Yanhua; Sunxiaobo, Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    The characteristic of the self-infrared radiation of airplane-skin is very important for the stealth performance of airplane. Based on the theory of the airplane-skin temperature field, the distribution of the atmospheric temperature field and the principle of the black-body radiation function the self-infrared radiation model was established. In specified flight conditions, the influence of the atmospheric temperature, the speed of flight, the emissivity and the sight angle detection on the self-infrared radiation of the airplane skin were analyzed. Through the simulation of infrared radiation, some results under different flight states are obtained. The simulation results show that skin infrared radiation energy mainly concentrate on the far infrared wavebands, and various factors have different effects on the infrared radiation of skin. This conclusion can help reduce the infrared radiation and improve the stealth performance of airplane in the engineering design and the selection of flight conditions.

  13. Detailed probabilistic modelling of cell inactivation by ionizing radiations of different qualities: the model and its applications.

    PubMed

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2009-03-01

    The probabilistic two-stage model of cell killing by ionizing radiation enables to represent both damage induction by radiation and its repair by the cell. The model properties and applications as well as possible interpretation of the underlying damage classification are discussed. Analyses of published survival data for V79 hamster cells irradiated by protons and He, C, O, and Ne ions are reported, quantifying the variations in radiation quality with increasing charge and linear energy transfer of the ions.

  14. Lubricating bacteria model for the growth of bacterial colonies exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shengli; Zhang Lei; Liang Run; Zhang Erhu; Liu Yachao; Zhao Shumin

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we study the morphological transition of bacterial colonies exposed to ultraviolet radiation by modifying the bacteria model proposed by Delprato et al. Our model considers four factors: the lubricant fluid generated by bacterial colonies, a chemotaxis initiated by the ultraviolet radiation, the intensity of the ultraviolet radiation, and the bacteria's two-stage destruction rate with given radiation intensities. Using this modified model, we simulate the ringlike pattern formation of the bacterial colony exposed to uniform ultraviolet radiation. The following is shown. (1) Without the UV radiation the colony forms a disklike pattern and reaches a constant front velocity. (2) After the radiation is switched on, the bacterial population migrates to the edge of the colony and forms a ringlike pattern. As the intensity of the UV radiation is increased the ring forms faster and the outer velocity of the colony decreases. (3) For higher radiation intensities the total population decreases, while for lower intensities the total population increases initially at a small rate and then decreases. (4) After the UV radiation is switched off, the bacterial population grows both outward as well as into the inner region, and the colony's outer front velocity recovers to a constant value. All these results agree well with the experimental observations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 158102 (2001)]. Along with the chemotaxis, we find that lubricant fluid and the two-stage destruction rate are critical to the dynamics of the growth of the bacterial colony when exposed to UV radiation, and these were not previously considered.

  15. ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIVE TRANSFER MODELING OF NEARBY GALAXIES WITH EXTRAPLANAR DUSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-12-20

    In order to examine their relation to the host galaxy, the extraplanar dusts of six nearby galaxies are modeled, employing a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The targets are from the highly inclined galaxies that show dust-scattered ultraviolet halos, and the archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV band images were fitted with the model. The observed images are generally well-reproduced by two dust layers and one light source layer, whose vertical and radial distributions have exponential profiles. We obtained several important physical parameters, such as star formation rate (SFR{sub UV}), face-on optical depth, and scale-heights. Three galaxies (NGC 891, NGC 3628, and UGC 11794) show clear evidence for the existence of an extraplanar dust layer. However, it is found that the remaining three targets (IC 5249, NGC 24, and NGC 4173) do not necessarily need a thick dust disk to model the ultraviolet (UV) halo, because its contribution is too small and the UV halo may be caused by the wing part of the GALEX point spread function. This indicates that the galaxy samples reported to have UV halos may be contaminated by galaxies with negligible extraplanar (halo) dust. The galaxies showing evidence of an extraplanar dust layer fall within a narrow range on the scatter plots between physical parameters such as SFR{sub UV} and extraplanar dust mass. Several mechanisms that could possibly produce the extraplanar dust are discussed. We also found a hint that the extraplanar dust scale-height might not be much different from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission characteristic height.

  16. Ultraviolet Radiative Transfer Modeling of Nearby Galaxies with Extraplanar Dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Seon, Kwang-Il

    2015-12-01

    In order to examine their relation to the host galaxy, the extraplanar dusts of six nearby galaxies are modeled, employing a three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The targets are from the highly inclined galaxies that show dust-scattered ultraviolet halos, and the archival Galaxy Evolution Explorer FUV band images were fitted with the model. The observed images are generally well-reproduced by two dust layers and one light source layer, whose vertical and radial distributions have exponential profiles. We obtained several important physical parameters, such as star formation rate (SFRUV), face-on optical depth, and scale-heights. Three galaxies (NGC 891, NGC 3628, and UGC 11794) show clear evidence for the existence of an extraplanar dust layer. However, it is found that the remaining three targets (IC 5249, NGC 24, and NGC 4173) do not necessarily need a thick dust disk to model the ultraviolet (UV) halo, because its contribution is too small and the UV halo may be caused by the wing part of the GALEX point spread function. This indicates that the galaxy samples reported to have UV halos may be contaminated by galaxies with negligible extraplanar (halo) dust. The galaxies showing evidence of an extraplanar dust layer fall within a narrow range on the scatter plots between physical parameters such as SFRUV and extraplanar dust mass. Several mechanisms that could possibly produce the extraplanar dust are discussed. We also found a hint that the extraplanar dust scale-height might not be much different from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission characteristic height.

  17. Regional scale net radiation estimation by means of Landsat and TERRA/AQUA imagery and GIS modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristóbal, J.; Ninyerola, M.; Pons, X.; Llorens, P.; Poyatos, R.

    2009-04-01

    Net radiation (Rn) is one of the most important variables for the estimation of surface energy budget and is used for various applications including agricultural meteorology, climate monitoring and weather prediction. Moreover, net radiation is an essential input variable for potential as well as actual evapotranspiration modeling. Nowadays, radiometric measurements provided by Remote Sensing and GIS analysis are the technologies used to compute net radiation at regional scales in a feasible way. In this study we present a regional scale estimation of the daily Rn on clear days, (Catalonia, NE of the Iberian Peninsula), using a set of 22 Landsat images (17 Landsat-5 TM and 5 Landsat-7 ETM+) and 171 TERRA/AQUA images MODIS from 2000 to 2007 period. TERRA/AQUA MODIS images have been downloaded by means of the EOS Gateway. We have selected three different types of products which contain the remote sensing data we have used to model daily Rn: daily LST product, daily calibrated reflectances product and daily atmospheric water vapour product. Landsat-5 TM images have been corrected by means of conventional techniques based on first order polynomials taking into account the effect of land surface relief using a Digital Elevation Model, obtaining an RMS less than 30 m. Radiometric correction of Landsat non-thermal bands has been done following the methodology proposed by Pons and Solé (1994), which allows to reduce the number of undesired artifacts that are due to the effects of the atmosphere or to the differential illumination which is, in turn, due to the time of the day, the location in the Earth and the relief (zones being more illuminated than others, shadows, etc). Atmospheric correction of Landsat thermal band has been carried out by means of a single-channel algorithm improvement developed by Cristóbal et al. (2009) and the land surface emissivity computed by means of the methodology proposed by Sobrino and Raissouni (2000). Rn has been estimated through the

  18. Layered analytical radiative transfer model for simulating water color of coastal waters and algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Huddleston, Lisa H.

    2000-12-01

    A remote sensing reflectance model, which describes the transfer of irradiant light within a homogeneous water column has previously been used to simulate the nadir viewing reflectance just above or below the water surface by Bostater, et al. Wavelength dependent features in the water surface reflectance depend upon the nature of the down welling irradiance, bottom reflectance and the water absorption and backscatter coefficients. The latter are very important coefficients, and depend upon the constituents in water and both vary as a function of the water depth and wavelength in actual water bodies. This paper describes a preliminary approach for the analytical solution of the radiative transfer equations in a two-stream representation of the irradiance field with variable coefficients due to the depth dependent water concentrations of substances such as chlorophyl pigments, dissolved organic matter and suspended particulate matter. The analytical model formulation makes use of analytically based solutions to the 2-flow equations. However, in this paper we describe the use of the unique Cauchy boundary conditions previously used, along with a matrix solution to allow for the prediction of the synthetic water surface reflectance signatures within a nonhomogeneous medium. Observed reflectance signatures as well as model derived 'synthetic signatures' are processed using efficient algorithms which demonstrate the error induced using the layered matrix approach is much less than 1 percent when compared to the analytical homogeneous water column solution. The influence of vertical gradients of water constituents may be extremely important in remote sensing of coastal water constituents as well as in remote sensing of submerged targets and different bottom types such as corals, sea grasses and sand.

  19. Uncertainties in carbon dioxide radiative forcing in atmospheric general circulation models.

    PubMed

    Cess, R D; Zhang, M H; Potter, G L; Barker, H W; Colman, R A; Dazlich, D A; Del Genio, A D; Esch, M; Fraser, J R; Galin, V; Gates, W L; Hack, J J; Ingram, W J; Kiehl, J T; Lacis, A A; Le Treut, H; Li, Z X; Liang, X Z; Mahfouf, J F; McAvaney, B J; Meleshko, V P; Morcrette, J J; Randall, D A; Roeckner, E; Royer, J F; Sokolov, A P; Sporyshev, P V; Taylor, K E; Wang, W C; Wetherald, R T

    1993-11-19

    Global warming caused by an increase in the concentrations of greenhouse gases, is the direct result of greenhouse gas-induced radiative forcing. When a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is considered, this forcing differed substantially among 15 atmospheric general circulation models. Although there are several potential causes, the largest contributor was the carbon dioxide radiation parameterizations of the models.

  20. Uncertainties in Carbon Dioxide Radiative Forcing in Atmospheric General Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, M.-H.; Potter, G. L.; Gates, W. L.; Taylor, K. E.; Barker, H. W.; Colman, R. A.; Fraser, J. R.; McAvaney, B. J.; Dazlich, D. A.; Randall, D. A.; DelGenio, A. D.; Lacis, A. A.; Esch, M.; Roeckner, E.; Galin, V.; Hack, J. J.; Kiehl, J. T.; Ingram, W. J.; LeTreut, H.

    1993-01-01

    Global warming, caused by an increase in the concentrations of greenhouse gases, is the direct result of greenhouse gas-induced radiative forcing. When a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is considered, this forcing differed substantially among 15 atmospheric general circulation models. Although there are several potential causes, the largest contributor was the carbon dioxide radiation parameterizations of the models.

  1. A scalable plant-resolving radiative transfer model based on optimized GPU ray tracing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new model for radiative transfer in participating media and its application to complex plant canopies is presented. The goal was to be able to efficiently solve complex canopy-scale radiative transfer problems while also representing sub-plant heterogeneity. In the model, individual leaf surfaces ...

  2. Near-field dipole radiation dynamics through FDTD modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radzevicius, Stanley J.; Chen, Chi-Chih; Peters, Leon; Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    2003-02-01

    We use finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulations to study horizontal dipole radiation mechanisms and patterns near half-space interfaces. Time snapshots illustrating propagation of wavefronts at an instance in time are included with antenna patterns to provide a visualization tool for understanding antenna radiation properties. Near-field radiation patterns are compared with far-field asymptotic solutions and the effects of electrical properties, antenna height, and observation distance are investigated through numerical simulations. Numerical simulations show excellent agreement with measured data collected over a water-filled tank. Near-field H-plane radiation patterns are broader and contain radiation maxima beyond the critical angle predicted by far-field solutions. A large amplitude E-plane radiation lobe is located directly below the antenna in all simulations, while the two large amplitude sidelobes are less distinct and occur at larger incidence angles than predicted by far-field solutions. Radiation patterns resemble far-field solutions by a distance of 10 wavelengths, except near the critical angle where H-plane radiation maxima and E-plane sidelobes occur at larger incidence angles than predicted by far-field solutions.

  3. Testing a Model of IR Radiative Losses: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Vignola, F.; Long, C. N.; Reda, I.

    2009-08-01

    Thermopile pyranometers exhibit IR radiative losses that affect global and diffuse shortwave measurements made with first class thermopile based instruments. Pyrgeometers can be used to measure the sky temperature and are used to calculate the pyranometer?s IR radiative losses.

  4. Estimation of The Radiation Environment Based On The NASA Ap-8 and Ae-8 Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Thomas; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the earth's trapped radiation environment, as described by the NASA models AP-8 and AE-8. We include a description of the sources and structure of the trapped radiation belts, and their dependence on external factors. After describing how to use the models to predict the environment, we present data from various space missions, and compare those data to the models. This shows the limits and strengths of the models. Finally, we describe alternative models of the trapped radiation belts, and discuss why they have not been widely adopted yet.

  5. Modeling Natural Space Ionizing Radiation Effects on External Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alstatt, Richard L.; Edwards, David L.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Predicting the effective life of materials for space applications has become increasingly critical with the drive to reduce mission cost. Programs have considered many solutions to reduce launch costs including novel, low mass materials and thin thermal blankets to reduce spacecraft mass. Determining the long-term survivability of these materials before launch is critical for mission success. This presentation will describe an analysis performed on the outer layer of the passive thermal control blanket of the Hubble Space Telescope. This layer had degraded for unknown reasons during the mission, however ionizing radiation (IR) induced embrittlement was suspected. A methodology was developed which allowed direct comparison between the energy deposition of the natural environment and that of the laboratory generated environment. Commercial codes were used to predict the natural space IR environment model energy deposition in the material from both natural and laboratory IR sources, and design the most efficient test. Results were optimized for total and local energy deposition with an iterative spreadsheet. This method has been used successfully for several laboratory tests at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The study showed that the natural space IR environment, by itself, did not cause the premature degradation observed in the thermal blanket.

  6. Cataractogenesis from high-LET radiation and the Casarett model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, A. B.; Lee, A. C.; Lett, J. T.; Ainsworth, E. J.; Jose, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    The long-term effects on specific animal tissues of exposure to heavy ion irradiation are studied in experiments on cataractogenesis in mice and rabbits. Five groups of rabbits at ages from 8 weeks to 5.3 years were irradiated to a dose of 9.0 Gy of Bragg plateau Ne-20 ions, while mice were exposed to single and total fractionated doses of 4.17 Gy gamma rays or 0.40 to 1.20 Gy of C-12, Ne-20 or Ar-40 particles. Measurements of lens opacities over time show that in the year since irradiation, cataractogenesis is delayed and less severe in rabbits irradiated at age 6 months compared to younger animals, although it is possible that the late effects in adults will surpass those found in the young. The fractionation of the total dose of gamma rays in mice is observed to lead to a marked reduction in the extent of lens opacity after one year, while fractionated heavy ion doses caused a greater degree of posterior lens opacification. Evaluations of the effects of the LET of different ions on cataractogenesis are consistent with RBEs of about 5, 3 and 1-2 for Ar-40, Ne-20 and C-12 ions, respectively. Results thus support the Casarett model of radiation damaging stem cell populations that are not necessarily part of the vasculature.

  7. Modeling influences of topography on incoming solar radiation from satellite remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoran, Maria

    2007-08-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy that drives earth system processes, such as weather patterns and rates of primary production by green plants. Accurate solar irradiance data are necessary for the radiative forcing of the climate system assessment as well as for efficient planning and operation of solar energy systems. Topography is a major factor that determines the amount of solar radiation reaching any particular location on the Earth's surface. Its variability in elevation, surface orientation (slope and aspect), and shadows is subject to quantitative modeling, based on radiative transfer models (RTM) using atmospheric parameter information retrieved from the MODIS satellites. This paper focuses on the description of a solar radiation model to describe spatial and temporal patterns of daily radiation based on topography and daily temperature regimes with a specific analysis for Dobruja area, Romania.

  8. Optimization of a rotating thermally conducting joint and incorporation in a laboratory model deployable radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderer, B.

    1980-03-01

    A thermal and mechanical optimization of a thermally conducting joint and an attached heat pipe radiator was performed. A thermal node model was established to calculate different design configurations. The sealing-bearing concept was redesigned to minimize torque. Axially grooved heat pipe profiles were established for the design goal of this deployable radiator model. An engineering model deployable radiator was constructed and submitted to a thermal-vacuum test. Temperature drops from feeder to radiator closely met predictions, but measured torque exceeded expectations but was within an acceptable range for space applications. The heat pipe network comprising the heat pipes of the radiator and those integrated in the rotor profile was not entirely satisfactory. Evaluation of the results of thermal-vacuum test and previous heat pipe tests led to no definite explanation for the problems with some of the radiator heat pipes.

  9. Flow-radiation coupling for atmospheric entries using a Hybrid Statistical Narrow Band model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucasse, Laurent; Scoggins, James B.; Rivière, Philippe; Magin, Thierry E.; Soufiani, Anouar

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a Hybrid Statistical Narrow Band (HSNB) model is implemented to make fast and accurate predictions of radiative transfer effects on hypersonic entry flows. The HSNB model combines a Statistical Narrow Band (SNB) model for optically thick molecular systems, a box model for optically thin molecular systems and continua, and a Line-By-Line (LBL) description of atomic radiation. Radiative transfer calculations are coupled to a 1D stagnation-line flow model under thermal and chemical nonequilibrium. Earth entry conditions corresponding to the FIRE 2 experiment, as well as Titan entry conditions corresponding to the Huygens probe, are considered in this work. Thermal nonequilibrium is described by a two temperature model, although non-Boltzmann distributions of electronic levels provided by a Quasi-Steady State model are also considered for radiative transfer. For all the studied configurations, radiative transfer effects on the flow, the plasma chemistry and the total heat flux at the wall are analyzed in detail. The HSNB model is shown to reproduce LBL results with an accuracy better than 5% and a speed up of the computational time around two orders of magnitude. Concerning molecular radiation, the HSNB model provides a significant improvement in accuracy compared to the Smeared-Rotational-Band model, especially for Titan entries dominated by optically thick CN radiation.

  10. Modeling of Jovian Hectometric Radiation Source Locations: Ulysses Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Reiner, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on Ulysses has provided unique high latitude measurements of Jovian hectometric radiation (HOM) during its encounter with Jupiter in February 1992. URAP was the first radio instrument in the Jovian environment with radio direction-finding capability, which was previously used to determine the HOM source locations in the Jovian magnetosphere. These initial source location determinations were based on several assumptions, including the neglect of refractive effects, which may be tested. We have, for the first time, combined the measured incident ray-direction at the spacecraft with a model magnetosphere to directly trace the rays back to the HOM source. We concentrate on the observations of HOM from high northern latitudes when Ulysses was at distances less than 15 R(sub j). The three- dimensional ray-tracing calculations presented here indicate that the HOM sources probably lie on L shells in the range 3 less than or approximately equal to L less than 7 (tilted dipole magnetic field model) consistent with previous determinations that ignored the effects of refraction. The ray-tracing results, however, indicate that wave refraction due to the Io torus and the magnetic field can significantly influence the precise source location. We show that constraints on the locations imposed by the gyroemission mechanism suggest that the lo torus density may have experienced temporal and/or spatial fluctuations during the Ulysses observations of HOM. Finally, in the cold plasma approximation we demonstrate that even if the emission were nearly linearly polarized near the source region, almost circular polarization will be observed at Ulysses, in agreement with observations.

  11. Modeling the Early Annihilation Radiation Spectrum from INTEGRAL/SPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guessoum, N.; Jean, P.; Knödlseder, J.; Lonjou, V.; von Ballmoos, P.; Weidenspointer, G.

    2004-10-01

    We undertake to model the spectrum of the galactic annihilation radiation, using the preliminary data obtained by INTEGRAL/SPI (Jean et al. 2003; Jean et al. 2004; Lonjou et al. 2004). We use the general line spectroscopy approach developed by Guessoum et al. (1991), where the interstellar medium (ISM) is divided into 5 phases: cold, warm neutral, warm ionized, and hot, in addition to a dust grain fraction, each characterized by proper physical parameters. Each phase presents us with particular positron annihilation processes, rates, and line widths. Best- fitting the model spectrum to the SPI data (through a chi-square minimization approach) then allows us to obtain "best values" for the ISM phase fractions (density times filling factor) along with uncertainties. Noting that the (astrophysical) line width determined by SPI (3.0 ± 0.5 keV in the first set of data and 2.7 ± 0.3 keV in the most recent analysis; Lonjou et al. 2004) is rather significantly larger than the value derived by the TGRS measurements (Harris et al. 1998), i.e. 1.8 ± 0.5 keV, we submitted the TGRS data to the same analysis. We should also note, however, that the width of the line obtained from the previous Germanium-detector observation missions, namely GRIS and HEXAGONE, were 2.5±0.4 keV ("weighted mean" from 3 observation campaigns; (Leventhal et al. 1993) and 2.66±0.6 keV (Durouchoux et al. 1993), respectively. The results suggest annihilation in a medium that is warmer or hotter (more fully ionized) and quite devoid of grains, compared to the dustier and hotter (overall) medium suggested by the SPI data. We briefly discuss these results and possible interpretations as well as follow-up analyses and proposed observations.

  12. Three-dimensional modeling of radiative disks in binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picogna, G.; Marzari, F.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks in binaries are perturbed by the companion gravity causing significant alterations of the disk morphology. Spiral waves due to the companion tidal force also develop in the vertical direction and affect the disk temperature profile. These effects may significantly influence the process of planet formation. Aims: We perform 3D numerical simulations of disks in binaries with different initial dynamical configurations and physical parameters. Our goal is to investigate their evolution and their propensity to grow planets. Methods: We use an improved version of the SPH code VINE modified to better account for momentum and energy conservation via variable smoothing and softening length. The energy equation includes a flux-limited radiative transfer algorithm. The disk cooling is obtained with the use of "boundary particles" populating the outer surfaces of the disk and radiating to infinity. We model a system made of star/disk + star/disk where the secondary star (and relative disk) is less massive than the primary. Results: The numerical simulations performed for different values of binary separation and disk density show that trailing spiral shock waves develop when the stars approach their pericenter. Strong hydraulic jumps occur at the shock front, in particular for small separation binaries, creating breaking waves, and a consistent mass stream between the two disks. Both shock waves and mass transfer cause significant heating of the disk. At apocenter these perturbations are reduced and the disks are cooled down and less eccentric. Conclusions: The disk morphology is substantially affected by the companion perturbations, in particular in the vertical direction. The hydraulic jumps may slow down or even halt the dust coagulation process. The disk is significantly heated up by spiral waves and mass transfer, and the high gas temperature may prevent the ice condensation by moving the "snow line" outward. The disordered motion triggered by

  13. Integration of the Radiation Belt Environment Model Into the Space Weather Modeling Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, A.; Toth, G.; Fok, M.; Gombosi, T.; Liemohn, M.

    2009-01-01

    We have integrated the Fok radiation belt environment (RBE) model into the space weather modeling framework (SWMF). RBE is coupled to the global magnetohydrodynamics component (represented by the Block-Adaptive-Tree Solar-wind Roe-type Upwind Scheme, BATS-R-US, code) and the Ionosphere Electrodynamics component of the SWMF, following initial results using the Weimer empirical model for the ionospheric potential. The radiation belt (RB) model solves the convection-diffusion equation of the plasma in the energy range of 10 keV to a few MeV. In stand-alone mode RBE uses Tsyganenko's empirical models for the magnetic field, and Weimer's empirical model for the ionospheric potential. In the SWMF the BATS-R-US model provides the time dependent magnetic field by efficiently tracing the closed magnetic field-lines and passing the geometrical and field strength information to RBE at a regular cadence. The ionosphere electrodynamics component uses a two-dimensional vertical potential solver to provide new potential maps to the RBE model at regular intervals. We discuss the coupling algorithm and show some preliminary results with the coupled code. We run our newly coupled model for periods of steady solar wind conditions and compare our results to the RB model using an empirical magnetic field and potential model. We also simulate the RB for an active time period and find that there are substantial differences in the RB model results when changing either the magnetic field or the electric field, including the creation of an outer belt enhancement via rapid inward transport on the time scale of tens of minutes.

  14. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-06-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily timescales. We demonstrate that ambient CO2 concentrations influence daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  15. A murine model for bone loss from therapeutic and space-relevant sources of radiation.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S A; Pecaut, M J; Gridley, D S; Travis, N D; Bandstra, E R; Willey, J S; Nelson, G A; Bateman, T A

    2006-09-01

    Cancer patients receiving radiation therapy are exposed to photon (gamma/X-ray), electron, and less commonly proton radiation. Similarly, astronauts on exploratory missions will be exposed to extended periods of lower-dose radiation from multiple sources and of multiple types, including heavy ions. Therapeutic doses of radiation have been shown to have deleterious consequences on bone health, occasionally causing osteoradionecrosis and spontaneous fractures. However, no animal model exists to study the cause of radiation-induced osteoporosis. Additionally, the effect of lower doses of ionizing radiation, including heavy ions, on general bone quality has not been investigated. This study presents data developing a murine model for radiation-induced bone loss. Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to gamma, proton, carbon, or iron radiation at 2-Gray doses, representing both a clinical treatment fraction and spaceflight exposure for an exploratory mission. Mice were euthanized 110 days after irradiation. The proximal tibiae and femur diaphyses were analyzed using microcomputed tomography. Results demonstrate profound changes in trabecular architecture. Significant losses in trabecular bone volume fraction were observed for all radiation species: gamma, (-29%), proton (-35%), carbon (-39%), and iron (-34%). Trabecular connectivity density, thickness, spacing, and number were also affected. These data have clear implications for clinical radiotherapy in that bone loss in an animal model has been demonstrated at low doses. Additionally, these data suggest that space radiation has the potential to exacerbate the bone loss caused by microgravity, although lower doses and dose rates need to be studied. PMID:16741258

  16. Design and Modeling of a Variable Heat Rejection Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jennifer R.; Birur, Gajanana C.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Sunada, Eric T.; Berisford, Daniel F.; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Variable Heat Rejection Radiator technology needed for future NASA human rated & robotic missions Primary objective is to enable a single loop architecture for human-rated missions (1) Radiators are typically sized for maximum heat load in the warmest continuous environment resulting in a large panel area (2) Large radiator area results in fluid being susceptible to freezing at low load in cold environment and typically results in a two-loop system (3) Dual loop architecture is approximately 18% heavier than single loop architecture (based on Orion thermal control system mass) (4) Single loop architecture requires adaptability to varying environments and heat loads

  17. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging Without Harmful Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the detection of transmitted radiation, the spatial organization and composition of materials in the body can be ascertained. In this paper, we describe an original apparatus that teaches these concepts by utilizing near infrared radiation and an up-converting phosphorescent screen to safely probe the contents of an opaque enclosure.

  18. A Revised Model of Jupiter's Inner Electron Belts: Updating the Divine Radiation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Levin, Steven M.; Bolton, Scott J.; Evans, Robin W.; Bhattacharya, Bidushi

    2005-01-01

    In 1983, Divine presented a comprehensive model of the Jovian charged particle environment that has long served as a reference for missions to Jupiter. However, in situ observations by Galileo and synchrotron observations from Earth indicate the need to update the model in the inner radiation zone. Specifically, a review of the model for 1 MeV < E < 100 MeV trapped electrons suggests that, based on the new synchrotron observations, the pitch angle distributions within L < 4 need to be updated by introducing two additional components: one near the Jovian magnetic equator and one at high magnetic latitudes. We report modifications to the model that reproduce these observations. The new model improves the fit to synchrotron emission observations and remains consistent with the original fit to the in situ Pioneer and Voyager data. Further modifications incorporating observations from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft will be reported in the future.

  19. Modelling canopy scale solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence simulated by the three dimensional radiative transfer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Nagai, S.; Inoue, T.; Yang, W.; Ichii, K.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies show that the vegetation canopy scale sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can be observed from satellite. To understand how the canopy scale bidirectional fluorescence observations are related to three-dimensional fluorescence distribution within a plant canopy, it is necessary to evaluate canopy scale fluorescence emission using a detailed plant canopy radiative transfer model. In this study, we developed a three-dimensional plant canopy radiative transfer model that can simulate the bidirectional chlorophyll fluorescence radiance and show several preliminary results of fluorescence distribution at the tree level. To simulate the three dimensional variations in chlorophyll fluorescence from trees, we measured tree structures using a terrestrial LiDAR instrument. The measurements were conducted in Yokohama, Japan (35°22'49" N 139°37'29" E). Three Japanese cherry trees (Cerasus Speciosa) were chosen for our study (Figure 1). Leaf-level sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) is also necessary as an input of radiative transfer model. To measure the leaf-level SIF, we used high spectral resolution spectroradiometer (HR 4000, Ocean Optics Inc. USA). The spectral resolution of this instrument is 0.05 nm (full width half maximum). The spectral range measured was 720 to 780 nm. From the spectral radiance measurements, we estimated SIF using the three band Fraunhofer Line Depth (3FLD) method. The effect of solar and view zenith angles, multiple scattering depends on many factors such as back ground reflectance, leaf reflectance transmittance and landscape structures. To understand how the SIF from both sparse and dense forest stands vary with sun and view angles and optical variables, it is necessary to conduct further sensitivity analysis. Radiative transfer simulation will help understand SIF emission at variety of forest canopy cases.

  20. CODE's new solar radiation pressure model for GNSS orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D.; Meindl, M.; Beutler, G.; Dach, R.; Schaer, S.; Lutz, S.; Prange, L.; Sośnica, K.; Mervart, L.; Jäggi, A.

    2015-08-01

    The Empirical CODE Orbit Model (ECOM) of the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), which was developed in the early 1990s, is widely used in the International GNSS Service (IGS) community. For a rather long time, spurious spectral lines are known to exist in geophysical parameters, in particular in the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) and in the estimated geocenter coordinates, which could recently be attributed to the ECOM. These effects grew creepingly with the increasing influence of the GLONASS system in recent years in the CODE analysis, which is based on a rigorous combination of GPS and GLONASS since May 2003. In a first step we show that the problems associated with the ECOM are to the largest extent caused by the GLONASS, which was reaching full deployment by the end of 2011. GPS-only, GLONASS-only, and combined GPS/GLONASS solutions using the observations in the years 2009-2011 of a global network of 92 combined GPS/GLONASS receivers were analyzed for this purpose. In a second step we review direct solar radiation pressure (SRP) models for GNSS satellites. We demonstrate that only even-order short-period harmonic perturbations acting along the direction Sun-satellite occur for GPS and GLONASS satellites, and only odd-order perturbations acting along the direction perpendicular to both, the vector Sun-satellite and the spacecraft's solar panel axis. Based on this insight we assess in the third step the performance of four candidate orbit models for the future ECOM. The geocenter coordinates, the ERP differences w. r. t. the IERS 08 C04 series of ERPs, the misclosures for the midnight epochs of the daily orbital arcs, and scale parameters of Helmert transformations for station coordinates serve as quality criteria. The old and updated ECOM are validated in addition with satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations and by comparing the orbits to those of the IGS and other analysis centers. Based on all tests, we present a new extended ECOM which

  1. Verification of Mars solar radiation model based on Mars Pathfinder data

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, J.; Segalov, T.; Jenkins, P.P.; Landis, G.A.; Baraona, C.R.

    1997-12-31

    The solar radiation model for the Martian surface was developed based on the images taken by the two Viking Landers VL1 and VL2 cameras, and calculation of the solar flux function. This model was used for the design of the Pathfinder`s photovoltaic arrays. The Pathfinder is equipped with various instruments capable of measuring data from which solar radiation quantities may be derived. In the present study the authors use data of the Lander and Rover, and perform correlation calculation to the solar radiation model. This study shows that the solar radiation model predicts with good accuracy the solar radiation on the Martian surface for horizontal photovoltaic arrays and for an optical depth of 0.5 of the Martian atmosphere.

  2. Mathematical modeling of sulfide flash smelting process. Part 2; Quantitative analysis of radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Y.B. ); Sohn, H.Y. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on a mathematical model developed to describe the rate processes in an axisymmetric copper flash smelting furnace shaft. A particular feature of the model is the incorporation of the four-flux model to describe the radiative heat transfer by combining the absorbing, emitting, and anisotropic scattering phenomena. The importance of various subprocesses of the radiative heat transfer in a flash smelting furnace has been studied. Model predictions showed that the radiation from the furnace walls and between the particles and the surrounding is the dominant mode of heat transfer in a flash smelting furnace.

  3. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen; Hashemi, Bijan; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi; Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue

  4. Creation of 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model actual patient non-rigid body motion as determined from MRI and position tracking studies of volunteers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, C. M.; Konik, A.; Dasari, P. K. R.; Segars, P.; Zheng, S.; Johnson, K. L.; Dey, J.; King, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Patient motion can cause artifacts, which can lead to difficulty in interpretation. The purpose of this study is to create 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model the location of the structures of the chest and upper abdomen of human volunteers undergoing a series of clinically relevant motions. The 3D anatomy is modeled using the XCAT phantom and based on MRI studies. The NURBS surfaces of the XCAT are interactively adapted to fit the MRI studies. A detailed XCAT phantom is first developed from an EKG triggered Navigator acquisition composed of sagittal slices with a 3 x 3 x 3 mm voxel dimension. Rigid body motion states are then acquired at breath-hold as sagittal slices partially covering the thorax, centered on the heart, with 9 mm gaps between them. For non-rigid body motion requiring greater sampling, modified Navigator sequences covering the entire thorax with 3 mm gaps between slices are obtained. The structures of the initial XCAT are then adapted to fit these different motion states. Simultaneous to MRI imaging the positions of multiple reflective markers on stretchy bands about the volunteer's chest and abdomen are optically tracked in 3D via stereo imaging. These phantoms with combined position tracking will be used to investigate both imaging-data-driven and motion-tracking strategies to estimate and correct for patient motion. Our initial application will be to cardiacperfusion SPECT imaging where the XCAT phantoms will be used to create patient activity and attenuation distributions for each volunteer with corresponding motion tracking data from the markers on the body-surface. Monte Carlo methods will then be used to simulate SPECT acquisitions, which will be used to evaluate various motion estimation and correction strategies.

  5. Modelling of radiation losses for ion acceleration at ultra-high laser intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdessus, Remi; d'Humières, Emmanuel; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2013-11-01

    Radiation losses of charged particles can become important in ultra high intensity laser plasma interaction. This process is described by the radiation back reaction term in the electron equation of motion. This term is implemented in the relativistic particle-in-cell code by using a renormalized Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. In the hole boring regime case of laser ion acceleration it is shown that radiation losses results in a decrease of the piston velocity.

  6. Radiative corrections to the nucleon axial vector coupling constant in the chiral soliton quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Duck, I. )

    1993-04-01

    Second-order radiative corrections to the nucleon axial vector coupling constant from gluon, pion, and sigma meson exchange are calculated in the chiral soliton quark model. Many apparent processes are found not to contribute. The soliton is elastically decoupled from meson radiative corrections which are dominated by a gluon exchange contribution equivalent to a gluonic hybrid component of the nucleon. A 30% radiative reduction of the axial coupling strength is indicated.

  7. Radiation transport phenomena and modeling. Part A: Codes; Part B: Applications with examples

    SciTech Connect

    Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Beutler, D.E.

    1997-09-01

    This report contains the notes from the second session of the 1997 IEEE Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects Conference Short Course on Applying Computer Simulation Tools to Radiation Effects Problems. Part A discusses the physical phenomena modeled in radiation transport codes and various types of algorithmic implementations. Part B gives examples of how these codes can be used to design experiments whose results can be easily analyzed and describes how to calculate quantities of interest for electronic devices.

  8. Comparison of vibration dissociation coupling and radiative heat transfer models for AOTV/AFE flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.; Bobskill, Glenn J.; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    A series of detailed studies comparing various vibration dissociation coupling models, reaction systems and rates, and radiative heating models has been conducted for the nonequilibrium stagnation region of an AFE/AOTV vehicle. Atomic and molecular nonequilibrium radiation correction factors have been developed and applied to various absorption coefficient step models, and a modified vibration dissociation coupling model has been shown to yield good vibration/electronic temperature and concentration profiles. While results indicate sensitivity to the choice of vibration dissociation coupling model and to the nitrogen electron impact ionization rate, by proper combinations accurate flowfield and radiative heating results can be obtained. These results indicate that nonequilibrium effects significantly affect the flowfield and the radiative heat transfer. However, additional work is needed in ionization chemistry and absorption coefficient modeling.

  9. Radiative modelling by the zonal method and WSGG model in inhomogeneous axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méchi, Rachid; Farhat, Habib; Said, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    Nongray radiation calculations are carried out for a case problem available in the literature. The problem is a non-isothermal and inhomogeneous CO2-H2O- N2 gas mixture confined within an axisymmetric cylindrical furnace. The numerical procedure is based on the zonal method associated with the weighted sum of gray gases (WSGG) model. The effect of the wall emissivity on the heat flux losses is discussed. It is shown that this property affects strongly the furnace efficiency and that the most important heat fluxes are those leaving through the circumferential boundary. The numerical procedure adopted in this work is found to be effective and may be relied on to simulate coupled turbulent combustion-radiation in fired furnaces.

  10. Mathematical modelling of solar ultraviolet radiation induced optical degradation in anodized aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruley, John D.

    1986-01-01

    In the design of spacecraft for proper thermal balance, accurate information on the long-term optical behavior of the spacecraft outer skin materials is necessary. A phenomenological model for such behavior is given. The underlying principles are explained and some examples are given of the model's fit to actual measurements under simulated Earth-orbit conditions. Comments are given on the applicability of the model to materials testing and thermal modelling.

  11. Numerical modeling investigation of radiation stress in coastal wave-current coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Changlong; Li, Rui

    2014-05-01

    It is believed that the radiation stress is the main driving force for nearshore wave-induced currents. So far several theoretical formulas of radiation stress have been proposed, among which the vertical structures differ considerably. A numerical wave flume (NWF) have been established on the basis of the CFD software, and applied to simulate the wave motion in various shallow water topography with different incident waves. The results from the NWF is used to analyze the features of radiation stress. It is found, that the vertical integral of the radiation stress is agreeably consistent with the well-known classical result by Longuet-Higgins and Stewart (1964), while the vertical structure of the radiation stress is discontinuous at the surface where the maximum exists, which can be better characterized with the formula by Mellor (2008). The effects of radiation stress and wave roller are implemented in a coupled SWAN-POM model, so that the coupled model is able to simulate the wave setup and wave-induced current. The numerical modeling results have been verified by the field measurements. It is shown that the modelled wave setup corresponding to various radiation stress formulas is well in agreement with the field observation. This means the modeled wave setup is dependent on the vertical integral of radiation stress rather than the vertical structure of that. In comparison with the observed current velocity and direction data, it is shown that the modeled results with Mellor's radiation stress formula plus wave roller is able to be consistent with the filed measurement well. This indicates that the modeled wave-induced current is dependent on the vertical structure of radiation stress rather than the vertical integral of that.

  12. Radiation induced brain injury: assessment of white matter tracts in a pre-clinical animal model using diffusion tensor MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Silun; Qiu, Deqiang; So, Kwok-Fai; Wu, Ed X; Leung, Lucullus H T; Gu, Jing; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2013-03-01

    We aim to study radiation induced white matter injury in a pre-clinical model using Diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI). Nineteen 12-week old Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated to the right hemisphere using a linear accelerator. The dose distribution map was coregistered to the DTI map to generate the actual radiation dose to each white matter tract. Rats underwent longitudinal DTI scans at five time points from 4 to 48 weeks post-radiation with histological evaluations. Fractional anisotropy (FA) of the external capsule, fornix, cerebral peduncle, anterior commissure, optic tract and optic nerve was evaluated. Radiation dose was highest at the ipsilateral external capsule and fornix (29.4 ± 1.3 and 29.8 ± 1.1 Gy, respectively). Optic nerve received 50 % dose to the external capsule and other white matter tracts received 80 % dose. Significantly lower FA was firstly found in the ipsilateral external capsule at 4 weeks post-radiation and in the ipsilateral fornix at 40 weeks post-radiation compared to the contralateral side. Significantly lower FA was found in contralateral optic nerve compared to ipsilateral optic nerve at 48 weeks post-radiation despite ipsilateral optic nerves receiving higher radiation dose than contralateral optic nerve (p = 0.021). No differences were found in other white matter regions until 48 weeks. Histology indicated demyelination, axonal degeneration and coagulative necrosis in all injured white matter. DTI can serve as a promising tool for assessment of radiation induced white matter injury and regional radiosensitivity of white matter tracts. PMID:23334608

  13. Development of models for thermal infrared radiation above and within plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paw u, Kyaw T.

    1992-01-01

    Any significant angular dependence of the emitted longwave radiation could result in errors in remotely estimated energy budgets or evapotranspiration. Empirical data and thermal infrared radiation models are reviewed in reference to anisotropic emissions from the plant canopy. The biometeorological aspects of linking longwave models with plant canopy energy budgets and micrometeorology are discussed. A new soil plant atmosphere model applied to anisotropic longwave emissions from a canopy is presented. Time variation of thermal infrared emission measurements is discussed.

  14. Modeling and simulation of radiation from hypersonic flows with Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Ilyoup

    During extreme-Mach number reentry into Earth's atmosphere, spacecraft experience hypersonic non-equilibrium flow conditions that dissociate molecules and ionize atoms. Such situations occur behind a shock wave leading to high temperatures, which have an adverse effect on the thermal protection system and radar communications. Since the electronic energy levels of gaseous species are strongly excited for high Mach number conditions, the radiative contribution to the total heat load can be significant. In addition, radiative heat source within the shock layer may affect the internal energy distribution of dissociated and weakly ionized gas species and the number density of ablative species released from the surface of vehicles. Due to the radiation total heat load to the heat shield surface of the vehicle may be altered beyond mission tolerances. Therefore, in the design process of spacecrafts the effect of radiation must be considered and radiation analyses coupled with flow solvers have to be implemented to improve the reliability during the vehicle design stage. To perform the first stage for radiation analyses coupled with gas-dynamics, efficient databasing schemes for emission and absorption coefficients were developed to model radiation from hypersonic, non-equilibrium flows. For bound-bound transitions, spectral information including the line-center wavelength and assembled parameters for efficient calculations of emission and absorption coefficients are stored for typical air plasma species. Since the flow is non-equilibrium, a rate equation approach including both collisional and radiatively induced transitions was used to calculate the electronic state populations, assuming quasi-steady-state (QSS). The Voigt line shape function was assumed for modeling the line broadening effect. The accuracy and efficiency of the databasing scheme was examined by comparing results of the databasing scheme with those of NEQAIR for the Stardust flowfield. An accuracy of

  15. Measurements on the shuttle of the LET spectra of galactic cosmic radiation and comparison with the radiation transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Badhwar, G.D.; Konradi, A.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Braby, L.A.

    1994-09-01

    A new class of tissue-equivalent proportional counters has been flown on two space shuttle flights. These detectors and their associated electronics cover a lineal energy range from 0.4 to 1250 keV/{mu}m with a multichannel analyzer resolution of 0.1 keV/{mu}m from 0.4 to 20 keV/{mu} and 5 keV/{mu}m from 20 to 1250 keV/{mu}m. These detectors provide the most complete dynamic range and highest resolution of any technique currently in use. On one mission, one detector was mounted in the Shuttle payload bay and another older modele in the mid-deck, thus providing information on the depth dependence of the lineal energy spectrum. A detailed comparison of the observed lineal energy and calculated LET spectra for galacic cosmic radiation shows that, although the radiation transport models provide a rather accurate description of the dose ({+-}15%) and equivalent dose ({+-}15%), the calculations significantly underestimate the frequency of events below about 100 keV/{mu}m. This difference cannot be explained by the inclusion of the contribution of splash protons. The contribution of the secondary pions, kaons and electrons produce in the Shuttle shielding, if included in the radiation transport model, may explain these differences. There are also significant differences between the model predictions and observations above 1440 keV/{mu}m, particularly for 28.5{degrees} inclination orbit. 24 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Measurements on the shuttle of the LET spectra of galactic cosmic radiation and comparison with the radiation transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Braby, L. A.; Konradi, A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A new class of tissue-equivalent proportional counters has been flown on two space shuttle flights. These detectors and their associated electronics cover a lineal energy range from 0.4 to 1250 keV/microns with a multichannel analyzer resolution of 0.1 keV/microns from 0.4 to 20 keV/microns and 5 keV/microns from 20 to 1250 keV/microns. These detectors provide the most complete dynamic range and highest resolution of any technique currently in use. On one mission, one detector was mounted in the Shuttle payload bay and another older model in the mid-deck, thus providing information on the depth dependence of the lineal energy spectrum. A detailed comparison of the observed lineal energy and calculated LET spectra for galactic cosmic radiation shows that, although the radiation transport models provide a rather accurate description of the dose (+/- 15%) and equivalent dose (+/- 15%), the calculations significantly underestimate the frequency of events below about 100 keV/microns. This difference cannot be explained by the inclusion of the contribution of splash protons. The contribution of the secondary pions, kaons and electrons produced in the Shuttle shielding, if included in the radiation transport model, may explain these differences. There are also significant differences between the model predictions and observations above 140 keV/microns, particularly for 28.5 degrees inclination orbit.

  17. A Temperature-Based Model for Estimating Monthly Average Daily Global Solar Radiation in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huashan; Cao, Fei; Wang, Xianlong; Ma, Weibin

    2014-01-01

    Since air temperature records are readily available around the world, the models based on air temperature for estimating solar radiation have been widely accepted. In this paper, a new model based on Hargreaves and Samani (HS) method for estimating monthly average daily global solar radiation is proposed. With statistical error tests, the performance of the new model is validated by comparing with the HS model and its two modifications (Samani model and Chen model) against the measured data at 65 meteorological stations in China. Results show that the new model is more accurate and robust than the HS, Samani, and Chen models in all climatic regions, especially in the humid regions. Hence, the new model can be recommended for estimating solar radiation in areas where only air temperature data are available in China. PMID:24605046

  18. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  19. Realistic NLTE Radiative Transfer for Modeling Stellar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Philip D.

    1999-01-01

    This NASA grant supported the development of codes to solve the non-LTE multi-level spherical radiative transfer problem in the presence of velocity fields. Much of this work was done in collaboration with Graham Harper (CASA, University of Colorado). These codes were developed for application to the cool, low-velocity winds of evolved late-type stars. Particular emphasis was placed on modeling the wind of lambda Velorum (K4 lb), the brightest K supergiant in the sky, based on extensive observations of the ultraviolet spectrum with the HST/GHRS from GO program 5307. Several solution techniques were examined, including the Eddington factor Approach described in detail by Bennett & Harper (1997). An Eddington factor variant of Harper's S-MULTI code (Harper 1994) for stationary atmospheres was developed and implemented, although full convergence was not realized. The ratio of wind terminal velocity to turbulent velocity is large (approx. 0.3-0.5) in these cool star winds so this assumption of stationarity provides reasonable starting models. Final models, incorporating specified wind laws, were converged using the comoving CRD S-MULTI code. Details of the solution procedure were published by Bennett & Harper (1997). Our analysis of the wind of lambda Vel, based on wind absorption superimposed on chromospheric emission lines in the ultraviolet, can be found in Carpenter et al. (1999). In this paper, we compare observed wind absorption features to an exact CRD calculation in the comoving frame, and also to a much quicker, but approximate, method using the SEI (Sobolev with Exact Integration) code of Lamers, Cerruti-Sola, & Perinotto (1987). Carpenter et al. (1999) provide detailed comparisons of the exact CRD and approximate SEI results and discuss when SEI is adequate to use for computing wind line profiles. Unfortunately, the observational material is insufficient to unambiguously determine the wind acceleration law for lambda Vel. Relatively few unblended Fe II lines

  20. Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Mather, James H.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2007-07-01

    The vertical distribution of radiative heating in the atmosphere is an important driver of atmospheric circulation. Evaluation of model simulations of the Earth's radiation budget typically focus only on performance at the top of the atmosphere or at the surface. In this study, we compare the vertical distribution of cloud properties and radiative heating rates calculated from observations at the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites on the islands of Nauru and Manus to simulations performed using the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) and the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). Significant differences are found in the vertical profiles and diurnal cycle of cloud amount, condensed water content, and cloud effect on heating rates between the two models and between the models and the observations. The differences in the heating rates between the models and ARM results depend partly on the details of the parameterization of effective radius and absorption coefficients used and partly on differences in cloud frequency, vertical location of clouds, and optical thickness. Since the same radiative model is used in the CAM and MMF, differences in the effect of clouds on heating rates between the two models are due to the differing treatment of cloud processes in the models and the interaction of clouds and radiation on the local scale in the MMF.

  1. Community Radiative Transfer Model for Aerosol Radiance Assimilation in Global and Regional Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; van Delst, P. F.; Groff, D.; Collard, A.; Boukabara, S. A.; Weng, F.; Derber, J.

    2013-12-01

    Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM), developed at the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, has being operationally supporting satellite radiance assimilation for weather forecasting in NOAA and NASA. The CRTM is also supporting the MODIS, GOES-R and JPSS/NPP missions for instrument calibration, validation, monitoring long-term trending, and satellite products using a retrieval approach. The CRTM development is contributed to by multiple U.S. government agencies, universities as well as private companies. This paper will present the latest CRTM version 2.1, which is applicable for passive microwave, infrared and visible sensors. It supports all NOAA satellite instruments, NASA MODIS, and many foreign meteorological satellites. In this study, we will describe the CRTM functionalities and capabilities in the new release of version 2.1. The following are the highlights of the CRTM version: 1. Dual Transmittance models, ODAS and ODPS, 2. Sensor Specific Transmittance models: Fast Transmittance Model for Stratospheric Sounding Unit to take account for CO2 cell pressure variation, Fast Transmittance Model for SSMIS Upper Atmospheric Sounding (UAS) Channels including Zeeman-splitting. 3. Non-local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) Radiative Transfer 4. Surface Emissivity/Reflectivity Models 5. Aerosol, Cloud, and Molecular Scattering Models Pre-computed look-up tables for extinction, scattering coefficients and phase functions 6. Dual Radiative Transfer Solver, Adding Double-Adding method [1][2], Adding Matrix Operator method, and SOI method. The CRTM is flexible for users' applications, for example one can simulate aircraft measurements, turn scattering off for fast calculations, use an aerosol optical depth (AOD) module for aerosol optical depth calculation, use an emissivity interface to input your own emissivity data base, and use a channel selection function for specified channel radiance calculations. In this presentation, we focus on aerosol product

  2. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C.; Gridley, Daila S.; Seykora, John T.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the dermis upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed. PMID:26256624

  3. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C; Gridley, Daila S; Seykora, John T; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the derm is upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed.

  4. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C; Gridley, Daila S; Seykora, John T; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the derm is upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed. PMID:26256624

  5. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C.; Gridley, Daila S.; Seykora, John T.; Kennedy, Ann R.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2015-07-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the derm is upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed.

  6. A toy model linking atmospheric thermal radiation and sea ice growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorndike, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    A simplified analytical model of sea ice growth is presented where the atmosphere is in thermal radiative equilibrium with the ice. This makes the downwelling longwave radiation reaching the ice surface an internal variable rather than a specified forcing. Analytical results demonstrate how the ice state depends on properties of the ice and on the externally specified climate.

  7. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.; Seaton, Michael; Todorov, Ilian; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia has been viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and was consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as a nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with the account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely disjoint from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  8. TESTING PULSAR RADIATION MODELS USING AN alpha-WEAK-DEPENDENT ALTITUDE RATIO

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. J.; Cui, X. H.; Qiao, G. J.; Xu, R. X.; Wang, H. G.

    2009-09-20

    It is found that pulsar radiation altitude ratios between different radio frequencies are weak-dependent on the inclination angle alpha. This is proved via series expansion techniques and illustrated by using pulsar examples of PSR B0329+54, B1508+55, B2016+28, B1133+16, and B2319+60. It is emphasized that this alpha-weak-dependent radiation altitude ratio offers a good tool to test pulsar radiation models. We use the measured altitude ratios to constrain the parameter space for the Ruderman-Sutherland model and the inverse Compton scattering model. It is found that the Ruderman-Sutherland model is not compatible with the measured altitude ratios, while the results are compatible with the inverse Compton scattering model. The potential possible applications of this method in studying pulsar timing and in studying pulsar high energy radiation are also discussed.

  9. Cloud Radiation Forcings and Feedbacks: General Circulation Model Tests and Observational Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee,Wan-Ho; Iacobellis, Sam F.; Somerville, Richard C. J.

    1997-01-01

    Using an atmospheric general circulation model (the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model: CCM2), the effects on climate sensitivity of several different cloud radiation parameterizations have been investigated. In addition to the original cloud radiation scheme of CCM2, four parameterizations incorporating prognostic cloud water were tested: one version with prescribed cloud radiative properties and three other versions with interactive cloud radiative properties. The authors' numerical experiments employ perpetual July integrations driven by globally constant sea surface temperature forcings of two degrees, both positive and negative. A diagnostic radiation calculation has been applied to investigate the partial contributions of high, middle, and low cloud to the total cloud radiative forcing, as well as the contributions of water vapor, temperature, and cloud to the net climate feedback. The high cloud net radiative forcing is positive, and the middle and low cloud net radiative forcings are negative. The total net cloud forcing is negative in all of the model versions. The effect of interactive cloud radiative properties on global climate sensitivity is significant. The net cloud radiative feedbacks consist of quite different shortwave and longwave components between the schemes with interactive cloud radiative properties and the schemes with specified properties. The increase in cloud water content in the warmer climate leads to optically thicker middle- and low-level clouds and in turn to negative shortwave feedbacks for the interactive radiative schemes, while the decrease in cloud amount simply produces a positive shortwave feedback for the schemes with a specified cloud water path. For the longwave feedbacks, the decrease in high effective cloudiness for the schemes without interactive radiative properties leads to a negative feedback, while for the other cases, the longwave feedback is positive. These cloud radiation

  10. Laminar flow studies of a low-temperature space radiator model using D-shaped tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintula, T. C.; Prok, G. M.; Johnston, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Test results of a low-temperature space radiator model are presented. Radiator performance is evaluated with a low-thermal-conductivity fluid in laminar flow in D-shaped cross-section tubes. The test covered a Reynolds number range from 50 to 4500 and a fluid temperature range from 294 to 414 K (70 to 286 F). For low-temperature radiators, the fluid-to-surface temperature differential was predominately influenced by fluid temperature in laminar flow. Heat transfer and pressure drop for the radiator tube could be predicted within engineering accuracy from existing correlations.

  11. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  12. Application of the LPL model to mixed radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, S.B.

    1991-09-01

    The LPL (Lethal, Potentially Lethal) formulation was used to analyze sets of cell survival data from mixes of (1) alpha particles and X rays and (2) neon ions and X rays. The hypothesis tested was whether survival after mixed radiation could be predicted by simply adding the total number of lethal and potentially lethal lesions from each radiation in the theoretical survival expression. Results show that all data appear to conform satisfactorily to the LPL hypothesis except for the mixed neon-ion and X-ray results with a large dose of X rays (8 Gy) given first. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Box-wing model approach for solar radiation pressure modelling in a multi-GNSS scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Guillermo; Jesús García, Adrián

    2016-04-01

    The solar radiation pressure force is the largest orbital perturbation after the gravitational effects and the major error source affecting GNSS satellites. A wide range of approaches have been developed over the years for the modelling of this non gravitational effect as part of the orbit determination process. These approaches are commonly divided into empirical, semi-analytical and analytical, where their main difference relies on the amount of knowledge of a-priori physical information about the properties of the satellites (materials and geometry) and their attitude. It has been shown in the past that the pre-launch analytical models fail to achieve the desired accuracy mainly due to difficulties in the extrapolation of the in-orbit optical and thermic properties, the perturbations in the nominal attitude law and the aging of the satellite's surfaces, whereas empirical models' accuracies strongly depend on the amount of tracking data used for deriving the models, and whose performances are reduced as the area to mass ratio of the GNSS satellites increases, as it happens for the upcoming constellations such as BeiDou and Galileo. This paper proposes to use basic box-wing model for Galileo complemented with empirical parameters, based on the limited available information about the Galileo satellite's geometry. The satellite is modelled as a box, representing the satellite bus, and a wing representing the solar panel. The performance of the model will be assessed for GPS, GLONASS and Galileo constellations. The results of the proposed approach have been analyzed over a one year period. In order to assess the results two different SRP models have been used. Firstly, the proposed box-wing model and secondly, the new CODE empirical model, ECOM2. The orbit performances of both models are assessed using Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) measurements, together with the evaluation of the orbit prediction accuracy. This comparison shows the advantages and disadvantages of

  14. Skill Assessment of a Spectral Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson, W.; Casey, Nancy W.

    2009-01-01

    Ocean phytoplankton, detrital material, and water absorb and scatter light spectrally. The Ocean- Atmosphere Spectral Irradiance Model (OASIM) is intended to provide surface irradiance over the oceans with sufficient spectral resolution to support ocean ecology, biogeochemistry, and heat exchange investigations, and of sufficient duration to support inter-annual and decadal investigations. OASIM total surface irradiance (integrated 200 nm to 4 microns) was compared to in situ data and three publicly available global data products at monthly 1-degree resolution. OASIM spectrally-integrated surface irradiance had root mean square (RMS) difference= 20.1 W/sq m (about 11%), bias=1.6 W/sq m (about 0.8%), regression slope= 1.01 and correlation coefficient= 0.89, when compared to 2322 in situ observations. OASIM had the lowest bias of any of the global data products evaluated (ISCCP-FD, NCEP, and ISLSCP 11), and the best slope (nearest to unity). It had the second best RMS, and the third best correlation coefficient. OASIM total surface irradiance compared well with ISCCP-FD (RMS= 20.7 W/sq m; bias=-11.4 W/sq m, r=0.98) and ISLSCP II (RMS =25.2 W/sq m; bias= -13.8 W/sq m; r=0.97), but less well with NCEP (RMS =43.0 W/sq m ;bias=-22.6 W/sq m; x=0.91). Comparisons of OASIM photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) with PAR derived from SeaWiFS showed low bias (-1.8 mol photons /sq m/d, or about 5%), RMS (4.25 mol photons /sq m/d ' or about 12%), near unity slope (1.03) and high correlation coefficient (0.97). Coupled with previous estimates of clear sky spectral irradiance in OASIM (6.6% RMS at 1 nm resolution), these results suggest that OASIM provides reasonable estimates of surface broadband and spectral irradiance in the oceans, and can support studies on ocean ecosystems, carbon cycling, and heat exchange.

  15. Skill assessment of a spectral ocean-atmosphere radiative model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Casey, Nancy W.

    2009-02-01

    Ocean phytoplankton, detrital material, and water absorb and scatter light spectrally. The Ocean-Atmosphere Spectral Irradiance Model (OASIM) is intended to provide surface irradiance over the oceans with sufficient spectral resolution to support ocean ecology, biogeochemistry, and heat exchange investigations, and of sufficient duration to support inter-annual and decadal investigations. OASIM total surface irradiance (integrated 200 nm to 4 μm) was compared to in situ data and three publicly available global data products at monthly 1-degree resolution. OASIM spectrally-integrated surface irradiance had root mean square (RMS) difference = 20.1 W m - 2 (about 11%), bias = 1.6 W m - 2 (about 0.8%), regression slope = 1.01 and correlation coefficient = 0.89, when compared to 2322 in situ observations. OASIM had the lowest bias of any of the global data products evaluated (ISCCP-FD, NCEP, and ISLSCP II), and the best slope (nearest to unity). It had the second best RMS, and the third best correlation coefficient. OASIM total surface irradiance compared well with ISCCP-FD (RMS = 20.7 W m - 2 ; bias = - 11.4 W m - 2 , r = 0.98) and ISLSCP II (RMS = 25.2 W m - 2 ; bias = - 13.8 W m - 2 ; r = 0.97), but less well with NCEP (RMS = 43.0 W m - 2 ; bias = - 22.6 W m - 2 ; r = 0.91). Comparisons of OASIM photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) with PAR derived from SeaWiFS showed low bias (- 1.8 mol photons m - 2 d - 1 , or about 5%), RMS (4.25 mol photons m - 2 d - 1 , or about 12%), near unity slope (1.03) and high correlation coefficient (0.97). Coupled with previous estimates of clear sky spectral irradiance in OASIM (6.6% RMS at 1 nm resolution), these results suggest that OASIM provides reasonable estimates of surface broadband and spectral irradiance in the oceans, and can support studies on ocean ecosystems, carbon cycling, and heat exchange.

  16. Standardization Process for Space Radiation Models Used for Space System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet; Daly, Eamonn; Brautigam, Donald

    2005-01-01

    The space system design community has three concerns related to models of the radiation belts and plasma: 1) AP-8 and AE-8 models are not adequate for modern applications; 2) Data that have become available since the creation of AP-8 and AE-8 are not being fully exploited for modeling purposes; 3) When new models are produced, there is no authorizing organization identified to evaluate the models or their datasets for accuracy and robustness. This viewgraph presentation provided an overview of the roadmap adopted by the Working Group Meeting on New Standard Radiation Belt and Space Plasma Models.

  17. Space weather models for radiation conditions outside and inside of the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, Rikho; Kalegaev, Vladimir; Panasyuk, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Radiation environment in the Earth magnetosphere can not be considered without taking into account the physical conditions in interplanetary space due to solar activity. Therefore, any realistic model of radiation inside the magnetosphere should take into account the physical condition determined by the models out of it. Since the flux of galactic and solar cosmic rays in the magnetosphere based on the model of radiation outside the magnetosphere with an indispensable view of the magnetic field of the Earth, due to changes in the solar wind, interplanetary shock waves and magnetic field. These factors are also influence the models of trapped radiation and circular current. Particularly, this report addressed to the methodological issues of generalization of experimental data to the level of computational models, which is unchanged properties of predicting all kinds of extreme situations. The complex of these problems has long been discussed under the pressure of public attention in connection with the problems of weather forecasting and hydrology. In the field of space weather the problem of operational models evaluation (so called "metric & validation" activity) is also of great interest now. In the light of changes in the factors of solar activity in the last minimum and in the solar cycle 24, the report discusses the problems of modeling particle fluxes outside the magnetosphere. Current status of near- Earth radiation modeling including radiation belt particles transport, acceleration and losses will be discussed as well from the experimental and theoretical viewpoint.

  18. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  19. The Effects of Gamma and Proton Radiation Exposure on Hematopoietic Cell Counts in the Ferret Model.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Wan, X Steven; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S; Wroe, Andrew J; Gridley, Daila S; Kennedy, Ann R

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to total-body radiation induces hematological changes, which can detriment one's immune response to wounds and infection. Here, the decreases in blood cell counts after acute radiation doses of γ-ray or proton radiation exposure, at the doses and dose-rates expected during a solar particle event (SPE), are reported in the ferret model system. Following the exposure to γ-ray or proton radiation, the ferret peripheral total white blood cell (WBC) and lymphocyte counts decreased whereas neutrophil count increased within 3 hours. At 48 hours after irradiation, the WBC, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts decreased in a dose-dependent manner but were not significantly affected by the radiation type (γ-rays verses protons) or dose rate (0.5 Gy/minute verses 0.5 Gy/hour). The loss of these blood cells could accompany and contribute to the physiological symptoms of the acute radiation syndrome (ARS).

  20. Radiative Trasnfer Calculation Of Light Curves And Spectra For Type Ia Sne Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Soma; Baron, E.; Timmes, F.; Hauschildt, P.

    2011-01-01

    We present calculations of the light curves and spectra from a suite of Type Ia supernovae models, ranging from standard single degenerate scenarios to double degenerate collisions. We use a fully relativistic and time dependent radiative transfer code PHOENIX for our calculations which is time dependent in both radiative transfer and rate equation. Simple hydrodynamic calculation is used to treat conservation of energy of the gas and the radiation together and also allow different time-scales for gas and radiation. Between two time steps for the calculation of the light curve, the correct distribution of total energy change among gas and radiation is obtained by iteratively solving for the radiative transfer equation and hence the new temperature in the new time step. In our work we explore systematic relationships between the mass of 56ni mass produced, the mass of silicon group elements produced, the white dwarf metallicity, and the mass of unburned material

  1. REE radiation fault model: a tool for organizing and communication radiation test data and construction COTS based spacebourne computing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, R.; Some, R.

    2002-01-01

    The growth in data rates of instruments on future NASA spacecraft continues to outstrip the improvement in communications bandwidth and processing capabilities of radiation-hardened computers. Sophisticated autonomous operations strategies will further increase the processing workload. Given the reductions in spacecraft size and available power, standard radiation hardened computing systems alone will not be able to address the requirements of future missions. The REE project was intended to overcome this obstacle by developing a COTS- based supercomputer suitable for use as a science and autonomy data processor in most space environments. This development required a detailed knowledge of system behavior in the presence of Single Event Effect (SEE) induced faults so that mitigation strategies could be designed to recover system level reliability while maintaining the COTS throughput advantage. The REE project has developed a suite of tools and a methodology for predicting SEU induced transient fault rates in a range of natural space environments from ground-based radiation testing of component parts. In this paper we provide an overview of this methodology and tool set with a concentration on the radiation fault model and its use in the REE system development methodology. Using test data reported elsewhere in this and other conferences, we predict upset rates for a particular COTS single board computer configuration in several space environments.

  2. Modeling Trends in Tropospheric Aerosol Burden & Its Radiative Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large changes in emissions of aerosol precursors have occurred across the southeast U.S., North America, as well as the northern hemisphere. The spatial heterogeneity and contrasting trends in the aerosol burden is resulting in differing effects on regional radiative balance. Mul...

  3. Chairman's introduction: mechanisms, models and experiments in space radiation research.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Juergen

    2004-01-01

    Radiation risk estimate in space is a moral obligation and a scientific challenge requiring the combined efforts of physicists and biologists. This introductory paper presents some thoughts about problems to be solved and the possible directions of research. It stresses the necessity of cooperation across disciplines and the combination of space and ground based investigations. PMID:15880914

  4. Use of Existing CAD Models for Radiation Shielding Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Barzilla, J. E.; Wilson, P.; Davis, A.; Zachman, J.

    2015-01-01

    The utility of a radiation exposure analysis depends not only on the accuracy of the underlying particle transport code, but also on the accuracy of the geometric representations of both the vehicle used as radiation shielding mass and the phantom representation of the human form. The current NASA/Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) process to determine crew radiation exposure in a vehicle design incorporates both output from an analytic High Z and Energy Particle Transport (HZETRN) code and the properties (i.e., material thicknesses) of a previously processed drawing. This geometry pre-process can be time-consuming, and the results are less accurate than those determined using a Monte Carlo-based particle transport code. The current work aims to improve this process. Although several Monte Carlo programs (FLUKA, Geant4) are readily available, most use an internal geometry engine. The lack of an interface with the standard CAD formats used by the vehicle designers limits the ability of the user to communicate complex geometries. Translation of native CAD drawings into a format readable by these transport programs is time consuming and prone to error. The Direct Accelerated Geometry -United (DAGU) project is intended to provide an interface between the native vehicle or phantom CAD geometry and multiple particle transport codes to minimize problem setup, computing time and analysis error.

  5. Radiation transport modeling using extended quadrature method of moments

    SciTech Connect

    Vikas, V.; Hauck, C.D.; Wang, Z.J.; Fox, R.O.

    2013-08-01

    The radiative transfer equation describes the propagation of radiation through a material medium. While it provides a highly accurate description of the radiation field, the large phase space on which the equation is defined makes it numerically challenging. As a consequence, significant effort has gone into the development of accurate approximation methods. Recently, an extended quadrature method of moments (EQMOM) has been developed to solve univariate population balance equations, which also have a large phase space and thus face similar computational challenges. The distinct advantage of the EQMOM approach over other moment methods is that it generates moment equations that are consistent with a positive phase space density and has a moment inversion algorithm that is fast and efficient. The goal of the current paper is to present the EQMOM method in the context of radiation transport, to discuss advantages and disadvantages, and to demonstrate its performance on a set of standard one-dimensional benchmark problems that encompass optically thin, thick, and transition regimes. Special attention is given in the implementation to the issue of realizability—that is, consistency with a positive phase space density. Numerical results in one dimension are promising and lay the foundation for extending the same framework to multiple dimensions.

  6. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging without Harmful Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the…

  7. Monte Carlo modeling in CT-based geometries: dosimetry for biological modeling experiments with particle beam radiation.

    PubMed

    Diffenderfer, Eric S; Dolney, Derek; Schaettler, Maximilian; Sanzari, Jenine K; McDonough, James; Cengel, Keith A

    2014-03-01

    The space radiation environment imposes increased dangers of exposure to ionizing radiation, particularly during a solar particle event (SPE). These events consist primarily of low energy protons that produce a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution. Due to this inherent dose heterogeneity, experiments designed to investigate the radiobiological effects of SPE radiation present difficulties in evaluating and interpreting dose to sensitive organs. To address this challenge, we used the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation framework to develop dosimetry software that uses computed tomography (CT) images and provides radiation transport simulations incorporating all relevant physical interaction processes. We found that this simulation accurately predicts measured data in phantoms and can be applied to model dose in radiobiological experiments with animal models exposed to charged particle (electron and proton) beams. This study clearly demonstrates the value of Monte Carlo radiation transport methods for two critically interrelated uses: (i) determining the overall dose distribution and dose levels to specific organ systems for animal experiments with SPE-like radiation, and (ii) interpreting the effect of random and systematic variations in experimental variables (e.g. animal movement during long exposures) on the dose distributions and consequent biological effects from SPE-like radiation exposure. The software developed and validated in this study represents a critically important new tool that allows integration of computational and biological modeling for evaluating the biological outcomes of exposures to inhomogeneous SPE-like radiation dose distributions, and has potential applications for other environmental and therapeutic exposure simulations.

  8. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  9. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk. PMID:27345200

  10. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  11. Ethylene Decomposition Initiated by Ultraviolet Radiation from Low Pressure Mercury Lamps: Kinetics Model Prediction and Experimental Verification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozwiak, Zbigniew Boguslaw

    1995-01-01

    Ethylene is an important auto-catalytic plant growth hormone. Removal of ethylene from the atmosphere surrounding ethylene-sensitive horticultural products may be very beneficial, allowing an extended period of storage and preventing or delaying the induction of disorders. Various ethylene removal techniques have been studied and put into practice. One technique is based on using low pressure mercury ultraviolet lamps as a source of photochemical energy to initiate chemical reactions that destroy ethylene. Although previous research showed that ethylene disappeared in experiments with mercury ultraviolet lamps, the reactions were not described and the actual cause of ethylene disappearance remained unknown. Proposed causes for this disappearance were the direct action of ultraviolet rays on ethylene, reaction of ethylene with ozone (which is formed when air or gas containing molecular oxygen is exposed to radiation emitted by this type of lamp), or reactions with atomic oxygen leading to formation of ozone. The objective of the present study was to determine the set of physical and chemical actions leading to the disappearance of ethylene from artificial storage atmosphere under conditions of ultraviolet irradiation. The goal was achieved by developing a static chemical model based on the physical properties of a commercially available ultraviolet lamp, the photochemistry of gases, and the kinetics of chemical reactions. The model was used to perform computer simulations predicting time dependent concentrations of chemical species included in the model. Development of the model was accompanied by the design of a reaction chamber used for experimental verification. The model provided a good prediction of the general behavior of the species involved in the chemistry under consideration; however the model predicted lower than measured rate of ethylene disappearance. Some reasons for the model -experiment disagreement are radiation intensity averaging, the experimental

  12. Modified Slim-Disk Model Based on Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulation Data: The Conflict between Outflow and Photon Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Shun; Mineshige, Shin; Ohsuga, Ken

    2009-08-01

    Photon trapping and outflow are two key physics issues associated with supercritical accretion flow. We investigated the conflict between these two processes based on two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulation data, and constructed a simplified (radially) one-dimensional model. Mass loss due to outflow, which is not considered in the slim-disk model, reduces the surface density of the flow, and if very significantly, it can totally suppress the photon-trapping effects. If photon trapping is very significant, conversely, outflow can be suppressed because the radiation-pressure force is reduced. To see what actually occurs, we examined the RHD simulation data and evaluated the accretion and outflow rates as functions of the radius. We have found that the accretion rate monotonically decreases, while the outflow rate increases, as the radius decreases. However, the accretion remains constant at small radii, inside several Schwarzschild radii, since the outflow is suppressed by photon trapping effects. To understand the conflict between the photon trapping and outflow in a simpler way, we modeled the radial distribution of the accretion rate from our simulation data, and built up a new (radially) one-dimensional model, which is similar to the slim-disk model, but incorporates mass loss effects due to the outflow. We find that the surface density (and, hence, the optical depth) is greatly reduced even inside the trapping radius, compared to the case without outflow, whereas the effective temperature distribution hardly changes. That is, the emergent spectra do not sensitively depend on the amount of mass outflow. We conclude that the slim-disk approach is valid for interpreting observations, even if the outflow is taken into account. The observational implications of our findings are briefly discussed in relation to ultra-luminous X-ray sources.

  13. System identification of the radiation belts: How to model, forecast and understand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, Richard

    System identification is a black box modelling technique that is able to determine a mathematical model from the input and output data. In the case of modelling the radiation belts, electron flux data is used as the output. However, the exact inputs to the highly complex radiation belt system is unknown. Many variables can possibly effect the radiation belts in some way, such as solar wind parameters or geomagnetic indices, but identifying which are the main control parameters can be problematic. Here, the Error