Science.gov

Sample records for actual research funding

  1. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  2. Funding of Research in Librarianship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgibbons, Shirley Grinnell

    1984-01-01

    Discusses funding for library research (1964-84), including previous findings; problems in analyses of funding; activities of major research funding agencies (Higher Education Act of 1965 Title II-B, National Science Foundation, National Library of Medicine, Council on Library Resources); and funding by professional organizations. Problems and…

  3. Physics Education Research funding census

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Charles; Barthelemy, Ramón; Finkelstein, Noah; Mestre, Jose

    2012-02-01

    It is important for a research community, such as Physics Education Research (PER), to understand how much funding it receives and where this funding comes from. During spring 2011, US-based members of the PER community were asked to respond to a web survey to identify funding that supports their research. Results indicate that the total funding base for PER from 2006-2010 (inclusive) is at least 262 grants worth a total of 72.5M. Most (75%) of the funding for PER comes from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and most of the NSF funding is through the NSF Directorate for Education and Human Resources. Very little PER work is funded through the Education and Interdisciplinary Research (EIR) Program that is housed within the NSF Division of Physics, nor is there significant funding from the US Department of Education. Although funding supports work at all levels of physics instruction, by far the largest amount of funding goes to support work at the introductory undergraduate level.

  4. [Memorandum - research funding of prevention].

    PubMed

    Walter, U; Gold, C; Hoffmann, W; Jahn, I; Töppich, J; Wildner, M; Dubben, S; Franze, M; John, J; Kliche, T; Lehmann, H; Naegele, G; Nöcker, G; Plaumann, M; Pott, E; Robra, B-P

    2012-08-01

    The memorandum of the research funding of prevention has been devised within the framework of the Prevention Research Funding Programme of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research. It consists not only of the obtained findings of the research-practice co-operation but also of recommendations for the implementation of prospective, innovational, effective, practice-oriented and sustainable research. The respective knowledge has been acquired from quantitative surveys on the experiences of scientists and practice partners within the prevention research funding project as well as from extensive qualitative methods of structured group evaluation. A participatory co-operation between research and practice based on mutual respect, trust and recognition is seen as mandatory for the further development of both prevention and health promotion research. Research and practice partners are required to engage in an ab initio collaboration starting from the conception phase, whereby it is advisable to encourage and fortify the communication between research, practice and funding partners by systematic surveillance in form of a meta-project. In addition, the inclusion of the target population from the outset and on a collaborative basis is considered as beneficial in order to ensure the practical application of the research findings. Furthermore, innovatory research designs which are able to provide a framework for internal flexibility, continuous re-assessment and adjustment are fundamental for the implementation of practice-oriented research. Moreover, a dynamic co-operation between different groups of interest not only depends on sharing responsibility but also on sufficient funding for both research and practice, which is particularly important for the transfer and communication of the attained findings. With regard to the evaluation of both effectiveness and sustainability of interventions, a research funding project is required which makes long-term results possible

  5. Overview: Research Funding in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining more federal funds is the expressed research goal in "Closing the Gaps by 2015." It states: By 2015, increase the level of federal science and engineering research and development obligations to Texas institutions to 6.5 percent of obligations to higher education institutions across the nation. In 2006, Texas institutions of higher…

  6. The Domino Effects of Federal Research Funding.

    PubMed

    Lanahan, Lauren; Graddy-Reed, Alexandra; Feldman, Maryann P

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which federal investment in research crowds out or decreases incentives for investment from other funding sources remains an open question. Scholarship on research funding has focused on the relationship between federal and industry or, more comprehensively, non-federal funding without disentangling the other sources of research support that include nonprofit organizations and state and local governments. This paper extends our understanding of academic research support by considering the relationships between federal and non-federal funding sources provided by the National Science Foundation Higher Education Research and Development Survey. We examine whether federal research investment serves as a complement or substitute for state and local government, nonprofit, and industry research investment using the population of research-active academic science fields at U.S. doctoral granting institutions. We use a system of two equations that instruments with prior levels of both federal and non-federal funding sources and accounts for time-invariant academic institution-field effects through first differencing. We estimate that a 1% increase in federal research funding is associated with a 0.411% increase in nonprofit research funding, a 0.217% increase in state and local research funding, and a 0.468% increase in industry research funding, respectively. Results indicate that federal funding plays a fundamental role in inducing complementary investments from other funding sources, with impacts varying across academic division, research capacity, and institutional control. PMID:27327509

  7. The Domino Effects of Federal Research Funding

    PubMed Central

    Graddy-Reed, Alexandra; Feldman, Maryann P.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which federal investment in research crowds out or decreases incentives for investment from other funding sources remains an open question. Scholarship on research funding has focused on the relationship between federal and industry or, more comprehensively, non-federal funding without disentangling the other sources of research support that include nonprofit organizations and state and local governments. This paper extends our understanding of academic research support by considering the relationships between federal and non-federal funding sources provided by the National Science Foundation Higher Education Research and Development Survey. We examine whether federal research investment serves as a complement or substitute for state and local government, nonprofit, and industry research investment using the population of research-active academic science fields at U.S. doctoral granting institutions. We use a system of two equations that instruments with prior levels of both federal and non-federal funding sources and accounts for time-invariant academic institution-field effects through first differencing. We estimate that a 1% increase in federal research funding is associated with a 0.411% increase in nonprofit research funding, a 0.217% increase in state and local research funding, and a 0.468% increase in industry research funding, respectively. Results indicate that federal funding plays a fundamental role in inducing complementary investments from other funding sources, with impacts varying across academic division, research capacity, and institutional control. PMID:27327509

  8. Creative Partnerships for Funding Nursing Research

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Judith J.; Hills, Elizabeth Blanchard; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A.; Smith, Carol E.; Farran, Carol J.; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2013-01-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and the Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) program are two federal funding mechanisms that some nurses in academic positions have used to support research and development of innovative nursing products or services. Both the SBIR and STTR mechanisms are excellent sources of funding for nurse researchers who want to capitalize on relationships with small businesses or obtain seed money to fund high risk projects with potential to attract new venture capital. This paper provides an overview of NIH-funded SBIR and STTR programs and summarizes similarities and differences between the programs. The paper also describes unique features of NIH SBIR and STTR funding mechanisms that differentiate them from other R-series funding mechanisms, reviews evaluation criteria for SBIR and STTR projects, and discusses critical partners and resources for proposal development. Finally, the paper describes characteristics of successful partnerships and provides examples of SBIR/STTR-funded projects. PMID:20719996

  9. Funding strategies for emergency medicine research.

    PubMed

    Carden, D L; Dronen, S C; Gehrig, G; Zalenski, R J

    1998-02-01

    The importance of adequate funding for sustaining research efforts cannot be overemphasized. This article addresses funding strategies for emergency physicians including the necessity of establishing a research track record, developing a well-written grant proposal, and anticipating the grant review process. Funding sources are reviewed with an emphasis on federal institute support and private foundations (including the Emergency Medicine Foundation) in the United States. Sources of current grant support information available from the Internet are provided. Recommendations for enhancing research funding in emergency medicine are made, including enhancement of formal research training, promotion of emergency medicine research and investigators, federal study section membership, and collaboration with established investigators. PMID:9472178

  10. Funding strategies for emergency medicine research.

    PubMed

    Carden, D L; Dronen, S C; Gehrig, G; Zalenski, R J

    1998-02-01

    The importance of adequate funding for sustaining research efforts cannot be overemphasized. This article addresses funding strategies for emergency physicians, including the necessity of establishing a research track record, developing a well-written grant proposal, and anticipating the grant review process. Funding sources are reviewed with an emphasis on federal institute support and private foundations (including the Emergency Medicine Foundation) in the United States. Sources of current grant support information available from the Internet are provided. Recommendations for enhancing research funding in emergency medicine (EM) are made, including enhancement of formal research training, promotion of EM research and investigators, federal study section membership, and collaboration with established investigators. PMID:9492141

  11. Alternative Models for Funding Research and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Edward J., Ed.

    An introduction to the "hows" of research and development (R&D) funding decisions made by the U. S. Federal government, this book contains four chapters written by separate authors. The first chapter examines the Federal role, purpose, and practices in funding R&D concluding that Federal funding of R&D is designed primarily to serve nonscientific…

  12. Genomics Research: World Survey of Public Funding

    PubMed Central

    Pohlhaus, Jennifer Reineke; Cook-Deegan, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    Background Over the past two decades, genomics has evolved as a scientific research discipline. Genomics research was fueled initially by government and nonprofit funding sources, later augmented by private research and development (R&D) funding. Citizens and taxpayers of many countries have funded much of the research, and have expectations about access to the resulting information and knowledge. While access to knowledge gained from all publicly funded research is desired, access is especially important for fields that have broad social impact and stimulate public dialogue. Genomics is one such field, where public concerns are raised for reasons such as health care and insurance implications, as well as personal and ancestral identification. Thus, genomics has grown rapidly as a field, and attracts considerable interest. Results One way to study the growth of a field of research is to examine its funding. This study focuses on public funding of genomics research, identifying and collecting data from major government and nonprofit organizations around the world, and updating previous estimates of world genomics research funding, including information about geographical origins. We initially identified 89 publicly funded organizations; we requested information about each organization's funding of genomics research. Of these organizations, 48 responded and 34 reported genomics research expenditures (of those that responded but did not supply information, some did not fund such research, others could not quantify it). The figures reported here include all the largest funders and we estimate that we have accounted for most of the genomics research funding from government and nonprofit sources. Conclusion Aggregate spending on genomics research from 34 funding sources averaged around $2.9 billion in 2003 – 2006. The United States spent more than any other country on genomics research, corresponding to 35% of the overall worldwide public funding (compared to 49% US

  13. Rethinking funding priorities in mental health research.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Betts, Virginia Trotter; Greenman, Lisa; Essock, Susan M; Escobar, Javier I; Barch, Deanna; Hogan, Michael F; Areán, Patricia A; Druss, Benjamin G; DiClemente, Ralph J; McGlashan, Thomas H; Jeste, Dilip V; Proctor, Enola K; Ruiz, Pedro; Rush, A John; Canino, Glorisa J; Bell, Carl C; Henry, Renata; Iversen, Portia

    2016-06-01

    Mental health research funding priorities in high-income countries must balance longer-term investment in identifying neurobiological mechanisms of disease with shorter-term funding of novel prevention and treatment strategies to alleviate the current burden of mental illness. Prioritising one area of science over others risks reduced returns on the entire scientific portfolio. PMID:27251688

  14. Sources of Federal Funding for Potato Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starting in the mid-eighties, pressure for Federal Funding of potato research resulted in special appropriations available nationwide from two sources. The Cooperative State Resesarch Education and Extension System (CSREES) is a branch of the USDA that funds Land Grant State Universities to do rese...

  15. Funding Opportunities for Language Treatment Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses funding sources and issues for investigators to consider as they seek support for their language research. Highlights funding sources including traditional sources such as federal agencies and foundations, and nontraditional sources such as the pharmaceutical industry and managed care organizations. (Author/CR)

  16. Funding resources for rare disease research.

    PubMed

    Stehr, F; Forkel, M

    2013-11-01

    Research is an expensive venture requiring multiple sources of funding for small projects that test new theories, large projects to make major advancements, training the next generation of researchers and facilitating meetings to share findings and support collaboration. For rare conditions, such as Batten disease, research funds can be difficult to find. To see how investigators supported their work in the past, we did a key word search of the Acknowledgement Section of peer-reviewed literature published in Batten disease in the last 6.5 years. Interestingly, we discovered 193 separate funding sources. The authors hope that, by showing where funds are available, we will enable Batten disease researchers to continue their pursuits and expand their studies; moving key findings from discovery to application phases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses or Batten Disease. PMID:23608548

  17. 10 Questions: Approaches to Research Funding.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    We asked four stem cell scientists who recently started their labs or expanded their research programs to share their insights and approaches to obtaining funding. We present highlights from their interview responses here. PMID:27392222

  18. NSFC Health Research Funding and Burden of Disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gelin; Zhang, Zhizhong; Lv, Qiushi; Li, Yun; Ye, Ruidong; Xiong, Yunyun; Jiang, Yongjun; Liu, Xinfeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Allocation of health research funds among diseases has never been evaluated in China. This study aimed to examine the relationship between disease-specific funding levels of National Nature Science Foundation of China (NSFC), the main governmental resource for health research in China, and burden of disease. Methods Funding magnitudes for 53 diseases or conditions were obtained from the website of NSFC. Measures of disease burden, mortality, years of life lost (YLLs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), were derived from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. The relationship between NSFC funding and disease burden was analyzed with univariate linear regression. For each measure associated with funding, regression-derived estimates were used to calculate the expected funds for each disease. The actual and expected funds were then compared. We also evaluated the impacts of changes of disease burden metrics since 1990, and differences from the world averages on NSFC funding. Results NSFC health research funding was associated with disease burden measured in mortality (R = 0.33, P = 0.02), YLLs (R = 0.39, P = 0.004), and DALYs (R = 0.40, P = 0.003). But none of the changes of mortality (R = 0.22, P = 0.12), YLLs (R = −0.04, P = 0.79) and DALYs (R = −0.003, P = 0.98) since 1990 was associated with the funding magnitudes. None of the differences of mortality (R = −0.11, P = 0.45), YLLs (R = −0.11, P = 0.43) and DALYs (R = −0.12, P = 0.38) from that of the concurrent world averages were associated with the funding magnitudes. Measured by DALY, stroke and COPD received the least funding compared to expected; while leukemia and diabetes received the most funding compared to expected. Conclusion Although NSFC funding were roughly associated with disease burden as measured in mortality, YLLs and DALYs. Some major diseases such as stroke were underfunded; while others such as

  19. Creative partnerships for funding nursing research.

    PubMed

    McCann, Judith J; Hills, Elizabeth Blanchard; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Smith, Carol E; Farran, Carol J; Wilkie, Diana J

    2011-02-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and the Small Business Technology Transfer Research (STTR) program are two federal funding mechanisms that some nurses in academic positions have used to support research and development of innovative nursing products or services. Both the SBIR and STTR mechanisms are excellent sources of funding for nurse researchers who want to capitalize on relationships with small businesses or obtain seed money to fund high-risk projects with potential to attract new venture capital. This article provides an overview of National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded SBIR and STTR programs and summarizes similarities and differences between the programs. The article also describes unique features of NIH SBIR and STTR funding mechanisms that differentiate them from other R-series funding mechanisms, reviews evaluation criteria for SBIR and STTR projects, and discusses critical partners and resources for proposal development. Finally, the article describes characteristics of successful partnerships and provides examples of SBIR/STTR-funded projects. PMID:20719996

  20. Budgeting, funding, and managing clinical research projects.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Elizabeth; Dicks, Elizabeth; Parfrey, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Large, integrated multidisciplinary teams have become recognized as an efficient means by which to drive innovation and discovery in clinical research. This chapter describes how to budget and fund these large studies and effectively manage the large, often dispersed teams involved. Sources of funding are identified; budget development, justification, reporting, financial governance, and accountability are described; in addition to the creation and management of the multidisciplinary team that will implement the research plan. PMID:19160746

  1. US standards lab funds new research centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2010-02-01

    A dozen US research institutions have won grants totalling 123m from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to build new laboratories or extend existing research facilities. The funds, from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, will be used to develop new measurement technologies as well as improve environmental-monitoring techniques. The institutions - 11 universities and one non-profit organization - beat off competition from 155 other institutions for the funds.

  2. Anatomy of funded research in science

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Athen; Mondragón, Raúl J.; Latora, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Seeking research funding is an essential part of academic life. Funded projects are primarily collaborative in nature through internal and external partnerships, but what role does funding play in the formulation of these partnerships? Here, by examining over 43,000 scientific projects funded over the past three decades by one of the major government research agencies in the world, we characterize how the funding landscape has changed and its impacts on the underlying collaboration networks across different scales. We observed rising inequality in the distribution of funding and that its effect was most noticeable at the institutional level—the leading universities diversified their collaborations and increasingly became the knowledge brokers in the collaboration network. Furthermore, it emerged that these leading universities formed a rich club (i.e., a cohesive core through their close ties) and this reliance among them seemed to be a determining factor for their research success, with the elites in the core overattracting resources but also rewarding in terms of both research breadth and depth. Our results reveal how collaboration networks organize in response to external driving forces, which can have major ramifications on future research strategy and government policy. PMID:26504240

  3. Anatomy of funded research in science.

    PubMed

    Ma, Athen; Mondragón, Raúl J; Latora, Vito

    2015-12-01

    Seeking research funding is an essential part of academic life. Funded projects are primarily collaborative in nature through internal and external partnerships, but what role does funding play in the formulation of these partnerships? Here, by examining over 43,000 scientific projects funded over the past three decades by one of the major government research agencies in the world, we characterize how the funding landscape has changed and its impacts on the underlying collaboration networks across different scales. We observed rising inequality in the distribution of funding and that its effect was most noticeable at the institutional level--the leading universities diversified their collaborations and increasingly became the knowledge brokers in the collaboration network. Furthermore, it emerged that these leading universities formed a rich club (i.e., a cohesive core through their close ties) and this reliance among them seemed to be a determining factor for their research success, with the elites in the core overattracting resources but also rewarding in terms of both research breadth and depth. Our results reveal how collaboration networks organize in response to external driving forces, which can have major ramifications on future research strategy and government policy. PMID:26504240

  4. Trends in US Autism Research Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Jennifer; Illes, Judy; Lazzeroni, Laura; Hallmayer, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    This study shows that the number of autism research grants funded in the US from 1997 to 2006 significantly increased 15% per year. Although the majority of projects were concentrated in basic science (65%) compared to clinical (15%) and translational research (20%), there is a significant decrease in the proportion of basic research grants per…

  5. External Funding of Undergraduate Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friel, E. D.

    2002-12-01

    The National Science Foundation supports undergraduate research through a variety of programs and activities. Each year roughly 300 undergraduates are supported through either NSF research grants of faculty sponsors, Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) sites, or supplemental funds to research grants. While the mechanisms of providing support vary, the goal is the same - to provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to experience and contribute to current, topical research.

  6. Interdisciplinary research has consistently lower funding success.

    PubMed

    Bromham, Lindell; Dinnage, Russell; Hua, Xia

    2016-06-30

    Interdisciplinary research is widely considered a hothouse for innovation, and the only plausible approach to complex problems such as climate change. One barrier to interdisciplinary research is the widespread perception that interdisciplinary projects are less likely to be funded than those with a narrower focus. However, this commonly held belief has been difficult to evaluate objectively, partly because of lack of a comparable, quantitative measure of degree of interdisciplinarity that can be applied to funding application data. Here we compare the degree to which research proposals span disparate fields by using a biodiversity metric that captures the relative representation of different fields (balance) and their degree of difference (disparity). The Australian Research Council's Discovery Programme provides an ideal test case, because a single annual nationwide competitive grants scheme covers fundamental research in all disciplines, including arts, humanities and sciences. Using data on all 18,476 proposals submitted to the scheme over 5 consecutive years, including successful and unsuccessful applications, we show that the greater the degree of interdisciplinarity, the lower the probability of being funded. The negative impact of interdisciplinarity is significant even when number of collaborators, primary research field and type of institution are taken into account. This is the first broad-scale quantitative assessment of success rates of interdisciplinary research proposals. The interdisciplinary distance metric allows efficient evaluation of trends in research funding, and could be used to identify proposals that require assessment strategies appropriate to interdisciplinary research. PMID:27357795

  7. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

  8. The actual citation impact of European oncological research.

    PubMed

    López-Illescas, Carmen; de Moya-Anegón, Félix; Moed, Henk F

    2008-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the research performance of major European countries in the field Oncology, the most important journals in which they published their research articles, and the most important academic institutions publishing them. The analysis was based on Thomson Scientific's Web of Science (WoS) and calculated bibliometric indicators of publication activity and actual citation impact. Studying the time period 2000-2006, it gives an update of earlier studies, but at the same time it expands their methodologies, using a broader definition of the field, calculating indicators of actual citation impact, and analysing new and policy relevant aspects. Findings suggest that the emergence of Asian countries in the field Oncology has displaced European articles more strongly than articles from the USA; that oncologists who have published their articles in important, more general journals or in journals covering other specialties, rather than in their own specialist journals, have generated a relatively high actual citation impact; and that universities from Germany, and--to a lesser extent--those from Italy, the Netherlands, UK, and Sweden, dominate a ranking of European universities based on number of articles in oncology. The outcomes illustrate that different bibliometric methodologies may lead to different outcomes, and that outcomes should be interpreted with care. PMID:18039565

  9. Obtaining Funding and Support for Undergraduate Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorff, Michael; Narayan, Darren A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in undergraduate research activities at colleges and universities nationwide. However, this comes at a time when budgets are being tightened and some institutions do not have the resources to pursue new initiatives. In this article we present some ideas for obtaining funding and support for…

  10. Funding big research with small money.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Joanne V; Koithan, Mary; Unruh, Lynn; Lundmark, Vicki

    2014-06-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that maybe successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives.With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools,and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives.In this article, the guest authors introduce crowd sourcing asa strategy for funding big research with small money. PMID:24853791

  11. Research Funding at Alberta Universities, 2000-2001 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Innovation and Science, Edmonton. University Research and Strategic Investments Branch.

    This report presents facts related to the funding of research at Alberta, Canada, universities. Data are provided by the universities, derived from audited financial schedules. Research at Alberta universities is supported in part by the provincial government through a number of programs. Sponsored research funding, funding received outside of…

  12. Alternative Model of Funding for Academic Research in Nigerian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olayiwola, Shina

    2010-01-01

    Funding of academic research in Nigerian universities by Government (5 per cent recurrent grants) is a policy dictated by the National Universities Commission (NUC) as the central body for allocating research funds. This research fund, little as it is, is irregular and inadequate and to make it worse is difficult to access. These aforementioned…

  13. Needles and Haystacks: Finding Funding for Medical Education Research.

    PubMed

    Gruppen, Larry D; Durning, Steven J

    2016-04-01

    Medical education research suffers from a significant and persistent lack of funding. Although adequate funding has been shown to improve the quality of research, there are a number of factors that continue to limit it. The competitive environment for medical education research funding makes it essential to understand strategies for improving the search for funding sources and the preparation of proposals. This article offers a number of resources, strategies, and suggestions for finding funding. Investigators must be able to frame their research in the context of significant issues and principles in education. They must set their proposed work in the context of prior work and demonstrate its potential for significant new contributions. Because there are few funding sources earmarked for medical education research, researchers much also be creative, flexible, and adaptive as they seek to present their ideas in ways that are appealing and relevant to the goals of funders. Above all, the search for funding requires persistence and perseverance. PMID:26556292

  14. Research into Students' Perceptions of Preferred and Actual Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John A.; And Others

    Measures of both preferred and actual classroom and school environment were administered to 1,675 secondary school students in New South Wales (Australia). Shortened versions of the My Class Inventory, Classroom Environment Scale, and Individualized Classroom Environment Questionnaire, as well as the Quality of School Life questionnaire were…

  15. Research Funding: the Case for a Modified Lottery.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ferric C; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    The time-honored mechanism of allocating funds based on ranking of proposals by scientific peer review is no longer effective, because review panels cannot accurately stratify proposals to identify the most meritorious ones. Bias has a major influence on funding decisions, and the impact of reviewer bias is magnified by low funding paylines. Despite more than a decade of funding crisis, there has been no fundamental reform in the mechanism for funding research. This essay explores the idea of awarding research funds on the basis of a modified lottery in which peer review is used to identify the most meritorious proposals, from which funded applications are selected by lottery. We suggest that a modified lottery for research fund allocation would have many advantages over the current system, including reducing bias and improving grantee diversity with regard to seniority, race, and gender. PMID:27073093

  16. Research Funding: the Case for a Modified Lottery

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The time-honored mechanism of allocating funds based on ranking of proposals by scientific peer review is no longer effective, because review panels cannot accurately stratify proposals to identify the most meritorious ones. Bias has a major influence on funding decisions, and the impact of reviewer bias is magnified by low funding paylines. Despite more than a decade of funding crisis, there has been no fundamental reform in the mechanism for funding research. This essay explores the idea of awarding research funds on the basis of a modified lottery in which peer review is used to identify the most meritorious proposals, from which funded applications are selected by lottery. We suggest that a modified lottery for research fund allocation would have many advantages over the current system, including reducing bias and improving grantee diversity with regard to seniority, race, and gender. PMID:27073093

  17. Funding and Financing Vocational Education and Training. Research Readings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Katrina, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book of readings combines the results of a body of research on the funding and financing of vocational education and training (VET) in Australia. Funding arrangements, or how money is distributed, are described in the first section of this book and includes chapters on allocation of funding by state training authorities, the effects of market…

  18. Is Privately Funded Research on the Rise in Ocean Science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, M.; Cooksey, S. W.; Orcutt, J. A.; Ramberg, S. E.; Jankowski, J. E.; Mengelt, C.

    2014-12-01

    While federal funding for oceanography is leveling off or declining, private sector funding from industry and philanthropy appears to be on the rise. The Ocean Studies Board of the National Research Council is discussing these changes in the ocean science funding landscape. In 2014 the Board convened experts to better understand the long term public and private funding trends for the ocean sciences and the implications of such trends for the ocean science enterprise and the nation. Specific topics of discussion included: (1) the current scope of philanthropic and industry funding for the ocean sciences; (2) the long-term trends in the funding balance between federal and other sources of funding; (3) the priorities and goals for private funders; and (4) the characteristics of various modes of engagement for private funders. Although public funding remains the dominant source of research funding, it is unclear how far or fast that balance might shift in the future nor what a shifting balance may mean. There has been no comprehensive assessment of the magnitude and impact of privately-funded science, particularly the ocean sciences, as public funding sources decline. Nevertheless, the existing data can shed some light on these questions. We will present available data on long-term trends in federal and other sources of funding for science (focusing on ocean science) and report on preliminary findings from a panel discussion with key private foundations and industry funders.

  19. Reported Research Funding in Four Early Childhood Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Bridget A.; Sanchez, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Funding for research in the area of early childhood is an ongoing challenge. The present research objective was to identify the frequency of acknowledgment of federal funding in articles published by four leading early childhood journals from 1999 to 2008. We conducted a content analysis of 1,338 publications found in "Early Child Development and…

  20. Barriers to Seeking External Research Funding: Perceptions and Facts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karukstis, Kerry K.; Elgren, Timothy E.; Ronco, Silvia E.; Feller, Scott E.; Rowlett, Roger S.

    2009-07-01

    Members of the scientific community are keenly aware of the intense competition for research funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and other federal agencies. Pressure for external funding is further exacerbated by the declining economy and reduced institutional budgets. For primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs) seeking to expand and enhance their undergraduate research opportunities, the need for research support from external funding agencies is critical. The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) continues to aggressively communicate the needs of the PUI community to federal and private funding sources. One of CUR's historic roles has been to help faculty members overcome the barriers to establishing and sustaining a productive research program that incorporates undergraduate collaborators. Thus, CUR routinely seeks to better understand the obstacles that keep potential grant applicants from applying. This helps the organization to provide compelling evidence of these concerns to funding agencies and to develop the most effective initiatives to support PUI faculty.

  1. Research funding: Patience is a virtue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noailly, Joëlle

    2016-04-01

    Public investment in science and technology is critical for meeting future energy needs, although understanding its impact has remained unclear. Now, an analysis of publications resulting from government funding sheds light on its outcomes and the timescales required to see them.

  2. Researcher denied future U.S. funds.

    PubMed

    Broad, William J

    1982-06-01

    Marc J. Straus, formerly senior investigator on a lung cancer treatment project at Boston University, has been barred from receiving any federal funding until 1986 because of alleged fabrication of drug reponse data. Straus maintains that he was the victim of a conspiracy by some disgruntled employees. This represents the first time that federal "debarment" regulations have been invoked over the misuse of grant monies. PMID:11643749

  3. Learned Societies: A Bridge between Research, Policy Making and Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Dianne; Rands, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Learned societies play a number of roles in countries around the world, including national representation of the research community; recognising and rewarding research achievement; and as funding agents for fellowships, research grants or research institutes. They have a networking role both within national research communities and in linking with…

  4. Healing the NIH-funded Biomedical Research Enterprise

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Ronald N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many feel the RO1 grant system supporting biomedical research in the U.S. is broken, discouraging entry of young investigators into the system and inadequately supporting more established investigators. Here I argue for a ‘person not project’-based scheme that would permit creative, unfettered research by new investigators, better tie ongoing research contributions to continued funding, and help match the number of investigators seeking support with available funds. PMID:26091028

  5. Healing the NIH-Funded Biomedical Research Enterprise.

    PubMed

    Germain, Ronald N

    2015-06-18

    Many feel that the R01 grant system supporting biomedical research in the U.S. is broken, discouraging entry of young investigators into the system and inadequately supporting more established investigators. Here, I argue for a "person-not-project"-based scheme that would permit creative, unfettered research by new investigators, better tie ongoing research contributions to continued funding, and help match the number of investigators seeking support with available funds. PMID:26091028

  6. Federal Funding of Engineering Research and Development, 1980-1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Washington, DC.

    Data on the sources, amounts, and trends of federal funding for engineering research and development (R&D) are presented for 1980-1984. Narrative highlights are provided for: the total federal funding obligations for engineering R&D, mechanical engineering, astronautical engineering, aeronautical engineering, chemical engineering, civil…

  7. Research Funding for Psychology and Other Scientific Disciplines: An Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Robert P.

    From 1967 to 1982 federally funded research in psychology became increasingly dependent upon money from the Department of Defense and the Department of Health and Human Services. This is a return to the funding patterns that existed prior to the Korean war. While exact comparisons cannot be made with figures from before 1967 (because of changes in…

  8. Government funding of health research in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Reid, Ian R; Joyce, Peter; Fraser, John; Crampton, Peter

    2014-02-14

    An analysis of levels of government health research funding carried out in 2008 demonstrated that funding in New Zealand, after adjustment for population size, was less than one-third of that in Australia, less than one-fifth of that in the United Kingdom, and about 10% of that in the United States. This was perceived to be a major obstacle to the recruitment and retention of clinical and academic staff in our hospitals and universities. We have now repeated these analyses to determine the current state of these comparisons. From 2009 to the present funds for direct funding of research through the Health Research Council (HRC) have remained static at $54m. As a result of inflation of research costs (principally salaries) this represents a decrease of approximately one-quarter in the quantum of research funded by the HRC over the last 4 years. Current funding rates in the comparator countries, population-adjusted and converted to NZ$, are 3.4-fold higher in Australia, 4.5-fold higher in the United Kingdom, and 9.7-fold higher in the United States. Urgent and sustained action is needed to correct these major disparities in government health research funding if the quality of academic and clinical staff in our public institutions is to be maintained. PMID:24548954

  9. Commentary: a ray of hope for medical school research funding.

    PubMed

    Gabbe, Steven G; Lockwood, Charles J; Marsh, Clay B

    2012-11-01

    Academic health centers are traditionally dependent on extramural agencies like the National Institutes of Health to fund medical research. The still-struggling U.S. economy has kept federal paylines stagnant in recent years even as research costs climb. Academic health center leaders need to find new funding sources to ensure that critical medical research continues. Myers and colleagues, in their report in this issue of Academic Medicine, found that scientific research funding by philanthropic nonprofit organizations rose 26% from 2006 to 2008. Even though the time frame for their study precedes the recent economic recession, their findings provide hope and guidance to academic health centers. Stable research portfolios should include a variety of sources, and Myers and colleagues suggest that partnership opportunities exist between federal and not-for-profit funding sources to focus on key disease areas. Seeking broader research funding may benefit at-risk groups like junior investigators, as the average age of a first-time NIH grant recipient in 2008 was 42 years old. To foster the new discoveries and ideas that come from young scientists, academic health centers need to diversify their research funding sources.It is encouraging that high-visibility philanthropic organizations enhanced funding by 26% from 2006 to 2008. However, between 2008 and 2010, overall grant support from foundations declined 2.3%. Should federal and private funding continue to fall, there is an eminent threat of losing a generation of investigators. Thus, creative solutions and partnerships are needed to fund more high-priority research to cure disease and create the future of medicine. PMID:23111257

  10. University Research: The Role of Federal Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    University research is a vital building block of the nation's research and development (R&D) enterprise. While U.S. universities perform just 13 percent of total national R&D, they perform 31 percent of the nation's total research--basic and applied--and 56 percent of the nation's basic research. Because there is broad consensus that university…

  11. Reliability of Ratings of Research Proposals Submitted for Funding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpin, Gerald; And Others

    Based upon the assumption that the process of peer review of publications and research is flawed, interrater reliability of reviews of 188 research proposals submitted for funding at a major university was studied. The eight dimensions rated were: (1) significance of the research; (2) clarity and reasonableness of the objectives; (3)…

  12. 7 CFR 3430.311 - Allocation of research funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 6971)). (1) Research by multidisciplinary... multidisciplinary teams. (2) Equipment grants. Of the amount allocated by the Director for fundamental research... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Allocation of research funds. 3430.311 Section...

  13. 7 CFR 3430.311 - Allocation of research funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 6971)). (1) Research by multidisciplinary... multidisciplinary teams. (2) Equipment grants. Of the amount allocated by the Director for fundamental research... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Allocation of research funds. 3430.311 Section...

  14. 7 CFR 3430.311 - Allocation of research funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 6971)). (1) Research by multidisciplinary... multidisciplinary teams. (2) Equipment grants. Of the amount allocated by the Director for fundamental research... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Allocation of research funds. 3430.311 Section...

  15. 7 CFR 3430.311 - Allocation of research funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 1994 (7 U.S.C. 6971)). (1) Research by multidisciplinary... multidisciplinary teams. (2) Equipment grants. Of the amount allocated by the Director for fundamental research... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Allocation of research funds. 3430.311 Section...

  16. Survey of Chief Research Officers: Funding, Resources, and Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Management Review, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presnets the questionnaire used to survey college and university chief research officers in a July 1996 study, with response data summarized. The survey gathered information on the administrator's characteristics, research-funding levels and sources, costs, office functions (grant administration, research administration, ethical/legal oversight),…

  17. Improved Access to NSF Funded Ocean Research Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, C. L.; Groman, R. C.; Kinkade, D.; Shepherd, A.; Rauch, S.; Allison, M. D.; Gegg, S. R.; Wiebe, P. H.; Glover, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    Data from NSF-funded, hypothesis-driven research comprise an essential part of the research results upon which we base our knowledge and improved understanding of the impacts of climate change. Initially funded in 2006, the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) works with marine scientists to ensure that data from NSF-funded ocean research programs are fully documented and freely available for future use. BCO-DMO works in partnership with information technology professionals, other marine data repositories and national data archive centers to ensure long-term preservation of these valuable environmental research data. Data contributed to BCO-DMO by the original investigators are enhanced with sufficient discipline-specific documentation and published in a variety of standards-compliant forms designed to enable discovery and support accurate re-use.

  18. Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanner, G. E.; Daellenbach, K. K.; Hughes, K. R.; Brown, D. R.; Drost, M. K.

    1992-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE's thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps. The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a 'supply side' limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a 'demand side' limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research; and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

  19. Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research

    SciTech Connect

    Spanner, G E; Daellenbach, K K; Hughes, K R; Brown, D R; Drost, M K

    1992-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE's thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a supply side'' limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a demand side'' limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

  20. Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research

    SciTech Connect

    Spanner, G.E.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

    1992-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE`s thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a ``supply side`` limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a ``demand side`` limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

  1. Survey of community engagement in NIH-funded research.

    PubMed

    Hood, Nancy E; Brewer, Tracy; Jackson, Rebecca; Wewers, Mary Ellen

    2010-02-01

    Community engagement is an innovative and required component for Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs) funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). However, the extent of community engagement in NIH-funded research has not been previously examined. This study assessed baseline prevalence of community engagement activities among NIH-funded studies at a large Midwestern university with a CTSA. An online survey was e-mailed to principal investigators of recent NIH-funded studies (N = 480). Investigators were asked to identify what types of community engagement activities had occurred for each study. Responses were received for 40.4% (194/480) of studies. Overall, 42.6% reported any community engagement activities. More collaborative types of engagement (e.g., community advisory board) were less common than activities requiring less engagement (e.g., sharing study results with community members). Studies with more collaborative community engagement were less likely to be described as basic or preclinical research compared to all other studies. Given NIH's inclusive call for community engagement in research, relatively few NIH-funded studies reported community engagement activities, although this study used a broad definition of community and a wide range of types of engagement. These findings may be used to inform the goals of CTSA community engagement programs. PMID:20443949

  2. An Analysis of Canadian Institute for Health Research Funding for Research on Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Deonandan, R.; Liu, E. Y.; Kolisnyk, B.; Konkle, A. T. M.

    2016-01-01

    We examined patterns of Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) funding on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research. From 1999 to 2013, CIHR funded 190 ASD grants worth $48 million. Biomedical research received 43% of grants (46% of dollars), clinical research 27% (41%), health services 10% (7%), and population health research 8% (3%). The greatest number of grants was given in 2009, but 2003 saw the greatest amount. Funding is clustered in a handful of provinces and institutions, favouring biomedical research and disfavouring behavioural interventions, adaptation, and institutional response. Preference for biomedical research may be due to the detriment of clinical research. PMID:26977317

  3. [Management and funding of the research by the Peruvian National Institute of Health, 2004-2008].

    PubMed

    Garro, Gladys; Mormontoy, Henry; Yagui, Martín

    2010-09-01

    The results of the research projects that have been approved and funded by the Instituto Nacional de Salud (Peru) during the period 2004-2008 were analyzed. Out of 182 approved and funded research projects, 150 (82%) were actually performed, 86% (129/150) ended in the final report and only 14% (18/129) were published in indexed journals, the mean time for publication of an article was of 2,7 years. Out of the presented research projects, 68 (45%) were through a competitive fund, 60 (40%) were institutional, 14 (9%) coming from regional (provincial) health directions and 8 (5%) collaborative. The executed budget was of $ 5,032,906.62. The mean amount assigned to each research project was $ 33,552.71 and the cost of each publication was $ 279,605.92; the distribution of the budget according to each study subject was 61% for communicable diseases, 12% for non-communicable diseases and 27% for technological development. The research promotion, development and financing in the Instituto Nacional de Salud during this period have had a decreasing trend, influenced by institutional policy. In order to overcome this situation, not only at an institutional but also at a national level, it is necessary that the State defines its national research policy, respecting the national and regional priorities in health research. PMID:21152728

  4. The Impact of Research Grant Funding on Scientific Productivity*

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Brian A.; Lefgren, Lars

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate the impact of receiving an NIH grant on subsequent publications and citations. Our sample consists of all applications (unsuccessful as well as successful) to the NIH from 1980 to 2000 for standard research grants (R01s). Both OLS and IV estimates show that receipt of an NIH research grant (worth roughly $1.7 million) leads to only one additional publication over the next five years, which corresponds to a 7 percent increase. The limited impact of NIH grants is consistent with a model in which the market for research funding is competitive, so that the loss of an NIH grant simply causes researchers to shift to another source of funding. PMID:21857758

  5. International Alzheimer's Disease Research Portfolio (IADRP) aims to capture global Alzheimer's disease research funding.

    PubMed

    Liggins, Charlene; Snyder, Heather M; Silverberg, Nina; Petanceska, Suzana; Refolo, Lorenzo M; Ryan, Laurie; Carrillo, Maria C

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a recognized international public health crisis. There is an urgent need for public and private funding agencies around the world to coordinate funding strategies and leverage existing resources to enhance and expand support of AD research. To capture and compare their existing investments in AD research and research-related resources, major funding organizations are starting to utilize the Common Alzheimer's Disease Research Ontology (CADRO) to categorize their funding information. This information is captured in the International Alzheimer's Disease Research Portfolio (IADRP) for further analysis. As of January, 2014, over fifteen organizations from the US, Canada, Europe and Australia have contributed their information. The goal of the IADRP project is to enable funding organizations to assess the changing landscape of AD research and coordinate strategies, leverage resources, and avoid duplication of effort. PMID:24780512

  6. That sinking feeling, again? The state of National Institutes of Health pediatric research funding, fiscal year 1992-2010.

    PubMed

    Gitterman, Daniel P; Hay, William W

    2008-11-01

    This review article examines the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) overall budget and its pediatric research funding across three time periods: predoubling [fiscal year (FY) 1992-1997]; doubling (FY 1998-2003); and postdoubling (FY 2004-2009). The average annual NIH appropriations increased by 5.4%, 13.4%, and 1.3% in each period, respectively. The average annual pediatric research funding (actual grants, contracts, intramural research, and other mechanisms of support) increased much less, by 4.7%, 11.5%, and 0.3% in each period, respectively. Between FY 2004 and FY 2007, the average NIH budget increase has nearly flattened, to only 1.96%. During this period, average pediatric research funding has dropped markedly lower, to 0.57%; estimated FY 2008 pediatric funding is at negative 0.5%. Although pediatric research enjoyed significant benefits of the NIH doubling era, the proportion of the NIH budget devoted to the pediatric research portfolio has declined overall. The most recent period has wiped out the annual gains of the doubling era for both pediatric and overall NIH research funding. We offer recommendations to protect against further erosion of pediatric research funding and to implement several unfulfilled commitments to strengthen the federal pediatric research portfolio in the coming decade. PMID:18787420

  7. Funding Source and Research Report Quality in Nutrition Practice-Related Research

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Esther F.; Parrott, J. Scott; Cummins, Deborah S.; Splett, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Background The source of funding is one of many possible causes of bias in scientific research. One method of detecting potential for bias is to evaluate the quality of research reports. Research exploring the relationship between funding source and nutrition-related research report quality is limited and in other disciplines the findings are mixed. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine whether types of funding sources of nutrition research are associated with differences in research report quality. Design A retrospective study of research reporting quality, research design and funding source was conducted on 2539 peer reviewed research articles from the American Dietetic Association's Evidence Analysis Library® database. Results Quality rating frequency distributions indicate 43.3% of research reports were rated as positive, 50.1% neutral, and 6.6% as negative. Multinomial logistic regression results showed that while both funding source and type of research design are significant predictors of quality ratings (χ2 = 118.99, p<0.001), the model's usefulness in predicting overall research report quality is little better than chance. Compared to research reports with government funding, those not acknowledging any funding sources, followed by studies with University/hospital funding were more likely to receive neutral vs positive quality ratings, OR = 1.85, P <0.001 and OR = 1.54, P<0.001, respectively and those that did not report funding were more likely to receive negative quality ratings (OR = 4.97, P<0.001). After controlling for research design, industry funded research reports were no more likely to receive a neutral or negative quality rating than those funded by government sources. Conclusion Research report quality cannot be accurately predicted from the funding source after controlling for research design. Continued vigilance to evaluate the quality of all research regardless of the funding source and to further understand

  8. Philanthropy funding for neurosurgery research and program development.

    PubMed

    Zusman, Edie E; Heary, Robert F; Stroink, Ann R; Berger, Mitchel S; Popp, A John; Friedlander, Robert M; Martin, Neil A; Lonser, Russell R; Asthagiri, Ashok R

    2013-07-01

    In times of fiscal and political uncertainty, philanthropy has become an increasingly important mechanism for building, maintaining, and expanding neurosurgical research programs. Although philanthropy has historically helped launch many hospital systems, scientists and clinicians have generally relied on government grants and industry investment to support research and program infrastructure. However, competition for funds from all sources has increased at the same time as the pipelines for those funds have eroded. Philanthropy can provide salary support to allow neurosurgeons to pursue research and, ultimately, advance the field to improve outcomes for patients. Funds raised can fill financial gaps to recruit and pay for needed research staff, equipment, and facilities. To foster charitable giving, institutions can develop both a culture and processes to promote and support philanthropy. Furthermore, it is essential to ensure that donor relationships are properly nurtured with ongoing stewardship. In addition to cultivating grateful patients, there are numerous creative models of fundraising for research that can be explored, including venture philanthropy, in which voluntary health organizations or individuals partner with academia and industry to invest in early-stage drug development and other innovations. Other approaches include formation of nonprofit foundations and partnerships with other entities to work jointly on shared development goals. PMID:23615103

  9. Emergency care research funding in the global health context: trends, priorities, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Vu, Alexander; Duber, Herbert C; Sasser, Scott M; Hansoti, Bhakti; Lynch, Catherine; Khan, Ayesha; Johnson, Tara; Modi, Payal; Clattenburg, Eben J; Hargarten, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Over the past few decades there has been a steady growth in funding for global health, yet generally little is known about funding for global health research. As part of the 2013 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, a session was convened to discuss emergency care research funding in the global health context. Overall, the authors found a lack of evidence available to determine funding priorities or quantify current funding for acute care research in global health. This article summarizes the initial preparatory research and reports on the results of the consensus conference focused on identifying challenges and strategies to improve funding for global emergency care research. The consensus conference meeting led to the creation of near- and long-term goals to strengthen global emergency care research funding and the development of important research questions. The research questions represent a consensus view of important outstanding questions that will assist emergency care researchers to better understand the current funding landscape and bring evidence to the debate on funding priorities of global health and emergency care. The four key areas of focus for researchers are: 1) quantifying funding for global health and emergency care research, 2) understanding current research funding priorities, 3) identifying barriers to emergency care research funding, and 4) using existing data to quantify the need for emergency services and acute care research. This research agenda will enable emergency health care scientists to use evidence when advocating for more funding for emergency care research. PMID:24341581

  10. The Competition for Industry Research Funding: How Satisfied Are University Commercial Research Clients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Troy

    2009-01-01

    Constrained public funding for universities and the emphasis placed on university-industry interactions mean that universities are increasingly required to compete for industrial funds for research. This in turn means that universities need to develop a customer service culture in order to be competitive and attractive to industry. Many studies…

  11. Budget boosts overall research but cuts NOAA and USGS funds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Science in general, and physical sciences in particular, show growth far above projected inflation in President Ronald Reagan's fiscal 1984 budget proposal. Total funding requested for all federal research and development, including facilities, is $47 billion, up 17.2% over fiscal 1983, jumping hurdles over the 5% projected inflation rate. Defense R&D is slated to soar 29% to $30.3 billion, while non-defense R&D would rise 0.4% to $16.7 billion. Table 1 shows the proposed research and development budgets by major departments and agencies.

  12. The Transformative Nature of Transparency in Research Funding

    PubMed Central

    Mietchen, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Central to research funding are grant proposals that researchers send in to potential funders for review, in the hope of approval. A survey of policies at major research funders found that there is room for more transparency in the process of grant review, which would strengthen the case for the efficiency of public spending on research. On that basis, debate was invited on which transparency measures should be implemented and how, with some concrete suggestions at hand. The present article adds to this discussion by providing further context from the literature, along with considerations on the effect size of the proposed measures. The article then explores the option of opening to the public key components of the process, makes the case for pilot projects in this area, and sketches out the potential that such measures might have to transform the research landscape in those areas in which they are implemented. PMID:25549343

  13. 23 CFR 420.107 - What is the minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... planning and research funds for research development and technology transfer? 420.107 Section 420.107... funds for technology transfer and for transit or intermodal research and development to help meet the 25... minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research development and...

  14. 23 CFR 420.107 - What is the minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... planning and research funds for research development and technology transfer? 420.107 Section 420.107... funds for technology transfer and for transit or intermodal research and development to help meet the 25... minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research development and...

  15. 23 CFR 420.107 - What is the minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... planning and research funds for research development and technology transfer? 420.107 Section 420.107... funds for technology transfer and for transit or intermodal research and development to help meet the 25... minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research development and...

  16. 23 CFR 420.107 - What is the minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... planning and research funds for research development and technology transfer? 420.107 Section 420.107... funds for technology transfer and for transit or intermodal research and development to help meet the 25... minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research development and...

  17. 23 CFR 420.107 - What is the minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... planning and research funds for research development and technology transfer? 420.107 Section 420.107... funds for technology transfer and for transit or intermodal research and development to help meet the 25... minimum required expenditure of State planning and research funds for research development and...

  18. Funding, Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Micah

    2009-01-01

    I show herein how to develop fundable proposals to support your research. Although the proposal strategy I discuss is commonly used in successful proposals, most junior faculty (and many senior scholars) in political science and other social sciences seem to be unaware of it. I dispel myths about funding, and discuss how to find funders and target…

  19. The ethics of pharmaceutical research funding: a social organization approach.

    PubMed

    Gray, Garry C

    2013-01-01

    This paper advances a social organization approach to examining unethical behavior. While unethical behaviors may stem in part from failures in individual morality or psychological blind spots, they are both generated and performed through social interactions among individuals and groups. To illustrate the value of a social organization approach, a case study of a medical school professor's first experience with pharmaceutical-company-sponsored research is provided in order to examine how funding arrangements can constrain research integrity. The case illustrates three significant ways that institutional corruption can occur in the research process. First, conflicts of norms between pharmaceutical companies, universities, and affiliated teaching hospitals can result in compromises and self-censorship. Second, normal behavior is shaped through routine interactions. Unethical behaviors can be (or can become) normal behaviors when they are produced and reproduced through a network of social interactions. Third, funding arrangements can create networks of dependency that structurally distort the independence of the academic researcher in favor of the funder's interests. More broadly, the case study demonstrates how the social organization approach deepens our understanding of the practice of ethics. PMID:24088153

  20. Infectious disease research investments: systematic analysis of immunology and vaccine research funding in the UK.

    PubMed

    Fitchett, Joseph R; Head, Michael G; Atun, Rifat

    2013-12-01

    Financing for global health is a critical element of research and development. Innovations in new vaccines are critically dependent on research funding given the large sums required, however estimates of global research investments are lacking. We evaluate infectious disease research investments, focusing on immunology and vaccine research by UK research funding organisations. In 1997-2010, £2.6 billion were spent by public and philanthropic organisations, with £590 million allocated to immunology and vaccine research. Preclinical studies received the largest funding amount £505 million accounting for 85.6% of total investment. In terms of specific infection, "the big three" infections dominated funding: HIV received £127 million (21.5% of total), malaria received £59 million (10.0% of total) and tuberculosis received £36 million (6.0% of total). We excluded industry funding from our analysis, as open-access data were unavailable. A global investment surveillance system is needed to map and monitor funding and guide allocation of scarce resources. PMID:24176489

  1. Myths in funding ocean research at the National Science Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duce, Robert A.; Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.; Ortiz, Joseph; Woodgate, Rebecca A.; Bontempi, Paula; Delaney, Margaret; Gaines, Steven D.; Harper, Scott; Jones, Brandon; White, Lisa D.

    2012-12-01

    Every 3 years the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), through its Advisory Committee on Geosciences, forms a Committee of Visitors (COV) to review different aspects of the Directorate for Geosciences (GEO). This year a COV was formed to review the Biological Oceanography (BO), Chemical Oceanography (CO), and Physical Oceanography (PO) programs in the Ocean Section; the Marine Geology and Geophysics (MGG) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) science programs in the Marine Geosciences Section; and the Ocean Education and Ocean Technology and Interdisciplinary Coordination (OTIC) programs in the Integrative Programs Section of the Ocean Sciences Division (OCE). The 2012 COV assessed the proposal review process for fiscal year (FY) 2009-2011, when 3843 proposal actions were considered, resulting in 1141 awards. To do this, COV evaluated the documents associated with 206 projects that were randomly selected from the following categories: low-rated proposals that were funded, high-rated proposals that were funded, low-rated proposals that were declined, high-rated proposals that were declined, some in the middle (53 awarded, 106 declined), and all (47) proposals submitted to the Rapid Response Research (RAPID) funding mechanism. NSF provided additional data as requested by the COV in the form of graphs and tables. The full COV report, including graphs and tables, is available at http://www.nsf.gov/geo/acgeo_cov.jsp.

  2. Federal Research Funding for Family Medicine: Highly Concentrated, with Decreasing New Investigator Awards.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brianna J; Bazemore, Andrew W; Morley, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of National Institutes of Health and other federal research funding is received by university departments of family medicine, the largest primary care specialty. That limited funding is also concentrated, with roughly a quarter of all National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality funding awarded to 3 departments, almost half of that funding coming from 3 agencies, and a recent trend away from funding for new investigators. PMID:27613785

  3. 48 CFR 1335.017 - Federal funded research and development centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal funded research and development centers. 1335.017 Section 1335.017 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... funded research and development centers....

  4. Gender contributes to personal research funding success in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Lee, Romy; Ellemers, Naomi

    2015-10-01

    We examined the application and review materials of three calls (n=2,823) of a prestigious grant for personal research funding in a national full population of early career scientists awarded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). Results showed evidence of gender bias in application evaluations and success rates, as well as in language use in instructions and evaluation sheets. Male applicants received significantly more competitive "quality of researcher" evaluations (but not "quality of proposal" evaluations) and had significantly higher application success rates than female applicants. Gender disparities were most prevalent in scientific disciplines with the highest number of applications and with equal gender distribution among the applicants (i.e., life sciences and social sciences). Moreover, content analyses of the instructional and evaluation materials revealed the use of gendered language favoring male applicants. Overall, our data reveal a 4% "loss" of women during the grant review procedure, and illustrate the perpetuation of the funding gap, which contributes to the underrepresentation of women in academia. PMID:26392544

  5. [Extramural research funds and penal law--status of legislation].

    PubMed

    Ulsenheimer, Klaus

    2005-04-01

    After decades of smooth functioning, the cooperation of physicians and hospitals with the industry (much desired from the side of the government in the interest of clinical research) has fallen in legal discredit due to increasingly frequent criminal inquires and proceedings for unduly privileges, corruption, and embezzlement. The discredit is so severe that the industry funding for clinical research is diverted abroad to an increasing extent. The legal elements of embezzlement assume the intentional violation of the entrusted funds against the interest of the customer. Undue privileges occur when an official requests an advantage in exchange for a service (or is promised one or takes one) in his or somebody else's interest. The elements of corruption are then given when the receiver of the undue privilege provides an illegal service or takes a discretionary decision under the influence of the gratuity. The tension between the prohibition of undue privileges (as regulated by the penal law) and the granting of extramural funds (as regulated by the administrative law in academic institutions) can be reduced through a high degree of transparency and the start of control possibilities--public announcement and authorization by the officials--as well as through exact documentation and observance of the principles of separation of interests and moderation. With the anti-corruption law of 1997, it is possible to charge of corruption also physicians employed in private institutions. In contrast, physicians in private practice are not considered in the above criminal facts. They can only be charged of misdemeanor, or called to respond to the professional board, on the basis of the law that regulates advertising for medicinal products (Heilmittelwerbegesetz). PMID:15957662

  6. An Analysis of the Actual Processes of Physicists' Research and the Implications for Teaching Scientific Inquiry in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jongwon; Jang, Kyoung-Ae; Kim, Ikgyun

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of scientists' actual processes of conducting research can provide us with more realistic aspects of scientific inquiry. This study was performed to identify three aspects of scientists' actual research: their motivations for scientific inquiry, the scientific inquiry skills they used, and the main types of results obtained from…

  7. Gender contributes to personal research funding success in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van der Lee, Romy; Ellemers, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    We examined the application and review materials of three calls (n = 2,823) of a prestigious grant for personal research funding in a national full population of early career scientists awarded by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). Results showed evidence of gender bias in application evaluations and success rates, as well as in language use in instructions and evaluation sheets. Male applicants received significantly more competitive “quality of researcher” evaluations (but not “quality of proposal” evaluations) and had significantly higher application success rates than female applicants. Gender disparities were most prevalent in scientific disciplines with the highest number of applications and with equal gender distribution among the applicants (i.e., life sciences and social sciences). Moreover, content analyses of the instructional and evaluation materials revealed the use of gendered language favoring male applicants. Overall, our data reveal a 4% “loss” of women during the grant review procedure, and illustrate the perpetuation of the funding gap, which contributes to the underrepresentation of women in academia. PMID:26392544

  8. BCO-DMO: Enabling Access to Federally Funded Research Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinkade, D.; Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Groman, R. C.; Rauch, S.; Shepherd, A.; Gegg, S. R.; Wiebe, P. H.; Glover, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    In a February, 2013 memo1, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) outlined principles and objectives to increase access by the public to federally funded research publications and data. Such access is intended to drive innovation by allowing private and commercial efforts to take full advantage of existing resources, thereby maximizing Federal research dollars and efforts. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO; bco-dmo.org) serves as a model resource for organizations seeking compliance with the OSTP policy. BCO-DMO works closely with scientific investigators to publish their data from research projects funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), within the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections (OCE) and the Division of Polar Programs Antarctic Organisms & Ecosystems Program (PLR). BCO-DMO addresses many of the OSTP objectives for public access to digital scientific data: (1) Marine biogeochemical and ecological data and metadata are disseminated via a public website, and curated on intermediate time frames; (2) Preservation needs are met by collaborating with appropriate national data facilities for data archive; (3) Cost and administrative burden associated with data management is minimized by the use of one dedicated office providing hundreds of NSF investigators support for data management plan development, data organization, metadata generation and deposition of data and metadata into the BCO-DMO repository; (4) Recognition of intellectual property is reinforced through the office's citation policy and the use of digital object identifiers (DOIs); (5) Education and training in data stewardship and use of the BCO-DMO system is provided by office staff through a variety of venues. Oceanographic research data and metadata from thousands of datasets generated by hundreds of investigators are now available through BCO-DMO. 1 White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, Memorandum for

  9. The International Opportunities Fund for global change research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, Tim; Uhle, Maria; van der Pluijm, Ben

    2012-07-01

    Earthquakes, floods, and weather extremes are among a range of societal hazards that are increasingly studied by national and international researchers, but the absence of international collaboration and coordination is increasingly leading to inefficiencies and lost opportunities. The world's major funders of global change research are considering how best to align financial and human capital toward delivering the relevant knowledge that society will need in the 21st century. The Belmont Forum (named after the group's first meeting venue in Maryland in 2009) meets twice a year and is composed of funding executives from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, Norway, South Africa, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the European Commission, together with the executive directors of the International Council for Science (ICSU) and International Social Sciences Council (ISSC); a full list of members is on the Belmont Forum Web site, http://igfagcr.org/index.php/belmont-forum.

  10. Grounding Research in Reality: Fiscal Equity and K-12 Funding in Illinois. Policy Research: IERC 2008-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullin, Christopher M.; Brown, Kathleen Sullivan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate both The Education Trust's "The Funding Gap" and D. Verstegen and L. Driscoll's "The Illinois Dilemma" studies published in 2008 utilizing the actual allocations to districts resulting from the fiscal policy mechanism (funding formula) in Illinois for the 2004-2005 school year to understand the influence…

  11. Biases in grant proposal success rates, funding rates and award sizes affect the geographical distribution of funding for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Wahls, Wayne P

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the United States to most efficiently make breakthroughs on the biology, diagnosis and treatment of human diseases requires that physicians and scientists in each state have equal access to federal research grants and grant dollars. However, despite legislative and administrative efforts to ensure equal access, the majority of funding for biomedical research is concentrated in a minority of states. To gain insight into the causes of such disparity, funding metrics were examined for all NIH research project grants (RPGs) from 2004 to 2013. State-by-state differences in per application success rates, per investigator funding rates, and average award size each contributed significantly to vast disparities (greater than 100-fold range) in per capita RPG funding to individual states. To the extent tested, there was no significant association overall between scientific productivity and per capita funding, suggesting that the unbalanced allocation of funding is unrelated to the quality of scientists in each state. These findings reveal key sources of bias in, and new insight into the accuracy of, the funding process. They also support evidence-based recommendations for how the NIH could better utilize the scientific talent and capacity that is present throughout the United States. PMID:27077009

  12. Biases in grant proposal success rates, funding rates and award sizes affect the geographical distribution of funding for biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the United States to most efficiently make breakthroughs on the biology, diagnosis and treatment of human diseases requires that physicians and scientists in each state have equal access to federal research grants and grant dollars. However, despite legislative and administrative efforts to ensure equal access, the majority of funding for biomedical research is concentrated in a minority of states. To gain insight into the causes of such disparity, funding metrics were examined for all NIH research project grants (RPGs) from 2004 to 2013. State-by-state differences in per application success rates, per investigator funding rates, and average award size each contributed significantly to vast disparities (greater than 100-fold range) in per capita RPG funding to individual states. To the extent tested, there was no significant association overall between scientific productivity and per capita funding, suggesting that the unbalanced allocation of funding is unrelated to the quality of scientists in each state. These findings reveal key sources of bias in, and new insight into the accuracy of, the funding process. They also support evidence-based recommendations for how the NIH could better utilize the scientific talent and capacity that is present throughout the United States. PMID:27077009

  13. The state of research funding from the National Institutes of Health for criminal justice health research

    PubMed Central

    Ahalt, Cyrus; Bolano, Marielle; Wang, Emily A.; Williams, Brie

    2015-01-01

    Background Over 20 million Americans are currently incarcerated or have been in the past. Most are from medically underserved populations; one in three African American men and one in six Latino men born in 2001 are projected to go to prison during their lifetimes. The amount of funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to understand and improve the health of criminal justice-involved persons is unknown. Objective Describe NIH funding for research addressing the health and healthcare needs of criminal justice-involved individuals. Design Review of NIH grants (from 2008 through 2012) in the RePORT (Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools) database. Setting The NIH RePORT database. Patients Criminal justice involved individuals participating in NIH-funded clinical research. Measurements NIH research and training grants awarded by number, type, research area, institute or center, and dollar amount. Results Of more than 250,000 NIH funded grants, 180 (less than 0.1%) focused on criminal justice health research. The three most common foci of criminal justice health research grants were substance use and/or HIV (64%), mental health (11%), and juvenile health (8%). Two institutes, the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Mental Health, funded 78% of all grants. In 2012, the NIH invested $40.9 million in criminal justice health research, or 1.5% of the $2.7 billion health disparities budget for that year. Limitations NIH-supported research that did not explicitly include current or former prisoners but may have relevance to criminal justice health was not included. Conclusions Federal funding for research focused on understanding and improving the health of criminal justice-involved persons is small, even when compared to the NIH’s overall investment in health disparities research. The NIH is well-positioned to transform the care of current and former prisoners by investing in this critical yet overlooked research area. Primary

  14. "On the job" learning: A bioinformatics course incorporating undergraduates in actual research projects and manuscript submissions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason T; Harris, Justine C; Lopez, Oscar J; Valverde, Laura; Borchert, Glen M

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing of whole genomes and the analysis of genetic information continues to fundamentally change biological and medical research. Unfortunately, the people best suited to interpret this data (biologically trained researchers) are commonly discouraged by their own perceived computational limitations. To address this, we developed a course to help alleviate this constraint. Remarkably, in addition to equipping our undergraduates with an informatic toolset, we found our course design helped prepare our students for collaborative research careers in unexpected ways. Instead of simply offering a traditional lecture- or laboratory-based course, we chose a guided inquiry method, where an instructor-selected research question is examined by students in a collaborative analysis with students contributing to experimental design, data collection, and manuscript reporting. While students learn the skills needed to conduct bioinformatic research throughout all sections of the course, importantly, students also gain experience in working as a team and develop important communication skills through working with their partner and the class as a whole, and by contributing to an original research article. Remarkably, in its first three semesters, this novel computational genetics course has generated 45 undergraduate authorships across three peer-reviewed articles. More importantly, the students that took this course acquired a positive research experience, newfound informatics technical proficiency, unprecedented familiarity with manuscript preparation, and an earned sense of achievement. Although this course deals with analyses of genetic systems, we suggest the basic concept of integrating actual research projects into a 16-week undergraduate course could be applied to numerous other research-active academic fields. PMID:25643604

  15. The "Quality Myth": Promoting and Hindering Conditions for Acquiring Research Funds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laudel, Grit

    2006-01-01

    Research funding has been undergoing a shift from recurrent, stable funding to competitive funding of projects. The system rests on the assumption that the best proposals or the best researchers receive the resources, i.e., that quality is not only necessary but also sufficient to win a grant. A comparative study of the conditions of fund…

  16. Commissioning the University of Excellence: Swedish Research Policy and New Public Research Funding Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallonsten, Olof; Silander, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    In many countries, current research policy is dominated by managerialism and excellence, manifesting the aim of making universities into national strategic assets in the globally competitive knowledge economy. This article discusses these policy trends and their mirror in recent developments in public funding for academic research, with special…

  17. STEM learning research through a funds of knowledge lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civil, Marta

    2016-03-01

    This article examines STEM learning as a cultural process with a focus on non-dominant communities. Building on my work in funds of knowledge and mathematics education, I present three vignettes to raise some questions around connections between in-school and out-of-school mathematics. How do we define competence? How do task and environment affect engagement? What is the role of affect, language, and cognition in different settings? These vignettes serve to highlight the complexity of moving across different domains of STEM practice—everyday life, school, and STEM disciplines. Based on findings from occupational interviews I discuss characteristics of learning and engaging in everyday practices and propose several areas for further research, including the nature of everyday STEM practices, valorization of knowledge, language choice, and different forms of engagement.

  18. Selection of Research Mentors for K Funded Scholars

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Ellen L.; Fleming, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring is an important element in the training of new investigators, particularly for KL2, K12, K08, and K23 funded scholars who are often physicians or other clinicians with limited prior research experience. Matching K scholars with appropriate mentors who have the mentoring skills and available time is an ongoing challenge for most universities. The goal of this paper is to present a variety of strategies used to select mentors for K awardees. The information presented in this special communication is derived from the literature, a national survey of CTSA leaders, as well as K scholar and K mentor focus groups. Some of the mentor selection methods discussed in this paper include a) having the scholar find a mentor as part of the application process for the award, b) selecting mentors post award, c) expecting the chair of the department to identify a mentor(s), d) using a committee to match the scholar and a mentor based on a pool of approved mentors e) selecting additional mentors as the scholar’s research program develops. The paper concludes that mentor selection requires an ongoing programmatic approach with the active participation of K scholars, CTSA program leaders, center directors, research deans and chairs. PMID:21463493

  19. A Research Design for NASA-Funded Professional Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, R. E.; Lambert, J.; Getty, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    This proposal outlines a research plan designed to measure gains in student learning resulting from their teachers participating in professional development. Project Description Misconceptions about global climate change (GCC) are prevalent in the general public (Kellstedt, Zahran, & Vedlitz, 2008; Washington & Cook, 2011). One solution is to provide high school students with a better grounding in the basic science and data that underlie GCC. The overarching goal of a NASA-funded project, Promoting Educational Leadership in Climate Change Literacy (PEL), is to increase GCC literacy in high school students. Research Design The research design is interpretative (Erickson, 2006), framed within a multi-method design, synthesizing both quantitative and qualitative data sources (Morse, 2003). Overall, the data will provide rich information about the PEL's impact on curriculum development, teacher pedagogical knowledge, and student learning. The expectancy-value theory of achievement motivation (E-V-C) (Fan, 2011; Wigfield & Eccles, 1994) provides a theoretical foundation for the research. Expectancy is the degree to which a teacher or student has reason to expect that they will be successful in school. Value indicates whether they think that performance at school will be worthwhile to them. Cost is the perceived sacrifices that must be undertaken, or factors that can inhibit, a successful performance at school. For students, data from an embedded E-V-C investigation will help articulate how E-V-C factors relate to student interest in science, continuing to study science, or embarking on STEM related careers. For teachers, the E-V-C measures will give insight into a key mediating variable on student achievement in science. The evaluation will seek to address research questions at the student and teacher levels. Table 1 presents a sample of research questions and data sources. This is a sample of a much larger set of questions that will be addressed in the project. Data

  20. Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP) Showcases discovery level metadata for US Funded Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaylord, A. G.; Kassin, A.; Cody, R. P.; Manley, W. F.; Dover, M.; Score, R.; Garcia-Lavigne3, D.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP) is a suite of online applications and data services that support Arctic science by providing project tracking information (who's doing what, when and where in the region) for United States Government funded projects. Development of an interagency standard for tracking discovery level metadata for projects has been achieved through collaboration with the Alaska Data Integration work group. The US National Science Foundation plus 17 other agencies and organizations have adopted the standard with several entities successfully implementing XML based REST webservices. With ARMAP's web mapping applications and data services (http://armap.org), users can search for research projects by location, year, funding program, keyword, investigator, and discipline, among other variables. Key information about each project is displayed within the application with links to web pages that provide additional information. The ARMAP 2D mapping application has been significantly enhanced to include support for multiple projections, improved base maps, additional reference data layers, and optimization for better performance. In 2013, ship tracks for US National Science Foundation supported vessel based surveys and health care facilities have been included in ARMAP. The additional functionality of this tool will increase awareness of projects funded by numerous entities in the Arctic, enhance coordination for logistics support, help identify geographic gaps in research efforts and potentially foster more collaboration amongst researchers working in the region. Additionally, ARMAP can be used to demonstrate the effects of the International Polar Year (IPY) on funding of different research disciplines by the U.S. Government.

  1. Funding Science And Technology Research; A Congressional Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, Michael E.

    1981-03-01

    The growth in Federal funding of research and development that began during World War II has leveled off during the last decade, but the nation's need for continued expansion of effort in such areas as general technology development and industrial innovation has continued to grow. Foreign industries are increasingly able to compete in high technology areas previously dominated by domestic firms. As now constituted, research and support agencies such as the National Bureau of Standards are not able to respond to a call for new programs of greatly increased size and scope. For these reasons and others, a proposal is now before Congress to form a National Technology Foundation to include and expand the support missions of the National Bureau of Standards, the Patent and Trademark Office, the National Technical Information Service, and parts of the Engineering and Applied Science programs from the National Science Foundation. This proposal should be examined relative to the short term need for increasing the rate of industrial innovation and relative to a long term goal of integration of basic and applied interests in technology development.

  2. The Rise of Federally Funded Research and Development Centers

    SciTech Connect

    DALE,BRUCE C.; MOY,TIMOTHY D.

    2000-09-01

    Federally funded research and development centers (FFRDCS) area unique class of research and development (R and D) facilities that share aspects of private and public ownership. Some FFRDCS have been praised as national treasures, but FFRDCS have also been the focus of much criticism through the years. This paper traces the history of FFRDCS through four periods: (1) the World War II era, which saw the birth of federal R and D centers that would eventually become FFRDCS; (2) the early Cold War period, which exhibited a proliferation of FFRDCS despite their unclear legislative status and growing tension with an increasingly capable and assertive defense industry, (3) there-evaluation and retrenchment of FFRDCS in the 1960s and early 1970s, which resulted in a dramatic decline in the number of FFRDCS; and (4) the definition and codification of the FFRDC entity in the late 1970s and 1980s, when Congress and the executive branch worked together to formalize regulations to control FFRDCS. The paper concludes with observations on the status of FFRDCS at the end of the twentieth century.

  3. Models and Mechanisms for Evaluating Government-Funded Research: An International Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coryn, Chris L. S.; Hattie, John A.; Scriven, Michael; Hartmann, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This research describes, classifies, and comparatively evaluates national models and mechanisms used to evaluate research and allocate research funding in 16 countries. Although these models and mechanisms vary widely in terms of how research is evaluated and financed, nearly all share the common characteristic of relating funding to some measure…

  4. Research for Improved Health: Variability and Impact of Structural Characteristics in Federally Funded Community Engaged Research

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Cythina R.; Duran, Bonnie; Oetzel, John; Margarati, Maya; Villegas, Malia; Lucero, Julie; Wallerstein, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there is strong scientific, policy, and community support for community-engaged research (CEnR)—including community-based participatory research (CBPR)—the science of CEnR is still developing. Objective To describe structural differences in federally funded CEnR projects by type of research (i.e., descriptive, intervention, or dissemination/policy change) and race/ethnicity of the population served. Methods We identified 333 federally funded projects in 2009 that potentially involved CEnR, 294 principal investigators/project directors (PI/PD) were eligible to participate in a key informant (KI) survey from late 2011 to early 2012 that asked about partnership structure (68% response rate). Results The National Institute on Minority Health & Health Disparities (19.1%), National Cancer Institute (NCI; 13.3%), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; 12.6%) funded the most CEnR projects. Most were intervention projects (66.0%). Projects serving American Indian or Alaskan Native (AIAN) populations (compared with other community of color or multiple-race/unspecified) were likely to be descriptive projects (p < .01), receive less funding (p < .05), and have higher rates of written partnership agreements (p < .05), research integrity training (p < .05), approval of publications (p < .01), and data ownership (p < .01). AIAN-serving projects also reported similar rates of research productivity and greater levels of resource sharing compared with those serving multiple-race/unspecified groups. Conclusions There is clear variability in the structure of CEnR projects with future research needed to determine the impact of this variability on partnering processes and outcomes. In addition, projects in AIAN communities receive lower levels of funding yet still have comparable research productivity to those projects in other racial/ethnic communities. PMID:25981421

  5. Performance Funding and Quality Enhancement at Three Research Universities in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Catherine; Lancaster, Carol; Gilbert, James; Higerd, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect performance funding has had on funding and quality enhancement at three research universities as implemented over the past six years. The presentation details the accountability requirements and the relationship they have had on funding levels. It describes the cost-benefit ratio of maintaining and responding to the…

  6. Industry-funded dermatologic research within academia in the United States: fiscal and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Blank, I H

    1992-03-01

    Private-sector funding of biomedical research within academia may come from industry, foundations, the dermatologists themselves, and the public at large. Industry-funding is of benefit to both academia and industry. Industry may fund clinical and basic research and product testing. Industry is more willing to fund product testing and clinical research than basic research. Funds for dermatologic research may be obtained from manufacturers of drugs, medical devices, cosmetics, soaps, and detergents. Questions of academic freedom arise when research is funded by industry. The results of academic research are in the public domain; the results of intramural industry research are often proprietary, i.e., "trade secrets." When there is industry funding within academia, any restraints on publication should be held to a minimum and be temporary. Publication should occur in a timely fashion, although recognizing the need for delayed publication if the results concern patentable material. When there is a consultantship, pre-arranged terms of agreement may restrict communication. Patents usually are held by the investigator's institution. The funding company may be granted world-wide, royalty-bearing licenses. Conflicts of interest may arise during any research endeavor; this warrants close attention when the research is industry funded. Stock ownership, speaker fees, blind contracts, etc., should be avoided. In any communication, funding agreements should be stated. Indirect costs are a "necessary evil." There are non-research expenditures associated with all research projects for which the institution is justified in requesting compensation. Indirect costs must have definite connections to a project. As industrial funding of research within academia increases, various facets of the academia-industry relationship are receiving increasing attention. Several aspects of conflicts of interest and indirect costs must yet be resolved. When faced openly and directly, all of these

  7. Research Misconduct in National Science Foundation Funded Research: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of 2007-2011 Research Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Research is an important aspect of academic institutions as it brings funding, reputation, and other benefits to the associated establishment. Research misconduct in the form of plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification can occur in association with research, along with subsequent penalties. The problem of the poorly established prevalence of the…

  8. How funding structures for HIV/AIDS research shape outputs and utilization: a Swiss case study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research policy in the field of HIV has changed substantially in recent decades in Switzerland. Until 2004, social science research on HIV/AIDS was funded by specialized funding agencies. After 2004, funding of such research was “normalized” and integrated into the Swiss National Science Foundation as the main funding agency for scientific research in Switzerland. This paper offers a longitudinal analysis of the relationship between the changing nature of funding structures on the one hand and the production and communication of policy-relevant scientific knowledge in the field of HIV on the other hand. Methods The analysis relies on an inventory of all social sciences research projects on HIV in Switzerland that were funded between 1987 and 2010, including topics covered and disciplines involved, as well as financial data. In addition, in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 stakeholders. Results The analysis highlights that the pre-2004 funding policy ensured good coverage of important social science research themes. Specific incentives and explicit promotion of social science research related to HIV gave rise to a multidisciplinary, integrative and health-oriented approach. The abolition of a specific funding policy in 2004 was paralleled by a drastic reduction in the number of social science research projects submitted for funding, and a decline of public money dedicated to such research. Although the public administration in charge of HIV policy still acknowledges the relevance of findings from social sciences for the development of prevention, treatment and care, HIV-related social science research does not flourish under current funding conditions. Conclusions The Swiss experience sheds light on the difficulties of sustaining social science research and multidisciplinary approaches related to HIV without specialized funding agencies. Future funding policy might not necessarily require specialized agencies, but should better take into

  9. A Researcher's Dilemma: A Comparison of Estimated versus Actual College G.P.A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, William E.; Nelson, Gena C.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared college student reported grade point averages (GPA) with actual GPA as recorded at the Registrar's Office to determine the accuracy of student reported GPA. Results indicated that, on average, students reported slightly higher GPA than their actual GPA. Additionally, females were virtually as accurate as males and students with…

  10. Towards a Holistic Framework for Driving Performance in Externally-Funded Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagermann, Axel

    2009-01-01

    A gradual shift in United Kingdom research funding from blanket financing by government agencies towards more diversified income streams through activities funded by various customers is prompting academic research institutions to orient their research portfolios accordingly. Academic organisations such as university institutes are increasingly…

  11. 48 CFR 35.017 - Federally Funded Research and Development Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federally Funded Research and Development Centers. 35.017 Section 35.017 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 35.017 Federally Funded Research and Development Centers....

  12. 48 CFR 35.017 - Federally Funded Research and Development Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federally Funded Research... ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 35.017 Federally Funded Research and Development Centers. (a) Policy. (1) This section sets forth Federal policy...

  13. 75 FR 82400 - Stakeholders Meeting To Provide Updates on NIOSH-Funded Research, Certification and Standards...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... NIOSH-Funded Research, Certification and Standards, Educate Participants on Resources To Reinforce the... stakeholders meeting to provide updates on NIOSH-funded research, certification and standards, educate... community healthcare settings and the alignment of current and recommended PPT research to narrow...

  14. 48 CFR 3035.017 - Federally Funded Research and Development Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... use of Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs) in (FAR) 48 CFR 35.017. ... and Development Centers. 3035.017 Section 3035.017 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING Scope of Part 3035.017 Federally Funded Research...

  15. How Do I Review Thee? Let Me Count the Ways: A Comparison of Research Grant Proposal Review Criteria Across US Federal Funding Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Falk-Krzesinski, Holly J.; Tobin, Stacey C.

    2016-01-01

    While Elizabeth Barrett Browning counted 25 ways in which she loves her husband in her poem, “How Do I Love Thee? Let me Count the Ways,” we identified only eight ways to evaluate the potential for success of a federal research grant proposal. This may be surprising, as it seems upon initial glance of the review criteria used by various federal funding agencies that each has its own distinct set of “rules” regarding the review of grant proposals for research and scholarship. Much of the grantsmanship process is dependent upon the review criteria, which represent the funders’ desired impact of the research. But since most funders that offer research grants share the overarching goals of supporting research that (1) fits within its mission and (2) will bring a strong return on its financial investment, the review criteria used to evaluate research grant proposals are based on a similar set of fundamental questions. In this article, we compare the review criteria of 10 US federal agencies that support research through grant programs, and demonstrate that there are actually only a small and finite number of ways that a grant proposal can be evaluated. Though each funding agency may use slightly different wording, we found that the majority of the agencies’ criteria address eight key questions. Within the highly competitive landscape of research grant funding, new researchers must find support for their research agendas and established investigators and research development offices must consider ways to diversify their funding portfolios, yet all may be discouraged by the apparent myriad of differences in review criteria used by various funding agencies. Guided by research administrators and research development professionals, recognizing that grant proposal review criteria are similar across funding agencies may help lower the barrier to applying for federal funding for new and early career researchers, or facilitate funding portfolio diversification for

  16. Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP) Showcases discovery level metadata for US Funded Research Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Score, R.; Gaylord, A. G.; Kassin, A.; Cody, R. P.; Copenhaver, W.; Manley, W. F.; Dover, M.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP) is a suite of online applications and data services that support Arctic science by providing project tracking information (who's doing what, when and where in the region) for United States Government funded projects. Development of an interagency standard for tracking discovery level metadata for projects has been achieved through collaboration with the Alaska Data Integration work group. The US National Science Foundation plus 17 other agencies and organizations have adopted the standard with several entities successfully implementing XML based REST webservices. With ARMAP's web mapping applications and data services (http://armap.org), users can search for research projects by location, year, funding program, keyword, investigator, and discipline, among other variables. Key information about each project is displayed within the application with links to web pages that provide additional information. The ARMAP 2D mapping application has been significantly enhanced to include support for multiple projections, improved base maps, additional reference data layers, and optimization for better performance. In 2014, ship tracks for US National Science Foundation supported vessel based surveys have been expanded. These enhancements have been made to increase awareness of projects funded by numerous entities in the Arctic, enhance coordination for logistics support, help identify geographic gaps in research efforts and potentially foster more collaboration amongst researchers working in the region. Additionally, ARMAP can be used to demonstrate past, present, and future research efforts supported by the U.S. Government.

  17. [Research Award providing funds for a tracking video camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collett, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The award provided funds for a tracking video camera. The camera has been installed and the system calibrated. It has enabled us to follow in real time the tracks of individual wood ants (Formica rufa) within a 3m square arena as they navigate singly in-doors guided by visual cues. To date we have been using the system on two projects. The first is an analysis of the navigational strategies that ants use when guided by an extended landmark (a low wall) to a feeding site. After a brief training period, ants are able to keep a defined distance and angle from the wall, using their memory of the wall's height on the retina as a controlling parameter. By training with walls of one height and length and testing with walls of different heights and lengths, we can show that ants adjust their distance from the wall so as to keep the wall at the height that they learned during training. Thus, their distance from the base of a tall wall is further than it is from the training wall, and the distance is shorter when the wall is low. The stopping point of the trajectory is defined precisely by the angle that the far end of the wall makes with the trajectory. Thus, ants walk further if the wall is extended in length and not so far if the wall is shortened. These experiments represent the first case in which the controlling parameters of an extended trajectory can be defined with some certainty. It raises many questions for future research that we are now pursuing.

  18. The interface between publicly funded and industry-funded research in pediatric psychopharmacology: opportunities for integration and collaboration.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Benedetto; Heiligenstein, John H; Riddle, Mark A; Greenhill, Laurence L; Fegert, Jörg M

    2004-07-01

    Pediatric psychopharmacology research is undergoing a major expansion consequent to increasing use of psychotropic medications in children and recent legislative incentives to industry. In this rapidly changing context, the interface between publicly and privately funded research needs to be reconsidered to integrate activities and avoid unnecessary duplication of efforts. Once, by default, the almost exclusive domain of public research, child research is now increasingly funded by industry. There are, however, important issues unlikely to be addressed through private funding for which public support is needed, such as direct comparisons between active medications, between pharmacological and psychosocial interventions, or between combined and single treatment modalities; development of effective treatment strategies for patients unresponsive to first-line treatments; development of better research methods to assess efficacy and safety; identification of moderators and mechanisms of treatment response; and impact of treatment on illness course and prognosis. Industry-sponsored research is limited by the restricted access to proprietary databases, which impedes independent analyses and meta-analyses. Translation of basic neuroscience discoveries into treatment applications for children with mental illness is a critical area of inquiry that can benefit from integration of efforts and collaborations among academia, government, and industry. PMID:15219466

  19. 48 CFR 235.017 - Federally Funded Research and Development Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and Development Centers. 235.017 Section 235.017 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 235.017 Federally Funded Research and Development Centers. (a) Policy. (2) No DoD... Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) if a member of its board of directors or...

  20. 48 CFR 970.3501 - Federally funded research and development centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federally funded research and development centers. 970.3501 Section 970.3501 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... Development Contracting 970.3501 Federally funded research and development centers....

  1. 78 FR 53466 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Transformation Initiative: Sustainable Communities Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for Transformation Initiative: Sustainable Communities... Development and Research (PD&R), under the Assistant Secretary, administered the FY13 Sustainable Communities... Development and Research, HUD. ACTION: Announcement of funding awards. SUMMARY: In accordance with Section...

  2. The role of federal funding of environmental research in building capacity in indigenous communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tribal communities, as with many others, are faced with ongoing challenges that demand collaborative and sustained research and efforts. Federal funding of tribal community-based research is a critical infrastructure within which burdened communities have 1) reliable and flexible...

  3. STEM Learning Research through a Funds of Knowledge Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil, Marta

    2016-01-01

    This article examines STEM learning as a cultural process with a focus on non-dominant communities. Building on my work in funds of knowledge and mathematics education, I present three vignettes to raise some questions around connections between in-school and out-of-school mathematics. How do we define competence? How do task and environment…

  4. 23 CFR 420.105 - What is the FHWA's policy on use of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... research funds? 420.105 Section 420.105 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Administration of FHWA Planning and Research Funds § 420.105 What is the FHWA's policy on use of FHWA planning and research funds?...

  5. JOSPT supports immediate access to publicly funded research.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Guy G; Holmes, Edith

    2008-06-01

    Effective April 7, 2008, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) began to enforce a new law requiring all investigators funded by NIH to submit or have submitted for them to the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central an electronic version of their final, peer-reviewed manuscripts upon acceptance for publication. Further, these manuscripts must be made publicly available no later than 12 months after their official publication dates. PMID:18515965

  6. The Advanced Research Projects Agency: A new paradigm for funding chemical research

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, L.H.

    1995-12-01

    The Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) is the central research and development organization of the Department of Defense. Its mission is to develop imaginative, innovative and often high risk research ideas offering a significant technological impact that go well beyond normal evolutionary developmental approaches; and to pursue these ideas from the demonstration of technical feasibility through the development of prototype systems. Despite the fact that funding for research is tied tightly to strategic interests, their is still a strong need for fundamental science (approximately 14% of ARPA`s $2.7B budget goes directly to universities). Examples of how the two can coexist (and thrive!) will be presented. These include the development of advanced fuel cells and the creation of new environmental technologies. The impact of this new paradigm on creativity in science, chemical synthesis, theory, the peer review system, and accountability will also be discussed.

  7. Alternative research funding to improve clinical outcomes: model of prediction and prevention of sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Myerburg, Robert J; Ullmann, Steven G

    2015-04-01

    Although identification and management of cardiovascular risk markers have provided important population risk insights and public health benefits, individual risk prediction remains challenging. Using sudden cardiac death risk as a base case, the complex epidemiology of sudden cardiac death risk and the substantial new funding required to study individual risk are explored. Complex epidemiology derives from the multiple subgroups having different denominators and risk profiles, while funding limitations emerge from saturation of conventional sources of research funding without foreseeable opportunities for increases. A resolution to this problem would have to emerge from new sources of funding targeted to individual risk prediction. In this analysis, we explore the possibility of a research funding strategy that would offer business incentives to the insurance industries, while providing support for unresolved research goals. The model is developed for the case of sudden cardiac death risk, but the concept is applicable to other areas of the medical enterprise. PMID:25669654

  8. U.S.-Soviet seismology research funds switched to air force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    Department of Defense funding for seismology research has seen some changes in both amount and administration. While Congress increased the budget of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) by almost $1.4 billion this year, about 13% over last year (as reported October 30 in the Washington Post), it also rescinded DARPA's authority to manage funding of the Soviet Union program of the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS).

  9. Federal Funds for Research Development and Other Scientific Activities, Fiscal Years 1970, 1971, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    Between 1960 and 1972 fundamental shifts have taken place in the relative levels of support provided to different research and development programs. The first half of the 1960's witnessed an unprecedented growth in Federal funding of R&D; this growth was followed by a period when funding leveled off and then declined. For 1972, however, the…

  10. Implications of Project-Based Funding of Research on Budgeting and Financial Management in Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudla, Ringa; Karo, Erkki; Valdmaa, Kaija; Kattel, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of the paper is to explore--both theoretically and empirically--the implications of project-based research funding for budgeting and financial management at public universities. The theoretical contribution of the paper is to provide a synthesized discussion of the possible impacts of project-based funding on university financial…

  11. Externally Funded Research in Counselor Education: An Overview of the Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villalba, Jose A.; Young, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    "Publish or perish" is a phrase familiar to untenured and tenured faculty alike. In recent years, prominence has been placed on academicians to secure external funding for their research and training projects. The counselor education field has not been immune to this call for externally funded projects. This article includes strategies for seeking…

  12. 75 FR 60781 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Fiscal Year 2010 Doctoral Dissertation Research Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for Fiscal Year 2010 Doctoral Dissertation Research... and Urban Development (HUD) Reform Act of 1989, this document notifies the public of funding awards... used to help doctoral candidates complete dissertations on topics that focus on housing and...

  13. Research and Development in Industry, 1982. Funds, 1982; Scientists and Engineers, January 1983. Detailed Statistical Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    Data in this report were collected by the Bureau of the Census for the National Science Foundation annual Survey of Industrial Research and Development and cover the periods 1956 to 1982 for funding data and January 1957 to January 1983 for personnel data. These data are presented in 40 tables under seven major headings: (1) total funds for…

  14. Funding for the Future: Strategic Research in Further Education. A Report for FEDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellfield, C. R.; Bullock, A. D.; Rikowski, G.; Thomas, H. R.

    A research study focused on the funding method for further education (FE) in Britain. From a theoretical study of the stimuli built into the new funding methodology, four topics of interest were selected for further investigation. To clarify the arguments, these topics were cast as a series of hypotheses that could then be tested using both…

  15. The NIH R03 Award: An Initial Funding Step for Social Work Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langhorst, Diane M.; Svikis, Dace S.

    2007-01-01

    Social workers in academic and agency settings have the opportunity to do funded research using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) R03 small grant mechanism designed for discrete, clearly defined projects that can be completed within a 1- to 2-year time period with limited funding. This article describes the R03 mechanism and provides a guide…

  16. Research Funding at Alberta Universities. 2001/2002 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Innovation and Science, Edmonton. University Research and Strategic Investments Branch.

    This report summarizes sponsored research revenues at Alberta Universities. Sponsored research revenues are those that are received outside of regular university operating grant and include both research grants and research contracts. Research at Alberta universities is supported in part by the provincial government through a number of programs.…

  17. Lost in Translation: NIH Funding for Family Medicine Research Remains Limited.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brianna J; Bazemore, Andrew W; Morley, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Departments of Family Medicine (DFMs) in the United States consistently received around 0.2% of total research funding dollars and 0.3% of all awards awarded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) across the years 2002 to 2014. We used the NIH Reporter tool to quantify the amount of funding and the number of grants received by DFMs from the NIH from 2002 to 2014, using criteria similar to those applied by previous researchers. NIH funding to DFMs as remained fairly consistent across the time period, at roughly 0.2% of total NIH funding and 0.3% of total grants awarded. Changing these proportions will likely require considerable effort to build research capacity within DFMs and their frontline practice research networks, and to shift policymaker and funder perceptions of the value of the FM research enterprise. PMID:27613784

  18. Characteristics of Early Recipients of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Funding.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Stephany; Bazemore, Andrew; Merenstein, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is grounded in the goals of increasing access, improving quality, and reducing cost in the U.S. health care system. The ACA established the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to help accomplish these goals through patient-focused research. PCORI has a different charge than its federally supported counterpart, the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-to fund research that ultimately helps patients make better-informed health care decisions. The authors examined characteristics of the recipients and settings of the first six rounds of PCORI funding and differentiated PCORI and NIH funding patterns to analyze the extent to which PCORI is accomplishing the goals set out by the ACA. The authors performed a retrospective review of publicly available datasets, supplemented by a short questionnaire to funded PCORI principal investigators (PIs). The authors analyzed PCORI's first six funding cycles (2011-2014) and data on NIH funding patterns (2000-2013) to determine whether PCORI and NIH funding patterns differed by investigator, department, and institution, and whether PCORI had funded research in primary care settings. The authors found that PCORI is funding a more diverse cadre of PIs and biomedical departments than is NIH, but not a greater diversity of institutions, and that less than one-third of PCORI studies involve or are relevant to primary care--the largest patient care platform in the United States. As PCORI looks to be refunded, it is important that research funding is further evaluated and publicly acknowledged to assess whether goals are being achieved. PMID:26862840

  19. Competitive Funding, Citation Regimes, and the Diminishment of Breakthrough Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    At first glance Sweden looks like a researcher's paradise with high levels of GDP investment in research and high scores on citation indexes, yet recent studies have suggested that Sweden might be losing its edge in groundbreaking research. This paper explores why that is happening by examining researchers' logics of decision-making at a large…

  20. A Correlation Analysis of the Relationship between Research Administrators at Predominately Undergraduate Institutions and Faculty Funding for Undergraduate Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Joann

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation data provided the necessary information for the investigation into the top 45 funded predominately undergraduate institutions. These funded institutions sponsored research office staff members were sent surveys regarding the servant leadership characteristics of their managers. The Results showed two areas of the…

  1. Experiences accessing public funds for hydrocarbons research and technological development in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suro-Pérez, V.

    2013-05-01

    The Mexican Petroleum Institute (IMP) is a public facility oriented to research and technological development for the national petroleum industry. Its investment plan and operating expenses come, mainly, from selling engineering services to Petróleos Mexicanos. Its projects include upstream and downstream aspects, and the generated income together with public funds support research projects. These funds were approved since 2005, and widened in 2008 thanks to the so called Energy Reform. Until now, more than 50 projects have been funded, and this presentation shows the process to select, to approve, to fund and to ensure the results promised in the original proposal. It is shown that technical sanction of every particular project is essential to succeed, jointly with a structure of real technical pairs to advise during project development. Likewise, the mechanisms for accessing the funds are described, and simple suggestions are made to improve administrative efficiency.

  2. Target Areas for Enhanced Research Funding and Milestones toward an Improved National Ranking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey Commission on Higher Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The quality of institutional research, particularly at New Jersey's research universities, is critical to the competitiveness of both the institutions and the state. Strategic efforts to enhance the quality of research, expand the boundaries of knowledge, and increase the amount of research funding for colleges and universities in the state are…

  3. Linking critical care nursing and genetics with research funding opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sigmon, H D

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this article is threefold: to reveal how a disease that afflicts many critical care patients can be the impetus for forging into a research career; to illustrate a program of research undertaken by a nurse investigator to answer a critical care nursing question using genetic technology; and to identify exciting opportunities for research training, career development, and investigator-initiated research activities for the advanced practice critical care nurse at the National Institute of Nursing Research. The article concludes by identifying future linkages between nursing research and genetics. PMID:9855867

  4. Funding research in the twenty-first century: current opinions and future directions.

    PubMed

    Squitieri, Lee; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-08-01

    For all academic biomedical researchers, the process of submitting grants and securing research funding is a critical part of advancing one's career. In the current era of decreasing new grant awards and renewals leading to significantly worse success rates, it is hard for young aspiring physician-scientists to remain optimistic regarding their future in academic medicine. It is important that today's young surgeon-scientists prepare for and adapt to the inevitably changing climate of research funding. This article provides a primer on developing a successful career as a funded surgeon-scientist and pathways for building a robust research platform worthy of extramural National Institutes of Health funding in the twenty-first century. PMID:25066856

  5. Research funds for NCI’s Provocative Questions project announced

    Cancer.gov

    NCI’s Provocative Questions project has announced that it is now seeking applications from researchers eager to influence the state of cancer research by tackling potentially game-changing, but perplexing, scientific questions that could drive progress ag

  6. University Research Funding: The United States Is Behind and Falling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Robert D.; Stewart, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    Research and development drives innovation and innovation drives long-run economic growth, creating jobs and improving living standards in the process. University-based research is of particular importance to innovation, as the early-stage research that is typically performed at universities serves to expand the knowledge pool from which the…

  7. Critical Issues in the Funding of Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Qualitative research has moved from the margins to the mainstream in many domains of scholarship. Yet, biases against how qualitative methods can best address important research questions still persist. The present article provides reflections regarding my experiences of proposing and reviewing both qualitative and quantitative research grants for…

  8. 23 CFR 420.121 - What other requirements apply to the administration of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... research funds by the State DOTs must be in accordance with 49 CFR 18.32(b). Local government subrecipients... research funds by the State DOTs must be in accordance with 49 CFR 18.36(a) and (i) and, if applicable, 18... DOTs and their subrecipients with FHWA planning and research funds must be in accordance with 49 CFR...

  9. National Center for Education Research Publication Handbook: Publications from Funded Education Research Grants, FY 2002 to FY 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Research, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception in 2002, the National Center for Education Research (NCER) in the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) has funded over 700 education research grants and over 60 education training grants. The research grants have supported exploratory research to build theory or generate hypotheses on factors that may affect educational…

  10. ISMB Conference Funding to Support Attendance of Early Researchers and Students

    SciTech Connect

    Gaasterland, Terry

    2014-06-30

    ISMB Conference Funding for Students and Young Scientists Historical Description The Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) conference has provided a general forum for disseminating the latest developments in bioinformatics on an annual basis for the past 22 years. ISMB is a multidisciplinary conference that brings together scientists from computer science, molecular biology, mathematics and statistics. The goal of the ISMB meeting is to bring together biologists and computational scientists in a focus on actual biological problems, i.e., not simply theoretical calculations. The combined focus on “intelligent systems” and actual biological data makes ISMB a unique and highly important meeting. 21 years of experience in holding the conference has resulted in a consistently well-organized, well attended, and highly respected annual conference. "Intelligent systems" include any software which goes beyond straightforward, closed-form algorithms or standard database technologies, and encompasses those that view data in a symbolic fashion, learn from examples, consolidate multiple levels of abstraction, or synthesize results to be cognitively tractable to a human, including the development and application of advanced computational methods for biological problems. Relevant computational techniques include, but are not limited to: machine learning, pattern recognition, knowledge representation, databases, combinatorics, stochastic modeling, string and graph algorithms, linguistic methods, robotics, constraint satisfaction, and parallel computation. Biological areas of interest include molecular structure, genomics, molecular sequence analysis, evolution and phylogenetics, molecular interactions, metabolic pathways, regulatory networks, developmental control, and molecular biology generally. Emphasis is placed on the validation of methods using real data sets, on practical applications in the biological sciences, and on development of novel computational

  11. How research funding agencies support science integration into policy and practice: An international overview

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Funding agencies constitute one essential pillar for policy makers, researchers and health service delivery institutions. Such agencies are increasingly providing support for science implementation. In this paper, we investigate health research funding agencies and how they support the integration of science into policy, and of science into practice, and vice versa. Methods We selected six countries: Australia, The Netherlands, France, Canada, England and the United States. For 13 funding agencies, we compared their intentions to support, their actions related to science integration into policy and practice, and the reported benefits of this integration. We did a qualitative content analysis of the reports and information provided on the funding agencies’ websites. Results Most funding agencies emphasized the importance of science integration into policy and practice in their strategic orientation, and stated how this integration was structured. Their funding activities were embedded in the push, pull, or linkage/exchange knowledge transfer model. However, few program funding efforts were based on all three models. The agencies reported more often on the benefits of integration on practice, rather than on policy. External programs that were funded largely covered science integration into policy and practice at the end of grant stage, while overlooking the initial stages. Finally, external funding actions were more prominent than internally initiated bridging activities and training activities on such integration. Conclusions This paper contributes to research on science implementation because it goes beyond the two community model of researchers versus end users, to include funding agencies. Users of knowledge may be end users in health organizations like hospitals; civil servants assigned to decision making positions within funding agencies; civil servants outside of the Ministry of Health, such as the Ministry of the Environment; politicians deciding

  12. Bush Pledges Increased Science Research and Education Funding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2006-02-01

    In his 31 January State of the Union address, U.S. President George W. Bush announced two new initiatives aimed at galvanizing scientific research and education. For the American Competitiveness Initiative, Bush proposes to ``double the federal commitment to the most critical basic research programs in the physical sciences in the next 10 years. . .[and to] make permanent the research and development tax credit to encourage bolder private-sector initiative in technology.''

  13. UK research funding bodies’ views towards public participation in health-related research decisions: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A challenge facing science is how to renew and improve its relationship with society. One potential solution is to ensure that the public are more involved in the scientific process from the inception of research plans to scientific dissemination strategies. However, to date, little is known about how research funding bodies view public participation in research funding decisions, and how they involve the public into their strategies and practices. This paper provides insights into how key representatives working in the UK non-commercial research funding sector perceive public participation in health-related research funding decisions and the possible implications of these. Methods We conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews with 30 key stakeholders from 10 UK non-commercial research funding bodies that either partially or exclusively fund health-related research. The findings were written up in thematic narrative form. Results The different disciplines that encompass health research, and their differing frames of ‘science and society’, were found to influence how research funding bodies viewed and implemented public participation in research funding decisions. Relevant subsets of the public were more likely to be involved in research funding decisions than lay public, which could be linked to underlying technocratic rationales. Concerns about public participation stemmed from the highly professionalised scientific environment that the public were exposed to. Additionally, from a more positivist frame, concerns arose regarding subjective views and values held by the public that may damage the integrity of science. Conclusion Underlying assumptions of technocracy largely appear to be driving PP/PE within the research grant review process, even in funding bodies that have overtly democratic ideals. Some conceptions of technocracy were more inclusive than others, welcoming different types of expertise such as patient or research-user experiences

  14. "On the Job" Learning: A Bioinformatics Course Incorporating Undergraduates in Actual Research Projects and Manuscript Submissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jason T.; Harris, Justine C.; Lopez, Oscar J.; Valverde, Laura; Borchert, Glen M.

    2015-01-01

    The sequencing of whole genomes and the analysis of genetic information continues to fundamentally change biological and medical research. Unfortunately, the people best suited to interpret this data (biologically trained researchers) are commonly discouraged by their own perceived computational limitations. To address this, we developed a course…

  15. Promoting public health research in BRICS through a multinational public health prize fund.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes the establishment of a prize fund to incentivise public health research within the BRICS association, which comprises the five major emerging world economies: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. This would stimulate cooperative healthcare research within the group and, on the proviso that the benefits of the research are made freely available within the association, would be rewarding for researchers. The results of the research stimulated by the prize would provide beneficial new healthcare technologies, targeting the most vulnerable and needy groups. The proposed fund is consistent with current international patent law and would not only avoid some of the problems associated with the "Health Impact Fund", but also create a new model for healthcare research. PMID:24509109

  16. Hunt for Federal Funds Gives Classified Research a Lift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basken, Paul

    2012-01-01

    For some colleges and professors, classified research promises prestige and money. Powerhouses like the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Johns Hopkins University have for decades run large classified laboratories. But most other universities either do not allow such research or conduct it quietly, and in small doses. The…

  17. A Study of Federal Academic Earmarks and Research Funding in Relation to the Institutional Research Culture of Research University/High (RU/H) Institutions in Mississippi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, James Hubert, III

    2013-01-01

    Nationally, reductions in public funding for higher education, a stagnate economy, looming sequestration, and a divisive political culture present a complex and challenging dynamic for research universities in pursuit of external funding for their research programs and infrastructure needs. These universities and their research initiatives have…

  18. Stem cell research funding policies and dynamic innovation: a survey of open access and commercialization requirements.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Maroussia; Kim, Jihyun Rosel; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Plomer, Aurora; Joly, Yann

    2014-08-01

    This article compares and contrasts the pressures of both open access data sharing and commercialization policies in the context of publicly funded embryonic stem cell research (SCR). First, normative guidelines of international SCR organizations were examined. We then examined SCR funding guidelines and the project evaluation criteria of major funding organizations in the EU, the United Kingdom (UK), Spain, Canada and the United States. Our survey of policies revealed subtle pressures to commercialize research that include: increased funding availability for commercialization opportunities, assistance for obtaining intellectual property rights (IPRs) and legislation mandating commercialization. In lieu of open access models, funders are increasingly opting for limited sharing models or "protected commons" models that make the research available to researchers within the same region or those receiving the same funding. Meanwhile, there still is need for funding agencies to clarify and standardize terms such as "non-profit organizations" and "for-profit research," as more universities are pursuing for-profit or commercial opportunities. PMID:24676713

  19. Funding Opportunities Available for Innovative SBIR Development - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Does your small business need early-stage financing to take its cancer research to the next level? The National Cancer Institute Small Business Innovation Research (NCI SBIR) Development Center has released $5 million for new contract funding opportunities to support cancer research and technology development in key emerging areas of need.

  20. Get Funded! A Practical Guide for Scholars Seeking Research Support from Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Dorin

    This book is a guide to seeking and obtaining funding for research from corporate industry sources. The process outlined in the book can be used by researchers of any discipline in any type of research institution. Part 1 discusses the key to getting industrial support, developing good interpersonal relationships with people in companies. Part 2…

  1. Understanding the performance and impact of public knowledge translation funding interventions: Protocol for an evaluation of Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation funding programs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has defined knowledge translation (KT) as a dynamic and iterative process that includes the synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and ethically-sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products, and strengthen the healthcare system. CIHR, the national health research funding agency in Canada, has undertaken to advance this concept through direct research funding opportunities in KT. Because CIHR is recognized within Canada and internationally for leading and funding the advancement of KT science and practice, it is essential and timely to evaluate this intervention, and specifically, these funding opportunities. Design The study will employ a novel method of participatory, utilization-focused evaluation inspired by the principles of integrated KT. It will use a mixed methods approach, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative data, and will elicit participation from CIHR funded researchers, knowledge users, KT experts, as well as other health research funding agencies. Lines of inquiry will include an international environmental scan, document/data reviews, in-depth interviews, targeted surveys, case studies, and an expert review panel. The study will investigate how efficiently and effectively the CIHR model of KT funding programs operates, what immediate outcomes these funding mechanisms have produced, and what impact these programs have had on the broader state of health research, health research uptake, and health improvement. Discussion The protocol and results of this evaluation will be of interest to those engaged in the theory, practice, and evaluation of KT. The dissemination of the study protocol and results to both practitioners and theorists will help to fill a gap in knowledge in three areas: the role of a public research funding agency in facilitating KT, the outcomes and impacts KT funding interventions, and how KT can

  2. Citrus Disease Research and Development Trust Fund Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Buchanan, Vern [R-FL-16

    2013-02-27

    03/13/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Horticulture, Research, Biotechnology, and Foreign Agriculture. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. 'Ice Bucket Challenge' Funds a Boon to ALS Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ice Bucket Challenge donations, led to this important discovery," said study co-leader John Landers, from the ... of ALS cases, according to the researchers. "The discovery of NEK1 highlights the value of 'big data' ...

  4. The rising cost of NIH-funded biomedical research?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, T J

    1990-02-01

    During the last decade, total appropriations for the NIH have grown in current as well as constant dollars. Constant dollar expenditures for indirect costs and research project grants have increased, as also has the number of the latter, while such expenditures for research centers, training, and research contracts have shrunk. The most impressive redistribution in emphasis has been toward traditional research project grants (R01s). The size of the average R01 award, discounted for inflation, has grown at an annual rate of 1.1% during the last decade and 1.3% since fiscal year (FY) 1970; that of the average research program project (P01) has declined over the same periods, after a slight rise in the early 1970s. Factors contributing to the modest rise in the real (constant-dollar) size of the average R01 are explored. The regularity with which current-services-requirements estimates for the NIH exceed inflation reflects real growth in the program, particularly in the category of research project grants; the artifact of basing calculations on the post-rather than pre-"negotiated" levels of awards in the "current" year; and the extent to which the project periods of awards have been extended. The effect of lengthening project periods is slow to become manifest, but inexorably swells the pool of non-competing awards; decisions in this area undertaken in 1985, and continued at least through FY 1988, could very significantly increase current services requirements in FYs 1991 and 1992. PMID:2302301

  5. The impact of funding deadlines on personal workloads, stress and family relationships: a qualitative study of Australian researchers

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Danielle L; Coveney, John; Clarke, Philip; Graves, Nicholas; Barnett, Adrian G

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of applying for funding on personal workloads, stress and family relationships. Design Qualitative study of researchers preparing grant proposals. Setting Web-based survey on applying for the annual National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Project Grant scheme. Participants Australian researchers (n=215). Results Almost all agreed that preparing their proposals always took top priority over other work (97%) and personal (87%) commitments. Almost all researchers agreed that they became stressed by the workload (93%) and restricted their holidays during the grant writing season (88%). Most researchers agreed that they submitted proposals because chance is involved in being successful (75%), due to performance requirements at their institution (60%) and pressure from their colleagues to submit proposals (53%). Almost all researchers supported changes to the current processes to submit proposals (95%) and peer review (90%). Most researchers (59%) provided extensive comments on the impact of writing proposals on their work life and home life. Six major work life themes were: (1) top priority; (2) career development; (3) stress at work; (4) benefits at work; (5) time spent at work and (6) pressure from colleagues. Six major home life themes were: (1) restricting family holidays; (2) time spent on work at home; (3) impact on children; (4) stress at home; (5) impact on family and friends and (6) impact on partner. Additional impacts on the mental health and well-being of researchers were identified. Conclusions The process of preparing grant proposals for a single annual deadline is stressful, time consuming and conflicts with family responsibilities. The timing of the funding cycle could be shifted to minimise applicant burden, give Australian researchers more time to work on actual research and to be with their families. PMID:24682577

  6. Patient-centered outcomes research in radiology: trends in funding and methodology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2014-09-01

    The creation of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 presents new opportunities for funding patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER) in radiology. We provide an overview of the evolution of federal funding and priorities for CER with a focus on radiology-related priority topics over the last two decades, and discuss the funding processes and methodological standards outlined by PCORI. We introduce key paradigm shifts in research methodology that will be required on the part of radiology health services researchers to obtain competitive federal grant funding in patient-centered outcomes research. These paradigm shifts include direct engagement of patients and other stakeholders at every stage of the research process, from initial conception to dissemination of results. We will also discuss the increasing use of mixed methods and novel trial designs. One of these trial designs, the pragmatic trial, has the potential to be readily applied to evaluating the effectiveness of diagnostic imaging procedures and imaging-based interventions among diverse patient populations in real-world settings. PMID:24998691

  7. How to Receive More Funding for Your Research? Get Connected to the Right People!

    PubMed Central

    Ebadi, Ashkan; Schiffauerova, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Funding has been viewed in the literature as one of the main determinants of scientific activities. Also, at an individual level, securing funding is one of the most important factors for a researcher, enabling him/her to carry out research projects. However, not everyone is successful in obtaining the necessary funds. The main objective of this work is to measure the effect of several important factors such as past productivity, scientific collaboration or career age of researchers, on the amount of funding that is allocated to them. For this purpose, the paper estimates a temporal non-linear multiple regression model. According to the results, although past productivity of researchers positively affects the funding level, our findings highlight the significant role of networking and collaboration. It was observed that being a member of large scientific teams and getting connected to productive researchers who have also a good control over the collaboration network and the flow of information can increase the chances for securing more money. In fact, our results show that in the quest for the research money it is more important how researchers build their collaboration network than what publications they produce and whether they are cited. PMID:26222598

  8. The validation of peer review through research impact measures and the implications for funding strategies.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Stephen A; Carpenter, Afton S; Irwin, David; McPartland, Caitlin D; Travis, Joseph; Reynders, Sofie; Thompson, Lisa A; Glisson, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of data in the literature concerning the validation of the grant application peer review process, which is used to help direct billions of dollars in research funds. Ultimately, this validation will hinge upon empirical data relating the output of funded projects to the predictions implicit in the overall scientific merit scores from the peer review of submitted applications. In an effort to address this need, the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) conducted a retrospective analysis of peer review data of 2,063 applications submitted to a particular research program and the bibliometric output of the resultant 227 funded projects over an 8-year period. Peer review scores associated with applications were found to be moderately correlated with the total time-adjusted citation output of funded projects, although a high degree of variability existed in the data. Analysis over time revealed that as average annual scores of all applications (both funded and unfunded) submitted to this program improved with time, the average annual citation output per application increased. Citation impact did not correlate with the amount of funds awarded per application or with the total annual programmatic budget. However, the number of funded applications per year was found to correlate well with total annual citation impact, suggesting that improving funding success rates by reducing the size of awards may be an efficient strategy to optimize the scientific impact of research program portfolios. This strategy must be weighed against the need for a balanced research portfolio and the inherent high costs of some areas of research. The relationship observed between peer review scores and bibliometric output lays the groundwork for establishing a model system for future prospective testing of the validity of peer review formats and procedures. PMID:25184367

  9. Dissemination and Implementation Research Funded by the US National Institutes of Health, 2005–2012

    PubMed Central

    Tinkle, Mindy; Kimball, Richard; Haozous, Emily A.; Shuster, George; Meize-Grochowski, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Dissemination and implementation (D&I) research is a growing area of science focused on overcoming the science-practice gap by targeting the distribution of information and adoption of interventions to public health and clinical practice settings. This study examined D&I research projects funded under specific program announcements by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) from 2005 to 2012. The authors described the projects' D&I strategies, funding by NIH Institute, focus, characteristics of the principal investigators (PIs) and their organizations, and other aspects of study design and setting. Results showed 46 R01s, 6 R03s, and 24 R21s funded totaling $79.2 million. The top funders were the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Mental Health, together providing 61% of funding. The majority of PIs were affiliated with Schools of Medicine or large, nonprofit research organizations and think tanks. Only 4% of projects were to PIs with appointments at Schools of Nursing, with 7% of the funding. The most commonly funded projects across all of the studies focused on cancer control and screening, substance abuse prevention and treatment, and mental health services. Typically implemented in community and organizational settings, D&I research provides an excellent opportunity for team science, including nurse scientists and interdisciplinary collaborators. PMID:23606958

  10. Model for the First NIH-funded Center of Excellence in End-of-Life Research

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Gail M.; Kavanaugh, Karen; Wilkie, Diana J.; Bonner, Gloria; Ryan, Catherine; Fischer, Dena J.; Savage, Teresa; Choi, Heeseung; Burgener, Sandy C.; Foreman, Marquis D.; Yan, Han

    2013-01-01

    Centers of excellence are widely acknowledged as a mechanism to promote scientific advances in a particular field of science, but until recently there have been no end-of-life or palliative care research centers funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The purpose of this article is to describe aims, framework, and organizational structure of the first NIH-funded Center of Excellence on end-of-life research, the Center for End-of-Life Transition Research (CEoLTR), and the advances in end-of-life research that the CEoLTR will facilitate. The teams of researchers involved in the CEoLTR have grown impressively since it was funded in 2007. Collectively, the teams are on target to accomplish all of the original goals for this five year award. PMID:23762014

  11. The Effects of Research & Development Funding on Scientific Productivity: Academic Chemistry, 1990-2009

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Joshua L.; Ginther, Donna K.; Juhl, Ted; Heppert, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between Research & Development (R&D) funding and the production of knowledge by academic chemists. Using articles published, either raw counts or adjusted for quality, we find a strong, positive causal effect of funding on knowledge production. This effect is similar across subsets of universities, suggesting a relatively efficient allocation of R&D funds. Finally, we document a rapid acceleration in the rate at which chemical knowledge was produced in the late 1990s and early 2000s relative to the financial and human resources devoted to its production. PMID:26372555

  12. EU Funded Research Activities on NPPS Operational Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Manolatos, P.; Van Goethem, G.

    2002-07-01

    The 5. framework programme (FP-5), the pluri-annual research programme of the European Union (EU), covers the period 1998-2002. Research on nuclear energy, fusion and fission, is covered by the EURATOM part of the FP-5. An overview of the Euratom's research on Nuclear Reactor Safety, managed by the DG-RTD of the European Commission (EC), is presented. This concerns 70 multi-partner projects of approximately euro 82.5 million total contract value that have been selected and co-financed during the period 1999-2001. They form the three clusters of projects dealing with the 'Operational Safety of Existing Installations'. 'Plant Life Extension and Management' (PLEM), 'Severe Accident Management' (SAM) and 'Evolutionary concepts' (EVOL). Emphasis is given here to the projects of the PLEM cluster. (authors)

  13. Advancement Services: Research and Technology Support for Fund Raising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, John H., Ed.

    This book is intended for individuals who work in the operations side of campus fundraising, and addresses such issues as accounting and Internal Revenue Services rules and regulations, new technologies, gift processing, and prospect tracking and management. The 21 chapters are organized around five topics: prospect research, gift processing,…

  14. Interdisciplinary Research Funding: Reaching Outside the Boundaries of Kinesiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedson, Patty

    2009-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research requires that experts from multiple disciplines work together to combine methods and ideas in an integrative fashion to generate new knowledge. In many respects, the field of kinesiology is ideally positioned to take advantage of its inherent multidisciplinary design. Because of the multidisciplinary structure of…

  15. Adapt or perish? Assessing the recent shift in the European research funding arena from 'ELSA' to 'RRI'.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Hub; Landeweerd, Laurens; van Rooij, Arjan

    2014-12-01

    Two decades ago, in 1994, in the context of the 4(th) EU Framework Programme, ELSA was introduced as a label for developing and funding research into the ethical, legal and social aspects of emerging sciences and technologies. Currently, particularly in the context of EU funding initiatives such as Horizon2020, a new label has been forged, namely Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI). What is implied in this metonymy, this semantic shift? What is so new about RRI in comparison to ELSA? First of all, for both labels, the signifier (S) was introduced in a top-down manner, well before the concept that was signified by it (s) had acquired a clear and stable profile. In other words, the signifier preceded (and helped or helps to shape) the research strategies actually covered by these labels (the precedence of the signifier over the signified: S/s). Moreover, the newness of RRI does not reside in its interactive and anticipatory orientation, as is suggested by authors who introduced the term, but rather in its emphases on social-economic impacts (valorisation, employment and competitiveness). PMID:26085447

  16. Applying for, reviewing and funding public health research in Germany and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gerhardus, Ansgar; Becher, Heiko; Groenewegen, Peter; Mansmann, Ulrich; Meyer, Thorsten; Pfaff, Holger; Puhan, Milo; Razum, Oliver; Rehfuess, Eva; Sauerborn, Rainer; Strech, Daniel; Wissing, Frank; Zeeb, Hajo; Hummers-Pradier, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Public health research is complex, involves various disciplines, epistemological perspectives and methods, and is rarely conducted in a controlled setting. Often, the added value of a research project lies in its inter- or trans-disciplinary interaction, reflecting the complexity of the research questions at hand. This creates specific challenges when writing and reviewing public health research grant applications. Therefore, the German Research Foundation (DFG), the largest independent research funding organization in Germany, organized a round table to discuss the process of writing, reviewing and funding public health research. The aim was to analyse the challenges of writing, reviewing and granting scientific public health projects and to improve the situation by offering guidance to applicants, reviewers and funding organizations. The DFG round table discussion brought together national and international public health researchers and representatives of funding organizations. Based on their presentations and discussions, a core group of the participants (the authors) wrote a first draft on the challenges of writing and reviewing public health research proposals and on possible solutions. Comments were discussed in the group of authors until consensus was reached. Public health research demands an epistemological openness and the integration of a broad range of specific skills and expertise. Applicants need to explicitly refer to theories as well as to methodological and ethical standards and elaborate on why certain combinations of theories and methods are required. Simultaneously, they must acknowledge and meet the practical and ethical challenges of conducting research in complex real life settings. Reviewers need to make the rationale for their judgments transparent, refer to the corresponding standards and be explicit about any limitations in their expertise towards the review boards. Grant review boards, funding organizations and research ethics committees

  17. Policy analysis: he who pays the piper: federal funding of research

    SciTech Connect

    Doig, D.

    1983-01-01

    Federal support for research has tended to inhibit speculative investment from private sources. This has led to a compartmentalization that discourages innovation and funding uncertainties that reflect bureaucratic an political fluctuations. The current debate over whether federal spending for military research and development has a positive spin-off effect on the civilian economy introduces questions of academic freedom and of open inquiry and information exchange. Whether private industry, hampered by antitrust laws in joint research efforts, can provide adequate support without federal funding is questionable, but the report concludes that only decentralization can encourage creativity and innovation. 65 references.

  18. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990. Report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R&D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R&D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

  19. Demographics of Investigators Involved in OSSA-Funded Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Konkel, Ronald; Habegger, Jay; Byerly, Radford, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The birth of the U.S. civil space program and the subsequent, dramatic growth in the ranks of the space science research population occurred in the 1950s and 1960s'. The large, post- Sputnik/ Apollo buildup in space program manpower is now approximately one career-lifetime in the past. It is therefore natural to anticipate that a large fraction of the space program engineers, scientists, and managers who pioneered the early exploration of space are approaching retirement. Such a "retirement wave" bodes both a loss of manpower and, more fundamentally, a loss of experience from the civil-space manpower base. Such losses could play a critical role constraining in NASA's ability to expand or maintain its technical capabilities. If this indeed applies to the NASA space science research population, then the potential for problems is exacerbated by the anticipated growth in flight rates, data volume, and data-set diversity which will accompany the planned expansion in the OSSA science effort during the 1990s and 2000s. The purpose of this study was to describe the OSSA PI/Co-I population and to determine the degree to which the OSSA space science investigator population faces a retirement wave, and to estimate the future population of PIs in the 1990-2010 era. To conduct such a study, we investigated the present demographics of the PI and Co-1 population contained in the NASA/OSSA Announcement of Opportunity (AO) mailing list. PIs represent the "leadership" class of the OSSA scientific researcher population, and Co-Is represent one important, oncoming component of the "replacement" generation. Using the PI population data, we then make projection estimates of the future PI population from 1991 through 2010, under various NASA growth/PI demand scenarios.

  20. Higher Education Research Expenditure in South Africa: A Review of the New Funding Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odhiambo, Nicholas M.; Ntenga, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    The trends and the trajectory of higher education research expenditure in South Africa since the introduction of the New Funding Formula in 2004 have been analysed. The paper also compares the level of South Africa's total gross expenditure on research and development with those of other selected economies. The findings show that following…

  1. Securing World-Class Research in UK Universities: Exploring the Impact of Block Grant Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The UK research base is world class. It is second only to the USA on leading scientific indicators and crucially, during the current economic climate, ranks first on publication productivity and citations in relation to research and development public spend. Commonly known as quality-related (QR) funding because it is allocated selectively on the…

  2. The Use and Misuse of Taxpayers' Money: Publicly-Funded Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowbottom, Darrell P.; Aiston, Sarah Jane

    2011-01-01

    How should educational research be contracted? And is there anything wrong with the way that public funding of educational research is currently administered? We endeavour to answer these questions by appeal to the work of two of the most prominent philosophers of science of the twentieth century, namely Popper and Kuhn. Although their normative…

  3. The Case for Public Access to Federally Funded Research Data. Policy Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, Michael; Milloy, Steven

    This study examines the importance of public review of federally funded scientific research by looking at several case studies. It shows that independent, nongovernmental review of federal scientific research has had a major positive effect on knowledge in many areas. The study focuses on: the Environmental Protection Agency and airborne asbestos;…

  4. Raising the Bar on External Research Funding: Infrastructure and Strategies for Enhancing Faculty Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chval, Kathryn B.; Nossaman, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    Administrators seek faculty who have the expertise to secure external funding to support their research agenda. Administrators also seek strategies to support and enhance faculty productivity across different ranks. In this manuscript, we describe the infrastructure we established and strategies we implemented to enhance the research enterprise at…

  5. Federal Funding of Social Work Research: High Hopes or Sour Grapes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corvo, Kenneth; Chen, Wan-Yi; Selmi, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Placed in the historical context of government funding of academic research, this critical analysis identifies the complexities and implications of schools of social work pursuing federal grants for research. Schools of social work with particular organizational characteristics are better able to compete for federal grants, incurring lower…

  6. The Performance-Based Research Fund, Gender and a Cultural Cringe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    This article explores ways the Performance-based Research Fund (PBRF) produces gendered results and expresses a cultural cringe. It is argued that the research evaluation is fixated with being "world-class" at the expense of academic practice that focuses on New Zealand. In this context, disadvantage faced by female academics under the…

  7. 48 CFR 35.017 - Federally Funded Research and Development Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and Development Centers. 35.017 Section 35.017 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 35.017 Federally Funded Research and Development Centers. (a) Policy. (1) This section sets forth Federal policy...

  8. 48 CFR 35.017 - Federally Funded Research and Development Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and Development Centers. 35.017 Section 35.017 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 35.017 Federally Funded Research and Development Centers. (a) Policy. (1) This section sets forth Federal policy...

  9. 48 CFR 35.017 - Federally Funded Research and Development Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and Development Centers. 35.017 Section 35.017 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTING 35.017 Federally Funded Research and Development Centers. (a) Policy. (1) This section sets forth Federal policy...

  10. Federal Funds for Education Research: What Happened in 1992? What Might Happen in 1993?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroufe, Gerald E.; Knutson, Marcia L.

    1992-01-01

    The education finance bill recently passed by the federal government has changed the funding of many programs within the Office of Educational Research and Improvement. Budget lines that gained or lost are traced, with some explanation of the changes. Prospects for the 1993 federal education research budget are reviewed. (SLD)

  11. The Impact of a Funded Research Program on Music Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Donald A.; Luehrsen, Mary

    2010-01-01

    "Sounds of Learning: The Impact of Music Education" is a research program designed to allow researchers to examine the roles of music education in the lives of school-aged children to expand the understanding of music's role in a quality education. The NAMM Foundation, the sponsoring organization, has provided more than $1,000,000 to fund research…

  12. Mental Retardation Research Funding Trends of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Alfred A.; Berkson, Gershon

    1982-01-01

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development is the federal agency with the explicit legislative mandate to support mental retardation research. Examination of funding trends within that institute over the past 10 years reveals a steady and linear decline in relative support for mental retardation research. (Author)

  13. Social Contracts and the Impact of Matching Fund Requirements on American Research Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Irwin

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the social contract framework and matching and cost-sharing requirements affect agency and university decisions at three different stages of the research funding cycle. Draws on a national survey of research universities to examine responses to changing conditions set by federal agencies. Explores policy issues of cost-sharing and…

  14. Nutrition professionals are obligated to follow ethical guidelines when conducting industry-funded research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fiscal climate for research reflects the increasing difficulty in obtaining competitive government and foundation funds. Thus, nutrition professionals conducting research may need to work with industry. However, there is a growing concern about real or perceived conflicts of interest and the pot...

  15. DOE (Department of Energy) funds awarded for scrap tire research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    After promising initial results in demonstrating the technical and commercial feasibility of modifying the surface of finely ground scrap tires to produce adhesion properties needed for reuse in polymers such as polyurethanes and epoxies, the US Department of Energy increased its research contract with Air Products and Chemicals to $850,000. The additional monies will be used to evaluate a second approach to surface modification that will extend the use of the rubber to other polymers and rubber formulations. Supplies to the surface-modified rubber particles should be available by late summer for customer evaluation. The initial applications for the new rubber particles are expected to include polyurethane, for the manufacture of carpet underlayment, shoe soles and newly developed polyurethane spare tires, improving the impact resistance of polystyrene, PVC and engineering plastics and automotive belts, gaskets and seals.

  16. Verification of poultry carcass composting research through application during actual avian influenza outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Flory, Gary A; Peer, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    An avian influenza outbreak in 2002 affected 197 poultry farms in Virginia and cost an estimated $130 million in losses and cleanup. In 2004-2005, researchers initiated a project to investigate the feasibility and practicality of in-house composting of turkey mortalities (heavy hens and toms) as a method of disposal and disease containment. Occurrences of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) in West Virginia and Virginia in 2007 provided an opportunity for first responders to verify composting as an effective carcass disposal method. Many lessons learned from these experiences have led to improvements in the application of this technology. Market-weight turkeys, once thought too large for effective composting, were composted sufficiently for land application within 4 to 6 weeks. Additionally, fire-fighting foam, a new method of mass depopulation, proved to be compatible with composting. Knowledge gained from these incidents will be valuable not only for future responses to LPAI but also for outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza such as the H5N1 virus, which currently causes disease in both animals and humans in many parts of the world. Since three-quarters of all recent emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) have arisen from animals, control of disease in animals is the principal way to reduce human exposure and prevent EIDs. Many of the general approaches and specific techniques used to eradicate the avian influenza virus can also be used to control other EIDs such as H1N1, Nipah virus, Rift Valley Fever, and plague. PMID:20375437

  17. Proposed methods for reviewing the outcomes of health research: the impact of funding by the UK's 'Arthritis Research Campaign'

    PubMed Central

    Hanney, Stephen R; Grant, Jonathan; Wooding, Steven; Buxton, Martin J

    2004-01-01

    Background External and internal factors are increasingly encouraging research funding bodies to demonstrate the outcomes of their research. Traditional methods of assessing research are still important, but can be merged into broader multi-dimensional categorisations of research benefits. The onus has hitherto been on public sector funding bodies, but in the UK the role of medical charities in funding research is particularly important and the Arthritis Research Campaign, the leading medical charity in its field in the UK, commissioned a study to identify the outcomes from research that it funds. This article describes the methods to be used. Methods A case study approach will enable narratives to be told, illuminating how research funded in the early 1990s was (or was not) translated into practice. Each study will be organised using a common structure, which, with careful selection of cases, should enable cross-case analysis to illustrate the strengths of different modes and categories of research. Three main interdependent methods will be used: documentary and literature review; semi-structured interviews; and bibliometric analysis. The evaluative framework for organising the studies was previously used for assessing the benefits from health services research. Here, it has been specifically amended for a medical charity that funds a wide range of research and is concerned to develop the careers of researchers. It was further refined in three pilot studies. The framework has two main elements. First, a multi-dimensional categorisation of benefits going from the knowledge produced in peer reviewed journal articles through to the health and potential economic gain. The second element is a logic model, which, with various stages, should provide a way of organising the studies. The stock of knowledge is important: much research, especially basic, will feed into it and influence further research rather than directly lead to health gains. The cross-case analysis will

  18. Publications Emerging from Research Funded through the National Center for Education Research as of September 30, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Research, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Since 2002, the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) has funded more than 400 research grants through the National Center for Education Research. This document lists the publications that have resulted from these projects. Publications from IES grantees include articles intended for scientific audiences, as well as articles written for general…

  19. NASA's Plan for Improving Public Access to Federally Funded Scientific Research (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G.

    2013-12-01

    In February, 2013, OSTP issued a policy to all Federal agencies directing those that engage in $100 million or greater of federally funded research and development expenditures to develop an agency public access plan. The plan must consider both digital scientific data and scientific publications. This talk will review how NASA is currently complying with this OSTP directive, and NASA's plan for improving the public's ability to locate and access digital data and scientific publications resulting from NASA funded research. Updating NASA's policy will occur during FY 2014 and implementation of new policies and guidance will be in place by FY 2015.

  20. Achievements and bottlenecks in humanitarian demining EU-funded research: final results from the EC DELVE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahli, Hichem; Bruschini, Claudio; Van Kempen, Luc; Schleijpen, Ric; den Breejen, Eric

    2008-04-01

    The EC DELVE Support Action project has analyzed the bottlenecks in the transfer of Humanitarian Demining (HD) technology from technology development to the use in the field, and drawn some lessons learned, basing itself on the assessment of the European Humanitarian Demining Research and Technology Development (RTD) situation from early 1990 until 2006. The situation at the European level was analyzed with emphasis on activities sponsored by the European Commission (EC). This was also done for four European countries and Japan, with emphasis on national activities. The developments in HD during the last 10 years underline the fact that in a number of cases demining related developments have been terminated or at least put on hold. The study also showed that the funding provided by the EC under the Framework Program for RTD has led directly to the creation of an extensive portfolio of Humanitarian Demining technology development projects. The latter provided a range of research and supporting measures addressing the critical issues identified as a result of the regulatory policies developed in the field of Humanitarian Demining over the last ten years. However, the range of instruments available to the EC to finance the necessary research and development were limited, to pre-competitive research. The EC had no tools or programs to directly fund actual product development. As a first consequence, the EC funding program for development of technology for Humanitarian Demining unfortunately proved to be largely unsuitable for the small-scale development needed in a field where there is only a very limited market. As a second consequence, most of the research has been demonstrator-oriented. Moreover, the timeframe for RTD in Humanitarian Demining has not been sufficiently synchronized with the timeframe of the EC policies and regulations. The separation of the Mine Action and RTD funding streams in the EC did also negatively affect the take-up of new technologies. As a

  1. When the Governmental Tail Wags the Disciplinary Dog: Some Consequences of National Funding Policy on Doctoral Research in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Kaylene A.; Comer, Keith

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores disciplinary approaches to knowledge production and the supervision of doctoral students in the context of New Zealand's current Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF). In the last decade New Zealand has experienced significant changes to the way doctoral students are funded by central government. Funding has moved away from a…

  2. Co-Operation and Co-Funding Networks in eHealth Research.

    PubMed

    Kokol, Peter; Blažun Vošner, Helena; Saranto, Kaija

    2016-01-01

    In our bibliometric study we were interested in development and global trends in information and communication technology resulted in the emergence of cooperation and co-funding networks in eHealth research. The corpus was formed from the Web of Science Core Collection using the search keyword string "eHealth" in information source titles, abstracts, and keywords for the time period 2005-2014. The study results show that the research in eHealth is globally dispersed, however most co-operation is performed on the local continent or country level. Most co-founding is done among pharmaceutical firms themselves, however Sanofi, Merck and Abbot also co-fund the same projects as funding agencies. PMID:27332426

  3. DCB Funding

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Biology (DCB) funds and supports extramural basic research that investigates the fundamental biology behind cancer. Find out more about DCB's grants process and funding opportunities.

  4. Funding considerations for the disclosure of genetic incidental findings in biobank research

    PubMed Central

    Black, L; Avard, D; Zawati, MH; Knoppers, BM; Hébert, J; Sauvageau, G

    2013-01-01

    The use of biobanks in biomedical research has grown considerably in recent years. As a result of the increasing analysis of tissue samples stored in biobanks, there has also been an increase in the probability of discovering—in addition to the research target—incidental findings (IF). We identified 23 laws, policies and guidelines from international, regional and national organizations that provide guidance or identify the need for the disclosure of IF to research participants. We analyzed these instruments to determine their contemplation of the funding considerations for the disclosure of IF, examining their guidance for who discloses and the extent of researcher responsibilities. We found that the available normative documents provide little guidance to researchers and biobanks for how they should address cost and funding concerns associated with IF disclosure. It is therefore essential that the research and policy communities think through the financial implications of imposing an ethical responsibility to disclose IF. Concerted efforts should be made by policymakers, ethicists, researchers, clinicians and research institutions to develop detailed funding recommendations, potentially universal in application, to aid in the disclosure of IF, and we provide recommendations on steps that can be taken to ensure full consideration of these issues. PMID:23662709

  5. Investigation and research on classification of productive skills (1)--Actual work and skills in the car manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Mori, K; Kikuchi, Y

    1992-12-01

    A survey was conducted at a site for production which is in the process of technological innovation to examine and clarify the trend in current productive skills. In August 1991, a questionnaire survey was given to skilled workers of a car manufacturing company. The number of valid responses was 1,215. The survey included 133 items in the following three areas: (1) nature of workers' productive skills, 40 items; (2) human functions and vocational ability necessary for the work, 60 items; and (3) working conditions, 33 items. The characteristics of the productive skills required in each division were compared and examined based on the final results of the survey. Clear characteristics were found which reflect the actual productive skills introduced into the factories and sections through technological innovation. The nature of the product manufactured at each factory and the actual skills which reflect the work done at the factories are clarified. The survey items used for this research have effectively clarified the characteristic of the productive skills. PMID:1340499

  6. Does Targeted, Disease-Specific Public Research Funding Influence Pharmaceutical Innovation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blume-Kohout, Margaret E.

    2012-01-01

    Public funding for biomedical research is often justified as a means to encourage development of more (and better) treatments for disease. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between these expenditures and downstream pharmaceutical innovation. In particular, although recent analyses have shown a clear contribution of federally…

  7. The inverse care law - is Australian primary care research funding headed this way?

    PubMed

    Brett, Tom

    2011-08-01

    Tudor Hart's Inverse Care Law classically described the inequity in medical service access in South Wales. From his primary care perspective, the availability of good medical care varied inversely with the need and the population served. In Australia, future funding for primary care research capacity building appears headed in a similar direction - at least for newly established medical schools. PMID:21814660

  8. 76 FR 20673 - Announcement of Notice; Proposed Establishment of a Federally Funded Research and Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... sponsor a studies and analysis, Delivery System, Simulations, and Cost Modeling Federally Funded Research... Planning. Further analysis will consist of expert advice and guidance in the areas of program and project..., and support for Medicare and Medicaid. Conceptual Planning, including operations,...

  9. 48 CFR 970.5235-1 - Federally funded research and development center sponsoring agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Sponsoring Agreement (DEC 2000) (a) Pursuant to 48 CFR 35.017-1, this contract constitutes the sponsoring... the operation of a Department of Energy sponsored Federally Funded Research and Development Center... provided by the contract, the Contractor may accept work from a nonsponsor (as defined in 48 CFR 35.017)...

  10. The Research Funding Guidebook: Getting It, Managing It, and Renewing It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ries, Joanne B.; Leukefeld, Carl G.

    This guide, intended primarily for new or inexperienced researchers, provides suggestions for obtaining and maintaining external funding from grants and contracts. It emphasizes that this effort requires considerable thought, ongoing planning, sound management, and clear decisions. The book uses the National Institutes of Health application and…

  11. Navigating toward research success in times of uncertainty: funding opportunities for early career investigators in nephrology.

    PubMed

    Ikizler, T Alp; Lovett, David H; Chertow, Glenn M; Mitch, William E; Schiller, Brigitte

    2015-03-01

    There is considerable concern within the nephrology community about recent federal budget cuts and the decreasing availability of funds for research. This is especially difficult for junior investigators who are about to start a career as physician-scientists. Accordingly, it is imperative that resources other than federal funds be made available to these individuals during this most delicate yet crucial transition period. This commentary aims to provide an overview of nonfederal funding resources, focusing on the Norman S. Coplon Extramural Grant Program. This program emphasizes support of investigators at the most fragile period in their development of an academic career; it has provided >$11 million of research funds to more than 80 individuals since 2000. The outcome has been stellar, with more than 130 publications originating from these projects and >90% of awardees staying in academia. We hope these accomplishments will encourage similar activities by other entities and scientific programs in addition to ones that are ongoing. Ultimately, these collective efforts will inspire young researchers to use their knowledge, passion, and dedication to advance research into kidney diseases. PMID:25542413

  12. ASHE Directory of Funded Research Opportunities for Pre-Post-Doctoral Students of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Glenda, Comp.

    Information about 18 organizations that provide funding for individual, group, or organizational research efforts is presented. The organizations include foundations, corporations, and government and nonprofit agencies. Descriptions are provided for 13 organizations that provide educational grants and 5 organizations that provide miscellaneous…

  13. 76 FR 15961 - Funding Priorities and Selection Criterion; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program for SCIMS Centers (proposed priority 1), and (2) a priority and... Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries (SCI) Program and Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRP... Demonstrations for Spinal Cord Injuries Program The SCIMS centers program is funded through the......

  14. BrisSynBio: a BBSRC/EPSRC-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre

    PubMed Central

    Sedgley, Kathleen R.; Race, Paul R.; Woolfson, Derek N.

    2016-01-01

    BrisSynBio is the Bristol-based Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)/Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)-funded Synthetic Biology Research Centre. It is one of six such Centres in the U.K. BrisSynBio's emphasis is on rational and predictive bimolecular modelling, design and engineering in the context of synthetic biology. It trains the next generation of synthetic biologists in these approaches, to facilitate translation of fundamental synthetic biology research to industry and the clinic, and to do this within an innovative and responsible research framework. PMID:27284028

  15. Restricting access to publications from funded research: ethical issues and solutions.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, S; Vani, N Isai

    2010-01-01

    India is becoming one of the hubs of clinical research. Commensurate with these advances, the government funding for biomedical research in thrust areas is also increasing. The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Department of Biotechnology (DBT), Department of Science and Technology (DST) are some of the government organizations which provide financial support for various research projects. The results of the funded research projects are published in various international journals. Most of these journals have an access to paid subscribers only. Hence it is unethical to use the research grants from government (people's money) and not allow the scientific community free access to the results of the study. To tackle such issues, these agencies should sign the Berlin declaration and create open access repositories. A public access policy should be formulated and listed in JULIET. The funding bodies in India should also join Pubmed Central (PMC) to form PMC India so that every investigator who has received grants would submit the full text of the paper published from his study and these can be made freely accessible to everyone. Universities and research institutions should also develop institutional open access repositories. The public access policy has definitive advantages and should be implemented. PMID:20622399

  16. Use and abuse of statistics in tobacco industry-funded research on standardised packaging.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Anthony A; Diethelm, Pascal; Hopkinson, Nicholas S; Watt, Hilary C; McKee, Martin

    2015-09-01

    In this commentary we consider the validity of tobacco industry-funded research on the effects of standardised packaging in Australia. As the first country to introduce standardised packs, Australia is closely watched, and Philip Morris International has recently funded two studies into the impact of the measure on smoking prevalence. Both of these papers are flawed in conception as well as design but have nonetheless been widely publicised as cautionary tales against standardised pack legislation. Specifically, we focus on the low statistical significance of the analytical methods used and the assumption that standardised packaging should have an immediate large impact on smoking prevalence. PMID:25650186

  17. Current research funding methods dumb down health care and rehabilitation for disabled people and aging population: a call for a change.

    PubMed

    Negrini, S; Padua, L; Kiekens, C; Michail, X; Boldrini, P

    2014-12-01

    Health care systems in Western societies are faced with two major challenges: aging populations and the growing burden of chronic conditions. This translates into more persons with disabilities and the need for more Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) services. We raise the point of how these emerging needs are faced by the actual research funding. We briefly present the results of an analysis we made about research funding by the Italian National Health Service as an interesting case study, since it relates to Italy (the financer) and the United States, where National Institutes of Health (NIH) reviewers were identified according to their classification of research topics. The topics of potentially greatest interest for aging Western societies, like chronicity, disability and rehabilitation, were among those least often funded and considered in the traditional method of financing research projects. These results could be based on those PRM peculiarities that make the specialty different from all other classical biomedical specialties, namely the bio-psycho-social approach and its specific research methodologies. Moreover, PRM researchers are spread among the different topics as usually classified, and it is probable that PRM projects are judged by non-PRM reviewers. There are at least two possible ways in which research can be better placed to meet the emerging needs of Western societies (chronicity, disability and consequently also rehabilitation). One is to create specific keywords on these topics so as to improve the match between researchers and reviewers; the second is to allocate specific funds to research in these areas. In fact, the not coherence between emerging needs and research priorities have already been periodically addressed in the past with specific "political" and/or "social" initiatives, when researchers were forced to respond to new emergencies: some historical examples include cancer or HIV and viral diseases or the recent Ebola

  18. Relationship between funding sources and outcomes of obesity-related research.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Parke; Morgan, Emily; Roberts, Jesse; Schpok, Andrea; Wilson, Tawny

    2012-08-20

    This study examined the relationship between funding sources and the outcomes of published obesity-related research. A list of funded projects for human nutrition research linking food intake to obesity in 2001-2005 was drawn from two distinct sources: (a) the federal government's semi-public generic commodity promotion or "checkoff" programs for Fluid Milk and Dairy and (b) the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The Principal Investigator for each funded project was determined. Published literature by that individual was located using an Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed author search. All articles related to both dairy and obesity were included. Financial sponsorship for each article and article conclusions were classified by independent groups of co-investigators. Seventy-nine relevant articles were included in the study. Of these, 62 were sponsored by the checkoff programs and 17 by the NIH. The study did not find consistent evidence that checkoff-funded projects were more likely to support an obesity prevention benefit from dairy consumption. The study did identify a new research methodology for the investigation of bias by source of sponsorship. PMID:22583858

  19. Assessing the Impact of Research: A Case Study of the LSAY Research Innovation and Expansion Fund. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, Jo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to apply the framework developed by the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) for measuring research impact to assess the outcomes of the research and activities funded under the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) Research Innovation and Expansion Fund (RIEF). LSAY provides a rich…

  20. The Fund for Astrophysical Research: Ten Years of the Small Grants Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upgren, A. R.; Aller, L. H.; Dunham, W. B.; Philip, A. G. Davis

    1996-12-01

    The Fund for Astrophysical Research, Inc. is a non-profit research corporation, incorporated under the laws of New York State in 1936. It was founded in that year by Charles G. Thompson and Alice Bemis Thompson, to advance research in astrophysics. Theodore Dunham, Jr. served as its scientific director from its founding until his death in 1984. In 1985, the FAR created a program to distribute small research grants among the North American community of astronomers. The grants were named in honor of Dunham. This paper summarizes the results of the first decade of the program.

  1. Can We Build an Open-Science Model to Fund Young, Risky, Blue-Sky Research? First Insights into Funding Geoscientists Via Thinkable.Org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, B.

    2014-12-01

    Some of the biggest discoveries and advances in geoscience research have come from purely curiosity-driven, blue-sky research. Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura's discovery of Green-Fluorecent Protein (GFP) in the 1960s during his postdoc is just one example, which came about through his interest and pursuit of how certain jellyfish bioluminescence. His discovery would eventually revolutionise medicine, culminating in a Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2008. Despite the known importance of "blue-sky" research that doesn't have immediate commercial or social applications, it continues to struggle for funding from both government and industry. Success rates for young scientists also continue to decline within the government competitive granting models due to the importance of track records, yet history tells us that young scientists tend to come up with science's greatest discoveries. The digital age however, gives us a new opportunity to create an alternative and sustainable funding model for young, risky, blue-sky science that tends not to be supported by governments and industry anymore. Here I will discuss how new digital platforms empower researchers and organisations to showcase their research using video, allowing wider community engagment and funding that can be used to directly support young, risky, blue-sky research that is so important to the future of science. I will then talk about recent experience with this model from some ocean researchers who used a new platform called thinkable.org to showcase and raise funding via the public.

  2. "Broader impacts" or "responsible research and innovation"? A comparison of two criteria for funding research in science and engineering.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael; Laas, Kelly

    2014-12-01

    Our subject is how the experience of Americans with a certain funding criterion, "broader impacts" (and some similar criteria) may help in efforts to turn the European concept of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI) into a useful guide to funding Europe's scientific and technical research. We believe this comparison may also be as enlightening for Americans concerned with revising research policy. We have organized our report around René Von Schomberg's definition of RRI, since it seems both to cover what the European research group to which we belong is interested in and to be the only widely accepted definition of RRI. According to Von Schomberg, RRI: "… is a transparent, interactive process by which societal actors and innovators become mutually responsive to each other with a view to the (ethical) acceptability, sustainability and societal desirability of the innovation process and its marketable products (in order to allow a proper embedding of scientific and technological advances in our society)." While RRI seeks fundamental changes in the way research is conducted, Broader Impacts is more concerned with more peripheral aspects of research: widening participation of disadvantaged groups, recruiting the next generation of scientists, increasing the speed with which results are used, and so on. Nevertheless, an examination of the broadening of funding criteria over the last four decades suggests that National Science Foundation has been moving in the direction of RRI. PMID:24155159

  3. Federal Funds for Research and Development. Fiscal Years 1993, 1994, and 1995. Volume 43. Detailed Statistical Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeks, Ronald L.; And Others

    Data in the tables of this publication were derived from the Survey of Federal Funds for Research and Development. They reflect research and development funding (R&D) levels as reported by 32 federal agencies from March through October 1994. The agencies reported their data as obligations and outlays incurred, or expected to be incurred,…

  4. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) Any list that may be prepared by the Food and Drug Administration of testing and...

  5. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds... Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) Any list that may be prepared by the Food and Drug Administration of testing and...

  6. Public health research support through the European structural funds in central and eastern Europe and the Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Public health research provides evidence for practice across fields including health care, health promotion and health surveillance. Levels of public health research vary markedly across European Union (EU) countries, and are lowest in the EU's new member states (in Central and Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean). However, these countries now receive most of the EU's Structural Funds, some of which are allocated to research. Methods STEPS, an EU-funded study, sought to assess support for public health research at national and European levels. To identify support through the Structural funds, STEPS drew information from country respondents and internet searches for all twelve EU new member states. Results The EU allocates annually around €7 billion through the Structural Funds for member states' own use on research. These funds can cover infrastructure, academic employment, and direct research grants. The programmes emphasise links to business. Support for health research includes major projects in biosciences, but direct support for public health research was found in only three countries - Cyprus, Latvia and Lithuania. Conclusions Public health research is not prioritised in the EU's Structural Funds programme in comparison with biomedicine. For the research dimension of the new European programme for Structural Funds 2014-2002, ministries of health should propose public health research to strengthen the evidence-base for European public health policy and practice. PMID:22480250

  7. USE OF SPACE TECHNOLOGY IN FEDERALLY FUNDED LAND PROCESSES RESEARCH IN THE UNITED STATES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorley, G.A.; McArdle, R.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the use of space technology in federally funded earth science research in the US was carried out in 1985 by the President's Office of Science and Technology Policy. Five departments and three independent agencies, representing the primary earth science research agencies in the Federal government, participated in the review. The review by the subcommittee indicated that, while there is considerable overlap in the legislated missions of the earth science agencies, most of the space-related land processes research is complementary. Summaries are provided of the current and projected uses of space technology in land processes activities within the eight Federal organizations.

  8. Survey of Postdoctorates at FFRDCs: Final Report [Federally Funded Research and Development Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Mulrow, Jeri

    2010-06-30

    The 2009 FFRDC survey collected the total number of postdocs employed by FFRDCs in the United States—categorized by source of support, citizenship, sex, and field of research—as of October 1, 2009. The universe for the 2009 GSS-FFRDC survey was the Master Government List of Federally Funded Research and Development Centers. The 2009 survey also contacted the NIH’s Intramural Research Program because it employs the largest number of postdocs in the federal government. The FFRDC survey collected data via a web instrument. Topics included the type of support the postdocs received (federal and nonfederal), their sex, citizenship, race/ethnicity, and field of research.

  9. National Institutes of Health eliminates funding for national architecture linking primary care research.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kevin A

    2007-01-01

    With the ending of the National Electronic Clinical Trial and Research Network (NECTAR) pilot programs and the abridgement of Clinical Research Associate initiative, the National Institutes of Health Roadmap presents a strategic shift for practice-based research networks from direct funding of a harmonized national infrastructure of cooperating research networks to a model of local engagement of primary care clinics performing practice-based research under the aegis of regional academic health centers through Clinical and Translational Science Awards. Although this may present important opportunities for partnering between community practices and large health centers, for primary care researchers, the promise of a transformational change that brings a unified national primary care community into the clinical research enterprise seems likely to remain unfulfilled. PMID:17341760

  10. EU-funded malaria research under the 6th and 7th Framework Programmes for research and technological development.

    PubMed

    Holtel, Andreas; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Penas-Jimenez, Inmaculada

    2011-01-01

    While malaria research has traditionally been strong in Europe, targeted and sustained support for cooperative malaria research at EU level, namely through the EU's 6th and 7th Framework Programmes for research and technological development, FP6 (2002-2006) and FP7 (2007-2013), has boosted both impact and visibility of European malaria research. Most of the European malaria research community is now organized under a number of comprehensive and complementary research networks and projects, assembled around four key areas: (1) fundamental research on the malaria parasite and the disease, (2) development of new malaria drugs, (3) research and development of a malaria vaccine, and (4) research to control the malaria-transmitting mosquito vector. Considerable efforts were undertaken to ensure adequate participation of research groups from disease-endemic countries, in particular from Africa, with the long-term aim to strengthen cooperative links and research capacities in these countries. The concept of organizing European research through major strategic projects to form a "European Research Area" (ERA) was originally developed in the preparation of FP6, and ERA formation has now turned into a major EU policy objective explicitly inscribed into the Lisbon Treaty. EU-funded malaria research may serve as a showcase to demonstrate how ERA formation can successfully be implemented in a given area of science when several surrounding parameters converge to support implementation of this strategic concept: timely coincidence of political stimuli, responsive programming, a clearly defined--and well confined--area of research, and the readiness of the targeted research community who is well familiar with transnational cooperation at EU level. Major EU-funded malaria projects have evolved into thematic and organizational platforms that can collaborate with other global players. Europe may thus contribute more, and better, to addressing the global research agenda for malaria

  11. NCI Approves Funding Plan for NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    On June 24, 2014, the Scientific Program Leaders (SPL) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) approved the funding plan for the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP will conduct multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States. The program will receive $93 million a year for five years. |

  12. Evolution of public and non-profit funding for mental health research in France between 2007 and 2011.

    PubMed

    Gandré, Coralie; Prigent, Amélie; Kemel, Marie-Louise; Leboyer, Marion; Chevreul, Karine

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007, actions have been undertaken in France to foster mental health research. Our objective was to assess their utility by estimating the evolution of public and non-profit funding for mental health research between 2007 and 2011, both in terms of total funding and the share of health research budgets. Public and non-profit funding was considered. Core funding from public research institutions was determined through a top-down approach by multiplying their total budget by the ratio of the number of psychiatry-related publications to the total number of publications focusing on health issues. A bottom-up method was used to estimate the amount of project-based grants and funding by non-profit organizations, which were directly contacted to obtain this information. Public and non-profit funding for mental health research increased by a factor of 3.4 between 2007 and 2011 reaching €84.8 million, while the share of health research funding allocated to mental health research nearly doubled from 2.2% to 4.1%. Public sources were the main contributors representing 94% of the total funding. Our results have important implications for policy makers, as they suggest that actions specifically aimed at prioritizing mental health research are effective in increasing research funding. There is therefore an urgent need to further undertake such actions as funding in France remains particularly low compared to the United Kingdom and the United States, despite the fact that the epidemiological and economic burden represented by mental disorders is expected to grow rapidly in the coming years. PMID:26530777

  13. European Non-Communicable Respiratory Disease Research, 2002-13: Bibliometric Study of Outputs and Funding

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John S. F.; Pallari, Elena; Sullivan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to map European research in chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs). It was intended to assist the European Commission and other research funders to identify gaps and overlaps in their portfolios, and to suggest ways in which they could improve the effectiveness of their support and increase the impact of the research on patient care and on the reduction of the incidence of the CRDs. Articles and reviews were identified in the Web of Science on research in six non-communicable respiratory diseases that were published in 2002–13 from 31 European countries. They represented only 0.8% of biomedical research output but these diseases accounted for 4.7% of the European disease burden, as measured by Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), so the sub-field is seriously under-researched. Europe is prominent in the sub-field and published 56% of the world total, with the UK the most productive and publishing more than France and Italy, the next two countries, combined. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were the diseases with the most publications and the highest citation rates. They also received the most funding, with around two acknowledgments per paper (in 2009–13), whereas cystic fibrosis and emphysema averaged only one. Just over 37% of papers had no specific funding and depended on institutional support from universities and hospitals. PMID:27111670

  14. European Non-Communicable Respiratory Disease Research, 2002-13: Bibliometric Study of Outputs and Funding.

    PubMed

    Begum, Mursheda; Lewison, Grant; Wright, John S F; Pallari, Elena; Sullivan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to map European research in chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs). It was intended to assist the European Commission and other research funders to identify gaps and overlaps in their portfolios, and to suggest ways in which they could improve the effectiveness of their support and increase the impact of the research on patient care and on the reduction of the incidence of the CRDs. Articles and reviews were identified in the Web of Science on research in six non-communicable respiratory diseases that were published in 2002-13 from 31 European countries. They represented only 0.8% of biomedical research output but these diseases accounted for 4.7% of the European disease burden, as measured by Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), so the sub-field is seriously under-researched. Europe is prominent in the sub-field and published 56% of the world total, with the UK the most productive and publishing more than France and Italy, the next two countries, combined. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were the diseases with the most publications and the highest citation rates. They also received the most funding, with around two acknowledgments per paper (in 2009-13), whereas cystic fibrosis and emphysema averaged only one. Just over 37% of papers had no specific funding and depended on institutional support from universities and hospitals. PMID:27111670

  15. Towards government-funded special biomedical research programs to combat rare diseases in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Yao, Lan; Liu, Zhiyong

    2015-04-01

    Rare diseases are rarely conditions that are often debilitating and even life-threatening, which was identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) with a prevalence of 0.65-1‰. 5,000-7,000 rare diseases are thought to exist, which account for around 10% of diseases for individuals worldwide. It is estimated that over 10 million people were patients with rare disease in China. During the past years, public awareness of rare diseases has in fact heightened with the launching of campaigns by patients' organizations and spontaneous efforts by members of the public, not only in developed countries and regions including United States of America (USA), the European Union (EU), and in Japan, but also in China. However, the features of missed or delayed diagnosis, shortage of effective drugs, and the high cost of currently available drugs for rare diseases make it an important public health issue and a challenge to medical care worldwide. To combat rare disease, the government should assume the responsibility of taking on the important task of promoting the sustained development of a system of medical care for and research into rare diseases. Government-funded special biomedical research programs in the USA, EU, and Japan may serve as a reference for China coping with rare diseases. The government-funded special biomedical research programs consisting of leading clinicians and researchers to enhance basic and applied research on rare diseases were expected to be launched in China. PMID:25902953

  16. Library Programs. Strengthening Research Library Resources Program. Higher Education Act, Title II-C. Abstracts of Funded Projects, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    The 39 funded programs described in this brochure involve bibliographic control, collection development, and preservation of library materials at research libraries, and are designed to make rare materials accessible through bibliographic control and networking. The description of each funded project includes the responsible agent conducting the…

  17. Choosing Whether to Resist or Reinforce the New Managerialism: The Impact of Performance-Based Research Funding on Academic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waitere, Hine Jane; Wright, Jeannie; Tremaine, Marianne; Brown, Seth; Pause, Cat Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    This article uses four academics' gendered and cultural responses to life in a university in Aotearoa New Zealand under the new managerialist regime. Performance Based Research Funding (PBRF) requires academics to submit evidence-based portfolios every six years to categorise and rank them, with government funding assigned accordingly. When the…

  18. Federal Funds for Research, Development, and Other Scientific Activities. Fiscal Years 1973, 1974, and 1975. Volume 23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report provides comprehensive statistical information on the size and scope of federal funding for research and development (R&D) and the types of institutions and purposes to which such funds are directed. The report covers fiscal years 1973, 1974, and 1975. Some of the highlights of the report include: (1) a 20 percent increase in energy…

  19. Research and Development in Industry: 1979. Funds, 1979. Scientists and Engineers, January 1980. Surveys of Science Resources Series. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This report analyzes data on research and development (R&D) performed by industry during 1979, examines historical trends for key R&D funding variables, and presents information on industry-employed R&D scientists and engineers. Areas addressed in the first section on R&D funds include: major R&D industries (aircraft/missiles, electrical…

  20. 23 CFR 420.205 - What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... technology transfer funding? 420.205 Section 420.205 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.205 What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? (a) It is the FHWA's policy to administer the RD&T program activities...

  1. 23 CFR 420.205 - What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... technology transfer funding? 420.205 Section 420.205 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.205 What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? (a) It is the FHWA's policy to administer the RD&T program activities...

  2. 23 CFR 420.205 - What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... technology transfer funding? 420.205 Section 420.205 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.205 What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding? (a) It is the FHWA's policy to administer the RD&T program activities...

  3. Connections, Productivity and Funding: An Examination of Factors Influencing Scientists' Perspectives on the Market Orientation of Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronning, Emily Anne

    2012-01-01

    This study examines scientists' perceptions of the environment in which they do their work. Specifically, this study examines how academic and professional factors such as research productivity, funding levels for science, connections to industry, type of academic appointment, and funding sources influence scientists' perceptions of the…

  4. Adequate Funding of Education Programs for At-Risk Children: An Econometric Application of Research-Based Cost Differentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Kern; Wall, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This article contributes to the ongoing discussion of the adequacy of funding for public schools, specifically with regard to the provision of programs for at-risk children. Of particular concern is the determination of realistic, research-based costs of adequately funded programs. This article has three basic parts: the definition and measurement…

  5. Productivity of sustained research funded by the Medical Research Council of New Zealand during the period 1973-84.

    PubMed

    Lee, D

    1988-02-10

    From 1973-81, Medical Research Council funding for sustained research rose from $1.6 to $4.4 million per year but, during 1982-84 fell to $3.8 million. Corrected for inflation, this funding was constant until 1982-84 when it fell by one-third. Publications increased from about 190 in 1974 to a peak of about 310 in 1980 but fell to 200 during 1982-4. Grantees who failed to publish took about 16% of sustained project grants and 10% of such funding. The average cost of an article rose from $5500 in 1973 to $20,000 in 1983/4 but, in real terms, the cost in 1984 was two-thirds of that in the mid-1970's. Cost of publications from Auckland increased steadily from 1973-84. Those for Dunedin remained constant from 1974-80, but increased to exceed $20,000 in 1982-84. From 1973-78, articles from Wellington cost $12,000 but this rose to $20,000 thereafter. Costs in Christchurch increased from $2500 in 1973 to $12,000 in 1984. Inflation-corrected costs per publication from Auckland, Wellington and Dunedin have shown a downward trend while those from Christchurch showed a slight increase. PMID:3380427

  6. [Introduction of Shimane University's outside funded support project for female researchers and healthcare staff].

    PubMed

    Tsumori, Toshiko

    2013-09-01

    Shimane University has started to provide facilities and services to female researchers and healthcare staff who have worked for the university or its hospital after 2007. This initiative had been supported by grants from the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology until 2010. Over time, it has become clear that these efforts, including a day-and-night nursery, day-care for sick children, temporary day-care, after-school programs, and research support system have effectively sustained female researchers and staff in maintaining a balance between private life and work. It is essential that the university devote part of its budget along with outside funding for continued childcare, which has so motivated these female employees. Moreover, it is expected that these efforts will become an effective recruitment tool for excellent young teachers and researchers. PMID:24066393

  7. Research by pathologists not funded by external grant agencies: a success story.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, A; Berman, J J; Moore, G W

    1992-09-01

    The paradigm of pathology research as an endeavor among grant-funded principal investigators resulting in first-author publications is unsupported by quantitative examination of author profiles extracted from the scientific literature. Publications in six pathology journals (Modern Pathology, American Journal of Surgical Pathology, Human Pathology, Acta Cytologica, Archives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and American Journal of Clinical Pathology) and three general science journals (Science, New England Journal of Medicine, and Proceedings of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences) were reviewed. Twenty articles per journal from each of three years (1987, 1989, and 1991) were examined (a total of 520 articles). Of these, 295 articles were first-authored by a member of a department of pathology. Of the 295 articles first-authored by a member of a pathology department, 47 (16%) articles listed competitive grant support. Of the grant-supported articles, 20 articles listed NIH support, but only four had an NIH-supported principle investigator as the first author of the article. Unfunded research represented the vast majority (84%) of work produced by pathologists. A review of the ISI Citation Index showed that those articles written by funded pathologists averaged 8.7 (S.D. 7.8) citations per article, compared to 10.4 (S.D. 12.1) citations per article for unfunded pathologists. Results suggest that unfunded research accounts for the majority of pathology research activity as well as their resulting literature citations. PMID:1344824

  8. Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP): visualize project-level information for U.S. funded research in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassin, A.; Cody, R. P.; Barba, M.; Escarzaga, S. M.; Score, R.; Dover, M.; Gaylord, A. G.; Manley, W. F.; Habermann, T.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Research Mapping Application (ARMAP; http://armap.org/) is a suite of online applications and data services that support Arctic science by providing project tracking information (who's doing what, when and where in the region) for United States Government funded projects. In collaboration with 17 research agencies, project locations are displayed in a visually enhanced web mapping application. Key information about each project is presented along with links to web pages that provide additional information. The mapping application includes new reference data layers and an updated ship tracks layer. Visual enhancements are achieved by redeveloping the front-end from FLEX to HTML5 and JavaScript, which now provide access to mobile users utilizing tablets and cell phone devices. New tools have been added that allow users to navigate, select, draw, measure, print, use a time slider, and more. Other module additions include a back-end Apache SOLR search platform that provides users with the capability to perform advance searches throughout the ARMAP database. Furthermore, a new query builder interface has been developed in order to provide more intuitive controls to generate complex queries. These improvements have been made to increase awareness of projects funded by numerous entities in the Arctic, enhance coordination for logistics support, help identify geographic gaps in research efforts and potentially foster more collaboration amongst researchers working in the region. Additionally, ARMAP can be used to demonstrate past, present, and future research efforts supported by the U.S. Government.

  9. Earth Data Multimedia Instrument - EDMI: A NASA-funded Showcase That Brings Research Technology to Secondary Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, B.; Gautier, C.; Landsfeld, M.; Engle, D.

    2001-12-01

    Through its NASA-funded work in partnership with scientists, schools and curriculum developers, Planet Earth Science Inc. (PES) develops multimedia education software to support Earth science education at the secondary level. One of the main ingredients of PES software is the use of geographical data sets from satellite or climate models to illustrate and explain complex and interacting Earth processes. The exploration of science learning and actual Earth-system data sets occurs in parallel, the science and the data continuously interacting with each other. Data exploration is made possible through a novel interactive courseware product (the EDMIT or Earth Data Multimedia Instrument) PES is developing that melds the data visualization and analysis capabilities of Kodak's IDLT with the interactive, multimedia authoring capabilities of Macromedia's DirectorT. The Earth Data Multimedia Instrument (EDMIT) is "mini-IDL" capability within an interactive Director-based GUI. In this session we will demonstrate the EDMI technology through a couple of applications that showcase its powerful capability to grow a community of developers that can create cost-efficient tools to bring real (and real-time) data into secondary schools and better integrate research and education. We will also highlight the role scientists play in finding ways to successfully partner with different constituencies, from educators to the private sector, to bring the best technology to the students' desktop.

  10. Training the Research Integrity Officers (RIO): The Federally Funded "RIO Boot Camps" Backward Design to Train for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, David E.; Schneider, Paige P.

    2010-01-01

    Research institutions receiving U. S. Public Health Service (PHS) funding must assure the Office of Research Integrity (ORI/OPHS/DHHS) that policies and procedures are in place conforming to 42 CFR 93 to investigate allegations of Misconduct in Research, defined as fabrication or falsification of research data, or plagiarism. An institutional…

  11. A Report of a New Zealand-Based Funding Initiative Designed to Improve a University's Research Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rath, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Over recent years universities in New Zealand have come under pressure from Government to increase quality assured research outputs and raise the level of staff participation in research-focused activity. One response to this pressure has been to target research development funding toward new researchers within an institution. This paper reports…

  12. Research support on foreign funding of fossil fuel and alternative energy r&d. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fedor, H.; Garian, R.

    1994-11-01

    A compendium of open-source materials for the period 1989-94, on fossil fuel and alternative energy research and development funding in selected industrialized countries. The information is presented in two types of tables: those showing the expenditures of all the countries and those showing expenditures of a single country over a given period of time. Sources of information are mainly from the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and materials provided by ministries, statistical bureaus, embassies, and public organizations of various countries.

  13. UNC SKYNET adds NRAO 20m Radio Telescope: Dynamic Research and Funding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, Glen; Hosmer, L.; Heatherly, S.; Towner, A. P.; Reichart, D.; Haipslip, J.

    2013-01-01

    The University of North Carolina (UNC) and NRAO have teamed up to deliver dynamic, realtime optical and Radio observations of the universe, using the web-based SKYNET queuing system developed at UNC. A 20m telescope is outfitted with cryogenically cooled receivers and a reprogrammable spectrometer. To get started see: http://www.gb.nrao.edu/20m/fantastic/ for connections to the observing system, educational activities and opportunities to purchase observing time. The SKYNET goal is to provide the finest research tools to high schools, colleges and independent researchers. This is accomplished through the capabilities to use existing observing modes and through reprogram the University of California, Berkeley's Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) systems for custom digital hardware development. This provides a door for engineering and computer science students to create real-time, high capability data acquisition and processing tools. We will demo the 20m observing system and its capabilities. The NSF funded this construction project with the goal of making the network self funding. We are looking for collaborators with targeted research projects wanting to take advantage of the powerful observing tools.

  14. Funding food science and nutrition research: financial conflicts and scientific integrity.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Clydesdale, Fergus M; Applebaum, Rhona S; Atkinson, Stephanie; Black, Richard M; Dwyer, Johanna T; Hentges, Eric; Higley, Nancy A; Lefevre, Michael; Lupton, Joanne R; Miller, Sanford A; Tancredi, Doris L; Weaver, Connie M; Woteki, Catherine E; Wedral, Elaine

    2009-05-01

    There has been significant public debate about the susceptibility of research to biases of various kinds. The dialogue has extended to the peer-reviewed literature, scientific conferences, the mass media, government advisory bodies, and beyond. Whereas biases can come from myriad sources, the overwhelming focus of the discussion to date has been on industry-funded science. Given the critical role that industry has played and will continue to play in the research process, the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) North America Working Group on Guiding Principles has, in this article, proposed conflict-of-interest guidelines regarding industry funding to protect the integrity and credibility of the scientific record, particularly with respect to health, nutrition, and food-safety science. Eight principles are enumerated, which specify the ground rules for industry-sponsored research. This article, which issues a challenge to the broader scientific community to address all bias issues, is only a first step; the document is intended to be dynamic, prompting ongoing discussion and refinement. In the conduct of public/private research relationships, all relevant parties shall 1) conduct or sponsor research that is factual, transparent, and designed objectively, and, according to accepted principles of scientific inquiry, the research design will generate an appropriately phrased hypothesis and the research will answer the appropriate questions, rather than favor a particular outcome; 2) require control of both study design and research itself to remain with scientific investigators; 3) not offer or accept remuneration geared to the outcome of a research project; 4) ensure, before the commencement of studies, that there is a written agreement that the investigative team has the freedom and obligation to attempt to publish the findings within some specified time frame; 5) require, in publications and conference presentations, full signed disclosure of all financial

  15. Funding food science and nutrition research: financial conflicts and scientific integrity.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Clydesdale, Fergus; Applebaum, Rhona; Atkinson, Stephanie; Black, Richard; Dwyer, Johanna; Hentges, Eric; Higley, Nancy; Lefevre, Michael; Lupton, Joanne; Miller, Sanford; Tancredi, Doris; Weaver, Connie; Woteki, Catherine; Wedral, Elaine

    2009-05-01

    There has been significant public debate about the susceptibility of research to biases of various kinds. The dialogue has extended to the peer-reviewed literature, scientific conferences, the mass media, government advisory bodies, and beyond. While biases can come from myriad sources, the overwhelming focus of the discussion, to date, has been on industry-funded science. Given the critical role that industry has played and will continue to play in the research process, the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) North America Working Group on Guiding Principles has, in this paper, set out proposed conflict-of-interest guidelines, regarding industry funding, for protecting the integrity and credibility of the scientific record, particularly with respect to health, nutrition, and food-safety science. Eight principles are enumerated, specifying ground rules for industry-sponsored research. The paper, which issues a challenge to the broader scientific community to address all bias issues, is only a first step; the document is intended to be dynamic, prompting ongoing discussion and refinement. The Guiding Principles are as follows. In the conduct of public/private research relationships, all relevant parties shall: 1) conduct or sponsor research that is factual, transparent, and designed objectively; according to accepted principles of scientific inquiry, the research design will generate an appropriately phrased hypothesis and the research will answer the appropriate questions, rather than favor a particular outcome; 2) require control of both study design and research itself to remain with scientific investigators; 3) not offer or accept remuneration geared to the outcome of a research project; 4) prior to the commencement of studies, ensure that there is a written agreement that the investigative team has the freedom and obligation to attempt to publish the findings within some specified time-frame; 5) require, in publications and conference presentations

  16. Funding Systems and Their Impact on Skills. Skills Task Force Research Paper 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felstead, Alan; Unwin, Lorna

    This paper is designed to provide the reader with a map of how government funding of post-16 education and training provision in Great Britain operates, with a particular focus on Training and Enterprise Council (TEC) and Further Education Funding Council (FEFC) funding streams. It also outlines some consequences current funding arrangements have…

  17. Wide disparity of clinical genetics services and EU rare disease research funding across Europe.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Sally Ann; Borg, Isabella

    2016-04-01

    The origins of clinical genetics services vary throughout Europe with some emerging from paediatric medicine and others from an academic laboratory setting. In 2011, the cross-border patients' rights directive recommended the creation of European Research Networks (ERNs) to improve patient care throughout EU. In 2013, the EU recommendation on the care for rare diseases came into place. The process of designating EU centres of expertise in rare diseases is being implemented to allow centres to enter ERNs. Hence, this is an opportune time to reflect on the current status of genetic services and research funding throughout Europe as 80 % of rare diseases have a genetic origin. Our aims were to determine (a) whether EU countries are prepared in terms of appropriate clinical genetic staffing to fulfil the European Union Committee of Experts on Rare Diseases (EUCERD) criteria that will allow national centres to be designated as centres of expertise, (b) which EU countries are successful in grant submissions to EU rare disease research funding and (c) country of origin of researchers from the EU presenting their research work as a spoken presentation at the European Society of Human Genetics annual conference. Our results show there is wide disparity of staffing levels per head of population in clinical genetics units throughout Europe. EU rare disease research funding is not being distributed equitably and the opportunity to present research is skewed with many countries not achieving spoken presentations despite abstract submissions. Inequity in the care of patients with rare diseases exists in Europe. Many countries will struggle to designate centres of expertise as their staffing mix and levels will not meet the EUCERD criteria which may prevent them from entering ERNs. The establishment of a small number of centres of expertise centrally, which is welcome, should not occur at the expense of an overall improvement in EU rare disease patient care. Caution should be

  18. NIH research funding and early career physician scientists: continuing challenges in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Howard H.; Deschamps, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Physician scientists (researchers with either M.D. or M.D.-Ph.D. degrees) have the unique potential to combine clinical perspectives with scientific insight, and their participation in biomedical research has long been an important topic for policymakers and educators. Given the recent changes in the research environment, an update and extension of earlier studies of this population was needed. Our findings show that physician scientists are less likely to take a major role in biomedical research than they were in the past. The number of physician scientists receiving postdoctoral research training and career development awards is at an all-time low. Physician scientists today, on average, receive their first major research award (R01 equivalent) at a later age than in the 1980s. The number of first-time R01-equivalent awards to physicians is at the same level as it was 30 yr ago, but physicians now represent a smaller percentage of the grant recipients. The long-term decline in the number of physicians entering research careers was temporarily halted during the period of substantial U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget growth (1998–2003). These gains are lost, however, in the subsequent years when NIH budgets failed to keep pace with rising costs.— Garrison, H. H., Deschamps, A. M. NIH research funding and early career physician scientists: continuing challenges in the 21st century. PMID:24297696

  19. Final report for the Department of Energy funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project'' [University electronic research administration demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, John

    1998-07-31

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy (DOE) funded cooperative agreement ''Electronic Research Demonstration Project (DE-FC02-92ER35180)'' for the period August 1994-July 1998. The goal of the project, referred to as NewERA, was to demonstrate the use of open standards for electronic commerce to support research administration, otherwise referred to as Electronic Research Administration (ERA). The NewERA demonstration project provided a means to test interagency standards developed within the Federal Grant Electronic Commerce Committee, a group comprised of federal granting agencies. The NewERA program was initiated by DOE. NewERA was comprised of three separate, but related, ERA activities in preaward administration, postaward administration, and secure Internet commerce. The goal of New ERA was to demonstrate an open standard implementation of ERA using electronic data interchange, e-mail and Internet transaction security between grant applicants and DOE, along with t h e other participating agencies.

  20. Call for a change in research funding priorities: the example of mental health in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Javier; Raventós, Henriette; Rodríguez, Gloriana; Leandro, Mauricio

    2014-10-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Mental Health Action Plan 2013-2020 urges its Member States to strengthen leadership in mental health, ensure mental and social health interventions in community-based settings, promote mental health and strengthen information systems, and increase evidence and research for mental health. Although Costa Rica has strongly invested in public health and successfully reduced the burden of nutritional and infectious diseases, its transitional epidemiological pattern, population growth, and immigration from unstable neighboring countries has shifted the burden to chronic disorders. Although policies for chronic disorders have been in place for several decades, mental disorders have not been included. Recently, as the Ministry of Health of Costa Rica developed a Mental Health Policy for 2013-2020, it became evident that the country needs epidemiological data to prioritize evidence-based intervention areas. This article stresses the importance of conducting local epidemiological studies on mental health, and calls for changes in research funding priorities by public and private national and international funding agencies in order to follow the WHO Mental Health Action Plan. PMID:25563152

  1. Research Investments in Global Health: A Systematic Analysis of UK Infectious Disease Research Funding and Global Health Metrics, 1997–2013

    PubMed Central

    Head, Michael G.; Fitchett, Joseph R.; Nageshwaran, Vaitehi; Kumari, Nina; Hayward, Andrew; Atun, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases account for a significant global burden of disease and substantial investment in research and development. This paper presents a systematic assessment of research investments awarded to UK institutions and global health metrics assessing disease burden. Methods We systematically sourced research funding data awarded from public and philanthropic organisations between 1997 and 2013. We screened awards for relevance to infection and categorised data by type of science, disease area and specific pathogen. Investments were compared with mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLD) across three time points. Findings Between 1997–2013, there were 7398 awards with a total investment of £3.7 billion. An increase in research funding across 2011–2013 was observed for most disease areas, with notable exceptions being sexually transmitted infections and sepsis research where funding decreased. Most funding remains for pre-clinical research (£2.2 billion, 59.4%). Relative to global mortality, DALYs and YLDs, acute hepatitis C, leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis received comparatively high levels of funding. Pneumonia, shigellosis, pertussis, cholera and syphilis were poorly funded across all health metrics. Tuberculosis (TB) consistently attracts relatively less funding than HIV and malaria. Interpretation Most infections have received increases in research investment, alongside decreases in global burden of disease in 2013. The UK demonstrates research strengths in some neglected tropical diseases such as African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis, but syphilis, cholera, shigellosis and pneumonia remain poorly funded relative to their global burden. Acute hepatitis C appears well funded but the figures do not adequately take into account projected future chronic burdens for this condition. These findings can help to inform global policymakers on resource allocation for research investment

  2. Research and collaboration overview of Institut Pasteur International Network: a bibliometric approach toward research funding decisions

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Ehsan; Bazrafshan, Azam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Institut Pasteur International Network (IPIN), which includes 32 research institutes around the world, is a network of research and expertise to fight against infectious diseases. A scientometric approach was applied to describe research and collaboration activities of IPIN. Methods: Publications were identified using a manual search of IPIN member addresses in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) between 2006 and 2011. Total publications were then subcategorized by geographic regions. Several scientometric indicators and the H-index were employed to estimate the scientific production of each IPIN member. Subject and geographical overlay maps were also applied to visualize the network activities of the IPIN members. Results: A total number of 12667 publications originated from IPIN members. Each author produced an average number of 2.18 papers and each publication received an average of 13.40 citations. European Pasteur Institutes had the largest amount of publications, authored papers, and H-index values. Biochemistry and molecular biology, microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases were the most important research topics, respectively. Geographic mapping of IPIN publications showed wide international collaboration among IPIN members around the world. Conclusion: IPIN has strong ties with national and international authorities and organizations to investigate the current and future health issues. It is recommended to use scientometric and collaboration indicators as measures of research performance in IPIN future policies and investment decisions. PMID:24596896

  3. Assessing the Impact of the Funding Environment on Researchers' Risk Aversion: The Use of Citation Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoller, Frank A.; Zimmerling, Eric; Boutellier, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The funding environment has a profound impact on researchers' behavior. In particular, it influences their freedom and readiness to conduct research ventures with highly uncertain outcomes. In this conceptual paper, we propose a concise new methodology to evaluate researchers' risk aversion based on citation statistics. The derived…

  4. 75 FR 46904 - Request for Proposals: Fiscal Year 2010 Funding Opportunity for Research on the Economic Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... may be submitted by public or private colleges or universities, research foundations maintained by a... Research on the Economic Impact of Cooperatives (REIC) AGENCY: Rural Business-Cooperative Service, USDA... competitive cooperative agreement funds for fiscal year (FY) 2010 to conduct research on the national...

  5. 23 CFR 420.105 - What is the FHWA's policy on use of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Management and Budget (OMB) under control numbers 2125-0028 and 2125-0032.) ... research funds? 420.105 Section 420.105 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Administration of FHWA...

  6. Research funding for addressing tobacco-related disease: an analysis of UK investment between 2008 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Mary; Bogdanovica, Ilze; Britton, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the UK. However, research spending on tobacco-related disease, and particularly smoking prevention, is thought to be low. We therefore aimed to assess the relation between tobacco-related research investment and disease burden from 2008 to 2012. Methods We used the Health Research Classification System to classify UK government and charitable research funding by broad health category and then by tobacco prevention research and 18 WHO defined tobacco-related diseases. We used UK mortality figures to calculate disease-specific tobacco attributable deaths and then compared disease specific and tobacco prevention research investment with all cause and tobacco attributable mortality over the 5-year period and as annual averages. Results 12 922 research grants were identified with a total value of £6.69bn, an annual average of £1.34bn. Annually an average of 110 000 people die from tobacco-related disease, approximately 20% of total deaths. £130m is invested in researching tobacco-related disease each year and £5m on tobacco prevention, 10.8% and 0.42% of total annual research funding, respectively. Prevention research equated to an annual average of £46 per tobacco attributable death or one pound for every £29 spent on tobacco-related disease. Funding varied widely for diseases with different numbers of deaths (eg, lung cancer £68 per all cause death, cervical cancer £2500), similar numbers of deaths (leukaemia £983 per death, stomach cancer £43) or similar numbers of tobacco attributable deaths (eg, colorectal cancer £5k, pancreatic cancer £670, bladder cancer £340). Conclusions Tobacco-related research funding is not related to burden of disease or level of risk. As a result certain diseases receive a disproportionately low level of research funding and disease prevention funding is even lower. PMID:27377637

  7. Funding Mechanisms for Gender-Specific Research: Proceedings from a Panel Discussion at the 2014 AEM Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R.; Anise, Ayodola; Brown, Jeremy; Conwit, Robin; Filart, Rosemarie; Scott, Jane; Choo, Esther K.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference “Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes,” we assembled a diverse panel of representatives from federal and non-federal funding agencies to discuss future opportunities for sex- and gender-specific research. The discussion revolved around the mission and priorities of each organization, as well as its interest in promoting sex- and gender-specific research. The panelists were asked to provide specific examples of funding lines generated or planned for as pertinent to emergency care. Training opportunities for future researchers in this area were also discussed. PMID:25413301

  8. Funding mechanisms for gender-specific research: proceedings from a panel discussion at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R; Anise, Ayodola; Brown, Jeremy; Conwit, Robin; Filart, Rosemarie; Scott, Jane; Choo, Esther K

    2014-12-01

    As part of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," we assembled a diverse panel of representatives from federal and nonfederal funding agencies to discuss future opportunities for sex- and gender-specific research. The discussion revolved around the mission and priorities of each organization, as well as its interest in promoting sex- and gender-specific research. The panelists were asked to provide specific examples of funding lines generated or planned for as pertinent to emergency care. Training opportunities for future researchers in this area were also discussed. PMID:25413301

  9. Building a funded research program in cancer health disparities: considerations for young investigators.

    PubMed

    Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Phillips, Lynette S; Nichols, Hazel B; Martinez, Elena; Thompson, Beti; Ojeifo, John; Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2015-05-01

    A workshop entitled "Building a funded research program in cancer health disparities" was held at the 38th Annual American Society of Preventive Oncology (ASPO) Meeting. Organized by the Junior Members Interest Group, the session addressed topics relevant to career development for cancer disparities investigators. Such considerations include the development of research programs on a backdrop of existing multi- and transdisciplinary teams, recognizing opportunities for advancing their research, given the growth of consortia-related research, and development of effective community-based partnerships. Key strategies for developing a sustainable career in cancer health disparities in the current environment include the need to effectively engage with communities, appreciate the value of team science and develop cross-discipline collaborations, and navigate the use and utility of consortia for disparities research. Academic considerations related to earning tenure and promotion that may be faced by the junior investigator in cancer health disparities were also discussed. This report may serve to both educate and provide lessons for early-stage investigators who wish to tackle complex scientific questions while developing their careers in cancer health disparities. PMID:25934837

  10. Concerning trends and outcomes for National Institutes of Health funding of cancer research.

    PubMed

    Bland, Kirby I

    2007-02-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) considers its principal mission for three modalities: (1) the integration of discovery activities with collaborations of interdisciplinary types; (2) the acceleration of innovations and provision of technology that will allow achievements of translational research; and (3) to move the aforementioned new discoveries via translational methods for application in clinics and public health programs. This article will focus on the contemporary trends for 2003-2004 and the NIH budget of 2005 to enumerate the progress in surgical funding by the NIH and NCI. Specifically, this presentation focuses on outcomes in departments of surgery nationally with correlates for non-surgical clinical sciences and their funding. While the NCI and NIH continue to undergo a comprehensive scrutiny of their resources in this budget-reduced environment related to the efforts to secure peace in Iraq, it is highly probable that our current mechanisms in place will not change without participation of surgical scientists in oncology in the award mechanisms. It should be highly encouraged that surgeon-scientists actively participate on Study Sections of the NIH-NCI to provide surgical investigators the opportunity to be competitive with non-surgeons when reviews of meritorious proposals are submitted by their surgical oncology peers. PMID:17262723

  11. Adolescent pregnancy: a report on ACYF-funded research and demonstration projects.

    PubMed

    Salguero, C

    1980-01-01

    Findings of the 1980 conference sponsored by the Administration for Children, Youth, and Families to review the progress made by 16 agency-funded research and demonstration projects on adolescent pregnancy are discussed. Very young mothers were found to be naive about sexuality and family planning. The prematurity rate of their infants was twice the national average, and they had more birth and delivery complications. Another study found that teenage mothers underestimate their infants' needs and abilities in cognitive, social and language development. Young mothers with positive attitudes toward their pregnancies and children were found to have better maternal-infant relationships and to be more likely to stay in school and delay a subsequent preganancy. Although many agencies offering help were identified in another study, few adolescents were aware of their existence. Need for a wide variety of programs to help adolescents was seen. The effectiveness of states in dealing with the problems of adolescent mothers was found to be limited by a lack of data and a lack of categorical funding for this population. Several investigators stressed the need to provide more support for members of the girl's families and for adolescent fathers. PMID:7273922

  12. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for antimicrobial resistance research to institutions in the UK, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Head, Michael G.; Fitchett, Joseph R.; Cooke, Mary K.; Wurie, Fatima B.; Atun, Rifat; Hayward, Andrew C.; Holmes, Alison; Johnson, Alan P.; Woodford, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the level of research funding awarded to UK institutions specifically for antimicrobial resistance-related research and how closely the topics funded relate to the clinical and public health burden of resistance. Methods Databases and web sites were systematically searched for information on how infectious disease research studies were funded for the period 1997–2010. Studies specifically related to antimicrobial resistance, including bacteriology, virology, mycology and parasitology research, were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen and disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. Results The overall dataset included 6165 studies receiving a total investment of £2.6 billion, of which £102 million was directed towards antimicrobial resistance research (5.5% of total studies, 3.9% of total spend). Of 337 resistance-related projects, 175 studies focused on bacteriology (40.2% of total resistance-related spending), 42 focused on antiviral resistance (17.2% of funding) and 51 focused on parasitology (27.4% of funding). Mean annual funding ranged from £1.9 million in 1997 to £22.1 million in 2009. Conclusions Despite the fact that the emergence of antimicrobial resistance threatens our future ability to treat many infections, the proportion of the UK infection-research spend targeting this important area is small. There are encouraging signs of increased investment in this area, but it is important that this is sustained and targeted at areas of projected greatest burden. Two areas of particular concern requiring more investment are tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:24038777

  13. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Projects at NASA Glenn Research Center for 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    This document is intended to enable the more effective transition of NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) SBIR technologies funded by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program as well as its companion, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program into NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) projects. Primarily, it is intended to help NASA program and project managers find useful technologies that have undergone extensive research and development (RRD), through Phase II of the SBIR program; however, it can also assist non-NASA agencies and commercial companies in this process. aviation safety, unmanned aircraft, ground and flight test technique, low emissions, quiet performance, rotorcraft

  14. Engaging Transgender People in NIH-Funded HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Research.

    PubMed

    Siskind, Rona L; Andrasik, Michele; Karuna, Shelly T; Broder, Gail B; Collins, Clare; Liu, Albert; Lucas, Jonathan Paul; Harper, Gary W; Renzullo, Philip O

    2016-08-15

    In 2009, the National Institutes of Health recognized the need to expand knowledge of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health and commissioned the Institute of Medicine to report on the health of these populations in the United States. The resulting Institute of Medicine publication called for more knowledge of the health of LGBT populations, as well as improved methodologies to reach them, more LGBT-focused research, and enhanced training programs and cultural competency of physicians and researchers. Several of the National Institutes of Health-funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks, including the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, HIV Prevention Trials Network, HIV Vaccine Trials Network, and Microbicide Trials Network, have focused attention on engaging transgender (TG) individuals in research. They have identified issues that transcend the nature of research (ie, treatment or prevention, adult or adolescent) and have adopted various approaches to effectively engage the TG community. Each network has recognized the importance of developing partnerships to build trust with and seek input from TG individuals on research plans and policies. They have established standing advisory groups and convened consultations for this purpose. To ensure that trial data are reflective of the participants they are seeking to enroll, they have reviewed and revised data collection forms to incorporate the 2-step method of collecting sex at birth and gender identity as 2 independent variables, and some have also revised research protocol templates and policies for concept development to ensure that they are appropriate for the inclusion of TG participants. The networks have also initiated trainings to enhance cultural sensitivity and developed a range of materials and resources for network and clinical research site staff. They continue to identify TG-specific research needs in an effort to be more responsive to and improve the health of

  15. Engaging Transgender People in NIH-Funded HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Research

    PubMed Central

    Andrasik, Michele; Karuna, Shelly T.; Broder, Gail B.; Collins, Clare; Liu, Albert; Lucas, Jonathan Paul; Harper, Gary W.; Renzullo, Philip O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: In 2009, the National Institutes of Health recognized the need to expand knowledge of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health and commissioned the Institute of Medicine to report on the health of these populations in the United States. The resulting Institute of Medicine publication called for more knowledge of the health of LGBT populations, as well as improved methodologies to reach them, more LGBT-focused research, and enhanced training programs and cultural competency of physicians and researchers. Several of the National Institutes of Health–funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks, including the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, HIV Prevention Trials Network, HIV Vaccine Trials Network, and Microbicide Trials Network, have focused attention on engaging transgender (TG) individuals in research. They have identified issues that transcend the nature of research (ie, treatment or prevention, adult or adolescent) and have adopted various approaches to effectively engage the TG community. Each network has recognized the importance of developing partnerships to build trust with and seek input from TG individuals on research plans and policies. They have established standing advisory groups and convened consultations for this purpose. To ensure that trial data are reflective of the participants they are seeking to enroll, they have reviewed and revised data collection forms to incorporate the 2-step method of collecting sex at birth and gender identity as 2 independent variables, and some have also revised research protocol templates and policies for concept development to ensure that they are appropriate for the inclusion of TG participants. The networks have also initiated trainings to enhance cultural sensitivity and developed a range of materials and resources for network and clinical research site staff. They continue to identify TG-specific research needs in an effort to be more responsive to and improve

  16. Implications of Current and Proposed Funding Plans for Oklahoma Common Schools. Research Report P-748.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrance, Danny; Tweeten, Luther

    Utilizing data from the 1973-1974 school year, the study analyzed and compared the educational funding system presently used by Oklahoma with other school funding plans on the basis of economic efficiency and social equity. Funding plans used for comparison included Flat Grants, Minimum Foundation, Percentage Equalizing, Guaranteed Tax Base, Full…

  17. Research and Development Funding in New England. Facts about New England Colleges, Universities, and Institutes. Supplementary Higher Education Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New England Board of Higher Education, Boston, MA.

    An analysis of research and development (R&D) funding in New England is presented in four sections: (1) total federal obligations for R&D to the region (e.g., New England received 8.8% of all federal obligations for R&D that were made nationally in 1986, and of the 1986 funds obligated nationally to colleges and universities, over 11% were awarded…

  18. Integrating grant-funded research into the undergraduate biology curriculum using IMG-ACT.

    PubMed

    Ditty, Jayna L; Williams, Kayla M; Keller, Megan M; Chen, Grischa Y; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Rebecca E

    2013-01-01

    It has become clear in current scientific pedagogy that the emersion of students in the scientific process in terms of designing, implementing, and analyzing experiments is imperative for their education; as such, it has been our goal to model this active learning process in the classroom and laboratory in the context of a genuine scientific question. Toward this objective, the National Science Foundation funded a collaborative research grant between a primarily undergraduate institution and a research-intensive institution to study the chemotactic responses of the bacterium Pseudomonas putida F1. As part of the project, a new Bioinformatics course was developed in which undergraduates annotate relevant regions of the P. putida F1 genome using Integrated Microbial Genomes Annotation Collaboration Toolkit, a bioinformatics interface specifically developed for undergraduate programs by the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute. Based on annotations of putative chemotaxis genes in P. putida F1 and comparative genomics studies, undergraduate students from both institutions developed functional genomics research projects that evolved from the annotations. The purpose of this study is to describe the nature of the NSF grant, the development of the Bioinformatics lecture and wet laboratory course, and how undergraduate student involvement in the project that was initiated in the classroom has served as a springboard for independent undergraduate research projects. PMID:23382122

  19. NCI Funding Trends and Priorities in Physical Activity and Energy Balance Research Among Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Catherine M; Bluethmann, Shirley M; Tesauro, Gina; Perna, Frank; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Elena, Joanne W; Ross, Sharon A; O'Connell, Mary; Bowles, Heather R; Greenberg, Deborah; Nebeling, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a healthy lifestyle consisting of physical activity, healthy diet, and weight control is associated with reduced risk of morbidity and mortality after cancer. However, these behavioral interventions are not widely adopted in practice or community settings. Integrating heath behavior change interventions into standard survivorship care for the growing number of cancer survivors requires an understanding of the current state of the science and a coordinated scientific agenda for the future with focused attention in several priority areas. To facilitate this goal, this paper presents trends over the past decade of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) research portfolio, fiscal year 2004 to 2014, by funding mechanism, research focus, research design and methodology, primary study exposures and outcomes, and study team expertise and composition. These data inform a prioritized research agenda for the next decade focused on demonstrating value and feasibility and creating desire for health behavior change interventions at multiple levels including the survivor, clinician, and healthcare payer to facilitate the development and implementation of appropriately targeted, adaptive, effective, and sustainable programs for all survivors. PMID:26547926

  20. Funding priorities in animal reproduction at the United States Department of Agriculture's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service.

    PubMed

    Mirando, Mark A; Hamernik, Debora L

    2006-03-01

    The National Research Initiative (NRI) Competitive Grants Program is the U.S. Department of Agriculture's major competitive grants program and is administered by the Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES). Since its inception in 1991, the NRI has funded competitive grants in the discipline of animal reproduction. Previously, this program provided funding for a broad range of projects encompassing almost every subdiscipline in reproductive biology of farm animals, including aquatic species important to the aquaculture industry. During fiscal year 2004, the NRI Animal Reproduction Program narrowed the focus of funding priorities to the topics of infertility, basic mechanisms regulating fertility, cryopreservation of gametes, reducing the postpartum interval to conception, and sterilization methods or development of monosex populations. In response to a directive to further narrow the focus of funding priorities for fiscal year 2005 and beyond, CSREES conducted a Stakeholder Workshop on Funding Priorities in Animal Reproduction at the 37th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Reproduction in Vancouver, Canada. More than 75 stakeholder scientists from a cross section of federal, public, and private institutions from across the United States participated in the workshop and provided recommendations to CSREES for future NRI-funding priorities in Animal Reproduction. The recommendations provided by stakeholders included continuing efforts to focus funding priorities into fewer high-impact areas relevant to animal agriculture and aquaculture. Recommendations also included movement back toward subdisciplines of animal reproduction that cut across all applicable species. The three funding priorities that consistently emerged as recommendations from the workshop participants were 1) gonadal function and production of gametes, 2) pituitary-hypothalamic function, and 3) embryo and conceptus development, including interaction between the

  1. The Intersection of Massage Practice and Research: Community Massage Therapists as Research Personnel on an NIH-funded Effectiveness Study

    PubMed Central

    Munk, Niki; Stewart, Katie; Love, Margaret M.; Carter, Eddie; Elder, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Few NIH funded studies give community massage therapists the opportunity to become study personnel. A recent NIH/NCCAM-funded study investigating chronic low back pain (CLBP) recruited, trained, and utilized community massage practitioners (CMPs) as study personnel. This study’s aim was to determine whether health-related outcomes for CLBP improve when patients are referred from primary care to select CAM modalities including massage therapy (MT). The purpose of this paper is to report the results of the study’s three massage practice-driven study objectives which were to: 1) identify challenges and solutions to recruiting and retaining ample CMPs, 2) develop a practice-informed protocol reflecting real-world MT, and 3) determine the extent to which CMPs comply with rigorous research methodology in their clinical practices as study personnel. Methods Eligible CMPs in urban and rural Kentucky counties were identified through licensure board records, professional organizations, and personal contact opportunities. Interested CMPs completed 6 CE hours of research and Human Subjects Protection training and agreed to comply with a study protocol reflecting MT as practiced. Once trained, study CMPs were matched with study participants to provide and document up to 10 MT sessions per participant. Results Utilizing prominent MT community members proved invaluable to CMP recruitment and protocol development. CMP recruitment challenges included mixed interest, low number of available rural CMPs, busy clinic schedules, and compensation. Ethics CE credits were offered to encourage CMP interest. A total of 28 Kentucky licensed massage therapists with 5–32 years of experience completed study training. A total of 127 CLBP patients consented to participate (n = 104 for MT). Twenty-five CMPs were assigned CLBP patients and provided 1–10 treatments for 94 study participants. Treatment documentation was provided by CMPs for 97% of treatments provided. Conclusions

  2. Mold growth in on-reserve homes in Canada: the need for research, education, policy, and funding.

    PubMed

    Optis, Michael; Shaw, Karena; Stephenson, Peter; Wild, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The impact of mold growth in homes located on First Nations reserves in Canada is part of a national housing crisis that has not been adequately studied. Nearly half of the homes on reserves contain mold at levels of contamination associated with high rates of respiratory and other illnesses to residents. Mold thrives due to increased moisture levels in building envelopes and interior spaces. Increased moisture stems from several deficiencies in housing conditions, including structural damage to the building envelope, overcrowding and insufficient use of ventilation systems, and other moisture-control strategies. These deficiencies have developed due to a series of historical and socioeconomic factors, including disenfranchisement from traditional territory, environmentally inappropriate construction, high unemployment rates, lack of home ownership, and insufficient federal funding for on-reserve housing and socioeconomic improvements. The successful, long-term reduction of mold growth requires increased activity in several research and policy areas. First, the actual impacts on health need to be studied and associated with comprehensive experimental data on mold growth to understand the unique environmental conditions that permit the germination and growth of toxic mold species. Second, field data documenting the extent of mold growth in on-reserve homes do not exist but are essential in understanding the full extent of the crisis. Third, current government initiatives to educate homeowners in mold remediation and prevention techniques must be long lasting and effective. Finally, and most importantly, the federal government must make a renewed and lasting commitment to improve the socioeconomic conditions on reserves that perpetuate mold growth in homes. Without such improvement, the mold crisis will surely persist and likely worsen. PMID:22329204

  3. Governance of Higher Education in Britain: The Significance of the Research Assessment Exercises for the Funding Council Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapper, Ted; Salter, Brian

    2004-01-01

    This article uses the political struggles that have enveloped the research assessment exercises (RAEs) to interpret the UK's current funding council model of governance. Ironically, the apparently widespread improvement in the research performance of British universities, as demonstrated by RAE 2001, has made it more difficult to distribute…

  4. Funding for Research and Training in Professional Occupational Therapy Education Programs from 1985 to 1987 [and] Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Mary Ann; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Data collected from 49 occupational therapy programs determined that 226 requests for funding were submitted from 1985-87. The $8 million received went for research, training, model programs, and research and development projects. The American Occupational Therapy Association, the American Occupational Therapy Foundation, and the U.S. Department…

  5. The Administration's American Competitiveness Initiative: Providing Federal Funding for Basic Research in the Physical Sciences. BHEF Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business-Higher Education Forum (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Investing in research, which drives industrial development and innovation, is essential to ensuring America's economic prosperity, national security, and leadership in a global economy. Although U.S. commitment to research and development (R&D) has traditionally been strong and sustained, federal funding of R&D as a share of U.S. gross domestic…

  6. An Institutional Postdoctoral Research Training Program: Predictors of Publication Rate and Federal Funding Success of Its Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Randal G.; Greco-Sanders, Linda; Laudenslager, Mark; Reite, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The National Institute of Mental Health funds institutional National Research Service Awards (NRSA) to provide postdoctoral research training. While peer-reviewed publications are the most common outcome measure utilized, there has been little discussion of how publications should be counted or what factors impact the long-term…

  7. Knowledge transfer within EU-funded marine science research - a viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss-Brown, Georgia; Cheallachaín, Cliona Ní

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge transfer, in its most inherent form, can be tracked back to the earliest phase of the Neolithic Revolution, 10,000 years ago, at a time when innovators shared their thoughts on crop cultivation and livestock farming (Bellwood, 2004). Not to be mistaken for science transfer - the export of modern science to non-scientific audiences - it was in the 1960s, that modern knowledge transfer was initiated, when reporting research achievements shifted towards having institutional and political agendas (Lipphardt & Ludwig, 2011). Albeit that the economic contribution of scientific research has been scrutinised for decades; today, there is a pronounced need for the evaluation of its social, cultural and ecological impact. To have impact, it is essential that scientific knowledge is clear and accessible, as well as robust and credible, so that it can be successfully transferred and applied by those identifying solutions for today's societal and environmental challenges. This phenomenon is receiving growing academic interest, where publications including "knowledge transfer" in the title have increased near exponentially for 60 years. Furthermore, we are seeing a definite shift towards embedding a mission of knowledge transfer in Public Research Organisations. This new approach is rewarding researchers whom deliver on all three institutional missions: teaching, research and knowledge transfer. In addition, the European Commission (2008) recommends that "knowledge transfer between universities and industry is made a permanent political and operational priority" and that "sufficient resources and incentives [be] available to public research organisations and their staff to engage in knowledge transfer activities". It is also anticipated that funding agencies will soon make pathways-to-impact statements, also known as knowledge transfer plans, a mandatory requirement of all project proposals. AquaTT is a leader in scientific knowledge management, including knowledge

  8. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Head, M G; Fitchett, J R; Cooke, G S; Foster, G R; Atun, R

    2015-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is responsible for great health, social and economic burden both globally and in the UK. This study aimed to assess the research funding awarded to UK institutions for viral hepatitis research and the relationship of funded research to clinical and public health burden of viral hepatitis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on infectious disease research studies funded for the period 1997–2010. Studies specifically related to viral hepatitis research were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen, disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall data set included 6165 studies (total investment £2.6 billion) of which £76.9 million (3.0%) was directed towards viral hepatitis across 323 studies (5.2%). By pathogen, there were four studies specifically investigating hepatitis A (£3.8 million), 69 studies for hepatitis B (21.4%) with total investment of £14.7 million (19.1%) and 236 (73.1%) hepatitis C studies (£62.7 million, 81.5%). There were 4 studies investigating hepatitis G, and none specifying hepatitis D or E. By associated area, viral hepatitis and therapeutics research received £17.0 million, vaccinology £3.1 million and diagnostics £2.9 million. Preclinical research received £50.3 million (65.4%) across 173 studies, whilst implementation and operational research received £19.4 million (25.3%) across 128 studies. The UK is engaged in much hepatology research, but there are areas where the burden is great and may require greater focus, such as hepatitis E, development of a vaccine for hepatitis C, and further research into hepatitis-associated cancers. Private sector data, and funding information from other countries, would also be useful in priority setting. PMID:25146854

  9. Systematic analysis of funding awarded for viral hepatitis-related research to institutions in the United Kingdom, 1997-2010.

    PubMed

    Head, M G; Fitchett, J R; Cooke, G S; Foster, G R; Atun, R

    2015-03-01

    Viral hepatitis is responsible for great health, social and economic burden both globally and in the UK. This study aimed to assess the research funding awarded to UK institutions for viral hepatitis research and the relationship of funded research to clinical and public health burden of viral hepatitis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on infectious disease research studies funded for the period 1997-2010. Studies specifically related to viral hepatitis research were identified and categorized in terms of funding by pathogen, disease and by a research and development value chain describing the type of science. The overall data set included 6165 studies (total investment £2.6 billion) of which £76.9 million (3.0%) was directed towards viral hepatitis across 323 studies (5.2%). By pathogen, there were four studies specifically investigating hepatitis A (£3.8 million), 69 studies for hepatitis B (21.4%) with total investment of £14.7 million (19.1%) and 236 (73.1%) hepatitis C studies (£62.7 million, 81.5%). There were 4 studies investigating hepatitis G, and none specifying hepatitis D or E. By associated area, viral hepatitis and therapeutics research received £17.0 million, vaccinology £3.1 million and diagnostics £2.9 million. Preclinical research received £50.3 million (65.4%) across 173 studies, whilst implementation and operational research received £19.4 million (25.3%) across 128 studies. The UK is engaged in much hepatology research, but there are areas where the burden is great and may require greater focus, such as hepatitis E, development of a vaccine for hepatitis C, and further research into hepatitis-associated cancers. Private sector data, and funding information from other countries, would also be useful in priority setting. PMID:25146854

  10. Bibliometrics as a Performance Measurement Tool for Research Evaluation: The Case of Research Funded by the National Cancer Institute of Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, David; Picard-Aitken, Michelle; Cote, Gregoire; Caruso, Julie; Valentim, Rodolfo; Edmonds, Stuart; Williams, Gregory Thomas; Macaluso, Benoit; Robitaille, Jean-Pierre; Bastien, Nicolas; Laframboise, Marie-Claude; Lebeau, Louis-Michel; Mirabel, Philippe; Lariviere, Vincent; Archambault, Eric

    2010-01-01

    As bibliometric indicators are objective, reliable, and cost-effective measures of peer-reviewed research outputs, they are expected to play an increasingly important role in research assessment/management. Recently, a bibliometric approach was developed and integrated within the evaluation framework of research funded by the National Cancer…

  11. Indicator-Assisted Evaluation and Funding of Research: Visualizing the Influence of Grants on the Number and Citation Counts of Research Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyack, Kevin W.; Borner, Katy

    2003-01-01

    Reports research on analyzing and visualizing the impact of government funding on the amount and citation counts of research publications. Provides an example using grant and publication data from Behavioral and Social Science Research at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) using the VxInsight[R] visualization tool. (Author/LRW)

  12. Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) Progress Report and Proposal for Funding Continuation NASA Nebraska EPSCoR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent; Fink, Mary; Gogos, George; Moussavi, Massoum; Nickerson, Jocelyn; Rundquist, Donald; Russell, Valerie; Tarry, Scott

    2004-01-01

    The Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL), which began as a comprehensive, multi-faceted NASA EPSCoR 2000 initiative, has contributed substantially to the strategic research and technology priorities of NASA, while intensifying Nebraska's rapidly growing aeronautics research and development endeavors. AERIAL has enabled Nebraska researchers to: (a) continue strengthening their collaborative relationships with NASA Field Centers, Codes, and Enterprises; (b) increase the capacity of higher education throughout Nebraska to invigorate and expand aeronautics research; and (c) expedite the development of aeronautics-related research infrastructure and industry in the state. Nebraska has placed emphasis on successfully securing additional funds from non-EPSCoR and non-NASA sources. AERIAL researchers have aggressively pursued additional funding opportunities offered by NASA, industry, and other agencies. This report contains a summary of AERIAL's activities and accomplishments during its first three years of implementation.

  13. [Complementary medicine and scientific pluralism--from governmental research funding to the dialogue forum of pluralism in medicine].

    PubMed

    Matthiessen, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    Medicine is based on a pluralism of different ways of thinking and practical approaches. Given this assumption, the history and experiences of the 2 German governmental research funding programs 'Unconventional Methods of Cancer' (UMK) and 'Unconventional Medicine Directions' (UMR) are described from the perspective of the project supporter of 2 working groups that were based at the University of Witten/Herdecke, Germany, on behalf of the federal government. The results of a nationwide inventory analysis conducted under my direction in the years 1989–1992 showed a distinct lack of human and infrastructural resources for competitive research for complementary medicine at that time. The field of complementary medicine was found to be very heterogeneous and was divided into procedures without any visible research interest, but also contained approaches nourishing mainstream medicine by its different paradigm. The representatives of complementary medicine were and still are recognizably interested in evaluative, empirical research. The following contains our funding recommendations made for the relevant ministries, the advertised funding issues, and the research activities carried out. Although this governmental research funding was limited, a signal function can be awarded, retrospectively. For the subsequent period, there has been a significant improvement in infrastructural, staff, and research conditions. This development led to a significant increase in the level of quality and the acceptability of research results. As a result of an increased willingness for cooperations, the foundations, concerns, and activities of the 'dialogue forum pluralism in medicine' set up in 2000 are presented and compared with the situation at the time of research funding by government. 'Integrative Medicine' is currently being favored and welcomed as a sign of better mutual acceptance. Nevertheless, complementary medicine is still seen as being creative, enriching medical and health

  14. Managing multiple funding streams and agendas to achieve local and global health and research objectives: lessons from the field

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Charles B.; Sikazwe, Izukanji; Raelly, Roselyne; Freeman, Bethany; Wambulawae, Inonge; Silwizya, Geoffrey; Topp, Stephanie; Chilengi, Roma; Henostroza, German; Kapambwe, Sharon; Simbeye, Darius; Sibajene, Sheila; Chi, Harmony; Godfrey, Katy; Chi, Benjamin; Moore, Carolyn Bolton

    2014-01-01

    Multiple funding sources provide research and program implementation organizations a broader base of funding and facilitate synergy, but also entail challenges that include varying stakeholder expectations, unaligned grant cycles, and highly variable reporting requirements. Strong governance and strategic planning are essential to ensure alignment of goals and agendas. Systems to track budgets and outputs as well as procurement and human resources are required. A major goal is to transition leadership and operations to local ownership. This article details successful approaches used by the newly independent non-governmental organization, the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia (CIDRZ). PMID:24321983

  15. The Pale Blue Dot Project: an Adopt-a-star Program to Fund Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2009-01-01

    In April 2009, NASA is scheduled to launch the Kepler satellite -- a mission designed to discover habitable Earth-like planets around distant Sun-like stars. The satellite consists of a 0.95-m telescope with an array of digital cameras that will monitor the brightness of 100,000 solar-type stars with a few parts-per-million (ppm) precision for between 4-6 years. Inspired by the grassroots Internet fundraising success of several recent political campaigns, we have initiated an adopt-a-star program to support the research efforts of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC), which does not receive funding from NASA. Through the project website at http://whitedwarf.org/palebluedot/ stars can be selected either visually with Google Sky or by catalog number in our simplified text version of the Kepler Input Catalog. For a $10 donation, sponsors receive a "certificate of adoption" by email and updates when any planets are discovered around their adopted star. On our website we tag each target with the name of the donor, so no two people can adopt the same star. If most of the Kepler target stars are ultimately adopted, the resulting endowment is expected to provide significant research support to KASC throughout the lifetime of the mission. The Pale Blue Dot Project adopt a star program is not affiliated with, sponsored by, or endorsed by NASA. It is an independent program of White Dwarf Research Corporation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization supporting the research efforts of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium.

  16. Systematic analysis of funding awarded to institutions in the United Kingdom for infectious disease research, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Fitchett, Joseph R; Moore, David AJ; Atun, Rifat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives This study aimed to assess the research investments made to UK institutions for all infectious disease research and identify the direction of spend by institution. Design Systematic analysis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on relevant studies funded for the period 1997–2010. Setting UK institutions carrying out infectious disease research. Participants None. Main outcome measures Twenty academic institutions receiving greatest sum investments across infection are included here, also NHS sites, Sanger Institute, Health Protection Agency and the Medical Research Council. We measured total funding, median award size, disease areas and position of research along the R&D value chain. Results Included institutions accounted for £2.1 billion across 5003 studies. Imperial College and University of Oxford received the most investment. Imperial College led the most studies. The Liverpool and London Schools of Tropical Medicine had highest median award size, whereas the NHS sites combined had many smaller studies. Sum NHS funding appears to be declining over time, whilst university income is relatively stable. Several institutions concentrate almost exclusively on pre-clinical research. In some areas, there is clearly a leading institution, e.g. Aberdeen and mycology research or UCL and antimicrobial resistance. Conclusion UK institutions carry out research across a wide range of infectious disease areas. This analysis can identify centres of excellence and help inform future resource allocation for research priorities. Institutions can use this analysis for establishing expertise within their groups, identifying external collaborators and informing local research strategy. PMID:25893108

  17. Surrogate waste streams for use in MWFA funded research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D.; Priebe, S.; Borduin, L.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers developing technologies for treatment of mixed (both hazardous and radioactive) wastes are strongly encouraged to test using materials representative of the wastes targeted by their processes. Using actual wastes is essential for treatability studies and demonstrations prior to implementation, but is excessively costly and impractical during development. Thus, it is a responsibility of the focus area to provide researchers with surrogate recipes for use in development. Data from tests with standardized recipes will also facilitate comparison of results for competing technologies by potential end users and industry. Due to the wide range of waste materials in the DOE inventory and the scope of technology covered by the focus area, no one surrogate will accurately represent all wastes in all applications. The surrogates described are based on generic base compositions representative of that class of wastes, with variable constituents to be added over a recommended test range. Not all of the additives must be tested for each technology; focus should be directed to the constituents and physical forms present in the waste streams targeted by the developer. Excluding some parameters, or reducing the parametric testing rather than using the full range of concentration recommended simply limits the scope of potential application when the data is considered by a potential user. Surrogates are described for debris, sludges, and caustic scrub solution. Soils are recognized as a fourth class, and are considered too complex to represent with a surrogate. Descriptive text is also included to explain how the recipes were developed, and why each test additive is prescribed.

  18. RO1 Funding for Mixed Methods Research: Lessons learned from the Mixed-Method Analysis of Japanese Depression Project

    PubMed Central

    Arnault, Denise Saint; Fetters, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed methods research has made significant in-roads in the effort to examine complex health related phenomenon. However, little has been published on the funding of mixed methods research projects. This paper addresses that gap by presenting an example of an NIMH funded project using a mixed methods QUAL-QUAN triangulation design entitled “The Mixed-Method Analysis of Japanese Depression.” We present the Cultural Determinants of Health Seeking model that framed the study, the specific aims, the quantitative and qualitative data sources informing the study, and overview of the mixing of the two studies. Finally, we examine reviewer's comments and our insights related to writing mixed method proposal successful for achieving RO1 level funding. PMID:25419196

  19. School Funding, Taxes, and Economic Growth: An Analysis of the 50 States. NEA Research Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Richard G.

    2004-01-01

    Recent court decisions and state studies indicate that none of the states measure up on even rough measures of adequacy and equity in school funding. Because of tax and spending limits, some states have school funding systems that are equitable, but hardly adequate. One way to address this problem is for states to get on a path toward achieving…

  20. The Australian Research Quality Framework: A Live Experiment in Capturing the Social, Economic, Environmental, and Cultural Returns of Publicly Funded Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Claire

    2008-01-01

    The author regards development of Australia's ill-fated Research Quality Framework (RQF) as a "live experiment" in determining the most appropriate approach to evaluating the extra-academic returns, or "impact," of a nation's publicly funded research. The RQF was at the forefront of an international movement toward richer qualitative,…

  1. Eliciting and Activating Funds of Knowledge in an Environmental Science Community College Classroom: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Niel, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Many non-traditional students are currently underperforming in college and yet may have untapped knowledge and skills that could support their academic success if appropriately utilized. Previous practices that students experience as a part of their lives are what Gonzales and other researchers call "funds of knowledge" (FOK). There is ample…

  2. Cornell U. to Step Up Efforts to Market Its Research; Other Institutions Report Progress on Venture Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchsberg, Gilbert

    1989-01-01

    While some universities have had success establishing venture funds to market research with commercial potential, Cornell University has formed an alumni panel to evaluate new university technologies for those with promise for new products, spin-off companies, and profits. Members with connections in venture capital will arrange financing and…

  3. 23 CFR 420.121 - What other requirements apply to the administration of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section 1001(b) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (Pub. L. 105-178) and 49 CFR part 26... 49 CFR part 29, subpart F, State DOTs must certify to the FHWA that they will provide a drug free... research funds by the State DOTs must be in accordance with 49 CFR 18.32(b). Local government...

  4. 23 CFR 420.121 - What other requirements apply to the administration of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... section 1001(b) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (Pub. L. 105-178) and 49 CFR part 26... 49 CFR part 29, subpart F, State DOTs must certify to the FHWA that they will provide a drug free... research funds by the State DOTs must be in accordance with 49 CFR 18.32(b). Local government...

  5. 23 CFR 420.121 - What other requirements apply to the administration of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... section 1001(b) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (Pub. L. 105-178) and 49 CFR part 26... 49 CFR part 29, subpart F, State DOTs must certify to the FHWA that they will provide a drug free... research funds by the State DOTs must be in accordance with 49 CFR 18.32(b). Local government...

  6. 23 CFR 420.121 - What other requirements apply to the administration of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... section 1001(b) of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (Pub. L. 105-178) and 49 CFR part 26... 49 CFR part 29, subpart F, State DOTs must certify to the FHWA that they will provide a drug free... research funds by the State DOTs must be in accordance with 49 CFR 18.32(b). Local government...

  7. Trends in Funding for Dissertation Field Research: Why Do Political Science and Sociology Students Win so Few Awards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwala, Rina; Teitelbaum, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Despite the size and growth of political science and sociology relative to other disciplines, political science and sociology graduate students have received a declining share of funding for dissertation field research in recent years. Specifically, political science and sociology students are losing out to competitive applicants from…

  8. A Review of Research on Prospective Teachers' Learning about Children's Mathematical Thinking and Cultural Funds of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Erin E.; Drake, Corey

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have studied the preparation of elementary teachers to teach mathematics to students from diverse racial, ethnic, and linguistic backgrounds by focusing either on teachers' learning about children's mathematical thinking (CMT) or, less frequently, about children's cultural funds of knowledge (CFoK) related to mathematics. Despite this…

  9. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing...

  10. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing...

  11. 21 CFR 20.105 - Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testing and research conducted by or with funds provided by the Food and Drug Administration. 20.105 Section 20.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Availability of Specific Categories of Records § 20.105 Testing...

  12. A small grant funding program to promote innovation at an academic research hospital.

    PubMed

    Orrell, Kelsey; Yankanah, Rosanna; Heon, Elise; Wright, James G

    2015-10-01

    Innovation is important for the improvement of health care. A small grant innovation funding program was implemented by the Hospital for Sick Children(SickKids) for the Perioperative Services group, awarding relatively small funds (approximately $10 000) in order to stimulate innovation. Of 48 applications,26 (54.2%) different innovation projects were funded for a total allocation of $227 870. This program demonstrated the ability of small grants to stimulate many applications with novel ideas, a wide range of innovations and reasonable academic productivity. PMID:26384144

  13. A small grant funding program to promote innovation at an academic research hospital

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, Kelsey; Yankanah, Rosanna; Heon, Elise; Wright, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Innovation is important for the improvement of health care. A small grant innovation funding program was implemented by the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) for the Perioperative Services group, awarding relatively small funds (approximately $10 000) in order to stimulate innovation. Of 48 applications, 26 (54.2%) different innovation projects were funded for a total allocation of $227 870. This program demonstrated the ability of small grants to stimulate many applications with novel ideas, a wide range of innovations and reasonable academic productivity. PMID:26384144

  14. Simplifying the Process for Finding Research Funding: A Cross-Campus Collaboration at a Large Academic Institution.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Merle; Smith, Judith E; Curtis, Ann; Puffenberger, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the collaboration between the University of Michigan's M-Library and the University of Michigan Medical School's Office of Research in developing a comprehensive online guide and consultation service. The guide was designed to assist researchers in finding available funding from both internal and external sources and was based on the results of a survey distributed by the Office of Research. Because many of the respondents were unaware of internal funding programs and needed more information on resources external to the university as well, the guide included information on both possibilities in an easy-to-use format that researchers use independently without needing further instruction, although personal consultation was also offered when necessary. PMID:26794196

  15. DOE FY 2010 Budget Request and Recovery Act Funding for Energy Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment: Analysis and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Bunn, Matthew

    2009-06-01

    The combination of the FY 2010 budget request for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the portion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) funds likely to be available in 2010 would (assuming that they would be split evenly between FY 2010 and FY 2011) result in a doubling in funding available for energy research, development, and deployment (ERD and D) from $3.6 billion in FY 2009 to $7.2 billion in FY 2010. Without the stimulus funds, DOE ERD and D investments in FY 2010 would decrease very slightly when compared to FY 2009. Excluding the $7.5 billion for the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loans in FY 2009, the FY 2010 budget request for deployment represents a 33 percent decrease from the FY 2009 levels from $520 million to $350 million. This decrease is largely due to the large amounts of funds appropriated in ARRA for DOE deployment programs, or $23.6 billion, which are three times greater than those appropriated in the FY 2009 budget. These very substantial funding amounts, coupled with the broad range of institutional innovations the administration is putting in place and movement toward putting a price on carbon emissions, will help accelerate innovation for a broad range of energy technologies. DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) and the Energy Innovation Hubs are important initiatives that could contribute to two weak points of the government's energy innovation effort, namely funding high-risk projects in transformational technologies and in companies that have not traditionally worked with the government and strengthening the integration of basic and applied research in priority areas. Increasing the funding for different types of energy storage research, providing some support for exploring opportunities in coal-to-liquids with carbon capture and storage (CCS) and coal-and-biomass-to-liquids with CCS, and reducing funding for fission RD and D are other actions that Congress could take in the short

  16. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Harris, Holly R; Bergkvist, Leif; Wolk, Alicja

    2016-06-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund/American Association for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) has published eight nutrition-related recommendations for the prevention of cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined these recommendations by breast cancer hormone receptor subtype and only one case-control study has included the dietary supplements recommendation in their evaluation. We investigated whether adherence to the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations was associated with breast cancer incidence, overall and by hormone receptor subtype, in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Among 31,514 primarily postmenopausal women diet and lifestyle factors were assessed with a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. A score was constructed based on adherence to the recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, energy density, plant foods, animal foods, alcoholic drinks and dietary supplements (score range 0-7). Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). During 15 years of follow-up 1,388 cases of breast cancer were identified. Women who met six to seven recommendations had a 51% decreased risk of breast cancer compared to women meeting only zero to two recommendations (95% CI = 0.35-0.70). The association between each additional recommendation met and breast cancer risk was strongest for the ER-positive/PR-positive subtype (HR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.79-0.94), while for the ER-negative/PR-negative subtype the individual recommendations regarding plant and animal foods were most strongly associated with reduced risk. Our findings support that adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations reduces breast cancer risk in a population of primarily postmenopausal women. Promoting these recommendations to the public could help reduce breast cancer incidence. PMID:26804371

  17. Medical relevance of UK-funded non-human primate research published from January 1997 to July 2012.

    PubMed

    Moore, Edward

    2014-04-16

    In 2012, the Bateson Review of research using non-human primates (NHPs) recommended the commissioning of a working group to identify and follow-up the results of UK-funded NHP research of potential benefit for human health (Recommendation 4), but the Medical Research Council (MRC) has postponed implementation of the recommendation. Information on results and potential benefits of NHP research therefore remains unavailable. To fill this gap in knowledge, this study identified all published NHP research studies funded by the MRC, Wellcome Trust and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) from January 1997 to July 2012 and assessed full texts for medical relevance. In total, 284 papers were identified, of which 51 (18%) involved invasive NHP research, compared to 176 (61%) which used NHP tissue and cell lines, indicating a shift in research emphasis from invasive whole animal to cell-based research. Of these studies, 98 (35%) were medically relevant, of which 22 had potential therapeutic or public health applications. The relatively low proportion of medical studies together with the small number of applied studies raises questions over the level of investment in medical research and the effectiveness of knowledge transfer from basic to applied research. Implementation of the Bateson Review's Recommendation 4 would address these questions. PMID:24739383

  18. Medical relevance of UK-funded non-human primate research published from January 1997 to July 2012

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the Bateson Review of research using non-human primates (NHPs) recommended the commissioning of a working group to identify and follow-up the results of UK-funded NHP research of potential benefit for human health (Recommendation 4), but the Medical Research Council (MRC) has postponed implementation of the recommendation. Information on results and potential benefits of NHP research therefore remains unavailable. To fill this gap in knowledge, this study identified all published NHP research studies funded by the MRC, Wellcome Trust and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) from January 1997 to July 2012 and assessed full texts for medical relevance. In total, 284 papers were identified, of which 51 (18%) involved invasive NHP research, compared to 176 (61%) which used NHP tissue and cell lines, indicating a shift in research emphasis from invasive whole animal to cell-based research. Of these studies, 98 (35%) were medically relevant, of which 22 had potential therapeutic or public health applications. The relatively low proportion of medical studies together with the small number of applied studies raises questions over the level of investment in medical research and the effectiveness of knowledge transfer from basic to applied research. Implementation of the Bateson Review’s Recommendation 4 would address these questions. PMID:24739383

  19. Selectivity of physiotherapist programs in the United States does not differ by institutional funding source or research activity level

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to compare selectivity characteristics among institution characteristics to determine differences by institutional funding source (public vs. private) or research activity level (research vs. non-research). Methods: This study included information provided by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) and the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy. Data were extracted from all students who graduated in 2011 from accredited physical therapy programs in the United States. The public and private designations of the institutions were extracted directly from the classifications from the ‘CAPTE annual accreditation report,’ and high and low research activity was determined based on Carnegie classifications. The institutions were classified into four groups: public/research intensive, public/non-research intensive, private/research intensive, and private/non-research intensive. Descriptive and comparison analyses with post hoc testing were performed to determine whether there were statistically significant differences among the four groups. Results: Although there were statistically significant baseline grade point average differences among the four categorized groups, there were no significant differences in licensure pass rates or for any of the selectivity variables of interest. Conclusion: Selectivity characteristics did not differ by institutional funding source (public vs. private) or research activity level (research vs. non-research). This suggests that the concerns about reduced selectivity among physiotherapy programs, specifically the types that are experiencing the largest proliferation, appear less warranted. PMID:27079201

  20. NADA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report number 19: The US government technical report and the transfer of federally funded aerospace R/D: An analysis of five studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the 'NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project'. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reprts and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from five studies of our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report and close with a brief overview of on-going research into the use of the U.S. government technical report as a rhetorical device for transferring federally funded aerospace R&D.

  1. Is There a Relationship between Research Sponsorship and Publication Impact? An Analysis of Funding Acknowledgments in Nanotechnology Papers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jue; Shapira, Philip

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes funding acknowledgments in scientific papers to investigate relationships between research sponsorship and publication impacts. We identify acknowledgments to research sponsors for nanotechnology papers published in the Web of Science during a one-year sample period. We examine the citations accrued by these papers and the journal impact factors of their publication titles. The results show that publications from grant sponsored research exhibit higher impacts in terms of both journal ranking and citation counts than research that is not grant sponsored. We discuss the method and models used, and the insights provided by this approach as well as it limitations. PMID:25695739

  2. Funding Research in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: Summary of a Panel Discussion at the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Cherney, Alan R; Marin, Jennifer R; Brown, Jeremy; Anise, Ayodola; Krosnick, Steven; Henriksen, Kerm; Lewis, Roger J; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    As part of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization," a panel of representatives from the National Institute of Health's Office of Emergency Care Research, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute was assembled to discuss future opportunities for funding research in this particular area of interest. Representatives from these agencies and organizations discussed their missions and priorities and how they distribute funding. They also addressed questions on mechanisms for new and established researchers to secure future funding. PMID:26567519

  3. How Does National Scientific Funding Support Emerging Interdisciplinary Research: A Comparison Study of Big Data Research in the US and China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L.; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    How do funding agencies ramp-up their capabilities to support research in a rapidly emerging area? This paper addresses this question through a comparison of research proposals awarded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) in the field of Big Data. Big data is characterized by its size and difficulties in capturing, curating, managing and processing it in reasonable periods of time. Although Big Data has its legacy in longstanding information technology research, the field grew very rapidly over a short period. We find that the extent of interdisciplinarity is a key aspect in how these funding agencies address the rise of Big Data. Our results show that both agencies have been able to marshal funding to support Big Data research in multiple areas, but the NSF relies to a greater extent on multi-program funding from different fields. We discuss how these interdisciplinary approaches reflect the research hot-spots and innovation pathways in these two countries. PMID:27219466

  4. How Does National Scientific Funding Support Emerging Interdisciplinary Research: A Comparison Study of Big Data Research in the US and China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    How do funding agencies ramp-up their capabilities to support research in a rapidly emerging area? This paper addresses this question through a comparison of research proposals awarded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) in the field of Big Data. Big data is characterized by its size and difficulties in capturing, curating, managing and processing it in reasonable periods of time. Although Big Data has its legacy in longstanding information technology research, the field grew very rapidly over a short period. We find that the extent of interdisciplinarity is a key aspect in how these funding agencies address the rise of Big Data. Our results show that both agencies have been able to marshal funding to support Big Data research in multiple areas, but the NSF relies to a greater extent on multi-program funding from different fields. We discuss how these interdisciplinary approaches reflect the research hot-spots and innovation pathways in these two countries. PMID:27219466

  5. Does a Change in Health Research Funding Policy Related to the Integration of Sex and Gender Have an Impact?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joy; Sharman, Zena; Vissandjée, Bilkis; Stewart, Donna E.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the impact of a requirement introduced in December 2010 that all applicants to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research indicate whether their research designs accounted for sex or gender. We aimed to inform research policy by understanding the extent to which applicants across health research disciplines accounted for sex and gender. We conducted a descriptive statistical analysis to identify trends in application data from three research funding competitions (December 2010, June 2011, and December 2011) (N = 1459). We also conducted a qualitative thematic analysis of applicants' responses. Here we show that the proportion of applicants responding affirmatively to the questions on sex and gender increased over time (48% in December 2011, compared to 26% in December 2010). Biomedical researchers were least likely to report accounting for sex and gender. Analysis by discipline-specific peer review panel showed variation in the likelihood that a given panel will fund grants with a stated focus on sex or gender. These findings suggest that mandatory questions are one way of encouraging the uptake of sex and gender in health research, yet there remain persistent disparities across disciplines. These disparities represent opportunities for policy intervention by health research funders. PMID:24964040

  6. Does a change in health research funding policy related to the integration of sex and gender have an impact?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joy; Sharman, Zena; Vissandjée, Bilkis; Stewart, Donna E

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the impact of a requirement introduced in December 2010 that all applicants to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research indicate whether their research designs accounted for sex or gender. We aimed to inform research policy by understanding the extent to which applicants across health research disciplines accounted for sex and gender. We conducted a descriptive statistical analysis to identify trends in application data from three research funding competitions (December 2010, June 2011, and December 2011) (N = 1459). We also conducted a qualitative thematic analysis of applicants' responses. Here we show that the proportion of applicants responding affirmatively to the questions on sex and gender increased over time (48% in December 2011, compared to 26% in December 2010). Biomedical researchers were least likely to report accounting for sex and gender. Analysis by discipline-specific peer review panel showed variation in the likelihood that a given panel will fund grants with a stated focus on sex or gender. These findings suggest that mandatory questions are one way of encouraging the uptake of sex and gender in health research, yet there remain persistent disparities across disciplines. These disparities represent opportunities for policy intervention by health research funders. PMID:24964040

  7. Educational Funding and Student Outcomes: The Relationship as Evidenced by State-Level Data. Research Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ted

    2014-01-01

    This report shows the impact of various school funding measures on student outcomes measured by NAEP, ACT, and SAT scores, the four-year cohort graduation rate, and percent of the population ages 18-24 with at least a high school diploma. State-level data for the United States from 2005 through 2014 as available is utilized to establish the nature…

  8. Demand, Funding, and Prestige: Driving the Use of Undergraduate Tuition Discounting in Research 1 Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Greg R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine (a) if high school enrollment demand, governmental funding capacity, or institutional prestige were predictors of the use of tuition discounts, (b) if increases in tuition discounts stimulated institutional spending capacity, and (c) if tuition discounts trends were notably different if examined from a…

  9. Subjective Variables Affecting Funding Decisions by Federal Research & Development Agencies: The Grantsmanship Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapek, Raymond A.

    1984-01-01

    There are many misconceptions about how funding decisions are made within federal agencies. Observations of how bias creeps into an otherwise objective evaluation process are presented, and hints are offered on improving the probability of receiving federal support. (Author/MLW)

  10. Funding Universities for Efficiency and Equity: Research Findings versus Petty Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Psacharopoulos, George

    2008-01-01

    The present paper starts by discussing the principles of public funding of universities. The size of the social returns to investment in education gives an indication regarding the most efficient use of resources, while the difference between the private and the social rates relates to issues of equity. The available evidence is contrasted to…

  11. The SBHE Guideline for Operating Budget Funding. Postsecondary Education Research Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board for Higher Education, Annapolis.

    New Maryland State Board for Higher Education funding guidelines for public four-year institutions in Maryland are presented, along with information on the development of the guidelines. Four guidelines models were studied and evaluated by criteria endorsed by state and university officials. To derive the guidelines, each program area…

  12. At-Risk Funding in Kansas: Free Lunch Status and At-Risk Status. Research Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Association of School Boards, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The percentage of public school students qualifying for free or reduced price meals has increased from about 33 percent to nearly 50 percent over the past 15 years. Kansas uses the number of students eligible for free (but not reduced-price) lunch to determine the amount of funding school districts receive to provide for services to at-risk…

  13. The impact of a streamlined funding application process on application time: two cross-sectional surveys of Australian researchers

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Adrian G; Graves, Nicholas; Clarke, Philip; Herbert, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine if streamlining a medical research funding application process saved time for applicants. Design Cross-sectional surveys before and after the streamlining. Setting The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia. Participants Researchers who submitted one or more NHMRC Project Grant applications in 2012 or 2014. Main outcome measures Average researcher time spent preparing an application and the total time for all applications in working days. Results The average time per application increased from 34 working days before streamlining (95% CI 33 to 35) to 38 working days after streamlining (95% CI 37 to 39; mean difference 4 days, bootstrap p value <0.001). The estimated total time spent by all researchers on applications after streamlining was 614 working years, a 67-year increase from before streamlining. Conclusions Streamlined applications were shorter but took longer to prepare on average. Researchers may be allocating a fixed amount of time to preparing funding applications based on their expected return, or may be increasing their time in response to increased competition. Many potentially productive years of researcher time are still being lost to preparing failed applications. PMID:25596201

  14. The State of Federal Research Funding in Genetics as Reflected by Members of the Genetics Society of America.

    PubMed

    Rine, Jasper; Fagen, Adam P

    2015-08-01

    Scientific progress runs on the intellect, curiosity, and passion of its practitioners fueled by the research dollars of its sponsors. The concern over research funding in biology in general and genetics in particular led us to survey the membership of the Genetics Society of America for information about the federal support of genetics at the level of individual principal investigators. The results paint a mosaic of circumstances-some good, others not so good-that describes some of our present challenges with sufficient detail to suggest useful steps that could address the challenges. PMID:26178966

  15. The State of Federal Research Funding in Genetics as Reflected by Members of the Genetics Society of America

    PubMed Central

    Rine, Jasper; Fagen, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific progress runs on the intellect, curiosity, and passion of its practitioners fueled by the research dollars of its sponsors. The concern over research funding in biology in general and genetics in particular led us to survey the membership of the Genetics Society of America for information about the federal support of genetics at the level of individual principal investigators. The results paint a mosaic of circumstances—some good, others not so good—that describes some of our present challenges with sufficient detail to suggest useful steps that could address the challenges. PMID:26178966

  16. Stroke Research in China over the Past Decade: Analysis of NSFC Funding.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lijun; He, Dongsheng; Han, Lijuan; Cao, Heqi

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the projects and published studies funded by NSFC (National Natural Science Foundation of China) in the field of stoke. Further more, we searched the published papers supported by NSFC in the last decade using the keywords of "stroke" or "cerebrovascular disease" and analyzed the results according to the topics associated with the mechanisms of ischemic brain injury, novel techniques and new drugs, medical imaging, translational medicine, and traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:26040422

  17. Human rights and biomedical research funding for the developing world: covering state obligations under the right to health.

    PubMed

    Attaran, A

    1999-01-01

    The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) obligates states to "take steps individually and through international assistance and co-operation. to the maximum of ¿their available resources" to realize the right to health. This obligation, however, is often dismissed because (1) realizing rights through "international assistance" is thought to intrude on state sovereignty and (2) it is impossible to say what is demanded by the "maximum of. available resources." These problems can be circumvented by "reading down" the mutual assistance clause, so that it demands only that steps be taken on a state's own territory, with its pecuniary resources. Industrialized states could use public funds to research diseases such as malaria, AIDS, and tuberculosis, but they have failed to consider their ICESCR obligations in making science funding decisions. These failures point to ubiquitous and grievous violations of international law. PMID:10438554

  18. From "Publish or Perish" to "Grant or Perish": Examining Grantsmanship in Communication and the Pressures on Communication Faculty to Procure External Funding for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musambira, George; Collins, Steven; Brown, Tim; Voss, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Although communication program faculty have traditionally not enjoyed large grants for research, administrators are pressuring them to garner external funding. This article examines the success rate of securing external funding that communication administrators reported for their units. Results show that while the pressure has increased on most…

  19. Announced Changes to the Funding Formula for 2012-13--What Do They Really Mean? BCTF Research Report. Section V. 2011-EF-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    A news release by the BC Ministry of Education on December 9, 2011 describes upcoming changes to the funding formula for the 2012-13 Operating Grants and announces increases in CommunityLink funding for 2012-13 and 2013-14. This research report analyzes the potential impact of these changes and compares BC's performance in improving education…

  20. The origin of the medical research grant in the United States: the Rockefeller Foundation and the NIH Extramural Funding Program.

    PubMed

    Schneider, William H

    2015-04-01

    The establishment of National Institutes of Health (NIH) extramural grants in the second half of the twentieth century marked a signal shift in support for medical research in the United States and created an influential model for the rest of the world. A similar landmark development occurred in the first half of the twentieth century with the creation of the Rockefeller Foundation and its funding programs for medical research. The programs and support of the foundation had a dramatic impact on medical research in the United States and globally. This paper examines early connections between these two developments. The NIH grants have usually been seen as having their roots primarily in the government programs of the Second World War. This article finds direct and indirect influence by the Rockefeller Foundation, as well as parallel developments in these two monumental programs of support for medical research. PMID:25862750

  1. Patient and Other Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Funded Studies of Patients with Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cukor, Daniel; Cohen, Lewis M; Cope, Elizabeth L; Ghahramani, Nasrollah; Hedayati, S Susan; Hynes, Denise M; Shah, Vallabh O; Tentori, Francesca; Unruh, Mark; Bobelu, Jeanette; Cohen, Scott; Dember, Laura M; Faber, Thomas; Fischer, Michael J; Gallardo, Rani; Germain, Michael J; Ghahate, Donica; Grote, Nancy; Hartwell, Lori; Heagerty, Patrick; Kimmel, Paul L; Kutner, Nancy; Lawson, Susan; Marr, Lisa; Nelson, Robert G; Porter, Anna C; Sandy, Phillip; Struminger, Bruce B; Subramanian, Lalita; Weisbord, Steve; Young, Bessie; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Including target populations in the design and implementation of research trials has been one response to the growing health disparities endemic to our health care system, as well as an aid to study generalizability. One type of community-based participatory research is "Patient Centered-Research", in which patient perspectives on the germane research questions and methodologies are incorporated into the study. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has mandated that meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement be incorporated into all applications. As of March 2015, PCORI funded seven clinically-focused studies of patients with kidney disease. The goal of this paper is to synthesize the experiences of these studies to gain an understanding of how meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement can occur in clinical research of kidney diseases, and what the key barriers are to its implementation. Our collective experience suggests that successful implementation of a patient- and stakeholder-engaged research paradigm involves: (1) defining the roles and process for the incorporation of input; (2) identifying the particular patients and other stakeholders; (3) engaging patients and other stakeholders so they appreciate the value of their own participation and have personal investment in the research process; and (4) overcoming barriers and challenges that arise and threaten the productivity of the collaboration. It is our hope that the experiences of these studies will further interest and capacity for incorporating patient and stakeholder perspectives in research of kidney diseases. PMID:27197911

  2. Federal Funds for Research and Development. Fiscal Years 1982, 1983, and 1984. Volume XXXII. Detailed Statistical Tables. Surveys of Science Resources Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    Detailed statistical tables on federal funds for research and development (R&D) are provided in this document. Tables are organized into the following sections: research, development, and R&D plant; R&D--agency, character of work, and performer; total research--agency, performer, and field of science; basic research--agency, performer, and field…

  3. Federal Funds for Research and Development: Fiscal Years 1981, 1982, and 1983. Volume XXXI. Detailed Statistical Tables. Surveys of Science Resources Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    Detailed statistical tables on federal funds for research and development (R&D) activities are provided in this document. Tables are organized into the following sections: research, development, and R&D plant; R&D- agency, character of work, and performer; total research- agency, performer, and field of science; basic research- agency, performer,…

  4. Successful Education Research: Guidelines for Getting Going, Getting Funded and Getting Published

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deacon, Roger; Parker, Ben

    2009-01-01

    As part of the Teacher Education Research and Development Programme (TEP), a project focusing on "Stimulation of practice-based teacher education research", was undertaken by Dr. Roger Deacon and Dr. Ben Parker, in conjunction with the Centre for Education Policy Development (CEPD). As part of the project, a set of research guidelines entitled,…

  5. The Efficacy of Strategy in the Competition for Research Funding in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litwin, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    A prestigious reputation is the primary success factor in higher education because it attracts resources necessary to sustain growth. Among research-intensive universities (RIUs), research performance is a key driver of institutional reputation. Achieving an accelerating rate of growth of research performance is the desired objective of all RIUs…

  6. Competing for Pharmaceutical Industry Funds: Planning Issues for University Research Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Gary; And Others

    1987-01-01

    University research managers can take the lead role in strategic planning statements. As they relate to the development of capability statements, specific planning issues concerning research personnel and management support services are examined. Examples of how university research managers can use capability statements for marketing are…

  7. Playing Fair?: Minority Research Institutions Call for NIH to Address Funding Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    When Ph.D. science and health researchers are seeking financial support for their health science studies, more often than not they apply to the federal government's National Institutes of Health (NIH) for an RO1 research grant, which boosts a project's standing in the research community as well as the career of the applicant. Even before the NIH…

  8. Matching taxpayer funding to population health needs.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Michael

    2015-04-10

    In an era of economic recession and budget cutbacks,Americans may be curious to know how the government is distributing their taxes for medical research, relative to their health needs. Previous reports recommended that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) allocate funding proportional to the burden-of-illness from diseases and conditions. But the most recent publicly available data on burden-of-illness and NIH funding show that infectious diseases are still overfunded relative to their health burden on the American population, especially HIV/AIDS. By contrast, several lifestyle/environmental health conditions are still underfunded, including importantly: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, stroke, heart disease, depression, violence, and road injury. NIH's allocation of research funding is often disproportionate to the current health needs of the American people. Greater decision-making involvement of Congress and the public would be helpful, if Americans want their taxes spent fairly on the illnesses that actually burden their health. PMID:25858062

  9. Institutions’ Expectations for Researchers’ Self-Funding, Federal Grant Holding and Private Industry Involvement: Manifold Drivers of Self-Interest and Researcher Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Brian C.; Crain, A. Lauren; Anderson, Melissa S.; De Vries, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    Background Private industry involvement is viewed as tainting research with self-interest, whereas public funding is generally well-regarded. Yet, dependence on “soft money” also triggers researcher and university self-interest. No empirical research has compared these factors’ effects on academic researchers’ behaviors. Methods In 2006–2007, a survey was mailed to 5,000 randomly selected biomedical and social science faculty at 50 top-tier research universities in the United States. Measures included a university’s expectations or nonexpectations that researchers obtain external grant funding, the receipt or nonreceipt of public research funding, any relationships with private industry, and research-related behaviors ranging from the ideal, to the questionable, to misconduct. Results Being expected to obtain external funding and receiving federal research funding were both associated with significantly higher reports of 1 or more of 10 serious misbehaviors (P < .05) and neglectful or careless behaviors (P < .001). Researchers with federal funding were more likely than were those without to report having carelessly or inappropriately reviewed papers or proposals (9.6% vs. 3.9%; P < .001). Those with private industry involvement were more likely than were those without to report 1 or more of 10 serious misbehaviors (28.5% vs. 21.5%; P = .005) and to have engaged in misconduct (12.2% vs. 7.1%; P = .004); they also were less likely to have always reported financial conflicts (96.0% vs. 98.6%, P < .001). Conclusions The free play of university and individual self-interests, combined with and contributing to the intense competition for research funding, may be undermining scientific integrity. PMID:19858802

  10. Contracts, grants and funding summary of supersonic cruise research and variable-cycle engine technology programs, 1972 - 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.; Varholic, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    NASA-SCAR (AST) program was initiated in 1972 at the direct request of the Executive Office of the White House and Congress following termination of the U.S. SST program. The purpose of SCR was to conduct a focused research and technology program on those technology programs which contributed to the SST termination and, also, to provide an expanded data base for future civil and military supersonic transport aircraft. Funding for the Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) Program was initiated in fiscal year 1973 and terminated in fiscal year 1981. The program was implemented through contracts and grants with industry, universities, and by in-house investigations at the NASA/OAST centers. The studies included system studies and five disciplines: propulsion, stratospheric emissions impact, materials and structures, aerodynamic performance, and stability and control. The NASA/Lewis Variable-Cycle Engine (VCE) Component Program was initiated in 1976 to augment the SCR program in the area of propulsion. After about 2 years, the title was changed to VCE Technology program. The total number of contractors and grantees on record at the AST office in 1982 was 101 for SCR and 4 for VCE. This paper presents a compilation of all the contracts and grants as well as the funding summaries for both programs.

  11. From free to free market: cost recovery in federally funded clinical research.

    PubMed

    McCammon, Margaret G; Fogg, Thomas T; Jacobsen, Lynda; Roache, John; Sampson, Royce; Bower, Cynthia L

    2012-07-01

    In a climate of increased expectation for the translation of research, academic clinical research units are looking at new ways to streamline their operation and maintain effective translational support services. Clinical research, although undeniably expensive, is an essential step in the translation of any medical breakthrough, and as a result, many academic clinical research units are actively looking to expand their clinical services despite financial pressures. We examine some of the hybrid academic-business models in 19 clinical research centers within the Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium that are emerging to address the issue of cost recovery of clinical research that is supported by the United States federal government. We identify initiatives that have succeeded or failed, essential supporting and regulatory components, and lessons learned from experience to design an optimal cost recovery model and a timeline for its implementation. PMID:22764204

  12. From Free to Free Market: Cost Recovery in Federally Funded Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, Margaret G.; Fogg, Thomas T.; Jacobsen, Lynda; Roache, John; Sampson, Royce; Bower, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    In a climate of increased expectation for the translation of research, academic clinical research units are looking at new ways to streamline their operation and maintain effective translational support services. Clinical research, although undeniably expensive, is an essential step in the translation of any medical breakthrough, and as a result, many academic clinical research units are actively looking to expand their clinical services despite financial pressures. We examine some of the hybrid academic-business models in 19 clinical research centers within the Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium that are emerging to address the issue of cost recovery of clinical research that is supported by the United States federal government. We identify initiatives that have succeeded or failed, essential supporting and regulatory components, and lessons learned from experience to design an optimal cost recovery model and a timeline for its implementation. PMID:22764204

  13. NEAMS-Funded University Research in Support of TREAT Modeling and Simulation, FY15

    SciTech Connect

    Dehart, Mark; Mausolff, Zander; Goluoglu, Sedat; Prince, Zach; Ragusa, Jean; Haugen, Carl; Ellis, Matt; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord; Alberti, Anthony; Palmer, Todd

    2015-09-01

    This report summarizes university research activities performed in support of TREAT modeling and simulation research. It is a compilation of annual research reports from four universities: University of Florida, Texas A&M University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Oregon State University. The general research topics are, respectively, (1) 3-D time-dependent transport with TDKENO/KENO-VI, (2) implementation of the Improved Quasi-Static method in Rattlesnake/MOOSE for time-dependent radiation transport approximations, (3) improved treatment of neutron physics representations within TREAT using OpenMC, and (4) steady state modeling of the minimum critical core of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT).

  14. Eliciting and activating funds of knowledge in an environmental science community college classroom: An action research study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Niel, John J.

    Many non-traditional students are currently underperforming in college and yet may have untapped knowledge and skills that could support their academic success if appropriately utilized. Previous practices that students experience as a part of their lives are what Gonzales and other researchers call "funds of knowledge" (FOK). There is ample evidence to show that utilization of students' FOK in K-12 instructional contexts can be beneficial. In contrast, little formal FOK research has been done with higher education students. To address this gap, this study explores how environmental college courses could be designed so as to better elicit and capitalize on students' FOK, with the ultimate goal of increasing student engagement and learning. More specifically, using an action research paradigm, I designed, implemented and studied an intervention in two sections of the required environmental science course I taught in Fall 2009 at the community college where I am employed. The intervention consisted of two phases: (1) eliciting FOK from the students enrolled in one section of the course through a draft survey, and (2) refining that survey tool in order to better elicit FOK, development of other methods of elicitation of FOK and activating (or incorporating) the FOK thus identified as relevant to enhance the learning experience of the students in both sections of the course. The designs of the intervention as well as data collection and analysis were informed by the following research questions: Q1. What are effective strategies for eliciting FOK that may be generalized to the practices of other college instructors? Q2. What relevant FOK do students bring to this class? Q3. What were instances where FOK were activated in the course? Q4. What are effective strategies for activating FOK that may be generalized to the practices of other college instructors? Q5. What evidence was there that students took up new practices due to the intervention? Data were collected from a

  15. The Competitive Funding of University Research: The Case of Finnish Science Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tammi, Timo

    2009-01-01

    The present European higher education policy and research policy can be characterized as emphasizing external financing of universities, competition between and within universities, and the need for a more practical and economically profitable output from research and education. A theoretical framework of analysing the impacts of this new…

  16. Evaluation and Funding of University Research--Where Does the Need Lie?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archambault, Jean-Marie

    1985-01-01

    While the model of peer evaluation has limits in its use in research resource allocation, it is vital for the equilibrium of the science structure and the university's mission, as evidenced in the University of Quebec at Trois Rivieres's pilot exercise in research evaluation. (Author/MSE)

  17. An Innovative Program to Fund Health-Oriented Student Projects and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Ronald F.; Thompson, Sharon E.

    2004-01-01

    The price of a university education has increased over the years. As a result, students often graduate with thousands of dollars of debt. Conducting research or developing class projects that require personal expenditures can be overwhelming, if not impossible. Participation in research and in developing projects can enhance a student's…

  18. Library Services Funding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorig, Jonathan A.

    2004-01-01

    collect as much of the relevant data as possible. Hopefully this dataset will permit the research units at the GRC, and library administration as well, to make informed decisions about future library funding. Prior to the creation of the actual dataset, I established a comprehensive list of the library s print and online journal subscriptions. This list will be useful outside the context of the cost analysis project, as an addition to the library website. The cost analysis dataset s primary fields are: journal name, vendor, publisher, ISSN (International Standard Serial Number, to uniquely identify the titles), stand-alone price, and indication as to the presence of the journal in current GRC Technical Library consortium membership subscriptions. The dataset will hopefully facilitate comparisons between the stand-alone journal prices and the cost of shared journal subscriptions for groups of titles.

  19. 45 CFR 149.45 - Funding limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Funding limitation. 149.45 Section 149.45 Public... Funding limitation. (a) Based on the projected or actual availability of program funding, the Secretary... accepting applications or satisfying reimbursement requests based on the availability of funding is...

  20. 45 CFR 149.45 - Funding limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Funding limitation. 149.45 Section 149.45 Public... Funding limitation. (a) Based on the projected or actual availability of program funding, the Secretary... accepting applications or satisfying reimbursement requests based on the availability of funding is...

  1. 45 CFR 149.45 - Funding limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Funding limitation. 149.45 Section 149.45 Public... Funding limitation. (a) Based on the projected or actual availability of program funding, the Secretary... accepting applications or satisfying reimbursement requests based on the availability of funding is...

  2. 45 CFR 149.45 - Funding limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Funding limitation. 149.45 Section 149.45 Public... Funding limitation. (a) Based on the projected or actual availability of program funding, the Secretary... accepting applications or satisfying reimbursement requests based on the availability of funding is...

  3. 45 CFR 149.45 - Funding limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Funding limitation. 149.45 Section 149.45 Public... Funding limitation. (a) Based on the projected or actual availability of program funding, the Secretary... accepting applications or satisfying reimbursement requests based on the availability of funding is...

  4. 43 CFR 2.25 - How will a bureau handle a request for Federally-funded research data in the possession of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Federally-funded research data in the possession of a private entity? 2.25 Section 2.25 Public Lands... findings are used by a bureau in developing an agency action, e.g., a policy or regulation, research data... for such research data, the bureau will require the recipient to provide the information to it...

  5. 43 CFR 2.25 - How will a bureau handle a request for Federally-funded research data in the possession of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Federally-funded research data in the possession of a private entity? 2.25 Section 2.25 Public Lands... findings are used by a bureau in developing an agency action, e.g., a policy or regulation, research data... for such research data, the bureau will require the recipient to provide the information to it...

  6. Federal Funds for Research and Development: Fiscal Years 1983, 1984, and 1985. Volume XXXIII. Detailed Statistical Tables. Surveys of Science Resources Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    Detailed statistical tables showing the funding levels of 92 federal agencies for research and development (R&D) are provided in this document. These tables are organized into the following sections: research, development, and R&D plant; R&D agency, character of work, and performer; total basic and applied applied research--agency, performer, and…

  7. NIH research funding and early career physician scientists: continuing challenges in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Howard H; Deschamps, Anne M

    2014-03-01

    Physician scientists (researchers with either M.D. or M.D.-Ph.D. degrees) have the unique potential to combine clinical perspectives with scientific insight, and their participation in biomedical research has long been an important topic for policymakers and educators. Given the recent changes in the research environment, an update and extension of earlier studies of this population was needed. Our findings show that physician scientists are less likely to take a major role in biomedical research than they were in the past. The number of physician scientists receiving postdoctoral research training and career development awards is at an all-time low. Physician scientists today, on average, receive their first major research award (R01 equivalent) at a later age than in the 1980s. The number of first-time R01-equivalent awards to physicians is at the same level as it was 30 yr ago, but physicians now represent a smaller percentage of the grant recipients. The long-term decline in the number of physicians entering research careers was temporarily halted during the period of substantial U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget growth (1998-2003). These gains are lost, however, in the subsequent years when NIH budgets failed to keep pace with rising costs. PMID:24297696

  8. Invited commentary on … Rethinking funding priorities in mental health research.

    PubMed

    Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2016-06-01

    This commentary takes up the notion proposed by Lewis-Fernández and colleagues that we need more balance in research priorities. Specifically, our reliance on neurobiology may be misplaced and likely to be unrewarding unless we ensure that: (a) research with better return for patients and the public is also pursued; (b) research findings are put into practice; and (c) we retain a focus on proportionate investment in service provision. Patient, public and economic perspectives should drive the decision making for better investment, and behaviour change might be better targeted at commissioners and policy makers rather than patients and providers. PMID:27251689

  9. 75 FR 80853 - Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... networking and information technologies (NIT) for the health, energy, transportation, and cyberinfrastructure... Technology AGENCY: National Coordination Office (NCO) for the Networking and Information Technology Research... Technology''. ACTION: Request for Information (RFI). SUMMARY: Networking and Information Technology......

  10. Balancing research and funding using value of information and portfolio tools for nanomaterial risk classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Matthew E.; Keisler, Jeffrey M.; Zussblatt, Niels P.; Plourde, Kenton J.; Wender, Ben A.; Linkov, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Risk research for nanomaterials is currently prioritized by means of expert workshops and other deliberative processes. However, analytical techniques that quantify and compare alternative research investments are increasingly recommended. Here, we apply value of information and portfolio decision analysis—methods commonly applied in financial and operations management—to prioritize risk research for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and nanoparticulate silver and titanium dioxide. We modify the widely accepted CB Nanotool hazard evaluation framework, which combines nano- and bulk-material properties into a hazard score, to operate probabilistically with uncertain inputs. Literature is reviewed to develop uncertain estimates for each input parameter, and a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to assess how different research strategies can improve hazard classification. The relative cost of each research experiment is elicited from experts, which enables identification of efficient research portfolios—combinations of experiments that lead to the greatest improvement in hazard classification at the lowest cost. Nanoparticle shape, diameter, solubility and surface reactivity were most frequently identified within efficient portfolios in our results.

  11. Balancing research and funding using value of information and portfolio tools for nanomaterial risk classification.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew E; Keisler, Jeffrey M; Zussblatt, Niels P; Plourde, Kenton J; Wender, Ben A; Linkov, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Risk research for nanomaterials is currently prioritized by means of expert workshops and other deliberative processes. However, analytical techniques that quantify and compare alternative research investments are increasingly recommended. Here, we apply value of information and portfolio decision analysis-methods commonly applied in financial and operations management-to prioritize risk research for multiwalled carbon nanotubes and nanoparticulate silver and titanium dioxide. We modify the widely accepted CB Nanotool hazard evaluation framework, which combines nano- and bulk-material properties into a hazard score, to operate probabilistically with uncertain inputs. Literature is reviewed to develop uncertain estimates for each input parameter, and a Monte Carlo simulation is applied to assess how different research strategies can improve hazard classification. The relative cost of each research experiment is elicited from experts, which enables identification of efficient research portfolios-combinations of experiments that lead to the greatest improvement in hazard classification at the lowest cost. Nanoparticle shape, diameter, solubility and surface reactivity were most frequently identified within efficient portfolios in our results. PMID:26551015

  12. 21st CCLC-Funded Afterschool Programs. Highlights from the Out-of-School Time Database. Research Update, No. 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Erin

    2010-01-01

    The 21st Century Community Learning Centers initiative provides funds for afterschool programs across the country and is the only federal funding source dedicated exclusively to afterschool programming. 21st CCLC-funded programs operate during nonschool hours (i.e., before and after school, summers, holidays, and weekends) and present children…

  13. Expand and Regularize Federal Funding for Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen-Smith, Jason; Scott, Christopher Thomas; McCormick, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has sparked incredible scientific and public excitement, as well as significant controversy. hESCs are pluripotent, which means, in theory, that they can be differentiated into any type of cell found in the human body. Thus, they evoke great enthusiasm about potential clinical applications. They are…

  14. Internal Grant Competitions: A New Opportunity for Research Officers to Build Institutional Funding Portfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balaji, Rengarajan V.; Knisely, Christine; Blazyk, Jack

    2007-01-01

    The Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2005 created an innovative competitive grant program aimed at stimulating faculty to submit more and better NIH research proposals, thereby increasing the probability of success. In this internal competition, three experienced external reviewers critique each proposal and assign a priority…

  15. New Funding Opportunity: Biospecimen Core Resource - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The purpose of this notice is to notify the community that the National Cancer Institute's (NCI’s) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is seeking sources to establish a Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR), capable of receiving, qualifying, processing, and distributing annotated biospecimens.

  16. New Funding Opportunity: Tissue Purchase Order Acquisitions - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is expanding its basic and translational research programs that rely heavily on sufficient availability of high quality, well annotated biospecimens suitable for use in genomic and proteomic studies. The NCI’s overarching goal with such programs is to improve the ability to diagnose, treat, and prevent cancer.

  17. Supportive and Palliative Care Research Funding Opportunities | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Fees on health insurance policies and self-insured plans for the patient-centered outcomes research trust fund. Final regulations.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    This document contains final regulations that implement and provide guidance on the fees imposed by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on issuers of certain health insurance policies and plan sponsors of certain self-insured health plans to fund the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund. These final regulations affect the issuers and plan sponsors that are directed to pay those fees. PMID:23227570

  19. The Challenge of Integrating Climate Research in Government-funded Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinen, M.

    2002-05-01

    Climate and global change research in the US has moved from a decade in which the goal was improvement of our understanding of the complex climate and global change system to one in which we envision the production of products to support decisions in policy circles, economic entities and communities. The scientific community has made clear through scientific planning documents and science reviews, as well as through the international global change organizations, that providing science-based policy advice to government requires research that focuses on a broad suite of global changes and their interactions with regional/local conditions as well as on the policy issue of the moment. For example, water cycle research is critical to improving projections of changes in the intensity, timing and location of precipitation. Thus management agencies as well as traditional science agencies have an important role to play. The breadth of agency expertise required to address such problems means that integration of climate and global change research planning and execution across agencies will be a key challenge for our federal investment and will be critical to our success. Even focused climate priorities are so broad that they require research that is housed in many different agencies. While this makes coordination difficult, it has the advantage of bringing the full spectrum of research capability of the country to bear on climate priorities. Our experience has been that informal coordination mechanisms are adequate when the scope of a research problem is of limited extent--either limited in disciplinary scope or of limited duration. Campaigns to make progress on complex multidisciplinary problems requiring multiyear commitments require more than coordination. They require a formal integration mechanism to take advantage of leverage as well as use the resources of the agencies. Such a mechanism must be responsible for leading an interagency process to develop implementation

  20. JOVE/NASA Funded Search for Aqueously Altered Minor Planets Provides Undergraduates with Valuable Research Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, L.; Leake, M.; Kilgard, R.; Semmes, K.; Alpert, A.

    1997-12-01

    A Joint Venture in Research Grant from NASA has enabled a team of undergraduates from Valdosta State University, lead by Dr. Martha Leake, to spectroscopically and photometrically search for aqueously altered minor planets. To carry out the necessary preparations, calculations, and measurements, students are using CCD and Spectroscopy equipment provided by VSU, a .4-m telescope in Valdosta, in addition to a .9-m telescope at Kitt Peak, belonging to the SARA consortium (Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy). Focusing on primitive C-class asteroids, the team is looking for water of hydration, in the form of absorption bands occurring at specific, previously researched wavelengths. The evidence occurring at these wavelengths suggests the extent of alteration in small solar-system bodies. Equipment being utilized includes an ST-6 and Axiom CCD Cameras, and an Optomechanics 10C spectrograph, and several "intermediate-band" filters to target the specified wavelengths essential to detection o f aqueously altered minerals. Test runs on Valdosta's .4-m are currently being conducted to inspect new equipment and develop analogs for more efficient observation runs on SARA's .9-m telescope. Students were originally chosen on a competitive basis, having to submit formal applications. Three were selected for JOVE research: Roy Kilgard, senior astronomy major; Katherine Semmes, junior physics major; and myself, Lisa Watkins, sophomore astronomy major. Roy Kilgard graduated in the Spring of 1997 with his Astronomy degree, and the position was filled by Brent Collier, a junior Geosciences major at VSU. Students' research is monitored and directed by the project mentor and grant recipient, Dr. Martha Leake.

  1. Public funding for research on antibacterial resistance in the JPIAMR countries, the European Commission, and related European Union agencies: a systematic observational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ruth; Zoubiane, Ghada; Walsh, Desmond; Ward, Rebecca; Goossens, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Antibacterial resistant infections are rising continuously, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. With no new antibiotic classes entering the market and the possibility of returning to the pre-antibiotic era, the Joint Programming Initiative on Antimicrobial Resistance (JPIAMR) was established to address this problem. We aimed to quantify the scale and scope of publicly funded antibacterial resistance research across JPIAMR countries and at the European Union (EU) level to identify gaps and future opportunities. Methods We did a systematic observational analysis examining antibacterial resistance research funding. Databases of funding organisations across 19 countries and at EU level were systematically searched for publicly funded antibacterial resistance research from Jan 1, 2007, to Dec 31, 2013. We categorised studies on the basis of the JPIAMR strategic research agenda's six priority topics (therapeutics, diagnostics, surveillance, transmission, environment, and interventions) and did an observational analysis. Only research funded by public funding bodies was collected and no private organisations were contacted for their investments. Projects in basic, applied, and clinical research, including epidemiological, public health, and veterinary research and trials were identified using keyword searches by organisations, and inclusion criteria were based on the JPIAMR strategic research agenda's six priority topics, using project titles and abstracts as filters. Findings We identified 1243 antibacterial resistance research projects, with a total public investment of €1·3 billion across 19 countries and at EU level, including public investment in the Innovative Medicines Initiative. Of the total amount invested in antibacterial resistance research across the time period, €646·6 million (49·5%) was invested at the national level and €659·2 million (50·5%) at the EU level. When projects were classified under the six

  2. The Impact of NSF-funded Physics Education Research at the University of Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Paula

    2015-03-01

    It is now well known that many students who complete introductory physics courses are unable to apply fundamental concepts in situations that involve qualitative reasoning. Systematic investigations have helped researchers understand why so many students fail to develop robust and coherent conceptual frameworks, and have led to the development of new teaching practices and materials that are far more effective than conventional ones. The Physics Education Group at the University of Washington has played a leading role in raising awareness of the need to improve instruction, and in supporting physics faculty in their efforts to do so. With support from the National Science Foundation, the group has helped build a research base that instructors can draw on, and has produced practical, flexible instructional materials that promote deeper learning in physics classrooms. Both ``Tutorials in Introductory Physics'' (Pearson, 2002) and ``Physics by Inquiry'' (Wiley, 1996) have been developed in an iterative process in which ongoing assessment of student learning plays an integral role. These materials have had a widespread and significant impact on physics teaching and on student learning from kindergarten through graduate school. In this talk I will describe the role of research in curriculum development, and speculate on the next generation of tools and resources to support physics teaching and learning.

  3. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model

    PubMed Central

    Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D.; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility. PMID:27232234

  4. Public Access to Federally Funded Research Data: How New Freedom of Information Act Requirements Affect Academic Researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Mary Ellen

    2000-03-01

    In October, 1999, the U.S. Office of Management & Budget (OMB) published the final rules governing public access to certain research data. While many scientists and university administrators continue to believe that FOIA is not the right vehicle for public accountability of the scientific process, the final administrative rules are significantly more focused than the broad statutory language passed by Congress in 1998. The evolutionary process of this critical refinement will be reviewed as an excellent model for balancing the public’s interest with the protection of premature, confidential and other vulnerable research data. Scientists should be familiar with key parameters of the public’s new FOIA rights, including the specific definition of “research data”, the circumstances under which such data must be “used by the Federal government” for the new regulations to pertain, and the exemptions that protect certain data from public release.

  5. [Research proposals submitted to the Dutch Investigative Medicine Fund; evaluation of the scientific quality by the Council for Scientific Research (NWO)].

    PubMed

    Hoeksema, H L; Klasen, E C

    2001-01-01

    The Council for Medical and Health Research (MW-NWO) assessed the scientific quality of research proposals submitted to the Dutch Investigative Medicine Fund, and analysed if there had been changes over time in the proportion of proposals which the MW-NWO advised to reject, the role of reports of external reviewers and the most important methodological flaws. In the period 1995-1999 'reject' had been advised for an average of 50% of the proposals, with a tendency to a smaller proportion in recent years. In nearly half of the proposals the judgements of external reviewers were not in agreement with each other. There was only a weak correlation between the judgements of the reviewers and the final advice of NWO. Among the most important flaws mentioned in the NWO advice were: efficacy not proven (a prerequisite for the Fund), proposed study not needed to solve the policy problem and methodological flaws, e.g. design and power calculation not adequate, deficiencies of inclusion and exclusion criteria. PMID:11198965

  6. Interfacing mathematics and biology: a discussion on training, research, collaboration, and funding.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laura A; Alben, Silas

    2012-11-01

    This article summarizes the discussion at a workshop on "Working at the Interface of Mathematics and Biology" at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. The goal of this workshop was to foster an ongoing discussion by the community on how to effectively train students from the biological, physical, engineering, and mathematical sciences to work at the intersection of these fields. One major point of discussion centered on how to be a successful interdisciplinary researcher in terms of where to publish, how to successfully write grants, and how to navigate evaluations for tenure and promotion. An emphasis was placed on the importance of developing strong multidisciplinary collaborations and clearly defining one's career trajectory to the home discipline. Another focus of the discussion was on the training of students and postdoctoral fellows in interdisciplinary work and helping these junior researchers to launch their careers. The group emphasized the need for the development of publicly available resources for biologists to learn basic tools for mathematical modeling and for mathematicians and engineers to see how their fields may be applied to current topics in the life sciences. PMID:22730496

  7. DOE Office of Science Funded Basic Research at NREL that Impacts Photovoltaic Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, supports a number of basic research projects in materials, chemicals, and biosciences at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that impact several renewable energy technologies, including photovoltaics (PV). The goal of the Material Sciences projects is to study the structural, optical, electrical, and defect properties of semiconductors and related materials using state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical techniques. Specific projects involving PV include: ordering in III-V semiconductors, isoelectronic co-doping, doping bottlenecks in semiconductors, solid-state theory, and computational science. The goal of the Chemical Sciences projects is to advance the fundamental understanding of the relevant science involving materials, photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, nanoscale chemistry, and catalysis that support solar photochemical conversion technologies. Specific projects relating to PV include: dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cells, semiconductor nanostructures, and molecular semiconductors. This presentation will give an overview of some of the major accomplishments of these projects.

  8. Research on the Implementation of the NASA Joint Sponsored Research Program and other Innovative Mechanism for Commercializing NASA Funded Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, Karen Risa

    1997-01-01

    A goal of the ERAST Program is the commercial application of technology resulting from the work if the ERAST Alliance. This goal is sufficiently primary to be called out in the recitals section of the ERAST Joint Sponsored Research Agreement. In support of this goal, two activities described below were commenced in 1996 to assess and explore commercial applications of UAV technologies relevant to the ERAST Alliance.

  9. Mentoring Strategies and Outcomes of Two Federally Funded Cancer Research Training Programs for Underrepresented Students in the Biomedical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Ford, Marvella E; Abraham, Latecia M; Harrison, Anita L; Jefferson, Melanie S; Hazelton, Tonya R; Varner, Heidi; Cannady, Kimberly; Frichtel, Carla S; Bagasra, Omar; Davis, Leroy; Rivers, David E; Slaughter, Sabra C; Salley, Judith D

    2016-06-01

    The US is experiencing a severe shortage of underrepresented biomedical researchers. The purpose of this paper is to present two case examples of cancer research mentoring programs for underrepresented biomedical sciences students. The first case example is a National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute (NIH/NCI) P20 grant titled "South Carolina Cancer Disparities Research Center (SC CaDRe)" Training Program, contributing to an increase in the number of underrepresented students applying to graduate school by employing a triple-level mentoring strategy. Since 2011, three undergraduate and four graduate students have participated in the P20 SC CaDRe program. One graduate student published a peer-reviewed scientific paper. Two graduate students (50 %) have completed their master's degrees, and the other two graduate students will receive their degrees in spring 2015. Two undergraduate students (67 %) are enrolled in graduate or professional school (grad./prof. school), and the other graduate student is completing her final year of college. The second case example is a prostate cancer-focused Department of Defense grant titled "The SC Collaborative Undergraduate HBCU Student Summer Training Program," providing 24 students training since 2009. Additionally, 47 students made scientific presentations, and two students have published peer-reviewed scientific papers. All 24 students took a GRE test preparation course; 15 (63 %) have applied to graduate school, and 11 of them (73 %) are enrolled in grad./prof. school. Thirteen remaining students (54 %) are applying to grad./prof. school. Leveraged funding provided research-training opportunities to an additional 201 National Conference on Health Disparities Student Forum participants and to 937 Ernest E. Just Research Symposium participants at the Medical University of South Carolina. PMID:25869579

  10. The Self Actualized Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Michael; Moylan, Mary Elizabeth

    A study examined the commonalities that "voracious" readers share, and how their experiences can guide parents, teachers, and librarians in assisting children to become self-actualized readers. Subjects, 25 adults ranging in age from 20 to 67 years, completed a questionnaire concerning their reading histories and habits. Respondents varied in…

  11. Obtaining and maintaining funding

    SciTech Connect

    Beverly Hartline

    1996-04-01

    Obtaining and maintaining funding is important for individuals, groups, institutions, and fields. This challenge is easier during times of abundant and growing resources than it is now, when funding is tight and shrinking. Thus, to obtain and maintain funding will require: maintaining healthy funding levels for all of science; maintaining healthy funding levels for the field(s) you work in; and competing successfully for the available funds. Everyone should pay attention to the overall prospects for science funding and dedicate some effort to working with others to grow the constituency for science. Public support is likely an important prerequisite for keeping future science budgets high. In this context, researchers should share with society at large the benefits of their research, so that taxpayers can see and appreciate some return from the federal investment in science. Assuming this effort is successful, and there continue to be government and private organizations with substantial resources to invest in research, what can the individual investigator do to improve her chances? She can be clear about her goal(s) and carefully plan her effort to make maximum progress for minimum resources, especially early in her career while she is establishing a solid professional reputation. Specific useful strategies include: brainstorm funding options and select the most promising one(s); be persistent but flexible, responsive to new information and changing circumstances; provide value and assistance to prospective funding sources both before and after receiving funding; know the funding agents and what their goals are, they are the customers; promise a lot and always deliver more; build partnerships and collaboration to leverage interest and resources; and develop capabilities and ideas with a promising, irresistible future. There is no guarantee of success. For the best chances, consistently contribute positively and productively in all your efforts, and continue to

  12. Budget Update: "Budget 2011" Not Enough to Resolve Funding Crisis. BCTF Research Report. Section V. 2011-EF-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Each budget year, the Ministry of Education responds to concerns about chronic underfunding of public education by asserting that the ministry is providing its "highest funding ever" during a sustained period of declining student enrolment. This assertion of the "highest funding ever" continues in "Budget 2011," ignoring the evidence of a systemic…

  13. Impact of Next Generation Sequencing on the Organization and Funding of Returning Research Results: Survey of Canadian Research Ethics Boards Members.

    PubMed

    Jaitovich Groisman, Iris; Godard, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Research Ethics Boards (REBs) are expected to evaluate protocols planning the use of Next Generation Sequencing technologies (NGS), assuring that any genomic finding will be properly managed. As Canadian REBs play a central role in the disclosure of such results, we deemed it important to examine the views and experience of REB members on the return of aggregated research results, individual research results (IRRs) and incidental findings (IFs) in current genomic research. With this intent, we carried out a web-based survey, which showed that 59.7% of respondents viewed the change from traditional sequencing to NGS as more than a technical substitution, and that 77% of respondents agreed on the importance of returning aggregated research results, the most compelling reasons being the recognition of participants' contribution and increasing the awareness of scientific progress. As for IRRs specifically, 50% of respondents were in favour of conveying such information, even when they only indicated the probability that a condition may develop. Current regulations and risk to participants were considered equally important, and much more than financial costs, when considering the return of IRRs and IFs. Respondents indicated that the financial aspect of offering genetic counseling was the least important matter when assessing it as a requisite. Granting agencies were named as mainly responsible for funding, while the organizing and returning of IRRs and IFs belonged to researchers. However, views in these matters differ according to respondents' experience. Our results draw attention to the need for improved guidance when considering the organizational and financial aspects of returning genetic research results, so as to better fulfill the ethical and moral principles that are to guide such undertakings. PMID:27167380

  14. Impact of Next Generation Sequencing on the Organization and Funding of Returning Research Results: Survey of Canadian Research Ethics Boards Members

    PubMed Central

    Godard, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Research Ethics Boards (REBs) are expected to evaluate protocols planning the use of Next Generation Sequencing technologies (NGS), assuring that any genomic finding will be properly managed. As Canadian REBs play a central role in the disclosure of such results, we deemed it important to examine the views and experience of REB members on the return of aggregated research results, individual research results (IRRs) and incidental findings (IFs) in current genomic research. With this intent, we carried out a web-based survey, which showed that 59.7% of respondents viewed the change from traditional sequencing to NGS as more than a technical substitution, and that 77% of respondents agreed on the importance of returning aggregated research results, the most compelling reasons being the recognition of participants’ contribution and increasing the awareness of scientific progress. As for IRRs specifically, 50% of respondents were in favour of conveying such information, even when they only indicated the probability that a condition may develop. Current regulations and risk to participants were considered equally important, and much more than financial costs, when considering the return of IRRs and IFs. Respondents indicated that the financial aspect of offering genetic counseling was the least important matter when assessing it as a requisite. Granting agencies were named as mainly responsible for funding, while the organizing and returning of IRRs and IFs belonged to researchers. However, views in these matters differ according to respondents’ experience. Our results draw attention to the need for improved guidance when considering the organizational and financial aspects of returning genetic research results, so as to better fulfill the ethical and moral principles that are to guide such undertakings. PMID:27167380

  15. Ethical review of projects involving non-human primates funded under the European Union's 7th Research Framework Programme.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Ursula; Phillips, Barry; Reid, Kirsty; Schmit, Véronique; Jennings, Maggy

    2013-09-01

    Internet searches were performed on projects involving non-human primates ('primates') funded under the European Union (EU) 7th Research Framework Programme (FP7), to determine how project proposals are assessed from an ethical point of view. Due to the incompleteness of the information publicly available, the types and severity of the experiments could not be determined with certainty, although in some projects the level of harm was considered to be 'severe'. Information was scarce regarding the numbers of primates, their sourcing, housing, care and fate, or the application of the Three Rs within projects. Project grant holders and the relevant Commission officer were consulted about their experiences with the FP7 ethics review process. Overall, it was seen as meaningful and beneficial, but some concerns were also noted. Ethical follow-up during project performance and upon completion was recognised as a valuable tool in ensuring that animal welfare requirements were adequately addressed. Based upon the outcome of the survey, recommendations are presented on how to strengthen the ethical review process under the upcoming Framework Programme 'Horizon 2020', while adequately taking into account the specific requirements of Directive 2010/63/EU, with the aim of limiting the harms inflicted on the animals and the numbers used, and ultimately, replacing the use of primates altogether. PMID:24168134

  16. RESULTS FROM EPA FUNDED RESEARCH PROGRAMS ON THE IMPORTANCE OF PURGE VOLUME, SAMPLE VOLUME, SAMPLE FLOW RATE AND TEMPORAL VARIATIONS ON SOIL GAS CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two research studies funded and overseen by EPA have been conducted since October 2006 on soil gas sampling methods and variations in shallow soil gas concentrations with the purpose of improving our understanding of soil gas methods and data for vapor intrusion applications. Al...

  17. Federal Funds for Research and Development: Fiscal Years 1980, 1981, and 1982. Volume XXX. Detailed Statistical Tables. Surveys of Science Resources Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    During the March through July 1981 period a total of 36 Federal agencies and their subdivisions (95 individual respondents) submitted data in response to the Annual Survey of Federal Funds for Research and Development, Volume XXX, conducted by the National Science Foundation. The detailed statistical tables presented in this report were derived…

  18. Federal Funds for Research and Development: Fiscal Years 1980, 1981, and 1982, Volume XXX. Final Report. Surveys of Science Resources Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Resources Studies.

    This report is the 30th in a series that covers research and development (R&D) as shown in successive Presidential budgets. The Federal budget for 1982 was unusual in the extent to which it was subjected to change, reflecting the new administration's philosophy to reduce Federal spending. R&D funding data reflect the first series of 1981 and 1982…

  19. Value-Added and Other Methods for Measuring School Performance: An Analysis of Performance Measurement Strategies in Teacher Incentive Fund Proposals. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Value-Added and Other Methods for Measuring School Performance: An Analysis of Performance Measurement Strategies in Teacher Incentive Fund Proposals"--a paper presented at the February 2008 National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference--Robert Meyer and Michael Christian examine select performance-pay plans used by…

  20. SAR4Volcanoes: an international ASI funded research project on volcano deformation through new generation SAR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansosti, E.; Pepe, S.; Solaro, G.; Casu, F.; Tizzani, P.; Acocella, V.; Ruch, J.; Nobile, A.; Puglisi, G.; Guglielmino, F.; Zoffoli, S.

    2012-04-01

    Volcano deformation monitoring is crucial to understand how magma emplaces, propagates and erupts. Therefore, volcano deformation research projects are particularly important opportunities to improve our understanding of volcano dynamics. SAR4Volcanoes is a 2-year research project funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) within the framework of a cooperation agreement with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). It focuses on volcano deformation analysis through Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques by means of COSMO-SkyMed and ALOS data, through the joint use of L-band and X-band SAR data. It also aims to the identification of methods and techniques to support decision making in emergency cases. Main target volcanoes in the projects are Etna, Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei and Stromboli (Italy) and Sakurajima and Kirishima (Japan). Secondary target volcanoes include recently or currently erupting volcanoes, as El Hierro (Spain), Nabro (Ethiopia) and Galapagos volcanoes (Ecuador). Since the project kickoff (July 2011) a large number of COSMO-SkyMed data has been acquired at these volcanoes; in some cases, the acquisitions are available almost at every satellite orbit, with an average interval down to 4 days. On these premises, the project represents an important opportunity to: (1) collect a significant amount of X-band data on active and erupting volcanoes and (2) study surface deformation to understand magma dynamics in different volcanic settings. We will present preliminary results on the ground deformation analysis of the main and secondary target volcanoes. In particular, target volcanoes without a pre-project archive are analyzed using single deformation maps, while those with archives are analysed through a time series approach, based on the SBAS technique.

  1. Did the Preservice Teacher-Generated Studies Constitute Actual Instances of Teacher-Researcher Studies, and Were They Consistent with Notions of Dewey?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretschmer, Robert E.; Wang, Ye; Hartman, Maria C.

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that articles in an "American Annals of the Deaf" special issue on teacher action research constitute a 2-tiered metastudy: The first article serves as a literature review of the teacher-as-researcher notion; 5 subsequent articles form the data set for a higher-order teacher-as-researcher inquiry. It is maintained that the…

  2. Association between funding source, methodological quality and research outcomes in randomized controlled trials of synbiotics, probiotics and prebiotics added to infant formula: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is little or no information available on the impact of funding by the food industry on trial outcomes and methodological quality of synbiotics, probiotics and prebiotics research in infants. The objective of this study was to compare the methodological quality, outcomes of food industry sponsored trials versus non industry sponsored trials, with regards to supplementation of synbiotics, probiotics and prebiotics in infant formula. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted to identify published and unpublished randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Cochrane methodology was used to assess the risk of bias of included RCTs in the following domains: 1) sequence generation; 2) allocation concealment; 3) blinding; 4) incomplete outcome data; 5) selective outcome reporting; and 6) other bias. Clinical outcomes and authors’ conclusions were reported in frequencies and percentages. The association between source of funding, risk of bias, clinical outcomes and conclusions were assessed using Pearson’s Chi-square test and the Fisher’s exact test. A p-value < 0.05 was statistically significant. Results Sixty seven completed and 3 on-going RCTs were included. Forty (59.7%) were funded by food industry, 11 (16.4%) by non-industry entities and 16 (23.9%) did not specify source of funding. Several risk of bias domains, especially sequence generation, allocation concealment and blinding, were not adequately reported. There was no significant association between the source of funding and sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding and selective reporting, majority of reported clinical outcomes or authors’ conclusions. On the other hand, source of funding was significantly associated with the domains of incomplete outcome data, free of other bias domains as well as reported antibiotic use and conclusions on weight gain. Conclusion In RCTs on infants fed infant formula containing probiotics, prebiotics or synbiotics, the source of funding did not

  3. 23 CFR 420.111 - What are the documentation requirements for use of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... metropolitan planning area work programs is contained in 23 CFR part 450. Additional information on RD&T work..., and technology transfer related activities funded with other Federal or State and/or local...

  4. 23 CFR 420.111 - What are the documentation requirements for use of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... metropolitan planning area work programs is contained in 23 CFR part 450. Additional information on RD&T work... various combinations, or brought together as a single work program. The expenditure of PL funds...

  5. 23 CFR 420.111 - What are the documentation requirements for use of FHWA planning and research funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... metropolitan planning area work programs is contained in 23 CFR part 450. Additional information on RD&T work... various combinations, or brought together as a single work program. The expenditure of PL funds...

  6. INNOVATION AND SCIENTIFIC FUNDING

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Richard A.

    1980-06-01

    This article is an adaptation of the author's testimony before the Committee on Science and Technology of the U.S. House of Representatives regarding his experience of performing successful research projects that were initially rejected for funding.

  7. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 29: The US government technical report and the transfer of federally funded aerospace R and D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the U.S. government technical report and the transfer of federally funded aerospace research and development in a conceptual framework of the federal government as a producer of scientific and technical information. The article summarizes current literature and research and discusses U.S. government technical report use and the importance of using data obtained from the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. The authors make a case for changing existing U.S. technology policy and present a research agenda for the U.S. government technical report.

  8. Did the preservice teacher-generated studies constitute actual instances of teacher-researcher studies, and were they consistent with notions of Dewey?

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Robert E; Wang, Ye; Hartman, Maria C

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that articles in an American Annals of the Deaf special issue on teacher action research constitute a 2-tiered metastudy: The first article serves as a literature review of the teacher-as-researcher notion; 5 subsequent articles form the data set for a higher-order teacher-as-researcher inquiry. It is maintained that the preservice teachers' work met the definition of teacher-as-researcher in that they systematically investigated their own teaching/learning practices through a reflective lens, with the twin purposes of modifying their own practices and contributing to the theoretical in situ knowledge base of learning and teaching in general. It is also argued that this body of work is consistent with the stance on inquiry advocated by Columbia University's Teachers College and its Program in the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and that teacher research reflected Dewey's notions of pragmatism, functionalism, constructivism, communication, and social advocacy. PMID:20925286

  9. Research-Based Reading Reforms: The Impact of State-Funded Interventions on Educational Outcomes in Urban Elementary Schools. Policy Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Edward P.; Manset, Genevieve; Chung, Choong-Geun; Simmons, Ada B.; Musoba, Glenda Droogsma; Manoil, Kim; Worthington, Kim

    The Early Literacy Intervention Grant Program (ELIGP) supports training in Reading Recovery and provides grants for Other Early Literacy Interventions (OELI) in Indiana's elementary schools. This study examined the impact of funding on urban elementary schools, using surveys of funded and comparison schools in 1997-98, 1998-99, and 1999-2000. When…

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 12: The diffusion of federally funded aerospace research and development (R/D) and the information seeking behavior of US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the diffusion of federally funded aerospace R&D is explored from the perspective of the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists. The following three assumptions frame this exploration: (1) knowledge production, transfer, and utilization are equally important components of the aerospace R&D process; (2) the diffusion of knowledge resulting from federally funded aerospace R&D is indispensable for the U.S. to remain a world leader in aerospace; and (3) U.S. government technical reports, produced by NASA and DOD, play an important, but as yet undefined, role in the diffusion of federally funded aerospace R&D. A conceptual model for federally funded aerospace knowledge diffusion, one that emphasizes U.S. goverment technical reports, is presented. Data regarding three research questions concerning the information-seeking behavior of U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists are also presented.

  11. Learning to “Swim” with the Experts: Experiences of Two Patient Co-Investigators for a Project Funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Michele; Tufte, Janice; Hsu, Clarissa

    2016-01-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), established in 2010, launched a new model of incorporating stakeholder perspectives into health care research. To ensure that PCORI-funded studies address issues important to health care consumers, all projects must fully involve patients and other stakeholders in every step of the research process: from planning and design to implementation and dissemination of results. As members of the first cohort of PCORI-funded researchers, our team was on the forefront of developing new approaches to engaging patients in research. One innovation we pioneered was the creation of a “patient co-investigator” role for two nonscientists who were recruited to be active members of the research team throughout the project. This commentary, based on our experiences, aims to help other research teams to 1) understand how to effectively collaborate with stakeholder team members such as patients; 2) anticipate possible challenges; and 3) offer tools for the orientation, training, and integration of patients into a scientific team. Written from the perspective of two PCORI patient co-investigators, our commentary provides lessons learned and recommendations about incorporating nonscientists into research teams. Specifically, we suggest recruiting people with a record of relevant volunteer experience and commitment; establishing a formal application process that provides candidates with details about expectations and responsibilities; and providing comprehensive orientation with ongoing training, encouragement, and support. We hope the points in this commentary help research teams that are incorporating patient co-investigators move toward a positive and productive experience. PMID:27083011

  12. OTA Report, "Federally Funded Research: Decisions for a Decade." Hearing before the Subcommittee on Science of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (March 20, 1991) (No. 7).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

    A transcript of the hearing that discusses the findings and recommendations that are part of the Office of Technology Assessment's (OTA's) report on federally funded research is presented. The report evaluates the nature and distribution of research funding and decision-making and suggests alternative approaches that the Federal Government can…

  13. "I Actually Contributed to Their Research": The Influence of an Abbreviated Summer Apprenticeship Program in Science and Engineering for Diverse High-School Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgin, Stephen R.; McConnell, William J.; Flowers, Alonzo M., III

    2015-01-01

    This study describes an investigation of a research apprenticeship program that we developed for diverse high-school students often underrepresented in similar programs and in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professions. Through the apprenticeship program, students spent 2 weeks in the summer engaged in biofuels-related research…

  14. Changes in Family Literacy Funding and Welfare Policy: Consequences for Pennsylvania Family Literacy Programs. Research Brief #5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Esther; Gungor, Ramazan

    2008-01-01

    Due to federal budget cuts in 2005-06, 11 family literacy programs in Pennsylvania switched from federal Even Start to state (Act 143) funding. Simultaneously, state welfare requirements stipulated that in most circumstances adult education is not an allowable work activity for welfare recipients over age 20. This study examined how these policy…

  15. Transitioning to independence and maintaining research careers in a new funding climate: american society of preventive oncology junior members interest group report.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jada G; Birmingham, Wendy C; Tehranifar, Parisa; Irwin, Melinda L; Klein, William M P; Nebeling, Linda; Chubak, Jessica

    2013-11-01

    The American Society of Preventive Oncology (ASPO) is a professional society for multi-disciplinary investigators in cancer prevention and control. The ASPO Junior Members Interest Group promotes the interests of predoctoral, postdoctoral, and junior faculty members within the Society, and provides them with career development and training opportunities. To this end, as part of the 37th ASPO Annual Meeting held in Memphis, Tennessee in March 2013, the Junior Members Interest Group organized a session designed to address issues faced by early-career investigators as they navigate the transition to become an independent, well-funded scientist with a sustainable program of research in the current climate of reduced and limited resources. Four speakers were invited to provide their complementary but distinct perspectives on this topic based on their personal experiences in academic, research-intensive positions and in federal funding agencies. This report summarizes the main themes that emerged from the speakers' presentations and audience questions related to mentoring; obtaining grant funding; publishing; developing expertise; navigating appointments, promotion, and tenure; and balancing demands. These lessons can be used by early-career investigators in cancer prevention and control as they transition to independence and build programs of fundable research. PMID:24190867

  16. Transitioning to Independence and Maintaining Research Careers in a New Funding Climate: American Society of Preventive Oncology Junior Members Interest Group Report

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jada G.; Birmingham, Wendy C.; Tehranifar, Parisa; Irwin, Melinda L.; Klein, William M. P.; Nebeling, Linda; Chubak, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The American Society of Preventive Oncology (ASPO) is a professional society for multi-disciplinary investigators in cancer prevention and control. The ASPO Junior Members Interest Group promotes the interests of predoctoral, postdoctoral, and junior faculty members within the Society, and provides them with career development and training opportunities. To this end, as part of the 37th ASPO Annual Meeting held in Memphis, Tennessee in March 2013, the Junior Members Interest Group organized a session designed to address issues faced by early career investigators as they navigate the transition to become an independent, well-funded scientist with a sustainable program of research in the current climate of reduced and limited resources. Four speakers were invited to provide their complementary but distinct perspectives on this topic based on their personal experiences in academic, research-intensive positions and in federal funding agencies. This report summarizes the main themes that emerged from the speakers’ presentations and audience questions related to mentoring; obtaining grant funding; publishing; developing expertise; navigating appointments, promotion, and tenure; and balancing demands. These lessons can be used by early career investigators in cancer prevention and control as they transition to independence and build programs of fundable research. PMID:24190867

  17. Funding Backlash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William E.; Clark, Charlene H.

    1976-01-01

    Using California as an example, the authors illustrate how a state legislative decision relating to funding of the state university system effects the financial and academic conditions of the community colleges. (DC)

  18. `I Actually Contributed to Their Research': The influence of an abbreviated summer apprenticeship program in science and engineering for diverse high-school learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgin, Stephen R.; McConnell, William J.; Flowers, Alonzo M., III

    2015-02-01

    This study describes an investigation of a research apprenticeship program that we developed for diverse high-school students often underrepresented in similar programs and in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professions. Through the apprenticeship program, students spent 2 weeks in the summer engaged in biofuels-related research practices within working university chemistry and engineering laboratories. The experience was supplemented by discussions and activities intended to impact nature of science (NOS) and inquiry understandings and to allow for an exploration of STEM careers and issues of self-identity. Participants completed a NOS questionnaire before and after the experience, were interviewed multiple times, and were observed while working in the laboratories. Findings revealed that as a result of the program, participants (1) demonstrated positive changes in their understandings of certain NOS aspects many of which were informed by their laboratory experiences, (2) had an opportunity to explore and strengthen STEM-related future plans, and (3) examined their self-identities. A majority of participants also described a sense of belonging within the laboratory groups and believed that they were making significant contributions to the ongoing work of those laboratories even though their involvement was necessarily limited due to the short duration of the program. For students who were most influenced by the program, the belonging they felt was likely related to issues of identity and career aspirations.

  19. The Neuro Funding Rollercoaster.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Harry M

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the money dedicated to cancer and cardiology, funding for neuroscience research has lagged behind for decades. But things are starting to change. From the White House's Brain Initiative to the Ice Bucket Challenge for ALS to some recent sizeable gifts to universities, money for brain research appears to be on the rise. But, as our author explains, research and development funding from private and corporate lenders for cognitive neuroscience-an area that he has spent years tracking-is also vital to the quality of life for millions of people. PMID:27408678

  20. Director's discretionary fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This technical memorandum contains brief technical papers describing research and technology development programs sponsored by the ARC Director's Discretionary Fund during fiscal year 1992 (Oct. 1991 through Sep. 1992). An appendix provides administrative information for each of the 45 sponsored research programs.

  1. Research

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance.

  2. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Richard

    Biomedical imaging, and in particular MRI and CT, is often identified as among the top 10 most significant advances in healthcare in the 20th century. This presentation will describe some of the recent advances in medical physics and imaging being funded by NIH in this century and current funding opportunities. The presentation will also highlight the role of multidisciplinary research in bringing concepts from the physical sciences and applying them to challenges in biological and biomedical research.. NIH Funding for Biomedical Imaging.

  3. 23 CFR 420.205 - What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and... TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.205 What is the FHWA's policy for research, development,...

  4. 23 CFR 420.205 - What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and technology transfer funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is the FHWA's policy for research, development, and... TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH PLANNING AND RESEARCH PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Research, Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.205 What is the FHWA's policy for research, development,...

  5. New Funding Opportunities for Small Businesses Announced

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program recently announced $8 million in new contract funding opportunities to assist small businesses with cancer research and technology development. The 12 new contract funding opp

  6. 7 CFR 3419.2 - Matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MATCHING FUNDS REQUIREMENT FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EXTENSION FORMULA FUNDS AT 1890 LAND-GRANT INSTITUTIONS, INCLUDING TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY, AND AT 1862...

  7. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 67: Maximizing the Results of Federally-Funded Research and Development Through Knowledge Management: A Strategic Imperative for Improving US Competitiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1998-01-01

    Federally-funded research and development (R&D) represents a significant annual investment (approximately $79 billion in fiscal year 1996) on the part of U.S. taxpayers. Based on the results of a 10-year study of knowledge diffusion in U.S. aerospace industry, the authors take the position that U.S. competitiveness will be enhanced if knowledge management strategies, employed within a capability-enhancing U.S. technology policy framework, are applied to diffusing the results of federally-funded R&D. In making their case, the authors stress the importance of knowledge as the source of competitive advantage in today's global economy. Next, they offer a practice-based definition of knowledge management and discuss three current approaches to knowledge management implementation-mechanistic, "the learning organization," and systemic. The authors then examine three weaknesses in existing U.S. public policy and policy implementation-the dominance of knowledge creation, the need for diffusion-oriented technology policy, and the prevalence of a dissemination model- that affect diffusion of the results of federally-funded R&D. To address these shortcomings, they propose the development of a knowledge management framework for diffusing the results of federally-funded R&D. The article closes with a discussion of some issues and challenges associated with implementing a knowledge management framework for diffusing the results of federally-funded R&D.

  8. Mutual Funds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan L.

    1993-01-01

    There is good reason for college fund raisers and business officers to collaborate on common financial interests. Communication is a key element of such cooperation. Other needs include agreement on accounting and reporting of institutional finances, agreement on stewardship of gifts (particularly with restrictions or endowments), and common…

  9. How Big Science Gets Funded — An Introduction for Students to the Politics of Space Science Funding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard, Jr.

    A collaborative group project for non-science majors is described, which introduces students to the processes and politics involved in securing funding for big ticket space science missions. In this project, student groups represent research teams that have to make pleas for funding before a "congressional committee" composed of non-science faculty. Students are assigned actual projects (such as the Terrestrial Planet Finder or the Mission to Pluto) and are placed in direct competition for funds with other projects of similar goals. An additional student group plays the role of congressional staffers with responsibility for briefing their faculty congressperson on all of the competing projects that will be presented. The project will be discussed in terms of its benefits for student learning and the areas that tended to limit the overall success of the project.

  10. A specialist leukaemia/lymphoma registry in the UK. Part 1: Incidence and geographical distribution of Hodgkin's disease. Leukaemia Research Fund Data Collection Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, P. A.; Alexander, F. E.; Ricketts, T. J.; Williams, J.; Cartwright, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the epidemiology of Hodgkin's disease occurring in parts of the United Kingdom between 1984 and 1986. The cases were carefully diagnosed and the data rigorously cross-checked as part of the larger Leukaemia Research Fund Data Collection Survey of all lymphoid and haematogenous malignancies. The age-specific rates show the lack of an older adult second peak. Spatial variation is examined in some detail. At county and district levels there is little heterogeneity in the distribution of cases. However, at the electoral ward level there were real differences for the younger age group (0-34). PMID:2605103

  11. FRESH AIR: an implementation research project funded through Horizon 2020 exploring the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of chronic respiratory diseases in low-resource settings

    PubMed Central

    Cragg, Liza; Williams, Siân; Chavannes, Niels H

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes FRESH AIR, an implementation science project exploring how to improve the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of chronic lung diseases in contexts with limited healthcare resources. It consists of inter-related studies that take place in four countries that are part of the International Primary Care Respiratory Group’s (IPCRG) global network: Uganda, the Kyrgyz Republic, Vietnam and Greece. The project has been funded by the European Commission Horizon 2020 research programme and runs from October 2015 until September 2018. PMID:27356621

  12. Research Ethics Capacity Building in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review of NIH Fogarty-Funded Programs 2000–2012

    PubMed Central

    Ndebele, Paul; Wassenaar, Douglas; Benatar, Solomon; Fleischer, Theodore; Kruger, Mariana; Adebamowo, Clement; Kass, Nancy; Hyder, Adnan A.; Meslin, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    The last fifteen years have witnessed a significant increase in investment in research ethics capacity development throughout the world. We examine nine research ethics training programs that are focused on Sub-Saharan Africa and supported by the US National Institutes of Health. We collected data from grants awards’ documents and annual reports supplemented by questionnaires completed by the training program directors. Together, these programs provided long-term training in research ethics to 275 African professionals, strengthened research ethics committees in 19 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, and created research ethics curricula at many institutions and bioethics centers within Africa. Trainees’ leadership resulted in new national systems and policies on research ethics, human tissue storage and export, and methods of monitoring compliance with research ethics guidelines. Training programs adapted to challenges that arose due to varied trainees’ background knowledge in ethics, duration of time available for training, spoken and written English language skills, administrative obstacles, and the need to sustain post-training research ethics activities. Our report showcases the development of awareness of research ethics and building/strengthening of basic research ethics infrastructure in Sub-Saharan Africa. Nevertheless, the increasing amount and complexity of health research being conducted in Sub-Saharan Africa suggests the need for continued investment in research ethics capacity development in this region. This paper is part of a collection of papers analyzing the Fogarty International Center’s International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development program. PMID:24782070

  13. Education Program Funding: A Comparison of the September 2009 Budget Update to the February 2009 Budget Estimates. BCTF Research Report. Section V. 2009-EF-03

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports that the Education Program funding for 2009-2010 in the September 2009 budget update is about $128 million less than the funding allocated in the February 2009 budget announcement. As public-school funding comprises 95% of all Education Program Funding, this will have a significant impact on public education budgets. Instead of…

  14. Why do some countries publish more than others? An international comparison of research funding, English proficiency and publication output in highly ranked general medical journals.

    PubMed

    Man, Jonathan P; Weinkauf, Justin G; Tsang, Monica; Sin, Don D

    2004-01-01

    National factor(s) influencing publication output in the highest ranked medical journals are largely unknown. We sought to examine the relationship between national research funding and English proficiency on publication output. We identified all original research articles appearing in the five highest ranked general medical journals between 1997 and 2001. Using the country of the corresponding author as the source nation for each article, we determined a standardized publication rate across developed nations. We used multiple regression techniques to determine the influence of national expenditures on research and scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), a surrogate for English proficiency, on publication output. There was a significant relationship of national spending on research and TOEFL scores to publication output of developed countries (p = 0.04; p < 0.01, respectively). These two variables explained approximately 71.5% of the variation in publication rate across developed nations around the world (R = 0.85; p < 0.01). Normalized for population size, English-speaking nations and certain northern European countries such as Denmark, The Netherlands, Switzerland, and Sweden had the highest rate of publication in the five highest ranked general medical journals, while Asian countries had generally low rates of publication. Research spending and English proficiency were strongly associated with publication output in the highest ranked general medical journals. While these data cannot be considered definitive due to their observational nature, they do suggest that for English-language medical journals, research funding and English proficiency may be important determinants of publication. PMID:15469039

  15. Federal Government Funding of Research in Universities in Nigeria, the University of Benin as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osagie, Roseline O.

    2012-01-01

    It is increasingly evident that research is extremely critical and important if universities are to serve as engines of development in their areas of locations. For a knowledge-driven world, investment in research and development (R&D) is a sine qua non for a nation. Few studies have examined the federal government's investment in research in…

  16. An analysis of the funding to, and by, the Medical Research Council of New Zealand during the period 1973-84.

    PubMed

    Lee, D

    1986-11-12

    Correcting for inflation, the government grant to the MRC from 1973-84 was maintained at 90% of that for 1973. Funding of units was constant at 12% of total disbursements. That for project grants decreased from 89% in 1973 to a low of 48% in 1981. Programme grants increased from 21% in 1974 to a peak of 40% in 1981. After 1981 there was a slight shift favouring project grants. Purchasing power of project grants fell to a low, in 1980, of 41.5% of that in 1974 but, from 1981-84 remained at 45%. The purchasing power of programme grants was protected and held at 90% of that in 1974. From 1982-84 expenditure on project grants running for 3 years decreased from 50-60%, to only 15% and, with the declining fraction of the budget allotted to project grants, and in their purchasing power, this may account for the perception of a shortage of funds for medical research. Sustained support for research in the main centres has changed little and reflects the number of full-time academic staff at each school. PMID:3466073

  17. A Compendium of Social-Behavioral Research Funded by NCER and NCSER: 2002-2013. NCER 2016-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Ryoko; Hall, Adam; Stapleton, Katina; Doolittle, Emily; Buckley, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this compendium is to catalog NCER's and NCSER's contributions to social-behavioral research. Research undertaken as part of these projects is contributing to a knowledge base that ultimately aims to improve academic outcomes for students via improvements in students' social-behavioral competencies, teachers' practices, and the…

  18. Parametric Analyses of Alternative Flow Models at Yucca Mountain, Nevada Calibrations and Controls - State of Nevada-Funded Research

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, L.; Brown, T. P.

    2002-02-26

    The controls on the potentiometric surface and temperature distribution at Yucca Mountain have long been thought to be related to major fault zones. The exact way the faults influence these distributions has been somewhat elusive. The parametric studies discussed in this paper show that the fault zone x, y and z permeability tensors, as well as the alignment of the fault zone in relation to the flow field (1), are major contributing factors in the pressure and temperature distributions. A series of runs were conducted for the State of Nevada with a 3-dimensional model utilizing the AT2VOC version of the A-TOUGH code (2),(3). The runs were conducted under steady state conditions and utilized fully coupled heat and flow conditions. The model setup and boundary conditions are fully described. Comparisons were done with varying degrees of anisotropic permeability ratios in the fault zones. The resulting temperature and pressure profiles are compared. The model, while simple, allowed us to examine the relationship of the head and temperature distributions to the position and permeability of major fault zones. It is our conclusion that the major faults included in this model do significantly affect the observed head and temperature distributions. Performance Assessments currently may not reflect actual doses at the Compliance boundary due to the potential for radionuclide flow to be captured in the Ghost Dance Fault and be transported primarily south with little dilution and dispersion.

  19. The Crisis in Extramural Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Joel

    2011-01-01

    When "crisis" and "extramural funding" are mentioned, most academics think about problems such as the low percentage of proposals funded by federal agencies (now approaching single digits in many fields) or inadequate indirect-cost recovery rates that fail to reimburse universities for all costs of research. These are great problems draining…

  20. Adequacy Model for School Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banicki, Guy; Murphy, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    This study considers the effectiveness of the Evidence-Based Adequacy model of school funding. In looking at the Evidence-Based Adequacy model for school funding, one researcher has been centrally associated with the development and study of this model. Allen Odden is currently a professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy…

  1. Reducing Outbreaks: Using International Governmental Risk Pools to Fund Research and Development of Infectious Disease Medicines and Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Erfe, J. Mark

    2014-01-01

    The deadliest Ebola outbreak the world has ever seen is currently ravaging West Africa, despite the concerted efforts of the World Health Organization and many national governments. The current picture is troubling, but not altogether unexpected. Ebola was initially identified in 1976, and since that time, few drugs have been developed to combat it. The same is true for myriad other dangerous infectious diseases to which the world is currently susceptible. One proposal that might prevent outbreaks of this scale and magnitude from recurring would be to have the World Health Organization (WHO) and its technical partners assess which of its member states are at high risk for a disease, either directly or indirectly, and facilitate the creation of international governmental risk pools of those member states. Risk pools would offer open-indexed grant contracts to fund vaccine and drug development for a particular disease, and pharmaceutical companies could browse the index to apply for these grants. If the risk-pool states and a particular company sign a contract, a mutually agreed upon amount of the vaccine or drug would be produced at a below-market purchase price for those states. In return, the company would keep any patents or intellectual property rights for the developed vaccines or drugs. Risk-pool countries that did not use their vaccine or drug could resell that supply on secondary markets to other countries outside of the risk pool. This arrangement will increase the supply of tested drug and vaccine candidates available for combatting unexpected outbreaks of any previously discovered major infectious disease in the future. PMID:25506281

  2. Reducing outbreaks: using international governmental risk pools to fund research and development of infectious disease medicines and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Erfe, J Mark

    2014-12-01

    The deadliest Ebola outbreak the world has ever seen is currently ravaging West Africa, despite the concerted efforts of the World Health Organization and many national governments. The current picture is troubling, but not altogether unexpected. Ebola was initially identified in 1976, and since that time, few drugs have been developed to combat it. The same is true for myriad other dangerous infectious diseases to which the world is currently susceptible. One proposal that might prevent outbreaks of this scale and magnitude from recurring would be to have the World Health Organization (WHO) and its technical partners assess which of its member states are at high risk for a disease, either directly or indirectly, and facilitate the creation of international governmental risk pools of those member states. Risk pools would offer open-indexed grant contracts to fund vaccine and drug development for a particular disease, and pharmaceutical companies could browse the index to apply for these grants. If the risk-pool states and a particular company sign a contract, a mutually agreed upon amount of the vaccine or drug would be produced at a below-market purchase price for those states. In return, the company would keep any patents or intellectual property rights for the developed vaccines or drugs. Risk-pool countries that did not use their vaccine or drug could resell that supply on secondary markets to other countries outside of the risk pool. This arrangement will increase the supply of tested drug and vaccine candidates available for combatting unexpected outbreaks of any previously discovered major infectious disease in the future. PMID:25506281

  3. Carbon dioxide and climate. [Appendix includes names and addresses of the Principal Investigators for the research projects funded in FY1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO{sub 2} Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration.

  4. [Substance use disorders as a cause and consequence of childhood abuse. Basic research, therapy and prevention in the BMBF-funded CANSAS-Network].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Ingo; Barnow, Sven; Pawils, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) belong to the most frequent behavioural consequences of childhood abuse and neglect (CAN). In community samples, about 20% of adults with experiences of abuse or neglect in childhood have a lifetime diagnosis of an SUD. About 30% of individuals seeking treatment for a post-traumatic disorder have an SUD and 24–67% of all patients in treatment for an SUD have a history of CAN. About 16% of all children and adolescents under the age of 20 in Germany grow up in families where an alcohol- and/or drug-dependence is present. The children of parents with SUDs have, in addition to other risks to their development in cognitive and psychosocial domains, an increased risk of experiencing violence and neglect. Regarding both perspectives, SUD as a cause and as a consequence of CAN, a better understanding of relevant mediators and risk factors is necessary to improve prevention and develop adequate treatments. The aims of the BMBF-funded research network CANSAS are: 1. To gain a better understanding of the relationships between these two important public health problems (basic research), 2. To provide evidence-based treatments for survivors of CAN with SUDs and to increase the awareness for the necessity to diagnose CAN in patients with SUDs in counselling and treatment facilities (research on diagnostics and therapy), 3. To improve the systematic evaluation of child welfare among children of parents with SUDs through counselling services and to promote links between addiction services and youth welfare services (prevention research and health services research). In a multidisciplinary approach, the CANSAS network brings together experts in the fields of trauma treatment, epidemiology, basic research, health services research, prevention research as well as addiction services. PMID:26497814

  5. Tutorial on Actual Space Environmental Hazards For Space Systems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Fennell, J. F.; Guild, T. B.; O'Brien, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    It has become common in the space science community to conduct research on diverse physical phenomena because they are thought to contribute to space weather. However, satellites contend with only three primary environmental hazards: single event effects, vehicle charging, and total dose, and not every physical phenomenon that occurs in space contributes in substantial ways to create these hazards. One consequence of the mismatch between actual threats and all-encompassing research is the often-described gap between research and operations; another is the creation of forecasts that provide no actionable information for design engineers or spacecraft operators. An example of the latter is the physics of magnetic field emergence on the Sun; the phenomenon is relevant to the formation and launch of coronal mass ejections and is also causally related to the solar energetic particles that may get accelerated in the interplanetary shock. Unfortunately for the research community, the engineering community mitigates the space weather threat (single-event effects from heavy ions above ~50 MeV/nucleon) with a worst-case specification of the environment and not with a prediction. Worst-case definition requires data mining of past events, while predictions involve large-scale systems science from the Sun to the Earth that is compelling for scientists and their funding agencies but not actionable for design or for most operations. Differing priorities among different space-faring organizations only compounds the confusion over what science research is relevant. Solar particle impacts to human crew arise mainly from the total ionizing dose from the solar protons, so the priority for prediction in the human spaceflight community is therefore much different than in the unmanned satellite community, while both communities refer to the fundamental phenomenon as space weather. Our goal in this paper is the presentation of a brief tutorial on the primary space environmental phenomena

  6. Eliciting and Utilizing Rural Students' Funds of Knowledge in the Service of Science Learning: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Ellen M.

    2010-01-01

    Several researchers have pointed out the failures of current schooling to adequately prepare students in science and called for radical reform in science education to address the problem. One dominant critique of science education is that several groups of students are not well served by current school science practices and discourses. Rural…

  7. The MYCOGLOBE Project: A European Union Funded Successful Experiment in Enhancing Cooperation and Coordination Amongst Mycotoxin Researchers Worldwide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2004, the European Commission approved the specific support action “Integration of Mycotoxin and Toxigenic Fungi Research for Food Safety in the Global System” (MycoGlobe, contract FOOD-CT-2004-007174) within the Sixth Framework Programme, Food Quality and Safety. The aim of the MycoGlobe projec...

  8. Ohio Board of Regents Research Incentive Program. Universities Plans for Use of Funds During the FY 2008-2009 Biennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This document presents the research incentive plans of these Ohio institutions: (1) The University of Akron; (2) Bowling Green State University; (3) Central State University; (4) University of Cincinnati; (5) Cleveland State University; (6) Kent State University; (7) Miami University; (8) Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine; (9) The…

  9. [Sex/Gender-Responsive Health Research: New Funding Guidelines of the USA National Institutes of Health Can Bring a New Impetus to Germany].

    PubMed

    Jahn, I

    2016-07-01

    In June 2015, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the USA published a new funding guideline entitled "Consideration of Sex as a Biological Variable in NIH-funded Research". This guideline is part of the NIH policy to enhance quality and generalizability of health research. Its core element is the classification of sex as a key element of rigorous study designs. The requirement is that sex be defined as a biological variable, and taking the potentially relevant sex/gender related anatomical and physiological characteristics into account. In Germany, the "Guidelines and recommendations to assure good epidemiological practice" (GEP) of 1998 specify that the study design and research methods are to be designed so that sex/gender-specific aspects of the research question can be adequately detected. Mostly health research is restricted to the categorization of the study population into men and women and to the consideration of the sex/gender variable (man*woman) in the analyses. Research in accordance with the NIH guideline as well as with the German GEP needs to investigate differences and similarities between men and women, and also to look for factors that explain in what way being a man or a woman poses a risk or is protective against the development of diseases. This scientific basis is essential for the development and implementation of sex/gender equitable prevention, health promotion and health care, which in turn enables statutory health insurances to take sex/gender differences into account regarding the medical services they provide. The latter is a consequence of the current legal position in Germany, which is based on the Prevention law that was passed in 2015. In addition to the categorical sex/gender variable (man*woman), there is therefore the need to analytically differentiate between the dimensions sex (the biological factors) and gender (the socio-cultural ascriptions) as well as their interaction. For conceptual clarity, this paper proposes

  10. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central element in a metaphysical…

  11. How funding agencies can support research use in healthcare: an online province-wide survey to determine knowledge translation training needs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health research funding agencies are increasingly promoting evidence use in health practice and policy. Building on work suggesting how agencies can support such knowledge translation (KT), this paper discusses an online survey to assess KT training needs of researchers and research users as part of a Canadian provincial capacity-building effort. Methods The survey comprised 24 multiple choice and open-ended questions including demographics, interest in learning KT skills, likelihood of participating in training, and barriers and facilitators to doing KT at work. More than 1,200 people completed the survey. The high number of responses is attributed to an engagement strategy involving partner organizations (health authorities, research institutes, universities) in survey development and distribution. SPSS was used to analyze quantitative results according to respondents’ primary role, geographic region, and work setting. Qualitative results were analyzed in NVivo. Results Over 85 percent of respondents are interested in learning more about the top KT skills identified. Research producers have higher interest in disseminating research results; research users are more interested in the application of research results. About one-half of respondents require beginner-level training in KT skills; one-quarter need advanced training. Time and cost constraints are the biggest barriers to participating in KT training. More than one-half of respondents have no financial support for travel and almost one-half lack support for registration fees. Time is the biggest challenge to integrating KT into work. Conclusions Online surveys are useful for determining knowledge translation training needs of researchers, research users and ultimately organizations. In this case, findings suggest the importance of considering all aspects of KT in training opportunities, while taking into account different stakeholder interests. Funders can play a role in developing new training

  12. R and D: To fund or not to fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterdock, T. N.

    1981-01-01

    U.S. Government spending to fund the research and development of electronics for a variety of applications is discussed. Commercial enterprises also spend large sums on research and development of electronics and other areas of interest to the U.S. Government and its agencies. The government can take advantage of industrial research programs and thereby maximize the utilization of their own.

  13. 7 CFR 282.2 - Funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding. 282.2 Section 282.2 Agriculture Regulations... Funding. Federal financial participation may be made available to demonstration, research, and evaluation... approval. Funding for additional costs is subject to existing Federal grant and contract procedures....

  14. 7 CFR 3430.605 - Funding restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding restrictions. 3430.605 Section 3430.605 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... § 3430.605 Funding restrictions. (a) Facility costs. Funds made available under this subpart shall not...

  15. 7 CFR 282.2 - Funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding. 282.2 Section 282.2 Agriculture Regulations... Funding. Federal financial participation may be made available to demonstration, research, and evaluation... approval. Funding for additional costs is subject to existing Federal grant and contract procedures....

  16. 7 CFR 550.21 - Funding availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding availability. 550.21 Section 550.21 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Agreements Financial Management § 550.21 Funding availability. The funding period will begin on the date...

  17. 7 CFR 282.2 - Funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding. 282.2 Section 282.2 Agriculture Regulations... Funding. Federal financial participation may be made available to demonstration, research, and evaluation... approval. Funding for additional costs is subject to existing Federal grant and contract procedures....

  18. 7 CFR 3430.905 - Funding restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding restrictions. 3430.905 Section 3430.905 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... Program § 3430.905 Funding restrictions. (a) Prohibition against construction. Grant funds awarded...

  19. 7 CFR 282.2 - Funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding. 282.2 Section 282.2 Agriculture Regulations... Funding. Federal financial participation may be made available to demonstration, research, and evaluation... approval. Funding for additional costs is subject to existing Federal grant and contract procedures....

  20. 7 CFR 550.21 - Funding availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Funding availability. 550.21 Section 550.21 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Agreements Financial Management § 550.21 Funding availability. The funding period will begin on the date...

  1. 7 CFR 550.21 - Funding availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Funding availability. 550.21 Section 550.21 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Agreements Financial Management § 550.21 Funding availability. The funding period will begin on the date...

  2. 7 CFR 282.2 - Funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Funding. 282.2 Section 282.2 Agriculture Regulations... Funding. Federal financial participation may be made available to demonstration, research, and evaluation... approval. Funding for additional costs is subject to existing Federal grant and contract procedures....

  3. 7 CFR 550.21 - Funding availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding availability. 550.21 Section 550.21 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Agreements Financial Management § 550.21 Funding availability. The funding period will begin on the date...

  4. 7 CFR 550.21 - Funding availability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Funding availability. 550.21 Section 550.21 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Agreements Financial Management § 550.21 Funding availability. The funding period will begin on the date...

  5. 7 CFR 3430.205 - Funding restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funding restrictions. 3430.205 Section 3430.205 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... Funding restrictions. (a) Prohibition against construction. Funds made available under this subpart...

  6. School Funding System and Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabatadze, Shalva; Gorgadze, Natia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study the effectiveness of general education funding system from the perspective of equal and equal educational opportunities for all in Georgia. Following the objective, the research aimed to respond three main research questions: 1. is the school financing formula effective and efficient enough to be administrated…

  7. [Analysis of the recommendations for cancer prevention given by the global fund for research on cancer (FMIC) and the situation in Chile].

    PubMed

    Crovetto, Mirta; Uauy, Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    Cancer is one of the most important causes of death in the world corresponding to 63% annually, is the second in the Americas with 1.2 million deaths in 2008 and Chile in 2007 representing 25.6% of all deaths. Obesity is associated with a third of all cancers and is associated with body fat, abdominal fat, weight gain in adulthood, all modifiable factors through a healthy diet pattern and physical activity. The aim was to analyze the recommendations of Public Health issued by the International Fund for Cancer Research (WCRF) and American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) in 2007 to prevent cancer. Compare the recommendations of the report Food, Nutrition and physical activity and cancer prevention: a global perspective, "with the national situation regarding these recommendations. Then, we propose national recommendations in accordance with the proposals of WCRF. The analysis reveals that Chile has a population level cancer risks associated with lifestyle, diet, body mass index and physical inactivity. The pattern of food consumption and nutritional profile and behaviors associated with the lifestyles of the population does not reflect the recommendations of international organizations, on the consumption of protective (vegetables, fruits high in antioxidants, fiber) and high risk (sugary drinks and juices, processed, high in sodium, total fat). Is required to educate people about healthy eating and lifestyles to maintain health PMID:25799684

  8. Self-Actualizing Men and Women: A Comparison Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Eleanor G.; Hansen, Jan B.

    1997-01-01

    The self-actualization of 167 women who lived in the Martha Cook (MC) dormitory of the University of Michigan (1950-1970) was compared to that of a group of Ivy League men researched in another study. In addition, two groups of MC women were compared to each other to identify differences which might explain why some self-actualized while other did…

  9. SELF-ACTUALIZATION AND THE UTILIZATION OF TALENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FRENCH, JOHN R.P.; MILLER, DANIEL R.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED (1) TO DEVELOP A THEORY OF THE CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION AS RELATED TO THE UTILIZATION OF TALENT, (2) TO FIT THE THEORY TO EXISTING DATA, AND (3) TO PLAN ONE OR MORE RESEARCH PROJECTS TO TEST THE THEORY. TWO ARTICLES ON IDENTITY AND MOTIVATION AND SELF-ACTUALIZATION AND SELF-IDENTITY THEORY REPORTED THE…

  10. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Aeronautics and Mission Directorate (ARMD) programs. Other Government and commercial program managers can also find this information useful.

  11. Benevolent Paradox: Integrating Community-Based Empowerment and Transdisciplinary Research Approaches into Traditional Frameworks to Increase Funding and Long-Term Sustainability of Chicano-Community Research Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Adela

    2014-01-01

    Niños Sanos, Familia Sana (NSFS) is a 5-year multi-intervention study aimed at preventing childhood obesity among Mexican-origin children in rural California. Using a transdisciplinary approach and community-based participatory research (CBPR) methodology, NSFS's development included a diversely trained team working in collaboration with…

  12. Cigarette makers pioneered many of our black arts of disinformation, including the funding of research to distract from the hazards of smoking. Ten Nobel prizes were the result. By funding distraction research, the cigarette industry became an important source of academic corruption, helping also to forge other forms of denialism on a global scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette Disinformation: Origins and Global Impact Robert N. Proctor The cigarette is the deadliest artifact in the history of human civilization. And whereas "only" a hundred million people died in the 20th century from smoking, we are presently on a pace to have several times that toll in the present century. Much of that catastrophe would not be possible without a massive campaign of disinformation. The cigarette industry pioneered many of the black arts of disinformation, cleverly exploiting the inherent skepticism of science to claim that "more research" was needed to resolve a purported "cigarette controversy." Cigarette makers funded hundreds of millions of dollars worth of "distraction research," most of which was solid empirical science but off topic, focusing on basic biology and biochemistry, viral and genetic causes of disease, and other "cigarette friendly" topics. At least ten Nobel prizes were the result. Cigarette skepticism was thus more complex than we normally imagine: the tobacco industry corrupted science by funding "alternative causation," meaning anything that could be used to draw attention away from cigarettes as a source of disease. The cigarette industry by this means became the most important source of academic corruption since the Nazi era. That corruption has also helped forge other forms of denialism and corruption on a global scale.

  13. Evaluation of Funded Projects for Development of Vocational Instructional Materials (Conclusion of Two Year Project). Final Report. Vocational-Technical Education Research Report, Volume 15, Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park. Div. of Occupational and Vocational Studies.

    The purpose of the second-year activities of this project was to develop a comprehensive inventory of available vocational curriculum material throughout the State of Pennsylvania, to determine weaknesses in funding efforts, and to provide suggestions by which to establish an efficient and effective funding pattern. The objectives were…

  14. The Impacts of State Performance Funding Systems on Higher Education Institutions: Research Literature Review and Policy Recommendations. CCRC Working Paper No. 37

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Kevin J.; Reddy, Vikash

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades policymakers have been seeking new ways to secure improved performance from higher education institutions. One popular approach has been performance funding, which involves use of a formula to tie funding to institutional performance on specified indicators. This report reviews findings from studies on performance…

  15. 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Stable Funding for Innovation and Continuous Improvement. Research Update: Highlights from the Out-of-School Time Database. Number 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimer, Christopher; Harris, Erin

    2012-01-01

    As the only federal funding stream that provides dedicated funds for afterschool programs across the country, the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) initiative plays an important role in supporting the innovation that takes place in afterschool programs. Social innovation has been defined as "a novel solution to a social problem…

  16. Research designs for the study of gene-environment interactions in psychiatric disorders. Report of a Foundations Fund for Research in Psychiatry Panel.

    PubMed

    Kidd, K K; Matthysee, S

    1978-08-01

    Understanding the genetic and environmental contributions (and their interactions, which are likely to be complex) to the etiology of psychiatric disorders requires research designs incorporating many basic principles of genetics. Genetic variation is likely to contribute to psychiatric disorders and genetic heterogeneity is likely to exist for any single disorder, ie, completely different genetic variants may each be capable of increasing an individual's susceptibility to the disorder. Thus, it is important to define phenotypes that may more closely reflect each individual genetic variant rather than to rely solely on the psychiatric diagnosis. Research should be undertaken with the goal of testing specific hypotheses that can be excluded. Research designs can include studies of unrelated individuals, twins, separated relatives, nuclear families, or extended pedigrees. Not all hypotheses can be tested on one type of data, and appropriate analytic methods vary. Because genetic hypotheses cannot be tested on studies of unrelated individuals, it is important that data be collected on families instead of unrelated individual patients and/or controls. Studies should include traits that bridge the gap between the genotype and the diagnostic phenotype. Such studies should be multidisciplinary, and the best statistical-genetics methodology should be used for data analysis. PMID:678045

  17. Working within local funding trends.

    PubMed

    Pomales-Connors, Irma

    2004-06-01

    Like politics, environmentalism, and fashion, there are trends in health care research and funding. According to a series of reports by the Foundation Center-which collects, organizes, and communicates information on U.S. philanthropy-it is important to understand the significant financial and programmatic changes in the way foundations give. For pharmacists considering soliciting grant support, it is critical that they become aware of these trends and be responsive to the local or regional environments that affect funding. PMID:16553471

  18. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  19. Can Naturoptics, Inc. Provide Self-funding Mentored Awards for Students, Research, Athletics, Schools, and Minority use of Natural Medicine Protocols?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Thomas; McLeod, Roger David

    2008-05-01

    Naturoptics, Inc. is issuing awards nurturing causes that its late officer and board member David Matthew Mc Leod had actively participated in until his death. The patented property ``Naturopathic method for recovery of healthy vision'' has been directed entirely toward activities indicated, with all proceeds currently going to awardees and academic entities for stated purposes. The process includes mentoring and teaching awardees their impaired vision can be quickly reversed by reengaging self-repairing feedback control features that visual abuse had thwarted. Various percentages are allotted to different stages of mentored student progression; remainders will initially be directed to mutually agreed academic entities' needs, with scholarship funding a top priority. Some activity involving research into natural tornado and earthquake events is hoped for, along with foundational questions in physics. Present board members hope that benefit to participating institutions and individuals can be brought to levels over 100,000 per year; hoped-for final benefits being allowed to proceed to at least ten times that. The process/method competes with billion dollar a year industries.

  20. The New York State Program for the Conservation and Preservation of Library Research Materials. Selected Press Clippings about Projects Funded by the Discretionary Grant Program, 1988/89 and 1989/90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Library, Albany. Div. of Library Development.

    This document is composed of clippings from news publications and press releases about projects funded by the New York State Discretionary Grant Program for Conservation and Preservation of Library Research Materials, which annually awards $500,000 to libraries, archives, historical societies, and similar agencies in New York State through…

  1. Biomedical research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Biomedical problems encountered by man in space which have been identified as a result of previous experience in simulated or actual spaceflight include cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone loss, muscle atrophy, red cell alterations, fluid and electrolyte loss, radiation effects, radiation protection, behavior, and performance. The investigations and the findings in each of these areas were reviewed. A description of how biomedical research is organized within NASA, how it is funded, and how it is being reoriented to meet the needs of future manned space missions is also provided.

  2. The Temptations of Corporate Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krimsky, Sheldon

    2004-01-01

    Scientific researchers on campus increasingly worry that commercial sponsorship skews conclusions and restricts data sharing. Boards can help balance conflicting interests. This article discusses how boards of trustees and all leaders at universities and nonprofit research institutes can set the balance in accepting privately funded research…

  3. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Castelló, Adela; Martín, Miguel; Ruiz, Amparo; Casas, Ana M.; Baena-Cañada, Jose M; Lope, Virginia; Antolín, Silvia; Sánchez, Pedro; Ramos, Manuel; Antón, Antonio; Muñoz, Montserrat; Bermejo, Begoña; De Juan-Ferré, Ana; Jara, Carlos; Chacón, José I; Jimeno, María A.; Rosado, Petra; Díaz, Elena; Guillem, Vicente; Lluch, Ana; Carrasco, Eva; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Vioque, Jesús; Pollán, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Background According to the “World Cancer Research Fund” and the “American Institute of Cancer Research” (WCRF/AICR) one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity. Objective To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer. Methods During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention:: 1)Maintain adequate body weight; 2)Be physically active; 3)Limit the intake of high density foods; 4)Eat mostly plant foods; 5)Limit the intake of animal foods; 6)Limit alcohol intake; 7)Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; 8)Meet nutritional needs through diet; S1)Breastfeed infants exclusively up to 6 months. We explored its association with BC by menopausal status and by intrinsic tumor subtypes (ER+/PR+ & HER2-; HER2+; ER&PR-&HER2-) using conditional and multinomial logistic models respectively. Results Our results point to a linear association between the degree of noncompliance and breast cancer risk. Taking women who met 6 or more recommendations as reference, those meeting less than 3 showed a three-fold excess risk (OR=2.98(CI95%:1.59-5.59)), especially for postmenopausal women (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.24;10.47)) and ER+/PR+&HER2- (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.84;7.05)) and HER2+ (OR=4.23(CI95%:1.66;10.78)) tumors. Noncompliance of recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and drinks that promote weight gain in premenopausal women (OR=2.24(CI95%:1.18;4.28); p for interaction=0.014) and triple negative tumors (OR=2.93(CI95%:1.12-7.63)); the intake of plant foods in postmenopausal women (OR=2.35(CI95%:1.24;4.44)) and triple negative tumors (OR=3.48(CI95%:1.46-8.31)); and the alcohol consumption in ER+/PR+&HER2- tumors (OR=1.52 (CI95%:1.06-2.19)) showed the strongest associations. Conclusion Breast cancer prevention might

  4. Bringing Scientific Inquiry Alive Using Real Grass Shrimp Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aultman, Terry; Curran, Mary Carla; Partridge, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This lesson was developed for middle school students using actual research on grass shrimp ("Palaemonetes pugio") to illustrate the process of a scientific investigation. The research was conducted at Savannah State University and funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Education through the Living Marine…

  5. The actual status of Astronomy in Moldova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, A.

    The astronomical research in the Republic of Moldova after Nicolae Donitch (Donici)(1874-1956(?)) were renewed in 1957, when a satellites observations station was open in Chisinau. Fotometric observations and rotations of first Soviet artificial satellites were investigated under a program SPIN put in action by the Academy of Sciences of former Socialist Countries. The works were conducted by Assoc. prof. Dr. V. Grigorevskij, which conducted also research in variable stars. Later, at the beginning of 60-th, an astronomical Observatory at the Chisinau State University named after Lenin (actually: the State University of Moldova), placed in Lozovo-Ciuciuleni villages was open, which were coordinated by Odessa State University (Prof. V.P. Tsesevich) and the Astrosovet of the USSR. Two main groups worked in this area: first conducted by V. Grigorevskij (till 1971) and second conducted by L.I. Shakun (till 1988), both graduated from Odessa State University. Besides this research areas another astronomical observations were made: Comets observations, astroclimate and atmospheric optics in collaboration with the Institute of the Atmospheric optics of the Siberian branch of the USSR (V. Chernobai, I. Nacu, C. Usov and A.F. Poiata). Comets observations were also made since 1988 by D. I. Gorodetskij which came to Chisinau from Alma-Ata and collaborated with Ukrainean astronomers conducted by K.I. Churyumov. Another part of space research was made at the State University of Tiraspol since the beggining of 70-th by a group of teaching staff of the Tiraspol State Pedagogical University: M.D. Polanuer, V.S. Sholokhov. No a collaboration between Moldovan astronomers and Transdniestrian ones actually exist due to War in Transdniestria in 1992. An important area of research concerned the Radiophysics of the Ionosphere, which was conducted in Beltsy at the Beltsy State Pedagogical Institute by a group of teaching staff of the University since the beginning of 70-th: N. D. Filip, E

  6. NCLB Low Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Anne C.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the impact brought about by the "No Child Left Behind" Act (NCLB) on school funding. Because of changes in the funding formulas, most of the increased funding will go to districts in which the highest number of poor children reside. Districts which are less impacted by poverty will lose funding. The author…

  7. Why Can't Ohio Equitably Fund Public Education? Education Reform Stifling Equitable Education Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Carlee Escue

    2015-01-01

    Ohio has a long history of school funding inequity. This manuscript provides a brief history of Ohio education funding, the equity and adequacy concerns. Education reform efforts have been expanding while the appropriate management of the funding mechanism has been underfunded or entirely ignored. The researcher examines the negative impact of…

  8. 7 CFR 3419.6 - Use of matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MATCHING FUNDS REQUIREMENT FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EXTENSION FORMULA FUNDS AT 1890 LAND-GRANT INSTITUTIONS, INCLUDING TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY, AND...

  9. 7 CFR 3419.7 - Redistribution of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MATCHING FUNDS REQUIREMENT FOR AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EXTENSION FORMULA FUNDS AT 1890 LAND-GRANT INSTITUTIONS, INCLUDING TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY, AND...

  10. Report to Congress on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program: Research funded and its linkages to environmental cleanup problems, and Environmental Management Science Program research award abstracts. Volume 2 of 3 -- Appendix B

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) serves as a catalyst for the application of scientific discoveries to the development and deployment of technologies that will lead to reduction of the costs and risks associated with cleaning up the nation`s nuclear complex. Appendix B provides details about each of the 202 research awards funded by the EMSP. This information may prove useful to researchers who are attempting to address the Department`s environmental management challenges in their work, program managers who are planning, integrating, and prioritizing Environmental Management projects, and stakeholders and regulators who are interested in the Department`s environmental challenges. The research award information is organized by the state and institution in which the lead principal investigator is located. In many cases, the lead principal investigator is one of several investigators at a number of different institutions. In these cases, the lead investigator (major collaborator) at each of the additional institutions is listed. Each research award abstract is followed by a list of high cost projects that can potentially be impacted by the research results. High cost projects are Environmental Management projects that have total costs greater than $50 million from the year 2007 and beyond, based on the March 1998 Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure Draft data, and have costs or quantities of material associated with an Environmental Management problem area. High cost projects which must remain active in the year 2007 and beyond to manage high risk are also identified. Descriptions of these potentially related high cost Environmental Management projects can be found in Appendix C. Additional projects in the same problem area as a research award can be located using the Index of High Cost Environmental Management Projects by Problem Area, at the end of Appendices B and C.

  11. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  12. 75 FR 52956 - Funding Opportunity

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration on Aging Funding Opportunity Purpose of Notice: Availability of funding opportunity announcement. Funding Opportunity Title/Program Name: Older Americans Act (OAA), Title VI, Part A... funding opportunity. Funding Opportunity Number: Program Announcement No. is HHS-2011-...

  13. EIL in an Actual Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coskun, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    The English as an International Language (EIL) research movement that has appeared due to the increasing number of non-native speakers outnumbering the native English speakers seems to challenge some of the traditional assumptions in ELT. Within the scope of ELT curriculum development, this study aims to argue against two of the traditional…

  14. JSC director's discretionary fund program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center Director's Discretionary Fund Program Annual Report provides a brief review of the status of projects undertaken during the 1990 fiscal year. Three space exploration initiative related issues were focused on: regenerative life support, human spacecraft design, and lunar surface habitat. A viable program of life sciences, space sciences, and engineering research has been maintained.

  15. Possible funding strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, T. F.

    1991-01-01

    Funding strategies are examined for the AIA rocket propulsion strategic plan. Either the government, industry, or universities can fund the project alone, or it was concluded, it works best if is a combination of these sources.

  16. Fund Raising with Panache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dedman, Robert

    1985-01-01

    The key to fund raising is the donor, and fund raisers should learn to cultivate potential donors, approach them with goals compatible with their own, supplement their thinking, get them involved, and swamp them with gratitude. (MSE)

  17. Corporate funding and ideological polarization about climate change.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on large-scale computational data and methods, this research demonstrates how polarization efforts are influenced by a patterned network of political and financial actors. These dynamics, which have been notoriously difficult to quantify, are illustrated here with a computational analysis of climate change politics in the United States. The comprehensive data include all individual and organizational actors in the climate change countermovement (164 organizations), as well as all written and verbal texts produced by this network between 1993-2013 (40,785 texts, more than 39 million words). Two main findings emerge. First, that organizations with corporate funding were more likely to have written and disseminated texts meant to polarize the climate change issue. Second, and more importantly, that corporate funding influences the actual thematic content of these polarization efforts, and the discursive prevalence of that thematic content over time. These findings provide new, and comprehensive, confirmation of dynamics long thought to be at the root of climate change politics and discourse. Beyond the specifics of climate change, this paper has important implications for understanding ideological polarization more generally, and the increasing role of private funding in determining why certain polarizing themes are created and amplified. Lastly, the paper suggests that future studies build on the novel approach taken here that integrates large-scale textual analysis with social networks. PMID:26598653

  18. Corporate funding and ideological polarization about climate change

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on large-scale computational data and methods, this research demonstrates how polarization efforts are influenced by a patterned network of political and financial actors. These dynamics, which have been notoriously difficult to quantify, are illustrated here with a computational analysis of climate change politics in the United States. The comprehensive data include all individual and organizational actors in the climate change countermovement (164 organizations), as well as all written and verbal texts produced by this network between 1993–2013 (40,785 texts, more than 39 million words). Two main findings emerge. First, that organizations with corporate funding were more likely to have written and disseminated texts meant to polarize the climate change issue. Second, and more importantly, that corporate funding influences the actual thematic content of these polarization efforts, and the discursive prevalence of that thematic content over time. These findings provide new, and comprehensive, confirmation of dynamics long thought to be at the root of climate change politics and discourse. Beyond the specifics of climate change, this paper has important implications for understanding ideological polarization more generally, and the increasing role of private funding in determining why certain polarizing themes are created and amplified. Lastly, the paper suggests that future studies build on the novel approach taken here that integrates large-scale textual analysis with social networks. PMID:26598653

  19. Program development fund: FY 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    It is the objective of the Fund to encourage innovative research to maintain the Laboratory's position at the forefront of science. Funds are used to explore new ideas and concepts that may potentially develop into new directions of research for the Laboratory and that are consistent with the major needs, overall goals, and mission of the Laboratory and the DOE. The types of projects eligible for support from PDF include: work in forefront areas of science and technology for the primary purpose of enriching Laboratory research and development capabilities; advanced study of new hypotheses, new experimental concepts, or innovative approaches to energy problems; experiments directed toward ''proof of principle'' or early determination of the utility of a new concept; and conception, design analyses, and development of experimental devices, instruments, or components. This report is a review of these research programs.

  20. Perspective: Disclosing hidden sources of funding.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2009-09-01

    In this article, the author discusses ethical and policy issues related to the disclosure of hidden sources of funding in research. The author argues that authors have an ethical obligation to disclose hidden sources of funding and that journals should adopt policies to enforce this obligation. Journal policies should require disclosure of hidden sources of funding that authors know about and that have a direct relation to their research. To stimulate this discussion, the author describes a recent case: investigators who conducted a lung cancer screening study had received funding from a private foundation that was supported by a tobacco company, but they did not disclose this relationship to the journal. Investigators and journal editors must be prepared to deal with these issues in a manner that promotes honesty, transparency, fairness, and accountability in research. The development of well-defined, reasonable policies pertaining to hidden sources of funding can be a step in this direction. PMID:19707061