Science.gov

Sample records for actual response time

  1. Time experiences, self-actualizing values, and creativity.

    PubMed

    Yonge, G D

    1975-12-01

    The Personal Orientation Inventory (POI), the Inventory of Temporal Experiences (ITE), and the Adjective Check List (ACL) were administered to 80 subjects. Sixteen scores were derived from the POI, 4 from the ITE and a Creativity score for the ACL. The resulting intercorrelations were interpreted in the light of the theories of Maslow and Hugenholtz which postulate a convergence of self-actualization, creativity, and certain experiences of time. The present study presents some evidence for the expected convergence and contributes to the construct validity of several of the variables studied. PMID:1202191

  2. Response to actual and simulated recordings of conventional takeoff and landing jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mabry, J. E.; Sullivan, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    Comparability between noise characteristics of synthesized recordings of aircraft in flight and actual recordings were investigated. Although the synthesized recordings were more smoothly time-varying than the actual recordings and the synthesizer could not produce a comb-filter effect that was present in the actual recordings, results supported the conclusion that annoyance response is comparable to the synthesized and actual recordings. A correction for duration markedly improved the validity of engineering calculation procedures designed to measure noise annoyance. Results led to the conclusion that the magnitude estimation psychophysical method was a highly reliable approach for evaluating engineering calculation procedures designed to measure noise annoyance. For repeated presentations of pairs of actual recordings, differences between judgment results for identical signals ranged from 0.0 to 0.5 db.

  3. Actual preoperative fasting time in Brazilian hospitals: the BIGFAST multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    de Aguilar-Nascimento, José E; de Almeida Dias, Ana L; Dock-Nascimento, Diana B; Correia, Maria Isabel TD; Campos, Antonio CL; Portari-Filho, Pedro Eder; Oliveira, Sergio S

    2014-01-01

    Background Prolonged fasting increases organic response to trauma. This multicenter study investigated the gap between the prescribed and the actual preoperative fasting times in Brazilian hospitals and factors associated with this gap. Methods Patients (18–90-years-old) who underwent elective operations between August 2011 and September 2012 were included in the study. The actual and prescribed times for fasting were collected and correlated with sex, age, surgical disease (malignancies or benign disease), operation type, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, type of hospital (public or private), and nutritional status. Results A total of 3,715 patients (58.1% females) with a median age of 49 (18–94) years from 16 Brazilian hospitals entered the study. The median (range) preoperative fasting time was 12 (2–216) hours, and fasting time was longer (P<0.001) in hospitals using a traditional fasting protocol (13 [6–216] hours) than in others that had adopted new guidelines (8 [2–48] hours). Almost 80% (n=2,962) of the patients were operated on after 8 or more hours of fasting and 46.2% (n=1,718) after more than 12 hours. Prolonged fasting was not associated with physical score, age, sex, type of surgery, or type of hospital. Patients operated on due to a benign disease had an extended duration of preoperative fasting. Conclusion Actual preoperative fasting time is significantly longer than prescribed fasting time in Brazilian hospitals. Most of these hospitals still adopt traditional rather than modern fasting guidelines. All patients are at risk of long periods of fasting, especially those in hospitals that follow traditional practices. PMID:24627636

  4. 33 CFR 142.4 - Duties of lessees, permittees, and persons responsible for actual operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duties of lessees, permittees, and persons responsible for actual operations. 142.4 Section 142.4 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES...

  5. Testing two temporal upscaling schemes for the estimation of the time variability of the actual evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.

    2015-10-01

    Temporal availability of grapes actual evapotranspiration is an emerging issue since vineyards farms are more and more converted from rainfed to irrigated agricultural systems. The manuscript aims to verify the accuracy of the actual evapotranspiration retrieval coupling a single source energy balance approach and two different temporal upscaling schemes. The first scheme tests the temporal upscaling of the main input variables, namely the NDVI, albedo and LST; the second scheme tests the temporal upscaling of the energy balance output, the actual evapotranspiration. The temporal upscaling schemes were implemented on: i) airborne remote sensing data acquired monthly during a whole irrigation season over a Sicilian vineyard; ii) low resolution MODIS products released daily or weekly; iii) meteorological data acquired by standard gauge stations. Daily MODIS LST products (MOD11A1) were disaggregated using the DisTrad model, 8-days black and white sky albedo products (MCD43A) allowed modeling the total albedo, and 8-days NDVI products (MOD13Q1) were modeled using the Fisher approach. Results were validated both in time and space. The temporal validation was carried out using the actual evapotranspiration measured in situ using data collected by a flux tower through the eddy covariance technique. The spatial validation involved airborne images acquired at different times from June to September 2008. Results aim to test whether the upscaling of the energy balance input or output data performed better.

  6. Characterizing the response of galloping energy harvesters using actual wind statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we incorporate actual wind statistics into the response of galloping energy harvesters and shed light onto the influence of the wind probability distribution on the average power as compared to the deterministic scenario. Specifically, we obtain an expression for the average output power of the harvester as a function of the wind statistical averages, which are, in turn, obtained by fitting wind data using a Weibull Probability Density Function (PDF). The resulting expression is then used to demonstrate that knowledge of the actual PDF is essential for correct power predictions as well as for accurate electric load optimization. We discuss the influence of the wind direction on the average output power and show that the direction of the prevailing wind is not necessarily the ideal direction to maximize the average power.

  7. Modelling bulk surface resistance from MODIS time series data to estimate actual regional evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autovino, Dario; Minacapilli, Mario; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Estimation of actual evapotraspiration by means of Penman-Monteith (P-M) equation requires the knowledge of the so-called 'bulk surface resistance', rc,act, representing the vapour flow resistance through the transpiring crop and evaporating soil surface. The accurate parameterization of rc,act still represents an unexploited topic, especially in the case of heterogeneous land surface. In agro-hydrological applications, the P-M equation commonly used to evaluate reference evapotranspiration (ET0) of a well-watered 'standardized crop' (grass or alfalfa), generally assumes for the bulk surface resistance a value of 70 s m-1. Moreover, specific crop coefficients have to be used to estimate maximum and/or actual evapotranspiration based on ET0. In this paper, a simple procedure for the indirect estimation of rc,act as function of a vegetation index computed from remote acquisition of Land Surface Temperature (LST), is proposed. An application was carried out in an irrigation district located near Castelvetrano, in South-West of Sicily, mainly cultivated with olive groves, in which actual evapotranspiration fluxes were measured during two years (2010-2011) by an Eddy Covariance flux tower (EC). Evapotranspiration measurements allowed evaluating rc,actbased on the numerical inversion of the P-M equation. In the same study area, a large time series of MODIS LST data, characterized by a spatial resolution of 1x1 km and a time step of 8-days, was also acquired for the period from 2000 to 2014. A simple Vegetation Index Temperatures (VTI), with values ranging from 0 to 1, was computed using normalized LST values. Evapotranspiration fluxes measured in 2010 were used to calibrate the relationship between rc,act and VTI, whereas data from 2011 were used for its validation. The preliminary results evidenced that, for the considered crop, an almost constant value of rc,act, corresponding to about 250 s m-1, can be considered typical of periods in which the crop is well

  8. Comparing predicted and actual affective responses to process versus outcome: an emotion-as-feedback perspective.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Jessica Y Y; Wong, Kin Fai Ellick; Tang, Suki K Y

    2013-10-01

    One of the conjectures in affective forecasting literature is that people are advised to discount their anticipated emotions because their forecasts are often inaccurate. The present research distinguishes between emotional reactions to process versus those to outcome, and highlights an alternative view that affective misforecasts could indeed be adaptive to goal pursuit. Using an ultimatum game, Study 1 showed that people overpredicted how much they would regret and be disappointed by the amount of effort they exerted, should the outcomes turned out worse than expected; nonetheless, people could accurately predict their emotional responses to unfavorable outcomes per se. In a natural setting of a university examination, Study 2 demonstrated that actual regret and disappointment toward favorable outcomes were more intense than the level people expected, but this discrepancy was not observed in their emotional responses to efforts they had invested. These two distinct patterns of results substantiate the argument that the deviation between predicted and actual emotions is dependent on the referents of the emotional reactions. PMID:23831563

  9. Response times to conceptual questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Watkins, Jessica; Mazur, Eric; Ibrahim, Ahmed

    2013-09-01

    We measured the time taken by students to respond to individual Force Concept Inventory (FCI) questions. We examine response time differences between correct and incorrect answers, both before and after instruction. We also determine the relation between response time and expressed confidence. Our data reveal three results of interest. First, response times are longer for incorrect answers than for correct ones, indicating that distractors are not automatic choices. Second, response times increase after instruction for both correct and incorrect answers, supporting the notion that instruction changes students' approach to conceptual questions. Third, response times are inversely related to students' expressed confidence; the lower their confidence, the longer it takes to respond.

  10. Modeling Response Signal and Response Time Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Roger

    2006-01-01

    The diffusion model (Ratcliff, 1978) and the leaky competing accumulator model (LCA, Usher & McClelland, 2001) were tested against two-choice data collected from the same subjects with the standard response time procedure and the response signal procedure. In the response signal procedure, a stimulus is presented and then, at one of a number of…

  11. Response time of internauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Anders

    2001-07-01

    A new experiment measuring the dynamical response of the Internet population to a “point-like” perturbation has been performed. The nature of the perturbation was that of an announcement, specifically a web-interview on stock market crashes, which contained the URL to the author's articles on the subject. It was established that the download rate obeys the relation ≈1/ t in qualitative agreement with previously reported results.

  12. Education and Decision Making at the Time of Triptan Prescribing: Patient Expectations vs Actual Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Paul G.; Pavlovic, Jelena M.; Lettich, Alyssa; Wells, Rebecca E.; Robertson, Carrie E.; Mullin, Kathleen; Charleston, Larry; Dodick, David W.; Schwedt, Todd J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Optimizing patient satisfaction with their medical care and maximizing patient adherence with treatment plans requires an understanding of patient preferences regarding education and their role in decision making when treatments are prescribed. Objective To assess the congruence between patient expectations and actual practice regarding education and decision making at the time a triptan is prescribed. Methods This multicenter cross-sectional survey was performed by headache fellow members of the American Headache Society Headache Fellows Research Consortium at their respective tertiary care headache clinics. Migraine patients who were new patients to the headache clinic and who were current triptan users (use within prior 3 months and for ≥1 year) or past triptan users (no use within 6 months; prior use within 2 years) completed questionnaires that assessed the education they received and their role in decision making at the time a triptan was first prescribed as well as their desire for education and participation in decision making when a triptan is prescribed. Results Consistent with patient preference, most participants received the majority of their education about the triptan from the prescriber's office (70.2%). In descending rank order, participants most desired to be informed about how to decide if a triptan should be taken, when during the course of migraine a triptan should be taken, possible side effects, cost, and how to obtain refills. Regarding side effects, most participants preferred to receive education about the most common side effects of a triptan rather than addressing all possible side effects. Regarding triptan dosing, participants desired to be informed in descending order of importance about taking other medications with triptans, how many doses can be taken for each migraine, how many doses can be taken each week/month, what to do if the triptan does not work, and the triptan mechanism of action. The vast majority of

  13. Time interval moderates the relationship between psyching-up and actual sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Hammoudi-Nassib, Sarra; Chtara, Moktar; Nassib, Sabri; Briki, Walid; Hammoudi-Riahi, Sabra; Tod, David; Chamari, Karim

    2014-11-01

    This study attempted to test whether the strongest effect of psyching-up (PU) strategy on actual sprint performance can be observed when the strategy is used immediately (or almost) before performance compared with when there is a delay between PU and performance. To do so, 16 male sprinters (age, 20.6 ± 1.3 years; body mass, 77.5 ± 7.1 kg; height, 180.8 ± 5.6 cm) were enrolled in a counterbalanced experimental design in which participants were randomly assigned to 10 sessions (2 [Experimental Condition: imagery vs. distraction] × 5 [Time Intervals: no interval, 1 minute, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, and 5 minutes]). Before performing the experimental tasks, participants rated: (a) the Hooper index, (b) their degree of self-confidence, and (c) after the completion of the experimental test; they rated their perceived effort. Findings showed that the imagery significantly improved sprint performance. Specifically, the imagery enhanced performance on the phase of acceleration (0-10 m) and on the overall sprint (0-30 m) when used immediately before performance and at 1- and 2-minute intervals but not for 3- and 5-minute intervals. These findings support the hypothesis that the potential effect of the PU strategy on performance vanishes over time. The pre-experimental task Hooper and self-efficacy indexes did not change across the 10 experimental sessions, reinforcing the view that the observed performance changes were directly caused by the experimental manipulation and not through any altered status of the athletes (self-efficacy, fatigue/recovery, and stress). The potential mechanisms underlying such a process and practical applications are discussed. PMID:25029002

  14. Virologic response and haematologic toxicity of boceprevir- and telaprevir-containing regimens in actual clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Butt, A. A.; Yan, P.; Shaikh, O. S.; Freiberg, M. S.; Re, V. Lo; Justice, A. C.; Sherman, K. E.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Effectiveness, safety and tolerability of boceprevir (BOC) and telaprevir (TPV) in actual clinical settings remain unknown. We determined rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) and haematologic adverse effects among persons treated with BOC- or TPV-containing regimens, compared with pegylated interferon/ribavirin (PEG/RBV). Using an established cohort of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected persons, Electronically Retrieved Cohort of HCV Infected Veterans (ERCHIVES), we identified those treated with a BOC- or TPV-containing regimen and HCV genotype 1-infected controls treated with PEG/RBV. We excluded those with HIV co-infection and missing HCV RNA values to determine SVR. Primary endpoints were SVR (undetectable HCV RNA ≥12 weeks after treatment completion) and haematologic toxicity (grade 3/4 anaemia, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia). We evaluated 2288 persons on BOC-, 409 on TPV-containing regimen and 6308 on PEG/RBV. Among these groups, respectively, 31%, 43% and 9% were treatment-experienced; 17%, 37% and 14% had baseline cirrhosis; 63%, 54% and 48% were genotype 1a. SVR rates among noncirrhotics were as follows: treatment naïve: 65% (BOC), 67% (TPV) and 31% (PEG/RBV); treatment experienced: 57% (BOC), 54% (TPV) and 13% (PEG/RBV); (P-value not significant for BOC vs TPV; P < 0.0001 for BOC or TPV vs PEG/RBV). Haematologic toxicities among BOC-, TPV- and PEG/RBV-treated groups were as follows: grade 3/4 anaemia 7%, 11% and 3%; grade 4 thrombocytopenia 2.2%, 5.4% and 1.7%; grade 4 neutropenia 8.2%, 5.6% and 3.4%. SVR rates are higher and closer to those reported in pivotal clinical trials among BOC- and TPV-treated persons compared with PEG/RBV-treated persons. Haematologic adverse events are frequent, but severe toxicity is uncommon. PMID:25524834

  15. 45 CFR 612.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 612.5 Section 612.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... physical safety of an individual; or (B) An urgency to inform the public about an actual or alleged...

  16. Habenula responses to potential and actual loss in major depression: preliminary evidence for lateralized dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Furman, Daniella J; Gotlib, Ian H

    2016-05-01

    The habenula has been implicated in predicting negative events and in responding to unexpected negative outcomes. Animal models of depression have supported the hypothesis that perturbations in habenula activity contribute to the pathophysiology of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), a psychiatric illness characterized by abnormalities in responding to negative feedback and by pessimism in evaluating the likelihood of future events. No research to date, however, has examined human habenula responses to potential and experienced negative outcomes in MDD. In this study, depressed and healthy control participants performed a probabilistic guessing task for monetary rewards and penalties during high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging of the habenula. In healthy adults, we observed a pattern of habenula activation consistent with its hypothesized role in predicting future losses and responding to suboptimal outcomes. In contrast, in depressed participants the left habenula was not activated significantly during the prediction or experience of monetary penalty. Complementing this group difference, attenuated habenula activation to negative feedback in control participants was associated with levels of shame and rumination. The results of this study suggest that depressed individuals are characterized by dysfunction in a neural system involved in generating expectations and comparing expectations with objective outcomes. PMID:26884545

  17. Assessing daily actual evapotranspiration through energy balance: an experiment to evaluate the selfpreservation hypothesis with acquisition time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.; Rallo, G.

    2013-10-01

    An operational use of the actual evapotranspiration estimates requires the integration from instantaneous to daily values. This can commonly be achieved under the hypothesis of daytime self-preservation of the evaporative fraction. In this study, it has been evaluated the effect of this assumption on the assessment of daily evapotranspiration from proximity sensing images acquired at hourly intervals over a homogeneous olive groove. Results have been validated by comparison with observations made by a micrometeorological (EC-flux tower) and an eco-physiological (sap flux) sensor. SEBAL model has been applied to thermal and multispectral images acquired during a clear day on August 2009 trough a FLIR A320G thermal camera and a Tetracam MCA II multispectral camera, installed on a tethered helium balloon. Thermal and multispectral images were characterized by very high spatial resolution. This experiment aims to analyze two effects: 1) the consistency of the self-preservation hypothesis for daily estimates of the actual evapotranspiration from hourly assessments at different times of the day; 2) the effects of the spatial resolution on the performances of the energy balance model. To evaluate the effects of the spatial resolution, semi-hourly observations made by a flux tower and sap-flow measures were compared to the evapotranspiration estimates performed using downscaled images at resolutions close to canopy sizes (2, 5 and 10 m). Results show that the best estimates are obtained with a spatial resolution comparable to the average size of the canopy with images taken approximately at 10 UTC.

  18. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18... REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal is... later than the third calendar day after filing. If the time period for response to a Request or...

  19. A Measurement Model for Likert Responses that Incorporates Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a model for response times that is proposed as a supplement to the usual factor-analytic model for responses to graded or more continuous typical-response items. The use of the proposed model together with the factor model provides additional information about the respondent and can potentially increase the accuracy of the…

  20. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal...

  1. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal...

  2. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal...

  3. 28 CFR 542.18 - Response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Response time. 542.18 Section 542.18 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDY Administrative Remedy Program § 542.18 Response time. If accepted, a Request or Appeal...

  4. 29 CFR 1610.9 - Responses: timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Responses: timing. 1610.9 Section 1610.9 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS Production or Disclosure Under 5 U.S.C. 552 § 1610.9 Responses: timing. (a) The Legal Counsel's designee, the regional attorney, or the regional...

  5. 29 CFR 1610.9 - Responses: timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Responses: timing. 1610.9 Section 1610.9 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS Production or Disclosure Under 5 U.S.C. 552 § 1610.9 Responses: timing. (a) The EEOC utilizes a multitrack system for responding to FOIA requests....

  6. 29 CFR 1610.9 - Responses: timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Responses: timing. 1610.9 Section 1610.9 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS Production or Disclosure Under 5 U.S.C. 552 § 1610.9 Responses: timing. (a) The EEOC utilizes a multitrack system for responding to FOIA requests....

  7. 29 CFR 1610.9 - Responses: timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responses: timing. 1610.9 Section 1610.9 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS Production or Disclosure Under 5 U.S.C. 552 § 1610.9 Responses: timing. (a) The Legal Counsel's designee, the regional attorney, or the regional...

  8. Intrinsic Response Time of Graphene Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Graphene-based photodetectors are promising new devices for high-speed optoelectronic applications. However, despite recent efforts it is not clear what determines the ultimate speed limit of these devices. Here, we present measurements of the intrinsic response time of metal–graphene–metal photodetectors with monolayer graphene using an optical correlation technique with ultrashort laser pulses. We obtain a response time of 2.1 ps that is mainly given by the short lifetime of the photogenerated carriers. This time translates into a bandwidth of ∼262 GHz. Moreover, we investigate the dependence of the response time on gate voltage and illumination laser power. PMID:21627096

  9. Silicon Timing Response to Particles and Light

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is observed growing interest to fast timing detectors in high energy physics, related, for example, with collider luminosity increase (LHC) [1]. The options of CMS [2] calorimeter upgrade based on silicon detectors renewed interest to the timing study of this type of detectors. The article is devoted to study of silicon timing response to particles and light.

  10. Actual timing of neodymium isotopic variations recorded by Fe-Mn crusts in the western North Atlantic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, K.W.; Lee, D.-C.; Christensen, J.N.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts from the western North Atlantic record variations in the Nd and Pb isotopic composition of Cenozoic deep water preserved during their growth. The timing and cause of the most striking change have been the subject of debate. Some have proposed that the shift took place after 4 Ma in response to the closure of the Panama gateway. Others have argued that the major change in isotope composition occurred as early as 8 Ma. This study presents high-resolution Nd isotope records for crusts previously dated using 10Be/9Be chronology. These data confirm that the shifts in Nd occurred after 4 Ma, consistent with a likely relationship with the closure of the Central American Isthmus and intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation, and in accordance with changes seen in other physical and chemical records. These results illustrate the need for both a robust chronological framework and high-resolution records before a reliable paleoceanographic interpretation can be made of the variations recorded by Fe-Mn crusts.

  11. Response time for multilayered platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Response time constants for several multilayered temperature transducers were determined numerically by using Martin Marietta's MITAS software package which is available at NASA Langley Research Center. Present results were found in close agreement with the solutions reported in the literature, thus, the capability of MITAS was justified. On the basis of experiences gained, the MITAS is recommended for use in predicting the response time constants of sensors by an in-situ technique.

  12. The Value of Response Times in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    A new and very interesting approach to the analysis of responses and response times is proposed by Goldhammer (this issue). In his approach, differences in the speed-ability compromise within respondents are considered to confound the differences in ability between respondents. These confounding effects of speed on the inferences about ability can…

  13. Hierarchical Bayes Models for Response Time Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craigmile, Peter F.; Peruggia, Mario; Van Zandt, Trisha

    2010-01-01

    Human response time (RT) data are widely used in experimental psychology to evaluate theories of mental processing. Typically, the data constitute the times taken by a subject to react to a succession of stimuli under varying experimental conditions. Because of the sequential nature of the experiments there are trends (due to learning, fatigue,…

  14. Principal's Organizational Activities: An Analysis of the Differences between Actual and Ideal Time Expenditures as a Function of Career Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the gap between elementary school principals' rankings on current and ideal allocations of time for staff, student, managerial, curriculum, strategic, fiscal, and community activities as a function of career stage. Most principals surveyed preferred to spend more time on curricular and strategic activities than they were…

  15. What do stream tracers actually measure? Parameterization of stream transport models with geophysics-based transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    Stream solute tracers are a popular tool to quantify exchanges of water and solutes between the advection-dominated main channel and locations of temporary (commonly "transient") storage. Commonly, in-stream tracer time-series are interpreted with numerical models using assumed residence time distributions for the subsurface because the true distribution cannot be measured. Here, we use time-series analysis of geophysical images of hyporheic solute transport to assess the hyporheic residence time distribution in-situ. This residence time distribution is used to parameterize a numerical model of solute transport and hyporheic exchange. A best-fit is determined by adjusting the maximum observed residence time to consider. In this way, we develop a threshold to differentiate locations in the subsurface that contributed to the in-stream breakthrough curve from those that were beyond the window of detection. Finally, this threshold can be mapped onto the geophysical transect to visualize the physical extent of flowpaths contributing to the in-stream solute breakthrough curve. For the first time, we show the window of detection (a temporal concept) mapped onto a spatial domain.

  16. 29 CFR 1610.9 - Responses: timing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responses: timing. 1610.9 Section 1610.9 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS Production or... reasonably be expected to pose an imminent threat to the life or physical safety of an individual; or...

  17. RESPONSE TIMES IN DECISION-MAKING TASKS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DAGLE, EVERETT F.; AND OTHERS

    THE HUMAN OPERATOR AFFECTS TOTAL PERFORMANCE OF SEMI-AUTOMATED SYSTEMS, BUT LITTLE IS KNOWN ABOUT HIS SOURCES OF ERROR, PARTICULARLY WITH RESPECT TO RESPONSE TIME. UNDER CONTROLLED LABORATORY CONDITIONS, 37 FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORE GIRLS ATTENDING JUNIOR COLLEGE WERE ASKED TO GUESS A SERIES OF RANDOM NUMBERS GENERATED BY AN ELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEM…

  18. A Ballistic Model of Choice Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott; Heathcote, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Almost all models of response time (RT) use a stochastic accumulation process. To account for the benchmark RT phenomena, researchers have found it necessary to include between-trial variability in the starting point and/or the rate of accumulation, both in linear (R. Ratcliff & J. N. Rouder, 1998) and nonlinear (M. Usher & J. L. McClelland, 2001)…

  19. Investigation of response time testing requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, V.I. ); Mayo, C.W. ); Weiss, J. )

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of the Response Time Testing (RTT) Program was to determine if requirements for RTT could be eliminated for specific pressure and differential pressure transmitters and switches. This program was initiated when experience and historical data from a significant number of nuclear power plants indicated that, while RTT is both resource and exposure intensive, an insignificant number of pressure sensor failures have been detected through this type of testing. Assessment of plant response time data and performance of Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) on sensor hardware were the mechanisms used by the program to determine the redundancy of RTT in conjunction with other required periodic testing (e.g., calibrations, channel checks, surveillance tests). In general, the FMEA results indicated RTT is redundant to other periodic tests. Results of the program identified only two response time failure modes and two manufacturing/handling defects that may not concurrently affect sensor output. The two failure modes affect a limited number of sensor models. Appropriate testing has been identified in cases where response time degradation may not be coincident with significant sensor output change. 14 refs., 19 figs., 39 tabs.

  20. Creating Responsive Schools: Contextualizing Early Warning, Timely Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Kevin P.; Osher, David; Hoffman, Catherine C.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of the Department of Education's 1998 publication, "Early Warning, Timely Response: A Guide to Safe Schools," stresses the importance of violence prevention by providing a supportive schoolwide climate and responding early to at-risk students' academic and behavioral problems. Early imminent warning signs are highlighted, as are…

  1. Patterns of Response Times and Response Choices to Science Questions: The Influence of Relative Processing Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Scaife, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    We report on five experiments investigating response choices and response times to simple science questions that evoke student "misconceptions," and we construct a simple model to explain the patterns of response choices. Physics students were asked to compare a physical quantity represented by the slope, such as speed, on simple physics…

  2. Simulation of yearly rainfall time series at microscale resolution with actual properties: Intermittency, scale invariance, and rainfall distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akrour, Nawal; Chazottes, Aymeric; Verrier, Sébastien; Mallet, Cécile; Barthes, Laurent

    2015-09-01

    Rainfall is a physical phenomenon resulting from the combination of numerous physical processes involving a wide range of scales, from microphysical processes to the general circulation of the atmosphere. Moreover, unlike other geophysical variables such as water vapor concentration, rainfall is characterized by a relaxation behavior that leads to an alternation of wet and dry periods. It follows that rainfall is a complex process which is highly variable both in time and space. Precipitation is thus characterized by the following features: rain/no-rain intermittency, multiple scaling regimes, and extreme events. All these properties are difficult to model simultaneously, especially when a large time and/or space scale domain is required. The aim of this paper is to develop a simulator capable of generating high-resolution rain-rate time series (15 s), the main statistical properties of which are close to an observed rain-rate time series. We also attempt to develop a model having consistent properties even when the fine-resolution-simulated time series are aggregated to a coarser resolution. In order to break the simulation problem down into subcomponents, the authors have focused their attention on several key properties of rainfall. The simulator is based on a sequential approach in which, first, the simulation of rain/no-rain durations permits the retrieval of fractal properties of the rain support. Then, the generation of rain rates through the use of a multifractal, Fractionally Integrated Flux (FIF), model enables the restitution of the rainfall's multifractal properties. This second step includes a denormalization process that was added in order to generate realistic rain-rate distributions.

  3. Perception Versus Actual Performance in Timely Tissue Plasminogen Activation Administration in the Management of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheryl B; Cox, Margueritte; Olson, DaiWai M; Britz, Gavin W; Constable, Mark; Fonarow, Gregg C; Schwamm, Lee; Peterson, Eric D; Shah, Bimal R

    2015-01-01

    Background Timely thrombolytic therapy can improve stroke outcomes. Nevertheless, the ability of US hospitals to meet guidelines for intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains suboptimal. What is unclear is whether hospitals accurately perceive their rate of tPA “door-to-needle” (DTN) time within 60 minutes and how DTN rates compare across different hospitals. Methods and Results DTN performance was defined by the percentage of treated patients who received tPA within 60 minutes of arrival. Telephone surveys were obtained from staff at 141 Get With The Guidelines hospitals, representing top, middle, and lowDTN performance. Less than one-third (29.1%) of staff accurately identified their DTN performance. Among middle- and low-performing hospitals (n=92), 56 sites (60.9%) overestimated their performance; 42% of middle performers and 85% of low performers overestimated their performance. Sites that overestimated tended to have lower annual volumes of tPA administration (median 8.4 patients [25th to 75th percentile 5.9 to 11.8] versus 10.2 patients [25th to 75th percentile 8.2 to 17.3], P=0.047), smaller percentages of eligible patients receiving tPA (84.7% versus 89.8%, P=0.008), and smaller percentages of DTN ≤60 minutes among treated patients (10.6% versus 16.6%, P=0.002). Conclusions Hospitals often overestimate their ability to deliver timely tPA to treated patients. Our findings indicate the need to routinely provide comparative provider performance rates as a key step to improving the quality of acute stroke care. PMID:26201547

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring response time

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Edward W.; August, Charles

    1985-01-01

    A method of measuring the response time of an electrical instrument which generates an output signal in response to the application of a specified input, wherein the output signal varies as a function of time and when subjected to a step input approaches a steady-state value, comprises the steps of: (a) applying a step input of predetermined value to the electrical instrument to generate an output signal; (b) simultaneously starting a timer; (c) comparing the output signal to a reference signal to generate a stop signal when the output signal is substantially equal to the reference signal, the reference signal being a specified percentage of the steady-state value of the output signal corresponding to the predetermined value of the step input; and (d) applying the stop signal when generated to stop the timer.

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring response time

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, E.W.; August, C.

    1983-08-11

    A method of measuring the response time of an electrical instrument which generates an output signal in response to the application of a specified input, wherein the output signal varies as a function of time and when subjected to a step input approaches a steady-state value, comprises the steps of: (a) applying a step input of predetermined value to the electrical instrument to generate an output signal; (b) simultaneously starting a timer; (c) comparing the output signal to a reference signal to generate a stop signal when the output signal is substantially equal to the reference signal, the reference signal being a specified percentage of the steady-state value of the output signal corresponding to the predetermined value of the step input; and (d) applying the stop signal when generated to stop the timer.

  6. Binocular summation and peripheral visual response time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliland, K.; Haines, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Six males were administered a peripheral visual response time test to the onset of brief small stimuli imaged in 10-deg arc separation intervals across the dark adapted horizontal retinal meridian under both binocular and monocular viewing conditions. This was done in an attempt to verify the existence of peripheral binocular summation using a response time measure. The results indicated that from 50-deg arc right to 50-deg arc left of the line of sight binocular summation is a reasonable explanation for the significantly faster binocular data. The stimulus position by viewing eye interaction was also significant. A discussion of these and other analyses is presented along with a review of related literature.

  7. Response time correlations for platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    The 'plunge method' recommended by ASTM has been used to determine the time constant of 100-ohm platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) considered for use in the National Transonic Facility. It is shown that the response time of ventilated PRT can be correlated with the reciprocal of the heat transfer coefficient in a given field. Universal correlations are established for the 100- and 1000-ohm PRT with uncertainties of 20 and 30 percent, respectively. The correlations are found to be consistent with the uncertainty involved in heat transfer correlations available in the literature and are recommended for use in flowing liquids and gases.

  8. Time-dependent onshore tsunami response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apotsos, Alex; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    While bulk measures of the onshore impact of a tsunami, including the maximum run-up elevation and inundation distance, are important for hazard planning, the temporal evolution of the onshore flow dynamics likely controls the extent of the onshore destruction and the erosion and deposition of sediment that occurs. However, the time-varying dynamics of actual tsunamis are even more difficult to measure in situ than the bulk parameters. Here, a numerical model based on the non-linear shallow water equations is used to examine the effects variations in the wave characteristics, bed slope, and bottom roughness have on the temporal evolution of the onshore flow. Model results indicate that the onshore flow dynamics vary significantly over the parameter space examined. For example, the flow dynamics over steep, smooth morphologies tend to be temporally symmetric, with similar magnitude velocities generated during the run-up and run-down phases of inundation. Conversely, on shallow, rough onshore topographies the flow dynamics tend to be temporally skewed toward the run-down phase of inundation, with the magnitude of the flow velocities during run-up and run-down being significantly different. Furthermore, for near-breaking tsunami waves inundating over steep topography, the flow velocity tends to accelerate almost instantaneously to a maximum and then decrease monotonically. Conversely, when very long waves inundate over shallow topography, the flow accelerates more slowly and can remain steady for a period of time before beginning to decelerate. These results indicate that a single set of assumptions concerning the onshore flow dynamics cannot be applied to all tsunamis, and site specific analyses may be required.

  9. An Integer Batch Scheduling Model for a Single Machine with Simultaneous Learning and Deterioration Effects to Minimize Total Actual Flow Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusriski, R.; Sukoyo; Samadhi, T. M. A. A.; Halim, A. H.

    2016-02-01

    In the manufacturing industry, several identical parts can be processed in batches, and setup time is needed between two consecutive batches. Since the processing times of batches are not always fixed during a scheduling period due to learning and deterioration effects, this research deals with batch scheduling problems with simultaneous learning and deterioration effects. The objective is to minimize total actual flow time, defined as a time interval between the arrival of all parts at the shop and their common due date. The decision variables are the number of batches, integer batch sizes, and the sequence of the resulting batches. This research proposes a heuristic algorithm based on the Lagrange Relaxation. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is determined by comparing the resulting solutions of the algorithm to the respective optimal solution obtained from the enumeration method. Numerical experience results show that the average of difference among the solutions is 0.05%.

  10. Comparison of Clinician Judgments and Measurements of Swallow Response Time: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnell, Michael P.; Rogus, Nicole M.

    2005-01-01

    Practicing clinicians frequently offer judgments about aspects of swallowing physiology rather than performing actual measurements. Little is known about the accuracy of those judgments. The purpose of this preliminary study was to explore agreement of clinicians' judgments of pharyngeal swallow response time (PSRT) with temporal measurements of…

  11. Patterns of response times and response choices to science questions: the influence of relative processing time.

    PubMed

    Heckler, Andrew F; Scaife, Thomas M

    2015-04-01

    We report on five experiments investigating response choices and response times to simple science questions that evoke student "misconceptions," and we construct a simple model to explain the patterns of response choices. Physics students were asked to compare a physical quantity represented by the slope, such as speed, on simple physics graphs. We found that response times of incorrect answers, resulting from comparing heights, were faster than response times of correct answers comparing slopes. This result alone might be explained by the fact that height was typically processed faster than slope for this kind of task, which we confirmed in a separate experiment. However, we hypothesize that the difference in response time is an indicator of the cause (rather than the result) of the response choice. To support this, we found that imposing a 3-s delay in responding increased the number of students comparing slopes (answering correctly) on the task. Additionally a significant proportion of students recognized the correct written rule (compare slope), but on the graph task they incorrectly compared heights. Finally, training either with repetitive examples or providing a general rule both improved scores, but only repetitive examples had a large effect on response times, thus providing evidence of dual paths or processes to a solution. Considering models of heuristics, information accumulation models, and models relevant to the Stroop effect, we construct a simple relative processing time model that could be viewed as a kind of fluency heuristic. The results suggest that misconception-like patterns of answers to some science questions commonly found on tests may be explained in part by automatic processes that involve the relative processing time of considered dimensions and a priority to answer quickly. PMID:25230833

  12. Residential Real-time Price Response Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Chassin, David P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2011-10-10

    The electric industry is gaining experience with innovative price responsive demand pilots and limited roll-outs to customers. One of these pilots is investigating real-time pricing signals to engage end-use systems and local distributed generation and storage in a distributed optimization process. Attractive aspects about the approach include strong scalability characteristics, simplified interfaces between automation devices, and the adaptability to integrate a wide variety of devices and systems. Experience in this nascent field is revealing a rich array of for engineering decisions and the application of complexity theory. To test the decisions, computer simulations are used to reveal insights about design, demand elasticity, and the limits of response (including consumer fatigue). Agent-based approaches lend themselves well in the simulation to modeling the participation and interaction of each piece of equipment on a distribution feeder. This paper discusses rate design and simulation experiences at the distribution feeder level where consumers and their HVAC systems and water heaters on a feeder receive real-time pricing signals.

  13. Time-response-based evolutionary optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avigad, Gideon; Goldvard, Alex; Salomon, Shaul

    2015-04-01

    Solutions to engineering problems are often evaluated by considering their time responses; thus, each solution is associated with a function. To avoid optimizing the functions, such optimization is usually carried out by setting auxiliary objectives (e.g. minimal overshoot). Therefore, in order to find different optimal solutions, alternative auxiliary optimization objectives may have to be defined prior to optimization. In the current study, a new approach is suggested that avoids the need to define auxiliary objectives. An algorithm is suggested that enables the optimization of solutions according to their transient behaviours. For this optimization, the functions are sampled and the problem is posed as a multi-objective problem. The recently introduced algorithm NSGA-II-PSA is adopted and tailored to solve it. Mathematical as well as engineering problems are utilized to explain and demonstrate the approach and its applicability to real life problems. The results highlight the advantages of avoiding the definition of artificial objectives.

  14. A Flexible Latent Trait Model for Response Times in Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Latent trait models for response times in tests have become popular recently. One challenge for response time modeling is the fact that the distribution of response times can differ considerably even in similar tests. In order to reduce the need for tailor-made models, a model is proposed that unifies two popular approaches to response time…

  15. 40 CFR 1066.245 - Response time verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dynamometer's automated process to verify response time. Perform this test at two different inertia settings... observed settling response time must be less than 100 milliseconds for each inertia setting. ER15SE11.085...

  16. 40 CFR 1066.245 - Response time verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dynamometer's automated process to verify response time. Perform this test at two different inertia settings... observed settling response time must be less than 100 milliseconds for each inertia setting. ER15SE11.085...

  17. Improving OCD time to solution using Signal Response Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Pandev, Stilian; Sanko, Dimitry; Ramanathan, Vidya; Venkataraman, Kartik; Haupt, Ronny

    2016-03-01

    In recent technology nodes, advanced process and novel integration scheme have challenged the precision limits of conventional metrology; with critical dimensions (CD) of device reduce to sub-nanometer region. Optical metrology has proved its capability to precisely detect intricate details on the complex structures, however, conventional RCWA-based (rigorous coupled wave analysis) scatterometry has the limitations of long time-to-results and lack of flexibility to adapt to wide process variations. Signal Response Metrology (SRM) is a new metrology technique targeted to alleviate the consumption of engineering and computation resources by eliminating geometric/dispersion modeling and spectral simulation from the workflow. This is achieved by directly correlating the spectra acquired from a set of wafers with known process variations encoded. In SPIE 2015, we presented the results of SRM application in lithography metrology and control [1], accomplished the mission of setting up a new measurement recipe of focus/dose monitoring in hours. This work will demonstrate our recent field exploration of SRM implementation in 20nm technology and beyond, including focus metrology for scanner control; post etch geometric profile measurement, and actual device profile metrology.

  18. Charge distribution and response time for a modulation-doped extrinsic infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadek, Victor

    1987-01-01

    The electric charge distribution and response time of a modulation-doped extrinsic infrared detector are determined. First, it is demonstrated theoretically that the photoconductive layer is effectively depleted of ionized majority-impurity charges so that scattering is small and mobility is high for photogenerated carriers. Then, using parameters appropriate to an actual detector, the predicted response time is 10 to the -8th to about 10 to the -9th s, which is much faster than comparable conventional detectors. Thus, the modulation-doped detector design would be valuable for heterodyne applications.

  19. Analyzing Response Times in Tests with Rank Correlation Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2013-01-01

    It is common practice to log-transform response times before analyzing them with standard factor analytical methods. However, sometimes the log-transformation is not capable of linearizing the relation between the response times and the latent traits. Therefore, a more general approach to response time analysis is proposed in the current…

  20. Improving Adaptive Learning Technology through the Use of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M.; Kellman, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive learning techniques have typically scheduled practice using learners' accuracy and item presentation history. We describe an adaptive learning system (Adaptive Response Time Based Sequencing--ARTS) that uses both accuracy and response time (RT) as direct inputs into sequencing. Response times are used to assess learning strength and…

  1. Study of the response time of MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xinchun; Guo, Pengfei; Ou, Jinping

    2009-07-01

    Response time is an important parameter which determines the applied fields and practical vibration reduction effects of magnetorheological (MR) dampers. However, up to now, only a few papers discuss the test and analysis of response times. In this paper, the response time of a large-scale MR damper at different velocities and currents was firstly tested. Then, the transient magnetic field excited by the time-variant excitation current was simulated by finite element method (FEM). Based on the variation of the shear yield stress of magnetorheological fluids in the gap between the cylinder and the piston, the response time of the MR damper was investigated. Influences of eddy current and excitation current response time on the damper's response were also explored. Results show that by utilizing finite elements method, the calculated average effective shear yield strength can be used to predict the response time of a MR damper. Electromagnetic response is the predominant factor influencing the response time of a MR damper, and reducing eddy currents is the key to accelerate the response of a MR damper. Moreover, influence of eddy currents is much larger under stepping down excitation currents than stepping up currents, and with a same magnitude of step, no matter when the current increases or decreases, the smaller the initial current, the greater the eddy current affects a damper's response and the longer the response time of damping force is. A fast response excitation current may induce large eddy currents which reduce the response of the damper instead.

  2. System measures response time of photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, M. R.

    1968-01-01

    Calibration system enables precise determination of rise time of photosensitive detectors. To perform a calibration, the time-voltage curve of the excitation voltage for a light source is compared with the time-voltage curve of the voltage output from a photosensitive detector which is responding to the light.

  3. Design of responsive polymer surfaces with ultrafast response time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzer, Jan; Ozcam, Evren; Willoughby, Julie

    2009-03-01

    Responsive surfaces with tailorable surface-reconstruction kinetics and switching hysteresis were prepared from poly(vinylmethylsiloxane) (PVMS) networks modified with thiol alkanes to provide hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface properties. The cooperative effects of polymer mobility, arising from the high flexibility of the siloxane backbone, and the enthalpic interactions between the contacting medium and the PVMS functionalized surface control the degree of responsiveness. Exposing the modified-elastomer surfaces to water resulted in rearrangement of the hydrophilic alkanes at the surface. The kinetics of reconstruction and reversibility were established by measuring the surface wettability via dynamic contact angle. By controlling the formation of semi-crystalline regions in our substrates we demonstrate either ``sluggish'' kinetics and eventual surface ``freezing'' and stability or stimuli-responsive substrates with a magnitude of change and repeated reversibility unparallel to most polymeric surfaces.

  4. Dispersion of Response Times Reveals Cognitive Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, John G.; Van Orden, Guy C.; Turvey, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Trial-to-trial variation in word-pronunciation times exhibits 1/f scaling. One explanation is that human performances are consequent on multiplicative interactions among interdependent processes-interaction dominant dynamics. This article describes simulated distributions of pronunciation times in a further test for multiplicative interactions and…

  5. Dispersion of Response Times Reveals Cognitive Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holden, John G.; Van Orden, Guy C.; Turvey, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Trial to trial variation in word pronunciation times exhibits 1/f scaling. One explanation is that human performances are consequent on multiplicative interactions among interdependent processes – interaction dominant dynamics. This article describes simulated distributions of pronunciation times in a further test for multiplicative interactions and interdependence. Individual participant distributions of ≈1100 word pronunciation times are successfully mimicked for each participant in combinations of lognormal and power law behavior. Successful hazard function simulations generalize these results to establish interaction dominant dynamics, in contrast with component dominant dynamics, as a likely mechanism for cognitive activity. PMID:19348544

  6. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  7. Response modalities and time-sharing performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidulich, Michael A.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment performed to investigate the role of resource competition and asymmetric transfer in dual-task performance is described. It is shown that there is an advantage to mixed manual/speech response modality configurations that cannot be accounted for by asymmetric transfer. The present results support the multiple resources approach to the application of speech technology. Once speech recognition achieves an acceptable level of operational reliability, speech controls can be used to reduce resource competition and improve performance in multitask environments.

  8. Temperate grass response to timing of grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grazing management has a significant impact on pasture growth. We determined how timing of grazing influences grass productivity, yield distribution, and persistence. Meadow fescue [Schedonorus pratensis (Huds.) P. Beauv.], orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), quackgrass [Elymus repens (L.) Gould...

  9. A Study of Bayesian Estimation and Comparison of Response Time Models in Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Hongwook

    2010-01-01

    Response time has been regarded as an important source for investigating the relationship between human performance and response speed. It is important to examine the relationship between response time and item characteristics, especially in the perspective of the relationship between response time and various factors that affect examinee's…

  10. Using Response Times for Item Selection in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Response times on items can be used to improve item selection in adaptive testing provided that a probabilistic model for their distribution is available. In this research, the author used a hierarchical modeling framework with separate first-level models for the responses and response times and a second-level model for the distribution of the…

  11. A Lognormal Model for Response Times on Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    A lognormal model for the response times of a person on a set of test items is investigated. The model has a parameter structure analogous to the two-parameter logistic response models in item response theory, with a parameter for the speed of each person as well as parameters for the time intensity and discriminating power of each item. It is…

  12. 6 CFR 5.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 5.5 Section 5.5 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 5.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general....

  13. 6 CFR 5.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 5.5 Section 5.5 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 5.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general....

  14. 6 CFR 5.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 5.5 Section 5.5 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 5.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general....

  15. 10 CFR 1303.107 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1303.107 Section 1303.107 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.107 Timing of responses to requests. (a) General. The Board shall normally respond to requests in the order of...

  16. 10 CFR 1303.107 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1303.107 Section 1303.107 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.107 Timing of responses to requests. (a) General. The Board shall normally respond to requests in the order of...

  17. 6 CFR 5.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 5.5 Section 5.5 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 5.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general....

  18. Linking Response-Time Parameters onto a Common Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2010-01-01

    Although response times on test items are recorded on a natural scale, the scale for some of the parameters in the lognormal response-time model (van der Linden, 2006) is not fixed. As a result, when the model is used to periodically calibrate new items in a testing program, the parameter are not automatically mapped onto a common scale. Several…

  19. Hierarchical Diffusion Models for Two-Choice Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandekerckhove, Joachim; Tuerlinckx, Francis; Lee, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Two-choice response times are a common type of data, and much research has been devoted to the development of process models for such data. However, the practical application of these models is notoriously complicated, and flexible methods are largely nonexistent. We combine a popular model for choice response times--the Wiener diffusion…

  20. Testing for Aberrant Behavior in Response Time Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marianti, Sukaesi; Fox, Jean-Paul; Avetisyan, Marianna; Veldkamp, Bernard P.; Tijmstra, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Many standardized tests are now administered via computer rather than paper-and-pencil format. In a computer-based testing environment, it is possible to record not only the test taker's response to each question (item) but also the amount of time spent by the test taker in considering and answering each item. Response times (RTs) provide…

  1. 45 CFR 612.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 612.5 Section 612.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION § 612.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general. NSF...

  2. 45 CFR 612.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 612.5 Section 612.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION § 612.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general. The NSF and its component, OIG, ordinarily will...

  3. 45 CFR 612.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 612.5 Section 612.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION § 612.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general. The NSF...

  4. 45 CFR 612.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 612.5 Section 612.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AVAILABILITY OF RECORDS AND INFORMATION § 612.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general. NSF...

  5. 48 CFR 1505.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Publicizing and response time. 1505.203 Section 1505.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Proposed Contract Actions 1505.203 Publicizing and response time. (a) The...

  6. 48 CFR 1505.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Publicizing and response time. 1505.203 Section 1505.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Proposed Contract Actions 1505.203 Publicizing and response time. (a) The...

  7. 10 CFR 1303.107 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1303.107 Section 1303.107 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.107 Timing of responses to requests. (a) General. The Board shall normally respond to requests in the order of...

  8. 10 CFR 1303.107 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1303.107 Section 1303.107 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.107 Timing of responses to requests. (a) General. The Board shall normally respond to requests in the order of...

  9. 10 CFR 1303.107 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1303.107 Section 1303.107 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PUBLIC INFORMATION AND REQUESTS § 1303.107 Timing of responses to requests. (a) General. The Board shall normally respond to requests in the order of their receipt. (b) Acknowledgement of requests....

  10. 6 CFR 5.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 5.5 Section 5.5... INFORMATION Freedom of Information Act § 5.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general. Components... the number of pages involved. If a component does so, it shall advise requesters in its slower...

  11. 40 CFR 1601.24 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1601.24 Section 1601.24 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Procedures for Requesting and Disclosing Records § 1601.24 Timing of responses...

  12. 40 CFR 1601.24 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1601.24 Section 1601.24 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Procedures for Requesting and Disclosing Records § 1601.24 Timing of responses...

  13. 40 CFR 1601.24 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1601.24 Section 1601.24 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Procedures for Requesting and Disclosing Records § 1601.24 Timing of responses...

  14. 18 CFR 1301.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1301.5 Section 1301.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES Freedom of Information Act § 1301.5 Timing of responses to requests. (a) In general, TVA ordinarily shall respond to requests according...

  15. 40 CFR 1601.24 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1601.24 Section 1601.24 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Procedures for Requesting and Disclosing Records § 1601.24 Timing of responses...

  16. 40 CFR 1601.24 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1601.24 Section 1601.24 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD PROCEDURES FOR DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Procedures for Requesting and Disclosing Records § 1601.24 Timing of responses...

  17. Performance evaluation of response time in ATM LANs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Brandt, J.

    1995-12-11

    This contribution compares the response-time performance of ATM LANs using ABR EFCI, UBR FIFO, and UBR with per VC queuing switches. Our study is based on experimental as well as simulation results. We found that, with or without congestion, UBR switches with per VC queuing provide the best response times.

  18. Response Time Variations in an Online Search System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael D.

    1983-01-01

    Explores response time variations in National Library of Medicine's ELHILL bibliographic search system and analyzes statistical significance of response time in terms of its variations by day of week, hour of day, particular bibliographic file being searched, command issued by user, number of users logged onto system. Ten references are cited.…

  19. Efficient allocation of heterogeneous response times in information spreading process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Wei; Tang, Ming; Fu, Yan; Liang, Xiaoming; Do, Younghae

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the impacts of spatiotemporal heterogeneities of human activities on spreading dynamics have attracted extensive attention. In this paper, we intend to understand how the heterogeneous distribution of response times at the individual level influences information spreading. Based on the uncorrelated scale-free networks without degree-degree correlation, we study the susceptible-infected spreading dynamics with adjustable power-law response time distribution, and find that the stronger the heterogeneity of response times is, the faster the information spreading is in the early and middle stages. Following a given heterogeneity, the procedure of reducing the correlation between the response times and degrees of individuals can also accelerate the spreading dynamics in the early and middle stages. However, the dynamics in the late stage is slightly more complicated, and there is an optimal value of the full prevalence time (i.e., the time for full infection on a network) changing with the heterogeneity of response times and the response time-degree correlation, respectively. The optimal phenomena result from the efficient allocation of heterogeneous response times.

  20. Passenger comfort response times as a function of aircraft motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinalducci, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between a passenger's response time of changes in level of comfort experienced as a function of aircraft motion was examined. The aircraft used in this investigation was capable of providing a wide range of vertical and transverse accelerations by means of direct lift flap control surfaces and side force generator surfaces in addition to normal control surfaces. Response times to changes in comfort were recorded along with the passenger's rating of comfort on a five point scale. In addition, a number of aircraft motion variables including vertical and transverse accelerations were also recorded. Results indicate some relationship between human comfort response times to reaction time data.

  1. 10 CFR 9.31 - Extension of time for response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Extension of time for response. 9.31 Section 9.31 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Regulations § 9.31 Extension of time for response. (a) In unusual circumstances defined in § 9.13, the NRC may extend the time limits prescribed in § 9.25 or § 9.29 by not...

  2. Computer Response Time Measurements of Mood, Fatigue and Symptom Scale Items: Implications for Scale Response Time Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryman, David H.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes study conducted with U.S. Marine Corps enlisted personnel to measure response time to computer-administered questionnaire items, and to evaluate how measurement of response time might be useful in various research areas. Topics addressed include mood states; the occurrence of straight lining; and experimental effects of sleep loss and…

  3. Improving Item Response Theory Model Calibration by Considering Response Times in Psychological Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that response times in personality scales are related to the trait level according to the so-called speed-distance hypothesis. Against this background, Ferrando and Lorenzo-Seva proposed a latent trait model for the responses and response times in a test. The model consists of two components, a standard item response…

  4. Improved design provides faster response time in photomultiplier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Dynamic Crossed-Field Electron Multiplying /DCFEM/ light demodulator avoids the normal response time limitations inherent in static field devices by using time varying crossed electric and static magnetic fields. This eliminates the transit time spread that affects electrons as they proceed along the secondary emission stages of the tube.

  5. Thermal emittance and response time of a cesium antimonide photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Merluzzi, Richard; Nichols, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and response time of a Cs3Sb photocathode are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. Photoemission response time is evaluated using a RF deflecting cavity synchronized to a picosecond laser pulse train. We find that Cs3Sb has both small mean transverse energy, 160 ± 10 meV at 532 nm laser wavelength, and a prompt response time (below the resolution of our measurement) making it a suitable material for high brightness electron photoinjectors.

  6. Distinguishing Fast and Slow Processes in Accuracy - Response Time Data.

    PubMed

    Coomans, Frederik; Hofman, Abe; Brinkhuis, Matthieu; van der Maas, Han L J; Maris, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relation between speed and accuracy within problem solving in its simplest non-trivial form. We consider tests with only two items and code the item responses in two binary variables: one indicating the response accuracy, and one indicating the response speed. Despite being a very basic setup, it enables us to study item pairs stemming from a broad range of domains such as basic arithmetic, first language learning, intelligence-related problems, and chess, with large numbers of observations for every pair of problems under consideration. We carry out a survey over a large number of such item pairs and compare three types of psychometric accuracy-response time models present in the literature: two 'one-process' models, the first of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally independent and the second of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally dependent, and a 'two-process' model which models accuracy contingent on response time. We find that the data clearly violates the restrictions imposed by both one-process models and requires additional complexity which is parsimoniously provided by the two-process model. We supplement our survey with an analysis of the erroneous responses for an example item pair and demonstrate that there are very significant differences between the types of errors in fast and slow responses. PMID:27167518

  7. Distinguishing Fast and Slow Processes in Accuracy - Response Time Data

    PubMed Central

    Coomans, Frederik; Hofman, Abe; Brinkhuis, Matthieu; van der Maas, Han L. J.; Maris, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relation between speed and accuracy within problem solving in its simplest non-trivial form. We consider tests with only two items and code the item responses in two binary variables: one indicating the response accuracy, and one indicating the response speed. Despite being a very basic setup, it enables us to study item pairs stemming from a broad range of domains such as basic arithmetic, first language learning, intelligence-related problems, and chess, with large numbers of observations for every pair of problems under consideration. We carry out a survey over a large number of such item pairs and compare three types of psychometric accuracy-response time models present in the literature: two ‘one-process’ models, the first of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally independent and the second of which models accuracy and response time as conditionally dependent, and a ‘two-process’ model which models accuracy contingent on response time. We find that the data clearly violates the restrictions imposed by both one-process models and requires additional complexity which is parsimoniously provided by the two-process model. We supplement our survey with an analysis of the erroneous responses for an example item pair and demonstrate that there are very significant differences between the types of errors in fast and slow responses. PMID:27167518

  8. Assessing recognition memory using confidence ratings and response times.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Christoph T; Kahana, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Classification of stimuli into categories (such as 'old' and 'new' in tests of recognition memory or 'present' versus 'absent' in signal detection tasks) requires the mapping of internal signals to discrete responses. Introspective judgements about a given choice response are regularly employed in research, legal and clinical settings in an effort to measure the signal that is thought to be the basis of the classification decision. Correlations between introspective judgements and task performance suggest that such ratings often do convey information about internal states that are relevant for a given task, but well-known limitations of introspection call the fidelity of this information into question. We investigated to what extent response times can reveal information usually assessed with explicit confidence ratings. We quantitatively compared response times to confidence ratings in their ability to qualify recognition memory decisions and found convergent results suggesting that much of the information from confidence ratings can be obtained from response times. PMID:27152209

  9. A Mixture Rasch Model with Item Response Time Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    An examinee faced with a test item will engage in solution behavior or rapid-guessing behavior. These qualitatively different test-taking behaviors bias parameter estimates for item response models that do not control for such behavior. A mixture Rasch model with item response time components was proposed and evaluated through application to real…

  10. A Mechanism for Error Detection in Speeded Response Time Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holroyd, Clay B.; Yeung, Nick; Coles, Michael G. H.; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of error detection plays a central role in theories of executive control. In this article, the authors present a mechanism that can rapidly detect errors in speeded response time tasks. This error monitor assigns values to the output of cognitive processes involved in stimulus categorization and response generation and detects errors…

  11. Grade of Membership Response Time Model for Detecting Guessing Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pokropek, Artur

    2016-01-01

    A response model that is able to detect guessing behaviors and produce unbiased estimates in low-stake conditions using timing information is proposed. The model is a special case of the grade of membership model in which responses are modeled as partial members of a class that is affected by motivation and a class that responds only according to…

  12. Response time to colored stimuli in the full visual field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.; Dawson, L. M.; Galvan, T.; Reid, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Peripheral visual response time was measured in seven dark adapted subjects to the onset of small (45' arc diam), brief (50 msec), colored (blue, yellow, green, red) and white stimuli imaged at 72 locations within their binocular field of view. The blue, yellow, and green stimuli were matched for brightness at about 2.6 sub log 10 units above their absolute light threshold, and they appeared at an unexpected time and location. These data were obtained to provide response time and no-response data for use in various design disciplines involving instrument panel layout. The results indicated that the retina possesses relatively concentric regions within each of which mean response time can be expected to be of approximately the same duration. These regions are centered near the fovea and extend farther horizontally than vertically. Mean foveal response time was fastest for yellow and slowest for blue. Three and one-half percent of the total 56,410 trials presented resulted in no-responses. Regardless of stimulus color, the lowest percentage of no-responses occurred within 30 deg arc from the fovea and the highest within 40 deg to 80 deg arc below the fovea.

  13. Peripheral visual response time and visual display layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were performed on a group of 42 subjects in a study of their peripheral visual response time to visual signals under positive acceleration, during prolonged bedrest, at passive 70 deg headup body lift, under exposures to high air temperatures and high luminance levels, and under normal stress-free laboratory conditions. Diagrams are plotted for mean response times to white, red, yellow, green, and blue stimuli under different conditions.

  14. The Self Actualized Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Michael; Moylan, Mary Elizabeth

    A study examined the commonalities that "voracious" readers share, and how their experiences can guide parents, teachers, and librarians in assisting children to become self-actualized readers. Subjects, 25 adults ranging in age from 20 to 67 years, completed a questionnaire concerning their reading histories and habits. Respondents varied in…

  15. Conceptual Question Response Times in Peer Instruction Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to…

  16. Hypoxia responsive gene expression is mediated by various subsets of transcription factors and miRNAs that are determined by the actual oxygen availability.

    PubMed

    Licausi, Francesco; Weits, Daan A; Pant, Bikram Datt; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Geigenberger, Peter; van Dongen, Joost T

    2011-04-01

    • Reduced oxygen availability is not only associated with flooding, but occurs also during growth and development. It is largely unknown how hypoxia is perceived and what signaling cascade is involved in activating adaptive responses. • We analysed the expression of over 1900 transcription factors (TFs) and 180 microRNA primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs) in Arabidopsis roots exposed to different hypoxic conditions by means of quantitative PCR. We also analysed the promoters of genes induced by hypoxia with respect to over-represented DNA elements that can act as potential TF binding sites and their in vivo interaction was verified. • We identified various subsets of TFs that responded differentially through time and in an oxygen concentration-dependent manner. The regulatory potential of selected TFs and their predicted DNA binding elements was validated. Although the expression of pri-miRNAs was differentially regulated under hypoxia, only one corresponding mature miRNA changed accordingly. Putative target transcripts of the miRNAs were not significantly affected. • Our results show that the regulation of hypoxia-induced genes is controlled via simultaneous interaction of various combinations of TFs. Under anoxic conditions, an additional set of TFs is induced. Regulation of gene expression via miRNAs appears to play a minor role during hypoxia. PMID:20840511

  17. A Conditional Joint Modeling Approach for Locally Dependent Item Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Xiang-Bin; Tao, Jian; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The assumption of conditional independence between the responses and the response times (RTs) for a given person is common in RT modeling. However, when the speed of a test taker is not constant, this assumption will be violated. In this article we propose a conditional joint model for item responses and RTs, which incorporates a covariance…

  18. The time course effect of moderate intensity exercise on response execution and response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Jennifer; Graydon, Jan; McMorris, Terry; Davranche, Karen

    2009-10-01

    This research aimed to investigate the time course effect of a moderate steady-state exercise session on response execution and response inhibition using a stop-task paradigm. Ten participants performed a stop-signal task whilst cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity (40% of maximal aerobic power), immediately following exercise and 30min after exercise cessation. Results showed that moderate exercise enhances a subjects' ability to execute responses under time pressure (shorter Go reaction time, RT without a change in accuracy) but also enhances a subjects' ability to withhold ongoing motor responses (shorter stop-signal RT). The present outcomes reveal that the beneficial effect of exercise is neither limited to motor response tasks, nor to cognitive tasks performed during exercise. Beneficial effects of exercise remain present on both response execution and response inhibition performance for up to 52min after exercise cessation. PMID:19346049

  19. On the actual variety of plate dynamical mechanisms and how mantle evolution affected them through time, from core formation to the Indian collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmaston, Miles

    2010-05-01

    If horizontal plate motions were driven by thermal convection of the mantle, they would display the action of slow-to-change body forces. Yet rapid changes of spreading rate and direction, and ridge jumps, are well-documented for the past 130Ma. Also convection cannot readily cause rotations of a plate (e.g. Africa) about a pole within the plate or near it. And plate motions, especially that of India, scarcely fit a convective pattern. To address these problems we look first at mantle motivation at both ends of earth history, beginning with core formation. I then introduce 3 important properties of mantle materials, whose neglect by mantle modellers has surely impaired the value of their work, but whose recognition illuminates the present plate dynamical situation and provides the Earth with a heat engine that is not thermal convection. Finally I sketch the intervening changes in behaviour over time, the sharpest of which brought about the rise of atmospheric oxygen at ~2.25Ga. Core formation. As the very high specific angular momentum of mean planetary material (>105-fold relative to solar) can only be achieved if the planets were wholly accreted in presence of the nebula [1], the iron percolation model is ruled out, because it takes too long. This validates the A.E.Ringwood model (1960-1978) involving nebular H reaction with erupting FeO. The iron then loads the downgoing limb of what is then not a truly thermal convection system. Huge volumes of reaction water were produced, giving the early Earth a wet mantle, a (diminishing) feature that we'll see has constrained mantle behaviour ever since. Plate dynamics since 150Ma. Multiple plate dynamical evidence [2], which will be rapidly re-presented here, shows that currently (a) the Earth has a 2-layer mantle system with a boundary at ~660km and (b) that most cratons have tectospheric keels that reach right to that boundary, or nearly so. The argument is the simple and persuasive one (even to seismologists) of mantle

  20. Speed-Accuracy Response Models: Scoring Rules Based on Response Time and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; van der Maas, Han

    2012-01-01

    Starting from an explicit scoring rule for time limit tasks incorporating both response time and accuracy, and a definite trade-off between speed and accuracy, a response model is derived. Since the scoring rule is interpreted as a sufficient statistic, the model belongs to the exponential family. The various marginal and conditional distributions…

  1. Transient electromagnetic responses during the transmitter on-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Gregory M.; Miller, Jonathan S.; Song, Lin-Ping; Pasion, Leonard

    2010-04-01

    Current time-domain electromagnetic induction instruments generally only utilize data acquired after the cessation of the transmitted field. During this "off time", signals are dominated by induced eddy currents and magnetic surface modes, but do not fully capture the magnetostatic response of permeable and conductive metallic ordnance. In this paper, we investigate the response of EMI systems that measure signals during excitation of the primary magnetic field (the so-called "on-time"). Our analysis shows that on-time signals have great potential to yield useful information that is not often exploited in current EMI systems. We compare analytical models to data from state-of-the-art time-domain EM sensors that have the capability to sample receivers during the on-time. We present modeling results that represent the responses from different current ramps and on-time waveforms for objects and ground. We consider target and clutter objects and grounds having a range of material properties, shapes and sizes, and configurations and investigate signal processing and inversion methods for target detection and discrimination. Specifically, correlations between on-time and off-time signals are shown to be a powerful tool for discriminating ferrous and non-ferrous metallic objects.

  2. Conceptual question response times in Peer Instruction classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Lukoff, Brian; Schell, Julie; Mazur, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Classroom response systems are widely used in interactive teaching environments as a way to engage students by asking them questions. Previous research on the time taken by students to respond to conceptual questions has yielded insights on how students think and change conceptions. We measure the amount of time students take to respond to in-class, conceptual questions [ConcepTests (CTs)] in two introductory physics courses taught using Peer Instruction and use item response theory to determine the difficulty of the CTs. We examine response time differences between correct and incorrect answers both before and after the peer discussion for CTs of varying difficulty. We also determine the relationship between response time and student performance on a standardized test of incoming physics knowledge, precourse self-efficacy, and gender. Our data reveal three results of interest. First, response time for correct answers is significantly faster than for incorrect answers, both before and after peer discussion, especially for easy CTs. Second, students with greater incoming physics knowledge and higher self-efficacy respond faster in both rounds. Third, there is no gender difference in response rate after controlling for incoming physics knowledge scores, although males register significantly more attempts before committing to a final answer than do female students. These results provide insight into effective CT pacing during Peer Instruction. In particular, in order to maintain a pace that keeps everyone engaged, students should not be given too much time to respond. When around 80% of the answers are in, the ratio of correct to incorrect responses rapidly approaches levels indicating random guessing and instructors should close the poll.

  3. Modeling operators' emergency response time for chemical processing operations.

    PubMed

    Murray, Susan L; Harputlu, Emrah; Mentzer, Ray A; Mannan, M Sam

    2014-01-01

    Operators have a crucial role during emergencies at a variety of facilities such as chemical processing plants. When an abnormality occurs in the production process, the operator often has limited time to either take corrective actions or evacuate before the situation becomes deadly. It is crucial that system designers and safety professionals can estimate the time required for a response before procedures and facilities are designed and operations are initiated. There are existing industrial engineering techniques to establish time standards for tasks performed at a normal working pace. However, it is reasonable to expect the time required to take action in emergency situations will be different than working at a normal production pace. It is possible that in an emergency, operators will act faster compared to a normal pace. It would be useful for system designers to be able to establish a time range for operators' response times for emergency situations. This article develops a modeling approach to estimate the time standard range for operators taking corrective actions or following evacuation procedures in emergency situations. This will aid engineers and managers in establishing time requirements for operators in emergency situations. The methodology used for this study combines a well-established industrial engineering technique for determining time requirements (predetermined time standard system) and adjustment coefficients for emergency situations developed by the authors. Numerous videos of workers performing well-established tasks at a maximum pace were studied. As an example, one of the tasks analyzed was pit crew workers changing tires as quickly as they could during a race. The operations in these videos were decomposed into basic, fundamental motions (such as walking, reaching for a tool, and bending over) by studying the videos frame by frame. A comparison analysis was then performed between the emergency pace and the normal working pace operations

  4. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  5. Response-time optimization of rule-based expert systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupan, Blaz; Cheng, Albert M. K.

    1994-03-01

    Real-time rule-based decision systems are embedded AI systems and must make critical decisions within stringent timing constraints. In the case where the response time of the rule- based system is not acceptable, it has to be optimized to meet both timing and integrity constraints. This paper describes a novel approach to reduce the response time of rule-based expert systems. Our optimization method is twofold: the first phase constructs the reduced cycle-free finite state transition system corresponding to the input rule-based system, and the second phase further refines the constructed transition system using the simulated annealing approach. The method makes use of rule-base system decomposition, concurrency, and state- equivalency. The new and optimized system is synthesized from the derived transition system. Compared with the original system, the synthesized system has fewer number of rule firings to reach the fixed point, is inherently stable, and has no redundant rules.

  6. Peripheral visual response time and retinal luminance-area relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to elucidate the stimulus luminance-retinal area relationship that underlies response time (RT) behavior. Mean RT was significantly faster to stimuli imaged beyond about 70 deg of arc from the fovea when their luminance was increased by an amount equal to the foveal stimulus luminance multiplied by the cosine of the angle between the peripheral stimuli and the line of sight. This and additional data are discussed in relation to previous psychophysical data and to possible response mechanisms.

  7. Dynamic Response of an Optomechanical System to a Stationary Random Excitation in the Time Domain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Palmer, Jeremy A.; Paez, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    Modern electro-optical instruments are typically designed with assemblies of optomechanical members that support optics such that alignment is maintained in service environments that include random vibration loads. This paper presents a nonlinear numerical analysis that calculates statistics for the peak lateral response of optics in an optomechanical sub-assembly subject to random excitation of the housing. The work is unique in that the prior art does not address peak response probability distribution for stationary random vibration in the time domain for a common lens-retainer-housing system with Coulomb damping. Analytical results are validated by using displacement response data from random vibration testingmore » of representative prototype sub-assemblies. A comparison of predictions to experimental results yields reasonable agreement. The Type I Asymptotic form provides the cumulative distribution function for peak response probabilities. Probabilities are calculated for actual lens centration tolerances. The probability that peak response will not exceed the centration tolerance is greater than 80% for prototype configurations where the tolerance is high (on the order of 30 micrometers). Conversely, the probability is low for those where the tolerance is less than 20 micrometers. The analysis suggests a design paradigm based on the influence of lateral stiffness on the magnitude of the response.« less

  8. Assessing recognition memory using confidence ratings and response times

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Classification of stimuli into categories (such as ‘old’ and ‘new’ in tests of recognition memory or ‘present’ versus ‘absent’ in signal detection tasks) requires the mapping of internal signals to discrete responses. Introspective judgements about a given choice response are regularly employed in research, legal and clinical settings in an effort to measure the signal that is thought to be the basis of the classification decision. Correlations between introspective judgements and task performance suggest that such ratings often do convey information about internal states that are relevant for a given task, but well-known limitations of introspection call the fidelity of this information into question. We investigated to what extent response times can reveal information usually assessed with explicit confidence ratings. We quantitatively compared response times to confidence ratings in their ability to qualify recognition memory decisions and found convergent results suggesting that much of the information from confidence ratings can be obtained from response times. PMID:27152209

  9. Malignant glioma - timing of response to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, L.E.; Fisher, B.J.; MacDonald, D.R.; Cairncross, J.G. London Regional Cancer Centre, Ontario ); LeBer, D.V. ); Halperin, E.C.; Schold, S.C. Jr. )

    1993-04-02

    The response of malignant gliomas to radiation was examined retrospectively in 71 patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial malignant gliomas. Questions asked included frequency, timing and clinical significance of response. After surgery, all were treated with whole brain plus boost radiotherapy followed 8 weeks later by chemotherapy. The rate, degree, and timing of response to radiation were determined by comparing postoperative, end of radiation, and prechemotherapy CT scans on each patient. Postoperative residual tumor was evident on 63/71 postoperative scans. Twenty-two of 63 tumors (35%) had a partial or complete response to radiation. Twenty (32%) had responded by the end of radiation; 17 maximally. Six to 8 weeks later, three responding tumors had responded further and two previously stable ones had begun to respond. Only three tumors (5%) responded completely. A greater proportion of anaplastic gliomas than glioblastomas responded to radiation (52% vs. 26%). Protracted or delayed responses were only observed in patients with anaplastic glioma. Patients who responded to radiation did not live significantly longer than non-responders. However, tumor progression prior to chemotherapy was associated with significantly shorter survival. This CT scan-based analysis demonstrates that malignant gliomas are only moderately radioresponsive tumors and also demonstrates that response to radiation, if it is going to occur, is usually evident by the end of treatment. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Time-domain response of the ARIANNA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwick, S. W.; Berg, E. C.; Besson, D. Z.; Duffin, T.; Hanson, J. C.; Klein, S. R.; Kleinfelder, S. A.; Piasecki, M.; Ratzlaff, K.; Reed, C.; Roumi, M.; Stezelberger, T.; Tatar, J.; Walker, J.; Young, R.; Zou, L.

    2015-03-01

    The Antarctic Ross Ice Shelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a high-energy neutrino detector designed to record the Askaryan electric field signature of cosmogenic neutrino interactions in ice. To understand the inherent radio-frequency (RF) neutrino signature, the time-domain response of the ARIANNA RF receiver must be measured. ARIANNA uses Create CLP5130-2N log-periodic dipole arrays (LPDAs). The associated effective height operator converts incident electric fields to voltage waveforms at the LDPA terminals. The effective height versus time and incident angle was measured, along with the associated response of the ARIANNA RF amplifier. The results are verified by correlating to field measurements in air and ice, using oscilloscopes. Finally, theoretical models for the Askaryan electric field are combined with the detector response to predict the neutrino signature.

  11. Disaster Response Networks in Uncertain Times: Practical Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaps, Richard A.

    This paper outlines the preparations necessary for state psychological associations to make a timely, well-coordinated, and successful mental health response to disaster or trauma. It is suggested that early planning, recruiting, training, connecting with an authorized disaster organization, forming a mental health coalition, organizing…

  12. Modeling Information Accumulation in Psychological Tests Using Item Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a latent trait model is proposed for the response times in psychological tests. The latent trait model is based on the linear transformation model and subsumes popular models from survival analysis, like the proportional hazards model and the proportional odds model. Core of the model is the assumption that an unspecified monotone…

  13. Distinct Response Time Distributions in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Querne, Laurent; Berquin, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To address the issue of response time (RT) profiles in hyperactive-impulsive (ADHD-HI), inattentive (ADHD-IA), and combined (ADHD-C) subtypes of ADHD. We hypothesized that children with ADHD-HI should respond more rapidly than children without ADHD and children with ADHD-IA and ADHD-C should respond more slowly than children without…

  14. Response Time in 14-Year-Olds with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carol A.; Leonard, Laurence B.; Kail, Robert V.; Zhang, Xuyang; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Francis, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether children with language impairment were slower than typically developing peers at age 14, and whether slowing, if present, was similar across task domains; whether differences in response time (RT) across domains were the same for children with specific language impairment (SLI) and nonspecific language impairment…

  15. 38 CFR 1.556 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1.556 Section 1.556 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Procedures for Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act §...

  16. 1 CFR 304.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 304.5 Section... telephone, e-mail or letter, whichever is most efficient, in each case. (c) Unusual circumstances. (1) Where.... (1) Requests and appeals will be taken out of order and given expedited treatment whenever it...

  17. 38 CFR 1.556 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of responses to requests. 1.556 Section 1.556 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Procedures for Disclosure of Records Under the Freedom of Information Act §...

  18. 48 CFR 1505.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Publicizing and response time. 1505.203 Section 1505.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Proposed Contract Actions 1505.203...

  19. 48 CFR 1505.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Publicizing and response time. 1505.203 Section 1505.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Proposed Contract Actions 1505.203...

  20. 48 CFR 1505.203 - Publicizing and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Publicizing and response time. 1505.203 Section 1505.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Synopses of Proposed Contract Actions 1505.203...

  1. 40 CFR 1066.245 - Response time verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... automated process to verify response time. You may perform this test either at two different inertia... base inertia and two acceleration rates that cover the range of acceleration rates experienced during... less than 100 milliseconds for each inertia setting. ER28AP14.066...

  2. From Zero to Sixty: Calibrating Real-Time Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koulis, Theodoro; Ramsay, James O.; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in data recording technology have given researchers new ways of collecting on-line and continuous data for analyzing input-output systems. For example, continuous response digital interfaces are increasingly used in psychophysics. The statistical problem related to these input-output systems reduces to linking time-varying…

  3. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  4. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  5. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  6. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  7. 40 CFR 89.316 - Analyzer leakage and response time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Equipment Provisions § 89.316 Analyzer leakage and response time. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is 0.5 percent of the in-use flow rate for...

  8. Processing Time Shifts Affects the Execution of Motor Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sell, Andrea J.; Kaschak, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    We explore whether time shifts in text comprehension are represented spatially. Participants read sentences involving past or future events and made sensibility judgment responses in one of two ways: (1) moving toward or away from their body and (2) pressing the toward or away buttons without moving. Previous work suggests that spatial…

  9. Vectorised simulation of the response of a time projection chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiopoulos, C. H.; Mermikides, M. E.

    1989-12-01

    A Monte Carlo code used for the detailed simulation of the response of the ALEPH time projection chamber has been successfully restructured to exploit the vector architectures of the CDC CYBER-205, ETA10 and CRAY X-MP supercomputers. Some aspects of the vector implementation are discussed and the performance on the various processors is compared.

  10. Separability of Item and Person Parameters in Response Time Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses two forms of separability of item and person parameters in the context of response time models. The first is "separate sufficiency," and the second is "ranking independence." For each form a theorem stating sufficient conditions is proved. The two forms are shown to include several cases of models from psychometric and biometric…

  11. Are Unshifted Distributional Models Appropriate for Response Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.

    2005-01-01

    Van Breukelen (this issue) provides an approach to using both response time (RT) and accuracy for (1) measuring latent abilities of participants even when they may trade speed for accuracy, and for (2) providing insight into the psychological processes underlying task performance. In this commentary, I focus on the second of these aims and assess…

  12. Timing and Causality in the Generation of Learned Eyelid Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Campusano, Raudel; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M.

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum-red nucleus-facial motoneuron (Mn) pathway has been reported as being involved in the proper timing of classically conditioned eyelid responses. This special type of associative learning serves as a model of event timing for studying the role of the cerebellum in dynamic motor control. Here, we have re-analyzed the firing activities of cerebellar posterior interpositus (IP) neurons and orbicularis oculi (OO) Mns in alert behaving cats during classical eyeblink conditioning, using a delay paradigm. The aim was to revisit the hypothesis that the IP neurons (IPns) can be considered a neuronal phase-modulating device supporting OO Mns firing with an emergent timing mechanism and an explicit correlation code during learned eyelid movements. Optimized experimental and computational tools allowed us to determine the different causal relationships (temporal order and correlation code) during and between trials. These intra- and inter-trial timing strategies expanding from sub-second range (millisecond timing) to longer-lasting ranges (interval timing) expanded the functional domain of cerebellar timing beyond motor control. Interestingly, the results supported the above-mentioned hypothesis. The causal inferences were influenced by the precise motor and pre-motor spike timing in the cause-effect interval, and, in addition, the timing of the learned responses depended on cerebellar–Mn network causality. Furthermore, the timing of CRs depended upon the probability of simulated causal conditions in the cause-effect interval and not the mere duration of the inter-stimulus interval. In this work, the close relation between timing and causality was verified. It could thus be concluded that the firing activities of IPns may be related more to the proper performance of ongoing CRs (i.e., the proper timing as a consequence of the pertinent causality) than to their generation and/or initiation. PMID:21941469

  13. Aircraft Fault Detection Using Real-Time Frequency Response Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauer, Jared A.

    2016-01-01

    A real-time method for estimating time-varying aircraft frequency responses from input and output measurements was demonstrated. The Bat-4 subscale airplane was used with NASA Langley Research Center's AirSTAR unmanned aerial flight test facility to conduct flight tests and collect data for dynamic modeling. Orthogonal phase-optimized multisine inputs, summed with pilot stick and pedal inputs, were used to excite the responses. The aircraft was tested in its normal configuration and with emulated failures, which included a stuck left ruddervator and an increased command path latency. No prior knowledge of a dynamic model was used or available for the estimation. The longitudinal short period dynamics were investigated in this work. Time-varying frequency responses and stability margins were tracked well using a 20 second sliding window of data, as compared to a post-flight analysis using output error parameter estimation and a low-order equivalent system model. This method could be used in a real-time fault detection system, or for other applications of dynamic modeling such as real-time verification of stability margins during envelope expansion tests.

  14. Adaptive Responses to Prochloraz Exposure That Alter Dose-Response and Time-Course Behaviors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose response and time-course (DRTC) are, along with exposure, the major determinants of health risk. Adaptive changes within exposed organisms in response to environmental stress are common, and alter DRTC behaviors to minimize the effects caused by stressors. In this project, ...

  15. Statistical Tests of Conditional Independence between Responses and/or Response Times on Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Glas, Cees A. W.

    2010-01-01

    Three plausible assumptions of conditional independence in a hierarchical model for responses and response times on test items are identified. For each of the assumptions, a Lagrange multiplier test of the null hypothesis of conditional independence against a parametric alternative is derived. The tests have closed-form statistics that are easy to…

  16. The Time Course Effect of Moderate Intensity Exercise on Response Execution and Response Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Jennifer; Graydon, Jan; McMorris, Terry; Davranche, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the time course effect of a moderate steady-state exercise session on response execution and response inhibition using a stop-task paradigm. Ten participants performed a stop-signal task whilst cycling at a carefully controlled workload intensity (40% of maximal aerobic power), immediately following exercise and…

  17. Predicting aquifer response time for application in catchment modeling.

    PubMed

    Walker, Glen R; Gilfedder, Mat; Dawes, Warrick R; Rassam, David W

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that changes in catchment land use can lead to significant impacts on water resources. Where land-use changes increase evapotranspiration there is a resultant decrease in groundwater recharge, which in turn decreases groundwater discharge to streams. The response time of changes in groundwater discharge to a change in recharge is a key aspect of predicting impacts of land-use change on catchment water yield. Predicting these impacts across the large catchments relevant to water resource planning can require the estimation of groundwater response times from hundreds of aquifers. At this scale, detailed site-specific measured data are often absent, and available spatial data are limited. While numerical models can be applied, there is little advantage if there are no detailed data to parameterize them. Simple analytical methods are useful in this situation, as they allow the variability in groundwater response to be incorporated into catchment hydrological models, with minimal modeling overhead. This paper describes an analytical model which has been developed to capture some of the features of real, sloping aquifer systems. The derived groundwater response timescale can be used to parameterize a groundwater discharge function, allowing groundwater response to be predicted in relation to different broad catchment characteristics at a level of complexity which matches the available data. The results from the analytical model are compared to published field data and numerical model results, and provide an approach with broad application to inform water resource planning in other large, data-scarce catchments. PMID:24842053

  18. Ampoule failure sensor time response testing: Experiments 2 and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. L.; Watring, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The response time of an ampoule failure sensor exposed to a liquid or vapor gallium-arsenide (GaAs) and the corresponding breach time of the containing cartridge is investigated. The experiments were conducted in niobium-hafnium (WC-103) cartridges with an exterior silicide coating. These cartridges were built to flight specifications that were used in NASA's Crystal Growth Furnace during the first United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-1) mission. The ampoule failure sensor is a chemical fuse made from a metal with which the semiconductor material reacts more rapidly than it does with the containing cartridge. In these experiments a platinum metal was used for the manufacture of the sensors. This technical report discusses the response time of two different sensor designs. The first design utilizes a helical wrapped wire and the second uses a single bare wire element. Experimental results indicate that both sensors are adequate in sensing the presence of molten or vapor GaAs with the latter having a 2-minute longer response time. In both experiments, the containing cartridge was breached within 185 minutes after ampoule rupture.

  19. Ultimate response time of high electron mobility transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Rudin, Sergey; Rupper, Greg; Shur, Michael

    2015-05-07

    We present theoretical studies of the response time of the two-dimensional gated electron gas to femtosecond pulses. Our hydrodynamic simulations show that the device response to a short pulse or a step-function signal is either smooth or oscillating time-decay at low and high mobility, μ, values, respectively. At small gate voltage swings, U{sub 0} = U{sub g} − U{sub th}, where U{sub g} is the gate voltage and U{sub th} is the threshold voltage, such that μU{sub 0}/L < v{sub s}, where L is the channel length and v{sub s} is the effective electron saturation velocity, the decay time in the low mobility samples is on the order of L{sup 2}/(μU{sub 0}), in agreement with the analytical drift model. However, the decay is preceded by a delay time on the order of L/s, where s is the plasma wave velocity. This delay is the ballistic transport signature in collision-dominated devices, which becomes important during very short time periods. In the high mobility devices, the period of the decaying oscillations is on the order of the plasma wave velocity transit time. Our analysis shows that short channel field effect transistors operating in the plasmonic regime can meet the requirements for applications as terahertz detectors, mixers, delay lines, and phase shifters in ultra high-speed wireless communication circuits.

  20. Response to varying amounts of time in reading intervention for students with low response to intervention.

    PubMed

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Vaughn, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Two studies examined response to varying amounts of time in reading intervention for two cohorts of first-grade students demonstrating low levels of reading after previous intervention. Students were assigned to one of three groups that received (a) a single dose of intervention, (b) a double dose of intervention, or (c) no intervention. Examination of individual student response to intervention indicated that more students in the treatment groups demonstrated accelerated learning over time than students in the comparison condition. Students' responses to the single-dose and double-dose interventions were similar over time. Students in all conditions demonstrated particular difficulties with gains in reading fluency. Implications for future research and practice within response to intervention models are provided. PMID:18354933

  1. Planck 2013 results. VII. HFI time response and beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polegre, A. M.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper characterizes the effective beams, the effective beam window functions and the associated errors for the Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) detectors. The effective beam is theangular response including the effect of the optics, detectors, data processing and the scan strategy. The window function is the representation of this beam in the harmonic domain which is required to recover an unbiased measurement of the cosmic microwave background angular power spectrum. The HFI is a scanning instrument and its effective beams are the convolution of: a) the optical response of the telescope and feeds; b) the processing of the time-ordered data and deconvolution of the bolometric and electronic transfer function; and c) the merging of several surveys to produce maps. The time response transfer functions are measured using observations of Jupiter and Saturn and by minimizing survey difference residuals. The scanning beam is the post-deconvolution angular response of the instrument, and is characterized with observations of Mars. The main beam solid angles are determined to better than 0.5% at each HFI frequency band. Observations of Jupiter and Saturn limit near sidelobes (within 5°) to about 0.1% of the total solid angle. Time response residuals remain as long tails in the scanning beams, but contribute less than 0.1% of the total solid angle. The bias and uncertainty in the beam products are estimated using ensembles of simulated planet observations that include the impact of instrumental noise and known systematic effects. The correlation structure of these ensembles is well-described by five error eigenmodes that are sub-dominant to sample variance and instrumental noise in the harmonic domain. A suite of consistency tests provide confidence that the error model represents a sufficient description of the data. The total error in the effective beam window functions is below 1% at 100 GHz up to multipole ℓ ~ 1500, and below 0.5% at 143 and 217 GHz up to

  2. Time-dependent response of filamentary composite spherical pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel is modeled as a pseudoisotropic (or transversely isotropic) composite shell, with the effects of the liner and fill tubes omitted. Equations of elasticity, macromechanical and micromechanical formulations, and laminate properties are derived for the application of an internally pressured spherical composite vessel. Viscoelastic properties for the composite matrix are used to characterize time-dependent behavior. Using the maximum strain theory of failure, burst pressure and critical strain equations are formulated, solved in the Laplace domain with an associated elastic solution, and inverted back into the time domain using the method of collocation. Viscoelastic properties of HBFR-55 resin are experimentally determined and a Kevlar/HBFR-55 system is evaluated with a FORTRAN program. The computed reduction in burst pressure with respect to time indicates that the analysis employed may be used to predict the time-dependent response of a filamentary composite spherical pressure vessel.

  3. Response time of large-scale electrochromic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Randin, J.P.

    1990-12-31

    The studies related to electrochromic phenomena performed in the seventies were mainly aimed at the development of information displays. Such applications require small electrode sizes, i.e. with active surface areas of between about 0.01 to 10 cm{sup 2}. The development of large information devices and chiefly smart windows require much larger switching areas. This paper deals with the influence of increasing the active surface area on the response time. The latter depends on both properties of the cell components (transparent conducting layer, electrochromic film, electrolyte and counter electrode) and structure of the cell (size, shape, gap, resistivity of the busbar). Experimental devices were constructed with given components and cell geometry. The effect of a series resistance arisen mainly from the cell size was investigated and explained by the effect of the additional series resistance on the response time of a diffusion-controlled process. The study indicates that the scaling-up of WO{sub 3} devices will be limited by an increase of the response time with increasing active area.

  4. High frequency dielectrophoretic response of microalgae over time

    PubMed Central

    Hadady, Hanieh; Wong, Johnson J.; Hiibel, Sage R.; Redelman, Doug; Geiger, Emil J.

    2015-01-01

    The high frequency dielectrophoresis (>20 MHz) response of microalgae cells with different lipid content was monitored over time. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was cultured in regular medium and under nitrogen-depleted conditions in order to produce populations of cells with low and high lipid content, respectively. The electrical conductivity (EC) of the culture media was also monitored over the same time. The upper crossover frequency (UCOF) decreased for high-lipid cells over time. The single-shell model predicts that the upper crossover frequency is dictated primarily by the dielectric properties of the cytoplasm. The high frequency DEP response of the high-lipid cells’ cytoplasm was changed by lipid accumulation. DEP response of the low-lipid cells also varied with the conductivity of the culture media due to nutrient consumption. Relative lipid content was estimated with BODIPY 505/515 dye by calculating the area-weighted intensity average of fluorescent images. Finally, microalgae cells were successfully separated based on lipid content at 41 MHz and DEP media conductivity 106 ± 1 µS/cm. PMID:25229637

  5. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  6. Decreasing litter size of marmots over time: a life history response to climate change?

    PubMed

    Tafani, Marion; Cohas, Aurélie; Bonenfant, Christophe; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Allainé, Dominique

    2013-03-01

    The way that plants and animals respond to climate change varies widely among species, but the biological features underlying their actual response remains largely unknown. Here, from a 20-year monitoring study, we document a continuous decrease in litter size of the Alpine marmot (Marmota marmota) since 1990. To cope with harsh winters, Alpine marmots hibernate in burrows and their reproductive output should depend more on spring conditions compared to animals that are active year-round. However, we show that litter size decreased over time because of the general thinning of winter snow cover that has been repeatedly reported to occur in the Alps over the same period, despite a positive effect of an earlier snowmelt in spring. Our results contrast markedly with a recent study on North American yellow-bellied marmots, suggesting that between-species differences in life histories can lead to opposite responses to climate change, even between closely related species. Our case study therefore demonstrates the idiosyncratic nature of the response to climate change and emphasizes, even for related species with similar ecological niches, that it may be hazardous to extrapolate life history responses to climate change from one species to another. PMID:23687884

  7. Influence of the Helicopter Time Domain Electromagnetic System Off-Time Response by the Transmitter Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrov, A.; Mejzr, I.

    2010-12-01

    While developing a new Helicopter Time Domain Electromagnetic system (P-THEM), Pico Envirotec Inc (PEI) has studied the effect of the transmitter assembly on the acquired data. The P-THEM system consists of a loop-transmitter assembly, powered by a motor generator, 3-axis coil receiver attached at the midpoint of a tow cable and an additional Z-axis (dB/dt) receiver installed on the rear section of the transmitter loop. The system is towed by a helicopter on a 230 foot long tow cable. The transmitter loop is designed to produce a peak magnetic moment of approximately 250,000 NIA with a base frequency of 30 Hz (adjustable to 25Hz) and a quarter length duty cycle (4 ms on-time). The secondary field acquired with a dB/dt receiver coil consists of a ground response and a system response: SF=Rg+Rsys, where SF - the secondary field, Rg - ground response, Rsys - system response. The system itself, especially the transmitter assembly, being a conductor in an induced magnetic field, creates a magnetic anomaly. The influence of the transmitter assembly anomaly on the received signal depends on the position of the receiver coil against the transmitter, the intensity of on-time pulse and transmitter electro-magnetic properties. At the same time, the ground response acquired with a receiver coil depends on the length and the moment of transmitter pulse, as well as the position and distance of the receiver coil from the ground. This can be for vertical field (Z) receiver coil described as RXz(t)=e(t)pz(t)Rgz(t)+d(t)k(t)j(t)TXz(t), where RXz(t) - receiver response, e(t) - elevation of the receiver over the ground, pz(t) - horizontal projection of the receiver coil, Rgz(t) - vertical component of ground response, d(t) - distance (elevation) between the receiver coil and the transmitter loop, k(t) - the position of the receiver in the transmitter field, j(t) - the transmitter assembly electromagnetic properties, TXz(t) -transmitter field (Primary field on-time, and transmitter

  8. Real-time Pricing Demand Response in Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Berliner, Teri; Graves, Alan

    2012-07-26

    Abstract—Dynamic pricing schemes have been implemented in commercial and industrial application settings, and recently they are getting attention for application to residential customers. Time-of-use and critical-peak-pricing rates are in place in various regions and are being piloted in many more. These programs are proving themselves useful for balancing energy during peak periods; however, real-time (5 minute) pricing signals combined with automation in end-use systems have the potential to deliver even more benefits to operators and consumers. Besides system peak shaving, a real-time pricing system can contribute demand response based on the locational marginal price of electricity, reduce load in response to a generator outage, and respond to local distribution system capacity limiting situations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is teaming with a mid-west electricity service provider to run a distribution feeder-based retail electricity market that negotiates with residential automation equipment and clears every 5 minutes, thus providing a signal for lowering or raising electric consumption based on operational objectives of economic efficiency and reliability. This paper outlines the capability of the real-time pricing system and the operational scenarios being tested as the system is rolled-out starting in the first half of 2012.

  9. Sensitivity and response time improvements in millimeter-wave spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.

    1980-09-01

    A new version of a microwave spectrometer for the detection of gaseous pollutants and other atmospheric constituents is described. The spectrometer, which operates in the vicinity of 70 GHz, employs a Fabry-Perot resonator as a sample cell and uses superhetrodyne detection for high sensitivity. The spectrometer has been modified to incorporate a frequency doubler modulated at 30 MHz to permit operation with a single Gunn oscillator source. As a result, faster response time and somewhat greater sensitivity are obtained. The spectrometer is capable of detecting a minimum concentration of 1 ppM of SO/sub 2/ diluted in air with a 1 second time constant. For OCS diluted in air, the minimum detectable concentration is 800 ppB and with a 10 second time constant 300 ppB.

  10. Modeling in Real Time During the Ebola Response.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Martin I; Santibanez, Scott; Fischer, Leah S; Merlin, Toby L; Adhikari, Bishwa B; Atkins, Charisma Y; Campbell, Caresse; Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai; Gambhir, Manoj; Gift, Thomas; Greening, Bradford; Gu, Weidong; Jacobson, Evin U; Kahn, Emily B; Carias, Cristina; Nerlander, Lina; Rainisch, Gabriel; Shankar, Manjunath; Wong, Karen; Washington, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    To aid decision-making during CDC's response to the 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa, CDC activated a Modeling Task Force to generate estimates on various topics related to the response in West Africa and the risk for importation of cases into the United States. Analysis of eight Ebola response modeling projects conducted during August 2014-July 2015 provided insight into the types of questions addressed by modeling, the impact of the estimates generated, and the difficulties encountered during the modeling. This time frame was selected to cover the three phases of the West African epidemic curve. Questions posed to the Modeling Task Force changed as the epidemic progressed. Initially, the task force was asked to estimate the number of cases that might occur if no interventions were implemented compared with cases that might occur if interventions were implemented; however, at the peak of the epidemic, the focus shifted to estimating resource needs for Ebola treatment units. Then, as the epidemic decelerated, requests for modeling changed to generating estimates of the potential number of sexually transmitted Ebola cases. Modeling to provide information for decision-making during the CDC Ebola response involved limited data, a short turnaround time, and difficulty communicating the modeling process, including assumptions and interpretation of results. Despite these challenges, modeling yielded estimates and projections that public health officials used to make key decisions regarding response strategy and resources required. The impact of modeling during the Ebola response demonstrates the usefulness of modeling in future responses, particularly in the early stages and when data are scarce. Future modeling can be enhanced by planning ahead for data needs and data sharing, and by open communication among modelers, scientists, and others to ensure that modeling and its limitations are more clearly understood. The activities summarized in

  11. Free cortisol awakening responses are influenced by awakening time.

    PubMed

    Federenko, Ilona; Wüst, Stefan; Hellhammer, Dirk H; Dechoux, Ralph; Kumsta, Robert; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2004-02-01

    Psychobiological investigations on the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis depend on markers that adequately describe the activity of this system. There is evidence that the free cortisol response to awakening, proposed as a marker for the HPA axis, can be influenced by time of awakening. To further investigate this possible confounder, 24 shift working nurses and 31 female students on a regular sleep-wake cycle collected saliva samples 0, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after awakening. Nurses were investigated on the first and second day of their early (awakening: 04:00-05:30 h), late (awakening: 06:00-09:00 h), and night shift (awakening: 11:00-14:00 h), respectively. Students were studied after taking a short nap on two consecutive weekdays (awakening: 18:45-20:30 h). Mean cortisol levels after awakening increased significantly under all three shift conditions (p<0.01), but decreased in the student sample (p<.05). Within the three shift conditions, cortisol responses following waking in the early shift were more pronounced than in late (p<.01) and night shift (p<.05). The present study shows that in a sample with a large range of awakening times, an impact of this variable on the cortisol awakening response can be observed. The data furthermore strongly suggest that waking up per se is insufficient for adrenocortical stimulation. PMID:14604599

  12. Study of the time response of a LuAG(Pr) crystal for fast timing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile, L. M.; Mach, H.; Picado, E.; Vedia, V.; Udías, J. M.

    2013-06-01

    The recently developed praseodymium-doped lutetium aluminum garnet, LuAG(Pr), holds a strong potential for fast timing applications. In this study we report on the time response of LuAG(Pr) at 22Na and 60Co photon energies. The measurements were performed using a small crystal cube of 1 cm3 coupled to a Hamamatsu R5320 photomultiplier tube. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) time resolution is found to be 147±2 ps at 60Co energies, and 238±2 ps at 22Na.

  13. Time-dependent response of dissipative electron systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Krause, Pascal; Klamroth, Tillmann; Saalfrank, Peter

    2010-06-15

    We present a systematic study of the influence of energy and phase relaxation on dynamic polarizability simulations in the linear response regime. The nonperturbative approach is based on explicit electron dynamics using short laser pulses of low intensities. To include environmental effects on the property calculation, we use the time-dependent configuration-interaction method in its reduced density matrix formulation. Both energy dissipation and nonlocal pure dephasing are included. The explicit treatment of time-resolved electron dynamics gives access to the phase shift between the electric field and the induced dipole moment, which can be used to define a useful uncertainty measure for the dynamic polarizability. The nonperturbative treatment is compared to perturbation theory expressions, as applied to a simple model system, the rigid H{sub 2} molecule. It is shown that both approaches are equivalent for low field intensities, but the time-dependent treatment provides complementary information on the phase of the induced dipole moment, which allows for the definition of an uncertainty associated with the computation of the dynamic polarizability in the linear response regime.

  14. Time and total dose response of non-volatile UVPROMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, David F.

    1988-12-01

    The total-dose radiation response and intrinsic charge loss are reported as a function of operating time in a system. Five groups of 27C256 devices were aged from 1 to 5 years through accelerated bake to simulate system use. Characterizations of the groups with 5 years of simulated use are presented. The device margin voltage was characterized before and after aging and after exposure to five total-dose radiation levels, 1-5 krad (Si). A statistical model based upon the characterization data was developed to establish reprogramming intervals for these devices when they are used in airborne electronic systems.

  15. Time-dependent response of hydrogels under constrained swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A. D.; Sommer-Larsen, P.; Christiansen, J. deClaville; Sanporean, C.-G.

    2014-06-01

    Constitutive equations are developed for the viscoplastic behavior of covalently cross-linked hydrogels subjected to swelling. The ability of the model to describe the time-dependent response is confirmed by comparison of results of simulation with observations on partially swollen poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) gel specimens in uniaxial tensile tests with a constant strain rate and tensile relaxation tests. The stress-strain relations are applied to study the kinetics of unconstrained and constrained swelling. The following conclusions are drawn from numerical analysis: (i) maximum water uptake under constrained swelling a viscoplastic hydrogel is lower than that for unconstrained swelling of its elastic counterpart and exceeds maximum water uptake under constrained swelling of the elastic gel, (ii) when the rate of water diffusion exceeds the rate of plastic flow in a polymer network, swelling curves (mass uptake versus time) for viscoplastic gels under constraints demonstrate characteristic features of non-Fickian diffusion.

  16. Fast-Response-Time Shape-Memory-Effect Foam Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bulk shape memory alloys, such as Nitinol or CuAlZn, display strong recovery forces undergoing a phase transformation after being strained in their martensitic state. These recovery forces are used for actuation. As the phase transformation is thermally driven, the response time of the actuation can be slow, as the heat must be passively inserted or removed from the alloy. Shape memory alloy TiNi torque tubes have been investigated for at least 20 years and have demonstrated high actuation forces [3,000 in.-lb (approximately equal to 340 N-m) torques] and are very lightweight. However, they are not easy to attach to existing structures. Adhesives will fail in shear at low-torque loads and the TiNi is not weldable, so that mechanical crimp fits have been generally used. These are not reliable, especially in vibratory environments. The TiNi is also slow to heat up, as it can only be heated indirectly using heater and cooling must be done passively. This has restricted their use to on-off actuators where cycle times of approximately one minute is acceptable. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) has been used in the past to make porous TiNi metal foams. Shape Change Technologies has been able to train SHS derived TiNi to exhibit the shape memory effect. As it is an open-celled material, fast response times were observed when the material was heated using hot and cold fluids. A methodology was developed to make the open-celled porous TiNi foams as a tube with integrated hexagonal ends, which then becomes a torsional actuator with fast response times. Under processing developed independently, researchers were able to verify torques of 84 in.-lb (approximately equal to 9.5 Nm) using an actuator weighing 1.3 oz (approximately equal to 37 g) with very fast (less than 1/16th of a second) initial response times when hot and cold fluids were used to facilitate heat transfer. Integrated structural connections were added as part of the net shape process, eliminating

  17. Real-time seismic monitoring of the integrated cape girardeau bridge array and recorded earthquake response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the state of the art, real-time and broad-band seismic monitoring network implemented for the 1206 m [3956 ft] long, cable-stayed Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge in Cape Girardeau (MO), a new Mississippi River crossing, approximately 80 km from the epicentral region of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. The bridge was designed for a strong earthquake (magnitude 7.5 or greater) during the design life of the bridge. The monitoring network comprises a total of 84 channels of accelerometers deployed on the superstructure, pier foundations and at surface and downhole free-field arrays of the bridge. The paper also presents the high quality response data obtained from the network. Such data is aimed to be used by the owner, researchers and engineers to assess the performance of the bridge, to check design parameters, including the comparison of dynamic characteristics with actual response, and to better design future similar bridges. Preliminary analyses of ambient and low amplitude small earthquake data reveal specific response characteristics of the bridge and the free-field. There is evidence of coherent tower, cable, deck interaction that sometimes results in amplified ambient motions. Motions at the lowest tri-axial downhole accelerometers on both MO and IL sides are practically free from any feedback from the bridge. Motions at the mid-level and surface downhole accelerometers are influenced significantly by feedback due to amplified ambient motions of the bridge. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  18. Evaluating Cognitive Theory: A Joint Modeling Approach Using Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein Entink, Rinke H.; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias; Hornke, Lutz F.; Fox, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    In current psychological research, the analysis of data from computer-based assessments or experiments is often confined to accuracy scores. Response times, although being an important source of additional information, are either neglected or analyzed separately. In this article, a new model is developed that allows the simultaneous analysis of…

  19. The effect of alcohol hangover on choice response time.

    PubMed

    Grange, James A; Stephens, Richard; Jones, Kate; Owen, Lauren

    2016-07-01

    The effect of alcohol hangover on cognitive processing has received little attention. We explored the effect of alcohol hangover on choice response time (RT), a dominant dependent variable (DV) in cognitive research. Prior research of the effect of hangover on RT has produced mixed findings; all studies reviewed relied exclusively on estimates of central tendency (e.g. mean RT), which has limited information value. Here we present novel analytical methods by going beyond mean RT analysis. Specifically, we examined performance in hangover conditions (n=31) across the whole RT distribution by fitting ex-Gaussian models to participant data, providing a formal description of the RT distribution. This analysis showed detriments to performance under hangover conditions at the slower end of the RT distribution and increased RT variance under hangover conditions. We also fitted an explicit mathematical process model of choice RT - the diffusion model - which estimates parameters reflecting psychologically-meaningful processes underlying choice RT. This analysis showed that hangover reduced information processing efficiency during response selection, and increased response caution; changes in these parameters reflect hangover affecting core decisional-components of RT performance. The implications of the data as well as the methods used for hangover research are discussed. PMID:27166364

  20. Response time correlations for platinum resistance thermometers in flowing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal response of two types of Platinum Resistance Thermometers (PRT's), which are being considered for use in the National Transonic Wind Tunnel Facility, were studied. Response time correlations for each PRT, in flowing water, oil and air, were established separately. A universal correlation, tau WOA = 2.0 + 1264, 9/h, for a Hy-Cal Sensor (with a reference resistance of 100 ohm) within an error of 20% was established while the universal correlation for the Rosemount Sensor (with a reference resistance of 1000 ohm), tau OA = 0.122 + 1105.6/h, was found with a maximum percentage error of 30%. The correlation for the Rosemount Sensor was based on air and oil data only which is certainly not sufficient to make a correlation applicable to every condition. Therefore, the correlation needs more data to be gathered in different fluids. Also, it is necessary to state that the calculation of the parameter, h, was based on the available heat transfer correlations, whose accuracies are already reported in literature uncertain within 20-30%. Therefore, the universal response constant correlations established here for the Hy-Cal and Rosemount sensors are consistent with the uncertainty in the input data and are recommended for future use in flowing liquids and gases.

  1. Time domain responses of hydraulic bushing with two flow passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Tan; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    Hydraulic bushings are commonly employed in vehicle suspension and body sub-frame systems to control motion, vibration, and structure-borne noise. Since literature on this topic is sparse, a controlled bushing prototype which accommodates a combination of long and short flow passages and flow restriction elements is first designed, constructed and instrumented. Step-up and step-down responses of several typical fluid-filled bushing configurations are measured along with steady harmonic time histories of transmitted force and internal pressures. To analyze the experimental results and gain physical insights into the hydraulic bushing system, lumped system models of bushings with different design features are developed, and analytical expressions of transmitted force and internal pressure responses are derived by using the convolution method. Parametric studies are also conducted to examine the effect of hydraulic element parameters. System parameters are successfully estimated for both harmonic and step responses using theory and measurements, and the dynamic force measurements are analyzed using analytical predictions. Finally, some nonlinearities of the system are also observed, and the fluid resistance of flow passage is found to be the most nonlinear element.

  2. Ampoule failure sensor time response testing: Experiment 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, M. L.; Watring, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The response time of an ampoule failure sensor exposed to a liquid or vapor gallium-arsenide (GaAs) is investigated. The experimental configuration represents the sample/ampoule cartridge assembly used in NASA's Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF). The sensor is a chemical fuse made from a metal with which the semiconductor material reacts more rapidly than it does with the containing cartridge. For the III-IV compound of GaAs, a platinum metal was chosen based on the reaction of platinum and arsenic at elevated temperatures which forms a low melting eutectic. Ampoule failure is indicated by a step change in resistance of the failure sensor on the order of megohms. The sensors will increase the safety of crystal growth experiments by providing an indication that an ampoule has failed. Experimental results indicate that the response times (after a known ampoule failure) for the 0.003 and 0.010 inch ampoule failure sensors are 2.4 and 3.6 minutes, respectively. This ampoule failure sensor will be utilized in the CGF during the second United States Microgravity Laboratory Mission (USML-2) and is the subject of a NASA patent application.

  3. What Actually Happened.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    An ethics consult was scheduled for the following day. Prior to the consult, Mr. Hope subsequently decompensated and was transferred to the local hospital. The ethics consultation service continued with the ethics consult to discuss the ethical concerns of the medical staff but in particular to create an open forum for the staff to process their moral distress over the care of this patient and to come to an agreed-on plan on how they would proceed should the resident code. The patient never returned to the long-term care setting. While in the emergency room, the patient took a turn for the worse and appeared to require intubation. The emergency room attending physician contacted the patient's family and discussed the imminent likelihood of the patient's demise and the potential harm caused to the patient by resuscitation and intubation, and the family agreed to switch to comfort measures, allowing the patient to pass peacefully. The family stated to the ER physician that they needed to feel as though they had done everything they could to keep their loved one alive and did not want any responsibility for his death. The staff at the long-term care setting still remember Mr. Hope in their daily work and talk about him often. PMID:27348844

  4. Distinct roles for IT and IH in controlling the frequency and timing of rebound spike responses

    PubMed Central

    Engbers, Jordan D T; Anderson, Dustin; Tadayonnejad, Reza; Mehaffey, W Hamish; Molineux, Michael L; Turner, Ray W

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The ability for neurons to generate rebound bursts following inhibitory synaptic input relies on ion channels that respond in a unique fashion to hyperpolarization. Inward currents provided by T-type calcium channels (IT) and hyperpolarization-activated HCN channels (IH) increase in availability upon hyperpolarization, allowing for a rebound depolarization after a period of inhibition. Although rebound responses have long been recognized in deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) neurons, the actual extent to which IT and IH contribute to rebound spike output following physiological levels of membrane hyperpolarization has not been clearly established. The current study used recordings and simulations of large diameter cells of the in vitro rat DCN slice preparation to define the roles for IT and IH in a rebound response. We find that physiological levels of hyperpolarization make only small proportions of the total IT and IH available, but that these are sufficient to make substantial contributions to a rebound response. At least 50% of the early phase of the rebound spike frequency increase is generated by an IT-mediated depolarization. An additional frequency increase is provided by IH in reducing the time constant and thus the extent of IT inactivation as the membrane returns from a hyperpolarized state to the resting level. An IH-mediated depolarization creates an inverse voltage-first spike latency relationship and produces a 35% increase in the precision of the first spike latency of a rebound. IT and IH can thus be activated by physiologically relevant stimuli and have distinct roles in the frequency, timing and precision of rebound responses. PMID:21969455

  5. 28 CFR 16.5 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... telephone or by letter, whichever is more efficient in each case. (c) Unusual circumstances. (1) Where the... exist possible questions about the government's integrity which affect public confidence. (2) A request... physical safety of an individual; (ii) An urgency to inform the public about an actual or alleged...

  6. Driving time modulates accommodative response and intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jesús; Diaz-Piedra, Carolina; Jiménez, Raimundo; Morales, José M; Catena, Andrés; Cardenas, David; Di Stasi, Leandro L

    2016-10-01

    Driving is a task mainly reliant on the visual system. Most of the time, while driving, our eyes are constantly focusing and refocusing between the road and the dashboard or near and far traffic. Thus, prolonged driving time should produce visual fatigue. Here, for the first time, we investigated the effects of driving time, a common inducer of driver fatigue, on two ocular parameters: the accommodative response (AR) and the intraocular pressure (IOP). A pre/post-test design has been used to assess the impact of driving time on both indices. Twelve participants (out of 17 recruited) completed the study (5 women, 24.42±2.84years old). The participants were healthy and active drivers with no visual impairment or pathology. They drove for 2h in a virtual driving environment. We assessed AR and IOP before and after the driving session, and also collected subjective measures of arousal and fatigue. We found that IOP and AR decreased (i.e., the accommodative lag increased) after the driving session (p=0.03 and p<0.001, respectively). Moreover, the nearest distances tested (20cm, 25cm, and 33cm) induced the highest decreases in AR (corrected p-values<0.05). Consistent with these findings, the subjective levels of arousal decreased and levels of fatigue increased after the driving session (all p-values<0.001). These results represent an innovative step towards an objective, valid, and reliable assessment of fatigue-impaired driving based on visual fatigue signs. PMID:27235337

  7. Designing for time-dependent material response in spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, M. W.; Oleksuk, Lynda L. S.; Bowles, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    To study the influence on overall deformations of the time-dependent constitutive properties of fiber-reinforced polymeric matrix composite materials being considered for use in orbiting precision segmented reflectors, simple sandwich beam models are developed. The beam models include layers representing the face sheets, the core, and the adhesive bonding of the face sheets to the core. A three-layer model lumps the adhesive layers with the face sheets or core, while a five-layer model considers the adhesive layers explicitly. The deformation response of the three-layer and five-layer sandwich beam models to a midspan point load is studied. This elementary loading leads to a simple analysis, and it is easy to create this loading in the laboratory. Using the correspondence principle of viscoelasticity, the models representing the elastic behavior of the two beams are transformed into time-dependent models. Representative cases of time-dependent material behavior for the facesheet material, the core material, and the adhesive are used to evaluate the influence of these constituents being time-dependent on the deformations of the beam. As an example of the results presented, if it assumed that, as a worst case, the polymer-dominated shear properties of the core behave as a Maxwell fluid such that under constant shear stress the shear strain increases by a factor of 10 in 20 years, then it is shown that the beam deflection increases by a factor of 1.4 during that time. In addition to quantitative conclusions, several assumptions are discussed which simplify the analyses for use with more complicated material models. Finally, it is shown that the simpler three-layer model suffices in many situations.

  8. Word Association in L1 and L2: An Exploratory Study of Response Types, Response Times, and Interlingual Mediation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Tess; Izura, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Word association responses in first-language (L1) Spanish and second-language (L2) English were investigated by means of response latencies and types of associative response produced. The primary aims were to establish whether (a) some response types are produced more often or faster than others, (b) participants' L2 response time profiles mirror…

  9. Viewer response to time-varying video quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Don E.

    1998-07-01

    Over the past several years we have investigated viewer response to temporal fluctuations in the quality of digital television pictures, which occur when video is coded into relatively low bit rates. Three phenomena of interest have been identified: (1) a forgiveness effect, (2) a recency effect, and (3) a negative-peak (duration-neglect); these are described and discussed in the paper. In collaboration with our partners in European projects MOSAIC and TAPESTRIES, we have developed a three-stage method of measuring time-variant quality, which has been accepted by the ITU-R. The first stage is a Single Stimulus Continuous Quality Evaluation (SSCQE) of instantaneous quality; the second a calibration stage to link SSCQE with conventional DSCQS, and the third stage a numerical procedure for relating continuous and overall quality. Some of the factors we have identified as being important in producing good overall quality judgements have relevance to the design of optimal coding strategies for digital television.

  10. Field response and switching times in biaxial nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardi, Roberto; Muccioli, Luca; Zannoni, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We study by means of virtual molecular dynamics computer experiments the response of a bulk biaxial nematic to an applied external field and, in particular, the relative speed of reorientation of the principal director axis and of the secondary one, typical of these new materials, upon a π /2 field switch. We perform the simulations setting up and integrating the equations of motion for biaxial Gay-Berne particles using quaternions and a suitable time reversible symplectic integrator. We find that switching of the secondary axis is up to an order of magnitude faster than that of the principal axis, and that under fields above a certain strength a reorganization of local domains, temporarily disrupting the nematic and biaxial ordering, rather than a collective concerted reorientation occurs.

  11. Field response and switching times in biaxial nematics.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Roberto; Muccioli, Luca; Zannoni, Claudio

    2008-01-14

    We study by means of virtual molecular dynamics computer experiments the response of a bulk biaxial nematic to an applied external field and, in particular, the relative speed of reorientation of the principal director axis and of the secondary one, typical of these new materials, upon a pi2 field switch. We perform the simulations setting up and integrating the equations of motion for biaxial Gay-Berne particles using quaternions and a suitable time reversible symplectic integrator. We find that switching of the secondary axis is up to an order of magnitude faster than that of the principal axis, and that under fields above a certain strength a reorganization of local domains, temporarily disrupting the nematic and biaxial ordering, rather than a collective concerted reorientation occurs. PMID:18205473

  12. GPS computer navigators to shorten EMS response and transport times.

    PubMed

    Ota, F S; Muramatsu, R S; Yoshida, B H; Yamamoto, L G

    2001-05-01

    GPS (global positioning satellite system to determine one's position on earth) units have become inexpensive and compact. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a GPS enhanced computer street map navigator to improve the ability of EMS drivers in an urban setting to locate their destination and shorten response times. For part I, residential addresses in the city were randomly selected from a telephone directory. Two driver/navigator teams were assigned to drive to the address adhering to speed limits. One team used a standard street map, whereas the other team used a GPS computer navigator. The travel time and distance of the runs were compared. For part II, the computer GPS navigator was placed on an ambulance to supplement their normal methods of navigation to find the address requesting EMS. After the run was completed, EMS providers were interviewed to determine their opinion of whether the GPS navigator was helpful. For part I the results showed that in the 29 initial test runs, comparing the GPS team versus the standard map team, the mean distances traveled were 8.7 versus 9.0 kilometers (not significant) and the mean travel times were 13.5 versus 14.6 minutes (P=.02), respectively. The GPS team arrived faster in 72% runs. For part II the results showed that most EMS providers surveyed noted that the GPS computer navigator enhanced their ability to find the destination and all EMS providers acknowledged that it would enhance their ability to find a destination in an area in which they were unfamiliar. These results suggest that a portable GPS computer navigator system is helpful and can enhance the ability of prehospital care providers to locate their destination. Because these units are accurate and inexpensive, GPS computer navigators may be a valuable tool in reducing pre-hospital transport times. PMID:11326345

  13. Comment on 'Shang S. 2012. Calculating actual crop evapotranspiration under soil water stress conditions with appropriate numerical methods and time step. Hydrological Processes 26: 3338-3343. DOI: 10.1002/hyp.8405'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yatheendradas, Soni; Narapusetty, Balachandrudu; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Funk, Christopher; Verdin, James

    2014-01-01

    A previous study analyzed errors in the numerical calculation of actual crop evapotranspiration (ET(sub a)) under soil water stress. Assuming no irrigation or precipitation, it constructed equations for ET(sub a) over limited soil-water ranges in a root zone drying out due to evapotranspiration. It then used a single crop-soil composite to provide recommendations about the appropriate usage of numerical methods under different values of the time step and the maximum crop evapotranspiration (ET(sub c)). This comment reformulates those ET(sub a) equations for applicability over the full range of soil water values, revealing a dependence of the relative error in numerical ET(sub a) on the initial soil water that was not seen in the previous study. It is shown that the recommendations based on a single crop-soil composite can be invalid for other crop-soil composites. Finally, a consideration of the numerical error in the time-cumulative value of ET(sub a) is discussed besides the existing consideration of that error over individual time steps as done in the previous study. This cumulative ET(sub a) is more relevant to the final crop yield.

  14. The Response Time of a Rotor System with a Disk-Type Magnetorheological Fluid Damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changsheng

    The response time of a rotor system supported upon a disk-type magnetorheological fluid damper operating on shear mode is measured experimentally. The effects of rotating speed, step current and magnetic particle volume fraction, on the response time are dealt with. It is shown that the dynamic response can be described by first 10% response time and rapid response time. Generally, the first 10% response time and the rapid response time are in order of less than 0.1 second and 0.1~0.4 second. The magnetic field strength, magnetic particle volume fraction and power supply have a great effect on the response time. The response time in dropping step current is several times longer than that in applying step current. There is a zero initial delay time at either applying or dropping the current, which is caused by the magnetizing or de-magnetizing process.

  15. Structural Equation Model Approach to the Use of Response Times for Improving Estimation in Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Rohini

    2012-01-01

    In the last five decades, research on the uses of response time has extended into the field of psychometrics (Schnikpe & Scrams, 1999; van der Linden, 2006; van der Linden, 2007), where interest has centered around the usefulness of response time information in item calibration and person measurement within an item response theory. framework.…

  16. Unraveling the drivers of the storm time radiation belt response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpua, E. K. J.; Hietala, H.; Turner, D. L.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Reeves, G. D.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-05-01

    We present a new framework to study the time evolution and dynamics of the outer Van Allen belt electron fluxes. The framework is entirely based on the large-scale solar wind storm drivers and their substructures. The Van Allen Probe observations, revealing the electron flux behavior throughout the outer belt, are combined with continuous, long-term (over 1.5 solar cycles) geosynchronous orbit data set from GOES and solar wind measurements A superposed epoch analysis, where we normalize the timescales for each substructure (sheath, ejecta, and interface region) allows us to avoid smearing effects and to distinguish the electron flux evolution during various driver structures. We show that the radiation belt response is not random: The electron flux variations are determined by the combined effect of the structured solar wind driver and prestorm electron flux levels. In particular, we find that loss mechanisms dominate during stream interface regions, coronal mass ejection (CME) ejecta, and sheaths while enhancements occur during fast streams trailing the stream interface or the CME.

  17. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    PubMed

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained. PMID:26481207

  18. Bayesian Procedures for Identifying Aberrant Response-Time Patterns in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Guo, Fanmin

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify aberrant response-time patterns on educational and psychological tests, it is important to be able to separate the speed at which the test taker operates from the time the items require. A lognormal model for response times with this feature was used to derive a Bayesian procedure for detecting aberrant response times.…

  19. Real-Time Seismic Monitoring of Thenewcape Girardeau (mo) Bridge and Recorded Earthquake Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    çelebi, Mehmet

    This paper introduces the state of the art, real-time and broad-band seismic monitoring network implemented for the 1206 m [3956 ft] long, cable-stayed Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge in Cape Girardeau (MO), a new Mississippi River crossing, approximately 80 km from the epicentral region of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. Design of the bridge accounted for the possibility of a strong earthquake (magnitude 7.5 or greater) during the design life of the bridge. The monitoring network consists of a superstructure and two free-field arrays and comprises a total of 84 channels of accelerometers deployed on the superstructure, pier foundations and free-field in the vicinity of the bridge. The paper also introduces the high quality response data obtained from the network. Such data is aimed to be used by the owner, researchers and engineers to (1) assess the performance of the bridge, (2) check design parameters, including the comparison of dynamic characteristics with actual response, and (3) better design future similar bridges. Preliminary analyses of low-amplitude ambient vibration data and that from a small earthquake reveal specific response characteristics of this new bridge and the free-field in its proximity. There is coherent tower-cabledeck interaction that sometimes results in amplified ambient motions. Also, while the motions at the lowest (tri-axial) downhole accelerometers on both MO and IL sides are practically free-from any feedback from the bridge, the motions at the middle downhole and surface accelerometers are significantly influenced by amplified ambient motions of the bridge.

  20. Children's Rights and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1982-01-01

    Educators need to seriously reflect upon the concept of children's rights. Though the idea of children's rights has been debated numerous times, the idea remains vague and shapeless; however, Maslow's theory of self-actualization can provide the children's rights idea with a needed theoretical framework. (Author)

  1. Joint Modeling of Ability and Differential Speed Using Responses and Response Times.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jean-Paul; Marianti, Sukaesi

    2016-01-01

    With computerized testing, it is possible to record both the responses of test takers to test questions (i.e., items) and the amount of time spent by a test taker in responding to each question. Various models have been proposed that take into account both test-taker ability and working speed, with the many models assuming a constant working speed throughout the test. The constant working speed assumption may be inappropriate for various reasons. For example, a test taker may need to adjust the pace due to time mismanagement, or a test taker who started out working too fast may reduce the working speed to improve accuracy. A model is proposed here that allows for variable working speed. An illustration of the model using the Amsterdam Chess Test data is provided. PMID:27269482

  2. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  3. Assessing the Value of Regulation Resources Based on Their Time Response Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Lu, Shuai; Ma, Jian; Nguyen, Tony B.

    2008-06-01

    Fast responsive regulation resources are potentially more valuable as a power system regulation resource (more efficient) because they allow applying controls at the exact moment and in the exact amount as needed. Faster control is desirable because it facilitates more reliable compliance with the NERC Control Performance Standards at relatively lesser regulation capacity procurements. The current California ISO practices and markets do not provide a differentiation among the regulation resources based on their speed of response (with the exception of some minimum ramping capabilities). Some demand response technologies, including some generation and energy storage resources, can provide quicker control actions. California ISO practices and markets could be updated to welcome more fast regulation resources into the California ISO service area. The project work reported in this work was pursuing the following objectives: • Develop methodology to assess the relative value of generation resources used for regulation and load following California ISO functions • This assessment should be done based on physical characteristics including the ability to quickly change their output following California ISO signals • Evaluate what power is worth on different time scales • Analyze the benefits of new regulation resources to provide effective compliance with the mandatory NERC Control Performance Standards • Evaluate impacts of the newly proposed BAAL and FRR standards on the potential value of fast regulation and distributed regulation resources • Develop a scope for the follow-up projects to pave a road for the new efficient types of balancing resources in California. The work included the following studies: • Analysis of California ISO regulating units characteristics • California ISO automatic generation system (AGC) analysis • California ISO regulation procurement and market analysis • Fast regulation efficiency analysis • Projection of the

  4. Modulation of Response Timing in ADHD, Effects of Reinforcement Valence and Magnitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luman, Marjolein; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Sergeant, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of reinforcement valence and magnitude on response timing in children with ADHD. Children were required to estimate a 1-s interval, and both the median response time (response tendency) and the intrasubject-variability (response stability) were investigated. In addition, heart rate and skin conductance…

  5. An Analysis of Variance Approach for the Estimation of Response Time Distributions in Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2010-01-01

    Generalizability theory and analysis of variance methods are employed, together with the concept of objective time pressure, to estimate response time distributions and the degree of time pressure in timed tests. By estimating response time variance components due to person, item, and their interaction, and fixed effects due to item types and…

  6. Anticipating by Pigeons Depends on Local Statistical Information in a Serial Response Time Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Alyson L.; Herbranson, Walter T.; Loper, Julia D.; Wood, David M.; Shimp, Charles P.

    2004-01-01

    Pigeons responded in a serial response time task patterned after that of M. J. Nissen and P. Bullemer (1987) with humans. Experiment 1 produced global facilitation: Response times in repeating lists of locations were faster than when locations were random. Response time to a spatial location was also a function of both that location's 1st- and…

  7. Fractionated Reaction Time Responses to Auditory and Electrocutaneous Stimuli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beehler, Pamela J. Hoyes; Kamen, Gary

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to equate auditory and electrocutaneous stimuli. These equated stimuli were used in a second investigation examining neuromotor responses to stimuli of varying intensity. Results are provided. (Author/MT)

  8. Concerns about Appearing Prejudiced Get Under the Skin: Stress Responses to Interracial Contact in the Moment and across Time

    PubMed Central

    Trawalter, Sophie; Adam, Emma K.; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Richeson, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Many White Americans are concerned about appearing prejudiced. How these concerns affect responses during actual interracial interactions, however, remains understudied. The present work examines stress responses to interracial contact—both in the moment, during interracial interactions (Study 1), and over time as individuals have repeated interracial contact (Study 2). Results of Study 1 revealed that concerns about appearing prejudiced were associated with heightened stress responses during interracial encounters (Study 1). White participants concerned about appearing prejudiced exhibited significant increases in cortisol “stress hormone” levels as well as increases in anxious behavior during interracial but not same-race contact. Participants relatively unconcerned about appearing prejudiced did not exhibit these stress responses. Study 2 examined stress responses to interracial contact over an entire academic year. Results revealed that White participants exhibited shifts in cortisol diurnal rhythms on days after interracial contact. Moreover, participants’ cortisol rhythms across the academic year, from fall to spring, were related to their concerns about appearing prejudiced and their interracial contact experiences. Taken together, these data offer the first evidence that chronic concerns about appearing prejudiced are related to short- and longer-term stress responses to interracial contact. Implications for life in diverse spaces are discussed. PMID:22711918

  9. Limited information estimation of the diffusion-based item response theory model for responses and response times.

    PubMed

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias; Szardenings, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Psychological tests are usually analysed with item response models. Recently, some alternative measurement models have been proposed that were derived from cognitive process models developed in experimental psychology. These models consider the responses but also the response times of the test takers. Two such models are the Q-diffusion model and the D-diffusion model. Both models can be calibrated with the diffIRT package of the R statistical environment via marginal maximum likelihood (MML) estimation. In this manuscript, an alternative approach to model calibration is proposed. The approach is based on weighted least squares estimation and parallels the standard estimation approach in structural equation modelling. Estimates are determined by minimizing the discrepancy between the observed and the implied covariance matrix. The estimator is simple to implement, consistent, and asymptotically normally distributed. Least squares estimation also provides a test of model fit by comparing the observed and implied covariance matrix. The estimator and the test of model fit are evaluated in a simulation study. Although parameter recovery is good, the estimator is less efficient than the MML estimator. PMID:26853083

  10. Physiological changes in response to apnea impact the timing of motor representations: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reduced physiological arousal in response to breath-holding affects internal clock processes, leading swimmers to underestimate the time spent under apnea. We investigated whether reduced physiological arousal during static apnea was likely to affect the temporal organization of motor imagery (MI). Methods Fourteen inter-regional to national breath-holding athletes mentally and physically performed two 15 m swimming tasks of identical durations. They performed the two sequences in a counterbalanced order, the first while breathing normally using a scuba, the second under apnea. We assessed MI duration immediately after completion of the corresponding task. Athletes performed MI with and without holding breath. Results MI durations (26.1 s ± 8.22) were significantly shorter than actual durations (29.7 s ± 7.6) without holding breath. Apnea increased MI durations by 10% (± 5%). Heart rate decrease in response to breath-holding correlated with MI durations increase (p < .01). Under apnea, participants achieved temporal congruence between MI and PP only when performing MI of the apnea swimming task. Self-report data indicated greater ease when MI was performed in a physiological arousal state congruent with that of the corresponding motor task. Conclusions Physiological arousal affected the durations of MI through its effects on internal clock processes and by impacting the congruency in physiological body states between overt and covert motor performance. Present findings have potential implications with regards to the possibility of preventing underestimation of durations spent under a state of reduced physiological arousal. PMID:24773625

  11. Brainstem auditory evoked responses in man. 1: Effect of stimulus rise-fall time and duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Squires, N.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Short latency (under 10 msec) responses elicited by bursts of white noise were recorded from the scalps of human subjects. Response alterations produced by changes in the noise burst duration (on-time), inter-burst interval (off-time), and onset and offset shapes were analyzed. The latency of the most prominent response component, wave V, was markedly delayed with increases in stimulus rise time but was unaffected by changes in fall time. Increases in stimulus duration, and therefore in loudness, resulted in a systematic increase in latency. This was probably due to response recovery processes, since the effect was eliminated with increases in stimulus off-time. The amplitude of wave V was insensitive to changes in signal rise and fall times, while increasing signal on-time produced smaller amplitude responses only for sufficiently short off-times. It was concluded that wave V of the human auditory brainstem evoked response is solely an onset response.

  12. Motherhood and drug-dependency: the attributes of full-time versus part-time responsibility for child care.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M R; Berry, G L

    1994-10-01

    This study examined differences between the maternal characteristics of African-American drug-dependent mothers who have full-time responsibility for child care and those having part-time responsibility. The study revealed that full-time mothers have significantly higher levels of maternal adaptation than part-time mothers. For part-time mothers, the level of maternal adaptation or self-esteem did not fluctuate, regardless of whether she saw the child 4 days a week or once a month. The article identifies variables that may facilitate better maternal behaviors among drug-dependent mothers. PMID:7836017

  13. Leveraging First Response Time into the Knowledge Tracing Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yutao; Heffernan, Neil T.

    2012-01-01

    The field of educational data mining has been using the Knowledge Tracing model, which only look at the correctness of student first response, for tracking student knowledge. Recently, lots of other features are studied to extend the Knowledge Tracing model to better model student knowledge. The goal of this paper is to analyze whether or not the…

  14. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central element in a metaphysical…

  15. The Effects of Spatial Stimulus-Response Compatibility on Choice Time Production Accuracy and Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakitin, Brian C.

    2005-01-01

    Five experiments examined the relations between timing and attention using a choice time production task in which the latency of a spatial choice response is matched to a target interval (3 or 5 s). Experiments 1 and 2 indicated that spatial stimulus-response incompatibility increased nonscalar timing variability without affecting timing accuracy…

  16. Utilizing Response Time Distributions for Item Selection in CAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Zhewen; Wang, Chun; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for item selection in computerized adaptive testing only focus on item information without taking into consideration the time required to answer an item. As a result, some examinees may receive a set of items that take a very long time to finish, and information is not accrued as efficiently as possible. The authors propose two…

  17. Generalized time-dependent density-functional-theory response functions for spontaneous density fluctuations and nonlinear response: Resolving the causality paradox in real time

    SciTech Connect

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2005-02-01

    Time-ordered superoperators are used to develop a unified description of nonlinear density response and spontaneous fluctuations of many-electron systems. The pth-order density response functions are decomposed into 2{sup p+1} non-causal Liouville space pathways. Individual pathways are symmetric to the interchange of their space, time, and superoperator indices and can thus be calculated as functional derivatives. Other combinations of these pathways represent spontaneous density fluctuations and the response of such fluctuations to an external field. The resolution of the causality paradox of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is shown to be intimately connected with the nonretarded nature of fluctuations.

  18. Genes influence the amplitude and timing of brain hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zuyao Y; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Thompson, Paul M; McMahon, Katie L; Blokland, Gabriëlla A M; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Calhoun, Vince; Martin, Nicholas G; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Reutens, David C

    2016-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the hemodynamic response function (HRF) reflects regulation of regional cerebral blood flow in response to neuronal activation. The HRF varies significantly between individuals. This study investigated the genetic contribution to individual variation in HRF using fMRI data from 125 monozygotic (MZ) and 149 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs. The resemblance in amplitude, latency, and duration of the HRF in six regions in the frontal and parietal lobes was compared between MZ and DZ twin pairs. Heritability was estimated using an ACE (Additive genetic, Common environmental, and unique Environmental factors) model. The genetic influence on the temporal profile and amplitude of HRF was moderate to strong (24%-51%). The HRF may be used in the genetic analysis of diseases with a cerebrovascular etiology. PMID:26375212

  19. Real-time earthquake monitoring: Early warning and rapid response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A panel was established to investigate the subject of real-time earthquake monitoring (RTEM) and suggest recommendations on the feasibility of using a real-time earthquake warning system to mitigate earthquake damage in regions of the United States. The findings of the investigation and the related recommendations are described in this report. A brief review of existing real-time seismic systems is presented with particular emphasis given to the current California seismic networks. Specific applications of a real-time monitoring system are discussed along with issues related to system deployment and technical feasibility. In addition, several non-technical considerations are addressed including cost-benefit analysis, public perceptions, safety, and liability.

  20. 5 CFR 1820.4 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... simple and more complex requests based on the amount of work and/or time needed to process the request... out of order and given expedited treatment whenever OSC has established to its satisfaction that:...

  1. 5 CFR 1820.4 - Timing of responses to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... simple and more complex requests based on the amount of work and/or time needed to process the request... out of order and given expedited treatment whenever OSC has established to its satisfaction that:...

  2. The Impact of Item Format and Examinee Characteristics on Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Brian J.; Johnston, Mary M.; Lipner, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Current research on examination response time has focused on tests comprised of traditional multiple-choice items. Consequently, the impact of other innovative or complex item formats on examinee response time is not understood. The present study used multilevel growth modeling to investigate examinee characteristics associated with response time…

  3. Using Response Time to Detect Item Preknowledge in Computer-Based Licensure Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Hong; Staniewska, Dorota; Reckase, Mark; Woo, Ada

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of how to detect item preknowledge using item response time data in two computer-based large-scale licensure examinations. Item preknowledge is indicated by an unexpected short response time and a correct response. Two samples were used for detecting item preknowledge for each examination. The first sample was from…

  4. 75 FR 37712 - Temporary Suspension of Certain Oil Spill Response Time Requirements To Support Deepwater Horizon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ...; 2050-AG63 Temporary Suspension of Certain Oil Spill Response Time Requirements To Support Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill of National Significance (SONS) Response AGENCIES: Coast Guard, DHS, and Environmental... Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) temporary interim rule will suspend oil spill response time...

  5. Premotor and Motor Reaction Time as a Function of Response Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christina, Robert W.; Rose, Debra J.

    1985-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to identify response elements responsible for the complexity effect found by Henry and Rogers. Results suggest that, as the number of movement parts and the accuracy demands increase, programing time increases, supporting the hypothesis that response initiation time becomes longer as programing becomes more complex.…

  6. Brainstem auditory evoked responses in man. 1: Effect of stimulus rise-fall time and duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Squires, N.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Short latency (under 10 msec) evoked responses elicited by bursts of white noise were recorded from the scalp of human subjects. Response alterations produced by changes in the noise burst duration (on-time) inter-burst interval (off-time), and onset and offset shapes are reported and evaluated. The latency of the most prominent response component, wave V, was markedly delayed with increases in stimulus rise-time but was unaffected by changes in fall-time. The amplitude of wave V was insensitive to changes in signal rise-and-fall times, while increasing signal on-time produced smaller amplitude responses only for sufficiently short off-times. It is concluded that wave V of the human auditory brainstem evoked response is solely an onset response.

  7. Quantized response times are a signature of a neuronal bottleneck in decision.

    PubMed

    Perona, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The histograms of response times of optimal YES/NO decisions that are computed from a single sensory Poisson neuron are highly structured. In particular, response times in NO decisions are quantized to a small set of times, while response times in YES decisions have a multimodal structure. Both the times of NO decisions, as well as the modes of the the histogram of YES decisions, are associated to the number of action potentials that were necessary to reach the decision. Their value is a function of the firing rate of the neuron in response to the states of the stimulus. PMID:24782750

  8. Correlations between liquid crystal director reorientation and optical response time of a homeotropic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiying; Wu, Thomas X.; Zhu, Xinyu; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2004-05-01

    Correlations between the director reorientation time and its consequent optical response time (both decay and rise) of a homeotropic liquid crystal (LC) cell under crossed polarizers are derived theoretically based on small angle approximation. Results indicate that the optical response time is linearly proportional to the LC director reorientation time and is weakly dependent on the initial bias voltage. To validate the derived correlations, transient phase and transmittance responses at various bias voltages are analyzed numerically by solving the Erickson-Leslie equation. Pretilt angle is found to make an important contribution to the optical response time. Gray scale switching of the homeotropic cell is also investigated.

  9. Overeating at dinner time among Japanese workers: Is overeating related to stress response and late dinner times?

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akiko; Sakurazawa, Hirofumi; Fujita, Takanori; Akamatsu, Rie

    2016-06-01

    There are several known risk factors for overeating, including negative feelings and hunger. It was hypothesized that overtime work is associated with stress responses and later dinner times, leading to longer periods of time without eating, and that this, in turn, leads to a strong experience of hunger and consequent overeating at dinner. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among overeating at dinner, stress responses (e.g., fatigue, anxiety, and depression), and dinner times in Japanese male workers. In December 2012, 255 Japanese male workers at a leasing company completed a self-report questionnaire about overeating at dinner, psychological stress responses, physical stress responses, and dinner times. Each worker was sent an email with a link to the questionnaire website, where his answers were collected. Relationships between overeating at dinner and lifestyle issues were investigated using multiple linear regression analysis treating overeating as a dependent variable. Factors related to overeating at dinner included psychological stress response (β = 0.251 p < 0.001) and dinner time (β = 0.220, p = 0.004). These cross-sectional data suggest that overeating at dinner is related to dinner time in men and to stress responses. PMID:26923743

  10. Use of Constant Time Delay and Attentional Responses with Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolery, Mark; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study examined effectiveness of a constant time delay (CTD) procedure in teaching social studies and health facts to five adolescents with learning or behavioral disorders. Students were given praise with and without additional information. Results indicated CTD procedures were reliable and effective, and students acquired nontargeted as well…

  11. Time-Varying Affective Response for Humanoid Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshkina, Lilia; Arkin, Ronald C.; Lee, Jamee K.; Jung, Hyunryong

    This paper describes the design of a complex time-varying affective architecture. It is an expansion of the TAME architecture (traits, attitudes, moods, and emotions) as applied to humanoid robotics. It particular it is intended to promote effective human-robot interaction by conveying the robot’s affective state to the user in an easy-to-interpret manner.

  12. INTERNAL DOSE AND RESPONSE IN REAL-TIME.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Rapid temporal fluctuations in exposure may occur in a number of situations such as accidents or other unexpected acute releases of airborne substances. Often risk assessments overlook temporal exposure patterns under simplifying assumptions such as the use of time-wei...

  13. Physiological Evidence for Response Inhibition in Choice Reaction Time Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burle, Boris; Vidal, Frank; Tandonnet, Christophe; Hasbroucq, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    Inhibition is a widely used notion proposed to account for data obtained in choice reaction time (RT) tasks. However, this concept is weakly supported by empirical facts. In this paper, we review a series of experiments using Hoffman reflex, transcranial magnetic stimulation and electroencephalography to study inhibition in choice RT tasks. We…

  14. Groundwater recharge and time lag measurement through Vertosols using impulse response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Mark; Kelly, Bryce F. J.

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the world there are many stressed aquifers used to support irrigated agriculture. The Condamine River catchment (southern Queensland, Australia) is one example of a globally significant agricultural region where groundwater use has exceeded recharge over the last 50 years. There is a high dependence on groundwater in this catchment, because yearly rainfall is highly variable, and actual evapotranspiration often exceeds rainfall. To better manage the aquifer there is a need to correctly conceptualise the primary inputs and outputs of the system, and characterise the lags in system response to all forcings. In catchment models it is particularly important to correctly proportion diffuse (areal) rainfall recharge and to account for the lag between rainfall and recharge at the water table. Throughout large portions of the Condamine Catchment, groundwater levels are now 20 or more metres below the ground surface. This study aimed to better quantify the lag between rainfall and recharge at the water table using the predefined impulse response function in continuous time method (PIRFICT; von Asmuth et al., 2002; von Asmuth, 2012). The PIRFICT method was applied to 255 multi-decadal groundwater level data sets throughout the catchment. Inputs into the modelling include rainfall, irrigation deep drainage, stream water level, evapotranspiration, and groundwater extractions. As an independent check the PIRFICT model derived diffuse recharge estimates are compared to point lysimeter and geochemical recharge estimates in the Vertosol soils within this catchment. It is estimated using the PIRFICT method that in the Condamine Catchment between 1990 and 2012, the mean rain-derived groundwater recharge is 4.4 mm/year. Mean groundwater response from rainfall was determined to be 5.3 years: range 188 days to 48 years. The recharge estimates are consistent with both geochemical and lysimeter point measurements of recharge. It is concluded that where extensive groundwater

  15. Whiteheadian Actual Entitities and String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Joseph A.

    2012-06-01

    In the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the ultimate units of reality are actual entities, momentary self-constituting subjects of experience which are too small to be sensibly perceived. Their combination into "societies" with a "common element of form" produces the organisms and inanimate things of ordinary sense experience. According to the proponents of string theory, tiny vibrating strings are the ultimate constituents of physical reality which in harmonious combination yield perceptible entities at the macroscopic level of physical reality. Given that the number of Whiteheadian actual entities and of individual strings within string theory are beyond reckoning at any given moment, could they be two ways to describe the same non-verifiable foundational reality? For example, if one could establish that the "superject" or objective pattern of self- constitution of an actual entity vibrates at a specific frequency, its affinity with the individual strings of string theory would be striking. Likewise, if one were to claim that the size and complexity of Whiteheadian 'societies" require different space-time parameters for the dynamic interrelationship of constituent actual entities, would that at least partially account for the assumption of 10 or even 26 instead of just 3 dimensions within string theory? The overall conclusion of this article is that, if a suitably revised understanding of Whiteheadian metaphysics were seen as compatible with the philosophical implications of string theory, their combination into a single world view would strengthen the plausibility of both schemes taken separately. Key words: actual entities, subject/superjects, vibrating strings, structured fields of activity, multi-dimensional physical reality.

  16. Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Can Real-Time Pricing SupportRetail Competition and Demand Response?

    SciTech Connect

    Barbose, Galen; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Hopper,Nicole; Neenan, Bernie

    2006-04-25

    As retail choice states reach the end of their transitional, rate-cap periods, state regulators must decide what type of default supply service to provide to customers that have not switched to a competitive retail supplier. In a growing number of states, regulators have adopted real-time pricing (RTP) as the default service for large commercial and industrial (C&I) customers. Although this trend is driven chiefly by policy objectives related to retail competition, default service RTP may have the added benefit of stimulating demand response. To evaluate the potential role of RTP as a means to both ends--retail market development and demand response--we conducted a comprehensive review of experience with default RTP in the U.S. and examined the emergence of RTP as a product offering by competitive retail suppliers. Across the ten utilities with default RTP in place in 2005, between 5% and 35% of the applicable load remained on the rate. Based on interviews with competitive retailers, we find evidence to suggest that a comparable amount of load in these states has switched to hourly pricing arrangements with competitive retailers. Many customers on default or competitive hourly pricing are paying prices indexed to the real-time spot market, and thus have no advance knowledge of prices. Because the price responsiveness of customers under these conditions has yet to be formally analyzed, and relatively few efforts have been undertaken to help these customers become price responsive, the actual demand response impacts from hourly pricing in retail choice states remains largely an open question. However, we find that policymakers and other stakeholders in retail choice states have various strategies at their disposal to capture the potential demand response benefits from hourly pricing, while simultaneously supporting retail competition.

  17. Meteorological data assimilation for real-time emergency response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, G.; Chan, S.T.

    1996-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time dose assessments of airborne pollutant releases. Diverse data assimilation techniques are required to meet the needs of a new generation of ARAC models and to take advantage of the rapidly expanding availability of meteorological data. We are developing a hierarchy of algorithms to provide gridded meteorological fields which can be used to drive dispersion codes or to provide initial fields for mesoscale models. Data to be processed include winds, temperature, moisture, and turbulence.

  18. Age-related differences in predictive response timing in children: evidence from regularly relative to irregularly paced reaction time performance.

    PubMed

    Debrabant, Julie; Gheysen, Freja; Vingerhoets, Guy; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2012-08-01

    Predictive timing refers to the anticipation and precise timing of planned motor responses. This study was performed to investigate children's predictive response timing abilities while accounting for confounding age-related effects of motor speed. Indices of predictive timing were evaluated for their contributions in motor skill proficiency as well. Eighty typically developing children in 4 age groups (5-6, 7-8, 9-10 and 11-12 years) performed a visuomotor reaction time (RT) test. Differences in speed and anticipatory responding at regularly relative to irregularly paced stimuli were evaluated as indices of predictive timing. Also, explicit timing and motor tests (M-ABC-2, VMI tracing, and KTK jumping) were administered. Significant faster responding for regularly versus irregularly paced stimuli was found from the ages of 9-10 years on. Better anticipatory responding behavior for regular in contrast with irregular stimuli was found to be present already at 7-8 years. Overall, predictive timing abilities increased across the 4 age groups. Also, inter-individual differences in the speed indices of predictive timing contributed to predicting VMI tracing and KTK jumping outcomes when controlling for age and overall motor response speed. In conclusion, predictive motor timing abilities increase during age 5 to 12 and correlate with motor skill performance. PMID:22494922

  19. Do Young and Old Preschoolers Exhibit Response Bias Due to Different Mechanisms? Investigating Children's Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that younger preschoolers exhibit a yes bias due to underdeveloped cognitive abilities, whereas older preschoolers exhibit a response bias due to other factors. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the response latency to yes-no questions pertaining to familiar and unfamiliar objects in 3- to 6-year-olds. The…

  20. Abrupt rise of new machine ecology beyond human response time

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Neil; Zhao, Guannan; Hunsader, Eric; Qi, Hong; Johnson, Nicholas; Meng, Jing; Tivnan, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Society's techno-social systems are becoming ever faster and more computer-orientated. However, far from simply generating faster versions of existing behaviour, we show that this speed-up can generate a new behavioural regime as humans lose the ability to intervene in real time. Analyzing millisecond-scale data for the world's largest and most powerful techno-social system, the global financial market, we uncover an abrupt transition to a new all-machine phase characterized by large numbers of subsecond extreme events. The proliferation of these subsecond events shows an intriguing correlation with the onset of the system-wide financial collapse in 2008. Our findings are consistent with an emerging ecology of competitive machines featuring ‘crowds' of predatory algorithms, and highlight the need for a new scientific theory of subsecond financial phenomena. PMID:24022120

  1. Method for reducing response time in sensor measurement.

    PubMed

    Casas, Oscar; Rillo, Francesc I

    2009-08-01

    Transients are present in sensor and instrumentation systems. They are caused by energy transference and are typically modeled as first-order systems. If too long, transients may suppose a critical factor for these systems unless they are analyzed (e.g., in terms of consumption). This work presents a new method for estimating the final value of a first-order system transient. Since this problem may be harmful, mainly to autonomous systems, the method equations are composed of simple operations that can be implemented on microcontrollers or similar interfaces with low computational capacity. The experimental results validate the theoretical models of the method and prove that, when the system coexists with disturbances, it is possible to estimate the final value in around 60% of the time we would have to wait until reaching it, in the worst case scenario. PMID:19725676

  2. Linking impulse response functions to reaction time: Rod and cone reaction time data and a computational model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Zele, Andrew J.; Pokorny, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Reaction times for incremental and decremental stimuli were measured at five suprathreshold contrasts for six retinal illuminance levels where rods alone (0.002–0.2 Trolands), rods and cones (2–20 Trolands) or cones alone (200 Trolands) mediated detection. A 4-primary photostimulator allowed independent control of rod or cone excitations. This is the first report of reaction times to isolated rod or cone stimuli at mesopic light levels under the same adaptation conditions. The main findings are: 1) For rods, responses to decrements were faster than increments, but cone reaction times were closely similar. 2) At light levels where both systems were functional, rod reaction times were ~20 ms longer. The data were fitted with a computational model that incorporates rod and cone impulse response functions and a stimulus-dependent neural sensory component that triggers a motor response. Rod and cone impulse response functions were derived from published psychophysical two-pulse threshold data and temporal modulation transfer functions. The model fits were accomplished with a limited number of free parameters: two global parameters to estimate the irreducible minimum reaction time for each receptor type, and one local parameter for each reaction time versus contrast function. This is the first model to provide a neural basis for the variation in reaction time with retinal illuminance, stimulus contrast, stimulus polarity, and receptor class modulated. PMID:17346763

  3. Nonparametric Bayesian time-series modeling and clustering of time-domain ground penetrating radar landmine responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Kenneth D., Jr.; Torrione, Peter A.; Collins, Leslie

    2010-04-01

    Time domain ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been shown to be a powerful sensing phenomenology for detecting buried objects such as landmines. Landmine detection with GPR data typically utilizes a feature-based pattern classification algorithm to discriminate buried landmines from other sub-surface objects. In high-fidelity GPR, the time-frequency characteristics of a landmine response should be indicative of the physical construction and material composition of the landmine and could therefore be useful for discrimination from other non-threatening sub-surface objects. In this research we propose modeling landmine time-domain responses with a nonparametric Bayesian time-series model and we perform clustering of these time-series models with a hierarchical nonparametric Bayesian model. Each time-series is modeled as a hidden Markov model (HMM) with autoregressive (AR) state densities. The proposed nonparametric Bayesian prior allows for automated learning of the number of states in the HMM as well as the AR order within each state density. This creates a flexible time-series model with complexity determined by the data. Furthermore, a hierarchical non-parametric Bayesian prior is used to group landmine responses with similar HMM model parameters, thus learning the number of distinct landmine response models within a data set. Model inference is accomplished using a fast variational mean field approximation that can be implemented for on-line learning.

  4. Reaction Time and Movement Time as Measures of Stimulus Evaluation and Response Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlihan, Michael; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Three studies involving 16 college students explored cognitive processes reflected by reaction time (RT) and movement time (MT). The hypothesis that correlations of RT and MT with measures of intelligence are due to effects on a common stage of information processing cannot be rejected on the basis of study findings. (SLD)

  5. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status.

    PubMed

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L

    2013-05-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but "blocking out time" and "time shifting" suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice. PMID:24039337

  6. What Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation Actually Activates

    PubMed Central

    Curthoys, Ian S.; MacDougall, Hamish Gavin

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper in Frontiers Cohen et al. (2012) asked “What does galvanic vestibular stimulation actually activate?” and concluded that galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) causes predominantly otolithic behavioral responses. In this Perspective paper we show that such a conclusion does not follow from the evidence. The evidence from neurophysiology is very clear: galvanic stimulation activates primary otolithic neurons as well as primary semicircular canal neurons (Kim and Curthoys, 2004). Irregular neurons are activated at lower currents. The answer to what behavior is activated depends on what is measured and how it is measured, including not just technical details, such as the frame rate of video, but the exact experimental context in which the measurement took place (visual fixation vs total darkness). Both canal and otolith dependent responses are activated by GVS. PMID:22833733

  7. Fast multigrid fluorescent ion chamber with 0.1 ms time response.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motohiro; Kawamura, Naomi; Lytle, Farrel W; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2002-03-01

    A fast multigrid ion chamber for the detection of fluorescent X-rays has been developed. The structure of 17 grids with close separation was employed to maximize the time response as well as to give sufficient detection efficiency. The measured rise/fall response time to cyclic X-rays was shorter than that of an existing three-grid ion chamber by more than one order of magnitude. A 0.13 ms time response was obtained at the 500 V applied voltage, where the detector can stably operate without any discharge. The available frequency range is as high as 1 kHz with a practical amplitude response. PMID:11872931

  8. Response time of mean square slope to wind forcing: An empirical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David D.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Gleason, Scott T.

    2016-04-01

    We present an empirical study of the response time of surface wave mean square slope to local wind forcing using data collected over 11 years by 46 discus buoys moored at a wide variety of locations. The response time is defined as the time lag at which the time dependence of the waves exhibits the highest correlation with that of the local wind speed. The response time at each location is found to be fairly stable, with the time varying between 0.4 and 1.8 h depending on the location. Examination of long-term statistics reveals response time dependencies on wind speed magnitude, fetch, atmospheric stability, and wavelength. With the increasing reliance on satellite microwave remote sensing as a source of wind data, these results provide useful insights and bounds for their use.

  9. A Semiparametric Model for Jointly Analyzing Response Times and Accuracy in Computerized Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chun; Fan, Zhewen; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The item response times (RTs) collected from computerized testing represent an underutilized type of information about items and examinees. In addition to knowing the examinees' responses to each item, we can investigate the amount of time examinees spend on each item. Current models for RTs mainly focus on parametric models, which have the…

  10. 75 FR 79961 - Temporary Suspension of Certain Oil Spill Response Time Requirements To Support Deepwater Horizon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon SONSat the FOSC's request. 75 FR 37712. The rule also confirmed that...; 2050-AG63 Temporary Suspension of Certain Oil Spill Response Time Requirements To Support Deepwater.... Oil Spill Response Resources Return Time Several comments noted concerns about the return of assets...

  11. The Simplest Complete Model of Choice Response Time: Linear Ballistic Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Scott D.; Heathcote, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    We propose a linear ballistic accumulator (LBA) model of decision making and reaction time. The LBA is simpler than other models of choice response time, with independent accumulators that race towards a common response threshold. Activity in the accumulators increases in a linear and deterministic manner. The simplicity of the model allows…

  12. A Mixture Proportional Hazards Model with Random Effects for Response Times in Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jörg-Tobias

    2016-01-01

    In this article, a new model for test response times is proposed that combines latent class analysis and the proportional hazards model with random effects in a similar vein as the mixture factor model. The model assumes the existence of different latent classes. In each latent class, the response times are distributed according to a…

  13. Posterior Predictive Checks for Conditional Independence between Response Time and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolsinova, Maria; Tijmstra, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Conditional independence (CI) between response time and response accuracy is a fundamental assumption of many joint models for time and accuracy used in educational measurement. In this study, posterior predictive checks (PPCs) are proposed for testing this assumption. These PPCs are based on three discrepancy measures reflecting different…

  14. First passage time: Connecting random walks to functional responses in heterogeneous environments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, M. A.; McKenzie, H.; Merrill, E.

    2010-12-01

    In this talk I will outline first passage time analysis for animals undertaking complex movement patterns, and will demonstrate how first passage time can be used to derive functional responses in predator prey systems. The result is a new approach to understanding type III functional responses based on a random walk model. I will extend the analysis to heterogeneous environments to assess the effects of linear features on functional responses in wolves and elk using GPS tracking data.

  15. A Study of Time-dependent and Anisotropic Effects on the Deformation Response of Two Flywheel Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, Atef F.; Arnold, Steven M.; Al-Zoubi, Nasser R.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of material time dependency and anisotropy in the context of two specific flywheel designs-preload and multi-directional composite (MDC)--is investigated. In particular, we focus on the following aspects: 1) geometric constraints, 2) material constraints, 3) loading type, and 4) the fundamental character of the time-dependent response, i.e., reversible or irreversible. The bulk of the results presented were obtained using a composite (PMC IM7/8552 at 135 C) material system. The material was characterized using a general multimechanism hereditary (viscoelastoplastic) model. As a general conclusion, the results have clearly shown that both the preload and the MDC rotor designs are significantly affected by time-dependent material behavior, which may impact the state of rotor balance and potentially reduce its operating life. In view of the results of the parametric studies and predictions made in the present study, the need for actual experimentation focusing on the time-dependent behavior of full-scale flywheel rotors is self-evident.

  16. Performing dynamic time history analyses by extension of the response spectrum method

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate the dynamic time history response of finite-element models using results from response spectrum analyses. The proposed modified time history method does not represent a new mathamatical approach to dynamic analysis but suggests a more efficient ordering of the analytical equations and procedures. The modified time history method is considerably faster and less expensive to use than normal time hisory methods. This paper presents the theory and implementation of the modified time history approach along with comparisons of the modified and normal time history methods for a prototypic seismic piping design problem.

  17. Emotional Responses during Reading: Physiological Responses Predict Real-Time Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Samantha G.; Willett, John B.; Fischer, Kurt W.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between emotional responses and reading performance in middle-school students. Although a large number of prior studies have investigated the relationship between emotion and reading, those studies have concentrated primarily on relatively static and distal measures of emotion. In this research, we measured…

  18. Effect of prolonged bedrest and plus Gz acceleration on peripheral visual response time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Peripheral visual response time changes during +G sub z acceleration following fourteen days of bedrest are considered as well as what effect prolonged bedrest has upon this response. Eighteen test lights, placed 10 deg are apart along the horizontal meridian of the subject's field of view, were presented in a random sequence. The subject was instructed to press a button as soon as a light appeared. Response time testing occurred periodically during bedrest and continuously during centrifugation testing. The results indicate that: (1) mean response time is significantly longer to stimuli imaged in the far periphery than to stimuli imaged closer to the line of sight; (2) mean response time at each stimulus position tends to be longer at plateau g than during the preacceleration baseline period; (3) mean response time tends to lengthen as the g level is increased; (4) peripheral visual response time during +G sub x acceleration at 2, 3.2, and 3.8 g was not a reliable advanced indicator that blackout was going to occur; and (5) the subject's field of view collapsed rapidly just before blackout. Bedrest data showed that the distribution of response times to stimuli imaged across the subject's horizontal retinal meridian remained remarkably constant from day to day during both the bedrest and recovery periods.

  19. Response Times for Correct and Incorrect Item Responses on Computerized Adaptive Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Shu-Ren; Plake, Barbara S.; Ferdous, Abdullah A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the time different ability level examinees spend taking a CAT on demanding items to these examinees. It was also found that high able examinees spend more time on the pretest items, which are not tailored to the examinees' ability level, than do lower ability examinees. Higher able examinees showed persistence with test…

  20. Response times across the visual field: empirical observations and application to threshold determination.

    PubMed

    McKendrick, Allison M; Denniss, Jonathan; Turpin, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to determine if response times gathered during perimetry can be exploited within a thresholding algorithm to improve the speed and accuracy of the test. Frequency of seeing (FoS) curves were measured at 24 locations across the central 30° of the visual field of 10 subjects using a Method of Constant Stimuli, with response times recorded for each presentation. Spatial locations were interleaved, and built up over multiple 5-min blocks, in order to mimic the attentional conditions of clinical perimetry. FoS curves were fitted to each participant's data for each location, and response times derived as a function of distance-from-threshold normalised to the slope of each FoS curve. This data was then used to derive a function for the probability of observing response times given the distance-from-threshold, and to seed simulations of a new test procedure (BURTO) that exploited the probability function for stimulus placement. Test time and error were then simulated for patients with various false response rates. When compared with a ZEST algorithm, simulations revealed that BURTO was about one presentation per location faster than ZEST, on average, while sacrificing less precision and bias in threshold estimates than simply terminating the ZEST earlier. Despite response times varying considerably for a given individual and their thresholds, response times can be exploited to reduce the number of presentations required in a visual field test without loss of accuracy. PMID:24802595

  1. Detector response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry at high pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulcicek, Erol E.; Boyle, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Dead time effects in chevron configured dual microchannel plates (MCPs) are investigated. Response times are determined experimentally for one chevron-configured dual MCP-type detector and two discrete dynode-type electron multipliers with 16 and 23 resistively divided stages. All of these detectors are found to be suitable for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), yielding 3-6-ns (FWHM) response times triggered on a single ion pulse. It is concluded that, unless there are viable solutions to overcome dead time disadvantages for continuous dynode detectors, suitable discrete dynode detectors for TOF MS appear to have a significant advantage for high repetition rate operation.

  2. Estimating Testing Time: The Effects of Item Characteristics on Response Latency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkitis, Perry N.; And Others

    The relationship between test item characteristics and testing time was studied for a computer-administered licensing examination. One objective of the study was to develop a model to predict testing time on the basis of known item characteristics. Response latencies (i.e., the amount of time taken by examinees to read, review, and answer items)…

  3. Actualizing Mathematical Giftedness in Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirri, Kirsi

    This study followed up gifted Finnish students who participated in Olympiad mathematics and scientific competitions during the years 1965-1997. Survey responses were received from 158 former Olympians (150 males, 8 females) and 169 of their parents. The responding Olympians had competed in mathematics (N=73), physics (N=50), and chemistry (N=35)…

  4. The response time of the Changjiang plume to river discharge in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Rui; Wu, Hui; Zhu, Jianrong; Li, Lu

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model was used to study the response time of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River plume to river discharge by artificially increasing the runoff over a short period and investigating the variation of salinity in the plume region. The time lagged between the change of river discharge and the change of salinity that reaches the 10% of the adjusted value is considered as the response time in this study. The response times in the plume region differed slightly when the river discharge during the spring tide and the neap tide was increased. Specifically, the response times near the river mouth and in the plume edge were ~ 1 days and more than 15 days, respectively. The brackish water volumes were also calculated to determine the variations in the plume extensions over time. A tracer was released to study the transport time from the Datong station to the East China Sea using the concept of water age. The tracer transport time ranged from 10 days near the river mouth to more than 50 days at the edge of the plume, which is much longer than the response time of the surface salinity.

  5. New Approaches to Measuring Sticky Molecules: Improvement of Instrumental Response Times Using Active Passivation.

    PubMed

    Roscioli, J R; Zahniser, M S; Nelson, D D; Herndon, S C; Kolb, C E

    2016-03-10

    A novel method has been developed to improve sampling system response times for nominally "sticky" molecules such as HNO3 and NH3. The method reported here makes use of active, continuous passivation, where the instrument interfaces are continuously exposed to 0.01-1 ppm of fluorinated acidic or basic surfactants. To reduce HNO3 response times, perfluoroheptanoic acid and perfluorobutanesulfonic acid vapors are evaluated as passivation species. 1H,1H-perfluorooctylamine is used to improve NH3 response times. The resulting time responses using the perfluoroalkanoic acids are on the order of 0.4-0.7 s for a 75% quantitative recovery of HNO3, and 1-5 s for 90% recovery. Similar response time improvements are seen in detection of NH3 using perfluorooctylamine (<1 s for a 75% recovery, ∼2 s for 90% recovery). This generally applicable methodology significantly improves the capability of eddy covariance flux and real-time plume-based measurements of highly polar molecules that have historically been hampered by slow response times due to adsorption on sampling system surfaces. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by field measurements of HNO3 eddy covariance fluxes in a central U.S. prairie. PMID:26106902

  6. Response Time Comparisons among Four Base Running Starting Techniques in Slow Pitch Softball.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Richard G.; Brown, Rodney L.

    1981-01-01

    Response times among four starting techniques (cross-over step, jab step, standing sprinter's start, and momentum start) were compared. The results suggest that the momentum start was the fastest starting technique for optimum speed in running bases. (FG)

  7. Response of Vibrio fischeri to repeated exposures over time in an Online Toxicity Monitor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Online Toxicity Monitors have been developed to provide continuous, time-relevant information regarding water quality. These systems measure a physiological or behavioral response of a sentinel organism to changes water quality. One such system, the Microlan Toxcontrol, is base...

  8. Time/Loss Analysis in the development and evaluation of emergency response procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.A.

    1994-08-01

    Time/Loss Analysis (T/LA) provides a standard for conducting technically consistent and objective evaluations of emergency response planning and procedures. T/LA is also a sound tool for evaluating the performance of safeguards and procedures.

  9. 75 FR 38603 - State Responsibility for the Timely Reporting and Posting of Certain Convictions and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration State Responsibility for the Timely Reporting and Posting of... to ensuring highway safety. On July 31, 2002, FMCSA published a final rule (67 FR 49761) requiring... part of its responsibility to ensure State compliance with the minimum CDL program...

  10. Research on Mail Surveys: Response Rates and Methods in Relation to Population Group and Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boser, Judith A.; Green, Kathy

    The purpose of this review was to look for trends across time in response rates and variables studied for published mail surveys and to compare response rates and variables studied for different target populations. Studies were identified in databases in four fields: education, psychology, business and marketing, and sociology. A total of 225…

  11. Experimental philosophy of actual and counterfactual free will intuitions.

    PubMed

    Feltz, Adam

    2015-11-01

    Five experiments suggested that everyday free will and moral responsibility judgments about some hypothetical thought examples differed from free will and moral responsibility judgments about the actual world. Experiment 1 (N=106) showed that free will intuitions about the actual world measured by the FAD-Plus poorly predicted free will intuitions about a hypothetical person performing a determined action (r=.13). Experiments 2-5 replicated this result and found the relations between actual free will judgments and free will judgments about hypothetical determined or fated actions (rs=.22-.35) were much smaller than the differences between them (ηp(2)=.2-.55). These results put some pressure on theoretical accounts of everyday intuitions about freedom and moral responsibility. PMID:26126174

  12. Time and flow-direction responses of shear-styress-sensitive liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Muraqtore, J. J.; Heinick, James T.

    1994-01-01

    Time and flow-direction responses of shear-stress liquid crystal coatings were exploresd experimentally. For the time-response experiments, coatings were exposed to transient, compressible flows created during the startup and off-design operation of an injector-driven supersonic wind tunnel. Flow transients were visualized with a focusing schlieren system and recorded with a 100 frame/s color video camera.

  13. Effect of Time of Day on Performance, Hormonal and Metabolic Response during a 1000-M Cycling Time Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Alan Lins; Lopes-Silva, João Paulo; Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Casarini, Dulce Elena; Arita, Danielle Yuri; Bishop, David John; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of time of day on performance, pacing, and hormonal and metabolic responses during a 1000-m cycling time-trial. Nine male, recreational cyclists visited the laboratory four times. During the 1st visit the participants performed an incremental test and during the 2nd visit they performed a 1000-m cycling familiarization trial. On the 3rd and 4th visits, the participants performed a 1000-m TT at either 8 am or 6 pm, in randomized, repeated-measures, crossover design. The time to complete the time trial was lower in the evening than in the morning (88.2±8.7 versus 94.7±10.9 s, respectively, p<0.05), but there was no significant different in pacing. However, oxygen uptake and aerobic mechanical power output at 600 and 1000 m tended to be higher in the evening (p<0.07 and 0.09, respectively). There was also a main effect of time of day for insulin, cortisol, and total and free testosterone concentration, which were all higher in the morning (+60%, +26%, +31% and +22%, respectively, p<0.05). The growth hormone, was twofold higher in the evening (p<0.05). The plasma glucose was ∼11% lower in the morning (p<0.05). Glucagon, norepinephrine, epinephrine and lactate were similar for the morning and evening trials (p>0.05), but the norepinephrine response to the exercise was increased in the morning (+46%, p<0.05), and it was accompanied by a 5-fold increase in the response of glucose. Muscle recruitment, as measured by electromyography, was similar between morning and evening trials (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that performance was improved in the evening, and it was accompanied by an improved hormonal and metabolic milieu. PMID:25289885

  14. Modeling the Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    We apply two scenarios of external forcing, namely the SIM-based out-of-phase variations and the proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM, to compute climate responses to solar variation on decadal time scale. We find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, while temperature response decreases downward to the surface for both scenarios, and both models. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are 0.6 K in RCM and 0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of 5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing are similar to the HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment) observed 11-year temperature variations. Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to the stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two sce-narios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., the one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other one from flux transport that has much less background component [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide potential range of variations of TSI on centennial time scale. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive the as-sociated historical SSI. The historical SSI is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean will provide the first order estimate of temperature response to SSI variation on centennial time scales. We anticipate the stratosphere, troposphere, and

  15. Consequences of Predicted or Actual Asteroid Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2003-12-01

    Earth impact by an asteroid could have enormous physical and environmental consequences. Impactors larger than 2 km diameter could be so destructive as to threaten civilization. Since such events greatly exceed any other natural or man-made catastrophe, much extrapolation is necessary just to understand environmental implications (e.g. sudden global cooling, tsunami magnitude, toxic effects). Responses of vital elements of the ecosystem (e.g. agriculture) and of human society to such an impact are conjectural. For instance, response to the Blackout of 2003 was restrained, but response to 9/11 terrorism was arguably exaggerated and dysfunctional; would society be fragile or robust in the face of global catastrophe? Even small impacts, or predictions of impacts (accurate or faulty), could generate disproportionate responses, especially if news media reports are hyped or inaccurate or if responsible entities (e.g. military organizations in regions of conflict) are inadequately aware of the phenomenology of small impacts. Asteroid impact is the one geophysical hazard of high potential consequence with which we, fortunately, have essentially no historical experience. It is thus important that decision makers familiarize themselves with the hazard and that society (perhaps using a formal procedure, like a National Academy of Sciences study) evaluate the priority of addressing the hazard by (a) further telescopic searches for dangerous but still-undiscovered asteroids and (b) development of mitigation strategies (including deflection of an oncoming asteroid and on- Earth civil defense). I exemplify these issues by discussing several representative cases that span the range of parameters. Many of the specific physical consequences of impact involve effects like those of other geophysical disasters (flood, fire, earthquake, etc.), but the psychological and sociological aspects of predicted and actual impacts are distinctive. Standard economic cost/benefit analyses may not

  16. Does time differ from change? Philosophical appraisal of the problem of time in quantum gravity and in physics: A response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Julian

    2015-11-01

    In this paper I respond to the paper "Does time differ from change? Philosophical appraisal of the problem of time in quantum gravity and in physics" by Alexis de Saint-Ours, in which, among other things, he contrasts the views of Rovelli and myself. There are three main parts in my response. First, I consider Saint-Ours's question about the relationship between time and change and whether it is possible to have the latter without the former. Second, I go into somewhat more detail about the differences between Rovelli and myself concerning the nature of relationalism. Finally, I take the opportunity to discuss how my ideas about the nature of time have changed during the last decade as a result of examination of the role played by scale in the dynamics of the universe.

  17. Optical response of extended systems from time-dependent Hartree-Fock and time-dependent density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, Leonardo; Webster, Ross; Tomić, Stanko; Harrison, Nicholas M.

    2012-05-01

    We describe a unified formulation of time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF) and time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) for the accurate and efficient calculation of the optical response of infinite (periodic) systems. The method is formulated within the linear-response approximation, but it can easily be extended to include higher-order response contributions, and, in TD-DFT, it can treat with comparable computational efficiency purely local, semi-local or fully non-local approximations for the ground-state exchange-correlation (XC) functional and for the response TD-DFT XC kernel in the adiabatic approximation. At variance with existing methods for computing excitation energies based on the diagonalisation of suitable coupling matrices, or on the inversion of a dielectric matrix, our approach exploits an iterative procedure similar to a standard self-consistent field calculation. This results in a particularly efficient treatment of the coupling of excitations at different k points in the Brillouin zone. As a consequence, our method has the potential to describe completely from first principles the optically induced formation of bound particle-hole pairs in wide classes of materials. This point is illustrated by computing the optical gaps of a series of representative bulk semiconductors, (non-spin polarised) oxides and ionic insulators.

  18. Enhancing the humidity response time of polymer optical fiber Bragg grating by using laser micromachining.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Chen; Hong, Yanhua; Webb, David J

    2015-10-01

    The humidity sensors constructed from polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBG) respond to the water content change in the fiber induced by varying environmental condition. The water content change is a diffusion process. Therefore the response time of the POFBG sensor strongly depends on the geometry and size of the fiber. In this work we investigate the use of laser micromachining of D-shaped and slotted structures to improve the response time of polymer fiber grating based humidity sensors. A significant improvement in the response time has been achieved in laser micromachined D-shaped POFBG humidity sensors. The slotted geometry allows water rapid access to the core region but this does not of itself improve response time due to the slow expansion of the bulk of the cladding. We show that by straining the slotted sensor, the expansion component can be removed resulting in the response time being determined only by the more rapid, water induced change in core refractive index. In this way the response time is reduced by a factor of 2.5. PMID:26480109

  19. A window on perception: Response times of odontocete cetaceans in audiometric tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwood, Diane J.; Ridgway, Sam H.; Evans, William E.

    2002-05-01

    A standard psychometric measurement is response time, the interval elapsing between a stimulus and a response. While studies of response time have been published for humans and other terrestrial mammals, this study marks the first report of response times for odontocete cetaceans at threshold in an audiometric task. Two white whales (Delphinapterus leucas) and four Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) were given audiometric tests to determine masked hearing thresholds. Animals were tested at 26 frequencies over a range from 200 Hz to 100 kHz using pure tones. The test tone amplitudes covered a range of 20 dB re 1 microPascal including the hearing threshold of the animal at that frequency. Hearing thresholds varied from 87.5 dB to 125.5 dB depending on frequency, masking noise intensity and individual animal. Data was analyzed to determine characteristic relationships between response time and amplitude of test tone for each frequency and animal. The two whales responded significantly slower (640 ms, 0.001) than the four dolphins (430 ms). As in terrestrial animals, reaction time became shorter as stimulus strength increased. At threshold, median response time across frequencies within each animal varied about 150 ms.

  20. Response to gravity by Zea mays seedlings. I. Time course of the response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandurski, R. S.; Schulze, A.; Dayanandan, P.; Kaufman, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    Gravistimulation induces an asymmetric distribution of free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in the cortex-epidermis of the Zea mays L. cv 'Stowells Evergreen' mesocotyl within 15 minutes, the shortest time tested. IAA was measured by an isotope dilution method as the pentaflurobenzyl ester. The per cent IAA in the lower half of the mescotyl cortex was 56 to 57% at 15, 30, and 90 minutes after stimulus initiation. Curvature is detectable in the mescotyl within 3 minutes after beginning gravitropic stimulation. The rate of curvature of the mesocotyl increases during the first 60 minutes to maximum of about 30 degrees per hour. Thus, the growth asymmetry continues to increase for 45 minutes after hormone asymmetry is established. Free IAA occurs predominantly in the stele of the mesocotyl whereas esterified IAA is mainly in the mesocotyl cortex-epidermis. This compartmentation may permit determining in which tissue the hormone asymmetry arises. Current data suggest the asymmetry originated in the stele.

  1. Frequency-specific coupling between trial-to-trial fluctuations of neural responses and response-time variability.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Nicoletta; Baumeister, Sarah; Hohmann, Sarah; Wolf, Isabella; Holz, Nathalie; Boecker, Regina; Laucht, Manfred; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    We assessed intra-individual variability of response times (RT) and single-trial P3 amplitudes following targets in healthy adults during a Flanker/NO-GO task. RT variability and variability of the neural responses coupled at the faster frequencies examined (0.07-0.17 Hz) at Pz, the target-P3 maxima, despite non-significant associations for overall variability (standard deviation, SD). Frequency-specific patterns of variability in the single-trial P3 may help to understand the neurophysiology of RT variability and its explanatory models of attention allocation deficits beyond intra-individual variability summary indices such as SD. PMID:25724293

  2. Brain Oscillations and Diurnal Variations in Hypnotic Responsiveness--A Commentary on "Diurnal Variations in Hypnotic Responsiveness: Is There an Optimal Time to be Hypnotized?".

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    A recent study published in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis reported an interesting diurnal pattern of hypnotic responsivity; specifically, the authors found higher hypnotic responsiveness in a large sample of undergraduates in the morning and early evening. However, they did not have an explanation for this pattern of findings. This pattern is consistent, however, with the theta hypothesis of hypnotic responsivity. Further examination of the associations between brain oscillations and response to hypnosis is needed to determine if specific oscillations such as theta (a) actually facilitate response to some hypnotic suggestions, (b) merely reflect hypnotic responding, or (c) reflect another factor that itself plays a causal role in response to hypnosis. PMID:26599996

  3. New method for evaluating effective recovery time and single photoelectron response in silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzicka, Martyna; Szczęśniak, Tomasz; Moszyński, Marek; Szawłowski, Marek; Grodzicki, Krystian

    2015-05-01

    The linearity of a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) response depends on the number of APD cells and its effective recovery time and it is related to the intensity and duration of the detected light pulses. The aim of this study was to determine the effective recovery time on the basis of the measured SiPM response to light pulses of different durations. A closer analysis of the SiPM response to the light pulses shorter than the effective recovery time of APD cells led to a method for the evaluation of the single photoelectron response of the devices where the single photoelectron peak cannot be clearly measured. This is necessary in the evaluation of the number of fired APD cells (or the number of photoelectrons) in measurements with light pulses of various durations. Measurements were done with SiPMs manufactured by two companies: Hamamatsu and SensL.

  4. Use of the Vocera Communications Badge Improves Public Safety Response Times

    PubMed Central

    Joslin, Jeremy D.; Goldberger, David; Johnson, Loretta; Waltz, D. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Violence in the Emergency Department (ED) has been a long-standing issue complicated by deficiencies in staff training, ease of weapons access, and response availability of public safety officers. The Vocera Badge is being used by our staff to request public safety assistance in lieu of a formal phone call to the University Police Communications Center. We sought to learn if use of this technology improved officer response times to the ED. Methods. Mean response times were reviewed and descriptive statistics analyzed to determine if the use of the Vocera Badge improved public safety officer response times to the ED. Results. Average response times improved from an average of 3.2 minutes (SD = 0.456) in the 6 months before the use of the communication badges to an average of 1.02 minutes (SD = 0.319) in the 6 months after use began. Conclusions. The use of the Vocera Badge seemed to decrease response times of public safety officers to our ED compared with the traditional method of calling a dispatch center to request assistance. PMID:27127654

  5. Time Work by Overworked Professionals: Strategies in Response to the Stress of Higher Status

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Lam, Jack; Ammons, Samantha; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    How are professionals responding to the time strains brought on by the stress of their higher status jobs? Qualitative data from professionals reveal (a) general acceptance of the emerging temporal organization of professional work, including rising time demands and blurred boundaries around work/ nonwork times and places, and (b) time work as strategic responses to work intensification, overloads, and boundarylessness. We detected four time-work strategies: prioritizing time, scaling back obligations, blocking out time, and time shifting of obligations. These strategies are often more work-friendly than family-friendly, but “blocking out time” and “time shifting” suggest promising avenues for work-time policy and practice. PMID:24039337

  6. Molecular response properties in equation of motion coupled cluster theory: A time-dependent perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriani, Sonia; Pawłowski, Filip; Olsen, Jeppe; Jørgensen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Molecular response properties for ground and excited states and for transitions between these states are defined by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a molecular system in a field of a time-periodic perturbation. In equation of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CC) theory, molecular response properties are commonly obtained by replacing, in configuration interaction (CI) molecular response property expressions, the energies and eigenstates of the CI eigenvalue equation with the energies and eigenstates of the EOM-CC eigenvalue equation. We show here that EOM-CC molecular response properties are identical to the molecular response properties that are obtained in the coupled cluster-configuration interaction (CC-CI) model, where the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved using an exponential (coupled cluster) parametrization to describe the unperturbed system and a linear (configuration interaction) parametrization to describe the time evolution of the unperturbed system. The equivalence between EOM-CC and CC-CI molecular response properties only holds when the CI molecular response property expressions—from which the EOM-CC expressions are derived—are determined using projection and not using the variational principle. In a previous article [F. Pawłowski, J. Olsen, and P. Jørgensen, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 114109 (2015)], it was stated that the equivalence between EOM-CC and CC-CI molecular response properties only held for a linear response function, whereas quadratic and higher order response functions were mistakenly said to differ in the two approaches. Proving the general equivalence between EOM-CC and CC-CI molecular response properties is a challenging task, that is undertaken in this article. Proving this equivalence not only corrects the previous incorrect statement but also first and foremost leads to a new, time-dependent, perspective for understanding the basic assumptions on which the EOM-CC molecular response property expressions

  7. Molecular response properties in equation of motion coupled cluster theory: A time-dependent perspective.

    PubMed

    Coriani, Sonia; Pawłowski, Filip; Olsen, Jeppe; Jørgensen, Poul

    2016-01-14

    Molecular response properties for ground and excited states and for transitions between these states are defined by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for a molecular system in a field of a time-periodic perturbation. In equation of motion coupled cluster (EOM-CC) theory, molecular response properties are commonly obtained by replacing, in configuration interaction (CI) molecular response property expressions, the energies and eigenstates of the CI eigenvalue equation with the energies and eigenstates of the EOM-CC eigenvalue equation. We show here that EOM-CC molecular response properties are identical to the molecular response properties that are obtained in the coupled cluster-configuration interaction (CC-CI) model, where the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved using an exponential (coupled cluster) parametrization to describe the unperturbed system and a linear (configuration interaction) parametrization to describe the time evolution of the unperturbed system. The equivalence between EOM-CC and CC-CI molecular response properties only holds when the CI molecular response property expressions-from which the EOM-CC expressions are derived-are determined using projection and not using the variational principle. In a previous article [F. Pawłowski, J. Olsen, and P. Jørgensen, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 114109 (2015)], it was stated that the equivalence between EOM-CC and CC-CI molecular response properties only held for a linear response function, whereas quadratic and higher order response functions were mistakenly said to differ in the two approaches. Proving the general equivalence between EOM-CC and CC-CI molecular response properties is a challenging task, that is undertaken in this article. Proving this equivalence not only corrects the previous incorrect statement but also first and foremost leads to a new, time-dependent, perspective for understanding the basic assumptions on which the EOM-CC molecular response property expressions are

  8. Inclusion, Education, and Avoidance: The Prime Time Response to September 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladstone-Sovell, Tracey; Wilkerson, William R.

    This paper is an initial examination of prime time television's response to the events of September 11, 2001. Based on a review of the 2001-2002 television season's prime time programs, the study identifies 15 programs (out of 65 that ran the entire season) that incorporated September 11th elements. Themes of these programs are discussed as are…

  9. Inhibition of Return: Sensitivity and Criterion as a Function of Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanoff, Jason; Klein, Raymond M.

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) refers to a mechanism that results in a performance disadvantage typically observed when targets are presented at a location once occupied by a cue. Although the time course of the phenomenon--from the cue to the target--has been well studied, the time course of the effect--from target to response--is unknown. In 2…

  10. Anxiety and Sensory Over-Responsivity in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Bidirectional Effects across Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Shulamite A.; Ben-Sasson, Ayelet; Soto, Timothy W.; Carter, Alice S.

    2012-01-01

    This report focuses on the emergence of and bidirectional effects between anxiety and sensory over-responsivity (SOR) in toddlers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Participants were 149 toddlers with ASD and their mothers, assessed at 2 annual time points. A cross-lag analysis showed that anxiety symptoms increased over time while SOR remained…

  11. Cortisol Response to Physical Activity in African American Toddlers Attending Full-Time Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Sarah J.; Rudisill, Mary E.; Gladden, L. Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine African American toddlers' cortisol response to acute physical play activity within a full-time subsidized day care environment. Saliva samples were taken from participants (N = 22, ages 26-45.5 months) before and after physical play and control play conditions at the same time of day. Actiheart[TM]monitors…

  12. Response Time as an Indicator of Test Taker Speed: Assumptions Meet Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The growing presence of computer-based testing has brought with it the capability to routinely capture the time that test takers spend on individual test items. This, in turn, has led to an increased interest in potential applications of response time in measuring intellectual ability and achievement. Goldhammer (this issue) provides a very useful…

  13. Study and response time for the visual recognition of 'similarity' and identity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derks, P. L.; Bauer, T. M.

    1974-01-01

    Four subjects compared successively presented pairs of line patterns for a match between any lines in the pattern (similarity) and for a match between all lines (identity). The encoding or study times for pattern recognition from immediate memory and the latency in responses to comparison stimuli were examined. Qualitative differences within and between subjects were most evident in study times.

  14. Modeling Individual Differences in Numerical Reasoning Speed as a Random Effect of Response Time Limits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semmes, Robert; Davison, Mark L.; Close, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    If numerical reasoning items are administered under time limits, will two dimensions be required to account for the responses, a numerical ability dimension and a speed dimension? A total of 182 college students answered 74 numerical reasoning items. Every item was taken with and without time limits by half the students. Three psychometric models…

  15. A method to reduce response times in prehospital care: the motorcycle experience.

    PubMed

    Lin, C S; Chang, H; Shyu, K G; Liu, C Y; Lin, C C; Hung, C R; Chen, P H

    1998-11-01

    This study compared the response times of a motorcycle and a standard ambulance in a congested urban emergency medical services (EMS) setting. The study was performed in Taipei, Taiwan, a densely populated urban area. A basic life support (BLS) motorcycle (without defibrillation capability) and an advanced life support (ALS) ambulance were based at three study hospitals and simultaneously dispatched when there was a perceived need for ALS ambulance transport. Over a 3-month period, prehospital personnel evaluated 307 medical and trauma emergencies. Time data were insufficient for analysis in 33 cases, leaving a study population of 274. Response times of the motorcycle and the ambulance were prospectively assessed and compared. During rush hours, the response times of the motorcycle and ambulance were 4.9+/-3.0 minutes and 6.3+/-3.4 minutes (P < .05), respectively, and in non-rush hours, 4.2+/-2.1 minutes and 5.1+/-2.5 minutes (P < .05), respectively. Using motorcycles to transport EMTs to the emergency scene significantly reduced response time compared with a standard ambulance in a congested urban setting. Large prospective studies are required to determine the impact on patient outcome of shorter EMS response times using motorcycles. EMS motorcycles appear feasible and deserve consideration to help expedite prehospital care in other systems in densely populated cities. PMID:9827757

  16. Effects of fixational saccades on response timing in macaque lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Saul, Alan B

    2010-11-01

    Even during active fixation, small eye movements persist that might be expected to interfere with vision. Numerous brain mechanisms probably contribute to discounting this jitter. Changes in the timing of responses in the visual thalamus associated with fixational saccades are considered in this study. Activity of single neurons in alert monkey lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) was recorded during fixation while pseudorandom visual noise stimuli were presented. The position of the stimulus on the display monitor was adjusted based on eye position measurements to control for changes in retinal locations due to eye movements. A method for extracting nonstationary first-order response mechanisms was applied, so that changes around the times of saccades could be observed. Saccade-related changes were seen in both amplitude and timing of geniculate responses. Amplitudes were greatly reduced around saccades. Timing was retarded slightly during a window of about 200 ms around saccades. That is, responses became more sustained. These effects were found in both parvocellular and magnocellular neurons. Timing changes in LGN might play a role in maintaining cortical responses to visual stimuli in the presence of eye movements, compensating for the spatial shifts caused by saccades via these shifts in timing. PMID:20932359

  17. Impaired timing adjustments in response to time-varying auditory perturbation during connected speech production in persons who stutter.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shanqing; Beal, Deryk S; Ghosh, Satrajit S; Guenther, Frank H; Perkell, Joseph S

    2014-02-01

    Auditory feedback (AF), the speech signal received by a speaker's own auditory system, contributes to the online control of speech movements. Recent studies based on AF perturbation provided evidence for abnormalities in the integration of auditory error with ongoing articulation and phonation in persons who stutter (PWS), but stopped short of examining connected speech. This is a crucial limitation considering the importance of sequencing and timing in stuttering. In the current study, we imposed time-varying perturbations on AF while PWS and fluent participants uttered a multisyllabic sentence. Two distinct types of perturbations were used to separately probe the control of the spatial and temporal parameters of articulation. While PWS exhibited only subtle anomalies in the AF-based spatial control, their AF-based fine-tuning of articulatory timing was substantially weaker than normal, especially in early parts of the responses, indicating slowness in the auditory-motor integration for temporal control. PMID:24486601

  18. Presentation and response timing accuracy in Adobe Flash and HTML5/JavaScript Web experiments.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Web-based research is becoming ubiquitous in the behavioral sciences, facilitated by convenient, readily available participant pools and relatively straightforward ways of running experiments: most recently, through the development of the HTML5 standard. Although in most studies participants give untimed responses, there is a growing interest in being able to record response times online. Existing data on the accuracy and cross-machine variability of online timing measures are limited, and generally they have compared behavioral data gathered on the Web with similar data gathered in the lab. For this article, we took a more direct approach, examining two ways of running experiments online-Adobe Flash and HTML5 with CSS3 and JavaScript-across 19 different computer systems. We used specialist hardware to measure stimulus display durations and to generate precise response times to visual stimuli in order to assess measurement accuracy, examining effects of duration, browser, and system-to-system variability (such as across different Windows versions), as well as effects of processing power and graphics capability. We found that (a) Flash and JavaScript's presentation and response time measurement accuracy are similar; (b) within-system variability is generally small, even in low-powered machines under high load; (c) the variability of measured response times across systems is somewhat larger; and (d) browser type and system hardware appear to have relatively small effects on measured response times. Modeling of the effects of this technical variability suggests that for most within- and between-subjects experiments, Flash and JavaScript can both be used to accurately detect differences in response times across conditions. Concerns are, however, noted about using some correlational or longitudinal designs online. PMID:24903687

  19. Dynamic response time of a metal foam magneto-rheological damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yao X.; Hui, Liu X.; M, Yu; J, Fu; Dong, Liao H.

    2013-02-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) dampers are a promising type of semi-active control device for various dynamic systems. Recently, low-cost MR dampers without any sealing structure have been required. Motivated by the desire to overcome the need for the costly dynamic seals of conventional MR dampers, a new type of metal foam MR damper is proposed in this study and the dynamic response performance is also investigated. The metal foam is firmly adhered to a working cylinder to store the unexcited MR fluids. In the action of a magnetic field, MR fluids will be extracted from the metal foam and fill up the shear gap to produce the MR effect. Three time parameters related to response time are introduced to further describe the dynamic response process. The results show that, due to the period required for extracting the MR fluids out from the metal foam, the time to produce the damper force of the metal foam MR damper is longer than for conventional fluid-filled MR dampers. The response time of the metal foam MR damper will change with different currents and shear rates. Given a constant shear rate, in a small range of currents (0-1.5 A), the response time decreases rapidly as the operating current increases; however, there is a slower change rate in larger ranges. To evaluate the effect of shear rate on response time, shear rates ranging from 2 to 10 s-1 are tested, and the results demonstrate that with increasing shear rates the response time decreases.

  20. Influence of Pause Duration and Nod Response Timing in Dialogue between Human and Communication Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasugi, Shoji; Yoshida, Shohei; Okitsu, Kengo; Yokoyama, Masanori; Yamamoto, Tomohito; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the influence from timing of utterance and body motion in dialogue between human and robot. We controlled pause duration and nod response timing in robot-side, and analyzed impression of communication in human-side by using Scheffe's Paired Comparison method. The results revealed that the impression of communication significantly modified by changing the pause duration and nod response timing. And, timing pattern of the impression altered diversely in elderly people than in younger, indicating that elderly generation uses various timing control mechanisms. From these results, it was suggested that timing control and impression of communication are mutually influenced, and this mechanism is thought to be useful to realize human-robot communication system for elderly generation.

  1. Time history solution program, L225 (TEV126). Volume 2: Supplemental system design and maintenance document. [for airplane dynamic response using frequency response data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornallyay, A.; Clemmons, R. E.; Kroll, R. I.

    1979-01-01

    The time history solution program L225 (TEV126) is described. The program calculates the time responses of a linear system by convoluting the impulsive response functions with the time dependent excitation. The convolution is performed as a multiplication in the frequency domain. Fast Fourier transform techniques are used to transform the product back into the time domain to obtain response time histories. The design and structure of the program is presented.

  2. Information Gap Analysis: near real-time evaluation of disaster response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Trevor

    2014-05-01

    Disasters, such as major storm events or earthquakes, trigger an immediate response by the disaster management system of the nation in question. The quality of this response is a large factor in its ability to limit the impacts on the local population. Improving the quality of disaster response therefore reduces disaster impacts. Studying past disasters is a valuable exercise to understand what went wrong, identify measures which could have mitigated these issues, and make recommendations to improve future disaster planning and response. While such ex post evaluations can lead to improvements in the disaster management system, there are limitations. The main limitation that has influenced this research is that ex post evaluations do not have the ability to inform the disaster response being assessed for the obvious reason that they are carried out long after the response phase is over. The result is that lessons learned can only be applied to future disasters. In the field of humanitarian relief, this limitation has led to the development of real time evaluations. The key aspect of real time humanitarian evaluations is that they are completed while the operation is still underway. This results in findings being delivered at a time when they can still make a difference to the humanitarian response. Applying such an approach to the immediate disaster response phase requires an even shorter time-frame, as well as a shift in focus from international actors to the nation in question's government. As such, a pilot study was started and methodology developed, to analyze disaster response in near real-time. The analysis uses the information provided by the disaster management system within the first 0 - 5 days of the response. The data is collected from publicly available sources such as ReliefWeb and sorted under various categories which represent each aspect of disaster response. This process was carried out for 12 disasters. The quantity and timeliness of information

  3. Decision deadlines and uncertainty monitoring: the effect of time constraints on uncertainty and perceptual responses.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewski, Alexandria C; Coutinho, Mariana V C; Boomer, Joseph; Church, Barbara A; Smith, J David

    2014-06-01

    The behavioral uncertainty response has grounded the study of animal metacognition and influenced the study of human psychophysics. However, the interpretation of this response is debated--especially whether it is a behavioral index of metacognition. The authors advanced this interpretation using the dissociative technique of response deadlines. Uncertainty responding, if it is higher level or metacognitive, should depend on a slower, more controlled decisional process and be more vulnerable to time constraints. Humans performed sparse-uncertain-dense or sparse-middle-dense discriminations in which, respectively, they could decline difficult trials or positively identify middle stimuli. Uncertainty responses were sharply and selectively reduced under a decision deadline, as compared to primary perceptual responses (i.e., "sparse," "middle," and "dense" responses). This dissociation suggests that the uncertainty response does reflect a higher-level, decisional response. It grants the uncertainty response a distinctive psychological role in its task and encourages an interpretation of this response as an elemental behavioral index of uncertainty that deserves continuing research. PMID:24072596

  4. Coherent averaging of the passive fathometer response using short correlation time.

    PubMed

    Traer, James; Gerstoft, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The passive fathometer algorithm was applied to data from two drifting array experiments in the Mediterranean, Boundary 2003 and 2004. The passive fathometer response was computed with correlation times from 0.34 to 90 s and, for correlation times less than a few seconds, the observed signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) agrees with a 1D model of SNR of the passive fathometer response in an ideal waveguide. In the 2004 experiment, the fathometer response showed the array depth varied periodically with an amplitude of 1 m and a period of 7 s consistent with wave driven motion of the array. This introduced a destructive interference, which prevents the SNR growing with increasing correlation time. A peak-tracking algorithm applied to the fathometer response of experimental data was used to remove this motion allowing the coherent passive fathometer response to be averaged over several minutes without destructive interference. Multirate adaptive beamforming, using 90 s correlation time to form adaptive steer vectors which were applied to 0.34 s data snapshots, increases the SNR of the passive fathometer response. PMID:22225020

  5. Spatial Attention and Temporal Expectation Under Timed Uncertainty Predictably Modulate Neuronal Responses in Monkey V1.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jitendra; Sugihara, Hiroki; Katz, Yarden; Schummers, James; Tenenbaum, Joshua; Sur, Mriganka

    2015-09-01

    The brain uses attention and expectation as flexible devices for optimizing behavioral responses associated with expected but unpredictably timed events. The neural bases of attention and expectation are thought to engage higher cognitive loci; however, their influence at the level of primary visual cortex (V1) remains unknown. Here, we asked whether single-neuron responses in monkey V1 were influenced by an attention task of unpredictable duration. Monkeys covertly attended to a spot that remained unchanged for a fixed period and then abruptly disappeared at variable times, prompting a lever release for reward. We show that monkeys responded progressively faster and performed better as the trial duration increased. Neural responses also followed monkey's task engagement-there was an early, but short duration, response facilitation, followed by a late but sustained increase during the time monkeys expected the attention spot to disappear. This late attentional modulation was significantly and negatively correlated with the reaction time and was well explained by a modified hazard function. Such bimodal, time-dependent changes were, however, absent in a task that did not require explicit attentional engagement. Thus, V1 neurons carry reliable signals of attention and temporal expectation that correlate with predictable influences on monkeys' behavioral responses. PMID:24836689

  6. Time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Wu, Donghai; Zhao, Xiang; Liang, Shunlin; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Kaicheng; Tang, Bijian; Zhao, Wenqian

    2015-09-01

    Climate conditions significantly affect vegetation growth in terrestrial ecosystems. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of ecosystems, the vegetation responses to climate vary considerably with the diverse spatial patterns and the time-lag effects, which are the most important mechanism of climate-vegetation interactive effects. Extensive studies focused on large-scale vegetation-climate interactions use the simultaneous meteorological and vegetation indicators to develop models; however, the time-lag effects are less considered, which tends to increase uncertainty. In this study, we aim to quantitatively determine the time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to different climatic factors using the GIMMS3g NDVI time series and the CRU temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation datasets. First, this study analyzed the time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to different climatic factors. Then, a multiple linear regression model and partial correlation model were established to statistically analyze the roles of different climatic factors on vegetation responses, from which the primary climate-driving factors for different vegetation types were determined. The results showed that (i) both the time-lag effects of the vegetation responses and the major climate-driving factors that significantly affect vegetation growth varied significantly at the global scale, which was related to the diverse vegetation and climate characteristics; (ii) regarding the time-lag effects, the climatic factors explained 64% variation of the global vegetation growth, which was 11% relatively higher than the model ignoring the time-lag effects; (iii) for the area with a significant change trend (for the period 1982-2008) in the global GIMMS3g NDVI (P < 0.05), the primary driving factor was temperature; and (iv) at the regional scale, the variation in vegetation growth was also related to human activities and natural disturbances. Considering the time-lag effects is quite

  7. Temperature Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    2010-05-01

    We apply two scenarios of 11-year solar spectral forcing, namely SIM-based out-of-phase variations and proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM. For both scenarios, and both models, we find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, and temperature responses decrease downward to the surface. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are ~0.6 K in RCM and ~0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of ~5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature response to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing resembles 11-year temperature variations observed with HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two scenarios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., one based on 11-year cycles with background [Lean 2000] and the second from flux transport that has much less background change [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide a range of variations of TSI on centennial time scales. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI. The spectral solar forcing is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean provides a first-order estimate of climate response. We report the different responses of stratosphere, troposphere, and ocean surface to these 4 scenarios of centennial spectral solar forcing. We further discuss the mechanisms for atmosphere-ocean and stratosphere

  8. Modeling the Temperature Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Wen, G.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric temperature responses to decadal solar variations are computed for two scenarios of solar spectral irradiance (SSI), SIM-based out-of-phase and proxy-based in-phase variations, using a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also GISS modelE (GCM.) For both scenarios and both models, maximum responses occur in upper stratosphere, decreasing downward to the surface. Upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase forcing are ~0.6 K in RCM and ~0.9 K over tropics in GCM, ~5x as large as responses to in-phase forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). Modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to SIM-based forcing are similar to 11-year temperature variations observed with HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). For both RCM and GCM, surface responses to the two scenarios are significantly smaller than stratospheric responses. On centennial timescales, SSI variations are poorly known. However, two scenarios of reconstructed TSI, one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other on flux transport with much less background [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005], provide a potential range of TSI variations. We apply phase relations among different SSI bands both from SIM observations and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive associated historical SSI, which then drives the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean provide a first order estimate of temperature responses to SSI variations on centennial time scales. We discuss potential mechanisms for atmosphere-ocean and stratosphere-troposphere couplings responsible for the climate responses to spectral solar variations.

  9. Mode of action classification of chemicals using multi-concentration time-dependent cellular response profiles.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhankun; Khare, Swanand; Cheung, Aaron; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Zhang, Weiping; Ibrahim, Fadi; Jin, Can; Gabos, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we present a new statistical pattern recognition method for classifying cytotoxic cellular responses to toxic agents. The advantage of the proposed method is to quickly assess the toxicity level of an unclassified toxic agent on human health by bringing cytotoxic cellular responses with similar patterns (mode of action, MoOA) into the same class. The proposed method is a model-based hierarchical classification approach incorporating principal component analysis (PCA) and functional data analysis (FDA). The cytotoxic cell responses are represented by multi-concentration time-dependent cellular response profiles (TCRPs) which are dynamically recorded by using the xCELLigence real-time cell analysis high-throughput (RTCA HT) system. The classification results obtained using our algorithm show satisfactory discrimination and are validated using biological facts by examining common chemical mechanisms of actions with treatment on human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2). PMID:24583602

  10. Time-dependent influence of sensorimotor set on automatic responses in perturbed stance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, R. K.; Horak, F. B.; Woollacott, M. H.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    These experiments tested the hypothesis that the ability to change sensorimotor set quickly for automatic responses depends on the time interval between successive surface perturbations. Sensorimotor set refers to the influence of prior experience or context on the state of the sensorimotor system. Sensorimotor set for postural responses was influenced by first giving subjects a block of identical backward translations of the support surface, causing forward sway and automatic gastrocnemius responses. The ability to change set quickly was inferred by measuring the suppression of the stretched antagonist gastrocnemius responses to toes-up rotations causing backward sway, following the translations. Responses were examined under short (10-14 s) and long (19-24 s) inter-trial intervals in young healthy subjects. The results showed that subjects in the long-interval group changed set immediately by suppressing gastrocnemius to 51% of translation responses within the first rotation and continued to suppress them over succeeding rotations. In contrast, subjects in the short-interval group did not change set immediately, but required two or more rotations to suppress gastrocnemius responses. By the last rotation, the short-interval group suppressed gastrocnemius responses to 33%, similar to the long-interval group of 29%. Associated surface plantarflexor torque resulting from these responses showed similar results. When rotation and translation perturbations alternated, however, the short-interval group was not able to suppress gastrocnemius responses to rotations as much as the long-interval group, although they did suppress more than in the first rotation trial after a series of translations. Set for automatic responses appears to linger, from one trial to the next. Specifically, sensorimotor set is more difficult to change when surface perturbations are given in close succession, making it appear as if set has become progressively stronger. A strong set does not mean

  11. Automaticity and conscious control in single and choice response time versions of the Perruchet effect.

    PubMed

    Livesey, Evan J; Costa, Daniel S J

    2014-01-01

    The Perruchet effect refers to a dissociation between conscious expectation of an event and the strength or speed of the response elicited by that event, which is revealed through sequential analyses of consecutive trials. For instance in a cued go/no-go task, over a run of consecutive go responses, participants perform the go task with increasing speed but display decreasing expectancy of the go response when asked to rate the likelihood of its occurrence, in line with a gambler's fallacy. The effect has conventionally been shown in procedures that measure expectancy and responding in separate blocks of trials (separate measurement) or measure both on the same trial (concurrent measurement). Here we directly compared the trends produced in separate and concurrent measurement procedures, using single response and two-choice response procedures. While the single response showed the same trends regardless of measurement style, the Perruchet dissociation disappeared when concurrent measurement was used with the choice response task. Furthermore, in the concurrent measurement versions of both tasks, those participants who produced a consistent gambler's fallacy did not show the standard effects of positive recency that underpin the Perruchet effect in response time. The results suggest that explicit expectation of events and facilitation based on recent trial history have dissociable but competing effects on response performance. PMID:23972053

  12. Decision Deadlines and Uncertainty Monitoring: The effect of time constraints on uncertainty and perceptual responses

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Alexandria C.; Coutinho, Mariana V. C.; Boomer, Joseph; Church, Barbara A.; Smith, J. David

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral uncertainty response has grounded the study of animal metacognition and influenced the study of human psychophysics. However, the interpretation of this response is debated—especially whether it is a behavioral index of metacognition. The authors advanced this interpretation using the dissociative technique of response deadlines. Uncertainty responding, if higher level or metacognitive, should depend on a slower, more controlled decisional process and be more vulnerable to time constraints. Humans performed sparse-uncertain-dense or sparse-middle-dense discriminations within which, respectively, they could decline difficult trials or positively identify middle stimuli. Uncertainty responses were sharply and selectively reduced under a decision deadline compared to primary perceptual responses (i.e., sparse, middle, and dense responses). This dissociation suggests that the uncertainty response does reflect a higher-level, decisional response. It grants the uncertainty response a distinctive psychological role in its task and encourages its interpretation as an elemental behavioral index of uncertainty that deserves continuing research. PMID:24072596

  13. Differences in time-dependent hypoxic phrenic responses among inbred rat strains.

    PubMed

    Golder, Francis J; Zabka, Andrea G; Bavis, Ryan W; Baker-Herman, Tracy; Fuller, David D; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2005-03-01

    Hypoxic ventilatory responses differ between rodent strains, suggesting a genetic contribution to interindividual variability. However, hypoxic ventilatory responses consist of multiple time-dependent mechanisms that can be observed in different respiratory motor outputs. We hypothesized that strain differences would exist in discrete time-dependent mechanisms of the hypoxic response and, furthermore, that there may be differences between hypoglossal and phrenic nerve responses to hypoxia. Hypoglossal and phrenic nerve responses were assessed during and after a 5-min hypoxic episode in anesthetized, vagotomized, and ventilated rats from four inbred strains: Brown Norway (BN), Fischer 344 (FS), Lewis (LW), and Piebald-viral-Glaxo (PVG). During baseline, burst frequency was higher in PVG than LW rats (P < 0.05), phrenic burst amplitude was higher in PVG vs. other strains (P < 0.05), and hypoglossal burst amplitude was higher in PVG and BN vs. FS and LW (P < 0.05). During hypoxia, burst frequency did not change in BN or LW rats, but it increased in PVG and FS rats. The phrenic amplitude response was smallest in PVG vs. other strains (P < 0.05), and the hypoglossal response was similar among strains. Short-term potentiation posthypoxia was slowest in FS and fastest in LW rats (P < 0.05). Posthypoxia frequency decline was absent in PVG, but it was observed in all other strains. Augmented breaths were observed during hypoxia in FS rats only. Thus genetic differences exist in the time domains of the hypoxic response, and these are differentially expressed in hypoglossal and phrenic nerves. Furthermore, genetic diversity observed in hypoxic ventilatory responses in unanesthetized rats may arise from multiple neural mechanisms. PMID:15531560

  14. Masked Morphological Priming in German-Speaking Adults and Children: Evidence from Response Time Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Hasenäcker, Jana; Beyersmann, Elisabeth; Schroeder, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we looked at masked morphological priming effects in German children and adults beyond mean response times by taking into account response time distributions. We conducted an experiment comparing suffixed word primes (kleidchen-KLEID), suffixed nonword primes (kleidtum-KLEID), nonsuffixed nonword primes (kleidekt-KLEID), and unrelated controls (träumerei-KLEID). The pattern of priming in adults showed facilitation from suffixed words, suffixed nonwords, and nonsuffixed nonwords relative to unrelated controls, and from both suffixed conditions relative to nonsuffixed nonwords, thus providing evidence for morpho-orthographic and embedded stem priming. Children also showed facilitation from real suffixed words, suffixed nonwords, and nonsuffixed nonwords compared to unrelated words, but no difference between the suffixed and nonsuffixed conditions, thus suggesting that German elementary school children do not make use of morpho-orthographic segmentation. Interestingly, for all priming effects, a shift of the response time distribution was observed. Consequences for theories of morphological processing are discussed. PMID:27445899

  15. Response time effects of alerting tone and semantic context for synthesized voice cockpit warnings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, C. A.; Williams, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Some handbooks and human factors design guides have recommended that a voice warning should be preceded by a tone to attract attention to the warning. As far as can be determined from a search of the literature, no experimental evidence supporting this exists. A fixed-base simulator flown by airline pilots was used to test the hypothesis that the total 'system-time' to respond to a synthesized voice cockpit warning would be longer when the message was preceded by a tone because the voice itself was expected to perform both the alerting and the information transfer functions. The simulation included realistic ATC radio voice communications, synthesized engine noise, cockpit conversation, and realistic flight routes. The effect of a tone before a voice warning was to lengthen response time; that is, responses were slower with an alerting tone. Lengthening the voice warning with another work, however, did not increase response time.

  16. Masked Morphological Priming in German-Speaking Adults and Children: Evidence from Response Time Distributions.

    PubMed

    Hasenäcker, Jana; Beyersmann, Elisabeth; Schroeder, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we looked at masked morphological priming effects in German children and adults beyond mean response times by taking into account response time distributions. We conducted an experiment comparing suffixed word primes (kleidchen-KLEID), suffixed nonword primes (kleidtum-KLEID), nonsuffixed nonword primes (kleidekt-KLEID), and unrelated controls (träumerei-KLEID). The pattern of priming in adults showed facilitation from suffixed words, suffixed nonwords, and nonsuffixed nonwords relative to unrelated controls, and from both suffixed conditions relative to nonsuffixed nonwords, thus providing evidence for morpho-orthographic and embedded stem priming. Children also showed facilitation from real suffixed words, suffixed nonwords, and nonsuffixed nonwords compared to unrelated words, but no difference between the suffixed and nonsuffixed conditions, thus suggesting that German elementary school children do not make use of morpho-orthographic segmentation. Interestingly, for all priming effects, a shift of the response time distribution was observed. Consequences for theories of morphological processing are discussed. PMID:27445899

  17. Indicial response approach derived from Navier-Stokes equations. Part 1: Time-invariant equilibrium state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, K. V.; Tobak, M.

    1990-01-01

    The indicial response approach is recast in a form appropriate to the study of vortex induced oscillations phenomena. An appropriate form is demonstrated for the indicial response of the velocity field which may be derived directly from the Navier-Stokes equations. On the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations, it is demonstrated how a form of the velocity response to an arbitrary motion may be determined. To establish its connection with the previous work, the new approach is applied first to the simple situation wherein the indicial response has a time invariant equilibrium state. Results for the aerodynamic response to an arbitrary motion are shown to confirm to the form obtained previously.

  18. Rate and timing of cortical responses driven by separate sensory channels

    PubMed Central

    Saal, Hannes P; Harvey, Michael A; Bensmaia, Sliman J

    2015-01-01

    The sense of touch comprises multiple sensory channels that each conveys characteristic signals during interactions with objects. These neural signals must then be integrated in such a way that behaviorally relevant information about the objects is preserved. To understand the process of integration, we implement a simple computational model that describes how the responses of neurons in somatosensory cortex—recorded from awake, behaving monkeys—are shaped by the peripheral input, reconstructed using simulations of neuronal populations that reproduce natural spiking responses in the nerve with millisecond precision. First, we find that the strength of cortical responses is driven by one population of nerve fibers (rapidly adapting) whereas the timing of cortical responses is shaped by the other (Pacinian). Second, we show that input from these sensory channels is integrated in an optimal fashion that exploits the disparate response behaviors of different fiber types. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10450.001 PMID:26650354

  19. Time reallocation in a multiresponse environment: Effects of restricting response classes

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Charles A.; Cheney, Carl D.

    1984-01-01

    Four adult male rats were each placed for three hours daily into an apparatus that provided individual compartments for six separate location-defined responses. The available responses consisted of: (1) the opportunity to turn off room lighting, producing darkness; (2) the opportunity to view a female rat; (3) the opportunity to turn off white noise; (4) the opportunity to drink; (5) the opportunity to eat; and (6) “other,” representing time in the hallway between compartments. Each subject underwent a series of conditions characterized as an A-B-A-C-A design. Manipulations consisted of the removal of a low-probability response (darkness) and of a high-probability response (escape from noise) in a counter-balanced manner across subjects. The dependent measure for all subjects was the percentage of total session time spent in each compartment. Four predictive rules concerning the redistribution of behavior after response restriction were tested, including the constant-ratio rule, equal time redistribution, the most probable alternative, and the sequential-dependency rule. The results indicate no support for any of the four predictive rules and suggest that empirical assessment of restriction effects is necessary in reinforcement studies involving temporally extended responses. PMID:16812370

  20. Design oriented identification of critical times in transient response. [due to dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Watson, L. T.; Grandhi, R. V.

    1984-01-01

    Two techniques are presented for reducing the computational effort in identifying the critical time points. One approach is an adaptive search technique, well suited for the case where the response is exactly known. The other technique, useful for noisy response, is based on a least-squares spline approximation of the response. The possibility of grouping several closely spaced local peaks to identify a single super peak from each group is also investigated. The computational efficiency of the techniques proposed here is illustrated by two examples.

  1. Simulations of hybrid system varying solar radiation and microturbine response time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Ribaya, Yolanda; Álvarez, Eduardo; Paredes Sánchez, José Pablo; Xiberta Bernat, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid power systems, such as combinations of renewable power sources with intermittent power production and non-renewable power sources, theoretically increase the reliability and thus integration of renewable sources in the electrical system. However, a recent increase in the number of hybrid installations has sparked interest in the effects of their connection to the grid, especially in remote areas. This paper analyses a photovoltaic-gas microturbine hybrid system dimensioned to be installed in La Paz (Mexico).The research presented in this paper studies and quantifies the effects on the total electric power produced, varying both the solar radiation and the gas microturbine response time. The gas microturbine and the photovoltaic panels are modelled using Matlab/Simulink software, obtaining a platform where different tests to simulate real conditions have been executed. They consist of diverse ramps of irradiance that replicate solar radiation variations, and different microturbine response times reproduced by the time constants of a first order transfer function that models the microturbine dynamic response. The results obtained show that when radiation varies quickly it does not produce significant differences in the power guarantee or the microturbine gas consumption, to any microturbine response time. However, these two parameters are highly variable with smooth radiance variations. The maximum total power variation decreases greatly as the radiation variation gets lower. In addition, by decreasing the microturbine response time, it is possible to appreciably increase the power guarantee although the maximum power variation and gas consumption increase. Only in cases of low radiation variation is there no appreciable difference in the maximum power variation obtained by the different turbine response times.

  2. Radiographic Response to Locoregional Therapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Predicts Patient Survival Times

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Khairuddin; Kulik, Laura; Lewandowski, Robert J; Wang, Edward; Riaz, Ahsun; Ryu, Robert K; Sato, Kent T; Marshall, Karen; Gupta, Ramona; Nikolaidis, Paul; Miller, Frank H; Yaghmai, Vahid; Senthilnathan, Seanthan; Baker, Talia; Gates, Vanessa L; Abecassis, Michael; Benson, Al B; Mulcahy, Mary F; Omary, Reed A; Salem, Riad

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims It is not clear whether survival times of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are associated with their response to therapy. We analyzed the association between tumor response and survival times of patients with HCC who were treated with locoregional therapies (LRTs; chemoembolization and radioembolization). Methods Patients received LRTs over a 9-year period (n=463). Patients with metastases, portal venous thrombosis, or who had received transplants were excluded; 159 patients with Child-Pugh≤B7 were analyzed. Response (based on European Association for Study of the Liver [EASL] or World Health Organization [WHO] criteria) was associated with survival times using the landmark, risk-of-death, and Mantel-Byar methodologies. In a subanalysis, survival times of responders were compared to those of patients with stable disease (SD) and progressive disease (PD). Results Based on 6-month data, in landmark analysis, responders survived longer than nonresponders (based on EASL but not WHO criteria: P=0.002 and 0.0694). The risk of death was also lower for responders (based on EASL but not WHO criteria: P=0.0463 and 0.707). Landmark analysis of 12-month data showed that responders survived longer than nonresponders (P=<0.0001 and 0.004, based on EASL and WHO criteria, respectively). The risk of death was lower for responders (P=0.0132 and 0.010, based on EASL and WHO criteria, respectively). By the Mantel-Byar method, responders had longer survival than nonresponders, based on EASL criteria (P<0.0001; P=0.596 with WHO criteria). In the subanalysis, responders lived longer than patients with SD or PD. Conclusion Radiographic response to LRTs predicts survival time. EASL criteria for response more consistently predicted survival times than WHO criteria. The goal of LRT should be to achieve a radiologic response, rather than to stabilize disease. PMID:21664356

  3. Simulations of hybrid system varying solar radiation and microturbine response time

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández Ribaya, Yolanda Álvarez, Eduardo; Paredes Sánchez, José Pablo; Xiberta Bernat, Jorge

    2015-07-15

    Hybrid power systems, such as combinations of renewable power sources with intermittent power production and non-renewable power sources, theoretically increase the reliability and thus integration of renewable sources in the electrical system. However, a recent increase in the number of hybrid installations has sparked interest in the effects of their connection to the grid, especially in remote areas. This paper analyses a photovoltaic-gas microturbine hybrid system dimensioned to be installed in La Paz (Mexico).The research presented in this paper studies and quantifies the effects on the total electric power produced, varying both the solar radiation and the gas microturbine response time. The gas microturbine and the photovoltaic panels are modelled using Matlab/Simulink software, obtaining a platform where different tests to simulate real conditions have been executed. They consist of diverse ramps of irradiance that replicate solar radiation variations, and different microturbine response times reproduced by the time constants of a first order transfer function that models the microturbine dynamic response. The results obtained show that when radiation varies quickly it does not produce significant differences in the power guarantee or the microturbine gas consumption, to any microturbine response time. However, these two parameters are highly variable with smooth radiance variations. The maximum total power variation decreases greatly as the radiation variation gets lower. In addition, by decreasing the microturbine response time, it is possible to appreciably increase the power guarantee although the maximum power variation and gas consumption increase. Only in cases of low radiation variation is there no appreciable difference in the maximum power variation obtained by the different turbine response times.

  4. Timing of conditioned eyeblink responses is impaired in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Frings, Markus; Gaertner, Kristina; Buderath, Paul; Gerwig, Marcus; Christiansen, Hanna; Schoch, Beate; Gizewski, Elke R; Hebebrand, Johannes; Timmann, Dagmar

    2010-03-01

    Structural changes of the cerebellum have been reported in several psychiatric diseases like schizophrenia, autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Beside behavioral deficits children with ADHD often show slight motor abnormalities. Cerebellar malfunction may contribute. The cerebellum is a structure essential for motor coordination, various forms of motor learning and timing of motor responses. In the present study, eyeblink conditioning was applied to investigate learning and timing of motor responses both in children with ADHD and children with cerebellar lesions. Acquisition, timing and extinction of conditioned eyeblink responses were investigated in children with ADHD, children with chronic surgical cerebellar lesions and controls using a standard delay paradigm with two different interstimulus intervals. Timing of conditioned eyeblink responses was significantly impaired in children with ADHD in the long interstimulus interval condition. Also in children with cerebellar lesions conditioned responses (CR) tended to occur earlier than in controls. Incidences of CRs were significantly reduced in children with cerebellar lesions and tended to be less in children with ADHD than in controls. Extinction of the CRs was impaired in children with cerebellar lesions in both interstimulus interval conditions and in children with ADHD in the long interstimulus interval condition. Cerebellar malfunction may contribute to disordered eyeblink conditioning in ADHD. However, because CR abnormalities differed between ADHD and cerebellar subjects, dysfunction of non-cerebellar structures cannot be excluded. PMID:19777220

  5. Mucosal and systemic immune responses induced by a single time vaccination strategy in mice.

    PubMed

    González Aznar, Elizabeth; Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; Zayas, Caridad; Cuello, Maribel; Cabrera, Osmir; Valdez, Yolanda; Fariñas, Mildrey; Pérez, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination is considered by the World Health Organization as the most cost-effective strategy for controlling infectious diseases. In spite of great successes with vaccines, many infectious diseases are still leading killers, because of the inadequate coverage of many vaccines. Several factors have been responsible: number of doses, high vaccine reactogenicity, vaccine costs, vaccination policy, among others. Contradictorily, few vaccines are of single dose and even less of mucosal administration. However, more common infections occur via mucosa, where secretory immunoglobulin A plays an essential role. As an alternative, we proposed a novel protocol of vaccination called Single Time Vaccination Strategy (SinTimVaS) by immunizing 2 priming doses at the same time: one by mucosal route and the other by parenteral route. Here, the mucosal and systemic responses induced by Finlay adjuvants (AF Proteoliposome 1 and AF Cochleate 1) implementing SinTimVaS in BALB/c mice were evaluated. One intranasal dose of AF Cochleate 1 and an intramuscular dose of AF Proteoliposome 1 adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide, with bovine serum albumin or tetanus toxoid as model antigens, administrated at the same time, induced potent specific mucosal and systemic immune responses. Also, we demonstrated that SinTimVaS using other mucosal routes like oral and sublingual, in combination with the subcutaneous route elicits immune responses. SinTimVaS, as a new immunization strategy, could increase vaccination coverage and reduce time-cost vaccines campaigns, adding the benefits of immune response in mucosa. PMID:26140382

  6. Cortisol response to physical activity in African American toddlers attending full-time day care.

    PubMed

    Wall, Sarah J; Rudisill, Mary E; Gladden, L Bruce

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine African American toddlers' cortisol response to acute physical play activity within a full-time subsidized day care environment. Saliva samples were taken from participants (N = 22, ages 26-45.5 months) before and after physical play and control play conditions at the same time of day. Actiheart monitors were used to estimate the intensity of the play conditions. Although heart rate and other indicators were significantly higher during physical play, no change in cortisol levels was seen pre- to postphysical play. Further research is needed to better understand the cortisol response observed. PMID:20025115

  7. Evolutionary minority game: The roles of response time and mutation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar; Nakar, Ehud

    2004-06-01

    In the evolutionary minority game, agents are allowed to evolve their strategies (“mutate”) based on past experience. We explore the dependence of the system’s global behavior on the response time and the mutation threshold of the agents. We find that the precise values of these parameters determine if the strategy distribution of the population has a U shape, inverse U shape, or W shape. It is shown that in a free society (market), highly adaptive agents (with short response times) perform best. In addition, “patient” agents (with high mutation thresholds) outperform “nervous” ones.

  8. On timing response improvement of an NE213 scintillator attached to two PMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, S.; Ghal-Eh, N.; Bayat, E.

    2013-09-01

    A 5 cm diameter by 6 cm height NE213 scintillator attached to two XP2282 PHOTONIS photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) exposed to 241Americium-Berylium (Am-Be) neutron-gamma source has been used for timing response studies. The neutron-gamma discrimination (NGD) measurements based on a modified zero-crossing (ZC) method show that the discrimination quality, usually expressed in figure-of-merit (FoM) and peak-to-valley (P/V) values, has been improved. The timing response evaluated with Monte Carlo light transport code, PHOTRACK, also verifies this improvement.

  9. Motor Response Programming and Movement Time in Children with Heavy Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Roger W.; Thomas, Jennifer D.; Levy, Susan S.; Riley, Edward P.

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment assessed motor response programming and movement time in children with histories of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcohol-exposed children between the ages of 7 and 17 years were classified into two groups: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS: n = 9) and children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PEA: n = 19) but who did not have the defining characteristics of FAS. The FAS and PEA children were compared to non-alcohol exposed children (NC: n = 23) when completing two tasks: a simple reaction time task (RT alone condition) and a reaction plus movement task (RT + Move condition). The movement involved responding to an imperative stimulus signal and depressing three target buttons in a set sequence. Participants completed 24 trials each for the RT alone and RT + Move response conditions. Results indicated no significant differences in performance among FAS, PEA and NC groups during the RT alone condition. However, during the RT + Move condition, the FAS group produced significantly longer and more variable reaction times than either the PEA and NC groups, which produced comparable reaction times. The FAS group also produced significantly slower movement times when moving to all three targets, whereas movement time variability did not significantly differ as a function of group. The observed results indicate children with FAS experience deficits in response programming and movement time production. PMID:20598488

  10. Time to smell: a cascade model of human olfactory perception based on response-time (RT) measurement

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Jonas K.

    2014-01-01

    The timing of olfactory behavioral decisions may provide an important source of information about how the human olfactory-perceptual system is organized. This review integrates results from olfactory response-time (RT) measurements from a perspective of mental chronometry. Based on these findings, a new cascade model of human olfaction is presented. Results show that main perceptual decisions are executed with high accuracy within about 1~s of sniff onset. The cascade model proposes the existence of distinct processing stages within this brief time-window. According to the cascade model, different perceptual features become accessible to the perceiver at different time-points, and the output of earlier processing stages provides the input for later processing stages. The olfactory cascade starts with detecting the odor, which is followed by establishing an odor object. The odor object, in turn, triggers systems for determining odor valence and edibility. Evidence for the cascade model comes from studies showing that RTs for odor valence and edibility assessment are predicted by the shorter RTs needed to establish the odor object. Challenges for future research include innovative task designs for olfactory RT experiments and the integration of the behavioral processing sequence into the underlying cortical processes using complementary RT measures and neuroimaging methods. PMID:24550861

  11. The geomagnetic storm time response of GPS total electron content in the North American sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E. G.; Baker, J. B. H.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Coster, A. J.; Zhang, S.-R.

    2016-02-01

    Over the last two decades, maps of GPS total electron content (TEC) have improved our understanding of the large perturbations in ionospheric electron density which occur during geomagnetic storms. However, previous regional and global studies of ionospheric storms have performed only a limited separation of storm time, local time, longitudinal, and seasonal effects. Using 13 years of GPS TEC data, we present a complete statistical characterization of the ionospheric response to geomagnetic storms for midlatitudes in the North American sector where dense ground receiver coverage is available. The rapid onset of a positive phase is observed across much of the dayside and evening ionosphere followed by a longer-lasting negative phase across all latitudes and local times. Our results show clear seasonal variations in the storm time TEC, such that summer events tend to be dominated by the negative storm response while winter events exhibit a stronger initial positive phase with minimal negative storm effects. We find no discernable difference between spring and fall equinox events with both being equivalent to the average storm time response across all seasons. We also identify a prominent magnetic declination effect such that stronger dayside positive storm effects are observed in regions of negative declination (i.e., eastern North America). On the nightside, asymmetries in the TEC response are observed near the auroral oval and midlatitude trough which may be attributed to thermospheric zonal winds pushing plasma upward/downward along field lines of opposite declination.

  12. The contribution of pre-stimulus neural oscillatory activity to spontaneous response time variability.

    PubMed

    Bompas, Aline; Sumner, Petroc; Muthumumaraswamy, Suresh D; Singh, Krish D; Gilchrist, Iain D

    2015-02-15

    Large variability between individual response times, even in identical conditions, is a ubiquitous property of animal behavior. However, the origins of this stochasticity and its relation to action decisions remain unclear. Here we focus on the state of the perception-action network in the pre-stimulus period and its influence on subsequent saccadic response time and choice in humans. We employ magnetoencephalography (MEG) and a correlational source reconstruction approach to identify the brain areas where pre-stimulus oscillatory activity predicted saccadic response time to visual targets. We find a relationship between future response time and pre-stimulus power, but not phase, in occipital (including V1), parietal, posterior cingulate and superior frontal cortices, consistently across alpha, beta and low gamma frequencies, each accounting for between 1 and 4% of the RT variance. Importantly, these correlations were not explained by deterministic sources of variance, such as experimental factors and trial history. Our results further suggest that occipital areas mainly reflect short-term (trial to trial) stochastic fluctuations, while the frontal contribution largely reflects longer-term effects such as fatigue or practice. Parietal areas reflect fluctuations at both time scales. We found no evidence of lateralization: these effects were indistinguishable in both hemispheres and for both saccade directions, and non-predictive of choice - a finding with fundamental consequences for models of action decision, where independent, not coupled, noise is normally assumed. PMID:25482267

  13. Brain Activations Related to Saccadic Response Conflict are not Sensitive to Time on Task

    PubMed Central

    Beldzik, Ewa; Domagalik, Aleksandra; Oginska, Halszka; Marek, Tadeusz; Fafrowicz, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a role of the dorsal medial frontal cortex in the performance monitoring and cognitive control has been a challenge to neuroscientists for the past decade. In light of recent findings, the conflict monitoring hypothesis has been elaborated to an action-outcome predictor theory. One of the findings that led to this re-evaluation was the fMRI study in which conflict-related brain activity was investigated in terms of the so-called time on task effect, i.e., a linear increase of the BOLD signal with longer response times. The aim of this study was to investigate brain regions involved in the processing of saccadic response conflict and to account for the time on task effect. A modified spatial cueing task was implemented in the event-related fMRI study with oculomotor responses. The results revealed several brain regions which show higher activity for incongruent trials in comparison to the congruent ones, including pre-supplementary motor area together with the frontal and parietal regions. Further analysis accounting for the effect of response time provided evidence that these brain activations were not sensitive to time on task but reflected purely the congruency effect. PMID:26696871

  14. Subjective response to sonic booms having different shapes, rise times, and durations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Two laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify the subjective response of people to simulated outdoor sonic booms having different pressure signatures. The specific objectives of the experiments were to compare subjective response to sonic booms when described in terms of 'loudness' and 'annoyance'; to determine the ability of various noise metrics to predict subjective response to sonic booms; to determine the effects on subjective response of rise time, duration, and level; and to compare the subjective response to 'N-wave' sonic boom signatures with the subjective response to 'minimized' sonic boom signatures. The experiments were conducted in a computer-controlled, man-rated sonic boom simulator capable of reproducing user-specified pressure signatures for a wide range of sonic boom parameters. One hundred and fifty sonic booms representing different combinations of two wave shapes, four rise times, seven durations, and three peak overpressures were presented to 36 test subjects in each experiment. The test subjects in the first experiment made judgments of 'loudness' while the test subjects in the second experiment judged 'annoyance.' Subjective response to sonic booms was the same whether expressed in terms of loudness or in terms of annoyance. Analyses of several different noise metrics indicated that A-weighted sound exposure level and Perceived Level were the best predictors of subjective response. Further analyses indicated that, of these two noise metrics, only Perceived Level completely accounted for the effects of wave shape, rise time, and peak overpressure. Neither metric fully accounted for the effect of duration. However, the magnitude of the duration effect was small over the very wide range of durations considered.

  15. A New Thermostat for Real-Time Price Demand Response: Cost, Comfort and Energy Impacts of Discrete-Time Control without Deadband

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Stoustrup, Jakob; Agathoklis, Pan; Djilali, Ned

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a residential thermostat design that enables accurate aggregate load control systems for electricity demand response. The thermostat features a control strategy that can be modeled as a linear time-invariant system for short- term demand response signals from the utility. This control design maintains the same comfort and demand response characteristics of existing real-time price- responsive thermostats but gives rise to linear time-invariant models of aggregate load control and demand response, which facilitates the design of highly accurate load-based regulation services for electricity interconnections.

  16. Dynamic response and time-frequency analysis for gear tooth crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Omar D.; Rantatalo, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Vibration health monitoring is a non-destructive technique which can be applied to detect cracks propagating in gear teeth. This paper studies gear tooth crack detection by investigating the natural frequencies and by performing time-frequency analysis of a 6 DOF dynamic gear model. The gear mesh stiffness used in the model was calculated analytically for different cases of crack sizes. The frequency response functions (FRFs) of the model were derived for healthy and faulty cases and dynamic simulation was performed to obtain the time signal responses. A new approach involving a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) was applied where a fast Fourier transform (FFT) was calculated for successive blocks with different sizes corresponding to the time segments of the varying gear mesh stiffness. The relationship between the different crack sizes and the mesh-stiffness-dependent eigenfrequencies was studied in order to detect the tooth crack and to estimate its size.

  17. Detecting variable responses in time-series using repeated measures ANOVA: Application to physiologic challenges.

    PubMed

    Macey, Paul M; Schluter, Philip J; Macey, Katherine E; Harper, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to analyzing physiologic timetrends recorded during a stimulus by comparing means at each time point using repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA). The approach allows temporal patterns to be examined without an a priori model of expected timing or pattern of response. The approach was originally applied to signals recorded from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) volumes-of-interest (VOI) during a physiologic challenge, but we have used the same technique to analyze continuous recordings of other physiological signals such as heart rate, breathing rate, and pulse oximetry. For fMRI, the method serves as a complement to whole-brain voxel-based analyses, and is useful for detecting complex responses within pre-determined brain regions, or as a post-hoc analysis of regions of interest identified by whole-brain assessments. We illustrate an implementation of the technique in the statistical software packages R and SAS. VOI timetrends are extracted from conventionally preprocessed fMRI images. A timetrend of average signal intensity across the VOI during the scanning period is calculated for each subject. The values are scaled relative to baseline periods, and time points are binned. In SAS, the procedure PROC MIXED implements the RMANOVA in a single step. In R, we present one option for implementing RMANOVA with the mixed model function "lme". Model diagnostics, and predicted means and differences are best performed with additional libraries and commands in R; we present one example. The ensuing results allow determination of significant overall effects, and time-point specific within- and between-group responses relative to baseline. We illustrate the technique using fMRI data from two groups of subjects who underwent a respiratory challenge. RMANOVA allows insight into the timing of responses and response differences between groups, and so is suited to physiologic testing paradigms eliciting complex response patterns. PMID

  18. Detecting variable responses in time-series using repeated measures ANOVA: Application to physiologic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Paul M.; Schluter, Philip J.; Macey, Katherine E.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    We present an approach to analyzing physiologic timetrends recorded during a stimulus by comparing means at each time point using repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA). The approach allows temporal patterns to be examined without an a priori model of expected timing or pattern of response. The approach was originally applied to signals recorded from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) volumes-of-interest (VOI) during a physiologic challenge, but we have used the same technique to analyze continuous recordings of other physiological signals such as heart rate, breathing rate, and pulse oximetry. For fMRI, the method serves as a complement to whole-brain voxel-based analyses, and is useful for detecting complex responses within pre-determined brain regions, or as a post-hoc analysis of regions of interest identified by whole-brain assessments. We illustrate an implementation of the technique in the statistical software packages R and SAS. VOI timetrends are extracted from conventionally preprocessed fMRI images. A timetrend of average signal intensity across the VOI during the scanning period is calculated for each subject. The values are scaled relative to baseline periods, and time points are binned. In SAS, the procedure PROC MIXED implements the RMANOVA in a single step. In R, we present one option for implementing RMANOVA with the mixed model function “lme”. Model diagnostics, and predicted means and differences are best performed with additional libraries and commands in R; we present one example. The ensuing results allow determination of significant overall effects, and time-point specific within- and between-group responses relative to baseline. We illustrate the technique using fMRI data from two groups of subjects who underwent a respiratory challenge. RMANOVA allows insight into the timing of responses and response differences between groups, and so is suited to physiologic testing paradigms eliciting complex response patterns

  19. Actual change and inaccurate recall contribute to posttraumatic growth following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ransom, Sean; Sheldon, Kennon M; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2008-10-01

    People with cancer often report that they experience personal growth as a result of the disease, but such reports have unclear validity. Some suggest such growth results from Rogers's (1951) hypothesized organismic valuing process (OVP), an innate tendency for people to gravitate toward well-being; others suggest this growth may be a positive illusion resulting from temporal self-comparisons. To test these conceptualizations, the authors examined 83 individuals with Stages 0-III breast or prostate cancer. Patients completed measures of positive attributes and personal life goals before radiotherapy (Time 1) and after radiotherapy (Time 2). At Time 2, participants also attempted to recreate their Time 1 responses and completed a posttraumatic growth (PTG) measure. PTG was significantly related with actual increases (but not perceived increases) in the relative importance of intrinsic goals versus extrinsic goals and with perceived increases (but not actual increases) in positive attributes. These measures were unrelated to one another and thus explained unique variance in PTG. Data suggest that both actual change processes related to the OVP and biases in autobiographic recall may independently contribute to PTG reports. PMID:18837598

  20. Yield response curves of crops exposed to SO 2 time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Male, Larry; Preston, Eric; Neely, Grady

    Six species (alfalfa, onion, lettuce, radish, red clover, Douglas fir) were exposed in field growth chambers to both constant concentration and stochastic SO 2 time series. Yield response curves were generated with median concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 pphm. Constant concentration treatments were found to underestimate yield loss compared with the pollutant time series treatments. An heuristic model of plant assimilation of SO 2 is presented to explain this result.

  1. Moral Reasoning in Hypothetical and Actual Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumprer, Gerard F.; Butter, Eliot J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of this investigation suggest that moral reasoning of college students, when assessed using the DIT format, is the same whether the dilemmas involve hypothetical or actual situations. Subjects, when presented with hypothetical situations, become deeply immersed in them and respond as if they were actual participants. (Author/BEF)

  2. Factors Related to Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, H. Wayne; McWilliams, Jettie M.

    1978-01-01

    Provides data to further support the notions that females score higher in self-actualization measures and that self-actualization scores correlate inversely to the degree of undesirability individuals assign to their heights and weights. Finds that, contrary to predictions, greater androgyny was related to lower, not higher, self-actualization…

  3. Superposed epoch analysis of storm time response of the ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Zesta, E.; Connor, H.; Su, Y. J.; Sutton, E. K.; Huang, C. Y.; Ober, D. M.; Delay, S. H.; Schuck, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    The thermosphere-ionosphere system response to energy input by Joule heating via Poynting flux and auroral precipitation is strongly intensified during times with high geomagnetic activity or during geomagnetic storms. The most dramatic thermospheric response is the intensification and upwelling of the thermospheric mass density. The neutral mass density is not only a key parameter to understanding the solar wind - IT coupling, but also plays an important role in understanding satellite orbital drag, which in turn impacts satellite position predictions. Results of numerical simulations and satellite observations (CHAMP and GRACE) have shown that the neutral mass density is rapidly intensified (within minutes) after the initial storm shock impact and also after the onset of storm main phase. This almost immediate response is typical of CME-driven storms in which the neutral density is enhanced first in the dayside polar cap and the intensification subsequently spreads out to all magnetic local time regions and lower latitude regions. We perform a superposed epoch analysis using CHAMP and GRACE satellite data as well as DMSP data to study the spatial and temporal distribution of the measured Poynting flux and neutral density response during the main phase of storms of different intensity. We also examine the correlation characteristics between Poynting flux and neutral density response, in space and time during the storm.

  4. Spectral scaling of hydrochemical responses - decomposition of water quality time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riml, Joakim; Wörman, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the different processes affecting the biogeochemical cycling of compounds transported with water, such as nutrients, contaminants and different forms of organically and inorganically bound carbon, is fundamental for understanding and assessing the water quality of any given surface water systems. However, these governing processes are often difficult to quantify, partly due to the complex dynamics of the governing physical and biogeochemical mechanisms, which span over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Here we present a recently developed analytical technique that separates the spectrum of time scales in a physically based transport model by relating the fluctuations in the forcing boundary conditions (i.e. the load function) to the water quality response. By transforming the transport problem from the time domain into the frequency domain, closed-form solutions were obtained and used to derive compound specific formal expressions of the power spectral response for different hydrological systems including both a single stream reach and a network of interconnected transport pathways. The frequency dependent response, defined as the spectral scaling function, was subsequently used to evaluate concentration time series of water quality parameters on different spatial scales. This spectral decomposition attributes the water quality response in specific intervals of frequencies to governing processes and provides an opportunity to investigate/quantify the competing processes affecting the different compounds important for the water quality response.

  5. Real-time QCM-D monitoring of cellular responses to different cytomorphic agents.

    PubMed

    Fatisson, Julien; Azari, Fereshteh; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2011-03-15

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) is used for real-time in situ detection of cytoskeletal changes in live primary endothelial cells in response to different cytomorphic agents; namely, the surfactant Triton-X 100 (TX-100) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Reproducible dissipation versus frequency (Df) plots provide unique signatures of the interactions between endothelial cells and cytomorphic agents. While the QCM-D response for TX-100 can be described in two steps (changes in the osmotic pressure of the medium prior to observing the expected cell lysis), LPS results in a different single-phase signal. A complementary analysis is carried out to evaluate the possible competitive effects of TX-100 and LPS through the QCM-D response to BAEC stress by analyzing the Df plots obtained. Experiments with non-toxic components (fibronectin or serum) produce a different QCM-D response than that observed for the toxic chemicals, suggesting the use of Df plot signatures for the possible differentiation between cytotoxic or non-cytotoxic effects. Observations obtained by QCM-D signals are confirmed by conducting fluorescence microscopy at the same time. Our results show that a fast (few minutes) sensing response can be obtained in situ and in real-time. The conclusions from this study suggest that QCM-D can potentially be used in biodetection for applications in drug screening tests and diagnosis. PMID:21237634

  6. Task modulation of the effects of brightness on reaction time and response force.

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Włodarczyk, Dariusz

    2006-08-01

    Van der Molen and Keuss [van der Molen, M.W., Keuss, P.J.G., 1979. The relationship between reaction time and intensity in discrete auditory tasks. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 31, 95-102; van der Molen, M.W., Keuss, P.J.G., 1981. Response selection and the processing of auditory intensity. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 33, 177-184] showed that paradoxically long reaction times (RT) occur with extremely loud auditory stimuli when the task is difficult (e.g. needs a response choice). It was argued that this paradoxical behavior of RT is due to active suppression of response prompting to prevent false responses. In the present experiments, we demonstrated that such an effect can also occur for visual stimuli provided that they are large enough. Additionally, we showed that response force exerted by participants on response keys monotonically grew with intensity for large stimuli but was independent of intensity for small visual stimuli. Bearing in mind that only large stimuli are believed to be arousing this pattern of results supports the arousal interpretation of the negative effect of loud stimuli on RT given by van der Molen and Keuss. PMID:16198013

  7. Rise time and response measurements on a LiSOCl2 cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastien, Caroline; Lecomte, Eric J.

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic impedance tests were performed on a 180 Ah LiSOCl2 cell in the frame of a short term work contract awarded by Aerospatiale as part of the Hermes Space Plane development work. These tests consisted of rise time and response measurements. The rise time test was performed to show the ability to deliver 4 KW, in the nominal voltage range (75-115 V), within less than 100 microseconds, and after a period at rest of 13 days. The response measurements test consisted of step response and frequency response tests. The frequency response test was performed to characterize the response of the LiSOCl2 cell to a positive or negative load step of 10 A starting from various currents. The test was performed for various depths of discharge and various temperatures. The test results were used to build a mathematical, electrical model of the LiSOCl2 cell which are also presented. The test description, test results, electrical modelization description, and conclusions are presented.

  8. Time course of vasodilatory responses in skeletal muscle arterioles: role in hyperemia at onset of exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunsch, S. A.; Muller-Delp, J.; Delp, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    At the onset of dynamic exercise, muscle blood flow increases within 1-2 s. It has been postulated that local vasodilatory agents produced by the vascular endothelium or the muscle itself contribute to this response. We hypothesized that only vasodilators that act directly on the vascular smooth muscle could produce vasodilation of skeletal muscle arterioles in <2 s. To test this hypothesis, we determined the time course of the vasodilatory response of isolated skeletal muscle arterioles to direct application of potassium chloride, adenosine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside. Soleus and gastrocnemius muscles were dissected from the hindlimbs of male Sprague-Dawley rats. First-order arterioles (100-200 microm) were isolated, cannulated on micropipettes, and pressurized to 60 cmH(2)O in an organ bath. Vasodilatory agents were added directly to the bath, and diameter responses of the arterioles were recorded in real time on a videotape recorder. Frame-by-frame analysis of the diameter responses indicated that none of the vasodilator agents tested produced significant diameter increases in <4 s in either soleus or gastrocnemius muscle arterioles. These results indicate that, although these local vasodilators produce significant vasodilation of skeletal muscle resistance arterioles, these responses are not rapid enough (within 1-2 s) to contribute to the initiation of the exercise hyperemic response at the onset of dynamic exercise.

  9. Serial and Parallel Attentive Visual Searches: Evidence from Cumulative Distribution Functions of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Kyongje

    2008-01-01

    Participants searched a visual display for a target among distractors. Each of 3 experiments tested a condition proposed to require attention and for which certain models propose a serial search. Serial versus parallel processing was tested by examining effects on response time means and cumulative distribution functions. In 2 conditions, the…

  10. 33 CFR 155.4040 - Response times for each salvage and marine firefighting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and marine firefighting service. 155.4040 Section 155.4040 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Salvage and Marine Firefighting § 155.4040 Response times for each salvage and marine firefighting service. (a) You must ensure, by contract or other approved means, that your resource...

  11. 33 CFR 155.4040 - Response times for each salvage and marine firefighting service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and marine firefighting service. 155.4040 Section 155.4040 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Salvage and Marine Firefighting § 155.4040 Response times for each salvage and marine firefighting service. (a) You must ensure, by contract or other approved means, that your resource...

  12. Ultrafast Time Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint for Unsteady Shock-Wave Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) is an optical pressure measurement technique widely used in aerodynamic experiments, and has been applied to unsteady shock-wave phenomena [1, 2]. However, one of the largest problems to apply PSP to high-speed and unsteady phenomena is the response time of PSP.

  13. Intermolecular forces and nonbonded interactions: Superoperator nonlinear time-dependent density-functional-theory response approach

    SciTech Connect

    Harbola, Upendra; Mukamel, Shaul

    2004-11-01

    Electrostatic and dispersive interactions of polarizable molecules are expressed in terms of generalized (nonretarded) charge-density response functions of the isolated molecules, which in turn are expanded using the collective electronic oscillator (CEO) eigenmodes of linearized time-dependent density-functional theory. Closed expressions for the intermolecular energy are derived to sixth order in charge fluctuation amplitudes.

  14. PERSISTENCE OF THE HEAT-SHOCK RESPONSE OVER TIME IN A COMMON MYTILUS MUSSEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study uses immunological techniques to measure stress protein concentrations in Mytilus to examine the persistence of the heat-shock response over time. etabolic labeling and two-dimensional electrophoresis demonstrated that three major stress protein groups, hsp60, hsp70, a...

  15. What Are the Shapes of Response Time Distributions in Visual Search?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Evan M.; Horowitz, Todd S.; Torralba, Antonio; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    Many visual search experiments measure response time (RT) as their primary dependent variable. Analyses typically focus on mean (or median) RT. However, given enough data, the RT distribution can be a rich source of information. For this paper, we collected about 500 trials per cell per observer for both target-present and target-absent displays…

  16. Acute Time to Response in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Christopher; Emslie, Graham; Silva, Susan; McNulty, Steve; Walkup, John; Curry, John; Reinecke, Mark; Vitiello, Benedetto; Rohde, Paul; Feeny, Nora; Casat, Charles; Pathak, Sanjeev; Weller, Elizabeth; May, Diane; Mayes, Taryn; Robins, Michele; March, John

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine the time to response for both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method: Adolescents (N = 439, ages 12 to 17 years) with major depressive disorder were randomized to fluoxetine (FLX), cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), their combination (COMB), or pill placebo…

  17. Time-varying effect models for ordinal responses with applications in substance abuse research

    PubMed Central

    Dziak, John J.; Li, Runze; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Buu, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Ordinal responses are very common in longitudinal data collected from substance abuse research or other behavioral research. This study develops a new statistical model with free SAS macro’s that can be applied to characterize time-varying effects on ordinal responses. Our simulation study shows that the ordinal-scale time-varying effects model has very low estimation bias and sometimes offers considerably better performance when fitting data with ordinal responses than a model that treats the response as continuous. Contrary to a common assumption that an ordinal scale with several levels can be treated as continuous, our results indicate that it is not so much the number of levels on the ordinal scale but rather the skewness of the distribution that makes a difference on relative performance of linear versus ordinal models. We use longitudinal data from a well-known study on youth at high risk for substance abuse as a motivating example to demonstrate that the proposed model can characterize the time-varying effect of negative peer influences on alcohol use in a way that is more consistent with the developmental theory and existing literature, in comparison to the linear time-varying effect model. PMID:25209555

  18. Three Essays on Teacher Education Programs and Test-Takers' Response Times on Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Hong

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation includes three essays: one essay focuses on the effect of teacher preparation programs on teacher knowledge while the other two focus on test-takers' response times on test items. Essay One addresses the problem of how opportunities to learn in teacher preparation programs influence future elementary mathematics teachers'…

  19. Comparison of response times of a mobile-web EHRs system using PHP and JSP languages.

    PubMed

    De la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Antón-Rodríguez, Míriam; Díaz-Pernas, Francisco Javier; Perozo-Rondón, Freddy José

    2012-12-01

    Performance evaluation is highly important in the Electronic Health Records (EHRs) system implementation. Response time's measurement can be considered as one manner to make that evaluation. In the e-health field, after the creation of EHRs available through different platforms such as Web and/or mobile, a performance evaluation is necessary. The operation of the system in the right way is essential. In this paper, a comparison of the response times for the MEHRmobile system is presented. The first version uses PHP language with a MySQL database and the second one employs JSP with an eXist database. Both versions have got the same functionalities. In addition to the technological aspects, a significant difference is the way the information is stored. The main goal of this paper is choosing the version which offers better response times. We have created a new benchmark to calculate the response times. Better results have been obtained for the PHP version. Nowadays, this version is being used for specialists from Fundación Intras, Spain. PMID:22706897

  20. YIELD RESPONSE CURVES OF CROPS EXPOSED TO SO2 TIME SERIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Six species (alfalfa, onion, lettuce, radish, red clover, Douglas fir) were exposed in field growth chambers to both constant concentration and stochastic S02 time series. Yield response curves were generated with median concentrations ranging from 0 to 20 pphm. Constant concentr...

  1. The Effect of Intervention on Accuracy of Students' Responses and Reaction Times to Geometry Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babai, Reuven; Zilber, Hanna; Stavy, Ruth; Tirosh, Dina

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect on student performance in drawing their attention to relevant task variables, focusing on accuracy of responses and reaction times. We chose this methodology in order to better understand how such interventions affect the reasoning process. The study employs a geometry task in which the irrelevant salient…

  2. Cognitive performance and BMI in childhood: Shared genetic influences between reaction time but not response inhibition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this work is to understand whether shared genetic influences can explain the associationbetween obesity and cognitive performance, including slower and more variable reaction times(RTs) and worse response inhibition. RT on a four-choice RT task and the go/no-go task, and commission errors...

  3. Response-Time Variability Is Related to Parent Ratings of Inattention, Hyperactivity, and Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez-Guerrero, Lorena; Martin, Cristina Dominguez; Mairena, Maria Angeles; Di Martino, Adriana; Wang, Jing; Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Isquith, Peter K.; Gioia, Gerard; Petkova, Eva; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Individuals with ADHD are often characterized as inconsistent across many contexts. ADHD is also associated with deficits in executive function. We examined the relationships between response time (RT) variability on five brief computer tasks to parents' ratings of ADHD-related features and executive function in a group of children with…

  4. Norms of Filial Responsibility for Aging Parents across Time and Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gans, Daphna; Silverstein, Merril

    2006-01-01

    This investigation examined the normative expectation that adult children should be responsible for the care of their aging parents, and how this norm changes over the adult life span, across several decades of historical time, in relation to generational position in families, and between successive generations. Analyses were performed using 4…

  5. Decision-Tree Models of Categorization Response Times, Choice Proportions, and Typicality Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafond, Daniel; Lacouture, Yves; Cohen, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present 3 decision-tree models of categorization adapted from T. Trabasso, H. Rollins, and E. Shaughnessy (1971) and use them to provide a quantitative account of categorization response times, choice proportions, and typicality judgments at the individual-participant level. In Experiment 1, the decision-tree models were fit to…

  6. 28 CFR 513.68 - Time limits for responses to Freedom of Information Act requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requests. Consistent with sound administrative practice and the provisions of 28 CFR 16.1, the Bureau... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Time limits for responses to Freedom of... JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Freedom...

  7. 28 CFR 513.68 - Time limits for responses to Freedom of Information Act requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requests. Consistent with sound administrative practice and the provisions of 28 CFR 16.1, the Bureau... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Time limits for responses to Freedom of... JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Freedom...

  8. 28 CFR 513.68 - Time limits for responses to Freedom of Information Act requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requests. Consistent with sound administrative practice and the provisions of 28 CFR 16.1, the Bureau... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Time limits for responses to Freedom of... JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Freedom...

  9. Response-Time Tests of Logical-Rule Models of Categorization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Daniel R.; Nosofsky, Robert M.; Denton, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01

    A recent resurgence in logical-rule theories of categorization has motivated the development of a class of models that predict not only choice probabilities but also categorization response times (RTs; Fific, Little, & Nosofsky, 2010). The new models combine mental-architecture and random-walk approaches within an integrated framework and predict…

  10. Assessment of a Rotating Time Sampling Procedure: Implications for Interobserver Agreement and Response Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becraft, Jessica L.; Borrero, John C.; Davis, Barbara J.; Mendres-Smith, Amber E.

    2016-01-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate a rotating momentary time sampling (MTS) data collection system. A rotating MTS system has been used to measure activity preferences of preschoolers but not to collect data on responses that vary in duration and frequency (e.g., talking). We collected data on talking for 10 preschoolers using a 5-s MTS…

  11. On the Interpretation of the Number Attraction Effect: Response Time Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staub, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Speakers frequently make subject-verb number agreement errors in the presence of a local noun with a different number from the head of the subject phrase. A series of four experiments used a two-choice response time (RT) paradigm to investigate how the latency of correct agreement decisions is modulated by the presence of a number attractor, and…

  12. Improving linear accelerator service response with a real- time electronic event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Hoisak, Jeremy D P; Pawlicki, Todd; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Fletcher, Richard; Moore, Kevin L

    2014-01-01

    To track linear accelerator performance issues, an online event recording system was developed in-house for use by therapists and physicists to log the details of technical problems arising on our institution's four linear accelerators. In use since October 2010, the system was designed so that all clinical physicists would receive email notification when an event was logged. Starting in October 2012, we initiated a pilot project in collaboration with our linear accelerator vendor to explore a new model of service and support, in which event notifications were also sent electronically directly to dedicated engineers at the vendor's technical help desk, who then initiated a response to technical issues. Previously, technical issues were reported by telephone to the vendor's call center, which then disseminated information and coordinated a response with the Technical Support help desk and local service engineers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the improvements to clinical operations resulting from this new service model. The new and old service models were quantitatively compared by reviewing event logs and the oncology information system database in the nine months prior to and after initiation of the project. Here, we focus on events that resulted in an inoperative linear accelerator ("down" machine). Machine downtime, vendor response time, treatment cancellations, and event resolution were evaluated and compared over two equivalent time periods. In 389 clinical days, there were 119 machine-down events: 59 events before and 60 after introduction of the new model. In the new model, median time to service response decreased from 45 to 8 min, service engineer dispatch time decreased 44%, downtime per event decreased from 45 to 20 min, and treatment cancellations decreased 68%. The decreased vendor response time and reduced number of on-site visits by a service engineer resulted in decreased downtime and decreased patient treatment cancellations. PMID

  13. Mean Transit Time as a Predictor of Groundwater Discharge Response in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solder, J. E.; Heilweil, V. M.; Stolp, B. J.; Susong, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries support 40 million municipal water users and 5.5 million acres of agriculture in the south western United States (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012). Recent estimates by Rumsey et al. (2015) suggest that a significant portion (about 50 percent) of surface water flow in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is sustained by groundwater discharge to streams. Predicted climate variation (Cook et al., 2015) and increased water demand (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, 2012) within the UCRB suggest future decreases in groundwater discharge, however transient groundwater responses are not well understood. In this study we calculate groundwater mean transit time (MTT) and transit time distribution (TTD) as predictors of the pattern and timing of groundwater response to hydraulic stress. Samples from nineteen large springs within the UCRB were analyzed for environmental tracers to determine MTT and TTD. The predictive value of the MTT is examined by a statistical analysis of MTT, historical spring discharge records, and the Palmer Hydrological Drought Index. MTTs of the 19 springs range from 10 to 15,000 years with a flow-weighted average of 1,650 years. The composite TTD of the 19 springs suggest that flowpaths representing 45 percent of their combined discharge have transit times greater than 100 years. However, spring discharge records indicate that flow responds to drought on much shorter (0.5 - 6 year) time scales, indicative of a hydraulic pressure response. Springs with shorter MTTs (< 100) generally correlated with larger discharge variations and faster responses to drought indicating MTT can be used for estimating the relative magnitude and timing of groundwater response. Previous study (e.g., Manga, 1999) has shown groundwater responds on shorter time scales than the MTT, but of interest the results presented here indicate that relatively stable and old springs with long MTTs (> 100) also show a hydraulic pressure response. While

  14. Demand response-enabled model predictive HVAC load control in buildings using real-time electricity pricing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avci, Mesut

    A practical cost and energy efficient model predictive control (MPC) strategy is proposed for HVAC load control under dynamic real-time electricity pricing. The MPC strategy is built based on a proposed model that jointly minimizes the total energy consumption and hence, cost of electricity for the user, and the deviation of the inside temperature from the consumer's preference. An algorithm that assigns temperature set-points (reference temperatures) to price ranges based on the consumer's discomfort tolerance index is developed. A practical parameter prediction model is also designed for mapping between the HVAC load and the inside temperature. The prediction model and the produced temperature set-points are integrated as inputs into the MPC controller, which is then used to generate signal actions for the AC unit. To investigate and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, a simulation based experimental analysis is presented using real-life pricing data. An actual prototype for the proposed HVAC load control strategy is then built and a series of prototype experiments are conducted similar to the simulation studies. The experiments reveal that the MPC strategy can lead to significant reductions in overall energy consumption and cost savings for the consumer. Results suggest that by providing an efficient response strategy for the consumers, the proposed MPC strategy can enable the utility providers to adopt efficient demand management policies using real-time pricing. Finally, a cost-benefit analysis is performed to display the economic feasibility of implementing such a controller as part of a building energy management system, and the payback period is identified considering cost of prototype build and cost savings to help the adoption of this controller in the building HVAC control industry.

  15. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, J. S. Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J.; Horsfield, C. J.

    2014-11-15

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  16. Linear-response dynamics from the time-dependent Gutzwiller approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünemann, J.; Capone, M.; Lorenzana, J.; Seibold, G.

    2013-05-01

    Within a Lagrangian formalism, we derive the time-dependent Gutzwiller approximation for general multi-band Hubbard models. Our approach explicitly incorporates the coupling between time-dependent variational parameters and a time-dependent density matrix from which we obtain dynamical correlation functions in the linear-response regime. Our results are illustrated for the one-band model where we show that the interacting system can be mapped to an effective problem of fermionic quasiparticles coupled to ‘doublon’ (double occupancy) bosonic fluctuations. The latter have an energy on the scale of the on-site Hubbard repulsion U in the dilute limit but become soft at the Brinkman-Rice transition, which is shown to be related to an emerging conservation law of doublon charge and the associated gauge invariance. Coupling with the boson mode produces a structure in the charge response and we find that a similar structure appears in dynamical mean-field theory.

  17. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milnes, J. S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Conneely, T. M.; Howorth, J.

    2014-11-01

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year.

  18. Improved time response for large area microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes in fusion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Milnes, J S; Horsfield, C J; Conneely, T M; Howorth, J

    2014-11-01

    Fusion diagnostics that utilise high speed scintillators often need to capture a large area of light with a high degree of time accuracy. Microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are recognised as the leading device for capturing fast optical signals. However, when manufactured in their traditional proximity focused construction, the time response performance is reduced as the active area increases. This is due to two main factors: the capacitance of a large anode and the difficulty of obtaining small pore MCPs with a large area. Collaboration between Photek and AWE has produced prototype devices that combine the excellent time response of small area MCP-PMTs with a large active area by replacing the traditional proximity-gap front section with an electro-optically focused photocathode to MCP. We present results from both single and double MCP devices with a 40 mm diameter active area and show simulations for the 100 mm device being built this year. PMID:25430347

  19. The role of hillslopes in stream flow response: connectivity, flow path, and transit time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, K. J.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Subsurface flow from hillslopes is widely recognized as an important contributor to stream flow generation; however, processes that control how and when hillslopes connect to streams remain unclear. Much of the difficulty in deciphering hillslope response in the stream is due to riparian zone modulation of these inputs. We investigated stream and hillslope runoff dynamics in a 10 ha catchment in the western Cascades of Oregon where the riparian zone has been removed by debris flows, providing an unambiguous hillslope hydrologic signal to the stream channel. Water transit time was used as a framework to develop a conceptual stream flow generation model for the small basin. We based our conceptualization on observations of hydrometric, stable isotope, and applied tracer responses and computed transit times for multiple runoff components using a simple linear systems model. Event water mean transit times (8 to 34 h) and rapid breakthrough from applied hillslope tracer additions, demonstrated that contributing areas extend far upslope during events. Despite rapid hillslope transport processes during events, vadose zone water and runoff mean transit times during non-storm conditions were greater than the timescale of storm events. Vadose zone water mean transit times ranged between 10 and 25 days. Hillslope seepage and catchment baseflow mean transit times were between 1 and 2 years. We describe a conceptual model that captures variable physical flow pathways and transit times through changing antecedent wetness conditions that illustrate the different stages of hillslope and stream connectivity.

  20. Time of day influences the voluntary intake and behavioral response to methamphetamine and food reward.

    PubMed

    Keith, Diana R; Hart, Carl L; Robotham, Margaret; Tariq, Maliha; Le Sauter, Joseph; Silver, Rae

    2013-09-01

    The circadian timing system influences a vast array of behavioral responses. Substantial evidence indicates a role for the circadian system in regulating reward processing. Here we explore time of day effects on drug anticipation, locomotor activity, and voluntary methamphetamine (MA) and food intake in animals with ad libitum food access. We compared responses to drug versus a palatable treat during their normal sleep times in early day (zeitgeber time (ZT) 0400) or late day (ZT 1000). In the first study, using a between-subjects design, mice were given daily 1-h access to either peanut butter (PB-Alone) or to a low or high concentration of MA mixed in PB (MA+PB). In study 2, we repeated the experiment using a within-subjects design in which mice could choose between PB-Alone and MA+PB at either ZT 0400 or 1000. In study 3, the effects of MA-alone were investigated by evaluating anticipatory activity preceding exposure to nebulized MA at ZT 0400 vs. ZT 1000. Time of day effects were observed for both drug and palatable treat, such that in the between groups design, animals showed greater intake, anticipatory activity, and post-ingestional activity in the early day. Furthermore, there were differences among mice in the amount of MA ingested but individuals were self-consistent in their daily intake. The results for the within-subjects experiment also revealed robust individual differences in preference for MA+PB or PB-Alone. Interestingly, time of day effects on intake were observed only for the preferred substance. Anticipatory activity preceding administration of MA by nebulization was also greater at ZT 0400 than ZT 1000. Finally, pharmacokinetic response to MA administered intraperitoneally did not vary as a function of time of administration. The results indicate that time of day is an important variable mediating the voluntary intake and behavioral effects of reinforcers. PMID:23711589

  1. Increasing temperature forcing reduces the Greenland Ice Sheet's response time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, Patrick J.; Parizek, Byron R.; Nicholas, Robert E.; Alley, Richard B.; Keller, Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Damages from sea level rise, as well as strategies to manage the associated risk, hinge critically on the time scale and eventual magnitude of sea level rise. Satellite observations and paleo-data suggest that the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) loses mass in response to increased temperatures, and may thus contribute substantially to sea level rise as anthropogenic climate change progresses. The time scale of GIS mass loss and sea level rise are deeply uncertain, and are often assumed to be constant. However, previous ice sheet modeling studies have shown that the time scale of GIS response likely decreases strongly with increasing temperature anomaly. Here, we map the relationship between temperature anomaly and the time scale of GIS response, by perturbing a calibrated, three-dimensional model of GIS behavior. Additional simulations with a profile, higher-order, ice sheet model yield time scales that are broadly consistent with those obtained using the three-dimensional model, and shed light on the feedbacks in the ice sheet system that cause the time scale shortening. Semi-empirical modeling studies that assume a constant time scale of sea level adjustment, and are calibrated to small preanthropogenic temperature and sea level changes, may underestimate future sea level rise. Our analysis suggests that the benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, in terms of avoided sea level rise from the GIS, may be greatest if emissions reductions begin before large temperature increases have been realized. Reducing anthropogenic climate change may also allow more time for design and deployment of risk management strategies by slowing sea level contributions from the GIS.

  2. Myosin-II sets the optimal response time scale of chemotactic amoeba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Westendorf, Christian; Tarantola, Marco; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Beta, Carsten

    2014-03-01

    The response dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton to external chemical stimuli plays a fundamental role in numerous cellular functions. One of the key players that governs the dynamics of the actin network is the motor protein myosin-II. Here we investigate the role of myosin-II in the response of the actin system to external stimuli. We used a microfluidic device in combination with a photoactivatable chemoattractant to apply stimuli to individual cells with high temporal resolution. We directly compare the actin dynamics in Dictyostelium discodelium wild type (WT) cells to a knockout mutant that is deficient in myosin-II (MNL). Similar to the WT a small population of MNL cells showed self-sustained oscillations even in absence of external stimuli. The actin response of MNL cells to a short pulse of chemoattractant resembles WT during the first 15 sec but is significantly delayed afterward. The amplitude of the dominant peak in the power spectrum from the response time series of MNL cells to periodic stimuli with varying period showed a clear resonance peak at a forcing period of 36 sec, which is significantly delayed as compared to the resonance at 20 sec found for the WT. This shift indicates an important role of myosin-II in setting the response time scale of motile amoeba. Institute of Physics und Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany.

  3. Reverberation time measurement using integrated impulse response and sweep sine excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabuco, Marco; Brando, Paulo

    2002-11-01

    As the capacity and speed of digital processing systems becomes much higher, the integrated impulsive response for reverberation time measurements by the indirect method also becomes more feasible and faster. The MLS technique to obtain the impulse response for LTI has been developed during the last several years and it is very well reported by the bibliography. Some frequency analyzers available in the market are capable to generate and process MLS to get the impulse responses very easily. Sometimes, when the room to be tested is very reverberant, sequences of higher order and a certain number of average are necessary to assure acceptable signal-to-noise ratio. The sweep sine technique or the deconvolution method to obtain impulsive responses presents many new advantages, most of them still reported in various technical documents. This paper presents the results of application of this technique to measure the reverberation time in two different reverberation rooms. Comparisons with MLS, ensemble, and reverberation time averages are presented. The sweep sine technique repeatability was verified in a reverberation chamber for a polyurethane foam sample and showed smaller standard deviations when compared with other techniques. (To be presented in Portuguese.)

  4. Dynamic response of cracked rotor-bearing system under time-dependent base movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinkai; Chu, Fulei

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic response of cracked rotor-bearing system under time-dependent base movements is studied in this paper. Three base angular motions, including the rolling, pitching and yawing motions, are assumed to be sinusoidal perturbations superimposed upon constant terms. Both the open and breathing transverse cracks are considered in the analysis. The finite element model is established for the base excited rotor-bearing system with open or breathing cracks. Considering the time-varying base movements and transverse cracks, the second-order differential equations of the system will not only have time-periodic gyroscopic and stiffness coefficients, but also the multi-frequency external excitations. An improved harmonic balance method is introduced to obtain the steady-state response of the system under both base and unbalance excitations. The response spectra, orbits of shaft center and frequency response characteristics, are analyzed accordingly. The effects of various base angular motions, frequency and amplitude of base excitations, and crack depths on the system dynamic behaviors are considered in the discussions.

  5. Response-coefficient method for heat-conduction transients with time-dependent inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceylan, Tamer

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical overview of the response coefficient method for heat conduction transients with time-dependent input forcing functions is presented with a number of illustrative applications. The method may be the most convenient and economical if the same problem is to be solved many times with different input-time histories or if the solution time is relatively long. The method is applicable to a wide variety of problems, including irregular geometries, position-dependent boundary conditions, position-dependent physical properties, and nonperiodic irregular input histories. Nonuniform internal energy generation rates within the structure can also be handled by the method. The area of interest is long-time solutions, in which initial condition is unimportant, and not the early transient period. The method can be applied to one dimensional problems in cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates as well as to two dimensional problems in cartesian and cylindrical coordinates.

  6. Modelling residence-time response to freshwater input in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wenrui; Spaulding, M.

    2002-10-01

    Residence time of an estuary can be used to estimate the rate of removal of freshwater and pollutants from river inflow. In this study, a calibrated three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was used to determine residence time in response to the change of freshwater input in Apalachicola Bay. The bay is about 40 km long and 7 km wide, with an average 3 m water depth. Through hydrodynamic model simulations, the spatial and temporal salinity and the total freshwater volume in the bay were calculated. Then the freshwater fraction method was used to estimate the residence time. Results indicate that the residence time in Apalachicola Bay typically ranges between 3 and 10 days for the daily freshwater input ranging from 177 m3/s to 4561 m3/s. Regression analysis of model results shows that an exponential regression equation can be used to correlate the estuarine residence time to changes of freshwater input.

  7. An analysis of thermal response factors and how to reduce their computational time requirement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    Te RESFAC2 version of the Thermal Response Factor Program (RESFAC) is the result of numerous modifications and additions to the original RESFAC. These modifications and additions have significantly reduced the program's computational time requirement. As a result of this work, the program is more efficient and its code is both readable and understandable. This report describes what a thermal response factor is; analyzes the original matrix algebra calculations and root finding techniques; presents a new root finding technique and streamlined matrix algebra; supplies ten validation cases and their results.

  8. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Isobe, M; Ogawa, K; Miyake, H; Hayashi, H; Kobuchi, T; Nakano, Y; Watanabe, K; Uritani, A; Misawa, T; Nishitani, T; Tomitaka, M; Kumagai, T; Mashiyama, Y; Ito, D; Kono, S; Yamauchi, M; Takeiri, Y

    2014-11-01

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10(9) counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10(16) n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design. PMID:25430293

  9. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, M. Takeiri, Y.; Ogawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Hayashi, H.; Kobuchi, T.; Nakano, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A.; Misawa, T.; Nishitani, T.; Tomitaka, M.; Kumagai, T.; Mashiyama, Y.; Ito, D.; Kono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    2014-11-15

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10{sup 9} counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10{sup 16} n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  10. Can a Clinical Test of Reaction Time Predict a Functional Head-Protective Response?

    PubMed Central

    ECKNER, JAMES T.; LIPPS, DAVID B.; KIM, HOGENE; RICHARDSON, JAMES K.; ASHTON-MILLER, JAMES A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Reaction time is commonly prolonged after a sport-related concussion. Besides being a marker for injury, a rapid reaction time is necessary for protective maneuvers that can reduce the frequency and severity of additional head impacts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a clinical test of simple visuomotor reaction time predicted the time taken to raise the hands to protect the head from a rapidly approaching ball. Methods Twenty-six healthy adult participants recruited from campus and community recreation and exercise facilities completed two experimental protocols during a single session: a manual visuomotor simple reaction time test (RTclin) and a sport-related head-protective response (RTsprt). RTclin measured the time required to catch a thin vertically oriented device on its release by the tester and was calculated from the distance the device fell before being arrested. RTsprt measured the time required to raise the hands from waist level to block a foam tennis ball fired toward the subject’s face from an air cannon and was determined using an optoelectronic camera system. A correlation coefficient was calculated between RTclin and RTsprt, with linear regression used to assess for effect modification by other covariates. Results A strong positive correlation was found between RTclin and RTsprt (r = 0.725, P < 0.001) independent of age, gender, height, or weight. Conclusions RTclin is predictive of a functional sport-related head-protective response. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a clinical test predicting the ability to protect the head in a simulated sport environment. This correlation with a functional head-protective response is a relevant consideration for the potential use of RTclin as part of a multifaceted concussion assessment program. PMID:20689458

  11. Dose- and time-response for breast cancer risk after radiation therapy for benign breast disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, A.; Rudén, B. I.; Palmgren, J.; Rutqvist, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of the breast to ionising radiation increases the risk of breast cancer, especially among young women. However, some issues remain controversial, for instance the shape of the dose-response curve and the expression of time-related excess. The main purpose of this report was to examine the dose-response curves for radiation-induced breast cancer formulated according to radiobiological target theories. Another purpose was to analyse the time-related excess of breast cancer risk after exposure when dose and age at first exposure were held constant. Breast cancer incidence was analysed in a cohort of 3090 women diagnosed with benign breast disease during 1925-61 (median age 37 years). Of these, 1216 were treated with radiation therapy. The dose range was 0-50 Gy (mean 5.8 Gy). The incidence rate as function of dose was analysed using a linear-quadratic Poisson regression model. Cell-killing effects and other modifying effects were incorporated through additional log-linear terms. Additive and multiplicative models were compared in estimating the time-related excess. The analysis, which was based on 278 breast cancer cases, showed a linear dose-response relationship at low to medium dose levels with a cell-killing effect of 5% Gy-1 (95% confidence interval 2-9%). For a given absorbed dose and age at first exposure the time-related excess was proportional to the background rates with a suggestion that the excess remains throughout life. PMID:7547222

  12. Response regime studies on standard detectors for decay time determination in phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe, C.; Abou Nada, F.; Lindén, J.; Richter, M.; Aldén, M.

    2013-09-01

    This work compares the extent of linear response regimes from standard time-resolving optical detectors for phosphor thermometry. Different types of Photomultipliers (ordinary and time-gated) as well as an Avalanche Photodiode are tested and compared using the phosphorescent time decay of CdWO4 that ranges from 10 μs down to a few ns within a temperature span of 290 to 580 K. Effects originating from incipient detector saturation, far from obvious to the operator's eye, are revealed as a change in evaluated phosphorescence decay time. Since the decay time of thermographic phosphors itself is used for temperature determination - systematic temperature errors up to several tens of Kelvins may be introduced by such detector saturation. A detector mapping procedure is suggested in order to identify linear response regions where the decay-to-temperature evaluation can be performed unbiased. Generation of such a library is highly recommended prior to any quantitative measurement attempt. Using this detector library, even signals collected in the partly saturated regime can be corrected to their unbiased value extending the usable detector operating range significantly. Further, the use of an external current-to-voltage amplifier proved useful for most applications in time-based phosphor thermometry helping to limit saturation effects whilst maintaining a reasonable bandwidth and signal outputs.

  13. Time-Lag in Responses of Birds to Atlantic Forest Fragmentation: Restoration Opportunity and Urgency.

    PubMed

    Uezu, Alexandre; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    There are few opportunities to evaluate the relative importance of landscape structure and dynamics upon biodiversity, especially in highly fragmented tropical landscapes. Conservation strategies and species risk evaluations often rely exclusively on current aspects of landscape structure, although such limited assumptions are known to be misleading when time-lag responses occur. By relating bird functional-group richness to forest patch size and isolation in ten-year intervals (1956, 1965, 1978, 1984, 1993 and 2003), we revealed that birds with different sensitivity to fragmentation display contrasting responses to landscape dynamics in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. For non-sensitive groups, there was no time-lag in response: the recent degree of isolation best explains their variation in richness, which likely relates to these species' flexibility to adapt to changes in landscape structure. However, for sensitive bird groups, the 1978 patch area was the best explanatory variable, providing evidence for a 25-year time-lag in response to habitat reduction. Time-lag was more likely in landscapes that encompass large patches, which can support temporarily the presence of some sensitive species, even when habitat cover is relatively low. These landscapes potentially support the most threatened populations and should be priorities for restoration efforts to avoid further species loss. Although time-lags provide an opportunity to counteract the negative consequences of fragmentation, it also reinforces the urgency of restoration actions. Fragmented landscapes will be depleted of biodiversity if landscape structure is only maintained, and not improved. The urgency of restoration action may be even higher in landscapes where habitat loss and fragmentation history is older and where no large fragment remained to act temporarily as a refuge. PMID:26820548

  14. Real-time Kadanoff-Baym approach to nuclear response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, H. S.; Kwong, N. H.

    2016-03-01

    Linear density response functions are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter of normal density by time-evolving two-time Green's functions in real time. Of particular interest is the effect of correlations. The system is therefore initially time-evolved with a collision term calculated in a direct Born approximation until fully correlated. An external time-dependent potential is then applied. The ensuing density fluctuations are recorded to calculate the density response. This method was previously used by Kwong and Bonitz for studying plasma oscillations in a correlated electron gas. The energy-weighted sum-rule for the response function is guaranteed by using conserving self-energy insertions as the method then generates the full vertex-functions. These can alternatively be calculated by solving a Bethe -Salpeter equation as done in works by Bozek et al. The (first order) mean field is derived from a momentum-dependent (non-local) interaction while 2nd order self-energies are calculated using a particle-hole two-body effective (or residual) interaction given by a gaussian local potential. We show results of calculations of the response function S(ɷ,q0 ) for q0 = 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8fm -1. Comparison is made with the nucleons being un-correlated i.e. with only the first order mean field included. We discuss the relation of our work with the Landau quasi-particle theory as applied to nuclear systems by Babu and Brown and followers.

  15. Time-Lag in Responses of Birds to Atlantic Forest Fragmentation: Restoration Opportunity and Urgency

    PubMed Central

    Uezu, Alexandre; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    There are few opportunities to evaluate the relative importance of landscape structure and dynamics upon biodiversity, especially in highly fragmented tropical landscapes. Conservation strategies and species risk evaluations often rely exclusively on current aspects of landscape structure, although such limited assumptions are known to be misleading when time-lag responses occur. By relating bird functional-group richness to forest patch size and isolation in ten-year intervals (1956, 1965, 1978, 1984, 1993 and 2003), we revealed that birds with different sensitivity to fragmentation display contrasting responses to landscape dynamics in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. For non-sensitive groups, there was no time-lag in response: the recent degree of isolation best explains their variation in richness, which likely relates to these species’ flexibility to adapt to changes in landscape structure. However, for sensitive bird groups, the 1978 patch area was the best explanatory variable, providing evidence for a 25-year time-lag in response to habitat reduction. Time-lag was more likely in landscapes that encompass large patches, which can support temporarily the presence of some sensitive species, even when habitat cover is relatively low. These landscapes potentially support the most threatened populations and should be priorities for restoration efforts to avoid further species loss. Although time-lags provide an opportunity to counteract the negative consequences of fragmentation, it also reinforces the urgency of restoration actions. Fragmented landscapes will be depleted of biodiversity if landscape structure is only maintained, and not improved. The urgency of restoration action may be even higher in landscapes where habitat loss and fragmentation history is older and where no large fragment remained to act temporarily as a refuge. PMID:26820548

  16. Gauging triple stores with actual biological data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Semantic Web technologies have been developed to overcome the limitations of the current Web and conventional data integration solutions. The Semantic Web is expected to link all the data present on the Internet instead of linking just documents. One of the foundations of the Semantic Web technologies is the knowledge representation language Resource Description Framework (RDF). Knowledge expressed in RDF is typically stored in so-called triple stores (also known as RDF stores), from which it can be retrieved with SPARQL, a language designed for querying RDF-based models. The Semantic Web technologies should allow federated queries over multiple triple stores. In this paper we compare the efficiency of a set of biologically relevant queries as applied to a number of different triple store implementations. Results Previously we developed a library of queries to guide the use of our knowledge base Cell Cycle Ontology implemented as a triple store. We have now compared the performance of these queries on five non-commercial triple stores: OpenLink Virtuoso (Open-Source Edition), Jena SDB, Jena TDB, SwiftOWLIM and 4Store. We examined three performance aspects: the data uploading time, the query execution time and the scalability. The queries we had chosen addressed diverse ontological or biological questions, and we found that individual store performance was quite query-specific. We identified three groups of queries displaying similar behaviour across the different stores: 1) relatively short response time queries, 2) moderate response time queries and 3) relatively long response time queries. SwiftOWLIM proved to be a winner in the first group, 4Store in the second one and Virtuoso in the third one. Conclusions Our analysis showed that some queries behaved idiosyncratically, in a triple store specific manner, mainly with SwiftOWLIM and 4Store. Virtuoso, as expected, displayed a very balanced performance - its load time and its response time for all the

  17. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-09

    .A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  18. Time-frequency analysis of railway bridge response in forced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, Daniel; Ülker-Kaustell, Mahir; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-08-01

    This paper suggests the use of the Continuous Wavelet Transform in combination with the Modified Littlewood-Paley basis to analyse bridge responses exited by traversing trains. The analysis provides an energy distribution map in the time-frequency domain that offers a better resolution compared to previous published studies. This is demonstrated with recorded responses of the Skidträsk Bridge, a 36 m long composite bridge located in Sweden. It is shown to be particularly useful to understand the evolution of the energy content during a vehicle crossing event. With this information it is possible to distinguish the effect of several of the governing factors involved in the dynamic response including vehicle's speed and axle configuration as well as non-linear behaviour of the structure.

  19. Time domain simulation of nonlinear response of a coupled TLP system in random seas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.; Kim, M.H.; Liu, Y.H.; Zhao, C.T.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a result of an analysis of the nonlinear interaction and response of the coupled ISSC-TLP System to the random seas in the time domain. The environmental load also includes the effect of the concurrent steady winds and currents. The first- and second-order wave-exciting forces are calculated using a robust higher-order boundary element method (HOBEM), while the nonlinear tendon dynamic analysis is performed using the three-dimensional hybrid element method with the upgated Lagrangian formulation. The Morison equation is employed for the wave and current load on slender structures. The analysis is focused on the nonlinear responses due to the nonlinear environmental load and nonlinear interaction between the platform and tendons that includes the offset, setdown, large coupled surge-heave motion in the low frequency and resonant heave/pitch responses with the springing loads in the high frequency.

  20. Breathing for answering: the time course of response planning in conversation

    PubMed Central

    Torreira, Francisco; Bögels, Sara; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the timing of pre-answer inbreaths in order to shed light on the time course of response planning and execution in conversational turn-taking. Using acoustic and inductive plethysmography recordings of seven dyadic conversations in Dutch, we show that pre-answer inbreaths in conversation typically begin briefly after the end of questions. We also show that the presence of a pre-answer inbreath usually co-occurs with substantially delayed answers, with a modal latency of 576 vs. 100 ms for answers not preceded by an inbreath. Based on previously reported minimal latencies for internal intercostal activation and the production of speech sounds, we propose that vocal responses, either in the form of a pre-utterance inbreath or of speech proper when an inbreath is not produced, are typically launched in reaction to information present in the last portion of the interlocutor's turn. We also show that short responses are usually made on residual breath, while longer responses are more often preceded by an inbreath. This relation of inbreaths to answer length suggests that by the time an inbreath is launched, typically during the last few hundred milliseconds of the question, the length of the answer is often prepared to some extent. Together, our findings are consistent with a two-stage model of response planning in conversational turn-taking: early planning of content often carried out in overlap with the incoming turn, and late launching of articulation based on the identification of turn-final cues. PMID:25814976

  1. Response of vegetation to drought time-scales across global land biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Gouveia, Célia; Julio Camarero, Jesús; Beguería, Santiago; Trigo, Ricardo; López-Moreno, Juan I.; Azorín-Molina, César; Pasho, Edmond; Lorenzo-Lacruz, Jorge; Revuelto, Jesús; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the response of the Earth land biomes to drought by correlating a drought index with three global indicators of vegetation activity and growth: vegetation indices from satellite imagery, tree-ring growth series, and Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP) records. Arid and humid biomes are both affected by drought, and we suggest that the persistence of the water deficit (i.e., the drought time-scale) could be playing a key role in determining the sensitivity of land biomes to drought. We found that arid biomes respond to drought at short time-scales; that is, there is a rapid vegetation reaction as soon as water deficits below normal conditions occur. This may be due to the fact that plant species of arid regions have mechanisms allowing them to rapidly adapt to changing water availability. Humid biomes also respond to drought at short time-scales, but in this case the physiological mechanisms likely differ from those operating in arid biomes, as plants usually have a poor adaptability to water shortage. On the contrary, semiarid and subhumid biomes respond to drought at long time-scales, probably because plants are able to withstand water deficits, but they lack the rapid response of arid biomes to drought. These results are consistent among three vegetation parameters analyzed and across different land biomes, showing that the response of vegetation to drought depends on characteristic drought time-scales for each biome. Understanding the dominant time-scales at which drought most influences vegetation might help assessing the resistance and resilience of vegetation and improving our knowledge of vegetation vulnerability to climate change.

  2. Response of vegetation to drought time-scales across global land biomes

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.; Gouveia, Célia; Camarero, Jesús Julio; Beguería, Santiago; Trigo, Ricardo; López-Moreno, Juan I.; Azorín-Molina, César; Pasho, Edmond; Lorenzo-Lacruz, Jorge; Revuelto, Jesús; Morán-Tejeda, Enrique; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the response of the Earth land biomes to drought by correlating a drought index with three global indicators of vegetation activity and growth: vegetation indices from satellite imagery, tree-ring growth series, and Aboveground Net Primary Production (ANPP) records. Arid and humid biomes are both affected by drought, and we suggest that the persistence of the water deficit (i.e., the drought time-scale) could be playing a key role in determining the sensitivity of land biomes to drought. We found that arid biomes respond to drought at short time-scales; that is, there is a rapid vegetation reaction as soon as water deficits below normal conditions occur. This may be due to the fact that plant species of arid regions have mechanisms allowing them to rapidly adapt to changing water availability. Humid biomes also respond to drought at short time-scales, but in this case the physiological mechanisms likely differ from those operating in arid biomes, as plants usually have a poor adaptability to water shortage. On the contrary, semiarid and subhumid biomes respond to drought at long time-scales, probably because plants are able to withstand water deficits, but they lack the rapid response of arid biomes to drought. These results are consistent among three vegetation parameters analyzed and across different land biomes, showing that the response of vegetation to drought depends on characteristic drought time-scales for each biome. Understanding the dominant time-scales at which drought most influences vegetation might help assessing the resistance and resilience of vegetation and improving our knowledge of vegetation vulnerability to climate change. PMID:23248309

  3. Response Time Measurements of the NIF DANTE XRD-31 X-Ray Diodes (Pre-print)

    SciTech Connect

    Don Pellinen and Michael Griffin

    2009-01-23

    The XRD-31 is a fast, windowless X-ray vacuum photodiode developed by EG&G. It is currently the primary fast X-ray detector used to diagnose the X-rays on NIF and OMEGA on the multichannel DANTE spectrometer. The XRD-31 has a dynamic range of less than 1e-12 amps to more than 10 amps. A technique is described to measure the impulse response of the diodes to a 150 fs pulse of 200 nm laser light and a method to calculate the “risetime” for a square pulse and compare it with the computed electron transit time from the photocathode to the anode. Measured response time for 5 XRD-31s assembled in early 2004 was 149.7 ps +-2.75 ps.

  4. Measurement and deconvolution of detector response time for short HPM pulses: Part 1, Microwave diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.R.

    1987-06-01

    A technique is described for measuring and deconvolving response times of microwave diode detection systems in order to generate corrected input signals typical of an infinite detection rate. The method has been applied to cases of 2.86 GHz ultra-short HPM pulse detection where pulse rise time is comparable to that of the detector; whereas, the duration of a few nanoseconds is significantly longer. Results are specified in terms of the enhancement of equivalent deconvolved input voltages for given observed voltages. The convolution integral imposes the constraint of linear detector response to input power levels. This is physically equivalent to the conservation of integrated pulse energy in the deconvolution process. The applicable dynamic range of a microwave diode is therefore limited to a smaller signal region as determined by its calibration.

  5. Phase Response Synchronization in Neuronal Population with Time-Varying Coupling Strength

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Xianfa; Zhao, Wanyu; Cao, Jinde

    2015-01-01

    We present the dynamic model of global coupled neuronal population subject to external stimulus by the use of phase sensitivity function. We investigate the effect of time-varying coupling strength on the synchronized phase response of neural population subjected to external harmonic stimulus. For a time-periodic coupling strength, we found that the stimulus with increasing intensity or frequency can reinforce the phase response synchronization in neuronal population of the weakly coupled neural oscillators, and the neuronal population with stronger coupling strength has good adaptability to stimulus. When we consider the dynamics of coupling strength, we found that a strong stimulus can quickly cause the synchronization in the neuronal population, the degree of synchronization grows with the increasing stimulus intensity, and the period of synchronized oscillation induced by external stimulation is related to stimulus frequency. PMID:26640514

  6. Real-time estimation of the structural response using limited measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedarat, Hassan; Talebinejad, Iman; Emami-Naeini, Abbas; Falck, David; van der Linden, Gwendolyn; Nobari, Farid; Krimotat, Alex; Lynch, Jerome

    2014-03-01

    This study introduces an efficient procedure to estimate the structural response of a suspension bridge in real-time based on a limited set of measured data. Unlike conventional techniques, the proposed procedure does not employ mode shapes and frequencies. In this study, the proposed technique is used to estimate the response of a suspension bridge structure based on a set of strain gauge measurements. Finite element analysis is performed only once to set up the structural parameters, namely computed flexibility matrix, and computed hanger forces matrix. The response of the bridge was estimated without any additional finite element analysis using the computed structural parameters and the measured hanger strains. The Alfred Zampa Memorial Bridge, on Interstate 80 in California, was selected for this study. A high fidelity finite element model of the bridge was developed using the general purpose computer program ADINA. The proposed method has been proven to have the capability to estimate any type of structural response in real time based on the measured hanger strains, and provides an important part of an integrated Structure Health Monitoring (SHM) system for major bridges.

  7. Linear summation in the barn owl's brainstem underlies responses to interaural time differences.

    PubMed

    Kuokkanen, Paula T; Ashida, Go; Carr, Catherine E; Wagner, Hermann; Kempter, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The neurophonic potential is a synchronized frequency-following extracellular field potential that can be recorded in the nucleus laminaris (NL) in the brainstem of the barn owl. Putative generators of the neurophonic are the afferent axons from the nucleus magnocellularis, synapses onto NL neurons, and spikes of NL neurons. The outputs of NL, i.e., action potentials of NL neurons, are only weakly represented in the neurophonic. Instead, the inputs to NL, i.e., afferent axons and their synaptic potentials, are the predominant origin of the neurophonic (Kuokkanen PT, Wagner H, Ashida G, Carr CE, Kempter R. J Neurophysiol 104: 2274-2290, 2010). Thus in NL the monaural inputs from the two brain sides converge and create a binaural neurophonic. If these monaural inputs contribute independently to the extracellular field, the response to binaural stimulation can be predicted from the sum of the responses to ipsi- and contralateral stimulation. We found that a linear summation model explains the dependence of the responses on interaural time difference as measured experimentally with binaural stimulation. The fit between model predictions and data was excellent, even without taking into account the nonlinear responses of NL coincidence detector neurons, although their firing rate and synchrony strongly depend on the interaural time difference. These results are consistent with the view that the afferent axons and their synaptic potentials in NL are the primary origin of the neurophonic. PMID:23554438

  8. Linear summation in the barn owl's brainstem underlies responses to interaural time differences

    PubMed Central

    Kuokkanen, Paula T.; Ashida, Go; Carr, Catherine E.; Wagner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The neurophonic potential is a synchronized frequency-following extracellular field potential that can be recorded in the nucleus laminaris (NL) in the brainstem of the barn owl. Putative generators of the neurophonic are the afferent axons from the nucleus magnocellularis, synapses onto NL neurons, and spikes of NL neurons. The outputs of NL, i.e., action potentials of NL neurons, are only weakly represented in the neurophonic. Instead, the inputs to NL, i.e., afferent axons and their synaptic potentials, are the predominant origin of the neurophonic (Kuokkanen PT, Wagner H, Ashida G, Carr CE, Kempter R. J Neurophysiol 104: 2274–2290, 2010). Thus in NL the monaural inputs from the two brain sides converge and create a binaural neurophonic. If these monaural inputs contribute independently to the extracellular field, the response to binaural stimulation can be predicted from the sum of the responses to ipsi- and contralateral stimulation. We found that a linear summation model explains the dependence of the responses on interaural time difference as measured experimentally with binaural stimulation. The fit between model predictions and data was excellent, even without taking into account the nonlinear responses of NL coincidence detector neurons, although their firing rate and synchrony strongly depend on the interaural time difference. These results are consistent with the view that the afferent axons and their synaptic potentials in NL are the primary origin of the neurophonic. PMID:23554438

  9. Simple peak shift analysis of time-of-flight data with a slow instrumental response function.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Goro; Tamura, Mamoru

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of time-of-flight (TOF) data is sometimes limited by the instrumental response function, and optical parameters are extracted from the observed response curve by several mathematical methods, such as deconvolution. In contrast to this, we demonstrate that a method using shifts of the peak time of the response curve with different source-detector separations can yield the average path length of the light traveling in a tissue-like sample without deconvolution. In addition, combining the intensity information allows us to separate the scattering and absorption coefficients. This simple method is more robust in signal-to-noise ratio than the moment analysis, which also does not require the deconvolution procedure, because the peak position is not significantly dependent on the baseline fluctuation and the contamination of the scattering. The analysis is demonstrated by TOF measurements of an Intralipid solution at 800 nm, and is applied to the measurements at 1.29 microm, where the temporal response of photomultiplier tubes is not sufficiently good. PMID:15847597

  10. Antarctic timing of surface water changes off Chile and Patagonian ice sheet response.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Frank; Kaiser, Jérôme; Ninnemann, Ulysses; Hebbeln, Dierk; Arz, Helge W; Stoner, Joseph

    2004-06-25

    Marine sediments from the Chilean continental margin are used to infer millennial-scale changes in southeast Pacific surface ocean water properties and Patagonian ice sheet extent since the last glacial period. Our data show a clear "Antarctic" timing of sea surface temperature changes, which appear systematically linked to meridional displacements in sea ice, westerly winds, and the circumpolar current system. Proxy data for ice sheet changes show a similar pattern as oceanographic variations offshore, but reveal a variable glacier-response time of up to approximately 1000 years, which may explain some of the current discrepancies among terrestrial records in southern South America. PMID:15218147

  11. Earth FUV Dayglow Response to the 20 January 2005 Solar Flare: TIMED and IMAGE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, R.; Solomon, S. C.; Immel, T. J.

    2005-05-01

    An X-class solar flare occurred on 20 January 2005 when the TIMED and IMAGE spacecraft were both well positioned to observe the response of Earth's dayglow emission intensity. Brightness enhancements during the flare relative to just before were determined at tangent altitudes of peak emission viewed toward the limb with TIMED. The TIMED observations were made at low solar zenith angles and show flare enhancements of roughly 15%, 30%, 30%, and 60%, respectively, for OI 130.4 nm, OI 135.6 nm, N2 LBH Short, and N2 LBH Long modes of the TIMED/GUVI instrument. However, GUVI observations of HI Lyman-alpha emission brightness do not show a significant brightness change. This lack of change in HI Lyman-alpha dayglow brightness is consistent with no significant change (<2%) in the solar Lyman-alpha flux observed with TIMED/SEE. Enhancements of emissions produced by photodissociation and photoelectron impact excitation sources are studied with IMAGE observations following Immel et al., JGR, 2003. Simulations of dayglow limb profiles to compare with the observations are produced using the NRLMSIS atmosphere model, the IRI90 ionosphere model, the GLOW photoelectron model, and the REDISTER radiative transfer model. The combined datasets enable a better study of the airglow sources most affected by the EUV and x-ray components of solar irradiance variability. We report our preliminary analysis of the response of FUV dayglow emissions to this event.

  12. Imaging the cellular response to transient shear stress using time-resolved digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-02-01

    Shear stress has been recognized as one of the biophysical methods by which to permeabilize plasma membranes of cells. In particular, high pressure transient hydrodynamic flows created by laser-induced cavitation have been shown to lead to the uptake of fluorophores and plasmid DNA. While the mechanism and dynamics of cavitation have been extensively studied using a variety of time-resolved imaging techniques, the cellular response to the cavitation bubble and cavitation induced transient hydrodynamic flows has never been shown in detail. We use time-resolved quantitative phase microscopy to study cellular response to laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped polystyrene nanoparticle (500nm in diameter) irradiated with a single nanosecond laser pulse at 532nm creates transient shear stress to surrounding cells without causing cell lysis. A bi-directional transient displacement of cytoplasm is observed during expansion and collapse of the cavitation bubble. In some cases, cell deformation is only observable at the microsecond time scale without any permanent change in cell shape or optical thickness. On a time scale of seconds, the cellular response to shear stress and cytoplasm deformation typically leads to retraction of the cellular edge most exposed to the flow, rounding of the cell body and, in some cases, loss of cellular dry mass. These results give a new insight into the cellular response to laser-induced shear stress and related plasma membrane permeabilization. This study also demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle offers localized cavitation (70 μm in diameter), which interacts with a single cell.

  13. Age-related slowing of response selection and production in a visual choice reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Woods, David L; Wyma, John M; Yund, E William; Herron, Timothy J; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with delayed processing in choice reaction time (CRT) tasks, but the processing stages most impacted by aging have not been clearly identified. Here, we analyzed CRT latencies in a computerized serial visual feature-conjunction task. Participants responded to a target letter (probability 40%) by pressing one mouse button, and responded to distractor letters differing either in color, shape, or both features from the target (probabilities 20% each) by pressing the other mouse button. Stimuli were presented randomly to the left and right visual fields and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were adaptively reduced following correct responses using a staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, we tested 1466 participants who ranged in age from 18 to 65 years. CRT latencies increased significantly with age (r = 0.47, 2.80 ms/year). Central processing time (CPT), isolated by subtracting simple reaction times (SRT) (obtained in a companion experiment performed on the same day) from CRT latencies, accounted for more than 80% of age-related CRT slowing, with most of the remaining increase in latency due to slowed motor responses. Participants were faster and more accurate when the stimulus location was spatially compatible with the mouse button used for responding, and this effect increased slightly with age. Participants took longer to respond to distractors with target color or shape than to distractors with no target features. However, the additional time needed to discriminate the more target-like distractors did not increase with age. In Experiment 2, we replicated the findings of Experiment 1 in a second population of 178 participants (ages 18-82 years). CRT latencies did not differ significantly in the two experiments, and similar effects of age, distractor similarity, and stimulus-response spatial compatibility were found. The results suggest that the age-related slowing in visual CRT latencies is largely due to delays in response selection and

  14. Real-time open-loop frequency response analysis of flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, J. T.; West, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A technique has been developed to compare the open-loop frequency response of a flight test aircraft real time with linear analysis predictions. The result is direct feedback to the flight control systems engineer on the validity of predictions and adds confidence for proceeding with envelope expansion. Further, gain and phase margins can be tracked for trends in a manner similar to the techniques used by structural dynamics engineers in tracking structural modal damping.

  15. Linear-response calculation in the time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Inakura, Tsunenori; Avogadro, Paolo; Ebata, Shuichiro; Sato, Koichi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2012-11-12

    Linear response calculations based on the time-dependent density-functional theory are presented. Especially, we report results of the finite amplitude method which we have recently proposed as an alternative and feasible approach to the (quasiparticle-)random-phase approximation. Calculated properties of the giant resonances and low-energy E1 modes are discussed. We found a universal linear correlation between the low-energy E1 strength and the neutron skin thickness.

  16. Age-related slowing of response selection and production in a visual choice reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with delayed processing in choice reaction time (CRT) tasks, but the processing stages most impacted by aging have not been clearly identified. Here, we analyzed CRT latencies in a computerized serial visual feature-conjunction task. Participants responded to a target letter (probability 40%) by pressing one mouse button, and responded to distractor letters differing either in color, shape, or both features from the target (probabilities 20% each) by pressing the other mouse button. Stimuli were presented randomly to the left and right visual fields and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were adaptively reduced following correct responses using a staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, we tested 1466 participants who ranged in age from 18 to 65 years. CRT latencies increased significantly with age (r = 0.47, 2.80 ms/year). Central processing time (CPT), isolated by subtracting simple reaction times (SRT) (obtained in a companion experiment performed on the same day) from CRT latencies, accounted for more than 80% of age-related CRT slowing, with most of the remaining increase in latency due to slowed motor responses. Participants were faster and more accurate when the stimulus location was spatially compatible with the mouse button used for responding, and this effect increased slightly with age. Participants took longer to respond to distractors with target color or shape than to distractors with no target features. However, the additional time needed to discriminate the more target-like distractors did not increase with age. In Experiment 2, we replicated the findings of Experiment 1 in a second population of 178 participants (ages 18–82 years). CRT latencies did not differ significantly in the two experiments, and similar effects of age, distractor similarity, and stimulus-response spatial compatibility were found. The results suggest that the age-related slowing in visual CRT latencies is largely due to delays in response selection and

  17. Nonlinear response - A time domain approach. [with applications to acoustic fatigue, spacecraft and composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1986-01-01

    The present paper reviews the basic concepts of nonlinear response of panels to surface flow and acoustic pressures, simulation of random processes, time domain solutions and the Monte Carlo Method. Applications of this procedure to the orbit-on-demand space vehicles, acoustic fatigue and composite materials are discussed. Numerical examples are included for a variety of nonlinear problems to illustrate the applicability of this method.

  18. Sampling frequency, response times and embedded signal filtration in fast, high efficiency liquid chromatography: A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Wahab, M Farooq; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kadjo, Akinde F; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-02-11

    With increasingly efficient columns, eluite peaks are increasingly narrower. To take full advantage of this, choice of the detector response time and the data acquisition rate a.k.a. detector sampling frequency, have become increasingly important. In this work, we revisit the concept of data sampling from the theorem variously attributed to Whittaker, Nyquist, Kotelnikov, and Shannon. Focusing on time scales relevant to the current practice of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and optical absorbance detection (the most commonly used method), even for very narrow simulated peaks Fourier transformation shows that theoretical minimum sampling frequency is still relatively low (<10 Hz). However, this consideration alone may not be adequate for real chromatograms when an appreciable amount of noise is present. Further, depending on the instrument, the manufacturer's choice of a particular data bunching/integration/response time condition may be integrally coupled to the sampling frequency. In any case, the exact nature of signal filtration often occurs in a manner neither transparent to nor controllable by the user. Using fast chromatography on a state-of-the-art column (38,000 plates), we evaluate the responses produced by different present generation instruments, each with their unique black box digital filters. We show that the common wisdom of sampling 20 points per peak can be inadequate for high efficiency columns and that the sampling frequency and response choices do affect the peak shape. If the sampling frequency is too low or response time is too large, the observed peak shapes will not remain as narrow as they really are - this is especially true for high efficiency and high speed separations. It is shown that both sampling frequency and digital filtering affect the retention time, noise amplitude, peak shape and width in a complex fashion. We show how a square-wave driven light emitting diode source can reveal the nature of the embedded filter

  19. INO80-dependent regression of ecdysone-induced transcriptional responses regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Sarah D; Ihry, Robert J; Gruetzmacher, Kelly M; Bashirullah, Arash

    2014-03-15

    Sequential pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone regulate the major developmental transitions in Drosophila, and the duration of each developmental stage is determined by the length of time between ecdysone pulses. Ecdysone regulates biological responses by directly initiating target gene transcription. In turn, these transcriptional responses are known to be self-limiting, with mechanisms in place to ensure regression of hormone-dependent transcription. However, the biological significance of these transcriptional repression mechanisms remains unclear. Here we show that the chromatin remodeling protein INO80 facilitates transcriptional repression of ecdysone-regulated genes during prepupal development. In ino80 mutant animals, inefficient repression of transcriptional responses to the late larval ecdysone pulse delays the onset of the subsequent prepupal ecdysone pulse, resulting in a significantly longer prepupal stage. Conversely, increased expression of ino80 is sufficient to shorten the prepupal stage by increasing the rate of transcriptional repression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing the rate of regression of the mid-prepupal competence factor βFTZ-F1 is sufficient to determine the timing of head eversion and thus the duration of prepupal development. Although ino80 is conserved from yeast to humans, this study represents the first characterization of a bona fide ino80 mutation in any metazoan, raising the possibility that the functions of ino80 in transcriptional repression and developmental timing are evolutionarily conserved. PMID:24468295

  20. Impact of admission and cache replacement policies on response times of jobs on data grids

    SciTech Connect

    Otoo, Ekow J.; Rotem, Doron; Shoshani, Arie

    2003-04-21

    Caching techniques have been used widely to improve the performance gaps of storage hierarchies in computing systems. Little is known about the impact of policies on the response times of jobs that access and process very large files in data grids particularly when data and computations on the data have to be co-located on the same host. In data intensive applications that access large data files over wide area network environment, such as data-grids, the combination of policies for job servicing (or scheduling), caching and cache replacement can significantly impact the performance of grid jobs. We present some preliminary results of a simulation study that combines an admission policy with a cache replacement policy when servicing jobs submitted to a storage resource manager. The results show that, in comparison to a first come first serve policy, the response times of jobs are significantly improved, for practical limits of disk cache sizes, when the jobs that are back-logged to access the same files are taken into consideration in scheduling the next file to be retrieved into the disk cache. Not only are the response times of jobs improved, but also the metric measures for caching policies, such as the hit ratio and the average cost per retrieval, are improved irrespective of the cache replacement policy.

  1. Time-domain model for TLP surge response in extreme sea states

    SciTech Connect

    Finnigan, T.D.; Botelho, D.L.R.; Petrauskas, C.

    1984-05-01

    A time-domain model is presented and evaluated for the prediction of the surge response of a tension leg platform (TLP) in regular and random waves, in the presence of a current. The wave force equation in the model is a modification of the Morison equation. Wave diffraction effects are incorporated in an approximate manner. The time-domain model is evaluated on the basis of experimental tests that were performed on a 1:60 scale model of a TLP. The tests were specially designed to investigate the effect of combined waves and current on surge response. The tests were conducted in regular, random and grouped waves. Current was simulated by towing the model. Two different forms of linear wave theory based on stretching and extrapolating wave particle kinematics from Airy wave theory up to the free surface are investigated. The maximum surge response is predicted well by the time-domain model provided the extrapolation of Airy wave theory is used.

  2. A Gravity-Responsive Time-Keeping Protein of the Plant and Animal Cell Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James

    2003-01-01

    The hypothesis under investigation was that a ubiquinol (NADH) oxidase protein of the cell surface with protein disulfide-thiol interchange activity (= NOX protein) is a plant and animal time-keeping ultradian (period of less than 24 h) driver of both cell enlargement and the biological clock that responds to gravity. Despite considerable work in a large number of laboratories spanning several decades, this is, to my knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a time-keeping biochemical reaction that is both gravity-responsive and growth-related and that has been shown to determine circadian periodicity. As such, the NOX protein may represent both the long-sought biological gravity receptor and the core oscillator of the cellular biological clock. Completed studies have resulted in 12 publications and two issued NASA-owned patents of the clock activity. The gravity response and autoentrainment were characterized in cultured mammalian cells and in two plant systems together with entrainment by light and small molecules (melatonin). The molecular basis of the oscillatory behavior was investigated using spectroscopic methods (Fourier transform infrared and circular dichroism) and high resolution electron microscopy. We have also applied these findings to an understanding of the response to hypergravity. Statistical methods for analysis of time series phenomena were developed (Foster et al., 2003).

  3. Effects of Short-Term Physical Activity Interventions on Simple and Choice Response Times

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Kevin; Norton, Lynda; Lewis, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Response time (RT) is important for health and human performance and provides insight into cognitive processes. It deteriorates with age, is associated with chronic physical activity (PA), and improves with PA interventions. We investigated associations between the amount and type of PA undertaken and the rate of change in RT for low-active adults across the age range 18–63 yr. Methods. Insufficiently active adults were assigned to either a walking (n = 263) or higher-intensity (n = 380) exercise program conducted over 40 days. Active controls were also recruited (n = 135). Simple response time (SRT) and choice response time (CRT) were measured before and after the intervention and at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Results. SRT and CRT slowed across the age range; however, habitually active participants at baseline had significantly faster CRT (p < 0.05). The interventions increased weekly PA with corresponding increases in physical fitness. These changes were mirrored in faster CRT across the study for both intervention groups (p < 0.05). No changes were found for SRT. Conclusions. Both PA interventions resulted in improvements in CRT among adults starting from a low activity base. These improvements were relatively rapid and occurred in both interventions despite large differences in exercise volume, type, and intensity. There were no effects on SRT in either intervention. PMID:27190993

  4. Congruency sequence effects and previous response times: conflict adaptation or temporal learning?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, James R; Weissman, Daniel H

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we followed up on a recent report of two experiments in which the congruency sequence effect-the reduction of the congruency effect after incongruent relative to congruent trials in Stroop-like tasks-was observed without feature repetition or contingency learning confounds. Specifically, we further scrutinized these data to determine the plausibility of a temporal learning account as an alternative to the popular conflict adaptation account. To this end, we employed a linear mixed effects model to investigate the role of previous response time in producing the congruency sequence effect, because previous response time is thought to influence temporal learning. Interestingly, slower previous response times were associated with a reduced current-trial congruency effect, but only when the previous trial was congruent. An adapted version of the parallel episodic processing (PEP) model was able to fit these data if it was additionally assumed that attention "wanders" during different parts of the experiment (e.g., due to fatigue or other factors). Consistent with this assumption, the magnitude of the congruency effect was correlated across small blocks of trials. These findings demonstrate that a temporal learning mechanism provides a plausible account of the congruency sequence effect. PMID:26093801

  5. Sub-Millisecond Response Time in a Photorefractive Composite Operating under CW Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Stevens, Tyler E.; Monson, Todd C.; Huber, Dale L.; Jin, Sung-Ho; Oh, Jin-Woo; Winiarz, Jeffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive study of photorefractive polymeric composites photosensitized with semiconductor nanocrystals has yielded data indicating that the inclusion of such nanocrystals enhances the charge-carrier mobility, and subsequently leads to a reduction in the photorefractive response time. Unfortunately, the included nanocrystals may also act as a source of deep traps, resulting in diminished diffraction efficiencies as well as reduced two beam coupling gain coefficients. Nonetheless, previous studies indicate that this problem is mitigated through the inclusion of semiconductor nanocrystals possessing a relatively narrow band-gap. Here, we fully exploit this property by doping PbS nanocrystals into a newly formulated photorefractive composite based on molecular triphenyldiamine photosensitized with C60. Through this approach, response times of 399 μs are observed, opening the door for video and other high-speed applications. It is further demonstrated that this improvement in response time occurs with little sacrifice in photorefractive efficiency, with internal diffraction efficiencies of 72% and two-beam-coupling gain coefficients of 500 cm−1 being measured. A thorough analysis of the experimental data is presented, supporting the hypothesized mechanism of enhanced charge mobility without the accompaniment of superfluous traps. It is anticipated that this approach can play a significant role in the eventual commercialization of this class of materials. PMID:27478156

  6. Sub-Millisecond Response Time in a Photorefractive Composite Operating under CW Conditions.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Stevens, Tyler E; Monson, Todd C; Huber, Dale L; Jin, Sung-Ho; Oh, Jin-Woo; Winiarz, Jeffrey G

    2016-01-01

    Extensive study of photorefractive polymeric composites photosensitized with semiconductor nanocrystals has yielded data indicating that the inclusion of such nanocrystals enhances the charge-carrier mobility, and subsequently leads to a reduction in the photorefractive response time. Unfortunately, the included nanocrystals may also act as a source of deep traps, resulting in diminished diffraction efficiencies as well as reduced two beam coupling gain coefficients. Nonetheless, previous studies indicate that this problem is mitigated through the inclusion of semiconductor nanocrystals possessing a relatively narrow band-gap. Here, we fully exploit this property by doping PbS nanocrystals into a newly formulated photorefractive composite based on molecular triphenyldiamine photosensitized with C60. Through this approach, response times of 399 μs are observed, opening the door for video and other high-speed applications. It is further demonstrated that this improvement in response time occurs with little sacrifice in photorefractive efficiency, with internal diffraction efficiencies of 72% and two-beam-coupling gain coefficients of 500 cm(-1) being measured. A thorough analysis of the experimental data is presented, supporting the hypothesized mechanism of enhanced charge mobility without the accompaniment of superfluous traps. It is anticipated that this approach can play a significant role in the eventual commercialization of this class of materials. PMID:27478156

  7. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E.; Powell, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. PMID:27347896

  8. Time Domains of the Hypoxic Ventilatory Response and Their Molecular Basis.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Mathhew E; Powell, Frank L

    2016-01-01

    Ventilatory responses to hypoxia vary widely depending on the pattern and length of hypoxic exposure. Acute, prolonged, or intermittent hypoxic episodes can increase or decrease breathing for seconds to years, both during the hypoxic stimulus, and also after its removal. These myriad effects are the result of a complicated web of molecular interactions that underlie plasticity in the respiratory control reflex circuits and ultimately control the physiology of breathing in hypoxia. Since the time domains of the physiological hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) were identified, considerable research effort has gone toward elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate these varied responses. This research has begun to describe complicated and plastic interactions in the relay circuits between the peripheral chemoreceptors and the ventilatory control circuits within the central nervous system. Intriguingly, many of these molecular pathways seem to share key components between the different time domains, suggesting that varied physiological HVRs are the result of specific modifications to overlapping pathways. This review highlights what has been discovered regarding the cell and molecular level control of the time domains of the HVR, and highlights key areas where further research is required. Understanding the molecular control of ventilation in hypoxia has important implications for basic physiology and is emerging as an important component of several clinical fields. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1345-1385, 2016. PMID:27347896

  9. Sub-Millisecond Response Time in a Photorefractive Composite Operating under CW Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jong-Sik; Stevens, Tyler E.; Monson, Todd C.; Huber, Dale L.; Jin, Sung-Ho; Oh, Jin-Woo; Winiarz, Jeffrey G.

    2016-08-01

    Extensive study of photorefractive polymeric composites photosensitized with semiconductor nanocrystals has yielded data indicating that the inclusion of such nanocrystals enhances the charge-carrier mobility, and subsequently leads to a reduction in the photorefractive response time. Unfortunately, the included nanocrystals may also act as a source of deep traps, resulting in diminished diffraction efficiencies as well as reduced two beam coupling gain coefficients. Nonetheless, previous studies indicate that this problem is mitigated through the inclusion of semiconductor nanocrystals possessing a relatively narrow band-gap. Here, we fully exploit this property by doping PbS nanocrystals into a newly formulated photorefractive composite based on molecular triphenyldiamine photosensitized with C60. Through this approach, response times of 399 μs are observed, opening the door for video and other high-speed applications. It is further demonstrated that this improvement in response time occurs with little sacrifice in photorefractive efficiency, with internal diffraction efficiencies of 72% and two-beam-coupling gain coefficients of 500 cm‑1 being measured. A thorough analysis of the experimental data is presented, supporting the hypothesized mechanism of enhanced charge mobility without the accompaniment of superfluous traps. It is anticipated that this approach can play a significant role in the eventual commercialization of this class of materials.

  10. Sub-millisecond response time in a photorefractive composite operating under CW conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moon, Jong -Sik; Stevens, Tyler E.; Monson, Todd C.; Huber, Dale L.; Jin, Sung -Ho; Oh, Jin -Woo; Winiarz, Jeffrey G.

    2016-08-01

    Extensive study of photorefractive polymeric composites photosensitized with semiconductor nanocrystals has yielded data indicating that the inclusion of such nanocrystals enhances the charge-carrier mobility, and subsequently leads to a reduction in the photorefractive response time. Unfortunately, the included nanocrystals may also act as a source of deep traps, resulting in diminished diffraction efficiencies as well as reduced two beam coupling gain coefficients. Nonetheless, previous studies indicate that this problem is mitigated through the inclusion of semiconductor nanocrystals possessing a relatively narrow band-gap. Here, we fully exploit this property by doping PbS nanocrystals into a newly formulated photorefractive composite based onmore » molecular triphenyldiamine photosensitized with C60. Through this approach, response times of 399 μs are observed, opening the door for video and other high-speed applications. It is further demonstrated that this improvement in response time occurs with little sacrifice in photorefractive efficiency, with internal diffraction efficiencies of 72% and two-beam-coupling gain coefficients of 500 cm–1 being measured. A thorough analysis of the experimental data is presented, supporting the hypothesized mechanism of enhanced charge mobility without the accompaniment of superfluous traps. As a result, it is anticipated that this approach can play a significant role in the eventual commercialization of this class of materials.« less

  11. Viewing time effects revisited: prolonged response latencies for sexually attractive targets under restricted task conditions.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Roland; Schmidt, Alexander F; Nordsiek, Uta; Luzar, Charlotte; Young, Andrew W; Banse, Rainer

    2010-12-01

    Sexually attractive stimuli are watched longer than unattractive stimuli. The processes underlying this robust and reliable viewing time effect are presently not well understood. In the present research comprising four experiments (total N = 250), four classes of potential explanations are proposed and the derived implications were experimentally tested. Contrary to explanations based on either deliberate delay or attentional adhesion to sexually attractive stimuli, prolonged response latencies were also found under restricted task conditions. Sexually preferred targets elicited longer response latencies in a self-paced evaluation task when stimulus pictures were presented for 750 ms (Experiment 1) or for 500 ms and followed by a pattern mask (Experiment 2). Prolonged latencies for sexually preferred targets were also observed when sexual attractiveness was rated in a speeded binary decision task with a response window of 1000 ms (Experiment 3). Eventually, it was shown that the response latency effect in the speeded binary choice task was still preserved when only the heads of target individuals were presented instead of the bodies (Experiment 4). Mate identification and schematic processes are discussed as the remaining plausible mechanisms for prolonged response latencies for sexually attractive targets under restricted conditions. PMID:20198414

  12. The timing of galvanic vestibular stimulation affects responses to platform translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavacka, F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    We compared the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation applied at 0, 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 s prior to a backward platform translation on postural responses. The effect of the galvanic stimulation was largest on the final equilibrium position of the center of pressure (CoP). The largest effects occurred for the 0.5 and 0-s pre-period, when the dynamic CoP pressure changes in response to both the galvanic stimulus and the platform translation coincided. The shift in the final equilibrium position was also larger than the sum of the shifts for the galvanic stimulus and the platform translation alone for the 0.5 and 0-s pre-periods. The initial rate of change of the CoP response to the platform translation was not significantly affected in any condition. Changes in the peak CoP position could be accounted for by local interaction of CoP velocity changes induced by the galvanic and translation responses alone, but the changes in final equilibrium position could only be accounted for by a change in global body orientation. These findings suggest that the contribution of vestibulospinal information is greatest during the dynamic phase of the postural response, and that the vestibular system contributes most to the later components of the postural response, particularly to the final equilibrium position. These findings suggest that a nonlinear interaction between the vestibular signal induced by the galvanic current and the sensory stimuli produced by the platform translation occurs when the two stimuli are presented within 1 s, during the dynamic phase of the postural response to the galvanic stimulus. When presented at greater separations in time, the stimuli appear to be treated as independent events, such that no interaction occurs. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Prediction, time variance, and classification of hydraulic response to recharge in two karst aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, A. J.; Mahler, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip) at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA) and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA). A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs) obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for

  14. Prediction, Time Variance, and Classification of Hydraulic Response to Recharge in Two Karst Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, A. J.; Mahler, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (springflow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip) at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA) and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA). A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs) obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for

  15. Prediction, time variance, and classification of hydraulic response to recharge in two karst aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Andrew J.; Mahler, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    Many karst aquifers are rapidly filled and depleted and therefore are likely to be susceptible to changes in short-term climate variability. Here we explore methods that could be applied to model site-specific hydraulic responses, with the intent of simulating these responses to different climate scenarios from high-resolution climate models. We compare hydraulic responses (spring flow, groundwater level, stream base flow, and cave drip) at several sites in two karst aquifers: the Edwards aquifer (Texas, USA) and the Madison aquifer (South Dakota, USA). A lumped-parameter model simulates nonlinear soil moisture changes for estimation of recharge, and a time-variant convolution model simulates the aquifer response to this recharge. Model fit to data is 2.4% better for calibration periods than for validation periods according to the Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency, which ranges from 0.53 to 0.94 for validation periods. We use metrics that describe the shapes of the impulse-response functions (IRFs) obtained from convolution modeling to make comparisons in the distribution of response times among sites and between aquifers. Time-variant IRFs were applied to 62% of the sites. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metrics describing the shapes of the IRFs indicates three principal components that together account for 84% of the variability in IRF shape: the first is related to IRF skewness and temporal spread and accounts for 51% of the variability; the second and third largely are related to time-variant properties and together account for 33% of the variability. Sites with IRFs that dominantly comprise exponential curves are separated geographically from those dominantly comprising lognormal curves in both aquifers as a result of spatial heterogeneity. The use of multiple IRF metrics in PCA is a novel method to characterize, compare, and classify the way in which different sites and aquifers respond to recharge. As convolution models are developed for

  16. Comparing Hydrologic Response Times Between a Forested and Mountaintop Mined Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. J.; Zegre, N.

    2012-12-01

    Mountaintop removal mining (MTR) represents the largest land cover/landuse change in the Central Appalachian region. By 2012, the U.S. EPA estimates that MTR will have impacted approximately 6.8% of the predominately forested Appalachian Coalfield region of West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia with nearly 4,000 miles of headwater streams buried under valley fills. In spite of the scale and extent of MTR, its hydrologic impacts are poorly understood. While MTR has a well-established pattern of downstream water quality degradation, its effect on the quantity and timing of catchment runoff is less clear. Several devastating floods in the region have been attributed to MTR, but there is little evidence to either confirm or refute this belief. Existing research has focused on statistical analysis of catchment outlet responses, but results from these studies only offer evidence of differences in hydrologic behavior, not process understanding of how the system is changing. This study begins to address that research gap by exploring differences in hydrologic response times, a fundamental hydraulic parameter that controls the conversion of rainfall to runoff. A simple rainfall-runoff model was used to quantify differences in response times for storm events in a mined and predominantly forested catchment. Results showed that the mountaintop mined catchment responded more quickly to storm events than the forested catchment. The mined catchment also showed more variability in response time than the forested catchment. These patterns repeated using multiple model structures. The more rapid response of the mined catchment is likely attributed to increased impervious surface, preferential flow paths within valley fills that rapidly route water to the stream, or rapid displacement of water stored in valley fills upon the onset of rain. However, further research using tools such as isotope tracers is needed to offer insight about the processes responsible for streamflow

  17. Miniature personal electronic UVR dosimeter with erythema response and time-stamped readings in a wristwatch.

    PubMed

    Heydenreich, Jakob; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2005-01-01

    Personal ultraviolet radiation (UVR) dosimetry is important because sunlight is the most important risk factor for skin cancer and a risk factor for some eye diseases and immunosuppression and related disorders. Integrating devices, such as polysulphone film dosimeters, are generally used. To measure the exact dose at specific times, we have developed a personal electronic UVR dosimeter that makes time-stamped measurements. It has a sensor with an erythema action spectrum response and a linear sensitivity (dose-response) with no offset. The sensor has cosine response, and the dosimeter can cope with environmental conditions such as rain, temperature and dirt. It can be programmed to measure with different time intervals and save the average of a specified number of measurements in the memory that can store 32 000 time-stamped measurements. It is small (36 x 28 x 13 mm), weighs 14 g and can work for 4 months without maintenance. It is worn on the wrist, is equipped with a watch showing the time and may thus be used in large-scale studies. The sensitivity can change by 10% due to temperature changes from -5 to 40 degrees C. The UVR dosimeter sensitivity is 0.09 standard erythema doses (SED)/h and the difference in total received dose during 7 days between a Solar Light 501 UV-Biometer (186 SED) and our UVR dosimeter was 3% and the median difference in daily total dose was 2.2%. The dosimeter provides unique possibilities. Examples of personal UVR measurements, data calculations and how they can be interpreted are given. PMID:15850424

  18. On cell resistance and immune response time lag in a model for the HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovey, Guillermo; Peruani, Fernando; Ponce Dawson, Silvina; Maria Zorzenon dos Santos, Rita

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a cellular automata model has been introduced (Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 168102) to describe the spread of the HIV infection among target cells in lymphoid tissues. The model reproduces qualitatively the entire course of the infection displaying, in particular, the two time scales that characterize its dynamics. In this work, we investigate the robustness of the model against changes in three of its parameters. Two of them are related to the resistance of the cells to get infected. The other one describes the time interval necessary to mount specific immune responses. We have observed that an increase of the cell resistance, at any stage of the infection, leads to a reduction of the latency period, i.e., of the time interval between the primary infection and the onset of AIDS. However, during the early stages of the infection, when the cell resistance increase is combined with an increase in the initial concentration of infected cells, the original behavior is recovered. Therefore we find a long and a short latency regime (eight and one year long, respectively) depending on the value of the cell resistance. We have obtained, on the other hand, that changes on the parameter that describes the immune system time lag affects the time interval during which the primary infection occurs. Using different extended versions of the model, we also discuss how the two-time scale dynamics is affected when we include inhomogeneities on the cells properties, as for instance, on the cell resistance or on the time interval to mount specific immune responses.

  19. An Empirical Model for the Ionospheric Global Electron Content Storm-Time Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuhui; Galas, Roman; Ewert, Dietrich; Peng, Junhuan

    2016-02-01

    By analyzing the variations of global electron content (GEC) during geomagnetic storm events, the ratio "GEC/GECQT" is found to be closely correlated with geomagnetic Kp index and time weighted Dst index, where GECQT is the quiet time reference value. Moreover, the GEC/GECQT will decrease with the increase of the solar flux F10.7 index. Furthermore, we construct a linear model for storm-time response of GEC. Eighty-two storm events during 1999-2011 were utilized to calculate the model coefficients, and the performance of the model was tested using data of 8 storm events in 2012 by comparing the outputs of the model with the observed GEC values. Results suggest that the model can capture the characteristics of the GEC variation in response to magnetic storms. The component describing the solar activity influence shows a counteracting effect with the geomagnetic activity component; and the influence of Kp index causes an increase of GEC, while the time weighted Dst index causes a decrease of GEC.

  20. Rasch analysis for the evaluation of rank of student response time in multiple choice examinations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James J; Yang, Tong; Chauvin, Sheila W

    2013-01-01

    The availability of computerized testing has broadened the scope of person assessment beyond the usual accuracy-ability domain to include response time analyses. Because there are contexts in which speed is important, e.g. medical practice, it is important to develop tools by which individuals can be evaluated for speed. In this paper, the ability of Rasch measurement to convert ordinal nonparametric rankings of speed to measures is examined and compared to similar measures derived from parametric analysis of response times (pace) and semi-parametric logarithmic time-scaling procedures. Assuming that similar spans of the measures were used, non-parametric methods of raw ranking or percentile-ranking of persons by questions gave statistically acceptable person estimates of speed virtually identical to the parametric or semi-parametric methods. Because no assumptions were made about the underlying time distributions with ranking, generality of conclusions was enhanced. The main drawbacks of the non-parametric ranking procedures were the lack of information on question duration and the overall assignment by the model of variance to the person by question interaction. PMID:24064578

  1. Physiological demands of women's rugby union: time-motion analysis and heart rate response.

    PubMed

    Virr, Jody Lynn; Game, Alex; Bell, Gordon John; Syrotuik, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physical demands of women's rugby union match play using time-motion analysis and heart rate (HR) response. Thirty-eight premier club level female rugby players, ages 18-34 years were videotaped and HRs monitored for a full match. Performances were coded into 12 different movement categories: 5 speeds of locomotion (standing, walking, jogging, striding, sprinting), 4 forms of intensive non-running exertion (ruck/maul/tackle, pack down, scrum, lift) and 3 discrete activities (kick, jump, open field tackle). The main results revealed that backs spend significantly more time sprinting and walking whereas forwards spend more time in intensive non-running exertion and jogging. Forwards also had a significantly higher total work frequency compared to the backs, but a higher total rest frequency compared to the backs. In terms of HR responses, forwards displayed higher mean HRs throughout the match and more time above 80% of their maximum HR than backs. In summary, women's rugby union is characterised by intermittent bursts of high-intensity activity, where forwards and backs have similar anaerobic energy demands, but different specific match demands. PMID:24168428

  2. Body size and activity times mediate mammalian responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    McCain, Christy M; King, Sarah R B

    2014-06-01

    Model predictions of extinction risks from anthropogenic climate change are dire, but still overly simplistic. To reliably predict at-risk species we need to know which species are currently responding, which are not, and what traits are mediating the responses. For mammals, we have yet to identify overarching physiological, behavioral, or biogeographic traits determining species' responses to climate change, but they must exist. To date, 73 mammal species in North America and eight additional species worldwide have been assessed for responses to climate change, including local extirpations, range contractions and shifts, decreased abundance, phenological shifts, morphological or genetic changes. Only 52% of those species have responded as expected, 7% responded opposite to expectations, and the remaining 41% have not responded. Which mammals are and are not responding to climate change is mediated predominantly by body size and activity times (phylogenetic multivariate logistic regressions, P < 0.0001). Large mammals respond more, for example, an elk is 27 times more likely to respond to climate change than a shrew. Obligate diurnal and nocturnal mammals are more than twice as likely to respond as mammals with flexible activity times (P < 0.0001). Among the other traits examined, species with higher latitudinal and elevational ranges were more likely to respond to climate change in some analyses, whereas hibernation, heterothermy, burrowing, nesting, and study location did not influence responses. These results indicate that some mammal species can behaviorally escape climate change whereas others cannot, analogous to paleontology's climate sheltering hypothesis. Including body size and activity flexibility traits into future extinction risk forecasts should substantially improve their predictive utility for conservation and management. PMID:24449019

  3. Time dependent viscoelastic rheological response of pure, modified and synthetic bituminous binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airey, G. D.; Grenfell, J. R. A.; Apeagyei, A.; Subhy, A.; Lo Presti, D.

    2016-04-01

    Bitumen is a viscoelastic material that exhibits both elastic and viscous components of response and displays both a temperature and time dependent relationship between applied stresses and resultant strains. In addition, as bitumen is responsible for the viscoelastic behaviour of all bituminous materials, it plays a dominant role in defining many of the aspects of asphalt road performance, such as strength and stiffness, permanent deformation and cracking. Although conventional bituminous materials perform satisfactorily in most highway pavement applications, there are situations that require the modification of the binder to enhance the properties of existing asphalt material. The best known form of modification is by means of polymer modification, traditionally used to improve the temperature and time susceptibility of bitumen. Tyre rubber modification is another form using recycled crumb tyre rubber to alter the properties of conventional bitumen. In addition, alternative binders (synthetic polymeric binders as well as renewable, environmental-friendly bio-binders) have entered the bitumen market over the last few years due to concerns over the continued availability of bitumen from current crudes and refinery processes. This paper provides a detailed rheological assessment, under both temperature and time regimes, of a range of conventional, modified and alternative binders in terms of the materials dynamic (oscillatory) viscoelastic response. The rheological results show the improved viscoelastic properties of polymer- and rubber-modified binders in terms of increased complex shear modulus and elastic response, particularly at high temperatures and low frequencies. The synthetic binders were found to demonstrate complex rheological behaviour relative to that seen for conventional bituminous binders.

  4. Time dependent viscoelastic rheological response of pure, modified and synthetic bituminous binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airey, G. D.; Grenfell, J. R. A.; Apeagyei, A.; Subhy, A.; Lo Presti, D.

    2016-08-01

    Bitumen is a viscoelastic material that exhibits both elastic and viscous components of response and displays both a temperature and time dependent relationship between applied stresses and resultant strains. In addition, as bitumen is responsible for the viscoelastic behaviour of all bituminous materials, it plays a dominant role in defining many of the aspects of asphalt road performance, such as strength and stiffness, permanent deformation and cracking. Although conventional bituminous materials perform satisfactorily in most highway pavement applications, there are situations that require the modification of the binder to enhance the properties of existing asphalt material. The best known form of modification is by means of polymer modification, traditionally used to improve the temperature and time susceptibility of bitumen. Tyre rubber modification is another form using recycled crumb tyre rubber to alter the properties of conventional bitumen. In addition, alternative binders (synthetic polymeric binders as well as renewable, environmental-friendly bio-binders) have entered the bitumen market over the last few years due to concerns over the continued availability of bitumen from current crudes and refinery processes. This paper provides a detailed rheological assessment, under both temperature and time regimes, of a range of conventional, modified and alternative binders in terms of the materials dynamic (oscillatory) viscoelastic response. The rheological results show the improved viscoelastic properties of polymer- and rubber-modified binders in terms of increased complex shear modulus and elastic response, particularly at high temperatures and low frequencies. The synthetic binders were found to demonstrate complex rheological behaviour relative to that seen for conventional bituminous binders.

  5. TIMED GUVI and SEE Observations of Solar Irradiance Variations and the Terrestrial Airglow Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolven, B.; Paxton, L.; Morrison, D.; Woods, T.

    2004-12-01

    Since the launch of the TIMED mission in 2001, the SEE and GUVI instruments have observed solar radiance changes during numerous solar flares, and measured their short-term impact on the terrestrial airglow, manifested as changes in both resonantly scattered and photoelectron excited emissions. The continuous coverage and higher time resolution of the GUVI airglow observations, in conjunction with the multispectral (5-color) image format, constitute a unique source of information on the time variation of the solar irradiance in different spectral regions. GUVI limb observations provide additional data on heating and composition changes in the thermosphere in response to these energy inputs. We examine changes in the observed airglow between quiet and flare conditions, and attempt to understand the differences between SEE measurements and the radiances inferred from GUVI airglow data.

  6. Decreased reaction time variability is associated with greater cardiovascular responses to acute stress.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Hamer, Mark; Steptoe, Andrew; Endrighi, Romano

    2016-05-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) responses to mental stress are prospectively associated with poor CV outcomes. The association between CV responses to mental stress and reaction times (RTs) in aging individuals may be important but warrants further investigation. The present study assessed RTs to examine associations with CV responses to mental stress in healthy, older individuals using robust regression techniques. Participants were 262 men and women (mean age = 63.3 ± 5.5 years) from the Whitehall II cohort who completed a RT task (Stroop) and underwent acute mental stress (mirror tracing) to elicit CV responses. Blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, during acute stress, and through a 75-min recovery. RT measures were generated from an ex-Gaussian distribution that yielded three predictors: mu-RT, sigma-RT, and tau-RT, the mean, standard deviation, and mean of the exponential component of the normal distribution, respectively. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was marginally associated with greater systolic (B = -.009, SE = .005, p = .09) and diastolic (B = -.004, SE = .002, p = .08) blood pressure reactivity. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was associated with impaired systolic blood pressure recovery (B = -.007, SE = .003, p = .03) and impaired vagal tone (B = -.0047, SE = .0024, p = .045). Study findings offer tentative support for an association between RTs and CV responses. Despite small effect sizes and associations not consistent across predictors, these data may point to a link between intrinsic neuronal plasticity and CV responses. PMID:26894967

  7. Decreased reaction time variability is associated with greater cardiovascular responses to acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Mark; Steptoe, Andrew; Endrighi, Romano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular (CV) responses to mental stress are prospectively associated with poor CV outcomes. The association between CV responses to mental stress and reaction times (RTs) in aging individuals may be important but warrants further investigation. The present study assessed RTs to examine associations with CV responses to mental stress in healthy, older individuals using robust regression techniques. Participants were 262 men and women (mean age = 63.3 ± 5.5 years) from the Whitehall II cohort who completed a RT task (Stroop) and underwent acute mental stress (mirror tracing) to elicit CV responses. Blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, during acute stress, and through a 75‐min recovery. RT measures were generated from an ex‐Gaussian distribution that yielded three predictors: mu‐RT, sigma‐RT, and tau‐RT, the mean, standard deviation, and mean of the exponential component of the normal distribution, respectively. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was marginally associated with greater systolic (B = −.009, SE = .005, p = .09) and diastolic (B = −.004, SE = .002, p = .08) blood pressure reactivity. Decreased intraindividual RT variability was associated with impaired systolic blood pressure recovery (B = −.007, SE = .003, p = .03) and impaired vagal tone (B = −.0047, SE = .0024, p = .045). Study findings offer tentative support for an association between RTs and CV responses. Despite small effect sizes and associations not consistent across predictors, these data may point to a link between intrinsic neuronal plasticity and CV responses. PMID:26894967

  8. Real-time cell analysis for monitoring cholera toxin-induced human intestinal epithelial cell response.

    PubMed

    Ye, Julian; Luo, Yun; Fang, Weijia; Pan, Junhang; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yanjun; Chen, Zhiping; Jin, Dazhi

    2015-04-01

    The pathogenic mechanism of Vibrio cholerae manifests as diarrhea and causes life-threatening dehydration. Here, we observe the human intestinal epithelial cells (HIEC) response to Cholera toxin (CT) by a real-time cell analysis (RTCA) platform, and disclose the difference from CT-induced cytotoxicity and others in HIEC. An HIEC cell of 1.0 × 10(5) cells/mL was characterized as the suitable concentration for each well. For experimentation, the assay requires an inoculation of CT dissolved in Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline with 0.1 % gelatin for a period of 18-25 h. The dimensionless impedance cell index curve presented characteristic dose- and time-dependent drop responses at the first stage, and the CT-induced cytotoxicity was the most remarkable following exposure for 18-25 h (P = 0.0002). Following the obvious cytotoxic reaction, the CI curve gradually increased over time until the original CI value, indicating that self-recovery occurred. The CT-induced CI curve for HIEC was different from that induced by other toxins, including diphtheria and Clostridium difficile toxin. Collectively, these results suggest that the CT-induced cytotoxicity in HIEC was absolutely different from that induced by C. difficile and other toxins because of the different pathogeneses that were correlated with the specific CI curve generated by the RTCA system. In summary, our data show that the assay described here is a convenient and rapid high-throughput tool for real-time monitoring of host cellular responses to CT on the basis of the characteristic CI curve. PMID:25510171

  9. The association between affective psychopathic traits, time incarcerated, and cortisol response to psychosocial stress.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Megan M; Mikolajewski, Amy; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Eckel, Lisa A; Taylor, Jeanette

    2015-06-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that psychopathic personality traits are significantly predictive of blunted cortisol reactivity to a performance-based stressor task (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) in college students. However, the relationship between cortisol reactivity and psychopathy has not been explored in high risk samples such as incarcerated populations. Further, the role of imprisonment in relation to cortisol stress reactivity has not been previously explored, but could have practical and conceptual consequences in regard to rehabilitation and biological sensitivity to context, respectively. The current study tested the hypotheses that both psychopathic personality traits and amount of time incarcerated are related to cortisol blunting in response to stress among incarcerated young adults. A sample of 49 young adult male offenders was recruited to complete the TSST. Salivary hormone samples were taken just prior to and 20 min post-stressor, and participants were interviewed with the Psychopathy Checklist-Youth Version. Variables quantifying the amount of time at the present facility prior to the date of testing and number of commitments in juvenile facilities were also collected. Correlational analyses indicated that only number of incarcerations was related to blunted cortisol. Hierarchical Linear Modeling revealed that time incarcerated and number of commitments were related to a blunted cortisol response among responders and declining cortisol reactivity among nonresponders, respectively. Controlling for time incarcerated, psychopathic traits were significantly related to cortisol decline in response to the stressor among nonresponders, but were not related to blunted cortisol among responders. Results of this project highlight the potential biological effects of prolonged and repeated incarcerations, and extend our understanding about the relationship between psychopathic traits and cortisol reactivity in an incarcerated sample. PMID:25921588

  10. Genetics of Heading Time in Wheat (TRITICUM AESTIVUM L.). II. the Inheritance of Vernalization Response

    PubMed Central

    Klaimi, Y. Y.; Qualset, C. O.

    1974-01-01

    The inheritance of vernalization response was studied in crosses involving four spring wheats (Sonora 64 (S), Pitic 62 (P), Justin (J) and Thatcher (T)) and three winter wheats (Blackhull (B), Early Blackhull (E) and Extra Early Blackhull (EE)).—All winter cultivars were highly responsive to vernalization, and Pitic 62 was the only spring cultivar whose time to heading was significantly accelerated following cold treatments. When vernalized and grown under long days, spring and winter cultivars became comparable in their heading response, indicating that cold requirement is the major attribute differentiating the heading behavior of true spring and true winter wheats.—Inheritance of growth habit in the F1 generation of a five-parent diallel cross showed dominance of the spring character in all spring x winter crosses. Depending on the cross, one or two duplicate major genes governing growth habit were detected in F2, F3 and backcross generations grown in the field under long days in the absence of vernalizing temperatures. In some spring x winter crosses most of the variation in heading time among spring segregates could be attributed to the effects of major genes conditioning growth habit. In other crosses the heading patterns appeared more complex, indicating that genes with smaller effects are also involved in the control of heading response under spring or summer environments.—Evidence was presented supporting the hypothesis that the cultivar Pitic 62 carries a different allele at one of the two major loci governing its spring habit. This allele was associated with some response to vernalization and acted as a dominant gene determining earliness under low temperature vernalization, but as a partially recessive gene determining lateness in the absence of vernalizing temperatures. Genotypes were assigned to five cultivars as follows: S, CC DD; P, CC D'D'; J, cc DD; B and EE, cc dd.—The presence of major and minor genes and of multiple alleles governing

  11. EQUIVALENCE BETWEEN SHORT-TIME BIPHASIC AND INCOMPRESSIBLE ELASTIC MATERIAL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Porous-permeable tissues have often been modeled using porous media theories such as the biphasic theory. This study examines the equivalence of the short-time biphasic and incompressible elastic responses for arbitrary deformations and constitutive relations from first principles. This equivalence is illustrated in problems of unconfined compression of a disk, and of articular contact under finite deformation, using two different constitutive relations for the solid matrix of cartilage, one of which accounts for the large disparity observed between the tensile and compressive moduli in this tissue. Demonstrating this equivalence under general conditions provides a rationale for using available finite element codes for incompressible elastic materials as a practical substitute for biphasic analyses, so long as only the short-time biphasic response is sought. In practice, an incompressible elastic analysis is representative of a biphasic analysis over the short-term response δt≪Δ2/‖C4‖||K||, where Δ is a characteristic dimension, C4 is the elasticity tensor and K is the hydraulic permeability tensor of the solid matrix. Certain notes of caution are provided with regard to implementation issues, particularly when finite element formulations of incompressible elasticity employ an uncoupled strain energy function consisting of additive deviatoric and volumetric components. PMID:17536908

  12. Background-free in-vivo Imaging of Vitamin C using Time-gateable Responsive Probe

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bo; Ye, Zhiqing; Yang, Yajie; Ma, Hua; Zheng, Xianlin; Jin, Dayong; Yuan, Jingli

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive optical imaging of active biomolecules in the living organism requires both a molecular probe specifically responsive to the target and a high-contrast approach to remove the background interference from autofluorescence and light scatterings. Here, a responsive probe for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) has been developed by conjugating two nitroxide radicals with a long-lived luminescent europium complex. The nitroxide radical withholds the probe on its “off” state (barely luminescent), until the presence of vitamin C will switch on the probe by forming its hydroxylamine derivative. The probe showed a linear response to vitamin C concentration with a detection limit of 9.1 nM, two orders of magnitude lower than that achieved using electrochemical methods. Time-gated luminescence microscopy (TGLM) method has further enabled real-time, specific and background-free monitoring of cellular uptake or endogenous production of vitamin C, and mapping of vitamin C in living Daphnia magna. This work suggests a rational design of lanthanide complexes for background-free small animal imaging of biologically functional molecules. PMID:26373894

  13. Background-free in-vivo Imaging of Vitamin C using Time-gateable Responsive Probe.

    PubMed

    Song, Bo; Ye, Zhiqing; Yang, Yajie; Ma, Hua; Zheng, Xianlin; Jin, Dayong; Yuan, Jingli

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive optical imaging of active biomolecules in the living organism requires both a molecular probe specifically responsive to the target and a high-contrast approach to remove the background interference from autofluorescence and light scatterings. Here, a responsive probe for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) has been developed by conjugating two nitroxide radicals with a long-lived luminescent europium complex. The nitroxide radical withholds the probe on its "off" state (barely luminescent), until the presence of vitamin C will switch on the probe by forming its hydroxylamine derivative. The probe showed a linear response to vitamin C concentration with a detection limit of 9.1 nM, two orders of magnitude lower than that achieved using electrochemical methods. Time-gated luminescence microscopy (TGLM) method has further enabled real-time, specific and background-free monitoring of cellular uptake or endogenous production of vitamin C, and mapping of vitamin C in living Daphnia magna. This work suggests a rational design of lanthanide complexes for background-free small animal imaging of biologically functional molecules. PMID:26373894

  14. Quadratic response functions in the time-dependent four-component Hartree-Fock approximation.

    PubMed

    Norman, Patrick; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2004-10-01

    The second-order response function has been implemented in the time-dependent four-component Hartree-Fock approximation. The implementation is atomic orbital direct and formulated in terms of Fock-type matrices. It employs a quaternion symmetry scheme that provides maximum computational efficiency with consideration made to time-reversal and spatial symmetries. Calculations are presented for the electric dipole first-order hyperpolarizabilities of CsAg and CsAu in the second-harmonic generation optical process beta(-2omega;omega,omega). It is shown that relativistic corrections to property values are substantial in these cases--the orientationally averaged hyperpolarizabilities in the static limit beta(0;0,0) are overestimated in nonrelativistic calculations by 18% and 66% for CsAg and CsAu, respectively. The dispersion displays anomalies in the band gap region due to one- and two-photon resonances with nonrelativistically spin-forbidden states. Although weakly absorbing these states inflict divergences in the quadratic response function, since the response theoretical approach which is used adopts the infinite excited-state lifetime approximation. This fact calls for caution in applications where knowledge of the exact positioning of all excited states in the spectrum is unknown. PMID:15446908

  15. Quadratic response functions in the time-dependent four-component Hartree-Fock approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Patrick; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa.

    2004-10-01

    The second-order response function has been implemented in the time-dependent four-component Hartree-Fock approximation. The implementation is atomic orbital direct and formulated in terms of Fock-type matrices. It employs a quaternion symmetry scheme that provides maximum computational efficiency with consideration made to time-reversal and spatial symmetries. Calculations are presented for the electric dipole first-order hyperpolarizabilities of CsAg and CsAu in the second-harmonic generation optical process β(-2ω;ω,ω). It is shown that relativistic corrections to property values are substantial in these cases—the orientationally averaged hyperpolarizabilities in the static limit β¯(0;0,0) are overestimated in nonrelativistic calculations by 18% and 66% for CsAg and CsAu, respectively. The dispersion displays anomalies in the band gap region due to one- and two-photon resonances with nonrelativistically spin-forbidden states. Although weakly absorbing these states inflict divergences in the quadratic response function, since the response theoretical approach which is used adopts the infinite excited-state lifetime approximation. This fact calls for caution in applications where knowledge of the exact positioning of all excited states in the spectrum is unknown.

  16. Dose-and time-dependent cardiovascular responses induced by ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Brackett, D.J.; Gauvin, D.V.; Lerner, M.R.; Lander, T.J.; Holloway, F.A.; Wilson, M.F. )

    1991-03-11

    A literature survey has revealed that a dose-response relationship between ethanol (ETOH) and serial measurements of cardiovascular parameters that include cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) has not been established in conscious animals. The available literature in this area is controversial regarding the responses of these two parameters that control tissue blood flow. In this study, rats were instrumented for conscious cardiovascular measurements and blood sampling. Rats were monitored for 4 hrs after intragastric ETOH at 2, 4, or 6 g/kg or water. Samples for blood alcohol concentrations were taken at every measurement point and achieved peak concentrations of 63 {plus minus} 4, 103 {plus minus} 6, and 221 {plus minus} 17 mg/dl. Dose- and time-dependency were documented for decreased CO, blood pressure, respiration rate, stroke volume, and central venous pressure, and increased SVR, heart rate, and blood glucose concentrations. Thermoregulatory disturbances were observed at all doses. Blood hematocrit and lactate concentrations were unchanged. In conscious rats ethanol induced significant dose- and time-dependent hemodynamic alterations, including marked CO reduction and peripheral vasoconstriction, suggesting the potential of compromised tissue perfusion. Data also indicate that increased sympathoadrenal activity following ETOH administration may be a significant mediator of these responses. These data suggest: (1) when evaluating the physiological effects of drugs, a complete battery of cardiovascular and physiological measurements need to be assessed, and (2) when measured, these indices suggest a greater degree of compromise by ETOH than previously reported.

  17. Tests of RTG (Real Time GIPSY) for Earthquake Early Warning and Response Applications in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, N.; Hudnut, K.; Stark, K.; Aspiotes, A.

    2008-12-01

    Recent developments in high-rate real-time GPS technology and processing promise to improve the application of GPS to earthquake early warning and response. Point positioning processing algorithms, which do not require a reference station, are particularly attractive for these applications since any reference station will itself be displaced during a large earthquake. USGS Pasadena is testing one such software package, Real Time GIPSY (RTG), developed and supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). JPL uses RTG for precise real-time satellite orbit and clock determination, formats the results as corrections to the GPS broadcast orbit, and provides a real-time stream over the Internet. In our tests we use a locally- installed copy of RTG to compute real-time positions of GPS stations at a sampling rate of 1 second. In clean sections of the position time series are good, with rms scatter of 2 to 4 cm in the north and east components, and 5 to 10 cm in the vertical. Current work is designed to understand and handle occasional convergence delays and large outliers; many outliers repeat every sidereal day and may be correlated with multipath or with the rising or setting of individual satellites. The test site is in a less-than-ideal setting, and we are experimenting with the software setup and with different sites with fewer sources of multipath and better sky view. USGS Pasadena currently operates about 90 permanent continuously-operating GPS stations, about 20 of which are real-time. With funding from the USGS MultiHazards Demonstration Project, USGS Pasadena is cooperating with the California Integrated Seismic Network to co-locate approximately eight real-time GPS receivers at new seismic stations along the southern San Andreas fault. The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is also converting many of its southern California stations to real-time operation. These real-time data and software such as RTG promise to improve USGS Pasasdena's geodetic response to

  18. Spatial heterogeneity in the timing of birch budburst in response to future climate warming in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffarra, Amelia; Zottele, Fabio; Gleeson, Emily; Donnelly, Alison

    2014-05-01

    In order to predict the impact of future climate warming on trees it is important to quantify the effect climate has on their development. Our understanding of the phenological response to environmental drivers has given rise to various mathematical models of the annual growth cycle of plants. These models simulate the timing of phenophases by quantifying the relationship between development and its triggers, typically temperature. In addition, other environmental variables have an important role in determining the timing of budburst. For example, photoperiod has been shown to have a strong influence on phenological events of a number of tree species, including Betula pubescens (birch). A recently developed model for birch (DORMPHOT), which integrates the effects of temperature and photoperiod on budburst, was applied to future temperature projections from a 19-member ensemble of regional climate simulations (on a 25 km grid) generated as part of the ENSEMBLES project, to simulate the timing of birch budburst in Ireland each year up to the end of the present century. Gridded temperature time series data from the climate simulations were used as input to the DORMPHOT model to simulate future budburst timing. The results showed an advancing trend in the timing of birch budburst over most regions in Ireland up to 2100. Interestingly, this trend appeared greater in the northeast of the country than in the southwest, where budburst is currently relatively early. These results could have implications for future forest planning, species distribution modeling, and the birch allergy season.

  19. Time-domain approach for the transient responses in stratified viscoelastic Earth models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanyk, L.; Moser, J.; Yuen, D. A.; Matyska, C.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed the numerical algorithm for the computation of transient viscoelastic responses in the time domain for a radially stratified Earth model. Stratifications in both the elastic parameters and the viscosity profile have been considered. The particular viscosity profile employed has a viscosity maximum with a constrast of O(100) in the mid lower mantle. The distribution of relaxation times reveals the presence of a continuous spectrum situated between O(100) and O(exp 4) years. The principal mode is embedded within this continuous spectrum. From this initial-value approach we have found that for the low degree harmonics the non-modal contributions are comparable to the modal contributions. For this viscosity model the differences between the time-domain and normal-mode results are found to decrease strongly with increasing angular order. These calculations also show that a time-dependent effective relaxation time can be defined, which can be bounded by the relaxation times of the principal modes.

  20. Field Experience with and Potential for Multi-time Scale Grid Transactions from Responsive Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-08-01

    The need for and concepts behind demand response are evolving. As the electric system changes with more intermittent renewable electric supply systems, there is a need to allow buildings to provide more flexible demand. This paper presents results from field studies and pilots, as well as engineering estimates of the potential capabilities of fast load responsiveness in commercial buildings. We present a sector wide analysis of flexible loads in commercial buildings, which was conducted to improve resource planning and determine which loads to evaluate in future demonstrations. These systems provide important capabilities for future transactional systems. The field analysis is based on results from California, plus projects in the northwest and east coast. End-uses considered include heating, ventilation, air conditioning and lighting. The timescales of control include day-ahead, as well as day-of, 10-minute ahead and even faster response. This technology can provide DR signals on different times scales to interact with responsive building loads. We describe the latency of the control systems in the building and the round trip communications with the wholesale grid operators.

  1. Dose-Dependent Effects of Androgens on the Circadian Timing System and Its Response to Light

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Matthew P.; Karatsoreos, Ilia N.; LeSauter, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the locus of a master clock that regulates circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior. Gonadectomy in male mice lengthens the period of circadian rhythms and increases the day-to-day variability of activity onset time. Both of these responses are rescued by the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone. Androgen receptors (AR) are localized in SCN neurons that receive direct retinal input. To explore how androgens affect circadian clock function and its responsiveness to photic cues, we measured wheel-running behavior and SCN AR expression in intact, gonadectomized, and testosterone-replaced mice, held under various photic conditions. Gonadectomy lengthened circadian period in constant dim light but not in constant darkness. Increasing intensities of constant light parametrically increased circadian period, and this was potentiated at all intensities by gonadectomy. In contrast, gonadectomy did not alter light-induced pupil constriction, suggesting a nonretinal locus of hormone action. In hormone-replaced animals housed in constant darkness, T concentration was positively correlated with precision of activity onset and with SCN AR expression and negatively correlated with duration of activity. We infer the existence of two androgenic mechanisms: one modulates SCN responsiveness to light, and the second modulates SCN timekeeping and locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, the effects of androgens on period are a result of hormonal modulation of the SCN's response to photic input rather than to a change in the inherent period of oscillators in the absence of light. PMID:22492303

  2. Response Times to Gustatory-Olfactory Flavor Mixtures: Role of Congruence.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Timothy G; Veldhuizen, Maria G; Marks, Lawrence E

    2015-10-01

    A mixture of perceptually congruent gustatory and olfactory flavorants (sucrose and citral) was previously shown to be detected faster than predicted by a model of probability summation that assumes stochastically independent processing of the individual gustatory and olfactory signals. This outcome suggests substantial integration of the signals. Does substantial integration also characterize responses to mixtures of incongruent flavorants? Here, we report simple response times (RTs) to detect brief pulses of 3 possible flavorants: monosodium glutamate, MSG (gustatory: "umami" quality), citral (olfactory: citrus quality), and a mixture of MSG and citral (gustatory-olfactory). Each stimulus (and, on a fraction of trials, water) was presented orally through a computer-operated, automated flow system, and subjects were instructed to press a button as soon as they detected any of the 3 non-water stimuli. Unlike responses previously found to the congruent mixture of sucrose and citral, responses here to the incongruent mixture of MSG and citral took significantly longer (RTs were greater) and showed lower detection rates than the values predicted by probability summation. This outcome suggests that the integration of gustatory and olfactory flavor signals is less extensive when the component flavors are perceptually incongruent rather than congruent, perhaps because incongruent flavors are less familiar. PMID:26304508

  3. Effect of loudness on reaction time and response force in different motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Włodarczyk, Dariusz

    2005-12-01

    Van der Molen and Keuss, in 1979 and 1981, showed that paradoxically long reaction times occur with extremely strong auditory stimuli when the task is difficult, e.g., choice-by-location or Simon paradigm. It was argued that this paradoxical behavior of RT is due to active inhibition of an arousal-dependent bypassing mechanism to prevent false responses. As the peak force, i.e., maximal force exerted by participants on a response key, is considered to be related to immediate arousal, we predicted that for extremely loud stimuli and for difficult tasks, lengthening of RT should be associated with reduction of peak force. Moreover, these effects should be enhanced when emphasis is on accuracy rather than speed. Although the relation between RT and intensity depended on task difficulty, no increase in RT was found for the loudest tones. Moreover, peak force increased monotonically with loudness, showing no tendency to be suppressed for loudest tones and difficult tasks. PMID:16491701

  4. Electromagnetic velocity gauge: use of multiple gauges, time response, and flow perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, L.M.; Johnson, C.B.; Parker, N.L.; Vantine, H.C.; Weingart, R.C.; Lee, R.S.

    1981-04-08

    We have developed an in-situ electromagnetic velocity (EMV) gauge system for use in multiple-gauge studies of initiating and detonating explosives. We have also investigated the risetime of the gauge and the manner in which it perturbs a reactive flow. We report on the special precautions that are necessary in multiple gauge experiments to reduce lead spreading, simplify target fabrication problems and minimize cross talk through the conducting explosive. Agreement between measured stress records and calculations from multiple velocity gauge data give us confidence that our velocity gauges are recording properly. We have used laser velocity interferometry to measure the gauge risetime in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). To resolve the difference in the two methods, we have examined hydrodynamic and material rate effects. In addition, we considered the effects of shock tilt, electronic response and magntic diffusion on the gauge's response time.

  5. Reducing Emergency Medical Service response time via the reallocation of ambulance bases.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, L C; Pinto, L R; Silva, P M S

    2016-03-01

    The demand for highly efficient and effective services and consumer goods is an essential prerequisite for modern organizations. In healthcare, efficiency and effectiveness mean reducing disabilities and maintaining human life. One challenge is guaranteeing rapid Emergency Medical Service (EMS) response. This study analyzes the EMS of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, using two modeling techniques: optimization and simulation. The optimization model locates ambulance bases and allocates ambulances to those bases. A simulation of this proposed configuration is run to analyze the dynamic behavior of the system. The main assumption is that optimizing the ambulance base locations can improve the system response time. Feasible solutions were found and the current system may be improved while considering economic and operational changes. PMID:24744263

  6. Time-domain sampling of x-ray pulses using an ultrafast sample response

    SciTech Connect

    Gaal, P.; Shayduk, R.; Schick, D.; Herzog, M.; Bojahr, A.; Goldshteyn, J.; Navirian, H. A.; Leitenberger, W.; Vrejoiu, I.; Khakhulin, D.; Wulff, M.; Bargheer, M.

    2012-12-10

    We employ the ultrafast response of a 15.4 nm thin SrRuO{sub 3} layer grown epitaxially on a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate to perform time-domain sampling of an x-ray pulse emitted from a synchrotron storage ring. Excitation of the sample with an ultrashort laser pulse triggers coherent expansion and compression waves in the thin layer, which turn the diffraction efficiency on and off at a fixed Bragg angle during 5 ps. This is significantly shorter than the duration of the synchrotron x-ray pulse of 100 ps. Cross-correlation measurements of the ultrafast sample response and the synchrotron x-ray pulse allow to reconstruct the x-ray pulse shape.

  7. Shock Compression of Beryllium Single Crystals: Time-Dependent, Anisotropic Elastic-Plastic Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, J.; Gupta, Y.

    2013-06-01

    To gain insight into inelastic deformation mechanisms in shocked Be single crystals, wave propagation simulations were performed for crystals shocked along the c-axis, a-axis, and other crystal directions to peak stresses reaching 7 GPa. The simulations utilized a time-dependent, anisotropic material model that incorporated dislocation dynamics and deformation twinning based descriptions of inelastic deformation. The simulation results showed good qualitative agreement with the measured wave profiles, including features arising from wave mode coupling due to the highly anisotropic inelastic response of Be. The measured wave profiles can be understood in terms of dislocation slip along basal, prismatic, and pyramidal planes, together with deformation twinning. Our results provide insight into the complex nature of inelastic deformation in shocked Be, and are also expected to be valuable for understanding the anisotropic inelastic response of analogous hcp metals subjected to shock compression. Work supported by ARL and DOE/NNSA.

  8. Electromagnetic response of time-reversal breaking metallic phases in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Victor; Assawasunthonnet, Wathid; Fradkin, Eduardo

    The electromagnetic response of models of nematic non Fermi-liquids previously proposed in Ref. are re-examined using conventional many-body methods. Nematic phases of this model are described by two 2-component real vectors which express the isotropy breaking nematicity in two Fermi-surfaces. Of interest is the time-reversal symmetry breaking nematic phase with a non-vanishing unquantized spontaneous anomalous Hall effect at zero external magnetic fields, and has a geometrical description as a Berry phase. We compare and contrast our results with conventional response calculations with those predicted with the higher-dimensional bosonization method. Finally we present preliminary results on an RG analysis of this system. This work was supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

  9. System for direct measurement of the step response of electronic devices on the picosecond time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, J. A.; Bloom, D. M.; Solomon, P. M.

    1995-03-01

    We have built a system capable of measuring the step response of III-V electronic devices on the picosecond time scale, with no alteration in device design or epitaxy. To switch on the device under test (DUT), we have designed and fabricated a new type of photoconductor, the recessed-ohmic photoconductor, which swings 0.45 V with a 2-ps rise time and maintains constant output voltage for 100 ps. This switch is monolithically integrated with the DUT. To measure the output current of the DUT, we have built a Ti:sapphire-laser-based pump-probe direct electro-optic sampling system that has a minimum detectable voltage of 70 mu V / \\radical Hz \\end-radical and a measurement bandwidth of 750 GHz. The overall system, comprised of the recessed ohmic photoconductor and the electro-optic sampling system, can be used to measure the step response of III-V electronic devices on the picosecond time scale.

  10. Cardiorespiratory Dynamic Response to Mental Stress: A Multivariate Time-Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Orini, Michele; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Mental stress is a growing problem in our society. In order to deal with this, it is important to understand the underlying stress mechanisms. In this study, we aim to determine how the cardiorespiratory interactions are affected by mental arithmetic stress and attention. We conduct cross time-frequency (TF) analyses to assess the cardiorespiratory coupling. In addition, we introduce partial TF spectra to separate variations in the RR interval series that are linearly related to respiration from RR interval variations (RRV) that are not related to respiration. The performance of partial spectra is evaluated in two simulation studies. Time-varying parameters, such as instantaneous powers and frequencies, are derived from the computed spectra. Statistical analysis is carried out continuously in time to evaluate the dynamic response to mental stress and attention. The results show an increased heart and respiratory rate during stress and attention, compared to a resting condition. Also a fast reduction in vagal activity is noted. The partial TF analysis reveals a faster reduction of RRV power related to (3 s) than unrelated to (30 s) respiration, demonstrating that the autonomic response to mental stress is driven by mechanisms characterized by different temporal scales. PMID:24386006

  11. How task complexity and stimulus modality affect motor execution: target accuracy, response timing and hesitations.

    PubMed

    Parrington, Lucy; MacMahon, Clare; Ball, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Elite sports players are characterized by the ability to produce successful outcomes while attending to changing environmental conditions. Few studies have assessed whether the perceptual environment affects motor skill execution. To test the effect of changing task complexity and stimulus conditions, the authors examined response times and target accuracy of 12 elite Australian football players using a passing-based laboratory test. Data were assessed using mixed modeling and chi-square analyses. No differences were found in target accuracy for changes in complexity or stimulus condition. Decision, movement and total disposal time increased with complexity and decision hesitations were greater when distractions were present. Decision, movement and disposal time were faster for auditory in comparison to visual signals, and when free to choose, players passed more frequently to auditory rather than visual targets. These results provide perspective on how basic motor control processes such as reaction and response to stimuli are influenced in a complex motor skill. Findings suggest auditory stimuli should be included in decision-making studies and may be an important part of a decision-training environment. PMID:25584721

  12. Time dependent response of equatorial ionospheric electric fields to magnetospheric disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Fejer, B.G.; Scherliess, L.

    1995-04-01

    The authors use extensive radar measurements of F region vertical plasma drifts and auroral electrojet indices to determine the storm time dependence of equatorial zonal electric fields. These disturbance drifts result from the prompt penetration of high latitude electric fields and from the dynamo action of storm time winds which produce the largest perturbations a few hours after the onset of magnetic activity. The signatures of the equatorial disturbance electric fields change significantly depending on the relative contributions of these two components. The prompt electric field responses, with lifetimes of about one hour, are in excellent agreement with results from global convection models. The electric fields generated by storm time winds have longer lifetimes, amplitudes proportional to the energy input into the high latitude ionosphere, and a daily variation which follows closely the disturbance dynamo pattern of Blanc and Richmond. The storm wind driven electric fields are responsible for the larger amplitudes and longer lifetimes of the drift perturbations following sudden decreases in convection compared to those associated with sudden convection enhancements. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Establishing a mobile environmental survey system for real-time emergency response.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hsin-Fa; Chen, Ing-Jane; Wang, Chu-Fang

    2014-02-01

    After the 9/11 incident, the needs of environmental survey mobility were increased because the time and place of terrorism attacks are more unpredictable than traditional radiological and nuclear accident. In recent years, more and more attention has been paid to the radiation protection of the survey workers in the field. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research has established a Mobile Environmental Survey System (MESS) for real time emergency response by using network communication. The system consists of three major functional components: the mobile units, the management center, and the work stations. The system can display real time survey data on an electric map collected by the survey workers from the remote field to improve the environmental survey mobility. The system can also send the survey workers messages/warnings according to geographic information and the location of the mobile unit to keep them from unnecessary radiation exposure that may be an effective way to the goal of "as low as reasonably achievable" for environmental surveys. MESS has been adopted as an essential tool for emergency response in Taiwan. The application experience of MESS in the relative exercises will be discussed in this paper. PMID:24378562

  14. Dose- and Time-Dependent Transcriptional Response of Ishikawa Cells Exposed to Genistein.

    PubMed

    Naciff, Jorge M; Khambatta, Zubin S; Carr, Gregory J; Tiesman, Jay P; Singleton, David W; Khan, Sohaib A; Daston, George P

    2016-05-01

    To further define the utility of the Ishikawa cells as a reliable in vitro model to determine the potential estrogenic activity of chemicals of interest, transcriptional changes induced by genistein (GES) in Ishikawa cells at various doses (10 pM, 1 nM, 100 nM, and 10 μM) and time points (8, 24, and 48 h) were identified using a comprehensive microarray approach. Trend analysis indicated that the expression of 5342 unique genes was modified by GES in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P ≤ 0.0001). However, the majority of gene expression changes induced in Ishikawa cells were elicited by the highest dose of GES evaluated (10 μM). The GES' estrogenic activity was identified by comparing the Ishikawa cells' response to GES versus 17 α-ethynyl estradiol (EE, at equipotent doses, ie, 10 μM vs 1 μM, respectively) and was defined by changes in the expression of 284 unique genes elicited by GES and EE in the same direction, although the magnitude of the change for some genes was different. Further, comparing the response of the Ishikawa cells exposed to high doses of GES and EE versus the response of the juvenile rat uterus exposed to EE, we identified 66 unique genes which were up- or down regulated in a similar manner in vivo as well as in vitro Genistein elicits changes in multiple molecular pathways affecting various biological processes particularly associated with cell organization and biogenesis, regulation of translation, cell proliferation, and intracellular transport; processes also affected by estrogen exposure in the uterus of the rat. These results indicate that Ishikawa cells are capable of generating a biologically relevant estrogenic response and offer an in vitro model to assess this mode of action. PMID:26865667

  15. Real-Time Drug Release Analysis of Enzyme and pH Responsive Polysaccharide Nanovesicles.

    PubMed

    Pramod, Poothayil Subash; Deshpande, Nilesh Umakant; Jayakannan, Manickam

    2015-08-20

    The accurate estimation of drug release kinetics of polymeric vehicles is an indispensable prerequisite for the developments of successful drug carriers for cancer therapy. The present investigation reports the development of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic approach for the real-time release kinetics of fluorophore loaded polysaccharide vesicles that are potential vectors in cancer treatment. The polysaccharide vesicles were custom designed with appropriate enzyme and pH responsiveness and loaded with water-soluble biocompatible fluorophore Rhodamine B (Rh-B). The semipermeable membrane dialysis method along with steady state absorbance spectroscopic technique was found to be inaccurate for the estimation of drug release. Time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique was found to exhibit significant difference in excited state decay profiles and fluorescent lifetime of Rh-B in the free and polymer bound states. This enabled the establishment of real-time drug release protocols by TCSPC method for polysaccharide vesicles that are responsible to pH and enzyme with respect to intracellular compartments. Real-time analysis predicted the release kinetics 20-25% higher accuracy when compared to the dialysis method under in vitro conditions. Moreover, the ability of enzyme to cleave the polysaccharide vesicles was further validated by docking studies. The positioning of the molecules in active site of enzyme and the binding energy data were generated using AUTODOCK program to study the rupture of polysaccharide vesicles. This new TCSPC technique could be very useful for studying the drug release pattern of synthetic polymer vesicles loaded with Rh-B fluorophore. PMID:26237375

  16. Moth hearing in response to bat echolocation calls manipulated independently in time and frequency.

    PubMed

    Jones, G; Waters, D A

    2000-08-22

    We measured the auditory responses of the noctuid moth Noctua pronuba to bat echolocation calls which were manipulated independently in time and frequency. Such manipulations are important in understanding how insect hearing influences the evolution of echolocation call characteristics. We manipulated the calls of three bat species (Rhinolophus hipposideros, Myotis nattereri and Pipistrellus pipistrellus) that use different echolocation call features by doubling their duration or reducing their frequency, and measured the auditory thresholds from the A1 cells of the moths. Knowing the auditory responses of the moth we tested three predictions. (i) The ranking of the audibility of unmanipulated calls to the moths should be predictable from their temporal and/or frequency structure. This was supported. (ii) Doubling the duration of the calls should increase their audibility by ca. 3 dB for all species. Their audibility did indeed increase by 2.1-3.5 dB. (iii) Reducing the frequency of the calls would increase their audibility for all species. Reducing the frequency had small effects for the two bat species which used short duration (2.7-3.6 ms) calls. However, the relatively long-duration (50 ms), largely constant-frequency calls of R. hipposideros increased in audibility by 21.6 dB when their frequency was halved. Time and frequency changes influence the audibility of calls to tympanate moths in different ways according to call design. Large changes in frequency and time had relatively small changes on the audibility of calls for short, largely broadband calls. Channelling energy into the second harmonic of the call substantially decreased the audibility of calls for bats which use long-duration, constant-frequency components in echolocation calls. We discuss our findings in the contexts of the evolution of both bat echolocation call design and the potential responses of insects which hear ultrasound. PMID:11467425

  17. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of rat deep brain: hemodynamic responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Iwazaki, Hideaki; Ida, Taiichiro; Hosaka, Tomoya; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi

    2013-03-01

    Hemodynamic responses of the brain to hypoxia or ischemia are one of the major interests in neurosurgery and neuroscience. In this study, we performed real-time transcutaneous PA imaging of the rat brain that was exposed to a hypoxic stress and investigated depth-resolved responses of the brain, including the hippocampus. A linear-array 8ch 10-MHz ultrasonic sensor (measurement length, 10 mm) was placed on the shaved scalp. Nanosecond, 570-nm and 595- nm light pulses were used to excite PA signals indicating cerebral blood volume (CBV) and blood deoxygenation, respectively. Under spontaneous respiration, inhalation gas was switched from air to nitrogen, and then reswitched to oxygen, during which real-time PA imaging was performed continuously. High-contrast PA signals were observed from the depth regions corresponding to the scalp, skull, cortex and hippocampus. After starting hypoxia, PA signals at 595 nm increased immediately in both the cortex and hippocampus for about 1.5 min, showing hemoglobin deoxygenation. On the other hand, PA signals at 570 nm coming from these regions did not increase in the early phase but started to increase at about 1.5 min after starting hypoxia, indicating reactive hyperemia to hypoxia. During hypoxia, PA signals coming from the scalp decreased transiently, which is presumably due to compensatory response in the peripheral tissue to preserve blood perfusion in the brain. The reoxygenation caused a gradual recovery of these PA signals. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of PA imaging for real-time, depth-resolved observation of cerebral hemodynamics.

  18. Effects of action observation on corticospinal excitability: Muscle specificity, direction, and timing of the mirror response.

    PubMed

    Naish, Katherine R; Houston-Price, Carmel; Bremner, Andrew J; Holmes, Nicholas P

    2014-11-01

    Many human behaviours and pathologies have been attributed to the putative mirror neuron system, a neural system that is active during both the observation and execution of actions. While there are now a very large number of papers on the mirror neuron system, variations in the methods and analyses employed by researchers mean that the basic characteristics of the mirror response are not clear. This review focuses on three important aspects of the mirror response, as measured by modulations in corticospinal excitability: (1) muscle specificity; (2) direction; and (3) timing of modulation. We focus mainly on electromyographic (EMG) data gathered following single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), because this method provides precise information regarding these three aspects of the response. Data from paired-pulse TMS paradigms and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) are also considered when we discuss the possible mechanisms underlying the mirror response. In this systematic review of the literature, we examine the findings of 85 TMS and PNS studies of the human mirror response, and consider the limitations and advantages of the different methodological approaches these have adopted in relation to discrepancies between their findings. We conclude by proposing a testable model of how action observation modulates corticospinal excitability in humans. Specifically, we propose that action observation elicits an early, non-specific facilitation of corticospinal excitability (at around 90ms from action onset), followed by a later modulation of activity specific to the muscles involved in the observed action (from around 200ms). Testing this model will greatly advance our understanding of the mirror mechanism and provide a more stable grounding on which to base inferences about its role in human behaviour. PMID:25281883

  19. Cumulative Instructional Time and Relative Effectiveness Conclusions: Extending Research on Response Intervals, Learning, and Measurement Scale.

    PubMed

    Black, Michelle P; Skinner, Christopher H; Forbes, Bethany E; McCurdy, Merilee; Coleman, Mari Beth; Davis, Kristie; Gettelfinger, Maripat

    2016-03-01

    Adapted alternating treatments designs were used to evaluate three computer-based flashcard reading interventions (1-s, 3-s, or 5-s response intervals) across two students with disabilities. When learning was plotted with cumulative instructional sessions on the horizontal axis, the session-series graphs suggest that the interventions were similarly effective. When the same data were plotted as a function of cumulative instructional seconds, time-series graphs suggest that the 1-s intervention caused the most rapid learning for one student. Discussion focuses on applied implications of comparative effectiveness studies and why measures of cumulative instructional time are needed to identify the most effective intervention(s).Comparative effectiveness studies may not identify the intervention which causes the most rapid learning.Session-series repeated measures are not the same as time-series repeated measures.Measuring the time students spend in each intervention (i.e., cumulative instructional seconds) allows practitioners to identify interventions that enhance learning most rapidly.Student time spent working under interventions is critical for drawing applied conclusions. PMID:27606240

  20. Visual analytics of phosphorylation time-series data on insulin response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, David K. G.; Stolte, Christian; Kaur, Sandeep; Bain, Michael; O'Donoghue, Seán I.

    2013-10-01

    Visual analysis of time-series data on protein phosphorylation presents a particular challenge: bioinformatics tools currently available for visualising 'omics' data in time series have been developed primarily to study gene expression, and cannot easily be adopted to phosphorylation data, where a single protein typically has multiple phosphosites. In this study, we worked with an experimental research group that is applying very recent methods in high-throughput experimental proteomics to study the time course of protein phosphorylation events in human cells in vitro following stimulation by insulin, as part of a broader study of diabetes and obesity. We applied several existing visual analytics approaches with the goal of organising the data to facilitate new insight into underlying molecular processes. We developed a novel layout strategy called 'Minardo' that is loosely based on cell topology and ordered by time and causality. This layout utilises a frame of reference familiar to life scientists and helpful for organising and interpreting time-series data. This strategy proved to be useful, leading to new insights into the insulin response pathway. We are working on generalising the Minardo layout to accommodate similar datasets related to other signalling pathways, which should be straightforward.

  1. Characteristics and control response of the TOPAZ II Reactor System Real-time Dynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.

    1993-11-12

    A dynamic simulator of the TOPAZ II reactor system has been developed for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program. The simulator combines first-principle modeling and empirical correlations in its algorithm to attain the modeling accuracy and computational through-put that are required for real-time execution. The overall execution time of the simulator for each time step is 15 ms when no data is written to the disk, and 18 ms when nine double precision data points are written to the disk once in every time step. The simulation program has been tested and it is able to handle a step decrease of $8 worth of reactivity. It also provides simulations of fuel, emitter, collector, stainless steel, and ZrH moderator failures. Presented in this paper are the models used in the calculations, a sample simulation session, and a discussion of the performance and limitations of the simulator. The simulator has been found to provide realistic real-time dynamic response of the TOPAZ II reactor system under both normal and casualty conditions.

  2. Static inverter with synchronous output waveform synthesized by time-optimal-response feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kernick, A.; Stechschulte, D. L.; Shireman, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Time-optimal-response 'bang-bang' or 'bang-hang' technique, using four feedback control loops, synthesizes static-inverter sinusoidal output waveform by self-oscillatory but yet synchronous pulse-frequency-modulation (SPFM). A single modular power stage per phase of ac output entails the minimum of circuit complexity while providing by feedback synthesis individual phase voltage regulation, phase position control and inherent compensation simultaneously for line and load disturbances. Clipped sinewave performance is described under off-limit load or input voltage conditions. Also, approaches to high power levels, 3-phase arraying and parallel modular connection are given.

  3. Visual response time to colored stimuli in peripheral retina - Evidence for binocular summation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    Simple onset response time (RT) experiments, previously shown to exhibit binocular summation effects for white stimuli along the horizontal meridian, were performed for red and green stimuli along 5 oblique meridians. Binocular RT was significantly shorter than monocular RT for a 45-min-diameter spot of red, green, or white light within eccentricities of about 50 deg from the fovea. Relatively large meridian differences were noted that appear to be due to the degree to which the images fall on corresponding retinal areas.

  4. Solvent effects in time-dependent self-consistent field methods. I. Optical response calculations.

    PubMed

    Bjorgaard, J A; Kuzmenko, V; Velizhanin, K A; Tretiak, S

    2015-01-28

    We implement and examine three excited state solvent models in time-dependent self-consistent field methods using a consistent formalism which unambiguously shows their relationship. These are the linear response, state specific, and vertical excitation solvent models. Their effects on energies calculated with the equivalent of COSMO/CIS/AM1 are given for a set of test molecules with varying excited state charge transfer character. The resulting solvent effects are explained qualitatively using a dipole approximation. It is shown that the fundamental differences between these solvent models are reflected by the character of the calculated excitations. PMID:25637965

  5. Solvent effects in time-dependent self-consistent field methods. I. Optical response calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Kuzmenko, V.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-01-22

    In this study, we implement and examine three excited state solvent models in time-dependent self-consistent field methods using a consistent formalism which unambiguously shows their relationship. These are the linear response, state specific, and vertical excitation solvent models. Their effects on energies calculated with the equivalent of COSMO/CIS/AM1 are given for a set of test molecules with varying excited state charge transfer character. The resulting solvent effects are explained qualitatively using a dipole approximation. It is shown that the fundamental differences between these solvent models are reflected by the character of the calculated excitations.

  6. A mercury flow meter for ion thruster testing. [response time, thermal sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of operation of the thermal flow meter is presented, and a theoretical model is used to determine design parameters for a device capable of measuring mercury flows in the range of 0 to 5 gm/hr. Flow meter construction is described. Tests performed using a positive displacement mercury pump as well as those performed with the device in the feed line of an operating thruster are discussed. A flow meter response time of about a minute and a sensitivity of about 10 mv/gm/hr are demonstrated. Additional work to relieve a sensitivity of the device to variations in ambient temperature is indicated to improve its quantitative performance.

  7. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  8. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  9. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  10. Culture Studies and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1983-01-01

    True citizenship education is impossible unless students develop the habit of intelligently evaluating cultures. Abraham Maslow's theory of self-actualization, a theory of innate human needs and of human motivation, is a nonethnocentric tool which can be used by teachers and students to help them understand other cultures. (SR)

  11. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  12. Racial Discrimination in Occupations: Perceived and Actual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Castellano B.; Turner, Barbara F.

    The relationship between the actual representation of Blacks in certain occupations and individual perceptions of the occupational opportunity structure were examined. A scale which rated the degree of perceived discrimination against Blacks in 21 occupations was administered to 75 black male, 70 black female, 1,429 white male and 1,457 white…

  13. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  14. Interdependency between Risk Assessments for Self and Other in the Field of Comparative Optimism: The Contribution of Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzenstetter, Florence; Schimchowitsch, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    By introducing a response-time measure in the field of comparative optimism, this study was designed to explore how people estimate risk to self and others depending on the evaluation order (self/other or other/self). Our results show the interdependency between self and other answers. Indeed, while response time for risk assessment for the self…

  15. Real-time performance modelling of a Sustained Attention to Response Task.

    PubMed

    Larue, Grégoire S; Rakotonirainy, Andry; Pettitt, Anthony N

    2010-10-01

    Vigilance declines when exposed to highly predictable and uneventful tasks. Monotonous tasks provide little cognitive and motor stimulation and contribute to human errors. This paper aims to model and detect vigilance decline in real time through participants' reaction times during a monotonous task. A laboratory-based experiment adapting the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) is conducted to quantify the effect of monotony on overall performance. Relevant parameters are then used to build a model detecting hypovigilance throughout the experiment. The accuracy of different mathematical models is compared to detect in real time - minute by minute - the lapses in vigilance during the task. It is shown that monotonous tasks can lead to an average decline in performance of 45%. Furthermore, vigilance modelling enables the detection of vigilance decline through reaction times with an accuracy of 72% and a 29% false alarm rate. Bayesian models are identified as a better model to detect lapses in vigilance as compared with neural networks and generalised linear mixed models. This modelling could be used as a framework to detect vigilance decline of any human performing monotonous tasks. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Existing research on monotony is largely entangled with endogenous factors such as sleep deprivation, fatigue and circadian rhythm. This paper uses a Bayesian model to assess the effects of a monotonous task on vigilance in real time. It is shown that the negative effects of monotony on the ability to sustain attention can be mathematically modelled and predicted in real time using surrogate measures, such as reaction times. This allows the modelling of vigilance fluctuations. PMID:20865604

  16. Attentional capture and understanding of nutrition labelling: a study based on response times.

    PubMed

    Ares, Gastón; Giménez, Ana; Bruzzone, Fernanda; Antúnez, Lucía; Sapolinski, Alejandra; Vidal, Leticia; Maiche, Alejandro

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the influence of nutrition information format on attentional capture and consumers' understanding. Sixteen labels of two products (yoghurt and pan bread) were designed following a four 2-level factors full factorial design with the following variables: label background design, type of product, nutrition information format and traffic light system. The labels were presented to 178 consumers, who were asked to decide whether the fat/sodium content of each yoghurt/pan bread label was medium or low. Participant responses and reaction times were recorded. Results showed that type of product, nutrition information format and traffic light system significantly affected the time needed by consumers to find the nutrition information and to classify the labels according to their content of a given nutrient. Meanwhile, consumers' understanding of the labels was mostly affected by the content of the nutrient and the presence of the traffic light system. PMID:22273500

  17. Real time quality control of meteorological data used in SRP's emergency response system

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergast, M.M.

    1980-05-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory's WIND minicomputer system allows quick and accurate assessment of an accidental release at the Savannah River Plant using data from eight meteorological towers. The accuracy of the assessment is largely determined by the accuracy of the meteorological data; therefore quality control is important in an emergency response system. Real-time quality control of this data will be added to the WIND system to automatically identify inaccurate data. Currently, the system averages the measurements from the towers to minimize the influence of inaccurate data being used in calculations. The computer code used in the real-time quality control has been previously used to identify inaccurate measurements from the archived tower data.

  18. Ultracold Bose gases in time-dependent one-dimensional superlattices: Response and quasimomentum structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hild, Markus; Schmitt, Felix; Tuerschmann, Ilona; Roth, Robert

    2007-11-15

    The response of ultracold atomic Bose gases in time-dependent optical lattices is discussed based on direct simulations of the time-evolution of the many-body state in the framework of the Bose-Hubbard model. We focus on small-amplitude modulations of the lattice potential as implemented in several recent experiments and study different observables in the region of the first resonance in the Mott-insulator phase. In addition to the energy transfer we investigate the quasimomentum structure of the system which is accessible via the matter-wave interference pattern after a prompt release. We identify characteristic correlations between the excitation frequency and the quasimomentum distribution and study their structure in the presence of a superlattice potential.

  19. Intramolecular stable isotope distributions detect plant metabolic responses on century time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleucher, Jürgen; Ehlers, Ina; Augusti, Angela; Betson, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Plants respond to environmental changes on a vast range of time scales, and plant gas exchanges constitute important feedback mechanisms in the global C cycle. Responses on time scales of decades to centuries are most important for climate models, for prediction of crop productivity, and for adaptation to climate change. Unfortunately, responses on these timescale are least understood. We argue that the knowledge gap on intermediate time scales is due to a lack of adequate methods that can bridge between short-term manipulative experiments (e.g. FACE) and paleo research. Manipulative experiments in plant ecophysiology give information on metabolism on time scales up to years. However, this information cannot be linked to results from retrospective studies in paleo research, because little metabolic information can be derived from paleo archives. Stable isotopes are prominent tools in plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry and in paleo research, but in all applications to date, isotope ratios of whole molecules are measured. However, it is well established that stable isotope abundance varies among intramolecular groups of biochemical metabolites, that is each so-called "isotopomer" has a distinct abundance. This intramolecular variation carries information on metabolic regulation, which can even be traced to individual enzymes (Schleucher et al., Plant, Cell Environ 1999). Here, we apply intramolecular isotope distributions to study the metabolic response of plants to increasing atmospheric [CO2] during the past century. Greenhouse experiments show that the deuterium abundance among the two positions in the C6H2 group of photosynthetic glucose depends on [CO2] during growth. This is observed for all plants using C3 photosynthesis, and reflects the metabolic flux ratio between photorespiration and photosynthesis. Photorespiration is a major C flux that limits assimilation in C3 plants, which encompass the overwhelming fraction of terrestrial photosynthesis and the

  20. Progesterone in experimental permanent stroke: a dose-response and therapeutic time-window study.

    PubMed

    Wali, Bushra; Ishrat, Tauheed; Won, Soonmi; Stein, Donald G; Sayeed, Iqbal

    2014-02-01

    Currently, the only approved treatment for ischaemic stroke is tissue plasminogen activator, a clot-buster. This treatment can have dangerous consequences if not given within the first 4 h after stroke. Our group and others have shown progesterone to be beneficial in preclinical studies of stroke, but a progesterone dose-response and time-window study is lacking. We tested male Sprague-Dawley rats (12 months old) with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham operations on multiple measures of sensory, motor and cognitive performance. For the dose-response study, animals received intraperitoneal injections of progesterone (8, 16 or 32 mg/kg) at 1 h post-occlusion, and subcutaneous injections at 6 h and then once every 24 h for 7 days. For the time-window study, the optimal dose of progesterone was given starting at 3, 6 or 24 h post-stroke. Behavioural recovery was evaluated at repeated intervals. Rats were killed at 22 days post-stroke and brains extracted for evaluation of infarct volume. Both 8 and 16 mg/kg doses of progesterone produced attenuation of infarct volume compared with the placebo, and improved functional outcomes up to 3 weeks after stroke on locomotor activity, grip strength, sensory neglect, gait impairment, motor coordination and spatial navigation tests. In the time-window study, the progesterone group exhibited substantial neuroprotection as late as 6 h after stroke onset. Compared with placebo, progesterone showed a significant reduction in infarct size with 3- and 6-h delays. Moderate doses (8 and 16 mg/kg) of progesterone reduced infarct size and improved functional deficits in our clinically relevant model of stroke. The 8 mg/kg dose was optimal in improving motor, sensory and memory function, and this effect was observed over a large therapeutic time window. Progesterone shows promise as a potential therapeutic agent and should be examined for safety and efficacy in a clinical trial for ischaemic stroke. PMID:24374329