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Sample records for actual testing phase

  1. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING, D.L.

    2006-10-18

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 222-S Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cs-137 sulfate, and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.

  2. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FLOWSHEET TESTS WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING, D.L.

    2007-04-13

    Laboratory-scale flowsheet tests of the fractional crystallization process were conducted with actual tank waste samples in a hot cell at the 2224 Laboratory. The process is designed to separate medium-curie liquid waste into a low-curie stream for feeding to supplemental treatment and a high-curie stream for double-shell tank storage. Separations criteria (for Cesium-137 sulfate and sodium) were exceeded in all three of the flowsheet tests that were performed.

  3. Teachers' Task Demands, Students' Test Expectations, and Actual Test Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broekkamp, H.; Van Hout-Wolters, B. H. A. M.; Van den Bergh, H.; Rijlaarsdam, G.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Previous studies on instructional importance show that individual students and their teachers differ in the topics that they consider important in the context of an upcoming teacher-made test. Aims: This study aimed to examine whether such differences between students' test expectations and teachers' intended task demands can be…

  4. Actual curriculum development practices instrument: Testing for factorial validity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foi, Liew Yon; Bakar, Kamariah Abu; Hamzah, Mohd Sahandri Gani; Alwi, Nor Hayati

    2014-09-01

    The Actual Curriculum Development Practices Instrument (ACDP-I) was developed and the factorial validity of the ACDP-I was tested (n = 107) using exploratory factor analysis procedures in the earlier work of [1]. Despite the ACDP-I appears to be content and construct valid instrument with very high internal reliability qualities for using in Malaysia, the accumulated evidences are still needed to provide a sound scientific basis for the proposed score interpretations. Therefore, the present study addresses this concern by utilising the confirmatory factor analysis to further confirm the theoretical structure of the variable Actual Curriculum Development Practices (ACDP) and enrich the psychometrical properties of ACDP-I. Results of this study have practical implication to both researchers and educators whose concerns focus on teachers' classroom practices and the instrument development and validation process.

  5. Actual Versus Predicted Cardiovascular Demands in Submaximal Cycle Ergometer Testing

    PubMed Central

    HOEHN, AMANDA M.; MULLENBACH, MEGAN J.; FOUNTAINE, CHARLES J.

    2015-01-01

    The Astrand-Rhyming cycle ergometer test (ARCET) is a commonly administered submaximal test for estimating aerobic capacity. Whereas typically utilized in clinical populations, the validity of the ARCET to predict VO2max in a non-clinical population, especially female, is less clear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of the ARCET in a sample of healthy and physically active college students. Subjects (13 females, 10 males) performed a maximal cycle ergometer test to volitional exhaustion to determine VO2max. At least 48 hours later, subjects performed the ARCET protocol. Predicted VO2max was calculated following the ARCET format using the age corrected factor. There was no significant difference (p=.045) between actual (41.0±7.97 ml/kg/min) and predicted VO2max (40.3±7.58 ml/kg/min). When split for gender there was a significant difference between actual and predicted VO2 for males, (45.1±7.74 vs. 42.7±8.26 ml/kg/min, p=0.029) but no significant difference observed for females, (37.9±6.9 vs. 38.5±6.77 ml/kg/min, p=0.675). The correlation between actual and predicted VO2 was r=0.84, p<0.001 with an SEE= 4.3 ml/kg/min. When split for gender, the correlation for males was r=0.94, p<0.001, SEE=2.72 ml/kg/min; for females, r=0.74, p=0.004, SEE=4.67 ml/kg/min. The results of this study indicate that the ARCET accurately estimated VO2max in a healthy college population of both male and female subjects. Implications of this study suggest the ARCET can be used to assess aerobic capacity in both fitness and clinical settings where measurement via open-circuit spirometry is either unavailable or impractical. PMID:27182410

  6. CHARACTERIZATION AND ACTUAL WASTE TEST WITH TANK 5F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. S.; Crapse, K. P.; Fink, S. D.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2007-08-30

    The initial phase of bulk waste removal operations was recently completed in Tank 5F. Video inspection of the tank indicates several mounds of sludge still remain in the tank. Additionally, a mound of white solids was observed under Riser 5. In support of chemical cleaning and heel removal programs, samples of the sludge and the mound of white solids were obtained from the tank for characterization and testing. A core sample of the sludge and Super Snapper sample of the white solids were characterized. A supernate dip sample from Tank 7F was also characterized. A portion of the sludge was used in two tank cleaning tests using oxalic acid at 50 C and 75 C. The filtered oxalic acid from the tank cleaning tests was subsequently neutralized by addition to a simulated Tank 7F supernate. Solids and liquid samples from the tank cleaning test and neutralization test were characterized. A separate report documents the results of the gas generation from the tank cleaning test using oxalic acid and Tank 5F sludge. The characterization results for the Tank 5F sludge sample (FTF-05-06-55) appear quite good with respect to the tight precision of the sample replicates, good results for the glass standards, and minimal contamination found in the blanks and glass standards. The aqua regia and sodium peroxide fusion data also show good agreement between the two dissolution methods. Iron dominates the sludge composition with other major contributors being uranium, manganese, nickel, sodium, aluminum, and silicon. The low sodium value for the sludge reflects the absence of supernate present in the sample due to the core sampler employed for obtaining the sample. The XRD and CSEM results for the Super Snapper salt sample (i.e., white solids) from Tank 5F (FTF-05-07-1) indicate the material contains hydrated sodium carbonate and bicarbonate salts along with some aluminum hydroxide. These compounds likely precipitated from the supernate in the tank. A solubility test showed the material

  7. Using lysimeters to test the Penman Monteith actual evapotranspiration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Asher, Jiftah; Volinski, Roman; Zilberman, Arkadi; Bar Yosef, Beni; Silber, Avner

    2015-04-01

    Differences in actual transpiration (ETa) of banana plants were quantified in a lysimeter experiment. ETA was computed using instantaneous data from two weighing lysimeters and compared to PM (Penman-Monteith) model for ETa. Two critical problems were faced in this test. A) Estimating canopy and aerodynamic resistances ("rc" and "ra" respectively ) and B) converting the lysimeter changes in water volume ( LYv cm3 ) to ETa length units ( cm ). The two unknowns " rc" and "ra" were obtained from continuous measurements of the differences between canopy and air temperature (Tc - Ta). This difference was established by means of the infrared thermometry which was followed by numerical and analytical calculation of ETa using the modification suggested by R. Jackson to the PM model. The conversion of lysimeter volumetric units (LYv) to ETa length units was derived from the slope of cumulative LYv/ETa. This relationship was significantly linear (r2=0.97and 0.98.). Its slope was interpreted as "evaporating leaf area" which accounted for 1.8E4 cm2 in lysimeter 1 and 2.3E4 cm2.in lysimeter 2 . The comparison between LYv and PM model was acceptable even under very low ETa. The average of two lysimeters was 1.1mm/day (1.4 mm/day , LYv 1 and 0.8 LYv 2) while ETa calculated on the basis of PM model was 1.2 mm/day. It was concluded that although lysimeters are most accurate systems to measure ETa one of its disadvantages ( beside the high cost) is the volumetric output that in many cases should be supported by a one dimensional energy balance system. The PM model was found to be a reliable complementary tool to convert lysimeters volumetric output into conventional length units of ETa.

  8. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-09

    .A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  9. Has the connection between polyploidy and diversification actually been tested?

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Elizabeth A

    2016-04-01

    Many major clades of angiosperms have several whole genome duplications (polyploidization events) in their distant past, suggesting that polyploidy drives or at least permits diversification. However, data on recently diverged groups are more equivocal, finding little evidence of elevated diversification following polyploidy. The discrepancy may be attributable at least in part to methodology. Many studies use indirect methods, such as chromosome numbers, genome size, and Ks plots, to test polyploidy, although these approaches can be misleading, and often lack sufficient resolution. A direct test of diversification following polyploidy requires a sequence-based approach that traces the history of nuclear genomes rather than species. These methods identify the point of coalescence of ancestral genomes, but may be misleading about the time and thus the extent of diversification. Limitations of existing methods mean that the connection between polyploidy and diversification has not been rigorously tested and remains unknown. PMID:26855304

  10. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-07-10

    In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

  11. Phase Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification ( OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect

    PAJUNEN, A.L.; LANGEVIN, M.J.

    2000-08-07

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: Define the Phase 3 and 4 test scope for the FRS and IWTS; Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

  12. Screening Mammography: Test Set Data Can Reasonably Describe Actual Clinical Reporting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Warwick; McEntee, Mark F.; Kench, Peter L.; Reed, Warren M.; Heard, Rob; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the extent to which test set reading can represent actual clinical reporting in screening mammography. Materials and Methods: Institutional ethics approval was granted, and informed consent was obtained from each participating screen reader. The need for informed consent with respect to the use of patient materials was waived. Two hundred mammographic examinations were selected from examinations reported by 10 individual expert screen readers, resulting in 10 reader-specific test sets. Data generated from actual clinical reports were compared with three test set conditions: clinical test set reading with prior images, laboratory test set reading with prior images, and laboratory test set reading without prior images. A further set of five expert screen readers was asked to interpret a common set of images in two identical test set conditions to establish a baseline for intraobserver variability. Confidence scores (from 1 to 4) were assigned to the respective decisions made by readers. Region-of-interest (ROI) figures of merit (FOMs) and side-specific sensitivity and specificity were described for the actual clinical reporting of each reader-specific test set and were compared with those for the three test set conditions. Agreement between pairs of readings was performed by using the Kendall coefficient of concordance. Results: Moderate or acceptable levels of agreement were evident (W = 0.69–0.73, P < .01) when describing group performance between actual clinical reporting and test set conditions that were reasonably close to the established baseline (W = 0.77, P < .01) and were lowest when prior images were excluded. Higher median values for ROI FOMs were demonstrated for the test set conditions than for the actual clinical reporting values; this was possibly linked to changes in sensitivity. Conclusion: Reasonable levels of agreement between actual clinical reporting and test set conditions can be achieved, although inflated sensitivity

  13. Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-20

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

  14. Testing two temporal upscaling schemes for the estimation of the time variability of the actual evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, A.; Capodici, F.; Ciraolo, G.; La Loggia, G.

    2015-10-01

    Temporal availability of grapes actual evapotranspiration is an emerging issue since vineyards farms are more and more converted from rainfed to irrigated agricultural systems. The manuscript aims to verify the accuracy of the actual evapotranspiration retrieval coupling a single source energy balance approach and two different temporal upscaling schemes. The first scheme tests the temporal upscaling of the main input variables, namely the NDVI, albedo and LST; the second scheme tests the temporal upscaling of the energy balance output, the actual evapotranspiration. The temporal upscaling schemes were implemented on: i) airborne remote sensing data acquired monthly during a whole irrigation season over a Sicilian vineyard; ii) low resolution MODIS products released daily or weekly; iii) meteorological data acquired by standard gauge stations. Daily MODIS LST products (MOD11A1) were disaggregated using the DisTrad model, 8-days black and white sky albedo products (MCD43A) allowed modeling the total albedo, and 8-days NDVI products (MOD13Q1) were modeled using the Fisher approach. Results were validated both in time and space. The temporal validation was carried out using the actual evapotranspiration measured in situ using data collected by a flux tower through the eddy covariance technique. The spatial validation involved airborne images acquired at different times from June to September 2008. Results aim to test whether the upscaling of the energy balance input or output data performed better.

  15. PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-11-01

    Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

  16. Testing reality during adolescence: the contribution of Erikson's concepts of fidelity and developmental actuality.

    PubMed

    Browning, Deborah L

    2011-07-01

    The process of reality testing can be thought of as a lifespan developmental line, where adolescence provides a critical developmental advance but not an endpoint. Erikson's concepts of fidelity and developmental actuality provide a frame of reference for considering this. Three means of reality testing are identified--contemplation, action, and conversation--where these modes of approach can be used separately or in concert to clarify the reality status of situations and phenomena. These methods of testing reality are illustrated within four arenas of adolescent functioning-thought, time, parental representations, and the experience of the embodied self. PMID:21874992

  17. Anticipated and actual reactions to receiving HIV positive results through self-testing among gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Omar; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Ibitoye, Mobolaji; Frasca, Timothy; Brown, William; Balan, Iván

    2014-12-01

    We explored anticipated and actual reactions to receiving HIV positive results through self-testing with a diverse group of 84 gay and bisexual men in New York City. Grounded Theory was used to investigate these reactions in a two-phase study, one hypothetical, followed by a practical phase in which self-tests were distributed and used. Three major themes emerged when participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to an HIV positive self-test result: managing emotional distress, obtaining HIV medical care, and postponing sexual activity. When participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to a partner's HIV positive self-test result, five themes emerged: provide emotional support; refrain from engaging in sex with casual partner; avoid high-risk sexual activity with both main and casual partners; seek medical services; and obtain a confirmatory test result. Although none of the participants tested positive, seven of their partners did. Participants provided emotional support and linked their partners to support services. The availability of HIV self-testing kits offers potential opportunities to tackle HIV infection among individuals with high-risk practices. PMID:24858480

  18. Anticipated and Actual Reactions to Receiving HIV Positive Results Through Self-Testing Among Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Ibitoye, Mobolaji; Frasca, Timothy; Brown, William; Balan, Iván

    2014-01-01

    We explored anticipated and actual reactions to receiving HIV positive results through self-testing with a diverse group of 84 gay and bisexual men in New York City. Grounded Theory was used to investigate these reactions in a two-phase study, one hypothetical, followed by a practical phase in which self-tests were distributed and used. Three major themes emerged when participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to an HIV positive self-test result: managing emotional distress, obtaining HIV medical care, and postponing sexual activity. When participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to a partner’s HIV positive self-test result, five themes emerged: provide emotional support; refrain from engaging in sex with casual partner; avoid high-risk sexual activity with both main and casual partners; seek medical services; and obtain a confirmatory test result. Although none of the participants tested positive, seven of their partners did. Participants provided emotional support and linked their partners to support services. The availability of HIV self-testing kits offers potential opportunities to tackle HIV infection among individuals with high-risk practices. PMID:24858480

  19. ACTUAL WASTE TESTING OF GYCOLATE IMPACTS ON THE SRS TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.

    2014-05-28

    Glycolic acid is being studied as a replacement for formic acid in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. After implementation, the recycle stream from DWPF back to the high-level waste Tank Farm will contain soluble sodium glycolate. Most of the potential impacts of glycolate in the Tank Farm were addressed via a literature review and simulant testing, but several outstanding issues remained. This report documents the actual-waste tests to determine the impacts of glycolate on storage and evaporation of Savannah River Site high-level waste. The objectives of this study are to address the following: Determine the extent to which sludge constituents (Pu, U, Fe, etc.) dissolve (the solubility of sludge constituents) in the glycolate-containing 2H-evaporator feed. Determine the impact of glycolate on the sorption of fissile (Pu, U, etc.) components onto sodium aluminosilicate solids. The first objective was accomplished through actual-waste testing using Tank 43H and 38H supernatant and Tank 51H sludge at Tank Farm storage conditions. The second objective was accomplished by contacting actual 2H-evaporator scale with the products from the testing for the first objective. There is no anticipated impact of up to 10 g/L of glycolate in DWPF recycle to the Tank Farm on tank waste component solubilities as investigated in this test. Most components were not influenced by glycolate during solubility tests, including major components such as aluminum, sodium, and most salt anions. There was potentially a slight increase in soluble iron with added glycolate, but the soluble iron concentration remained so low (on the order of 10 mg/L) as to not impact the iron to fissile ratio in sludge. Uranium and plutonium appear to have been supersaturated in 2H-evaporator feed solution mixture used for this testing. As a result, there was a reduction of soluble uranium and plutonium as a function of time. The change in soluble uranium concentration was

  20. TESTING OF THE SPINTEK ROTARY MICROFILTER USING ACTUAL HANFORD WASTE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER HJ

    2010-04-13

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter was tested on actual Hanford tank waste. The samples were a composite of archived Tank 241-AN-105 material and a sample representing single-shell tanks (SST). Simulants of the two samples have been used in non-rad test runs at the 222-S laboratory and at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The results of these studies are compared in this report. Two different nominal pore sizes for the sintered steel rotating disk filter were chosen: 0.5 and 0.1 {micro}m. The results suggest that the 0.5-{micro}m disk is preferable for Hanford tank waste for the following reasons: (1) The filtrate clarity is within the same range (<<4 ntu for both disks); (2) The filtrate flux is in general higher for the 0.5-{micro}m disk; and (3) The 0.1-{micro}m disk showed a higher likelihood of fouling. The filtrate flux of the actual tank samples is generally in the range of 20-30% compared to the equivalent non-rad tests. The AN-105 slurries performed at about twice the filtrate flux of the SST slurries. The reason for this difference has not been identified. Particle size distributions in both cases are very similar; comparison of the chemical composition is not conclusive. The sole hint towards what material was stuck in the filter pore holes came from the analysis of the dried flakes from the surface of the fouled 0.1-{micro}m disk. A cleaning approach developed by SRNL personnel to deal with fouled disks has been found adaptable when using actual Hanford samples. The use of 1 M nitric acid improved the filtrate flux by approximately two times; using the same simulants as in the non-rad test runs showed that the filtrate flux was restored to 1/2 of its original amount.

  1. Self-perceived and actual ability in the functional reach test in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ryckewaert, Gilles; Luyat, Marion; Rambour, Melanie; Tard, Céline; Noël, Myriam; Defebvre, Luc; Delval, Arnaud

    2015-03-01

    Falls frequently occur during daily activities such as reaching for an object in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Misjudgment is also reported to be one of the circumstances that lead to falls. The functional reach test is an indicator of dynamic balance. The primary objective was to establish whether there is a difference between self-perceived and actual ability to perform the functional reach test in patients with PD who have never fallen. Three groups of participants (all with no history of falls) were studied: young adults, elderly adults and PD patients. The participants first estimated their maximum reaching distance (but without performing the action, i.e. as a motor imagery task) and then actually performed the functional reach test (i.e. as a motor task). No significant overestimation or underestimation was observed. The reaching distance was lower in PD than in the two other groups. There were no differences between PD patients and elderly adults in terms of the forward centre of pressure displacement. Seven PD patients reported a fall in the year following the experiment. The fallers had a longer history of disease. Finally, PD patients adequately estimated their ability in the functional reach test and did not adopt an "at risk" strategy and appeared to be quite conservative (as were healthy elderly adults) in their postural control behavior. Ability to estimate self-performance is preserved in PD patients with no clinical impairments of postural control although they are at risk of future falls. PMID:25600856

  2. Comparing Perceptions with Actual Reports of Close Friend's HIV Testing Behavior Among Urban Tanzanian Men.

    PubMed

    Mulawa, Marta; Yamanis, Thespina J; Balvanz, Peter; Kajula, Lusajo J; Maman, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Men have lower rates of HIV testing and higher rates of AIDS-related mortality compared to women in sub-Saharan Africa. To assess whether there is an opportunity to increase men's uptake of testing by correcting misperceptions about testing norms, we compare men's perceptions of their closest friend's HIV testing behaviors with the friend's actual testing self-report using a unique dataset of men sampled within their social networks (n = 59) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We examine the accuracy and bias of perceptions among men who have tested for HIV (n = 391) and compare them to the perceptions among men who never tested (n = 432). We found that testers and non-testers did not differ in the accuracy of their perceptions, though non-testers were strongly biased towards assuming that their closest friends had not tested. Our results lend support to social norms approaches designed to correct the biased misperceptions of non-testers to promote men's HIV testing. PMID:26880322

  3. Strontium and Actinide Separations from High Level Nuclear Waste Solutions using Monosodium Titanate - Actual Waste Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.B.; Barnes, M.J.; Hobbs,D.T.; Walker, D.D.; Fondeur, F.F.; Norato, M.A.; Pulmano, R.L.; Fink, S.D.

    2005-11-01

    Pretreatment processes at the Savannah River Site will separate {sup 90}Sr, alpha-emitting and radionuclides (i.e., actinides) and {sup 137}Cs prior to disposal of the high-level nuclear waste. Separation of {sup 90}Sr and alpha-emitting radionuclides occurs by ion exchange/adsorption using an inorganic material, monosodium titanate (MST). Previously reported testing with simulants indicates that the MST exhibits high selectivity for strontium and actinides in high ionic strength and strongly alkaline salt solutions. This paper provides a summary of data acquired to measure the performance of MST to remove strontium and actinides from actual waste solutions. These tests evaluated the effects of ionic strength, mixing, elevated alpha activities, and multiple contacts of the waste with MST. Tests also provided confirmation that MST performs well at much larger laboratory scales (300-700 times larger) and exhibits little affinity for desorption of strontium and plutonium during washing.

  4. Criteria evaluation for cleanliness testing phase 0

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, Michael; Koester, Carolyn; Stefanni, Chris

    1999-02-04

    The Boeing Company (Boeing) contracted with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop criteria for evaluating the efficacy of its parts cleaning processes. In particular, LLNL and Boeing are attempting to identify levels of contamination that lead to parts failures. Sufficient contamination to cause impairment of anodizing, alodining, painting, or welding operations is considered a "part failure." In the "Phase 0" part of the project that was recently completed, preliminary analyses of aluminum substrates were performed as a first step in determining suitable cleanliness criteria for actual Boeing parts made from this material. A wide spread of contamination levels was specified for the Phase 0 test coupons, in the hopes of finding a range in which an appropriate cleanliness specification might lie. It was planned that, based on the results of the Phase 0 testing, further more detailed analyses ("Phase 1 testing") would be performed in order to more accurately identify the most appropriate criteria. For the Phase 0 testing, Boeing supplied LLNL with 3" x 6" and 3" x 10" aluminum test panels which LLNL contaminated with measured amounts of typical hydrocarbon substances encountered in Boeing' s fabrication operations. The panels were then subjected by Boeing to normal cleaning procedures, after which they went through one of the following sets of operations: l anodizing and primer painting . alodining (chromating) and primer painting l welding The coatings or welds were then examined by both Boeing and LLNL to determine whether any of the operations were impaired, and whether there was a correlation between contamination level and damage to the parts. The experimental approach and results are described in detail.

  5. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 - 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a clean, controlled ISS environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 - 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 - 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of ISS-based tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected at periodic intervals throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the development of improved cycle model tables. This paper provides a

  6. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 -- 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a dust free, manufactured microgravity EVA environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 -- 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 -- 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of International Space Station (ISS)-based EVA tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected periodically throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the

  7. The primary test of measuremental system for the actual emittance of relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Fu; Tai-bin Du; Xin Chen

    1995-12-31

    Recent, a new measuremental system has been established basically in Tsinghua University PRA. This system is able to measure the lower emittance of the electron beams from the RF accelerators for the FEL. It consists of a scanning magnetic field, a slit, a fluorescent screen, and a TV camera, an image processing system, a CAD 386 computer. Using it an actual phase diagram is obtained for 4-10 Mev electron beams, The principle and structure of the facility were reported in the Proceeding of the 15th FEL Conference. This paper describes the performance of the main components and the results of first measurement for the electron gun and 4Mev standing wave LINAC, Some new suggests are related too.

  8. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2009-02-28

    This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

  9. Field test of the Cognitive Interview: enhancing the recollection of actual victims and witnesses of crime.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R P; Geiselman, R E; Amador, M

    1989-10-01

    The Cognitive Interview was tested in the field to enhance the recollection of actual victims and witnesses of crime. The technique is based on laboratory-tested principles of memory retrieval, knowledge representation, and communication. Seven experienced detectives from the Metro-Dade Police Department were trained to use the technique and were compared with 9 untrained detectives. Before and after training, all detectives tape-recorded interviews with victims and witnesses of crime. The trained detectives elicited 47% more information after than before training, and 63% more information than did the untrained detectives. Overall collaboration rates (94%) were extremely high and were equivalent for pre- and posttrained interviews. Because the Cognitive Interview reliably enhances memory and is easily learned and administered, it should be useful for a variety of investigative interviews. PMID:2793772

  10. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form

  11. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTING FOR INCLUSION & COPRECIPITATION WITH ACTUAL TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    WARRANT, R.W.

    2006-12-11

    Fractional crystallization is being considered as a pretreatment method to support supplemental treatment of retrieved single-shell tank (SST) saltcake waste at the Hanford Site. The goal of the fractional crystallization process is to optimize the separation of the radioactivity (radionuclides) from the saltcake waste and send it to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant and send the bulk of the saltcake to the supplemental treatment plant (bulk vitrification). The primary factors that influence the separation efficiency are (1) solid/liquid separation efficiency, (2) contaminant inclusions, and (3) co-precipitation. This is a report of testing for factors (2) and (3) with actual tank waste samples. For the purposes of this report, contaminant inclusions are defined as the inclusion of supernatant, containing contaminating radionuclides, in a pocket within the precipitating saltcake crystals. Co-precipitation is defined as the simultaneous precipitation of a saltcake crystal with a contaminating radionuclide. These two factors were tested for various potential fractional crystallization product salts by spiking the composite tank waste samples (SST Early or SST Late, external letter CH2M-0600248, ''Preparation of Composite Tank Waste Samples for ME-21 Project'') with the desired target salt and then evaporating to precipitate that salt. SST Early represents the typical composition of dissolved saltcake early in the retrieval process, and SST Late represents the typical composition during the later stages of retrieval.

  12. Testing data evaluation strategies for estimating precipitation and actual evaporation from precision lysimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Frederik; Durner, Wolfgang; Fank, Johann; Pütz, Thomas; Wollschläger, Ute

    2014-05-01

    Weighing lysimeters have long been recognized as valuable tools not only for monitoring of groundwater recharge and solute transport, but also for the determination of the soil water balance and quantification of water exchange processes at the soil-plant-atmosphere interface. If well embedded into an equally-vegetated environment, they reach a hitherto unprecedented accuracy in estimating precipitation (P) by rain, dew, fog, rime and snow, as well as actual evapotranspiration (ET). At the same time, they largely avoid errors made by traditional micrometeorological instruments, such as the wind error of Hellman rain samplers or the influence of subsurface heterogeneity on readings from in situ instrumentation of soil water state variables. Beginning in 2008, the Helmholtz Association established a network of terrestrial environmental observatories (TERENO) that aim at long-term monitoring of climate and land-use change consequences. A total of 126 identically designed large weighing lysimeters, operating at a sampling frequency of 1 min-1, were installed for this purpose, which raises the demand for standardized data processing methods. In theory, estimating P and ET from these measurements is straightforward: An increase in the combined mass of the soil monolith and the collected seepage water indicates P, while a decrease indicates ET. However, in practice, lysimeter data are prone to numerous sources of error, including, but not limited to, outliers, systematic errors due to plant growth and removal, data gaps, and stochastic fluctuations. The latter pose a particularly challenging problem - if we would directly calculate P and ET from a time-series that is affected by random noise, every positive fluctuation would be interpreted as P and every negative one as ET. Consequently, we would overestimate both quantities by far. The aim of this study was to evaluate algorithms that focus on eliminating the effect of these fluctuations and to estimate actual fluxes

  13. Comparison of actual vs. synthesized ternary phase diagrams for solutes of cryobiological interest.

    PubMed

    Kleinhans, F W; Mazur, Peter

    2007-04-01

    Phase diagrams are of great utility in cryobiology, especially, those consisting of a cryoprotective agent (CPA) dissolved in a physiological salt solution. These ternary phase diagrams consist of plots of the freezing points of increasing concentrations of solutions of cryoprotective agents (CPA) plus NaCl. Because they are time-consuming to generate, ternary diagrams are only available for a small number of CPAs. We wanted to determine whether accurate ternary phase diagrams could be synthesized by adding together the freezing point depressions of binary solutions of CPA/water and NaCl/water which match the corresponding solute molality concentrations in the ternary solution. We begin with a low concentration of a solution of CPA+salt of given R (CPA/salt) weight ratio. Ice formation in that solution is mimicked by withdrawing water from it which increases the concentrations of both the CPA and the NaCl. We compute the individual solute concentrations, determine their freezing points from published binary phase diagrams, and sum the freezing points. These yield the synthesized ternary phase diagram for a solution of given R. They were compared with published experimental ternary phase diagrams for glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), sucrose, and ethylene glycol (EG) plus NaCl in water. For the first three, the synthesized and experimental phase diagrams agreed closely, with some divergence occurring as wt% concentrations exceeded 30% for DMSO and 55% for glycerol, and sucrose. However, in the case of EG there were substantial differences over nearly the entire range of concentrations which we attribute to systematic errors in the experimental EG data. New experimental EG work will be required to resolve this issue. PMID:17350609

  14. Comparison of actual vs synthesized ternary phase diagrams for solutes of cryobiological interest☆

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhans, F.W.; Mazur, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Phase diagrams are of great utility in cryobiology, especially those consisting of a cryoprotective agent (CPA) dissolved in a physiological salt solution. These ternary phase diagrams consist of plots of the freezing points of increasing concentrations of solutions of cryoprotective agents (CPA) plus NaCl. Because they are time-consuming to generate, ternary diagrams are only available for a small number of CPA's. We wanted to determine whether accurate ternary phase diagrams could be synthesized by adding together the freezing point depressions of binary solutions of CPA/water and NaCl/water which match the corresponding solute molality concentrations in the ternary solution. We begin with a low concentration of a solution of CPA + salt of given R (CPA/salt) weight ratio. Ice formation in that solution is mimicked by withdrawing water from it which increases the concentrations of both the CPA and the NaCl. We compute the individual solute concentrations, determine their freezing points from published binary phase diagrams, and sum the freezing points. These yield the synthesized ternary phase diagram for a solution of given R. They were compared with published experimental ternary phase diagrams for glycerol, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), sucrose, and ethylene glycol (EG) plus NaCl in water. For the first three, the synthesized and experimental phase diagrams agreed closely, with some divergence occurring as wt % concentrations exceeded 30% for DMSO and 55% for glycerol and sucrose. However, in the case of EG there were substantial differences over nearly the entire range of concentrations which we attribute to systematic errors in the experimental EG data. New experimental EG work will be required to resolve this issue. PMID:17350609

  15. Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-13

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  16. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-02-19

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  17. Modeling and testing of fractionation effects with refrigerant blends in an actual residential heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Biancardi, F.R.; Pandy, D.R.; Sienel, T.H.; Michels, H.H.

    1997-12-31

    The heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) industry is actively evaluating and testing hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant blends as a means of complying with current and impending national and international environmental regulations restricting the use and disposal of conventional chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerants that contribute to the global ozone-depletion effects. While analyses and system performance tools have shown that HFC refrigerant blends offer certain performance, capacity, and operational advantages, there are significant possible service and operational issues that are raised by the use of blends. Many of these issues occur due to the fractionation of the blends. Therefore, the objective of this program was to conduct analyses and experimental tests aimed at understanding these issues, develop approaches or techniques to predict these effects, and convey to the industry safe and reliable approaches. As a result, analytical models verified by laboratory data have been developed that predict the fractionation effects of HFC refrigerant blends (1) when exposed to selected POE lubricants, (2) during the system charging process from large liquid containers, and (3) during system start-up, operation, and shutdown within various system components (where two-phase refrigerant exists) and during selected system and component leakage scenarios. Model predictions and experimental results are presented for HFC refrigerant blends containing R-32, R-134a, and R-125 and the data are generalized for various operating conditions and scenarios.

  18. Final Report. LAW Glass Formulation to Support AP-101 Actual Waste Testing, VSL-03R3470-2, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, I. S.; Pegg, I. L.; Rielley, Elizabeth; Carranza, Isidro; Hight, Kenneth; Lai, Shan-Tao T.; Mooers, Cavin; Bazemore, Gina; Cecil, Richard; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-06-22

    The main objective of the work was to develop and select a glass formulation for vitrification testing of the actual waste sample of LAW AP-101 at Battelle - Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD). Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses to demonstrate compliance with contract and processing requirements, evaluation of the ability to achieve waste loading requirements, testing to demonstrate compatibility of the glass melts with melter materials of construction, comparison of the properties of simulant and actual waste glasses, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  19. Orion MPCV Phase 1 Drop Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers conducted the first test as part of Phase 1 of the Orion MPCV boilerplate test article at NASA's Langley Research Center, on Oct. 18. The 18,000-pound (8,165 kg) test article -- represent...

  20. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  1. ISDSN Sensor System Phase One Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gail Heath

    2011-09-01

    This Phase 1 Test Report documents the test activities and results completed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) sensor systems that will be deployed in the meso-scale test bed (MSTB) at Florida International University (FIU), as outlined in the ISDSN-MSTB Test Plan. This report captures the sensor system configuration tested; test parameters, testing procedure, any noted changes from the implementation plan, acquired test data sets, and processed results.

  2. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST). Phase I test results

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, W S; Alamgir, M; Sutherland, W A

    1984-09-01

    A new full height BWR system simulator has been built under the Full-Integral-Simulation-Test (FIST) program to investigate the system responses to various transients. The test program consists of two test phases. This report provides a summary, discussions, highlights and conclusions of the FIST Phase I tests. Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests have investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. Results and governing phenomena of each test have been evaluated and discussed in detail in this report. One of the FIST program objectives is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two pretest predictions made with TRACB02 are presented and compared with test data in this report.

  3. Characterization and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2008-07-10

    This report describes processing and analysis results of boehmite waste type (Group 5) and insoluble high Cr waste type (Group 6). The sample selection, compositing, subdivision, physical and chemical characterization are described. Extensive batch leach testing was conducted to define kinetics and leach factors of selected analytes as functions of NaOH concentration and temperature. Testing supports issue M-12 resolution for the Waste Treatment Plant.

  4. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Matthew; Weitz, David A.; Lu, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Phase Separation (BCAT-5-PhaseSep) experiment will photograph initially randomized colloidal samples onboard the ISS to determine their resulting structure over time. This allows the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-PhaseSep studies collapse (phase separation rates that impact product shelf-life); in microgravity the physics of collapse is not masked by being reduced to a simple top and bottom phase as it is on Earth.

  5. Physical Property and Rheological Testing of Actual Transuranic Waste from Hanford Single-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, Joel M. ); Gao, Johnway ); Delegard, Calvin H. ); Bagaasen, Larry M. ); Wells, Beric E. )

    2003-08-25

    Composites of sludge from Hanford tanks 241-B-203 (B-203), 241-T-203 (T-203), 241-T-204 (T-204), and 241-T-110 (T-110) were prepared at the Hanford 222-S Laboratory and transferred to the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for measurement of the composites' physical properties. These tank composites were prepared from core samples retieved from these tanks. These core samples may not be representative of the entire contents of the tank but provide some indication of the properties of the waste in these underground storage tanks. Dilutions in water were prepared from the composite samples. The measurements included paint filter tests, viscosity, shear strength, settling and centrifuging behavior, a qualitative test of stickiness, total solids concentration, and extrusion tests to estimate shear strength.

  6. The Control Question Test in polygraphic examinations with actual controls for truth.

    PubMed

    Bradley, M T; MacLaren, V V; Black, M E

    1996-12-01

    Subjects who were guilty of a mock crime, innocent and informed of the details of the crime or innocent, and uninformed of the details were examined on the polygraph with a modified version of a Control Question Test, which normally contains questions which are incriminating, ambiguous, and likely to be answered with a lie. We challenged the necessity of using incriminating, ambiguous control questions which may demand a lie as an answer. Instead, we created and tested control questions that were unambiguous and answered truthfully. The results, with the modified questions, showed correct identification of 86% of the guilty subjects and 83 to 89% of the innocent subjects. PMID:8961312

  7. How Are Mate Preferences Linked with Actual Mate Selection? Tests of Mate Preference Integration Algorithms Using Computer Simulations and Actual Mating Couples

    PubMed Central

    Conroy-Beam, Daniel; Buss, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Prior mate preference research has focused on the content of mate preferences. Yet in real life, people must select mates among potentials who vary along myriad dimensions. How do people incorporate information on many different mate preferences in order to choose which partner to pursue? Here, in Study 1, we compare seven candidate algorithms for integrating multiple mate preferences in a competitive agent-based model of human mate choice evolution. This model shows that a Euclidean algorithm is the most evolvable solution to the problem of selecting fitness-beneficial mates. Next, across three studies of actual couples (Study 2: n = 214; Study 3: n = 259; Study 4: n = 294) we apply the Euclidean algorithm toward predicting mate preference fulfillment overall and preference fulfillment as a function of mate value. Consistent with the hypothesis that mate preferences are integrated according to a Euclidean algorithm, we find that actual mates lie close in multidimensional preference space to the preferences of their partners. Moreover, this Euclidean preference fulfillment is greater for people who are higher in mate value, highlighting theoretically-predictable individual differences in who gets what they want. These new Euclidean tools have important implications for understanding real-world dynamics of mate selection. PMID:27276030

  8. How Are Mate Preferences Linked with Actual Mate Selection? Tests of Mate Preference Integration Algorithms Using Computer Simulations and Actual Mating Couples.

    PubMed

    Conroy-Beam, Daniel; Buss, David M

    2016-01-01

    Prior mate preference research has focused on the content of mate preferences. Yet in real life, people must select mates among potentials who vary along myriad dimensions. How do people incorporate information on many different mate preferences in order to choose which partner to pursue? Here, in Study 1, we compare seven candidate algorithms for integrating multiple mate preferences in a competitive agent-based model of human mate choice evolution. This model shows that a Euclidean algorithm is the most evolvable solution to the problem of selecting fitness-beneficial mates. Next, across three studies of actual couples (Study 2: n = 214; Study 3: n = 259; Study 4: n = 294) we apply the Euclidean algorithm toward predicting mate preference fulfillment overall and preference fulfillment as a function of mate value. Consistent with the hypothesis that mate preferences are integrated according to a Euclidean algorithm, we find that actual mates lie close in multidimensional preference space to the preferences of their partners. Moreover, this Euclidean preference fulfillment is greater for people who are higher in mate value, highlighting theoretically-predictable individual differences in who gets what they want. These new Euclidean tools have important implications for understanding real-world dynamics of mate selection. PMID:27276030

  9. Does Topic Familiarity Affect Assessed Difficulty and Actual Performance on Reading Comprehension Tests in LSP?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peretz, Arna S.; Shoham, Miriam

    A study investigated the hypothesis that topic familiarity and assessed difficulty of a second language text correlated positively with performance on reading comprehension tests in languages for special purposes (LSP). Subjects were 177 advanced students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) at Ben Gurion University (Israel). Faculty from the…

  10. Testing Reading Comprehension in LSP: Does Topic Familiarity Affect Assessed Difficulty and Actual Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peretz, Arna S.; Shoham, Miriam

    1990-01-01

    Investigates hypothesis that topic familiarity and assessed difficulty of a text correlate positively with performance on reading comprehension tests. A study of 177 advanced students of English for Specific Purposes indicates that students' subjective evaluation of the relative difficulty of a reading text is not always a reliable index of their…

  11. ILAW Glass Testing for Disposal at IDF: Phase 1 Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Papathanassiu, Adonia; Muller, Isabelle S.; Brandys, Marek; Gilbo, Konstantin; Barkatt, Aaron; Joseph, Innocent; Pegg, Ian L.; Brown, Elvie E.; Swanberg, David J.

    2011-04-11

    This document reports the results of the testing of phase 1 ORP LAW (low activity waste) glasses, also identified as enhanced LAW glasses. Testing involved are SPFT (Single Pass Flow Through), VHT (Vapor Hydration Test), and PCT (Product Consistency Test), along with the analytical tests (XRD and SEM-EDS). This report contains the data of the high waste loading ORP LAW glasses that will be used for the performance assessment of the IDF (Integrated Disposal Facility).

  12. Test plan for BWID Phase 2 electric arc melter vitrification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.R.; Turner, P.C.; Oden, L.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1994-10-01

    This test plan describes the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID), Phase 2, electric arc melter, waste treatment evaluation tests to be performed at the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) Albany Research Center. The BWID Arc Melter Vitrification Project is being conducted to evaluate and demonstrate existing industrial arc melter technology for thermally treating mixed transuranic-contaminated wastes and soils. Phase 1 baseline tests, performed during fiscal year 1993 at the USBM, were conducted on waste feeds representing incinerated buried mixed wastes and soils. In Phase 2, surrogate feeds will be processed that represent actual as-retrieved buried wastes from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex.

  13. Performance tests of a two phase ejector

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, G.S.; Kornhauser, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    The ejector expansion refrigeration cycle is a modified vapor compression cycle in which a two phase ejector is used to recover a portion of the work otherwise lost in the expansion valve. The ejector improves cycle performance by increasing compressor inlet pressure and by lowering the quality of liquid entering the evaporator. Theoretically, a cooling COP improvement of approximately 23% is achievable for a typical refrigerating cycle and an ideal ejector. If the ejector performed as well as typical single phase ejectors an improvement of 12% could be achieved. Previous tests have demonstrated a smaller 3.7% improvement; the difference is in the poor performance of the two phase ejector. The purpose of this research is to understand the operating characteristics of the two phase ejector and to devise design improvements. A two phase ejector test rig has been constructed and tested. Preliminary data show performance superior to previously tested two phase ejectors, but still inferior to single phase ejectors. Ejector performance corresponds to refrigeration cycle COP improvements ranging from 3.9% to 7.6%.

  14. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage : aerosol ratio test program and Phase 2 test results.

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Thompson, N. Slater; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Hibbs, R.S.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno; Young, F. I.; Koch, Wolfgang; Brochard, Didier; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Lange, Florentin

    2004-05-01

    A multinational test program is in progress to quantify the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device, HEDD, impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments; the program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the spent fuel ratio, SFR, the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are crucial for predicting radiological impacts. This document includes a thorough description of the test program, including the current, detailed test plan, concept and design, plus a description of all test components, and requirements for future components and related nuclear facility needs. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2003. All available test results, observations, and analyses - primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. This spent fuel sabotage - aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC, and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  15. Double-blind photo lineups using actual eyewitnesses: an experimental test of a sequential versus simultaneous lineup procedure.

    PubMed

    Wells, Gary L; Steblay, Nancy K; Dysart, Jennifer E

    2015-02-01

    Eyewitnesses (494) to actual crimes in 4 police jurisdictions were randomly assigned to view simultaneous or sequential photo lineups using laptop computers and double-blind administration. The sequential procedure used in the field experiment mimicked how it is conducted in actual practice (e.g., using a continuation rule, witness does not know how many photos are to be viewed, witnesses resolve any multiple identifications), which is not how most lab experiments have tested the sequential lineup. No significant differences emerged in rates of identifying lineup suspects (25% overall) but the sequential procedure produced a significantly lower rate (11%) of identifying known-innocent lineup fillers than did the simultaneous procedure (18%). The simultaneous/sequential pattern did not significantly interact with estimator variables and no lineup-position effects were observed for either the simultaneous or sequential procedures. Rates of nonidentification were not significantly different for simultaneous and sequential but nonidentifiers from the sequential procedure were more likely to use the "not sure" response option than were nonidentifiers from the simultaneous procedure. Among witnesses who made an identification, 36% (41% of simultaneous and 32% of sequential) identified a known-innocent filler rather than a suspect, indicating that eyewitness performance overall was very poor. The results suggest that the sequential procedure that is used in the field reduces the identification of known-innocent fillers, but the differences are relatively small. PMID:24933175

  16. Assessment of Differences in Phase 1 and Phase 2 Test Observations for Waste Treatment Plant Pulse Jet Mixer Tests with Non-Cohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Perry A.; Baer, Ellen BK; Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-10-27

    The purpose of this work was to assess the apparent discrepancy in critical suspension velocity (UCS) between M3 Phase 1 (Meyer et al. 2009) and Phase 2 testing conducted by Energy Solutions (ES) at Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE) and to address the applicability of Phase 1 scale-up laws to Phase 2 test results. Three Phase 2 test sequences were analyzed in detail. Several sources of discrepancy were identified including differences in nominal versus actual velocity, definition of model input parameters, and definition of UCS. A remaining discrepancy was shown to not be solely an artifact of Phase 1 data correlations, but was fundamental to the tests. The non-prototypic aspects of Phase 1 testing were reviewed and assessed. The effects of non-prototypic refill associated with the closed loop operation of the jets, previously known to affect cloud height, can be described in terms of a modified settling velocity. When the modified settling velocity is incorporated into the Phase 1 “new” physical model the adjusted new physical model does a better job of predicting the Phase 2 test results. The adjusted new physical model was bench marked with data taken during three prototypic drive tests. Scale-up behavior of the Phase 1 tests was reviewed. The applicability of the Phase 1 scale-up behavior to Phase 2 prototypic testing was analyzed. The effects of non-prototypic refill caused measured values of UCS to be somewhat reduced at larger scales. Hence the scale-up exponents are believed to be smaller than they would have been had there been prototypic refill. Estimated scale-up exponents for the Phase 2 testing are 0.40 for 8-tube tests and 0.36 for 12-tube tests.

  17. 29 CFR 801.24 - Rights of examinee-actual testing phase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under... during which the examiner administers the examination by using a polygraph instrument with respect to...

  18. 29 CFR 801.24 - Rights of examinee-actual testing phase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under... during which the examiner administers the examination by using a polygraph instrument with respect to...

  19. 29 CFR 801.24 - Rights of examinee-actual testing phase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under... during which the examiner administers the examination by using a polygraph instrument with respect to...

  20. 29 CFR 801.24 - Rights of examinee-actual testing phase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under... during which the examiner administers the examination by using a polygraph instrument with respect to...

  1. 29 CFR 801.24 - Rights of examinee-actual testing phase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LAWS APPLICATION OF THE EMPLOYEE POLYGRAPH PROTECTION ACT OF 1988 Restrictions on Polygraph Usage Under... during which the examiner administers the examination by using a polygraph instrument with respect to...

  2. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings was exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy are being exposed for 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after approximately 4,400 hours of exposure.

  3. Quantitative muscle strength testing: a comparison of job strength requirements and actual worker strength among military technicians.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, D M; Clark, J A; Johns, R E; White, G L; Hoffman, S

    1989-01-01

    In this study the authors investigate the percentage of mismatch between job demands and worker physical capacity in Utah National Guard mechanics. This population had demonstrated a higher incidence of low back trouble than other job descriptions reviewed. The authors utilized onsite still and videotape photography and a computerized biomechanical strength prediction model to assess loads on the lumbosacral spine due to various job tasks. Job demands were then compared to the actual physical capacity of the individual workers based on static strength testing in job-related positions. A load cell on the testing apparatus entered the force generated into a computer which averaged the force of the last three seconds of a five-second lift. It was determined that as much as a 38% mismatch existed within this population for some job tasks which these workers were exposed to. Suggestions for preventing job-related low back cumulative trauma disorders are presented, including: engineering redesign, worker selection programs, work hardening, and others. PMID:2522169

  4. Leach tests on grouts made with actual and trace metal-spiked synthetic phosphate/sulfate waste

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; LeGore, V.L.; Lindenmeier, C.W.; McLaurine, S.B.; Martin, P.F.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1989-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted experiments to produce empirical leach rate data for phosphate-sulfate waste (PSW) grout. Effective diffusivities were measured for various radionuclides ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 14}C, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and U), stable major components (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}, K and Na) and the trace constituents Ag, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, and Se. Two types of leach tests were used on samples of actual PSW grout and synthetic PSW grout: the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent replacement leach test and a static leach test. Grout produced from both synthetic and real PSW showed low leach rates for the trace metal constituents and most of the waste radionuclides. Many of the spiked trace metals and radionuclides were not detected in any leachates. None of the effluents contained measurable quantities of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 109}Cd, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 203}Hg, or As. For those trace species with detectable leach rates, {sup 125}I appeared to have the greatest leach rate, followed by {sup 99}Tc, {sup 75}Se, and finally U, {sup 14}C, and {sup 110m}Ag. Leach rates for nitrate are between those for I and Tc, but there is much scatter in the nitrate data because of the very low nitrate inventory. 32 refs., 6 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Yiming Sun

    2001-09-19

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M&O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M&O 2000a).

  6. FETAX interlaboratory validation study: Phase 2 testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bantle, J.A. . Dept. of Zoology); Burton, D.T. ); Dawson, D.A. . Dept. of Biology and Toxicology)

    1994-10-01

    The Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX) is a 96-h whole embryo developmental toxicity screening assay that can be used in ecotoxicology and in detecting mammalian developmental toxicants when an in vitro metabolic activation system is employed. A standardized American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) guide for the conduct of FETAX has been published along with a companion atlas that helps in embryo staging and identifying malformations. As part of the ASTM process, an interlaboratory validation study was undertaken to evaluate the repeatability and reliability of FETAX. Six different laboratories participated in the study. Each laboratory utilized one technician with the exception of one laboratory, which utilized two independent technicians. In Phase 1, FETAX proved to be more repeatable and reliable than many other bioassays. However, some excessive variation was observed in a few laboratories. Some of this variation may have been due to an initial lack of experience with the assay by some technicians. Phase 2, which is reported here, showed far less intralaboratory and interlaboratory variability than did Phase 1. Nonteratogens such as saccharin and sodium cyclamate showed the most consistent results, whereas more variability was observed for the teratogens caffeine and 5-fluorouracil. Interlaboratory coefficient of variation values for all FETAX end points ranged from 7.3 to 54.7%. The minimum concentration to inhibit growth proved to be the most variable end point for three of the four test chemicals, whereas the LC50 and EC50 (malformation) proved to be less variable.

  7. Testing the Performance of W-phase Source Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, L.; Kanamori, H.

    2008-12-01

    We have recently developed a method to perform fast source parameter inversions for large earthquakes using the W-phase, a very long-period phase starting right after the P-wave arrival (Kanamori and Rivera, 2008). Here we report on the results of a systematic test on the performance of the method for seismic tsunami warning purposes. We tested it using a global data set of all Mw ≥ 7.0 earthquakes between 1990 and 2008 (240 events). We use the vertical VBB data from GSN and Geoscope stations (mainly STS-1 seismometers) filtered between 0.001 and 0.005 Hz. The window length, τ, used for inversion is distance dependent, τ= 15 Δ sec (Δ in degree). Typically we use stations up to 40°- 60° corresponding to a delay of 18-25 min after the origin time. To perform inversion, we need, in addition to the seismic traces, estimates of the hypocenter parameters and of the centroid delay. The PDE parameters, which are quickly available, can be used as a first approximation of the hypocenter location. The centroid source delay is first estimated from an approximate Mw determined from the W phase amplitudes. Having a database of pre-computed Green's functions, the actual inversion process is nearly instantaneous. We can improve the inversion using either grid search or parameter optimization by a non- linear least squares method. In the test reported here, we systematically use the Harvard or the Global CMT solution as reference. Specifically, we compare our solutions with the reference solutions, in terms of the seismic moment (i.e., Mw) and the orientation of the nodal planes. The results of comparison are encouraging. The differences in Mw between the W phase and the CMT inversions are 0.1 or smaller. The differences in the angular distance between the nodal planes are typically less than 5-10 deg. The solutions are in general robust. Because of the sparse station coverage, the solutions for older events (~ 1990-1992) are not constrained well, but are still adequate for

  8. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-01-12

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

  9. PHASE I SINGLE CELL ELECTROLYZER TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J; Timothy Steeper, T

    2008-08-05

    This document reports the results of Phase I Single Cell testing of an SO{sub 2}-Depolarized Water Electrolyzer. Testing was performed primarily during the first quarter of FY 2008 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using an electrolyzer cell designed and built at SRNL. Other facility hardware were also designed and built at SRNL. This test further advances this technology for which work began at SRNL in 2005. This research is valuable in achieving the ultimate goal of an economical hydrogen production process based on the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Cycle. The focus of this work was to conduct single cell electrolyzer tests to further develop the technology of SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis as part of the HyS Cycle. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by water-splitting. Like all other sulfur-based cycles, HyS utilizes the high temperature thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both thermodynamic efficiency and hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. The anode and cathode are formed by spraying platinum containing catalyst on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). In most testing the material of the PEM was NafionR. The electrolyzer cell active area can be as large as 54.8 cm{sup 2}. Feed to the anode of the electrolyzer is a sulfuric acid solution containing sulfur dioxide. The partial pressure of sulfur dioxide could be varied in the

  10. Hybrid quantitative simulation on the in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging of three dimensional samples under actual clinic imaging parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hong; Han Shensheng; Ding Jianhui; Jiang Zhaoxia; Peng Weijun

    2009-07-06

    A hybrid model combining Monte Carlo method with diffraction theory of wave optics has been developed and applied to quantitatively simulate the in-line diffractive phase-contrast x-ray imaging of three dimensional tissue samples under actual clinic imaging parameters. The primary microcosmic interactions of medical-energy x-ray within matter including photoabsorption, Compton scattering, and coherent scattering, have been taken into account in the Monte Carlo simulation. A diffraction processing based on Fresnel diffraction theory is carried out to simulate the macroscopic diffraction effect. A comparison with experiment results has also been performed.

  11. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan; Lee, Steve; He, Hung

    2008-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The emitted infrared (IR) heat flux from the lunar surface varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. Due to the extremely high incident IR flux, especially at low beta angles, a radiator is oftentimes unable to reject the vehicle heat load throughout the entire lunar orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when the radiator is unable to reject the required heat load. The stored energy is then removed from the PCM heat exchanger when the environment is more benign. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration Low Lunar Orbit missions. The Advanced Thermal Control project at JSC is completing a PCM heat exchanger life test to determine whether further technology development is warranted. The life test is being conducted on four nPentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed and reported in the current document.

  12. Reversed-phase liquid chromatography column testing: robustness study of the test.

    PubMed

    Le Mapihan, K; Vial, J; Jardy, A

    2004-12-24

    Choosing the right RPLC column for an actual separation among the more than 600 commercially available ones still represents a real challenge for the analyst particularly when basic solutes are involved. Many tests dedicated to the characterization and the classification of stationary phases have been proposed in the literature and some of them highlighted the need of a better understanding of retention properties to lead to a rational choice of columns. However, unlike classical chromatographic methods, the problem of their robustness evaluation has often been left unaddressed. In the present study, we present a robustness study that was applied to the chromatographic testing procedure we had developed and optimized previously. A design of experiment (DoE) approach was implemented. Four factors, previously identified as potentially influent, were selected and subjected to small controlled variations: solvent fraction, temperature, pH and buffer concentration. As our model comprised quadratic terms instead of a simple linear model, we chose a D-optimal design in order to minimize the experiment number. As a previous batch-to-batch study [K. Le Mapihan, Caractérisation et classification des phases stationnaires utilisées pour l'analyse CPL de produits pharmaceutiques, Ph.D. Thesis, Pierre and Marie Curie University, 2004] had shown a low variability on the selected stationary phase, it was then possible to split the design into two parts, according to the solvent nature, each using one column. Actually, our testing procedure involving assays both with methanol and with acetonitrile as organic modifier, such an approach enabled to avoid a possible bias due to the column ageing considering the number of experiments required (16 + 6 center points). Experimental results were computed thanks to a Partial Least Squares regression procedure, more adapted than the classical regression to handle factors and responses not completely independent. The results showed the

  13. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  14. Engineering Work Plan for the Development of Phased Startup Initiative (PSI) Phases 3 and 4 Test Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-04-11

    A number of tools and equipment pieces are required to facilitate planned test operations during Phases 3 and 4 of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). These items will be used in assessing residual canister sludge quantities on cleaned fuel assemblies, sorting coarse and fine scrap fuel pieces, assessing the size distribution of scrap pieces, loading scrap into a canister, and measuring the depth of the accumulated scrap in a canister. This work plan supercedes those previously issued for development of several of these test items. These items will be considered prototype equipment until testing has confirmed their suitability for use in K West Basin. The process described in AP-EN-6-032 will be used to qualify the equipment for facility use. These items are considered non-OCRWM for PSI Phase 3 applications. The safety classification of this equipment is General Service, with Quality Level 0 (for PSI Phase 3). Quality Control inspections shall be performed to verify basic dimensions and overall configurations of fabricated components, and any special quality control verifications specified in this work plan (Section 3.1.5). These inspections shall serve to approve the test equipment for use in K West Basin (Acceptance Tag). This equipment is for information gathering only during PSI Phases 3 and 4 activities, and will be discarded at the completion of PSI. For equipment needed to support actual production throughput, development/fabrication/testing activities would be more rigorously controlled.

  15. Non-destructive testing method and apparatus utilizing phase multiplication holography

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale; Prince, James M.; Davis, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus and method for imaging of structural characteristics in test objects using radiation amenable to coherent signal processing methods. Frequency and phase multiplication of received flaw signals is used to simulate a test wavelength at least one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the actual wavelength. The apparent reduction in wavelength between the illumination and recording radiation performs a frequency translation hologram. The hologram constructed with a high synthetic frequency and flaw phase multiplication is similar to a conventional acoustic hologram construction at the high frequency.

  16. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio testing:phase 1 summary and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Manuel Gilbert; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Lange, F. , Germany); Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Dickey, Roy R.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire , France); Young, F. I.; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und reaktorsicherheit , Germany)

    2005-10-01

    This multinational test program is quantifying the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device (HEDD) impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. The experimental work, performed in four consecutive test phases, has been in progress for several years. The overall program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation for nuclear security related evaluations. The spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC), and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the preliminary, Phase 1 work performed in 2001 and 2002 at Sandia National Laboratories and the Fraunhofer Institute, Germany, and documents the experimental results obtained, observations, and preliminary interpretations. Phase 1 testing included: performance quantifications of the HEDD devices; characterization of the HEDD or conical shaped charge (CSC) jet properties with multiple tests; refinement of the aerosol particle collection apparatus being used; and, CSC jet-aerosol tests using leaded glass plates and glass pellets, serving as representative brittle materials. Phase 1 testing was quite important for the design and performance of the following Phase 2 test program and test apparatus.

  17. Actual-Waste Tests of Enhanced Chemical Cleaning for Retrieval of SRS HLW Sludge Tank Heels and Decomposition of Oxalic Acid - 12256

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Christopher J.; King, William D.; Ketusky, Edward T.

    2012-07-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge. During ECC actual waste testing, the introduction of ozone was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels. This testing did not identify physical or chemical changes in the ECC product sludge that would impact downstream processing. The results from these tests confirm observations made by AREVA NP during larger scale testing with waste simulants. This testing, however, had a decreased utilization of ozone, requiring approximately 5 moles of ozone per mole of oxalate decomposed. Decomposition of oxalates in sludge dissolved in 2 wt% OA to levels near 100 ppm oxalate using ECC process conditions required 8 to 12.5 hours without the aid of UV light and 4.5 to 8 hours with the aid of UV light. The pH and ORP were tracked during decomposition testing. Sludge components were tracked during OA decomposition, showing that most components have the highest soluble levels in the initial dissolved sludge and early decomposition samples and exhibit lower soluble levels as OA decomposition progresses. The Deposition Tank storage conditions that included pH adjustment to approximately 1 M free hydroxide tended to bring the soluble concentrations in the ECC product to nearly the same level for each test regardless of storage time, storage temperature, and contact with other tank sludge material. (authors)

  18. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2 field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.; Girshik, A.

    1998-06-01

    In Phase 1 of this project, laboratory experiments were performed on a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings by exposing them to fireside corrosion tests which simulated a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA85H, HR3C, RA253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, Ta-modified 310, NF 709, 690 clad, 671 clad, and 800HT for up to approximately 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy were exposed for 4,483, 11,348, and 15,883 hours of operation. The present results are for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after the full 15,883 hours of exposure. A previous topical report has been issued for the 4,483 hours of exposure.

  19. Bit error rate testing of fiber optic data links for MMIC-based phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Kunath, R. R.; Daryoush, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    The measured bit-error-rate (BER) performance of a fiber optic data link to be used in satellite communications systems is presented and discussed. In the testing, the link was measured for its ability to carry high burst rate, serial-minimum shift keyed (SMSK) digital data similar to those used in actual space communications systems. The fiber optic data link, as part of a dual-segment injection-locked RF fiber optic link system, offers a means to distribute these signals to the many radiating elements of a phased array antenna. Test procedures, experimental arrangements, and test results are presented.

  20. Water monitor system: Phase 1 test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Jeffers, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Automatic water monitor system was tested with the objectives of assuring high-quality effluent standards and accelerating the practice of reclamation and reuse of water. The NASA water monitor system is described. Various components of the system, including the necessary sensors, the sample collection system, and the data acquisition and display system, are discussed. The test facility and the analysis methods are described. Test results are reviewed, and recommendations for water monitor system design improvement are presented.

  1. HRB-22 irradiation phase test data report

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, F.C.; Acharya, R.T.; Baldwin, C.A.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Thoms, K.R.; Wallace, R.L.

    1995-03-01

    Irradiation capsule HRB-22 was a test capsule containing advanced Japanese fuel for the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR). Its function was to obtain fuel performance data at HTTR operating temperatures in an accelerated irradiation environment. The irradiation was performed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The capsule was irradiated for 88.8 effective full power days in position RB-3B of the removable beryllium (RB) facility. The maximum fuel compact temperature was maintained at or below the allowable limit of 1300{degrees}C for a majority of the irradiation. This report presents the data collected during the irradiation test. Included are test thermocouple and gas flow data, the calculated maximum and volume average temperatures based on the measured graphite temperatures, measured gaseous fission product activity in the purge gas, and associated release rate-to-birth rate (R/B) results. Also included are quality assurance data obtained during the test.

  2. Technical feasibility of transition phase tests in TREAT. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.R.; Bauer, T.H.; Hoff, O.I.; Koyama, K.; Stephenson, M.E.; Kraft, T.E.

    1982-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of molten fuel-steel mixtures subjected to fission heating within a HCDA environment is essential to continuing the mechanistic description of the whole-core accident into the transition phase, and further to a permanent subcritical and safe fuel debris configuration. Fundamentally, the RX1 TREAT test will simulte the transition phase of a HCDA (the accident phase in which the fuel in individual subassemblies melts and becomes a heat-generating pool of molten fuel and boiling steel). This assessment of the feasibility of such a test indicates that a transition phase test can be achieved in TREAT, at power levels simulating decay heat.

  3. CVT/GPL phase 3 integrated testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shurney, R. E.; Cantrell, E.; Maybee, G.; Schmitt, S.

    1975-01-01

    The hardware for 20 candidate shuttle program life sciences experiments was installed in the GPL and experiments were conducted during a 5-day simulated mission. The experiments involved humans, primates, rats, chickens, and marigold plants. All experiments were completed to the satisfaction of the experimenters. In addition to the scientific data gathered for each experiment, information was obtained concerning experiment hardware design and integration, experiment procedures, GPL support systems, and test operations. The results of the integrated tests are presented.

  4. 40 CFR 790.52 - Phase II test rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phase II test rule. 790.52 Section 790.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES GOVERNING TESTING CONSENT AGREEMENTS AND TEST RULES Implementation, Enforcement, and Modification of Test Rules §...

  5. 40 CFR 790.52 - Phase II test rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phase II test rule. 790.52 Section 790.52 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES GOVERNING TESTING CONSENT AGREEMENTS AND TEST RULES Implementation, Enforcement, and Modification of Test Rules §...

  6. Test plan for phase II of the Retained Gas Sampler system

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, B.E.

    1995-06-19

    The Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) system is being developed to permit characterization of the gas phase component of waste tank core samples. Several laboratory experiments have been conducted which have affirmed the proof-of-principle for separating the gas phase materials from waste tank material in a quantitative manner. However, experiments conducted thus far have dealt only with representative materials and simulated hardware mock-ups. This test plan deals with the operation and testing of actual devices in the hot cell environment. This test plan coves all aspects of the RGS system including: sampler load-in, extrusion, gas extraction, quantitative separation, sample collection, and quantitative analysis. Sample material used in this test plan will be waste tank simulants and will not be radioactive. The work environment, however, will be an operating hot cell facility and will have radioactive contaminated surfaces. Operation of the system will therefore require an official radiation work permit (RWP).

  7. Test results of the Phase 1 Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, B.E.

    1995-03-01

    Radioactive waste materials in underground high level waste (HLW) storage tanks at the Hanford Site evolve gaseous mixtures at varying rates. In order to verify the flammability of these gases and the mechanisms by which they are produced, it is necessary to sample material from these tanks in such a way as to preserve the gas phase of the material for analysis. Careful laboratory studies could then be performed on these samples which would allow judgement to be made of the hazard level of the storage tank. The Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) system is such a sampling method. A multidisciplinary team developed and issued a plan to obtain waste tank core samples for gas phase analysis. This plan contained the basic idea and function of the RGS system. Different organizations assumed responsibility of various aspects of the RGS program which they were most qualified to develop.

  8. Space Fission Propulsion Testing and Development Progress. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Pedersen, Kevin; Godfroy, Tom; Dickens, Ricky; Poston, David; Reid, Bob; Salvail, Pat; Ring, Peter; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Successful development of space fission systems will require an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. Testing can be divided into two categories, non-nuclear tests and nuclear tests. Full power nuclear tests of space fission systems we expensive, time consuming, and of limited use, even in the best of programmatic environments. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. Non-nuclear tests are affordable and timely, and the cause of component and system failures can be quickly and accurately identified. MSFC is leading a Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system using non-nuclear testing. This test series is carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities. If SAFE-related nuclear tests are desired they will have a high probability of success and can be performed at existing nuclear facilities. The paper describes the SAFE non-nuclear test series, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans.

  9. Phase 1 space fission propulsion system testing and development progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Pedersen, Kevin; Godfroy, Tom; Dickens, Ricky; Poston, David; Reid, Bob; Salvail, Pat; Ring, Peter

    2001-02-01

    Successful development of space fission systems will require an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. Testing can be divided into two categories, non-nuclear tests and nuclear tests. Full power nuclear tests of space fission systems are expensive, time consuming, and of limited use, even in the best of programmatic environments. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. Non-nuclear tests are affordable and timely, and the cause of component and system failures can be quickly and accurately identified, MSFC is leading a Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system using non-nuclear testing. This test series is carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities. If SAFE-related nuclear tests are desired, they will have a high probability of success and can be performed at existing nuclear facilities. The paper describes the SAFE non-nuclear test series, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans. .

  10. Phase C Flygt Mixer Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.

    1999-06-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) teamed with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and ITT Flygt Corporation to conduct a test program evaluating shrouded axial propeller mixers (Flygt mixers) for heel removal in SRS Tank 19. SRS is identifying and investigating techniques to remove sludge heels from waste tanks such as Tank 19.

  11. Concentrator hot-spot testing, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a study to determine the hot-spot susceptibility of concentrator cells, to provide a hot-spot qualification test for concentrator modules, and to provide guidelines for reducing hot-spot susceptibility are presented. Hot-spot heating occurs in a photovoltaic module when the short-circuit current of a cell is lower than the string operating current forcing the cell into reverse bias with a concurrent power dissipation. Although the basis for the concentrator module hot-spot qualification test is the test developed for flat-plate modules, issues, such as providing cell illumination, introduce additional complexities into the testing procedure. The same general guidelines apply for protecting concentrator modules from hot-spot stressing as apply to flat-plate modules. Therefore, recommendations are made on the number of bypass diodes required per given number of series cells per module or source circuit. In addition, a new method for determining the cell temperature in the laboratory or in the field is discussed.

  12. TESTING OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS ACTUAL WASTE TANK 5F AND TANK 12H SLUDGES

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.

    2011-08-22

    Forty three of the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have internal structures that hinder removal of the last approximately five thousand gallons of waste sludge solely by mechanical means. Chemical cleaning can be utilized to dissolve the sludge heel with oxalic acid (OA) and pump the material to a separate waste tank in preparation for final disposition. This dissolved sludge material is pH adjusted downstream of the dissolution process, precipitating the sludge components along with sodium oxalate solids. The large quantities of sodium oxalate and other metal oxalates formed impact downstream processes by requiring additional washing during sludge batch preparation and increase the amount of material that must be processed in the tank farm evaporator systems and the Saltstone Processing Facility. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) was identified as a potential method for greatly reducing the impact of oxalate additions to the SRS Tank Farms without adding additional components to the waste that would extend processing or increase waste form volumes. In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate an alternative to the baseline 8 wt. % OA chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. The baseline OA technology results in the addition of significant volumes of oxalate salts to the SRS tank farm and there is insufficient space to accommodate the neutralized streams resulting from the treatment of the multiple remaining waste tanks requiring closure. ECC is a promising alternative to bulk OA cleaning, which utilizes a more dilute OA (nominally 2 wt. % at a pH of around 2) and an oxalate destruction technology. The technology is being adapted by AREVA from their decontamination technology for Nuclear Power Plant secondary side scale removal. This report contains results from the SRNL small scale testing of the ECC process

  13. Compact range test applications, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Francis L.

    1992-01-01

    Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) has designed and fabricated a large outdoor Compact Antenna Range for the U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground (USAEPG). This range enables USAEPG to test antenna systems of large ground vehicles or aircraft that weigh up to 70 tons and are up to 50 feet in size over a frequency range of 6 to 40 GHz. Ongoing investigation and study are being conducted to determine the compatibility and adaptability of this antenna pattern measurement range to measure other system parameters such as target return signals and system responses to specialized electromagnetic environments.

  14. 40 CFR 790.52 - Phase II test rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... protocol section of the study plan, as defined by § 790.50(c)(1)(v) of this chapter, as the test standard... Modification of Test Rules § 790.52 Phase II test rule. (a) If EPA determines that the proposed study plan... Federal Register requesting comments on the ability of the proposed study plan to ensure that data...

  15. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring During GRC Phase 1 and Phase 2 Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.; Link, H.; LaCava, W.; van Dam, J.; McNiff, B.; Veers, P.; Keller, J.; Butterfield, S.; Oyague, F.

    2011-10-01

    This report will present the wind turbine drivetrain condition monitoring (CM) research conducted under the phase 1 and phase 2 Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) tests. The rationale and approach for this drivetrain CM research, investigated CM systems, test configuration and results, and a discussion on challenges in wind turbine drivetrain CM and future research and development areas, will be presented.

  16. Phase 1 Space Fission Propulsion System Testing and Development Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Godfroy, Tom; Dickens, Ricky; Poston, David; Kapernick, Rick; Reid, Bob; Salvail, Pat; Ring, Peter; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Successful development of space fission systems requires an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series, whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system, has demonstrated that realistic testing can be performed using non-nuclear methods. This test series, carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities, successfully completed a testing program with a 30 kWt core, Stirling engine, and ion engine configuration. Additionally, a 100 kWt core is in fabrication and appropriate test facilities are being reconfigured. This paper describes the current SAFE non-nuclear tests, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans.

  17. Phase 1 space fission propulsion system testing and development progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Godfroy, Tom; Dickens, Ricky; Poston, David; Kapernick, Rick; Reid, Bob; Salvail, Pat; Ring, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Successful development of space fission systems requires an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series, whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system, has demonstrated that realistic testing can be performed using non-nuclear methods. This test series, carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities, successfully completed a testing program with a 30 kWt core. Stirling engine, and ion engine configuration. Additionally, a 100 kWt core is in fabrication and appropriate test facilities are being reconfigured. This paper describes the current SAFE non-nuclear tests, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans. .

  18. Phase 1 space fission propulsion system testing and development progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, Melissa Van; Houts, Mike; Godfroy, Tom; Dickens, Ricky; Poston, David; Kapernick, Rick; Reid, Bob; Salvail, Pat; Ring, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Successful development of space fission systems requires an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through a series of non-nuclear tests. The Safe Affordable Fission Engine (SAFE) test series, whose ultimate goal is the demonstration of a 300 kW flight configuration system, has demonstrated that realistic testing can be performed using non-nuclear methods. This test series, carried out in collaboration with other NASA centers, other government agencies, industry, and universities, successfully completed a testing program with a 30 kWt core. Stirling engine, and ion engine configuration. Additionally, a 100 kWt core is in fabrication and appropriate test facilities are being reconfigured. This paper describes the current SAFE non-nuclear tests, which includes test article descriptions, test results and conclusions, and future test plans.

  19. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Cold Pour Phase 2 Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2001-02-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) at the Savannah River site (SRS) as part of a two-track approach for dispositioning weapons-usable plutonium. The Department of Energy is funding the development and testing effort for the PIP being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory. PIP is developing the ''Can-in Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding the forms with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. A cold (non-radioactive) test program was conducted to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. Tests were conducted in two phases. Phase 1 Cold Pour Tests, conducted in 1999, were scoping tests. This paper describes the Phase 2 tests conducted in 2000 that verified the adequacy of the baseline and demonstrated compliance with repository requirements.

  20. Dynamic Particle Growth Testing - Phase I Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z-C.

    2001-05-17

    There is clearly a great need to understand the processes of crystallization and solid scale formation that led to the shutdown of 2H evaporator operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and could possibly cause similar problems in the future in other evaporators. Waste streams from SRS operations that enter the evaporators generally contain alkaline, sodium nitrate/nitrite-based solutions with various changing concentrations of silicates and aluminates. It has been determined. that the silicates and aluminates served as precursor reactants for forming unwanted minerals during solution evaporation, upon transport, or upon storage. Mineral forms of the Zeolite Linde A group--sodalites and cancrinite--along with gibbsite, have often been identified as contributing to deposit (scale) formation on surfaces of the 2H evaporator as well as to the formation of solid plugs in the gravity drain line and lift line. Meanwhile, solids (amorphous or crystalline minerals) are believed, without direct evidence, to form in the bulk solutions in the evaporator. In addition, the position of deposits in the 2H evaporator suggests that scale formation depends on the interplay of heat and mass transfer, hydrodynamics, and reaction mechanisms and kinetics. The origin of solid scale formation on walls could be due to heterogeneous nucleation and/or to homogeneous nucleation followed by cluster/particle deposition. Preliminary laboratory tests at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with standing metal coupons seem to support the latter mechanism for initial deposition; that is, the solid particles form in the bulk solution first and then deposit on the metal surfaces. Further buildup of deposits may involve both mechanisms: deposition and crystal growth. Therefore, there may be a direct linkage between the solid particle growth in bulk solution and the scale buildup on the wall surfaces. On the other hand, even if scale formation is due solely to a heterogeneous mechanism

  1. The B.A.R. Demonstration Project: A Comparative Evaluation Trial of Computer-Based, Multimedia Simulation Testing and "Hands-on," Actual Equipment Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Thomas G.

    A general evaluation design was developed to examine the effectiveness of a computer-based, multimedia simulation test on California smog check mechanics. The simulation test operated on an Apple Macintosh IIci, with a single touchscreen color monitor controlling a videodisc player; it had three parts: introduction-tutorial-help, data, and test.…

  2. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Cold Pour Phase 2 Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2001-01-10

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop technology for dispositioning excess weapons grade plutonium. This program introduces the ''Can-in-Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes the plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding it with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. A cold (non-radioactive) test program was conducted to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. Tests were conducted in two phases. Phase 1 Cold Pour Tests, conducted in 1999, were scoping tests. This paper describes the Phase 2 tests conducted in 2000 which verified the adequacy of the baseline CIC design and assured that the system would meet repository quality assurance requirements.

  3. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Cold Pour Phase 2 Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2001-01-05

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop technology for dispositioning excess weapons grade plutonium. This program introduces the ''Can-in-Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes the plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding it with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. A cold (non-radioactive) test program was conducted to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. Tests were conducted in two phases. Phase 1 Cold Pour Tests, conducted in 1999, were scoping tests. This paper describes the Phase 2 tests conducted in 2000 which verified the adequacy of the baseline CIC design and assured that the system would meet repository quality assurance requirements.

  4. Transient well testing in two-phase geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Aydelotte, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    A study of well test analysis techniques in two-phase geothermal reservoirs has been conducted using a three-dimensional, two-phase, wellbore and reservoir simulation model. Well tests from Cerro Prieto and the Hawaiian Geothermal project have been history matched. Using these well tests as a base, the influence of reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, and heat capacity, along with flow rate and fracturing were studied. Single and two-phase transient well test equations were used to analyze these tests with poor results due to rapidly changing fluid properties and inability to calculate the flowing steam saturation in the reservoir. The injection of cold water into the reservoir does give good data from which formation properties can be calculated.

  5. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Stanko, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    In Phase I a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase II (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA-8511, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, 800HT, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy will be exposed for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The results will be presented for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 4000 hours of exposure.

  6. Development of advanced high-temperature heat flux sensors. Phase 2: Verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Cyr, M. A.; Strange, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    A two-phase program is conducted to develop heat flux sensors capable of making heat flux measurements throughout the hot section of gas turbine engines. In Phase 1, three types of heat flux sensors are selected; embedded thermocouple, laminated, and Gardon gauge sensors. A demonstration of the ability of these sensors to operate in an actual engine environment is reported. A segmented liner of each of two combustors being used in the Broad Specification Fuels Combustor program is instrumented with the three types of heat flux sensors then tested in a high pressure combustor rig. Radiometer probes are also used to measure the radiant heat loads to more fully characterize the combustor environment. Test results show the heat flux sensors to be in good agreement with radiometer probes and the predicted data trends. In general, heat flux sensors have strong potential for use in combustor development programs.

  7. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Stanko, G.J.

    1997-08-01

    In Phase 1 a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA-85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, 800HT, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle, coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy will be exposed for 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The results will be presented for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 4,000 hours of exposure.

  8. Phase III Simplified Integrated Test (SIT) results - Space Station ECLSS testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Dubiel, Melissa Y.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Perry, Jay L.; Whitley, Ken M.

    1990-01-01

    During 1989, phase III testing of Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) began at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the Simplified Integrated Test. This test, conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), was the first time the four baseline air revitalization subsystems were integrated together. This paper details the results and lessons learned from the phase III SIT. Future plans for testing at the MSFC CMIF are also discussed.

  9. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  10. Discrepancies between HIV prevention communication attitudes and actual conversations about HIV testing within social and sexual networks of African American men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Karin Elizabeth; Yang, Cui; Sun, Christina; Spikes, Pilgrim; Patterson, Jocelyn; Latkin, Carl Asher

    2015-01-01

    Background Promoting communication among African American men who have sex with men (AA MSM) and their social networks about HIV testing is an avenue for altering HIV prevention social norms. This study examined attitudes of AA MSM on talking with peers about HIV testing and characteristics of their network members with whom they have these conversations. Methods Data came from a cross-sectional survey of n=226 AA MSM who were aged >=18 years and self-reported sex with another male in the prior 90 days. Participants completed an inventory to characterize network members with whom they had conversations about HIV testing and HIV status. Results The majority of the sample reported that it was important/very important to talk to male friends about HIV (85%) and that they were comfortable/very comfortable talking with their friends about sexual behaviors (84%). However, a small proportion of the social network had been talked to by the participant about HIV testing (14%). Among sexual networks, 58% had been talked to about their HIV status and this was positively associated with main and casual partner type compared to partners with whom money or drugs were exchanged. Conclusion Findings suggest that positive attitudes about communication may be necessary but not sufficient for actual conversations to occur. Designing interventions that increase communication with social networks is warranted. PMID:24622631

  11. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  12. Test phase plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Test Phase Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant to satisfy the requirements of Public Law 102-579, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act (LWA). The Act provides seven months after its enactment for the DOE to submit this Plan to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for review. A potential geologic repository for transuranic wastes, including transuranic mixed wastes, generated in national-defense activities, the WIPP is being constructed in southeastern New Mexico. Because these wastes remain radioactive and chemically hazardous for a very long time, the WIPP must provide safe disposal for thousands of years. The DOE is developing the facility in phases. Surface facilities for receiving waste have been built and considerable underground excavations (2150 feet below the surface) that are appropriate for in-situ testing, have been completed. Additional excavations will be completed when they are required for waste disposal. The next step is to conduct a test phase. The purpose of the test phase is to develop pertinent information and assess whether the disposal of transuranic waste and transuranic mixed waste in the planned WIPP repository can be conducted in compliance with the environmental standards for disposal and with the Solid Waste Disposal Act (SWDA) (as amended by RCRA, 42 USC. 6901 et. seq.). The test phase includes laboratory experiments and underground tests using contact-handled transuranic waste. Waste-related tests at WIPP will be limited to contact-handled transuranic and simulated wastes since the LWA prohibits the transport to or emplacement of remote-handled transuranic waste at WIPP during the test phase.

  13. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 1 20-Inch Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 1 of the EWIT series featured water impact tests of a 20-inch hemisphere dropped from heights of 5 feet and 10 feet. The hemisphere was outfitted with an accelerometer and three pressure gages. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data.

  14. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Phase V of the single-breath washout test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichol, G. M.; Michels, D. B.; Guy, H. J. B.

    1982-01-01

    A downward-deflecting phase V is often seen following the terminal rise (phase IV) in single-breath washout tests. To investigate the nature of phase V, experiments using simultaneous washouts of N2 and tracer boluses of Ar were performed on eight normal nonsmoking subjects aged 27-41 who exhibited a phase V. Phase V is found to occur in all subjects at expiratory flow rates between 0.1 and 2.0 l/sec shortly after expiration became flow limited. Volumes of both phases IV and V increase with increasing flow rate. The difference between the exhaled volumes at which flow became limited and phase V appeared is shown to be approximately equal to the anatomic dead space. Results support a model of lung emptying in a gravitational field in which flow limitation occurs first in the lower lung regions and then progresses toward the upper regions, causing phase IV. A decrease in the amount of flow from the upper relative to the lower regions after all regions have become flow limited then causes phase V.

  16. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popelar, Carl F.; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA with a suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for the vessels described above, Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. An initial characterization of the strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth properties was performed in Phase 1. Based on the results and recommendations of Phase 1, a more extensive material property characterization effort was developed in this Phase 2 effort. This Phase 2 characterization included additional strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth of the multilayer vessel and head materials. In addition, some more limited characterization of the welds and heat affected zones (HAZs) were performed. This report

  17. Testing and Calibration of Phase Plates for JWST Optical Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; Chu, Jenny; Tournois, Severine; Eichhorn, William; Kubalak, David

    2011-01-01

    Three phase plates were designed to simulate the JWST segmented primary mirror wavefront at three on-orbit alignment stages: coarse phasing, intermediate phasing, and fine phasing. The purpose is to verify JWST's on-orbit wavefront sensing capability. Amongst the three stages, coarse alignment is defined to have piston error between adjacent segments being 30 m to 300 m, intermediate being 0.4 m to 10 m, and fine is below 0.4 m. The phase plates were made of fused silica, and were assembled in JWST Optical Simulator (OSIM). The piston difference was realized by the thickness difference of two adjacent segments. The two important parameters to phase plates are piston and wavefront errors. Dispersed Fringe Sensor (DFS) method was used for initial coarse piston evaluation, which is the emphasis of this paper. Point Diffraction Interferometer (PDI) is used for fine piston and wavefront error. In order to remove piston's 2 pi uncertainty with PDI, three laser wavelengths, 640nm, 660nm, and 780nm, are used for the measurement. The DHS test setup, analysis algorithm and results are presented. The phase plate design concept and its application (i.e. verifying the JWST on-orbit alignment algorithm) are described. The layout of JWST OSIM and the function of phase plates in OSIM are also addressed briefly.

  18. Testing and calibration of phase plates for JWST optical simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Qian; Chu, Jenny; Tournois, Severine; Eichhorn, William; Kubalak, David

    2011-10-01

    Three phase plates were designed to simulate the JWST segmented primary mirror wavefront at three on-orbit alignment stages: coarse phasing, intermediate phasing, and fine phasing. The purpose is to verify JWST's on-orbit wavefront sensing capability. Amongst the three stages, coarse alignment is defined to have piston error between adjacent segments being 30 μm to 300 μm, intermediate being 0.4 μm to 10 μm, and fine being below 0.4 μm. The phase plates were made of fused silica, and were assembled in JWST Optical Simulator (OSIM). The piston difference was realized by the thickness difference of two adjacent segments. The two important parameters to phase plates are piston and wavefront errors. Dispersed Fringe Sensor (DFS) method was used for initial coarse piston evaluation, which is the emphasis of this paper. Point Diffraction Interferometer (PDI) is used for fine piston and wavefront error. In order to remove piston's 2π uncertainty with PDI, three laser wavelengths, 640nm, 660nm, and 780nm, are used for the measurement. The DHS test setup, analysis algorithm and results are presented. The phase plate design concept and its application (i.e. verifying the JWST on-orbit alignment algorithm) are described. The layout of JWST OSIM and the function of phase plates in OSIM are also addressed briefly.

  19. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 3 Gearbox 2 Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jonathan; Wallen, Robb

    2015-06-10

    Many gearboxes in wind turbines have not been achieving their expected design life [1]; they do, however, commonly meet or exceed the design criteria specified in current standards in the gear, bearing, and wind turbine industry as well as third-party certification criteria. The cost of gearbox replacements and rebuilds, as well as the downtime associated with these failures, has elevated the cost of wind energy. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy established the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC). Its key goal is to understand the root causes of premature gearbox failures and improve their reliability [2]. The GRC is examining a hypothesis that the gap between design-estimated and actual wind turbine gearbox reliability is caused by underestimation of loads, inaccurate design tools, the absence of critical elements in the design process, or insufficient testing. This test report describes the recent tests of GRC gearbox (GB) 2 in the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) dynamometer and documents any modifications to the original test plan [3]. In this manner, it serves as a guide for interpreting the publicly released data sets with brief analyses to illustrate the data. Specific objectives of the test were to assess the effect of dynamic nontorque load (NTL) on the planetary section, generator misalignment on the highspeed shaft (HSS), and field representative conditions on the gearbox in general. Detailed analysis of those test objectives will be presented in subsequent publications.

  20. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; Popelar, Carl F.; Page, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA a comprehensive suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for aging multilayer pressure vessels, Southwest Research Institute (R) (SwRI) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. This report describes Phase 1 of this effort which includes a preliminary material property assessment as well as a fractographic, fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analyses of an induced flaw in the outer shell of a representative multilayer vessel that was subjected to cyclic pressure test. SwRI performed this Phase 1 effort under contract to the Digital Wave Corporation in support of their contract to Jacobs ATOM for the NASA Ames Research Center.

  1. Improved phase-measuring deflectometry for aspheric surfaces test.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunfeng; Lin, Xiaoyan; Hu, Anduo; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-10

    An improved phase-measuring deflectometry (PMD) is presented for the aspheric surfaces test. We explore this method from the Ronchi test in a reverse way. With this concept, a camera aperture is placed near the center of curvature of the test mirror, and fringes are displayed on a liquid crystal display screen. The fringes reflected off the test mirror are observed by the camera. By analyzing the captured fringes, the deviations of the test mirror from its ideal shape are obtained and the aspheric surface under test is reconstructed. Compared with traditional PMD, this method needs only to determine reflected rays and doesn't need to know the corresponding incident rays by calibrations, moving screen, or approximation. Both a computer simulation and preliminary experiment have been carried out to demonstrate the validity of the improved PMD. This improved PMD provides a new tool to measure aspheric surfaces quantitatively in full field for optical manufacturing. PMID:26974802

  2. Improved corner detection by ultrasonic testing using phase analysis.

    PubMed

    Broberg, Patrik; Runnemalm, Anna; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2013-02-01

    In ultrasonic testing, corners are used for sensitivity calibration in the form of notches, for measuring the sound velocity in the material, and as known reference points during testing. A 90° corner will always reflect incoming waves in the opposite direction due to a double reflection and therefore give a strong echo. This article presents a method for separating the echo from a corner from other echoes and more accurately find the position of the corner. The method is based on analysing the phase of the reflected signal. The proposed method was tested on a steel calibration block and the width of the indication was reduced by up to 50% compared to the amplitude signal. This results in a more accurate positioning of the corner. Using the phase instead of the amplitude will also improve the reliability, since reflections other than from corners will disappear. PMID:23164172

  3. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  4. Bit-error-rate testing of fiber optic data links for MMIC-based phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, K. A.; Kunath, R. R.; Daryoush, A. S.

    1990-01-01

    The measured bit-error-rate (BER) performance of a fiber optic data link to be used in satellite communications systems is presented and discussed. In the testing, the link was measured for its ability to carry high burst rate, serial-minimum shift keyed (SMSK) digital data similar to those used in actual space communications systems. The fiber optic data link, as part of a dual-segment injection-locked RF fiber optic link system, offers a means to distribute these signals to the many radiating elements of a phased array antenna. Test procedures, experimental arrangements, and test results are presented.

  5. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE I TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F.; Miller, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Lambert, D.

    2014-04-22

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further evaluation of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid1, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP):  Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models  Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters for the melter flammability models o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species Prior to startup, a number of improvements and modifications were made to the CEF, including addition of cameras, vessel support temperature measurement, and a

  6. Development of TiO2 powder-coated food packaging film and its ability to inactivate Escherichia coli in vitro and in actual tests.

    PubMed

    Chawengkijwanich, Chamorn; Hayata, Yasuyoshi

    2008-04-30

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has attracted a great deal of attention as a photocatalytic disinfecting material in the food and environmental industry. TiO2 has been used to inactivate a wide variety of microorganisms in many applications. In the present study, we aimed to develop a TiO2 powder-coated packaging film and clarify its ability to inactivate Escherichia coli both in vitro and in actual tests, using two different particle sizes and two types of illumination at different intensities. No inhibition effect of the testing method itself on the growth of E. coli was observed. The cells of E. coli were found to have decreased 3 log CFU/ml after 180 min of illumination by two 20 W black-light bulbs (wavelength of 300-400 nm) on TiO2-coated oriented-polypropylene (OPP) film, while E. coli decreased 1 log CFU/m with black-light illumination of uncoated OPP film. The results showed that both ultraviolet A (UVA; wavelength of 315-400 nm) alone and TiO2-coated OPP film combined with UVA reduced the number of E. coli cell in vitro, but that the reduction of E. coli cell numbers was greater by TiO2-coated OPP film combined with UVA. The antimicrobial effect of TiO2-coated film is dependent on the UVA light intensity (0, <0.05 and 1 mW/cm2) and the kind of artificial light (black-light and daylight fluorescent bulbs), but it is independent of the particle size of TiO2 coating on the surface of OPP film. The surviving cell numbers of E. coli on TiO2-coated film decreased 3 log and 0.35 log CFU/ml after 180 min of illumination by two 20 W black bulbs and two 20 W daylight fluorescent bulbs, respectively. Despite the lesser efficacy of the photocatalytic method with fluorescent lights, the survival of E. coli cells using this method was 50% of that using fluorescent lights alone. In the actual test, the number of E. coli cells from cut lettuce stored in a TiO2-coated film bag irradiated with UVA light decreased from 6.4 on Day 0 to 4.9 log CFU/g on Day 1, while that of an

  7. Calibration Test Set for a Phase-Comparison Digital Tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boas, Amy; Li, Samuel; McMaster, Robert

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that generates four signals at a frequency of 7.1 GHz having precisely controlled relative phases and equal amplitudes has been designed and built. This apparatus is intended mainly for use in computer-controlled automated calibration and testing of a phase-comparison digital tracker (PCDT) that measures the relative phases of replicas of the same X-band signal received by four antenna elements in an array. (The relative direction of incidence of the signal on the array is then computed from the relative phases.) The present apparatus can also be used to generate precisely phased signals for steering a beam transmitted from a phased antenna array. The apparatus (see figure) includes a 7.1-GHz signal generator, the output of which is fed to a four-way splitter. Each of the four splitter outputs is attenuated by 10 dB and fed as input to a vector modulator, wherein DC bias voltages are used to control the in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signal components. The bias voltages are generated by digital-to-analog- converter circuits on a control board that receives its digital control input from a computer running a LabVIEW program. The outputs of the vector modulators are further attenuated by 10 dB, then presented at high-grade radio-frequency connectors. The attenuation reduces the effects of changing mismatch and reflections. The apparatus was calibrated in a process in which the bias voltages were first stepped through all possible IQ settings. Then in a reverse interpolation performed by use of MATLAB software, a lookup table containing 3,600 IQ settings, representing equal amplitude and phase increments of 0.1 , was created for each vector modulator. During operation of the apparatus, these lookup tables are used in calibrating the PCDT.

  8. BWR Full Integral Simulation Test (FIST) Phase II test results and TRAC-BWR model qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, W A; Alamgir, M; Findlay, J A; Hwang, W S

    1985-10-01

    Eight matrix tests were conducted in the FIST Phase I. These tests investigated the large break, small break and steamline break LOCA's, as well as natural circulation and power transients. There are nine tests in Phase II of the FIST program. They include the following LOCA tests: BWR/6 LPCI line break, BWR/6 intermediate size recirculation break, and a BWR/4 large break. Steady state natural circulation tests with feedwater makeup performed at high and low pressure, and at high pressure with HPCS makeup, are included. Simulation of a transient without rod insertion, and with controlled depressurization, was performed. Also included is a simulation of the Peach Bottom turbine trip test. The final two tests simulated a failure to maintain water level during a postulated accident. A FIST program objective is to assess the TRAC code by comparisons with test data. Two post-test predictions made with TRACB04 are compared with Phase II test data in this report. These are for the BWR/6 LPCI line break LOCA, and the Peach Bottom turbine trip test simulation.

  9. Heat Pump Water Heater Durabliltiy Testing - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, VAND.

    2004-05-29

    Ten heat pump water heaters (HPWH) were placed in an environmentally controlled test facility and run through a durability test program of approximately 7300 duty cycles (actual cycles accumulated ranged from 6640 to 8324 for the ten units). Five of the units were upgraded integral types (HPWH mounted on storage tank, no pump) from the same manufacturer as those tested in our first durability program in 2001 (Baxter and Linkous, 2002). The other five were ''add-on'' type units (HPWH with circulation pump plumbed to a separate storage tank) from another manufacturer. This durability test was designed to represent approximately 7-10 years of normal operation to meet the hot water needs of a residence. The integral units operated without incident apart from two control board failures. Both of these were caused by inadvertent exposure to very hot and humid (>135 F dry bulb and >120 F dew point) conditions that occurred due to a test loop failure. It is not likely that any residential water heater would be installed where such conditions were expected so these failures are not considered a long-term reliability concern. Two of the integral HPWHs featured a condensate management system (CMS) option that effectively eliminated any need for an evaporator condensate drain, but imposed significant efficiency penalties when operating in high humidity ambient conditions. The add-on units experienced no operational failures (breakdowns with loss of hot water production) during the course of the testing. However, their control systems exhibited some performance degradation under the high temperature, high humidity test conditions--HPWHs would shut off with tank water temperatures 15-20 F lower than when operating under moderate ambient conditions. One unit developed a refrigerant leak during the test program and lost about 50% of its charge resulting in reduced efficiency. Efficiency measurements on all the integral units and four of the add-on units showed significantly higher

  10. Np Behavior in Synthesized Uranyl Phases: Results of Initial Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I.; Douglas, Matthew; McNamara, Bruce K.; Clark, Sue B.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2004-09-28

    Initial tests were completed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for developing a potential mechanism to retard the mobility of neptunium at the Yucca Mountain repository. Neptunium is of concern because of its mobility in the environment and long half life, contributing a large percentage of the potential dose over extended times at the perimeter of the site. The mobility of neptunium could be retarded by associating with uranium mineral phases. The following four uranium mineral phases were examined and are potential secondary phases expected to form as a result of interactions of spent nuclear fuel with the local environment: meta-schoepite, studtite, uranophane, and sodium boltwoodite. The fate of the neptunium was examined in these synthetic experiments.

  11. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase

  12. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel test database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternate recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data were acquired by competing contractors and NASA centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. This wind tunnel test data has been compiled into a database and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retro-glide and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks and double delta wings.

  13. Field test of Six-Phase Soil Heating and evaluation of engineering design code

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsman, T.M.; Roberts, J.S.; Lessor, D.L.; Heath, W.O.

    1993-02-01

    A field test was conducted to evaluate the performance of Six-Phase Soil Heating to enhance the removal of contaminants. The purpose of the test was to determine the scale-up characteristics of the Six-Phase Soil Heating technology and to evaluate a computer process simulator developed for the technology. The test heated a 20-ft diameter cylinder of uncontaminated soil to a 10-ft depth. Six-phase ac power was applied at a rate of 30--35 kW using a power system built from surplus electrical components. The test ran unattended, using a computer-based system to record data, alert staff of any excursions in operating conditions via telephone, and provide automatic shut-off of power depending on the type of excursion. The test data included in situ soil temperatures, voltage profiles, and moisture profiles (using a neutron-probetechnique). After 50 days of heating, soil in the center of the array at the 6-ft depth reached 80[degrees]C. Soil temperatures between the two electrodes at this depth reached approximately 75[degrees]C. Data from this test were compared with those predicted by a computer process simulator. The computer process simulator is a modified version of the TOUGH2 code, a thermal porous media code that can be used to determine the movement of air and moisture in soils. The code was modified to include electrical resistive heating and configured such that an application could be run quickly on a workstation (approximately 5 min for 1 day of field operation). Temperature and soil resistance data predicted from the process simulations matched actual data fairly closely. A series of parametric studies was performed to assess the affect of simulation assumptions on predicted parameters.

  14. Field test of Six-Phase Soil Heating and evaluation of engineering design code

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsman, T.M.; Roberts, J.S.; Lessor, D.L.; Heath, W.O.

    1993-02-01

    A field test was conducted to evaluate the performance of Six-Phase Soil Heating to enhance the removal of contaminants. The purpose of the test was to determine the scale-up characteristics of the Six-Phase Soil Heating technology and to evaluate a computer process simulator developed for the technology. The test heated a 20-ft diameter cylinder of uncontaminated soil to a 10-ft depth. Six-phase ac power was applied at a rate of 30--35 kW using a power system built from surplus electrical components. The test ran unattended, using a computer-based system to record data, alert staff of any excursions in operating conditions via telephone, and provide automatic shut-off of power depending on the type of excursion. The test data included in situ soil temperatures, voltage profiles, and moisture profiles (using a neutron-probetechnique). After 50 days of heating, soil in the center of the array at the 6-ft depth reached 80{degrees}C. Soil temperatures between the two electrodes at this depth reached approximately 75{degrees}C. Data from this test were compared with those predicted by a computer process simulator. The computer process simulator is a modified version of the TOUGH2 code, a thermal porous media code that can be used to determine the movement of air and moisture in soils. The code was modified to include electrical resistive heating and configured such that an application could be run quickly on a workstation (approximately 5 min for 1 day of field operation). Temperature and soil resistance data predicted from the process simulations matched actual data fairly closely. A series of parametric studies was performed to assess the affect of simulation assumptions on predicted parameters.

  15. Theory and Tests of Two-Phase Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1986-01-01

    New turbines open possibility of new types of power cycles. Report describes theoretical analysis and experimental testing of two-phase impulse turbines. Such turbines open possibility of new types of power cycles operating with extremely wet mixtures of steam and water, organic fluids, or immiscible liquids and gases. Possible applications are geothermal power, waste-heat recovery, refrigerant expansion, solar conversion, transportation, and engine-bottoming cycles.

  16. Combined Analysis of Phase I and Phase II Data to Enhance the Power of Pharmacogenetic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, J; Chenel, M; Comets, E

    2016-01-01

    We show through a simulation study how the joint analysis of data from phase I and phase II studies enhances the power of pharmacogenetic tests in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. PK profiles were simulated under different designs along with 176 genetic markers. The null scenarios assumed no genetic effect, while under the alternative scenarios, drug clearance was associated with six genetic markers randomly sampled in each simulated dataset. We compared penalized regression Lasso and stepwise procedures to detect the associations between empirical Bayes estimates of clearance, estimated by nonlinear mixed effects models, and genetic variants. Combining data from phase I and phase II studies, even if sparse, increases the power to identify the associations between genetics and PK due to the larger sample size. Design optimization brings a further improvement, and we highlight a direct relationship between η‐shrinkage and loss of genetic signal. PMID:27069775

  17. Combined Analysis of Phase I and Phase II Data to Enhance the Power of Pharmacogenetic Tests.

    PubMed

    Tessier, A; Bertrand, J; Chenel, M; Comets, E

    2016-03-01

    We show through a simulation study how the joint analysis of data from phase I and phase II studies enhances the power of pharmacogenetic tests in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. PK profiles were simulated under different designs along with 176 genetic markers. The null scenarios assumed no genetic effect, while under the alternative scenarios, drug clearance was associated with six genetic markers randomly sampled in each simulated dataset. We compared penalized regression Lasso and stepwise procedures to detect the associations between empirical Bayes estimates of clearance, estimated by nonlinear mixed effects models, and genetic variants. Combining data from phase I and phase II studies, even if sparse, increases the power to identify the associations between genetics and PK due to the larger sample size. Design optimization brings a further improvement, and we highlight a direct relationship between η-shrinkage and loss of genetic signal. PMID:27069775

  18. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP):  Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models;  Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36

  19. HESTIA Phase I Test Results: The Air Revitalization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Sarah E.; Hansen, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    In any human spaceflight mission, a number of Environmental Control & Life Support System (ECLSS) technologies work together to provide the conditions astronauts need to live healthily, productively, and comfortably in space. In a long-duration mission, many of these ECLSS technologies may use materials supplied by In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), introducing more interactions between systems. The Human Exploration Spacecraft Test-bed for Integration & Advancement (HESTIA) Project aims to create a test-bed to evaluate ECLSS and ISRU technologies and how they interact in a high-fidelity, closed-loop, human-rated analog habitat. Air purity and conditioning are essential components within any ECLSS and for HESTIA's first test they were achieved with the Air Revitalization System (ARS) described below. The ARS provided four essential functions to the test-bed chamber: cooling the air, removing humidity from the air, removing trace contaminants, and scrubbing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air. In this case, the oxygen supply function was provided by ISRU. In the current configuration, the ARS is a collection of different subsystems. A fan circulates the air, while a condensing heat exchanger (CHX) pulls humidity out of the air. A Trace Contaminant Removal System (TCRS) filters the air of potentially harmful contaminants. Lastly, a Reactive Plastic Lithium Hydroxide (RP-LiOH) unit removes CO2 from the breathing air. During the HESTIA Phase I test in September 2015, the ARS and its individual components each functioned as expected, although further analysis is underway. During the Phase I testing and in prior bench-top tests, the energy balance of heat removed by the CHX was not equal to the cooling it received. This indicated possible instrument error and therefore recalibration of the instruments and follow-up testing is planned in 2016 to address the issue. The ARS was tested in conjunction with two other systems: the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) and the

  20. Enhanced INL Power Grid Test Bed Infrastructure – Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Carol Ann; West, Grayson Shawn; McBride, Scott Alan

    2014-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) laboratory, owns, operates, and maintains transmission and distribution power grid infrastructure to support the INL multi program mission. Sections of this power infrastructure, known as the INL Power Grid Test Bed, have been and are being used by government and industry to develop, demonstrate, and validate technologies for the modern grid, including smart grid, on a full scale utility test bed. INL’s power grid includes 61 miles of 140 MW, 138 kV rated electrical power transmission supplying seven main substations, each feeding a separate facility complex (or ‘city’) within the INL’s 890 square mile Site. This power grid is fed by three commercial utilities into the INL’s main control substation, but is operated independently from the commercial utility through its primary substation and command and control center. Within the INL complex, one of the seven complexes, the Critical Infrastructure Test Range Complex (CITRC), has been designated as the INL complex for supporting critical infrastructure research and testing. This complex includes its own substation and 13.8kV distribution network, all configurable and controlled by the INL research and development programs. Through investment partnership with the DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE OE), INL is enhancing its existing distribution infrastructure to expand the types of testing that can be conducted and increase flexibility for testing configurations. The enhancement of the INL Power Grid Test Bed will enable development and full scale testing of smart-grid-related technologies and smart devices including testing interoperability, operational performance, reliability, and resiliency contribution at multiple distribution voltage classes, specifically 15kV, 25kV, and 35kV. The expected time frame for completion of the Phase I portion of the enhancement would be 4th quarter fiscal year (FY) 2015.

  1. Vectra GSI, Inc. low-level waste melter testing Phase 1 test report

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, G.E.; Wilson, C.N.

    1996-02-21

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Vectra GSI, Inc. was one of seven vendors selected for Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW that were completed during fiscal year 1995. The attached report prepared by Vectra GSI, Inc. describes results of melter testing using slurry feed and dried feeds. Results of feed drying and prereaction tests using a fluid bed calciner and rotary dryer also are described.

  2. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  3. Testing gravity with the stacked phase space around galaxy clusters.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tsz Yan; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Schmidt, Fabian; Takada, Masahiro

    2012-08-01

    In general relativity, the average velocity field of dark matter around galaxy clusters is uniquely determined by the mass profile. The latter can be measured through weak lensing. We propose a new method of measuring the velocity field (phase space density) by stacking redshifts of surrounding galaxies from a spectroscopic sample. In combination with lensing, this yields a direct test of gravity on scales of 1-30 Mpc. Using N-body simulations, we show that this method can improve upon current constraints on f(R) and Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model parameters by several orders of magnitude when applied to upcoming imaging and redshift surveys. PMID:23006162

  4. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

  5. Theory and tests of two-phase turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical model for two-phase turbines was developed. Apparatus was constructed for testing one- and two-stage turbines (using speed decrease from stage to stage). Turbines were tested with water and nitrogen mixtures and refrigerant 22. Nozzle efficiencies were 0.78 (measured) and 0.72 (theoretical) for water and nitrogen mixtures at a water/nitrogen mixture ratio of 68, by mass; and 0.89 (measured) and 0.84 (theoretical) for refrigerant 22 expanding from 0.02 quality to 0.28 quality. Blade efficiencies (shaft power before windage and bearing loss divided by nozzle jet power) were 0.63 (measured) and 0.71 (theoretical) for water and nitrogen mixtures and 0.62 (measured) and 0.63 (theoretical) for refrigerant 22 with a single stage turbine, and 0,70 (measured) and 0.85 (theoretical) for water and nitrogen mixtures with a two-stage turbine.

  6. Environmental performance of an integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) reactor treating actual municipal wastewater during start-up phase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nitin Kumar; Kazmi, Absar Ahmad; Starkl, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The present study summarizes the start-up performance and lessons learned during the start-up and optimization of a pilot-scale plant employing integrated fixed film activated sludge (IFAS) process treating actual municipal wastewater. A comprehensive start-up was tailored and implemented to cater for all the challenges and problems associated with start-up. After attaining desired suspended biomass (2,000-3,000 mg/L) and sludge age (∼7 days), the average biological oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals were observed as 77.3 and 70.9%, respectively, at optimized conditions, i.e. hydraulic retention time (HRT), 6.9 h; return sludge rate, 160%. The influent concentrations of COD, BOD, total suspended solids, NH3-N, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were found to be in the range of 157-476 mg/L, 115-283 mg/L, 152-428 mg/L, 23.2-49.3 mg/L, 30.1-52 mg/L and 3.6-7.8 mg/L, respectively, and the minimum effluent concentrations were achieved as ∼49 mg/L, 23 mg/L, 35 mg/L, 2.2 mg/L, 3.4 mg/L and 2.8 mg/L, respectively, at optimum state. The present system was found effective in the removal of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, 79%; Salmonella spp., 97.5%; Shigella spp., 92.9%) as well as coliforms (total coliforms, 97.65%; faecal coliforms, 80.35%) without any disinfection unit. Moreover it was observed that the time required for the stabilization of the plant was approximately 3 weeks if other parameters (sludge age, HRT and dissolved oxygen) are set to optimized values. PMID:26540547

  7. Test Plan: Phase 1, Hanford LLW melter tests, GTS Duratek, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-06-14

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384215] is GTS Duratek, Inc., Columbia, Maryland. The GTS Duratek project manager for this work is J. Ruller. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes melting of glass with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a DuraMelter{trademark} vitrification system.

  8. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings -- Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Seitz, W.W.

    1997-12-01

    In Phase 1 a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase 2 (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347 RA-85H, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 Ta modified, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for approximately 4,000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were assembled on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, the probe was installed in the reheater activity of the boiler and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. The results will be presented for the preliminary metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 16,000 hours of exposure. Continued metallurgical and interpretive analysis is still on going.

  9. Theory and tests of two-phase turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Elliot, D.G.

    1982-03-15

    Two-phase turbines open the possibility of new types of power cycles operating with extremely wet mixtures of steam and water, organic fluids, or immiscible liquids and gases. Possible applications are geothermal power, waste-heat recovery, refrigerant expansion, solar conversion, transportation turbine engines, and engine bottoming cycles. A theoretical model for two-phase impulse turbines was developed. Apparatus was constructed for testing one- and two-stage turbines (using speed decrease from stage to stage). Turbines were tested with water-and-nitrogen mixtures and Refrigerant 22. Nozzle efficiencies were 0.78 (measured) and 0.72 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures at a water/nitrogen mixture ratio of 68, by mass; and 0.89 (measured) and 0.84 (theoretical) for Refrigerant 22 expanding from 0.02 quality to 0.28 quality. Blade efficiencies (shaft power before windage and bearing loss divided by nozzle jet power) were 0.63 (measured) and 0.71 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures and 0.62 (measured) and 0.63 (theoretical) for Refrigerant 22 with a single-stage turbine, and 0.70 (measured) and 0.85 (theoretical) for water-and-nitrogen mixtures with a two-stage turbine.

  10. Optimal allocation of testing effort during testing and debugging phases: a control theoretic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, P. K.; Pham, Hoang; Chanda, Udayan; Kumar, Vijay

    2013-09-01

    Allocation of efforts to a software development project during the testing phase is a multifaceted task for software managers. The challenges become stiffer when the nature of the development process is considered in the dynamic environment. Many software reliability growth models have been proposed in last decade to minimise the total testing-effort expenditures, but mostly under static assumption. The main purpose of this article is to investigate an optimal resource allocation plan to minimise the cost of software during the testing and operational phase under dynamic condition. An elaborate optimisation policy based on the optimal control theory is proposed and numerical examples are illustrated. This article also studies the optimal resource allocation problems for various conditions by examining the behaviour of the model parameters and also suggests policy for the optimal release time of the software. The experimental results greatly help us to identify the contribution of each selected parameter and its weight.

  11. Tests of the Contamination Analysis Unit, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, M; Daley, P

    2003-09-11

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a mass spectrometer-based system that measures organic surface residues in situ. This system, called the Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU), can detect and quantify a variety of volatile surface residues on a range of different substrates. Residue samples are removed from the substrate using a combination of vacuum and thermal desorption, and are then ionized and quantified by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The current effort (Phase 2) was carried out in accordance with Thiokol Project Test Plan PTP-0467. A first phase of tests was completed under PTP-0327 and the results reported in TWR-75385. The Phase 2 test plan, PTP-0467, is a follow-on to PTP-0327, and was conducted in order to more fully determine the capabilities of the CAU. This report summarizes experiments in which the CAU was evaluated for application in reusable solid rocket motor production scenarios. The report has been ordered by the tasks requested by ATK Thiokol Propulsion Testplan PTP-0467. Project tasks included the following: (1) Determine the amount of residual propellant and liner components with the CAU after coupons have been cleaned. (2) Determine if the CAU can detect solvent that has soaked into NBR. (3) Test the capabilities of the CAU for analyzing non-flat surfaces on the inside and outside of the 12-foot diameter Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) and 5-foot diameter nozzle throat housing surfaces. (4) Determine if solvent extraction and gas chromatography (GC) approaches are able to enhance the surface analysis data available through use of the mass-spectrometer-based CAU. (5) Determine the CAU's detection limit for various soils and cleaners. (6) Determine if contact of both Viton and silicon O-rings with critical substrates will result in any visual evidence of the contact, when observed under black light. (7) Demonstrate CAU viability during routine manufacturing Thiokol manufacturing operations. This effort was

  12. Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

    1992-10-01

    How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

  13. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. The Self Actualized Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Michael; Moylan, Mary Elizabeth

    A study examined the commonalities that "voracious" readers share, and how their experiences can guide parents, teachers, and librarians in assisting children to become self-actualized readers. Subjects, 25 adults ranging in age from 20 to 67 years, completed a questionnaire concerning their reading histories and habits. Respondents varied in…

  15. Laboratory Testing of a Phased Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Give'on, Amir; Kuhnert, Andreas; Niessner, Albert

    2011-01-01

    We present high-contrast images from laboratory testing of a Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA) coronagraph at NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). Using a deformable mirror and wavefront estimation and control algorithms, we create a 'dark hole' in the monochromatic point-spread function with an inner working angle of (2.05 f lambda/D), with a mean intensity 3.5x10(exp -8). We discuss the contributions to this floor, and the techniques being developed to improve it. We also present simulations that investigate the effect of Lyot stops of various sizes, and conclude that a Lyot stop is necessary for 10(exp -9) performance but that an annular postapodizer is not necessary.

  16. Phase 1 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent [Jubin 2012b]. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the first phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 and early FY-2014. Testing has been performed to address questions posed in the test plan, and followed the testing outline in the test plan. Tests established detection limits, developed procedures for sample analysis with minimal analytical interferences, and confirmed earlier results that show that the methyl iodide reacts when in contact with the AgZ sorbent, and not significantly in the gas flow upstream of the sorbent. The reaction(s) enable separation of the iodine from the organic moiety, so that the iodine can chemisorb onto the sorbent. The organic moiety can form other compounds, some of which are organic compounds that are detected and can be tentatively identified using GC-FID and GCMS. Test results also show that other gas constituents (NOx and/or H2O) can affect the methyl iodide reactions. With NOx and H2O present in the gas stream, the majority of uncaptured iodine exiting iodine-laden sorbent beds is in the form of I2 or HI, species that

  17. Free-piston stirling component test power converter test results of the initial test phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochat, George R.; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1992-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)—Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has the responsibility to develop power technologies that have the potential of satisfying anticipated future space mission power requirements. The Free-Piston Stirling Power Converter (FPSC) is one of the many power technologies being evaluated and developed by NASA. FPSPCs have the potential to provide high reliability, long life, efficient operation; and they can be coupled with all potential heat sources, nuclear, radioisotope and solar, various heat input, heat rejection systems, and various power management and distribution systems. FPSPCs can complete favorably with alternative power conversion systems over a range of hundreds of watts to hundreds of kilowatts and to megawatts. Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) is developed FPSPC technology under contract to NASA-LeRC and will demonstrate this technology in two full-scale power converters. The first of these, the Component Test Power Converter (CTPC), initiated testing in Spring 1991 to evaluate mechanical operation at space operating temperatures. This paper reviews the testing of the CTPC at MTI and the companion testing of the earlier technology engine, the Space Power Research Engine (SPRE) at NASA-LeRC.

  18. Large-scale numerical simulations of star formation put to the test. Comparing synthetic images and actual observations for statistical samples of protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimann, S.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Haugbølle, T.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Both observations and simulations of embedded protostars have progressed rapidly in recent years. Bringing them together is an important step in advancing our knowledge about the earliest phases of star formation. Aims: To compare synthetic continuum images and spectral energy distributions (SEDs), calculated from large-scale numerical simulations, to observational studies, thereby aiding in both the interpretation of the observations and in testing the fidelity of the simulations. Methods: The adaptive mesh refinement code, RAMSES, is used to simulate the evolution of a 5 pc × 5 pc × 5 pc molecular cloud. The simulation has a maximum resolution of 8 AU, resolving simultaneously the molecular cloud on parsec scales and individual protostellar systems on AU scales. The simulation is post-processed with the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D, which is used to create synthetic continuum images and SEDs of the protostellar systems. In this way, more than 13 000 unique radiative transfer models, of a variety of different protostellar systems, are produced. Results: Over the course of 0.76 Myr the simulation forms more than 500 protostars, primarily within two sub-clusters. The synthetic SEDs are used to calculate evolutionary tracers Tbol and Lsmm/Lbol. It is shown that, while the observed distributions of the tracers are well matched by the simulation, they generally do a poor job of tracking the protostellar ages. Disks form early in the simulation, with 40% of the Class 0 protostars being encircled by one. The flux emission from the simulated disks is found to be, on average, a factor ~6 too low relative to real observations; an issue that can be traced back to numerical effects on the smallest scales in the simulation. The simulated distribution of protostellar luminosities spans more than three order of magnitudes, similar to the observed distribution. Cores and protostars are found to be closely associated with one another, with the distance distribution

  19. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Krawchuk, M.T.; Van Weele, S.F.

    1995-08-01

    A number of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings have previously been exposed in Phase I to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. This program is exposing samples of TP 347, RA-85H, HR-3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, NF-709, 690 clad, and 671 clad, which showed good corrosion resistance from Phase 1, to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW, coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on air-cooled, retractable corrosion probes, installed in the reheater cavity, and are being controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. The exposure will continue for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. After the three exposure times, the samples will be metallurgically examined to determine the wastage rates and mode of attack. The probes were commissioned November 16, 1994. The temperatures are being recorded every 15 minutes, and the weighted average temperature calculated for each sample. Each of the alloys is being exposed to a temperature in each of two temperature bands-1150 to 1260{degrees}F and 1260 to 1325{degrees}F. After 2000 hours of exposure, one of the corrosion probes was cleaned and the wall thicknesses were ultrasonically measured. The alloy performance from the field probes will be discussed.

  20. Real time blood testing using quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hoa V; Bhaduri, Basanta; Tangella, Krishnarao; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Popescu, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a real-time blood testing system that can provide remote diagnosis with minimal human intervention in economically challenged areas. Our instrument combines novel advances in label-free optical imaging with parallel computing. Specifically, we use quantitative phase imaging for extracting red blood cell morphology with nanoscale sensitivity and NVIDIA's CUDA programming language to perform real time cellular-level analysis. While the blood smear is translated through focus, our system is able to segment and analyze all the cells in the one megapixel field of view, at a rate of 40 frames/s. The variety of diagnostic parameters measured from each cell (e.g., surface area, sphericity, and minimum cylindrical diameter) are currently not available with current state of the art clinical instruments. In addition, we show that our instrument correctly recovers the red blood cell volume distribution, as evidenced by the excellent agreement with the cell counter results obtained on normal patients and those with microcytic and macrocytic anemia. The final data outputted by our instrument represent arrays of numbers associated with these morphological parameters and not images. Thus, the memory necessary to store these data is of the order of kilobytes, which allows for their remote transmission via, for example, the cellular network. We envision that such a system will dramatically increase access for blood testing and furthermore, may pave the way to digital hematology. PMID:23405194

  1. Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration, Phase I Flight-Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Nabaa, Nassib

    2007-01-01

    The first phase of the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration (AARD) project was completed on August 30, 2006. The goal of this 15-month effort was to develop and flight-test a system to demonstrate an autonomous refueling engagement using the Navy style hose-and-drogue air-to-air refueling method. The prime contractor for this Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored program was Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), Sparks, Nevada. The responsible flight-test organization was the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), Edwards, California, which also provided the F/A-18 receiver airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The B-707-300 tanker airplane (The Boeing Company) was contracted through Omega Aerial Refueling Services, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia, and the optical tracking system was contracted through OCTEC Ltd., Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom. Nine research flights were flown, testing the functionality and performance of the system in a stepwise manner, culminating in the plug attempts on the final flight. Relative position keeping was found to be very stable and accurate. The receiver aircraft was capable of following the tanker aircraft through turns while maintaining its relative position. During the last flight, six capture attempts were made, two of which were successful. The four misses demonstrated excellent characteristics, the receiver retreating from the drogue in a controlled, safe, and predictable manner that precluded contact between the drogue and the receiver aircraft. The position of the receiver aircraft when engaged and in position for refueling was found to be 5.5 to 8.5 ft low of the ideal position. The controller inputs to the F/A-18 were found to be extremely small

  2. Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration: Phase I Flight-Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibley, Ryan P.; Allen, Michael J.; Nabaa, Nassib

    2007-01-01

    The first phase of the Autonomous Airborne Refueling Demonstration (AARD) project was completed on August 30, 2006. The goal of this 15-month effort was to develop and flight-test a system to demonstrate an autonomous refueling engagement using the Navy style hose-and-drogue air-to-air refueling method. The prime contractor for this Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) sponsored program was Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC), Sparks, Nevada. The responsible flight-test organization was the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC), Edwards, California, which also provided the F/A-18 receiver airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The B-707-300 tanker airplane (The Boeing Company) was contracted through Omega Aerial Refueling Services, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia, and the optical tracking system was contracted through OCTEC Ltd., Bracknell, Berkshire, United Kingdom. Nine research flights were flown, testing the functionality and performance of the system in a stepwise manner, culminating in the plug attempts on the final flight. Relative position keeping was found to be very stable and accurate. The receiver aircraft was capable of following the tanker aircraft through turns while maintaining its relative position. During the last flight, six capture attempts were made, two of which were successful. The four misses demonstrated excellent characteristics, the receiver retreating from the drogue in a controlled, safe, and predictable manner that precluded contact between the drogue and the receiver aircraft. The position of the receiver aircraft when engaged and in position for refueling was found to be 5.5 to 8.5 ft low of the ideal position. The controller inputs to the F/A-18 were found to be extremely small.

  3. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX); Phase 1 Test Procedure: Building Thermal Fabric Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, Ron

    2010-08-01

    This report documents the initial Phase 1 test process for testing the reliability of software models that predict retrofit energy savings of existing homes, including their associated calibration methods.

  4. Thin film temperature sensors, phase 3. [for engine-test evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.; Claing, R. G.; Anderson, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    A thin film thermocouple system installation suitable for engine test evaluation was designed, and an engine test plan was prepared. Film adherence, durability, accuracy, and drift characteristics were improved. Film thickness was increased to 14 microns, and drift was reduced to less than 0.02 percent of Fahrenheit temperature per hour on actual turbine blades at 1255 K.

  5. Phase 2: HGM air flow tests in support of HEX vane investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Steele, L. L.; Eisenhart, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    Following the start of SSME certification testing for the Pratt and Whitney Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP), cracking of the leading edge of the inner HEX vane was experienced. The HEX vane, at the inlet of the oxidizer bowl in the Hot Gas Manifold (HGM), accepts the HPOTP turbine discharge flow and turns it toward the Gaseous Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (GOX HEX) coil. The cracking consistently initiated over a specific circumferential region of the hex vane, with other circumferential locations appearing with increased run time. Since cracking had not to date been seen with the baseline HPOTP, a fluid-structural interaction involving the ATD HPOTP turbine exit flowfield and the HEX inner vane was suspected. As part of NASA contract NAS8-36801, Pratt and Whitney conducted air flow tests of the ATD HPOTP turbine turnaround duct flowpath in the MSFC Phase 2 HGM air flow model. These tests included HEX vane strain gages and additional fluctuating pressure gages in the turnaround duct and HEX vane flowpath area. Three-dimensional flow probe measurements at two stations downstream of the turbine simulator exit plane were also made. Modifications to the HPOTP turbine simulator investigated the effects on turbine exit flow profile and velocity components, with the objective of reproducing flow conditions calculated for the actual ATD HPOTP hardware. Testing was done at the MSFC SSME Dynamic Fluid Air Flow (Dual-Leg) Facility, at air supply pressures between 50 and 250 psia. Combinations of turbine exit Mach number and pressure level were run to investigate the effect of flow regime. Information presented includes: (1) Descriptions of turbine simulator modifications to produce the desired flow environment; (2) Types and locations for instrumentation added to the flow model for improved diagnostic capability; (3) Evaluation of the effect of changes to the turbine simulator flowpath on the turbine exit flow environment; and (4

  6. Phase 2: HGM air flow tests in support of HEX vane investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Steele, L. L.; Eisenhart, D. W.

    1993-07-01

    Following the start of SSME certification testing for the Pratt and Whitney Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP), cracking of the leading edge of the inner HEX vane was experienced. The HEX vane, at the inlet of the oxidizer bowl in the Hot Gas Manifold (HGM), accepts the HPOTP turbine discharge flow and turns it toward the Gaseous Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (GOX HEX) coil. The cracking consistently initiated over a specific circumferential region of the hex vane, with other circumferential locations appearing with increased run time. Since cracking had not to date been seen with the baseline HPOTP, a fluid-structural interaction involving the ATD HPOTP turbine exit flowfield and the HEX inner vane was suspected. As part of NASA contract NAS8-36801, Pratt and Whitney conducted air flow tests of the ATD HPOTP turbine turnaround duct flowpath in the MSFC Phase 2 HGM air flow model. These tests included HEX vane strain gages and additional fluctuating pressure gages in the turnaround duct and HEX vane flowpath area. Three-dimensional flow probe measurements at two stations downstream of the turbine simulator exit plane were also made. Modifications to the HPOTP turbine simulator investigated the effects on turbine exit flow profile and velocity components, with the objective of reproducing flow conditions calculated for the actual ATD HPOTP hardware. Testing was done at the MSFC SSME Dynamic Fluid Air Flow (Dual-Leg) Facility, at air supply pressures between 50 and 250 psia. Combinations of turbine exit Mach number and pressure level were run to investigate the effect of flow regime. Information presented includes: (1) Descriptions of turbine simulator modifications to produce the desired flow environment; (2) Types and locations for instrumentation added to the flow model for improved diagnostic capability; (3) Evaluation of the effect of changes to the turbine simulator flowpath on the turbine exit flow environment; and (4

  7. How People Actually Use Thermostats

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

    2010-08-15

    Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

  8. Light duty utility arm phase 2 qualification test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, G.A.

    1997-01-16

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will test and verify that the Exhauster meets the specified functional requirements, safety requirements, operating requirements, and provide a record of the functional test results. The system/functions that will be tested are listed in the scope section of the Acceptance Test Procedure.

  9. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan: Phase 3 -- Test plan for centrally heated surrogate rodlet test. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.N.; Baldwin, C.A.; Wilson, D.F.

    1998-07-01

    The Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) is investigating the use of weapons grade plutonium in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for light-water reactors (LWR). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons derived fuel may differ from the previous commercial fuels because of small amounts of gallium impurities. A concern presently exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel, react with and weaken the clad, and thereby promote loss of fuel pin integrity. Phases 1 and 2 of the gallium task are presently underway to investigate the types of reactions that occur between gallium and clad materials. This is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. This Plan summarizes the projected Phase 3 Gallium-Cladding compatibility heating test and the follow-on post test examination (PTE). This work will be performed using centrally-heated surrogate pellets, to avoid unnecessary complexities and costs associated with working with plutonium and an irradiation environment. Two sets of rodlets containing pellets prepared by two different methods will be heated. Both sets will have an initial bulk gallium content of approximately 10 ppm. The major emphasis of the PTE task will be to examine the material interactions, particularly indications of gallium transport from the pellets to the clad.

  10. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX); Phase 1 Test Procedure: Building Thermal Fabric Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.

    2010-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy tasked NREL to develop a process for testing the reliability of models that predict retrofit energy savings, including their associated calibration methods. DOE asked NREL to conduct the work in phases so that a test procedure would be ready should DOE need it to meet legislative requirements related to residential retrofits in FY 2010. This report documents the initial 'Phase 1' test procedure.

  11. The waveform correlation event detection system project, Phase I: Issues in prototype development and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.; Harris, M.; Beiriger, J.; Moore, S.; Trujillo, J.; Withers, M.; Aster, R.

    1996-08-01

    A study using long-period seismic data showed that seismic events can be detected and located based on correlations of processed waveform profiles with the profile expected for an event. In this technique both time and space are discretized and events are found by forming profiles and calculating correlations for all time-distance points. events are declared at points with large correlations. In the first phase of the Waveform Correlation Event Detection System (WCEDS) Project at Sandia Labs we have developed a prototype automatic event detection system based on Shearer`s work which shows promise for treaty monitoring applications. Many modifications have been made to meet the requirements of the monitoring environment. A new full matrix multiplication has been developed which can reduce the number of computations needed for the data correlation by as much as two orders of magnitude for large grids. New methodology has also been developed to deal with the problems caused by false correlations (sidelobes) generated during the correlation process. When an event has been detected, masking matrices are set up which will mask all correlation sidelobes due to the event, allowing other events with intermingled phases to be found. This process is repeated until a detection threshold is reached. The system was tested on one hour of Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) broadband data and built all 4 of the events listed in the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) which were observable by the IRIS network. A continuous execution scheme has been developed for the system but has not yet been implemented. Improvements to the efficiency of the code are in various stages of development. Many refinements would have to be made to the system before it could be used as part of an actual monitoring system, but at this stage we know of no clear barriers which would prevent an eventual implementation of the system.

  12. A New Real - Time Fault Detection Methodology for Systems Under Test. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Roger W.; Jayaram, Sanjay; Hull, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this research is focussed on the identification/demonstration of critical technology innovations that will be applied to various applications viz. Detection of automated machine Health Monitoring (BM, real-time data analysis and control of Systems Under Test (SUT). This new innovation using a High Fidelity Dynamic Model-based Simulation (BFDMS) approach will be used to implement a real-time monitoring, Test and Evaluation (T&E) methodology including the transient behavior of the system under test. The unique element of this process control technique is the use of high fidelity, computer generated dynamic models to replicate the behavior of actual Systems Under Test (SUT). It will provide a dynamic simulation capability that becomes the reference truth model, from which comparisons are made with the actual raw/conditioned data from the test elements.

  13. Tests of achromatic phase shifters performed on the SYNAPSE test bench: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Pavel; Schuller, Peter A.; Chazelas, Bruno; Decaudin, Michel; Labèque, Alain; Duret, Philippe; Rabbia, Yves; Launhardt, Ralf; Gay, Jean; Sodnik, Zoran; Barillot, Marc; Brachet, Frank; Laurent, Thomas; Jacquinod, Sophie; Vandormael, Denis; Loicq, Jérôme; Mawet, Dimitri; Ollivier, Marc; Léger, Alain

    2008-07-01

    The achromatic phase shifter (APS) is a component of the Bracewell nulling interferometer studied in preparation for future space missions (viz. Darwin/TPF-I) focusing on spectroscopic study of Earth-like exo-planets. Several possible designs of such an optical subsystem exist. Four approaches were selected for further study. Thales Alenia Space developed a dielectric prism APS. A focus crossing APS prototype was developed by the OCA, Nice, France. A field reversal APS prototype was prepared by the MPIA in Heidelberg, Germany. Centre Spatial de Liege develops a concept based on Fresnel's rhombs. This paper presents a progress report on the current work aiming at evaluating these prototypes on the Synapse test bench at the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale in Orsay, France.

  14. Field tests of a chemiresistor sensor for in-situ monitoring of vapor-phase contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, C.; McGrath, L.; Wright, J.

    2003-04-01

    An in-situ chemiresistor sensor has been developed that can detect volatile organic compounds in subsurface environmental applications. Several field tests were conducted in 2001 and 2002 to test the reliability, operation, and performance of the in-situ chemiresistor sensor system. The chemiresistor consists of a carbon-loaded polymer deposited onto a microfabricated circuit. The polymer swells reversibly in the presence of volatile organic compounds as vapor-phase molecules absorb into the polymer, causing a change in the electrical resistance of the circuit. The change in resistance can be calibrated to known concentrations of analytes, and arrays of chemiresistors can be used on a single chip to aid in discrimination. A waterproof housing was constructed to allow the chemiresistor to be used in a variety of media including air, soil, and water. The integrated unit, which can be buried in soils or emplaced in wells, is connected via cable to a surface-based solar-powered data logger. A cell-phone modem is used to automatically download the data from the data logger on a periodic basis. The field tests were performed at three locations: (1) Edwards Air Force Base, CA; (2) Nevada Test Site; and (3) Sandia's Chemical Waste Landfill near Albuquerque, NM. The objectives of the tests were to evaluate the ruggedness, longevity, operation, performance, and engineering requirements of these sensors in actual field settings. Results showed that the sensors could be operated continuously for long periods of time (greater than a year) using remote solar-powered data-logging stations with wireless telemetry. The sensor housing, which was constructed of 304 stainless steel, showed some signs of corrosion when placed in contaminated water for several months, but the overall integrity was maintained. The detection limits of the chemiresistors were generally found to be near 0.1% of the saturated vapor pressure of the target analyte in controlled laboratory conditions (e

  15. SITE project. Phase 1: Continuous data bit-error-rate testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    1992-09-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) Project at NASA LeRC encompasses a number of research and technology areas of satellite communications systems. Phase 1 of this project established a complete satellite link simulator system. The evaluation of proof-of-concept microwave devices, radiofrequency (RF) and bit-error-rate (BER) testing of hardware, testing of remote airlinks, and other tests were performed as part of this first testing phase. This final report covers the test results produced in phase 1 of the SITE Project. The data presented include 20-GHz high-power-amplifier testing, 30-GHz low-noise-receiver testing, amplitude equalization, transponder baseline testing, switch matrix tests, and continuous-wave and modulated interference tests. The report also presents the methods used to measure the RF and BER performance of the complete system. Correlations of the RF and BER data are summarized to note the effects of the RF responses on the BER.

  16. SITE project. Phase 1: Continuous data bit-error-rate testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) Project at NASA LeRC encompasses a number of research and technology areas of satellite communications systems. Phase 1 of this project established a complete satellite link simulator system. The evaluation of proof-of-concept microwave devices, radiofrequency (RF) and bit-error-rate (BER) testing of hardware, testing of remote airlinks, and other tests were performed as part of this first testing phase. This final report covers the test results produced in phase 1 of the SITE Project. The data presented include 20-GHz high-power-amplifier testing, 30-GHz low-noise-receiver testing, amplitude equalization, transponder baseline testing, switch matrix tests, and continuous-wave and modulated interference tests. The report also presents the methods used to measure the RF and BER performance of the complete system. Correlations of the RF and BER data are summarized to note the effects of the RF responses on the BER.

  17. Accelerated life testing effects on CMOS microcircuit characteristics, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximow, B.

    1976-01-01

    An accelerated life test of sufficient duration to generate a minimum of 50% cumulative failures in lots of CMOS devices was conducted to provide a basis for determining the consistency of activation energy at 250 C. An investigation was made to determine whether any thresholds were exceeded during the high temperature testing, which could trigger failure mechanisms unique to that temperature. The usefulness of the 250 C temperature test as a predictor of long term reliability was evaluated.

  18. Digital Resource Exchange About Music (DREAM): Phase 2 Usability Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upitis, Rena; Boese, Karen; Abrami, Philip C.; Anwar, Zaeem

    2015-01-01

    The Digital Resource Exchange About Music (DREAM) is a virtual space for exchanging information about digital learning tools. The purpose of the present study was to determine how users responded to DREAM in the first four months after its public release. This study is the second phase of usability research on DREAM, and was conducted to guide…

  19. Modulation of Different Phases of Formalin Test by Force Swim Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad-Zadeh, Mohammad; Azhdari-Zarmehri, Hassan; Mosavi, Faeze; Haghdoost-Yazdi, Hashem; Nazeri, Masoud; Shabani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The formalin test is the most accepted chemical test for evaluation of nociception. It requires the injection of an adequate amount of formalin into the surface of the hindpaw. Formalin test consists of phase 1 (0–7 min) and phase 2 (15–60) in which the animal shows painful behaviors. These phases are separated with a quiet phase named interphase, in which the nociceptive responses are decreased or completely disappeared. Methods: The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of swim stress at different heights of water on different phases of the formalin test in male rats. Results: Swim stress decreased nociceptive behaviors in first phase and prolonged interphase or delayed the start of second phase in a water height dependent manner. Swim stress in 25 and 50cm completely abolished the nociceptive behaviors in phase 1. Discussion: The present results showed different pain modulation during different phases of the formalin test and elucidated the impact of swim stress on duration of interphase. Interphase considered as an inactive period, but a recent research has shown that active inhibitory mechanisms are involved in the modulation of pain during this period. Therefore, swim stress may be considered as a useful tool for study of the basic inhibitory mechanisms underlying attenuation of nociceptive behaviors between phase 1 and 2 of the formalin test. PMID:27284395

  20. Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2009-12-23

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

  1. Operational test approach for Navstar GPS Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, G.

    1983-11-01

    The performance features and tests of each of the three Navstar GPS segments are outlined. The GPS consists of a constellation of 18 satellites equipped to furnish signals to passive stations (UE - user equipment) to determine position, velocity, and time. The Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center (AFOTEC) is assigned to validate the operations of the UE, space, and control segments of the GPS, which featured only 6 prototype spacecraft for the test. Accuracy was found to vary with the time and location of the user, although overall performance exceed expectations. The tests verified that the GPS spacecraft were ready for production. Trials are yet to be run with UE installed on host aircraft, tanks, an aircraft carrier, a submarine, and backpacks. The control segment will be tested after the UE evaluations.

  2. Do CS-US Pairings Actually Matter? A Within-Subject Comparison of Instructed Fear Conditioning with and without Actual CS-US Pairings

    PubMed Central

    Raes, An K.; De Houwer, Jan; De Schryver, Maarten; Brass, Marcel; Kalisch, Raffael

    2014-01-01

    Previous research showed that instructions about CS-US pairings can lead to fear of the CS even when the pairings are never presented. In the present study, we examined whether the experience of CS-US pairings adds to the effect of instructions by comparing instructed conditioning with and without actual CS-US pairings in a within-subject design. Thirty-two participants saw three fractals as CSs (CS+1, CS+2, CS−) and received electric shocks as USs. Before the start of a so-called training phase, participants were instructed that both CS+1 and CS+2 would be followed by the US, but only CS+1 was actually paired with the US. The absence of the US after CS+2 was explained in such a way that participants would not doubt the instructions about the CS+2-US relation. After the training phase, a test phase was carried out. In this phase, participants expected the US after both CS+s but none of the CS+s was actually paired with the US. During test, self-reported fear was initially higher for CS+1 than for CS+2, which indicates that the experience of actual CS-US pairings adds to instructions about these pairings. On the other hand, the CS+s elicited similar skin conductance responses and US expectancies. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:24465447

  3. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 3 Gearbox 2 Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Link, H.; Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; McNiff, B.

    2013-04-01

    Gearboxes in wind turbines have not been achieving their expected design life even though they commonly meet or exceed the design criteria specified in current design standards. One of the basic premises of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) is that the low gearbox reliability results from the absence of critical elements in the design process or insufficient design tools. Key goals of the GRC are to improve design approaches and analysis tools and to recommend practices and test methods resulting in improved design standards for wind turbine gearboxes that lower the cost of energy (COE) through improved reliability. The GRC uses a combined gearbox testing, modeling and analysis approach, along with a database of information from gearbox failures collected from overhauls and investigation of gearbox condition monitoring techniques to improve wind turbine operations and maintenance practices. Testing of Gearbox 2 (GB2) using the two-speed turbine controller that has been used in prior testing. This test series will investigate non-torque loads, high-speed shaft misalignment, and reproduction of field conditions in the dynamometer. This test series will also include vibration testing using an eddy-current brake on the gearbox's high speed shaft.

  4. Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

  5. Silo 3 Waste Treatment Phase I Physical Testing Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    2001-03-13

    A characterization study of the Fernald Silo 3 waste was performed at the request of Rocky Mountain Remedial Services, LLC (RMRS) to support treatment of the waste with the Envirobond reagents and Envirobrick process. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) performed the characterization under a Work for Others Agreement WOF-00-007. Physical property testing was subcontracted to the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). This report is intended to transmit the results of the physical property testing conducted at the CETL. Results of the physical property testing are summarized in a final report from Steve Hoeffner, CETL.

  6. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  7. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 3 Gearbox 2 Test

    DOE Data Explorer

    Keller, Jonathan; Robb, Wallen

    2016-05-12

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy in 2006; its key goal is to understand the root causes of premature gearbox failures and improve their reliability. The GRC uses a combined gearbox testing, modeling, and analysis approach disseminating data and results to the industry and facilitating improvement of gearbox reliability. This test data describes the tests of GRC gearbox 2 in the National Wind Technology Center dynamometer and documents any modifications to the original test plan. It serves as a guide to interpret the publicly released data sets with brief analyses to illustrate the data. TDMS viewer and Solidworks software required to view data files.

  8. MSFC hot air collectors. Phase 1: Test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losey, R.

    1977-01-01

    A development test program of 3 hot air flat plate solar collectors is described in detail. The pressure drop versus flow rate performance characteristics for these collectors, mounted in series, was determined under 14 different test conditions each of which was characterized by a unique combination of inlet air temperature and air flow rate. Characteristics of inlet, exit and transfer ducts of these collectors were also determined during this testing. The test results indicate that significant pressure drop occurs at air flow rates greater than 150 standard cubic feet per minute and this drop is not heavily dependent upon inlet air temperature; and inlet, exit and transfer duct characteristics differ sufficiently to suggest that system performance may be enhanced through careful design of each type of duct individually.

  9. The Palomar kernel-phase experiment: testing kernel phase interferometry for ground-based astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Benjamin; Tuthill, Peter; Hinkley, Sasha; Ireland, Michael J.; Greenbaum, Alexandra; Latyshev, Alexey; Monnier, John D.; Martinache, Frantz

    2016-01-01

    At present, the principal limitation on the resolution and contrast of astronomical imaging instruments comes from aberrations in the optical path, which may be imposed by the Earth's turbulent atmosphere or by variations in the alignment and shape of the telescope optics. These errors can be corrected physically, with active and adaptive optics, and in post-processing of the resulting image. A recently developed adaptive optics post-processing technique, called kernel-phase interferometry, uses linear combinations of phases that are self-calibrating with respect to small errors, with the goal of constructing observables that are robust against the residual optical aberrations in otherwise well-corrected imaging systems. Here, we present a direct comparison between kernel phase and the more established competing techniques, aperture masking interferometry, point spread function (PSF) fitting and bispectral analysis. We resolve the α Ophiuchi binary system near periastron, using the Palomar 200-Inch Telescope. This is the first case in which kernel phase has been used with a full aperture to resolve a system close to the diffraction limit with ground-based extreme adaptive optics observations. Excellent agreement in astrometric quantities is found between kernel phase and masking, and kernel phase significantly outperforms PSF fitting and bispectral analysis, demonstrating its viability as an alternative to conventional non-redundant masking under appropriate conditions.

  10. New algorithms for phase unwrapping: implementation and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlicki, Krzysztof

    1998-11-01

    In this paper it is shown how the regularization theory was used for the new noise immune algorithm for phase unwrapping. The algorithm were developed by M. Servin, J.L. Marroquin and F.J. Cuevas in Centro de Investigaciones en Optica A.C. and Centro de Investigacion en Matematicas A.C. in Mexico. The theory was presented. The objective of the work was to implement the algorithm into the software able to perform the off-line unwrapping on the fringe pattern. The algorithms are present as well as the result and also the software developed for the implementation.

  11. GTA (ground test accelerator) Phase 1: Baseline design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    The national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program has two objectives: to provide the necessary basis for a discriminator/weapon decision by 1992, and to develop the technology in stages that lead ultimately to a neutral particle beam weapon. The ground test accelerator (GTA) is the test bed that permits the advancement of the state-of-the-art under experimental conditions in an integrated automated system mode. An intermediate goal of the GTA program is to support the Integrated Space Experiments, while the ultimate goal is to support the 1992 decision. The GTA system and each of its major subsystems are described, and project schedules and resource requirements are provided. (LEW)

  12. Update on intraval-phase II test cases

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, T.J.

    1993-06-01

    The issues of flow and transport through unsaturated rock related to high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal are also being addressed in the INTRAVAL Project. The INTRAVAL Project is an international cooperative project for studying validation issues associated with geosphere transport models. The central theme for the INTRAVAL Project is the critical examination of validation issues for evaluating geosphere transport models that may be used in the performance assessment of HLW facilities. This presentation summarizes the project structure, test cases, test case selection criteria, and validation issues. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. NEXT GENERATION SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTING VIA DNA MICROARRAYS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current SBIR solicitation states that the EPA is seeking “better sampling, analysis, and monitoring technologies” to improve hazardous waste management.  Development of new methods for testing contaminated sediments is an area of particular concern because many industri...

  14. Large block migration experiments: INTRAVAL phase 1, Test Case 9

    SciTech Connect

    Gureghian, A.B.; Noronha, C.J. . Office of Waste Technology Development); Vandergraaf, T.T. )

    1990-08-01

    The development of INTRAVAL Test Case 9, as presented in this report, was made possible by a past subsidiary agreement to the bilateral cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) encompassing various aspects of nuclear waste disposal research. The experimental aspect of this test case, which included a series of laboratory experiments designed to quantify the migration of tracers in a single, natural fracture, was undertaken by AECL. The numerical simulation of the results of these experiments was performed by the Battelle Office of Waste Technology Development (OWTD) by calibrating an in-house analytical code, FRACFLO, which is capable of predicting radionuclide transport in an idealized fractured rock. Three tracer migration experiments were performed, using nonsorbing uranine dye for two of them and sorbing Cs-137 for the third. In addition, separate batch experiments were performed to determine the fracture surface and rock matrix sorption coefficients for Cs-137. The two uranine tracer migration experiment were used to calculate the average fracture aperture and to calibrate the model for the fracture dispersivity and matrix diffusion coefficient. The predictive capability of the model was then tested by simulating the third, Cs-137, tracer test without changing the parameter values determined from the other experiments. Breakthrough curves of both the experimental and numerical results obtained at the outlet face of the fracture are presented for each experiment. The reported spatial concentration profiles for the rock matrix are based solely on numerical predictions. 22 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. A novel phase measuring deflectometry for aspheric mirror test.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Su, Xianyu; Wu, Fan; Liu, Yuankun

    2009-10-26

    A method based on fringe reflection is presented to measure the aspheric mirror with higher precise. This method measures the absolute height of the aspheric mirror with dummy paraboloid, while the camera is located beside the optical axis of the test surface. It can be used to measure the aspheric mirror with high deviation. And for locating the camera beside the optical axis, this method doesn't have occlusion problem and can do the measurement more flexibility. Furthermore, compared with the traditional PMD, this method measures the tested surface with dummy paraboloid instead of the intersection of two straight lines, so it doesn't need to calibrate the image projection vectors. And the errors of the calibration influence this method less than the traditional method. Therefore, this method can measure the high deviation aspheric mirror with higher precise even if the calibration precise isn't very high. Computer simulations and preliminary experiment validate the feasibility of this method. PMID:19997198

  16. APE: the Active Phasing Experiment to test new control system and phasing technology for a European Extremely Large Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Yaitskova, N.; Derie, F.; Constanza, A.; Brast, R.; Buzzoni, B.; Delabre, B.; Dierickx, P.; Dupuy, C.; Esteves, R.; Frank, C.; Guisard, S.; Karban, R.; Koenig, E.; Kolb, J.; Nylund, M.; Noethe, L.; Surdej, I.; Courteville, A.; Wilhelm, R.; Montoya, L.; Reyes, M.; Esposito, S.; Pinna, E.; Dohlen, K.; Ferrari, M.; Langlois, M.

    2005-08-01

    The future European Extremely Large Telescope will be composed of one or two giant segmented mirrors (up to 100 m of diameter) and of several large monolithic mirrors (up to 8 m in diameter). To limit the aberrations due to misalignments and defective surface quality it is necessary to have a proper active optics system. This active optics system must include a phasing system to limit the degradation of the PSF due to misphasing of the segmented mirrors. We will present the lastest design and development of the Active Phasing Experiment that will be tested in laboratory and on-sky connected to a VLT at Paranal in Chile. It includes an active segmented mirror, a static piston plate to simulate a secondary segmented mirror and of four phasing wavefront sensors to measure the piston, tip and tilt of the segments and the aberrations of the VLT. The four phasing sensors are the Diffraction Image Phase Sensing Instrument developed by Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Pyramid Phasing Sensor developed by Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, the Shack-Hartmann Phasing Sensor developed by the European Southern Observatory and the Zernike Unit for Segment phasing developed by Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille. A reference measurement of the segmented mirror is made by an internal metrology developed by Fogale Nanotech. The control system of Active Phasing Experiment will perform the phasing of the segments, the guiding of the VLT and the active optics of the VLT. These activities are included in the Framework Programme 6 of the European Union.

  17. Stability and Phase Noise Tests of Two Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Wang, Rabi T.

    1998-01-01

    A cryocooled Compensated Sapphire Oscillator (CSO), developed for the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment, and operating in the 8K - 10K temperature range was previously demonstrated to show ultra-high stability of sigma(sub y) = 2.5 x 10 (exp -15) for measuring times 200 seconds less than or equal to tau less than or equal to 600 seconds using a hydrogen maser as reference. We present here test results for a second unit which allows CSO short-term stability and phase noise to be measured for the first time. Also included are design details of a new RF receiver and an intercomparison with the first CSO unit. Cryogenic oscillators operating below about 10K offer the highest possible short term stability of any frequency sources. However, their use has so far been restricted to research environments due to the limited operating periods associated with liquid helium consumption. The cryocooled CSO is being built in support of the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment and is designed to operate continuously for periods of a year or more. Performance targets are a stability of 3-4 x 10 (exp -15) (1 second less than or equal to tau less than or equal to 100 seconds) and phase noise of -73dB/Hz @ 1Hz measured at 34 GHz. Installation in 5 stations of NASA's deep space network (DSN) is planned in the years 2000 - 2002. In the previous tests, actual stability of the CSO for measuring times tau less than or equal to 200 seconds could not be directly measured, being masked by short-term fluctuations of the H-maser reference. Excellent short-term performance, however, could be inferred by the success of an application of the CSO as local oscillator (L.O.) to the JPL LITS passive atomic standard, where medium-term stability showed no degradation due to L.O. instabilities at a level of (sigma)y = 3 x 10 (exp -14)/square root of tau. A second CSO has now been constructed, and all cryogenic aspects have been verified, including a resonator turn-over temperature of 7.907 K

  18. Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-03-01

    This report describes the work done under Phase I, the moisture tolerance testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The following coals were used in the test program: Western Bituminous (Utah), Eastern Bituminous (Pennsylvania), North Dakota Lignite, Sub-Bituminous (Montana), and Eastern Bituminous coal mixed with 20-percent Limestone. The coals were initially tested at the as-received moisture level and subsequently tested after surface moisture was added by water spray. Test results and recommendations for future research and development work are presented.

  19. Space Station Freedom environmental control and life support system phase 3 simplified integrated test detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, B. C.; Carrasquillo, R. L.; Dubiel, M. Y.; Ogle, K. Y.; Perry, J. L.; Whitley, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    A description of the phase 3 simplified integrated test (SIT) conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF) in 1989 is presented. This was the first test in the phase 3 series integrated environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) tests. The basic goal of the SIT was to achieve full integration of the baseline air revitalization (AR) subsystems for Space Station Freedom. Included is a description of the SIT configuration, a performance analysis of each subsystem, results from air and water sampling, and a discussion of lessons learned from the test. Also included is a full description of the preprototype ECLSS hardware used in the test.

  20. Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

    1999-06-01

    Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

  1. Tests of the Contamination Analysis Unit, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Meltzer, M

    2003-01-21

    Results are reported for a project testing the capabilities of a mass spectrometer-based system for analyzing in-situ organic compounds on a variety of substrates. The system, which was built and operated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is termed a Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) and employs vacuum and thermal desorption of surface residues, followed by ionization and analysis with a Leybold Inficon Transpector mass spectrometer. The CAU was employed in this study to examine soils, cleaner residues, and substrates on Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) components. Project work was supported by ATK Thiokol Propulsion. Major project objectives include: (1) Determine residual propellant and liner components with the CAU after test coupons have been cleaned. (2) Determine if the CAU can detect solvent that has soaked into NBR insulation material, and if possible, determine the time following solvent application during which the cleaning agent is detectable. (3) Test CAU capabilities for analyzing non-flat surfaces on the inside and outside surfaces of the RSRM (12-foot diameter), and nozzle throat housing surfaces (5-foot diameter). (4) Determine if solvent extraction and gas chromatography (GC) approaches are able to enhance the surface analysis data available through use of the mass-spectrometer-based CAU. (5) Determine the CAU's detection limit for various soils and cleaners. (6) Determine if contact of both Viton and silicon O-rings with critical substrates will result in any visual evidence of the contact, when observed under black light. (7) Demonstrate CAU viability during routine Thiokol manufacturing operations.

  2. The CARE 3 Phase 3 Report: Test and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiffler, J. J.; Neumqnn, J. S.; Bryant, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    CARE 3 (Computer-Aided Reliability Estimation, version three) is a computer program designed to help estimate the reliability of complex, redundant systems; although the program can model a wide variety of redundant structures, it was developed specifically for fault-tolerant avionics systems, systems distinguished by the need for extremely reliable performance since a system failure could well result in the loss of human life. CARE 3 further generalizes the class of system structures that can be modeled and greatly expands the coverage model to take into account such effects as intermittent and transient faults, latent faults, error propagation, etc. The initial test and evaluation of CARE 3 are reported.

  3. Design, fabrication, and test of lightweight shell structure, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A cylindrical shell skirt structure 4.57 m (180 in.) in diameter and 3.66 m (144 in.) high was subjected to a design and analysis study using a wide variety of structural materials and concepts. The design loading of 1225.8 N/cm (700 lb/in.) axial compression and 245.2 N/cm (140 lb/in.) torsion is representative of that expected on a typical space tug skirt section. Structural concepts evaluated included honeycomb sandwich, truss, isogrid, and skin/stringer/frame. The materials considered included a wide variety of structural metals as well as glass, graphite, and boron-reinforced composites. The most unique characteristic of the candidate designs is that they involve the use of very thin-gage material. Fabrication and structural test of small panels and components representative of many of the candidate designs served to demonstrate proposed fabrication techniques and to verify design and analysis methods.

  4. Subscale solid motor nozzle tests, phase 4 and nozzle materials screening and thermal characterization, phase 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J.; Dodson, J.; Laub, B.

    1979-01-01

    Subscale solid motor nozzles containing a baseline material or low cost materials to be considered as potential replacements for the baseline material are designed and tested. Data are presented from tests of four identically designed 2.5 inch throat diameter nozzles and one 7 inch throat diameter nozzle. The screening of new candidate low cost materials, as well as their thermophysical and thermochemical characterization is also discussed.

  5. HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

  6. Assessment of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) Technology at the MSFC ECLS Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomes, Kristin; Long, David; Carter, Layne; Flynn, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia. Removal (VPCAR) technology has been previously discussed as a viable option for. the Exploration Water Recovery System. This technology integrates a phase change process with catalytic oxidation in the vapor phase to produce potable water from exploration mission wastewaters. A developmental prototype VPCAR was designed, built and tested under funding provided by a National Research. Announcement (NRA) project. The core technology, a Wiped Film Rotating Device (WFRD) was provided by Water Reuse Technologies under the NRA, whereas Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International performed the hardware integration and acceptance test. of the system. Personnel at the-Ames Research Center performed initial systems test of the VPCAR using ersatz solutions. To assess the viability of this hardware for Exploration. Life Support (ELS) applications, the hardware has been modified and tested at the MSFC ECLS Test facility. This paper summarizes the hardware modifications and test results and provides an assessment of this technology for the ELS application.

  7. The DOE ETV-1 Electric Test Vehicle. Phase 3: Performance Testing and system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, D.

    1981-01-01

    Engineering tests were conducted in order to characterize overall system performance and component efficiencies within the system environment. A dynamometer was used in order to minimize the ambient effects and large uncertainties present in track testing. Extensive test requirements were defined and procedures were carefully controlled in order to maintain a high degree of credibility. Limited track testing was performed in order to corroborate the dynamometer results. Test results include an energy flow analysis through the major subsystems and incorporate the aerodynamic and rolling losses under cyclic and various steady speed conditions. The major output from all relevant dynamometer and track tests is also included.

  8. A synopsis of test results and knowledge gained from the Phase-0 CSI evolutionary model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Elliott, Kenny B.; Horta, Lucas G.

    1993-01-01

    The Phase-0 CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) is a testbed for the study of space platform global line-of-sight (LOS) pointing. Now that the tests have been completed, a summary of hardware and closed-loop test experiences is necessary to insure a timely dissemination of the knowledge gained. The testbed is described and modeling experiences are presented followed by a summary of the research performed by various investigators. Some early lessons on implementing the closed-loop controllers are described with particular emphasis on real-time computing requirements. A summary of closed-loop studies and a synopsis of test results are presented. Plans for evolving the CEM from phase 0 to phases 1 and 2 are also described. Subsequently, a summary of knowledge gained from the design and testing of the Phase-0 CEM is made.

  9. Development of a test and flight engineering oriented language. Phase 3: Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamsler, W. F.; Case, C. W.; Kinney, E. L.; Gyure, J.

    1970-01-01

    The format material used in an oral presentation of the phase 3 study effort is given. The material includes a description of the language ALOFT and a terminology comparison with other test languages.

  10. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  11. Comparisons of Sediment Test Volumes for Freshwater Solid Phase Sediment Toxicity Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests with benthic macroinvertebrates are commonly used to assess the potential toxicity of contaminated sediments, and detailed standard test procedures have been developed for various species. For freshwater, two benthic organisms, Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dil...

  12. Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase II. Verification testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-12

    This report describes the work done under Phase II, the verification testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The main objective of the test program was to determine failure modes and wear rates. Only minor auxiliary equipment malfunctions were encountered. Wear rates indicate useful life expectancy of from 1 to 5 years for wear-exposed components. Recommendations are made for adapting the equipment for pilot plant and commercial applications. 3 references, 20 figures, 12 tables.

  13. Energy Efficient Engine exhaust mixer model technology report addendum; phase 3 test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, M. J.; Blatt, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The Phase 3 exhaust mixer test program was conducted to explore the trends established during previous Phases 1 and 2. Combinations of mixer design parameters were tested. Phase 3 testing showed that the best performance achievable within tailpipe length and diameter constraints is 2.55 percent better than an optimized separate flow base line. A reduced penetration design achieved about the same overall performance level at a substantially lower level of excess pressure loss but with a small reduction in mixing. To improve reliability of the data, the hot and cold flow thrust coefficient analysis used in Phases 1 and 2 was augmented by calculating percent mixing from traverse data. Relative change in percent mixing between configurations was determined from thrust and flow coefficient increments. The calculation procedure developed was found to be a useful tool in assessing mixer performance. Detailed flow field data were obtained to facilitate calibration of computer codes.

  14. 40 CFR 90.113 - In-use testing program for Phase 1 engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... emission control technology which most likely will be used on Phase 2 engines; (2) Engine families using... technology specifically installed to achieve compliance with emission standards of this part; (6) The engine... all emission testing results generated from in-use testing. The following information may be...

  15. 43 CFR 11.64 - Injury determination phase-testing and sampling methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Injury determination phase-testing and sampling methods. 11.64 Section 11.64 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type B Procedures § 11.64 Injury determination phase—testing and sampling methods. (a) General. (1) The...

  16. Evolution of Ada technology in the flight dynamics area: Implementation/testing phase analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quimby, Kelvin L.; Esker, Linda; Miller, John; Smith, Laurie; Stark, Mike; Mcgarry, Frank

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the software engineering issues related to the use of Ada for the implementation and system testing phases of four Ada projects developed in the flight dynamics area. These projects reflect an evolving understanding of more effective use of Ada features. In addition, the testing methodology used on these projects has changed substantially from that used on previous FORTRAN projects.

  17. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.

  18. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) Cold Water Pipe At-Sea Test Program. Phase 2: Suspended pipe test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, F. A.

    1984-08-01

    An important step in the development of technology for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) cold water pipes (CWP) is the at-sea testing and subsequent evaluation of a large diameter fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) pipe. Focus was on the CWP since it is the most critical element in any OTEC design. The results of the second phase of the CWP At-Sea Test Program are given. During this phase an 8 foot diameter, 400 foot long sandwich wall FRP syntactic foam configuration CWP test article was developed, constructed, deployed and used for data acquisition in the open ocean near Honolulu, Hawaii. This instrumented CWP as suspended from a moored platform for a three week experiment in April-May, 1983. The CWP represented a scaled version of a 40 megawatt size structure, nominally 30 feet in diameter and 3000 feet long.

  19. Large-N Over the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Phase I and Phase II Test Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Carmichael, J. D.; Mellors, R. J.; Abbott, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    One of the current challenges in the field of monitoring and verification is source discrimination of low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity, both natural and anthropogenic. Work is underway at the Nevada National Security Site to conduct a series of chemical explosion experiments using a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary approach. The goal of this series of experiments, called the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is to refine the understanding of the effect of earth structures on source phenomenology and energy partitioning in the source region, the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field, and the development of S waves observed in the far field. To fully explore these problems, the SPE series includes tests in both hard and soft rock geologic environments. The project comprises a number of activities, which range from characterizing the shallow subsurface to acquiring new explosion data from both the near field (<100 m) and the far field (>100 m). SPE includes a series of planned explosions (with different yields and depths of burials), which are conducted in the same hole and monitored by a diverse set of sensors recording characteristics of the explosions, ground-shock, seismo-acoustic energy propagation. This presentation focuses on imaging the full 3D wavefield over hard rock and soft rock test beds using a large number of seismic sensors. This overview presents statistical analyses of optimal sensor layout required to estimate wavefield discriminants and the planned deployment for the upcoming experiments. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Test phase plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Test Phase Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant to satisfy the requirements of Public Law 102-579, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Land Withdrawal Act (LWA). The Act provides seven months after its enactment for the DOE to submit this Plan to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for review. A potential geologic repository for transuranic wastes, including transuranic mixed wastes, generated in national-defense activities, the WIPP is being constructed in southeastern New Mexico. Because these wastes remain radioactive and chemically hazardous for a very long time, the WIPP must provide safe disposal for thousands of years. The DOE is developing the facility in phases. Surface facilities for receiving waste have been built and considerable underground excavations (2150 feet below the surface) that are appropriate for in-situ testing, have been completed. Additional excavations will be completed when they are required for waste disposal. The next step is to conduct a test phase. The purpose of the test phase is to develop pertinent information and assess whether the disposal of transuranic waste and transuranic mixed waste in the planned WIPP repository can be conducted in compliance with the environmental standards for disposal and with the Solid Waste Disposal Act (SWDA) (as amended by RCRA, 42 USC. 6901 et. seq.). The test phase includes laboratory experiments and underground tests using contact-handled transuranic waste. Waste-related tests at WIPP will be limited to contact-handled transuranic and simulated wastes since the LWA prohibits the transport to or emplacement of remote-handled transuranic waste at WIPP during the test phase.

  1. Field Testing of Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2013-03-01

    A test wall built with phase change material (PCM)-enhanced loose-fill cavity insulation was monitored for a period of about a year in the warm-humid climate of Charleston, South Carolina. The test wall was divided into various sections, one of which contained only loose-fill insulation and served as a control for comparing and evaluating the wall sections with the PCM-enhanced insulation. This report summarizes the findings of the field test.

  2. Testing the Adequacy of Simple Water Models at the Opposite Ends of the Phase Diagram

    SciTech Connect

    Baranayai, A.; Bartok, A.; Chialvo, Ariel A

    2007-01-01

    The transferability of a few simple rigid non-polarizable water models were tested by Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations to predict their vapor-liquid phase equilibria, and by isothermal-isobaric (Parrinello-Rahman) Monte Carlo simulations of the 13 known crystalline phases of ice. The temperature dependence of the corresponding second virial coefficients was also determined and then used to test the internal consistency of the simulated vapor-phase densities. The model predictions appear satisfactory for liquid water for ambient conditions, but they fail to mimic accurately the properties of the ice polymorphs and the orthobaric vapor phase. The major shortcomings of the models were in the overestimation by a factor of two ({approx}4-6 kJ/mol) of the internal energy difference between the high-pressure ice phases and the hexagonal phase. This unacceptable discrepancy is caused by the parameterization to reproduce the density of liquid water at ambient conditions, that accounts for the significant polarization effects in the condensed phases in terms of augmented dipole moments, with the consequent detrimental effect on the estimations of the vapor-phase properties.

  3. Fabrication and Testing of Binary-Phase Fourier Gratings for Nonuniform Array Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Crow, Robert W.; Ashley, Paul R.; Nelson, Tom R., Jr.; Parker, Jack H.; Beecher, Elizabeth A.

    2004-01-01

    This effort describes the fabrication and testing of binary-phase Fourier gratings designed to generate an incoherent array of output source points with nonuniform user-defined intensities, symmetric about the zeroth order. Like Dammann fanout gratings, these binary-phase Fourier gratings employ only two phase levels to generate a defined output array. Unlike Dammann fanout gratings, these gratings generate an array of nonuniform, user-defined intensities when projected into the far-field regime. The paper describes the process of design, fabrication, and testing for two different version of the binary-phase grating; one designed for a 12 micron wavelength, referred to as the Long-Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) grating, and one designed for a 5 micron wavelength, referred to as the Mid-Wavelength Infrared Grating (MWIR).

  4. Orion MPCV GN and C End-to-End Phasing Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    End-to-end integration tests are critical risk reduction efforts for any complex vehicle. Phasing tests are an end-to-end integrated test that validates system directional phasing (polarity) from sensor measurement through software algorithms to end effector response. Phasing tests are typically performed on a fully integrated and assembled flight vehicle where sensors are stimulated by moving the vehicle and the effectors are observed for proper polarity. Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) Phasing Test was conducted from inertial measurement to Launch Abort System (LAS). Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1) has two end-to-end phasing tests planned. The first test from inertial measurement to Crew Module (CM) reaction control system thrusters uses navigation and flight control system software algorithms to process commands. The second test from inertial measurement to CM S-Band Phased Array Antenna (PAA) uses navigation and communication system software algorithms to process commands. Future Orion flights include Ascent Abort Flight Test 2 (AA-2) and Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). These flights will include additional or updated sensors, software algorithms and effectors. This paper will explore the implementation of end-to-end phasing tests on a flight vehicle which has many constraints, trade-offs and compromises. Orion PA-1 Phasing Test was conducted at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) from March 4-6, 2010. This test decreased the risk of mission failure by demonstrating proper flight control system polarity. Demonstration was achieved by stimulating the primary navigation sensor, processing sensor data to commands and viewing propulsion response. PA-1 primary navigation sensor was a Space Integrated Inertial Navigation System (INS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) (SIGI) which has onboard processing, INS (3 accelerometers and 3 rate gyros) and no GPS receiver. SIGI data was processed by GN&C software into thrust magnitude and

  5. Phase 2 THOR Steam Reforming Tests for Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas R. Soelberg

    2004-01-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste is stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the waste into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. A steam reforming technology patented by Studsvik, Inc., and licensed to THOR Treatment Technologies has been tested in two phases using a Department of Energy-owned fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center located in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier in 2003. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, stoichiometry, and chemistry were varied to identify and demonstrate process operation and product characteristics under different operating conditions. Two test series were performed. During the first series, the process chemistry was designed to produce a sodium carbonate product. The second series was designed to produce a more leach-resistant, mineralized sodium aluminosilicate product. The tests also demonstrated the performance of a MACT-compliant off-gas system.

  6. Phase errors in high line density CGH used for aspheric testing: beyond scalar approximation.

    PubMed

    Peterhänsel, S; Pruss, C; Osten, W

    2013-05-20

    One common way to measure asphere and freeform surfaces is the interferometric Null test, where a computer generated hologram (CGH) is placed in the object path of the interferometer. If undetected phase errors are present in the CGH, the measurement will show systematic errors. Therefore the absolute phase of this element has to be known. This phase is often calculated using scalar diffraction theory. In this paper we discuss the limitations of this theory for the prediction of the absolute phase generated by different implementations of CGH. Furthermore, for regions where scalar approximation is no longer valid, rigorous simulations are performed to identify phase sensitive structure parameters and evaluate fabrication tolerances for typical gratings. PMID:23736387

  7. Environmental testing of a prototypic digital safety channel, phase I: System design and test methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, K.; Turner, G.W.; Mullens, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    A microprocessor-based reactor trip channel has been assembled for environmental testing under an Instrumentation and Control (I&C) Qualification Program sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The goal of this program is to establish the technical basis for the qualification of advanced I&C systems. The trip channel implemented for this study employs technologies and digital subsystems representative of those proposed for use in some advanced light-water reactors (ALNWS) such as the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBNW) and AP600. It is expected that these tests will reveal any potential system vulnerabilities for technologies representative of those proposed for use in ALNWS. The experimental channel will be purposely stressed considerably beyond what it is likely to experience in a normal nuclear power plant environment, so that the tests can uncover the worst-case failure modes (i.e., failures that are likely to prevent an entire trip system from performing its safety function when required to do so). Based on information obtained from this study, it may be possible to recommend tests that are likely to indicate the presence of such failure mechanisms. Such recommendations would be helpful in augmenting current qualification guidelines.

  8. Environmental testing of a prototypic digital safety channel, Phase I: System design and test methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, K.; Turner, G.W.; Mullens, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    A microprocessor-based reactor trip channel has been assembled for environmental testing under an Instrumentation and Control (I&C) Qualification Program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The goal of this program is to establish the technical basis and acceptance criteria for the qualification of advanced I&C systems. The trip channel implemented for this study employs technologies and digital subsystems representative of those proposed for use in some advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs) such as the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). It is expected that these tests will reveal any potential system vulnerabilities for technologies representative of those proposed for use in ALWRs. The experimental channel will be purposely stressed considerably beyond what it is likely to experience in a normal nuclear power plant environment, so that the tests can uncover the worst-case failure modes (i.e., failures that are likely to prevent an entire trip system from performing its safety function when required to do so). Based on information obtained from this study, it may be possible to recommend tests that are likely to indicate the presence of such failure mechanisms. Such recommendations would be helpful in augmenting current qualification guidelines.

  9. Design, analysis, and testing of the Phase 1 CSI Evolutionary Model erectable truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronet, M. J.; Davis, D. A.; Kintis, D. H.; Brillhart, R. D.; Atkins, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    This report addressed the design, analysis, and testing of the erectable truss structure for the Phase 1 CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) testbed. The Phase 1 CEM testbed is the second testbed to form part of an ongoing program of focused research at NASA/LaRC in the development of Controls-Structures Integration (CSI) technology. The Phase 1 CEM contains the same overall geometry, weight, and sensor locations as the Phase 0 CEM, but is based in an integrated controller and structure design, whereby both structure and controller design variables are sized simultaneously. The Phase 1 CEM design features seven truss sections composed of struts with tailored mass and stiffness properties. A common erectable joint is used and the strut stiffness is tailored by varying the cross-sectional area. To characterize the structure, static tests were conducted on individual struts and 10-bay truss assemblies. Dynamic tests were conducted on 10-bay truss assemblies as well as the fully-assembled CEM truss. The results indicate that the static and dynamic properties of the structure are predictable, well-characterized, and within the performance requirements established during the Phase 1 CEM integrated controller/structure design analysis.

  10. Measurement of countercurrent phase separation and distribution in a two-dimensional test section

    SciTech Connect

    Bukhari, K M; Lahey, Jr, R T

    1984-01-01

    The degree of phase separation that occurs in the core of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) during various postulated accidents is an important consideration for studying the course of events during such accidents. The dependence of countercurrent phase separation and distribution phenomena on flow quality, mass flux and system geometry was studied experimentally in a two-dimensional (2-D) test section. A two-phase (air/water) mixture flowed upwards and single-phase water flowed downward along one side of the test section. This countercurrent flow configuration was intended to simulate the so-called chimney effect in the diabatic JAERI 2-D experiments in Japan. A large air/water loop used with a 91.44 cm x 91.44 cm x 1.27 cm test section to study phase separation and distribution effects. A traversing single beam gamma-densitometer was used to measure the chordal average void fractions at several elevations along the test section. Cross-plots between various flow conditions and geometries were made. An error analysis giving the total error in the void fraction measurements was also performed. High speed photographs were also made of the flow structure, to provide information on flow regimes. The photographic records and the void fraction and hydraulic inflow/outflow data are presented in a form suitable for the assessment of advanced generation computer codes (e.g., TRAC).

  11. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  12. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume IV - Hydrologic Parameter Data Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Volume IV of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the hydrologic parameter data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  13. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VI - Groundwater Flow Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Volume VI of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the groundwater flow model data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  14. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  15. The NASA broad-specification fuels combustion technology program: An assessment of phase 1 test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fear, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is made of the results of Phase 1 screening testing of current and advanced combustion system concepts using several broadened-properties fuels. The severity of each of several fuels-properties effects on combustor performance or liner life is discussed, as well as design techniques with the potential to offset these adverse effects. The selection of concepts to be pursued in Phase 2 refinement testing is described. This selection takes into account the relative costs and complexities of the concepts, the current outlook on pollutant emissions control, and practical operational problems.

  16. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume II - Potentiometric Data Document Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume II of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the potentiometric data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  17. Mixed-Phase Icing Simulation and Testing at the Cox Icing Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel; Irani, Eddie; Miller, Dean

    2003-01-01

    A new capability was developed for indoor simulation of snow and mixed-phase icing conditions. This capability is useful for year-round testing in the Cox closed-loop Icing Wind Tunnel. Certification of aircraft for flight into these types of icing conditions is only required by the JAA in Europe. In an effort to harmonize certification requirements, the FAA in the US sponsored a preliminary program to study the effects of mixed-phase and fully glaciated icing conditions on the performance requirements of thermal ice protection systems. This paper describes the test program and the associated results.

  18. Linguistic Theory and Actual Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segerdahl, Par

    1995-01-01

    Examines Noam Chomsky's (1957) discussion of "grammaticalness" and the role of linguistics in the "correct" way of speaking and writing. It is argued that the concern of linguistics with the tools of grammar has resulted in confusion, with the tools becoming mixed up with the actual language, thereby becoming the central element in a metaphysical…

  19. Phase 2 TWR Steam Reforming Test for Sodium-Bearing Waste Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas R. Soelberg; Doug Marshall; Dean Taylor; Steven Bates

    2004-01-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste (SBW) is stored in stainless steel tanks a the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Steam reforming is a candidate technology being investigated for converting the SBW into a road ready waste form that can be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for interment. Fluidized bed steam reforming technology, licensed to ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC (TWR) by Manufacturing Technology Conversion International, was tested in two phases using an INEEL (Department of Energy) fluidized bed test system located at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Phase 1 tests were reported earlier. The Phase 2 tests are reported here. For Phase 2, the process feed rate, reductant stoichiometry, and process temperature were varied to identify and demonstrate how the process might be optimized to improve operation and product characteristics. The first week of testing was devoted primarily to process chemistry and the second week was devoted more toward bed stability and particle size control.

  20. GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: 100-kg melter offgas report

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-11-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the 100-kg melter offgas report on testing performed by GTS Duratek, Inc., in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The document contains the complete offgas report on the 100-kg melter as prepared by Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. A summary of this report is also contained in the GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Final Report (WHC-SD-WM-VI-027).

  1. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 1 discusses the following topics: the background of the project; test program description; summary of tests and test results; problem evaluation; functional requirements confirmation; recommendations; and completed test documentation for tests performed in Phase 3.

  2. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

    2012-02-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  3. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  4. Next-generation fire extinguishing agent. Phase 2: Laboratory tests and scoping trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapscott, Robert E.; May, John H.; Moore, Joanne P.; Lee, Michael E.; Walker, Joseph L.

    1990-04-01

    Concepts were orginated for next-generation fire extinguishing agents. In Phase 2, laboratory tests and scoping trials were performed to initiate a program for replacement of halon fire extinguishants in Air Force fire protection and firefighter training. Facilities were also established to perform laser Raman spectroscopic investigations of flame suppression halon agents, and initial, baseline Raman studies were carried out.

  5. Development of improved ATF engineering alloy - Mechanical testing of Phase 2 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Anderoglu, Osman; Lovato, Manuel L.; Maloy, Stuart Andrew

    2015-06-15

    In this report we present the results on the tensile testing of phase 2 FeCrAl alloys (Mo and Nb added for high temperature strength) developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We also compare FeCrAl with MA956 which is an ODS FeCrAl.

  6. A Tool for Predicting Regulatory Approval After Phase II Testing of New Oncology Compounds.

    PubMed

    DiMasi, J A; Hermann, J C; Twyman, K; Kondru, R K; Stergiopoulos, S; Getz, K A; Rackoff, W

    2015-11-01

    We developed an algorithm (ANDI) for predicting regulatory marketing approval for new cancer drugs after phase II testing has been conducted, with the objective of providing a tool to improve drug portfolio decision-making. We examined 98 oncology drugs from the top 50 pharmaceutical companies (2006 sales) that first entered clinical development from 1999 to 2007, had been taken to at least phase II development, and had a known final outcome (research abandonment or regulatory marketing approval). Data on safety, efficacy, operational, market, and company characteristics were obtained from public sources. Logistic regression and machine-learning methods were used to provide an unbiased approach to assess overall predictability and to identify the most important individual predictors. We found that a simple four-factor model (activity, number of patients in the pivotal phase II trial, phase II duration, and a prevalence-related measure) had high sensitivity and specificity for predicting regulatory marketing approval. PMID:26239772

  7. Undulator system for the VUV FEL at the TESLA test facility phase-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflüger, J.; Hahn, U.; Faatz, B.; Tischer, M.

    2003-07-01

    The Phase-1 of the VUV Free Electron Laser at the TESLA Test Facility finishes in fall 2002. Phase-2, an extension of Phase-1 towards shorter wavelengths is under construction and will be ready for operation in 2003. A radiation wavelength as low as 6 nm will be obtained by raising the electron energy to 1 GeV. There will be only minor changes to the undulator system. Compared to Phase-1, six instead of three undulator segments will be installed. The integrated focusing system will be replaced by an electromagnetic doublet structure. We report about the changes of the undulator, the undulator vacuum system, the separated quadrupoles including a stretched wire alignment systems and the modifications to the beam diagnostic system consisting of pick up monitors and wire scanners.

  8. Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project. Phase 2; Human Factors and Crew Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Hurlbert, K. M.; Kirby, G.; Lewis, J. F.; ORear, P.

    1997-01-01

    Phase 2 of the Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project was conducted in June and July of 1996 at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The primary objective of Phase 2 was to demonstrate and evaluate an integrated physicochemical air revitalization and regenerative water recovery system capable of sustaining a human crew of four for 30 days inside a closed chamber. The crew (3 males and 1 female) was continuously present inside a chamber throughout the 30-day test. The objective of this paper was to describe crew interactions and human factors for the test. Crew preparations for the test included training and familiarization of chamber systems and accommodations, and medical and psychological evaluations. During the test, crew members provided metabolic loads for the life support systems, performed maintenance on chamber systems, and evaluated human factors inside the chamber. Overall, the four crew members found the chamber to be comfortable for the 30-day test. The crew performed well together and this was attributed in part to team dynamics, skill mix (one commander, two system experts, and one logistics lead), and a complementary mix of personalities. Communication with and support by family, friends, and colleagues were identified as important contributors to the high morale of the crew during the test. Lessons learned and recommendations for future testing are presented by the crew in this paper.

  9. Experimental instrumentation system for the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, William H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive optics are used in telescopes for both viewing objects with minimum distortion and for transmitting laser beams with minimum beam divergence and dance. In order to test concepts on a smaller scale, NASA MSFC is in the process of setting up an adaptive optics test facility with precision (fraction of wavelengths) measurement equipment. The initial system under test is the adaptive optical telescope called PAMELA (Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture). Goals of this test are: assessment of test hardware specifications for PAMELA application and the determination of the sensitivities of instruments for measuring PAMELA (and other adaptive optical telescopes) imperfections; evaluation of the PAMELA system integration effort and test progress and recommended actions to enhance these activities; and development of concepts and prototypes of experimental apparatuses for PAMELA.

  10. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-09-27

    located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

  11. SELF-ACTUALIZATION AND THE UTILIZATION OF TALENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FRENCH, JOHN R.P.; MILLER, DANIEL R.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED (1) TO DEVELOP A THEORY OF THE CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION AS RELATED TO THE UTILIZATION OF TALENT, (2) TO FIT THE THEORY TO EXISTING DATA, AND (3) TO PLAN ONE OR MORE RESEARCH PROJECTS TO TEST THE THEORY. TWO ARTICLES ON IDENTITY AND MOTIVATION AND SELF-ACTUALIZATION AND SELF-IDENTITY THEORY REPORTED THE…

  12. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 2 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. EWIT Phase 2 featured a 36-inch aluminum tank head. The tank head was outfitted with one accelerometer, twelve pressure transducers, three string potentiometers, and four strain gages. The tank head was dropped from heights of 1 foot and 2 feet. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data. As a measure of prediction accuracy, peak responses from the baseline LS-DYNA model were compared to peak responses from the tests.

  13. International Space Station Program Phase 3 Integrated Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; Franks, G. D.; Knox, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Testing of the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. Segment baseline configuration of the Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was conducted as part of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) design and development program. This testing was designed to answer specific questions regarding the control and performance of the baseline ARS subassemblies in the ISS U.S. Segment configuration. These questions resulted from the continued maturation of the ISS ECLSS configuration and design requirement changes since 1992. The test used pressurized oxygen injection, a mass spectrometric major constituent analyzer, a Four-Bed Molecular Sieve Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, and a Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly to maintain the atmospheric composition in a sealed chamber at ISS specifications for 30 days. Human metabolic processes for a crew of four were simulated according to projected ISS mission time lines. The performance of a static feed water electrolysis Oxygen Generator Assembly was investigated during the test preparation phases; however, technical difficulties prevented its use during the integrated test. The Integrated ARS Test (IART) program built upon previous closed-door and open-door integrated testing conducted at MSFC between 1987 and 1992. It is the most advanced test of an integrated ARS conducted by NASA to demonstrate its end-to-end control and overall performance. IART test objectives, facility design, pretest analyses, test and control requirements, and test results are presented.

  14. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.; Dane, Jacob H.

    2011-04-15

    Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry air injection and extraction, is a potentially robust remediation process to slow migration of inorganic or radionuclide contaminants through the vadose zone. The application of gas-phase partitioning tracer tests has been proposed as a means to estimate initial water volumes and to monitor the progress of the desiccation process at pilot-test and field sites. In this paper, tracer tests have been conducted in porous medium columns with various water saturations using sulfur hexafluoride as the conservative tracer and tricholorofluoromethane and difluoromethane as the water-partitioning tracers. For porous media with minimal silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests provided reasonable saturation estimates for saturations close to zero. However, for sediments with significant silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests only provided satisfactory results when the water saturation was at least 0.1 - 0.2. For dryer conditions, the apparent tracer retardation increases due to air – soil sorption, which is not included in traditional retardation coefficients derived from advection-dispersion equations accounting only for air – water partitioning and water – soil sorption. Based on these results, gas-phase partitioning tracer tests may be used to determine initial water volumes in sediments, provided the initial water saturations are sufficiently large. However, tracer tests are not suitable for quantifying moisture content in desiccated sediments.

  15. Concrete containment tests: Phase 2, Structural elements with liner plates: Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, N.W.; Roller, J.J.; Schultz, D.M.; Julien, J.T.; Weinmann, T.L.

    1987-08-01

    The tests described in this report are part of Phase 2 of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) program. The overall objective of the EPRI program is to provide a test-verified analytical method of estimating capacities of concrete reactor containment buildings under internal overpressurization from postulated degraded core accidents. The Phase 2 testing included seven large-scale specimens representing structural elements from reinforced and prestressed concrete reactor containment buildings. Six of the seven test specimens were square wall elements. Of these six specimens, four were used for biaxial tension tests to determine strength, deformation, and leak-rate characteristics of full-scale wall elements representing prestressed concrete containment design. The remaining two square wall elements were used for thermal buckling tests to determine whether buckling of the steel liner plate would occur between anchorages when subjected to a sudden extreme temperature differential. The last of the seven test specimens for Phase 2 represented the region where the wall and the basemat intersect in a prestressed concrete containment building. A multi-directional loading scheme was used to produce high bending moments and shear in the wall/basemat junction region. The objective of this test was to determine if there is potential for liner plate tearing in the junction region. Results presented include observed behavior and extensive measurements of deformations and strains as a function of applied load. The data are being used to confirm analytical models for predicting strength and deformation of containment structures in a separate parallel analytical investigation sponsored by EPRI.

  16. Designing null phase screens to test a fast plano-convex aspheric lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelOlmo-Márquez, Jesús; Castán-Ricaño, Diana; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Díaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2015-08-01

    We have obtained a formula to represent the wavefront produced by a plano-convex aspheric lens with symmetry of revolution considering a plane wavefront propagating parallel to the optical axis and impinging on the refracting surface, it is called a zero-distance phase front, being it the first wavefront to be out of the optical system. Using a concept of differential geometry called parallel curves it is possible to obtain an analytic formula to represent the wavefront propagated at arbitrary distances through the optical axis. In order to evaluate qualitatively a plano-convex aspheric lens, we have modified slightly an interferometer Tywman-Green as follow: In the reference beam we use a plane mirror and the beam of test we have used a spatial light modulator (SLM) to compensate the phase produced by the lens under test. It will be called a null phase interferometer. The main idea is to recombine both wavefronts in order to get a null interferogram, otherwise we will associate the patterns of the interferogram to deformations of the lens under test. The null phase screens are formed with concentric circumferences assuming different gray levels printed on SLM.

  17. GTS Duratek, phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-10-26

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the final report on testing performed by GTS Duratek Inc. in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The report contains description of the tests, observations, test data and some analysis of the data as it pertains to application of this technology for LLW vitrification. The document also contains summaries of the melter offgas reports issued as separate documents for the 100 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-028) and for the 1000 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-029).

  18. Evaluation of Flygt Mixers for Application in Savannah River Site Tank 19 Test Results from Phase B: Mid-Scale Testing at PNNL

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Combs, W.H.; Farmer, J.R.; Gladki, H.; Hatchell, B.K.; Johnson, M.A.; Poirier, M.R.; Rodwell, P.O.

    1999-03-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed mixer tests using 3-kW (4-hp) Flygt mixers in 1.8- and 5.7-m-diameter tanks at the 336 building facility in Richland, Washington to evaluate candidate scaling relationships for Flygt mixers used for sludge mobilization and particle suspension. These tests constituted the second phase of a three-phase test program involving representatives from ITT Flygt Corporation, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and PNNL. The results of the first phase of tests, which were conducted at ITT Flygt's facility in a 0.45-m-diameter tank, are documented in Powell et al. (1999). Although some of the Phase B tests were geometrically similar to selected Phase A tests (0.45-m tank), none of the Phase B tests were geometrically, cinematically, and/or dynamically similar to the planned Tank 19 mixing system. Therefore, the mixing observed during the Phase B tests is not directly indicative of the mixing expected in Tank 19 and some extrapolation of the data is required to make predictions for Tank 19 mixing. Of particular concern is the size of the mixer propellers used for the 5.7-m tank tests. These propellers were more than three times larger than required by geometric scaling of the Tank 19 mixers. The implications of the lack of geometric similarity, as well as other factors that complicate interpretation of the test results, are discussed in Section 5.4.

  19. Methods for testing Zernike phase plates and a report on silicon-based phase plates with reduced charging and improved ageing characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Marko, Michael; Meng, Xing; Hsieh, Chyongere; Roussie, James; Striemer, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Imaging with Zernike phase plates is increasingly being used in cryo-TEM tomography and cryo-EM single-particle applications. However, rapid ageing of the phase plates, together with the cost and effort in producing them, present serious obstacles to widespread adoption. We are experimenting with phase plates based on silicon chips that have thin windows; such phase plates could be mass-produced and made available at moderate cost. The windows are coated with conductive layers to reduce charging, and this considerably extends the useful life of the phase plates compared to traditional pure-carbon phase plates. However, a compromise must be reached between robustness and transmission through the phase-plate film. Details are given on testing phase-plate performance by means of imaging an amorphous thin film and evaluating the power spectra of the images. PMID:23994351

  20. ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

    2009-01-01

    This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

  1. ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Z.V.; Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

    1989-02-01

    A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  2. Push pull partitioning tracer tests using radon-222 to quantify non-aqueous phase liquid contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, B. M.; Istok, J. D.; Semprini, L.

    2002-09-01

    Naturally occurring radon in groundwater can be used as an in situ partitioning tracer for locating and quantifying non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination in the subsurface. When combined with the single-well, push-pull test, this methodology has the potential to provide a low-cost alternative to inter-well partitioning tracer tests. During a push-pull test, a known volume of test solution (radon-free water containing a conservative tracer) is first injected ("pushed") into a well; flow is then reversed and the test solution/groundwater mixture is extracted ("pulled") from the same well. In the presence of NAPL radon transport is retarded relative to the conservative tracer. Assuming linear equilibrium partitioning, retardation factors for radon can be used to estimate NAPL saturations. The utility of this methodology was evaluated in laboratory and field settings. Laboratory push-pull tests were conducted in both non-contaminated and trichloroethene NAPL (TCE)-contaminated sediment. The methodology was then applied in wells located in non-contaminated and light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL)-contaminated portions of an aquifer at a former petroleum refinery. The method of temporal moments and an approximate analytical solution to the governing transport equations were used to interpret breakthrough curves and estimate radon retardation factors; estimated retardation factors were then used to calculate TCE saturations. Numerical simulations were used to further investigate the behavior of the breakthrough curves. The laboratory and field push-pull tests demonstrated that radon retardation does occur in the presence of TCE and LNAPL and that radon retardation can be used to calculate TCE saturations. Laboratory injection-phase test results in TCE-contaminated sediment yielded radon retardation factors ranging from 1.1 to 1.5, resulting in calculated TCE saturations ranging from 0.2 to 0.9%. Laboratory extraction-phase test results in the same sediment

  3. Development and testing of commercial-scale, coal-fired combustion systems: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) is actively pursuing the development and testing of coal-fired combustion systems for residential, commercial, and industrial market sectors. In response, MTCI initiated the development of a new combustor technology based on the principle of pulse combustion under the sponsorship of PETC (Contract No. AC22-83PC60419). The initial pulse combustor development program was conducted in three phases (MTCI, Development of a Pulsed Coal Combustor Fired with CWM, Phase III Final Report, DOE Contract No. AC22-83PC60419, November 1986). Phase I included a review of the prior art in the area of pulse combustion and the development of pulse combustor design concepts. It led to the conclusion that pulse combustors offer technical and base-of-operation advantages over conventional burners and also indicated favorable economics for replacement of oil- and gas-fired equipment.

  4. NRC confirmatory AP600 safety system phase I testing in the ROSA/AP600 test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, G.S.; Kukita, Yutaka; Schultz, R.R.

    1996-03-01

    The NRC confirmatory phase I testing for the AP600 safety systems has been completed in the modified ROSA (Rig of Safety Assessment) test facility located at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) campus in Tokai, Japan. The test matrix included a variety of accident scenarios covering both design and beyond-design basis accidents. The test results indicate the AP600 safety systems as reflected in ROSA appear to perform as designed and there is no danger of core heatup for the accident scenarios investigated. In addition, no detrimental system interactions nor adverse effects of non-safety systems on the safety system functions were identified. However, three phenomena of interest have been identified for further examination to determine whether they are relevant to the AP600 plant. Those three phenomena are: (1) a potential for water hammer caused by rapid condensation which may occur following the actuation of the automatic depressurization system (ADS), (2) a large thermal gradient in the cold leg pipe where cooled water returns from the passive residual heat removal system and forms a thermally stratified layer, and (3) system-wide oscillations initiating following the ADS stage 4 actuation and persisting until the liquid in the pressurizer drains and steam generation in the core becomes insignificant.

  5. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  6. System Integral Test by BWR Drywell Cooler Applied as Phase-II Accident Management

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, Hideo; Tobimatsu, Toshimi; Tahara, Mika; Yokobori, Seiichi; Akinaga, Makoto

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the system interaction performance using the BWR drywell local cooler (DWC) in combination with containment spray as a Japanese Phase-II accident management (AM). By using almost full height simulation test facility (GIRAFFE-DWC) with scaling ratio of 1/600, the system integral tests simulating BWR low pressure vessel failure sequence were accomplished during about 14 hours. In case of DWC application, the containment pressure increase was found milder due to DWC heat removal performance. Initial spray timing was delayed about 3 hours and each spray period was reduced almost by half. It was concluded that the application of a BWR DWC to Phase-II AM measure is quite promising from the point of delaying or preventing the containment venting. (authors)

  7. Tracer dilution measurements for two-phase geothermal production: Comparative testing and operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hirtz, P.; Lovekin, J.

    1995-12-31

    The tracer dilution technique for the measurement of steam and water mass flowrates and total enthalpy of two-phase geothermal fluids has been in routine use in the U.S.A. for almost three years. The tracer technique was first tested and adopted on a field-wide basis at the Coso geothermal field in California. Validation of the method was performed at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal project in Utah and the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal projects in California by direct comparison to orifice-plate flowmeter measurements of the separated phases. Production well mass flowrates and total enthalpy are now regularly measured by this technique in the Coso, Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields. Implementation of the tracer method is currently underway for the Tiwi and Bulalo geothermal fields in the Philippines. This paper presents the conceptual design of the measurement process, the results of field validations, and operating experience during field-wide testing in Coso.

  8. Solid-phase spectrophotometric and test determination of silicate in natural water.

    PubMed

    Zaporozhets, Olga A; Bas, Julia P; Kachan, Igor A; Zinko, Lionel S; Davydov, Valentyn I

    2012-02-15

    Quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) of aliphatic (tetradecylammonium nitrate) and heterocyclic (lucigenine) nature immobilized onto silica surface have been proposed as effective anion-exchangers for the adsorptional extraction of silicate in the form of the reduced molybdo-silicic heteropoly anion for the successive determination in the solid phase by using spectrophotometric and visual test techniques. The interface interaction has been investigated. On the basis of the results obtained the new solid-phase spectrophotometric and visual test techniques for the direct silicon determination in the rage of its concentrations 14-400 μg L(-1) have been proposed. The tolerance limits of the major components in natural waters and other ions capable of producing heteropoly anions in the silicate determination have been reported. The techniques have been successfully applied for the silicate determination in natural waters. PMID:22340120

  9. Modeling and testing of two-phase flow in manifolds under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Frederick; Kurwitz, Cable

    2001-02-01

    Previous work relating to two-phase flow in manifolds has dealt primarily with 1-g phase distribution at each junction. Understanding the redistribution of gas and liquid at each junction in microgravity allows the investigator to calculate specific thermal-hydraulic phenomena in each branch or run. A model was developed at Texas A&M to determine the phasic distribution in an arbitrary manifold. Previously developed phase distribution equations are used to describe the redistribution at a dividing T-junction (Young et al., 1999). Mass flow rate, void fraction, and pressure drop are calculated iteratively for the entire manifold. Output from the model was compared to data taken from tests aboard NASA's KC-135. The test manifold consisted of a run with three branches. The system allowed the output to be directed to a phase separator or to collection bags. The distribution of liquid and gas in each collection bag could be used to determine the mass fraction in each branch and run. Results show good agreement between predicted mass fraction and flight data. .

  10. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Phase 1 and 2: Testing and Modeling Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.; Guo, Y.; LaCava, W.; Link, H.; McNiff, B.

    2012-05-01

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) investigates root causes of wind turbine gearbox premature failures and validates design assumptions that affect gearbox reliability using a combined testing and modeling approach. Knowledge gained from the testing and modeling of the GRC gearboxes builds an understanding of how the selected loads and events translate into internal responses of three-point mounted gearboxes. This paper presents some testing and modeling results of the GRC research during Phase 1 and 2. Non-torque loads from the rotor including shaft bending and thrust, traditionally assumed to be uncoupled with gearbox, affect gear and bearing loads and resulting gearbox responses. Bearing clearance increases bearing loads and causes cyclic loading, which could contribute to a reduced bearing life. Including flexibilities of key drivetrain subcomponents is important in order to reproduce the measured gearbox response during the tests using modeling approaches.

  11. Development of an AC Phase Controlled Testing Apparatus with an Impulse Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kando, Masaaki; Matsuo, Takashi

    Overvoltages as lightning surges and/or switching surges will affect power apparatuses and electric appliances, which make them of deterioration. However, recent AC testing apparatuses haven't been functions generating an impulse voltage. Moreover, the apparatuses with controlling an impulse voltage haven't been utilized except the low voltage function generator. Therefore, an AC phase controlled testing apparatus with an impulse voltage (0.8/6μs) has been developed in order to elucidate mechanism of the degradation in insulating materials with a AC power supply simulating the overvoltages.

  12. Concrete containment tests, Phase 3: Structural elements with penetration sleeves: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, N.W.; Roller, J.J.; Schultz, D.M.; Azizinamini, A.

    1989-03-01

    The tests described in this report are part of Phase 3 of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) program. The overall objective of the EPRI program is to provide a test-verified analytical method of estimating capacities of concrete reactor containment buildings under internal overpressurization from postulated degraded core accidents. Results presented include observed behavior and extensive measurements of deformations and strains as a function of applied load. The data are being used to confirm analytical models for predicting strength and deformation of containment structures in a separate parallel analytical investigation sponsored by EPRI. 11 refs., 31 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Phase 2 testing and evaluation of low data rate voice CODEC equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehel, Thomas; Grable, Marcus; Child, Joseph

    1989-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is currently evaluating low rate voice digitizing coder/decoder (CODEC's) for use with the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Service (AMSS). Phase 2 of this evaluation consisted of air traffic control (ATC) personnel participating in an objective intelligibility test of several CODEC's under operational conditions. The results of the testing show that the intelligibility of the low rate 4.8 kilobits per second (kbps) CODEC's is essentially equivalent to the intelligibility of the 9.6 kbps CODEC. The results also show that the 4.8 kbps CODEC's can operate with high intelligibility under conditions of high bit error rates and operational background noise.

  14. Solid phase microextraction analysis of B83 SLTS and Core B compatibility test units

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M; Ithaca, J; King, H A; Malcolm, S

    1999-03-26

    Solid phase microextraction has permitted the efficient collection and analysis of a broad range of volatile and semivolatile compounds outgassed from materials. In 1998, we implemented a microextraction protocol at Mason and Hanger, Pantex Plant, for the analysis of weapons and compatibility test units. The chemical information that was obtained from this work is interpreted by determining the source and outgas mechanism for each compound in the weapon signature, which is a task only accomplished by analysis of material standards.

  15. Development and Testing of a Jet Assisted Polycrystalline Diamond Drilling Bit. Phase II Development Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Pixton

    1999-09-20

    Phase II efforts to develop a jet-assisted rotary-percussion drill bit are discussed. Key developments under this contract include: (1) a design for a more robust polycrystalline diamond drag cutter; (2) a new drilling mechanism which improves penetration and life of cutters; and (3) a means of creating a high-pressure mud jet inside of a percussion drill bit. Field tests of the new drill bit and the new robust cutter are forthcoming.

  16. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 3 Plunge Depth of a 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 3 featured a composite tank head that was tested at a range of heights to verify the ability to predict structural failure of composites. To support planning for Phase 3, a test series was conducted with an aluminum tank head dropped from heights of 2, 6, 10, and 12 feet to verify that the test article would not impact the bottom of the test pool. This report focuses on the comparisons of the measured plunge depths to LS-DYNA predictions. The results for the tank head model demonstrated the following. 1. LS-DYNA provides accurate predictions for peak accelerations. 2. LS-DYNA consistently under-predicts plunge depth. An allowance of at least 20% should be added to the LS-DYNA predictions. 3. The LS-DYNA predictions for plunge depth are relatively insensitive to the fluid-structure coupling stiffness.

  17. Field test of high molecular weight alcohol flushing for subsurface nonaqueous phase liquid remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falta, Ronald W.; Lee, Cindy M.; Brame, Scott E.; Roeder, Eberhard; Coates, John T.; Wright, Charles; Wood, A. Lynn; Enfield, Carl G.

    1999-07-01

    A pilot scale field test of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) removal using high molecular weight alcohols was conducted at Operable Unit 1, Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Petroleum hydrocarbons and spent solvents were disposed of in chemical disposal pits at this site, and these materials are now present in the subsurface in the form of a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL). This LNAPL is a complex mixture of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated solvents, and other compounds. The field experiment was performed in a 5 m by 3 m confined test cell, formed by driving interlocking sheet pile walls through the contaminated zone into an underlying clay. The test involved the injection and extraction of about four pore volumes (1 pore volume=7000 L) of a mixture of 80% tert-butanol and 15% n-hexanol. The contaminants were removed by a combination of NAPL mobilization and enhanced dissolution, and the results of postflood soil coring indicate better than 90% removal of the more soluble contaminants (trichloroethane, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzene, naphthalene) and 70-80% removal of less soluble compounds (decane and undecane). The results of preflood and postflood NAPL partitioning tracer tests show nearly 80% removal of the total NAPL content from the test cell. The field data suggest that a somewhat higher level of removal could be achieved with a longer alcohol injection.

  18. Phase Fluctuations at Goldstone Derived from 1-Year Site Testing Interferometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Acosta, Roberto J.; Morabito, David D.

    2009-01-01

    A two-element site test interferometer has been deployed at the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) tracking complex in Goldstone, California, since May 2007. The interferometer system consists of two offset-fed 1.2 m parabolic reflectors which monitor atmospheric-induced amplitude and phase fluctuations on an unmodulated beacon signal (20.199 GHz) broadcast from a geostationary satellite (Anik F2). The geometry of the satellite and the ground-based infrastructure imposes a 48.5 elevation angle with a separation distance of 256 m along an east-west baseline. The interferometer has been recording phase fluctuation data, to date, for 1 yr with an overall system availability of 95 percent. In this paper, we provide the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) for 1 year of recorded data, including phase rms, spatial structure function exponent, and surface meteorological measurements: surface wind speed, relative humidity, temperature, barometric pressure, and rain rate. Correlation between surface measurements, phase rms, and amplitude rms at different time scales are discussed. For 1 year, phase fluctuations at the DSN site in Goldstone, are better than 23 for 90 percent of the time (at 48.5 elevation). This data will be used to determine the suitability of the Goldstone site as a location for the Next Generation Deep Space Network.

  19. High Rate User Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caroglanian, Armen; Perko, Kenneth; Seufert, Steve; Dod, Tom; Warshowsky, Jay; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High Rate User Phased Array Antenna (HRUPAA) is a Ka-Band planar phased array designed by the Harris Corporation for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The HRUPAA permits a satellite to downlink data either to a ground station or through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The HRUPAA is scanned electronically by ground station / user satellite command over a 120 degree cone angle. The phased array has the advantage of not imparting attitude disturbances to the user spacecraft. The 288-element transmit-only array has distributed RF amplifiers integrated behind each of the printed patch antenna elements. The array has 33 dBW EIRP and is left-hand circularly polarized. An engineering model of a partially populated array has been developed and delivered to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This report deals with the testing of the engineering model at the Goddard Antenna Range near-field and compact range facilities. The antenna specifications are described first, followed by the test plan and test results.

  20. An Application of Graphical Approach to Construct Multiple Testing Procedures in a Hypothetical Phase III Design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bushi; Ting, Naitee

    2014-01-01

    Many multiple testing procedures (MTP) have been developed in recent years. Among these new procedures, the graphical approach is flexible and easy to communicate with non-statisticians. A hypothetical Phase III clinical trial design is introduced in this manuscript to demonstrate how graphical approach can be applied in clinical product development. In this design, an active comparator is used. It is thought that this test drug under development could potentially be superior to this comparator. For comparison of efficacy, the primary endpoint is well established and widely accepted by regulatory agencies. However, an important secondary endpoint based on Phase II findings looks very promising. The target dose may have a good opportunity to deliver superiority to the comparator. Furthermore, a lower dose is included in case the target dose may demonstrate potential safety concerns. This Phase III study is designed as a non-inferiority trial with two doses, and two endpoints. This manuscript will illustrate how graphical approach is applied to this design in handling multiple testing issues. PMID:24432299

  1. Summary of test results for the cryogenic two-phase flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Theodore D.; Buchko, Matthew T.; Bello, Mel; Brennan, Patrick; Stoyanof, Marco M.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents a brief summary of the flight results for the Cryogenic Two-Phase Flight Experiment (CRYOTP). This experiment was a Hitchhiker-based payload that flew on the space shuttle Columbia in March of 1994 (STS-62). CRYOTP tested two new technologies for advanced cryogenic thermal control; the Space Heat Pipe (SHP), which was a constant conductance cryogenic heat pipe, and the Brilliant Eyes Thermal Storage Unit (BETSU), which was a cryogenic phase-change thermal storage device. Both devices were tested independently during the mission. Analysis of the flight data indicated that the SHP was unable to start in either of two attempts, due to a supercritical startup limit related to the wall material thermal conductivity, parasitic heat leaks, and cryocooler capacity. The BETSU test article was successfully operated with more than 250 hours of on-orbit testing including several cooldown cycles and 56 freeze/thaw cycles. Some degradation was observed with the five tactical cryocoolers used as thermal sinks, and one of the cryocoolers failed completely after 331 hours of operation. Post-flight analysis indicated that this problem was most likely due to failure of an electrical controller internal to the unit.

  2. Normal Gravity Testing of a Microchannel Phase Separator for In Situ Resource Utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; McQuillen, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A microchannel separator, with 2.7 millimeters as the smallest dimension, was tested, and a pore throat structure captured and removed liquid from a gas-liquid stream. The microchannel device was tested over a of gas and liquid flow rates ranging from 0.0005 up to 0. 14 volume fraction of liquid. Four liquids were tested with air. The biggest factor affecting the throughput is the capacity of liquid flow through the pore throat, which is dictated by permeability, liquid viscosity, flow area, pore throat thickness, and pressure difference across the pore throat. Typically, complete separation of gas and liquid fractions was lost when the liquid flow rate reached about 40 to 60% of the pore throat capacity. However, this could occur over a range of 10 to 90% utilization of pore throat capacity. Breakthrough occurs in the microchannel phase separator at conditions similar to the annular to plug flow transition of two-phase microgravity pipe flow implying that operating in the proper flow regime is crucial. Analysis indicates that the Bond number did not affect performance, supporting the premise that hydrodynamic, interfacial, and capillary forces are more important than gravity. However, the relative importance of gravity is better discerned through testing under reduced gravity conditions.

  3. Tests of CMS Phase 1 Pixel Upgrade Back-End Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    The CMS detector will be upgraded so that it can handle the higher instantaneous luminosity of the 13-14 TeV collisions. The Phase 1 Pixel detector will experience a higher density of particle interactions requiring new front-end and read-out electronics. A front-end pixel data emulator was developed to validate the back-end readout electronics prior to installation and operation. A FPGA-based design emulates 400 Mbps data patterns from the front-end read-out chips and will be used to confirm that each Front End Driver (FED) can correctly decode and process the expected data patterns and error conditions. A FED test bench using the emulator can produce LHC-like conditions for stress testing FED hardware, firmware and online software. The design of the emulator and initial test results will be reported.

  4. Automated screening of propulsion system test data by neural networks, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, W. Andes; Whitehead, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    The evaluation of propulsion system test and flight performance data involves reviewing an extremely large volume of sensor data generated by each test. An automated system that screens large volumes of data and identifies propulsion system parameters which appear unusual or anomalous will increase the productivity of data analysis. Data analysts may then focus on a smaller subset of anomalous data for further evaluation of propulsion system tests. Such an automated data screening system would give NASA the benefit of a reduction in the manpower and time required to complete a propulsion system data evaluation. A phase 1 effort to develop a prototype data screening system is reported. Neural networks will detect anomalies based on nominal propulsion system data only. It appears that a reasonable goal for an operational system would be to screen out 95 pct. of the nominal data, leaving less than 5 pct. needing further analysis by human experts.

  5. Progress in the Phase 0 Model Development of a STAR Concept for Dynamics and Control Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Armand, Sasan C.

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes progress in the development of a lightweight, deployable passive Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (STAR). The spacecraft concept presented will enable the realization of 10 km resolution global soil moisture and ocean salinity measurements at 1.41 GHz. The focus of this work was on definition of an approximately 1/3-scaled, 5-meter Phase 0 test article for concept demonstration and dynamics and control testing. Design requirements, parameters and a multi-parameter, hybrid scaling approach for the dynamically scaled test model were established. The El Scaling Approach that was established allows designers freedom to define the cross section of scaled, lightweight structural components that is most convenient for manufacturing when the mass of the component is small compared to the overall system mass. Static and dynamic response analysis was conducted on analytical models to evaluate system level performance and to optimize panel geometry for optimal tension load distribution.

  6. Testing The Performance Of A Single-Phase Autotransformer On MATLAB/Simulink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panu, Mihai Gheorghe; Viorel, Alina Cristina

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a virtual laboratory for testing a single-phase autotransformer using MATLAB Simulink environment. The model is implemented according to a practical laboratory used at electric machines' discipline for the undergraduate level in electrical engineering. The model presented herein is a copy of a practical experiment for an autotransformer made in the test laboratory. The rating of the autotransformer is taken to be 2 kVA, 230/0÷230 V, and it was set at a transformer ratio of 1.5. The used model is a linear one and run for a pure resistive load test. In the same time, it was aimed the simulation accuracy as it was used a linear model, neglecting the magnetic saturation effect.

  7. Influence of sediment composition on apparent toxicity in a solid-phase test using bioluminescent bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, M.J.; Malott, M.L. |; Knight, S.S.; Cooper, C.M.; Benson, W.H.

    1995-03-01

    Clean and spiked sediment formulations of various silt:sand and clay:sand ratios were tested for toxicity using a bioassay that utilizes bioluminescent bacteria. Measured toxicities of clean and copper sulfate-spiked sediments were negatively but nonlinearly related with percent silt and percent clay, but no significant relationship existed between measured toxicity and sediment composition for methyl parathion-spiked formulations. Results suggest that solid-phase sediment bioassays using bioluminescence bacteria may be useful for testing the toxicities of single contaminants in formulated artificial sediments of known particle-size composition, and for repeated samples collected from the same site. However, extreme caution must be taken when testing sediments of varying composition or which may be differentially contaminated or contain a suite of contaminants.

  8. Development of phased array ultrasonic testing in lieu of radiography for testing complete joint penetration (CJP) welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldipur, P.; Boone, Shane D.

    2014-04-01

    The past decade has seen new, emerging innovation of Ultrasonic Testing (UT). Specifically, multiple manufacturers have produced Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing (PAUT) systems. The PAUT systems embed a matrix of multiple (some up to 128) single transducers into one probe used for scanning elastic materials. Simultaneously exciting multiple transducers offers distinct advantages; depending on the sequencing of transducer excitation, the ultrasonic beam could be steered within the material and multiple beams help develop extra dimensional data to assist with visualization of possible flaws including the discontinuity size, shape and location. Unfortunately, there has not been broad acceptance of PAUT in the bridge fabrication industry because it is currently not a recognized inspection technology in AWS D1.5. One situation in which the technology would excel would be inspection of Complete Joint Penetration (CJP) butt welds. Currently, AWS D1.5 required CJP welds subjected to tensile or reversal stresses only be inspected by Radiographic Testing (RT). However, discontinuities normally seen by RT can also be seen with PAUT. Until specification language is adopted into D1.5, there will continue to be hesitancy to use PAUT for the inspection of CJP butt welds. Developmental work must first be performed to develop the acceptance criteria and the specification language. The developmental work from the inspections carried out on butt-weld specimens and transition butt-weld specimens are presented in this paper. Specific scan plans were developed using the ES-Beam simulation software for each of the test specimens. In depth analysis of PAUT data obtained to determine exact location and sizing information of the defects was performed. The results also present the comparison of results from PAUT to those obtained using conventional UT and radiography.

  9. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  10. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 2: Orbiter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternative recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data was acquired by the competing contractors and the NASA centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. All contractor and NASA wind tunnel test data acquired in the Phase B development have been compiled into a data base and are available for applying to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Data Base is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter, and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retro-glide and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks, and double delta wings. Launch configuration types include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations.

  11. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 1: Booster configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternative recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data was acquired by the competing contractors and the NASA Centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. All contractor and NASA wind tunnel test data acquired in the Phase B development have been compiled into a database and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks, and double delta wings. Launch configurations include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations. This is Volume 1 (Part 1) of the report -- Booster Configuration.

  12. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 2: Orbiter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternate recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data was acquired by the competing contractors and the NASA centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. All contractor and NASA wind tunnel test data acquiredin the Phase B development have been compiled into a database and are available for applying to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter, and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide, and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks, and double delta wings. Launch configration types include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandom combinations. The digital database consists of 220 files of data containing basic tunnel recorded data.

  13. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 1: Booster configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternative recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data was acquired by the competing contractors and the NASA Centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. All contractor and NASA wind tunnel test data acquired in the Phase B development have been compiled into a database and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include the booster, the orbiter, and the launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide and twin body. Orbiter configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks and double delta wings. Launch configurations include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations. This is Volume 1 (Part 2) of the report -- Booster Configuration.

  14. Stainless Steel Round Robin Test: Centrifugally cast stainless steel screening phase

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, D.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Burck, E.

    1987-10-01

    This report presents the results of the Centrifugally Cast Stainless Steel Round Robin Test (CCSSRRT). The CCSSRRT is the first phase of an effort to investigate and improve the capability and reliability of NDE inspections of light water reactor piping systems. This phase was a screening test to identify the most promising procedures presently available for CCSS. The next phase will be an in-depth program to evaluate the capability and reliability of inservice inspections (ISI) for piping. In the CCSSRRT, 15 centrifugally cast stainless steel pipe sections containing welds and laboratory-grown thermal fatigue cracks in both columnar and equiaxed base material were used. These pipe specimens were inspected by a total of 18 teams from Europe and the United States using a variety of NDE techniques, mostly ultrasonic (UT). The inspections were carried out at the team's facilities and included inspections from both sides of the weld and inspections restricted to one side of the weld. The results of the CCSSRRT make it apparent that a more detailed study on the capability and reliability of procedures to inspect stainless steel materials is needed to better understand the specific material and flaw properties and how they affect the outcome of an inspection.

  15. Testing the QCD string at large Nc from the thermodynamics of the hadronic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Thomas D.

    2007-02-01

    It is generally believed that in the limit of a large number of colors (Nc) the description of confinement via flux tubes becomes valid and QCD can be modeled accurately via a hadronic string theory—at least for highly excited states. QCD at large Nc also has a well-defined deconfinement transition at a temperature Tc. In this talk it is shown how the thermodyanmics of the metastable hadronic phase of QCD (above Tc) at large NC can be related directly to properties of the effective QCD string. The key points in the derivation is the weakly interacting nature of hadrons at large Nc and the existence of a Hagedorn temperature TH for the effective string theory. From this it can be seen at large Nc and near TH, the energy density and pressure of the hadronic phase scale as E ˜ (TH - T)-(D⊥-6)/2 (for D⊥ < 6) and P ˜ (TH - T)-(D⊥-4)/2 (for D⊥ < 4) where D⊥ is the effective number of transverse dimensions of the string theory. This behavior for D⊥ < 6 is qualitatively different from typical models in statistical mechanics and if observed on the lattice would provide a direct test of the stringy nature of large Nc QCD. However since it can be seen that TH > Tc this behavior is of relevance only to the metastable phase. The prospect of using this result to extract D⊥ via lattice simulations of the metastable hadronic phase at moderately large Nc is discussed.

  16. Testing a new multivariate GNSS carrier phase attitude determination method for remote sensing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Gabriele; Teunissen, Peter J. G.; Verhagen, Sandra; Buist, Peter J.

    2010-07-01

    GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems)-based attitude determination is an important field of study, since it is a valuable technique for the orientation estimation of remote sensing platforms. To achieve highly accurate angular estimates, the precise GNSS carrier phase observables must be employed. However, in order to take full advantage of the high precision, the unknown integer ambiguities of the carrier phase observables need to be resolved. This contribution presents a GNSS carrier phase-based attitude determination method that determines the integer ambiguities and attitude in an integral manner, thereby fully exploiting the known body geometry of the multi-antennae configuration. It is shown that this integral approach aids the ambiguity resolution process tremendously and strongly improves the capacity of fixing the correct set of integer ambiguities. In this contribution, the challenging scenario of single-epoch, single-frequency attitude determination is addressed. This guarantees a total independence from carrier phase slips and losses of lock, and it also does not require any a priori motion model for the platform. The method presented is a multivariate constrained version of the popular LAMBDA method and it is tested on data collected during an airborne remote sensing campaign.

  17. Field testing the role of heterogeneity at the inter-well scale during two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, S. D.; Gulf Coast Carbon Center; Geoseq

    2011-12-01

    Connectivity of rocks with different fluid flow properties (reservoir architecture) is a major source of uncertainty in predicting multi-phase fluid flow. Multi-institution research teams have completed three major DOE-funded test programs in which movement of supercritical CO2 through brine-saturated fluvial sandstones was observed with multiple tools. In each test, closely spaced wells (30 to 100 m) were drilled to reservoir depth so that the amount of reservoir complexity sampled between the wells would be reduced and higher resolution measurements of change could be obtained during time-lapse monitoring. During one test (Frio 1), an exceptionally homogeneous injection zone produced by marine reworking of a fine-grained fluvial sandstone of the Upper Frio Formation produced a classic-wedge-shaped CO2 plume. The maximum area occupied by CO2 was the result of radial expansion of the plume near the injection well; this produced plume down-building. Away from the injection well , the importance of gravity-override increased. A second test at the same well array in a deeper sandstone (Frio 2) was sited in heterogeneous (gravel to muddy sandstone) high permeability (>3 Darcy), weakly cemented fluvial sandstone. A slow injection rate over a small interval at the flow unit base was used to accentuate buoyancy effects. Measurements of plume migration through time using tracers and cross-well seismic documented interaction between near-well radial flow and vertical rise. However, because of discontinuous fast paths in gravel zones and CO2 ponding against muddy sandstone baffles, reservoir heterogeneity was a dominant influence in short-term plume evolution. The third test interval in the SECARB "Early" test documented response of amalgamated gravel and sandstone point bars in which heterogeneity was reduced by cementation. CO2 injection rate was increased incrementally and flow-rate dependent reservoir responses observed. These suggest that capillary-entry pressure and

  18. Phase II test plan for the evaluation of the performance of container filling systems

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-09-28

    The PHMC will provide tank wastes for final treatment by BNFL from Hanford's waste tanks. Concerns about the ability for ''grab'' sampling to provide large volumes of representative waste samples has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. Preferred concepts for filling sample containers that meet RCRA organic sample criteria were identified by a PHMC Decision Board. These systems will replace the needle based sampling ''T'' that is currently on the sampling system. This test plan document identifies cold tests with simulants that will demonstrate the preferred bottle filling concepts abilities to provide representative waste samples and will meet RCRA criteria. Additional tests are identified that evaluate the potential for cross-contamination between samples and the ability for the system to decontaminate surfaces which have contacted tank wastes. These tests will be performed with kaolid/water and sand/water slurry simulants in the test rig that was used by AEAT to complete Phase 1 tests in FY 1999.

  19. Parking and routing information system phase 1 evaluation -- Individual evaluation test plans

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    A parking and routing information system (PARIS) is being designed and deployed at a test site on the Mountain Home Veterans Administration campus in Johnson City, Tennessee using three sensor technologies. The purpose of the PARIS project is to demonstrate innovative integration of vehicle sensing technologies with parking management strategies to improve mobility and relieve congestion associated with a growing medical/technology complex. This technical memorandum presents the four individual evaluation test plans, System Performance Individual Evaluation Test Plan, User Acceptance Individual Evaluation Test Plan, Institutional and Business Issues Individual Evaluation Test Plan, and Transportation Systems Individual Evaluation Test Plan, which were developed to support ORNL`s responsibilities and functions during the four studies. The plans define the level of effort required to satisfy the data collection, processing, and analysis requirements for the assessment of the system performance, user acceptance, institutional and business issues, and transportation systems components of the PARIS phase 1 evaluation. Each plan is divided into three subsections: executive summary, detailed study design, and study management.

  20. Development of rotorcraft interior noise control concepts. Phase 2: Full scale testing, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoerkie, C. A.; Gintoli, P. J.; Moore, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The phase 2 effort consisted of a series of ground and flight test measurements to obtain data for validation of the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model. Included in the gound tests were various transfer function measurements between vibratory and acoustic subsystems, vibration and acoustic decay rate measurements, and coherent source measurements. The bulk of these, the vibration transfer functions, were used for SEA model validation, while the others provided information for characterization of damping and reverberation time of the subsystems. The flight test program included measurements of cabin and cockpit sound pressure level, frame and panel vibration level, and vibration levels at the main transmission attachment locations. Comparisons between measured and predicted subsystem excitation levels from both ground and flight testing were evaluated. The ground test data show good correlation with predictions of vibration levels throughout the cabin overhead for all excitations. The flight test results also indicate excellent correlation of inflight sound pressure measurements to sound pressure levels predicted by the SEA model, where the average aircraft speech interference level is predicted within 0.2 dB.

  1. Development and Testing of Industrial Scale Coal Fired Combustion System, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bert Zauderer

    1998-09-30

    Coal Tech Corp's mission is to develop, license & sell innovative, lowest cost, solid fuel fired power systems & total emission control processes using proprietary and patented technology for domestic and international markets. The present project 'DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF INDUSTRIAL SCALE, COAL FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEM, PHASE 3' on DOE Contract DE-AC22-91PC91162 was a key element in achieving this objective. The project consisted of five tasks that were divided into three phases. The first phase, 'Optimization of First Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor', consisted of three tasks, which are detailed in Appendix 'A' of this report. They were implemented in 1992 and 1993 at the first generation, 20 MMBtu/hour, combustor-boiler test site in Williamsport, PA. It consisted of substantial combustor modifications and coal-fired tests designed to improve the combustor's wall cooling, slag and ash management, automating of its operation, and correcting severe deficiencies in the coal feeding to the combustor. The need for these changes was indicated during the prior 900-hour test effort on this combustor that was conducted as part of the DOE Clean Coal Program. A combination of combustor changes, auxiliary equipment changes, sophisticated multi-dimensional combustion analysis, computer controlled automation, and series of single and double day shift tests totaling about 300 hours, either resolved these operational issues or indicated that further corrective changes were needed in the combustor design. The key result from both analyses and tests was that the combustor must be substantially lengthened to maximize combustion efficiency and sharply increase slag retention in the combustor. A measure of the success of these modifications was realized in the third phase of this project, consisting of task 5 entitled: 'Site Demonstration with the Second Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor'. The details of the task 5 effort are

  2. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 2 discusses the following topics: Fuel Rod Extraction System Test Results and Analysis Reports and Clamping Table Test Results and Analysis Reports.

  3. Evaluation of melter technologies for vitrification of Hanford site low-level tank waste - phase 1 testing summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.N., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-27

    Following negotiation of the fourth amendment to the Tri- Party Agreement for Hanford Site cleanup, commercially available melter technologies were tested during 1994 and 1995 for vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream to be derived from retrieval and pretreatment of the radioactive defense wastes stored in 177 underground tanks. Seven vendors were selected for Phase 1 testing to demonstrate vitrification of a high-sodium content liquid LLW simulant. The tested melter technologies included four Joule-heated melters, a carbon electrode melter, a combustion melter, and a plasma melter. Various dry and slurry melter feed preparation processes also were tested. The technologies and Phase 1 testing results were evaluated and a preliminary technology down-selection completed. This report describes the Phase 1 LLW melter vendor testing and the tested technologies, and summarizes the testing results and the preliminary technology recommendations.

  4. Modeling and Testing of Phase Transition-Based Deployable Systems for Small Body Sample Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco; Backes, Paul; Wilkie, Keats; Giersch, Lou; Quijano, Ubaldo; Keim, Jason; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the modeling, simulation, and testing work related to the development of technology to investigate the potential that shape memory actuation has to provide mechanically simple and affordable solutions for delivering assets to a surface and for sample capture and return. We investigate the structural dynamics and controllability aspects of an adaptive beam carrying an end-effector which, by changing equilibrium phases is able to actively decouple the end-effector dynamics from the spacecraft dynamics during the surface contact phase. Asset delivery and sample capture and return are at the heart of several emerging potential missions to small bodies, such as asteroids and comets, and to the surface of large bodies, such as Titan.

  5. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 3: Launch configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel test data are available for flyback booster or other alternate recoverable configuration as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle, including contractor data for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. The test data have been compiled into a database and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration. Basic components include booster, orbiter, and launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide and twin body. Orbiter configurations include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks and double delta wings. Launch configurations include booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations. The digital database consists of 220 files containing basic tunnel data. Database structure is documented in a series of reports which include configuration sketches for the various planforms tested. This is Volume 3 -- launch configurations.

  6. Test Plan: Phase 1 demonstration of 3-phase electric arc melting furnace technology for vitrifying high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-05-31

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of electric arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384216] is the US Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior, Albany Research Center, Albany, Oregon. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes feed preparation activities and melting of glass with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a 3-phase electric arc (carbon electrode) furnace.

  7. Development and testing of commercial-scale, coal-fired combustion systems: Phase III. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Based on studies that indicated a large potential for significantly increased coal-firing in the commercial sector, the U.S. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsored a multi-phase development effort for advanced coal combustion systems. This Final Report presents the results of the last phase (Phase III) of a project for the development of an advanced coal-fired system for the commercial sector of the economy. The project performance goals for the system included dual-fuel capability (i.e., coal as primary fuel and natural gas as secondary fuel), combustion efficiency exceeding 99 percent, thermal efficiency greater than 80 percent, turndown of at least 3:1, dust-free and semi-automatic dry ash removal, fully automatic start-up with system purge and ignition verification, emissions performance exceeding New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and approaching those produced by oil-fired, Commercial-sized units, and reliability, safety, operability, maintainability, and service life comparable to oil-fired units. The program also involved a site demonstration at a large facility owned by Striegel Supply Company, a portion of which was leased to MTCI. The site, mostly warehouse space, was completely unheated and the advanced coal-fired combustion system was designed and sized to heat this space. Three different coals were used in the project, one low and one high sulfur pulverized Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, and a micronized low volatile, bituminous coal. The sorbents used were Pfizer dolomitic limestone and an Anvil lime. More than 100 hours of screening test`s were performed to characterize the system. The parameters examined included coal firing rate, excess air level, ash recycle rate, coal type, dolomitic limestone feed rate, and steam injection rate. These tests indicated that some additional modifications for coal burning in the system were required.

  8. The actual goals of geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Vaclav

    2014-05-01

    The most actual goals of geoethics have been formulated as results of the International Conference on Geoethics (October 2013) held at the geoethics birth-place Pribram (Czech Republic): In the sphere of education and public enlightenment an appropriate needed minimum know how of Earth sciences should be intensively promoted together with cultivating ethical way of thinking and acting for the sustainable well-being of the society. The actual activities of the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Changes are not sustainable with the existing knowledge of the Earth sciences (as presented in the results of the 33rd and 34th International Geological Congresses). This knowledge should be incorporated into any further work of the IPCC. In the sphere of legislation in a large international co-operation following steps are needed: - to re-formulate the term of a "false alarm" and its legal consequences, - to demand very consequently the needed evaluation of existing risks, - to solve problems of rights of individuals and minorities in cases of the optimum use of mineral resources and of the optimum protection of the local population against emergency dangers and disasters; common good (well-being) must be considered as the priority when solving ethical dilemmas. The precaution principle should be applied in any decision making process. Earth scientists presenting their expert opinions are not exempted from civil, administrative or even criminal liabilities. Details must be established by national law and jurisprudence. The well known case of the L'Aquila earthquake (2009) should serve as a serious warning because of the proven misuse of geoethics for protecting top Italian seismologists responsible and sentenced for their inadequate superficial behaviour causing lot of human victims. Another recent scandal with the Himalayan fossil fraud will be also documented. A support is needed for any effort to analyze and to disclose the problems of the deformation of the contemporary

  9. NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment phase 3 test objectives and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Simms, D.A.; Fingersh, L.J.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1995-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are conducting research to improve a wind turbine technology. One program, the Combined Experiment, has focused on making measurements needed to understand aerodynamic and structural responses of horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT). A new phase of this program, the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment, will focus on quantifying unsteady aerodynamic phenomena prevalent install controlled HAWTs. Optimally twisted blades and innovative data acquisition systems will be used in these tests. data can now be acquired and viewed interactively during turbine operations. This paper describes the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment and highlights planned future research activities.

  10. Prototype geothermal power plant summary of operation for automatic-run test phase

    SciTech Connect

    Mines, G.L.

    1981-02-01

    The Prototype Power Plant was built to demonstrate and learn the operation of a binary power cycle, and then serve as a test bed for pilot scale components, systems, and/or concepts that have the potential for enhancing the feasibility of power generation from a moderate temperature geothermal fluid resource. The operation to date of the prototype plant is summarized with primary emphasis on the automatic-run phase, during which the plant was operated over a five-month period with minimal operator surveillance.

  11. Performance Testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Tleimat, Maher; Nalette, Tim; Quinn, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of performance testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) technology. The VPCAR technology is currently being developed by NASA as a Mars transit vehicle water recycling system. NASA has recently completed-a grant-to develop a next generation VPCAR system. This grant concluded with the shipment of the final deliverable to NASA on 8/31/03. This paper presents the results of mass, power, volume, and acoustic measurements for the delivered system. Product water purity analysis for a Mars transit mission and a simulated planetary base wastewater ersatz are also provided.

  12. Single-well and inter-well dual-tracer test design for quantifying phase volumes and interface areas in subsurface flow and transport systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Licha, T.; Maier, F.; Nottebohm, M.; Schaffer, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    processes, but they are strongly affected by ambiguity between dispersion and non-advective non-equilibrium processes. (Actually, this ambiguity also impedes upon single-well tests.) An interesting compromise between the advective- or equilibrium-dominated parameter sensitivity regimes, and the advection- or equilibrium-insensitive regimes is obtained when using in-situ tracer creation in a time-dependent manner (from another initially-injected tracer with different phase-partitioning properties), as had been originally proposed by [1] for determining residual-oil saturations. The poster presents a model set-up enabling to directly compare the sensitivities of the different tracer-test methods w. r. to the different parameters for a given system, and to reshape the concept of [1], from its originally intended oilfield application, to a possible new application for CCS site characterization. We illustrate the latter by simulating such dual-tracer tests for the pilot site of a CCS-related 'MMV Experiment' (Measuring, Monitoring, Verification) at Heletz in Israel. The target storage formation at Heletz is assumed to consist of a number (3-6) of permeable sandstone layers (with porosities ~12-17%) separated by shale layers (with porosities ~3-5%), whose permeabilities contrast by factors ~103-104. While single-well tracer tests are rather insensitive w. r. to porosity and permeability stratification details, they can yield information about gas-phase saturations and gas-brine interface densities within selected layers; using the in-situ creation of a dual tracer in the sense of [1], the sensitivity of single-well tests in the low-saturation (residual-saturation) range can be enhanced significantly. A inter-well conservative-tracer test, with depth-resolved monitoring at the 'arrival' well (as intended at the Heletz site), can additionally yield the effective-porosity profile, which can be used to better constrain the single-well test inversion. With bulk (not depth

  13. Phased array ultrasonic testing of dissimilar metal welds using geometric based referencing delay law technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Taeyoung; Schubert, Frank; Hillmann, Susanne; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2015-03-01

    Phased array ultrasonic testing (PAUT) techniques are widely used for the non-destructive testing (NDT) of austenitic welds to find defects like cracks. However, the propagation of ultrasound waves through the austenitic material is intricate due to its inhomogeneous and anisotropic nature. Such a characteristic leads beam path distorted which causes the signal to be misinterpreted. By employing a reference block which is cutout from the mockup of which the structure is a dissimilar metal weld (DMW), a new method of PAUT named as Referencing Delay Law Technique (RDLT) is introduced. With the RDLT, full matrix capture (FMC) was used for data acquisition. To reconstruct the images, total focusing method (TFM) was used. After the focal laws were calculated, PAUT was then performed. As a result, the flaws are more precisely positioned with significantly increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  14. Using Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Acceptance of Carbon Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Nove, Carol A.

    2014-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting studies for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for volumetric examination of nuclear power plant (NPP) components. This particular study focused on evaluating the use of UT on carbon steel plate welds. Welding fabrication flaws included a combination of planar and volumetric types, e.g., incomplete fusion, lack of penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array (PA) UT techniques applied primarily for detection and flaw type characterization. This paper will discuss the results of using UT in lieu of RT for detection and classification of fabrication flaws in carbon steel plate welds.

  15. Stability and corrosion testing of a high temperature phase change material for CSP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Bell, Stuart; Tay, Steven; Will, Geoffrey; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the stability and corrosion testing results of a candidate high temperature phase change material (PCM) for potential use in concentrating solar power applications. The investigated PCM is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and Na2CO3 and both are low cost materials. This PCM has a melting temperature of 635 °C and a relatively high latent heat of fusion of 308.1 J/g. The testing was performed by means of an electric furnace subjected to 150 melt-freeze cycles between 600 °C and 650 °C. The results showed that this PCM candidate has no obvious decomposition up to 650 °C after 150 cycles and stainless steel 316 potentially can be used as the containment material under the minimized oxygen atmosphere.

  16. Managing the Pre- and Post-analytical Phases of the Total Testing Process

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    For many years, the clinical laboratory's focus on analytical quality has resulted in an error rate of 4-5 sigma, which surpasses most other areas in healthcare. However, greater appreciation of the prevalence of errors in the pre- and post-analytical phases and their potential for patient harm has led to increasing requirements for laboratories to take greater responsibility for activities outside their immediate control. Accreditation bodies such as the Joint Commission International (JCI) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) now require clear and effective procedures for patient/sample identification and communication of critical results. There are a variety of free on-line resources available to aid in managing the extra-analytical phase and the recent publication of quality indicators and proposed performance levels by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) working group on laboratory errors and patient safety provides particularly useful benchmarking data. Managing the extra-laboratory phase of the total testing cycle is the next challenge for laboratory medicine. By building on its existing quality management expertise, quantitative scientific background and familiarity with information technology, the clinical laboratory is well suited to play a greater role in reducing errors and improving patient safety outside the confines of the laboratory. PMID:22259773

  17. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING/FEASIBILTY SUDIES FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    SPRITZER.M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The key potential advantage of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reacting and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carried out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an activated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to

  18. Phase II: Field Detector Development For Undeclared/Declared Nuclear Testing For Treaty Verfiation Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kriz, M.; Hunter, D.; Riley, T.

    2015-10-02

    Radioactive xenon isotopes are a critical part of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the detection or confirmation of nuclear weapons tests as well as on-site treaty verification monitoring. On-site monitoring is not currently conducted because there are no commercially available small/robust field detector devices to measure the radioactive xenon isotopes. Xenon is an ideal signature to detect clandestine nuclear events since they are difficult to contain and can diffuse and migrate through soils due to their inert nature. There are four key radioxenon isotopes used in monitoring: 135Xe (9 hour half-life), 133mXe (2 day half-life), 133Xe (5 day half-life) and 131mXe (12 day half-life) that decay through beta emission and gamma emission. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a leader in the field of gas collections and has developed highly selective molecular sieves that allow for the collection of xenon gas directly from air. Phase I assessed the development of a small, robust beta-gamma coincidence counting system, that combines collection and in situ detection methodologies. Phase II of the project began development of the custom electronics enabling 2D beta-gamma coincidence analysis in a field portable system. This will be a significant advancement for field detection/quantification of short-lived xenon isotopes that would not survive transport time for laboratory analysis.

  19. Near-surface test facility. Phase I. Geologic site characterization report

    SciTech Connect

    Moak, D.J.; Wintczak, T.M.

    1980-08-01

    The report is a description of the geology and characterization of the rock mass of the area in which the Phase I qualification tests at the Near-Surface Test Facility (NSTF) are being performed. The NSTF is located on Gable Mountain within the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. It is located in the entablature of the Pomona Member, an upper flow in the Columbia River Basalt Group, and is approximately 150 feet (47.5 meters) below the surface. Core logging from the instrument boreholes coupled with joint mapping, statistics, and other test data provided the basis for a detailed characterization of the 16-foot x 20-foot x 28-foot (5-meter x 6-meter x 9-meter) rock masses surrounding Full-Scale Heater Tests No. 1 and No. 2. The Pomona entablature contains three joint sets delineated by their degree of dip, each with apertures averaging 0.25 millimeter and having no preferred strike orientation. Although joint frequencies in the study area exceed 4 joints per foot (13 per meter), the rock-mass classification rating is good.

  20. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1, Demonstration tests: Volume 1, Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.; Shipway, G.D.; Glozman, V.

    1987-08-01

    This report describes tests performed in Phase I of the NRC Component Fragility Research Program. The purpose of these tests was to demonstrate procedures for characterizing the seismic fragility of a selected component, investigating how various parameters affect fragility, and finally using test data to develop practical fragility descriptions suitable for application in probabilistic risk assessments. A three-column motor control center housing motor controllers of various types and sizes as well as relays of different types and manufacturers was subjected to seismic input motions up to 2.5g zero period acceleration. To investigate the effect of base flexibility on the structural behavior of the MCC and on the functional behavior of the electrical devices, multiple tests were performed on each of four mounting configurations: four bolts per column with top bracking, four bolts per column with no top brace, four bolts per column with internal diagonal bracking, and two bolts per column with no top or internal bracking. Device fragility was characterized by contact chatter correlated to local in-cabinet response at the device location. Seismic capacities were developed for each device on the basis of local input motion required to cause chatter; these results were then applied to develop probabilistic fragility curves for each type of device, including estimates of the ''high-confidence low probability of failure'' capacity of each.

  1. Testing the QCD string at large Nc from the thermodynamics of the hadronic phase

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Thomas D.

    2007-02-27

    It is generally believed that in the limit of a large number of colors (Nc) the description of confinement via flux tubes becomes valid and QCD can be modeled accurately via a hadronic string theory-at least for highly excited states. QCD at large Nc also has a well-defined deconfinement transition at a temperature Tc. In this talk it is shown how the thermodyanmics of the metastable hadronic phase of QCD (above Tc) at large NC can be related directly to properties of the effective QCD string. The key points in the derivation is the weakly interacting nature of hadrons at large Nc and the existence of a Hagedorn temperature TH for the effective string theory. From this it can be seen at large Nc and near TH, the energy density and pressure of the hadronic phase scale as E {approx} (TH - T)-(D perpendicular -6)/2 (for D perpendicular < 6) and P {approx} (TH - T)-(D perpendicular -4)/2 (for D perpendicular < 4) where D perpendicular s the effective number of transverse dimensions of the string theory. This behavior for D perpendicular < 6 is qualitatively different from typical models in statistical mechanics and if observed on the lattice would provide a direct test of the stringy nature of large Nc QCD. However since it can be seen that TH > Tc this behavior is of relevance only to the metastable phase. The prospect of using this result to extract D perpendicular via lattice simulations of the metastable hadronic phase at moderately large Nc is discussed.

  2. Evaluation of fine-particle catalysts: Activity testing results and phase identification using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.; Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine- particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Coal Liquefaction program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Previously reported results have described the standard test procedure that was developed at Sandia to evaluate fine-particle size iron catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s AR Coal Liquefaction Program. This test uses DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that enables evaluation of a catalyst over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt% on a dmmf coal basis). Testing has been performed on Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst. Results showed that this catalyst is more active than the University of Pittsburgh`s sulfated iron oxide catalyst that was evaluated previously. PNL has also produced two additional batches of catalyst in an effort to optimize their preparation procedures for larger batches. Sandia has observed significant differences in activities among these three catalysts; these differences might be due to particle size effects, the type of drying procedure, or the amount of moisture present. Mossbauer characterization of the iron phases in the coal, catalyst precursors, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) insoluble material from liquefaction reactions has been performed on the University of Pittsburgh`s catalyst and the first PNL catalyst that was tested at Sandia. The Mossbauer results were obtained at the University of Kentucky and will be presented. Future work will include testing additional catalysts being developed in the AR Coal Liquefaction Program, developing procedures to characterize reaction products, and determining the kinetics of the reactions.

  3. Phase 1 Validation Testing and Simulation for the WEC-Sim Open Source Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, K.; Michelen, C.; Gunawan, B.; Bosma, B.; Simmons, A.; Lomonaco, P.

    2015-12-01

    WEC-Sim is an open source code to model wave energy converters performance in operational waves, developed by Sandia and NREL and funded by the US DOE. The code is a time-domain modeling tool developed in MATLAB/SIMULINK using the multibody dynamics solver SimMechanics, and solves the WEC's governing equations of motion using the Cummins time-domain impulse response formulation in 6 degrees of freedom. The WEC-Sim code has undergone verification through code-to-code comparisons; however validation of the code has been limited to publicly available experimental data sets. While these data sets provide preliminary code validation, the experimental tests were not explicitly designed for code validation, and as a result are limited in their ability to validate the full functionality of the WEC-Sim code. Therefore, dedicated physical model tests for WEC-Sim validation have been performed. This presentation provides an overview of the WEC-Sim validation experimental wave tank tests performed at the Oregon State University's Directional Wave Basin at Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory. Phase 1 of experimental testing was focused on device characterization and completed in Fall 2015. Phase 2 is focused on WEC performance and scheduled for Winter 2015/2016. These experimental tests were designed explicitly to validate the performance of WEC-Sim code, and its new feature additions. Upon completion, the WEC-Sim validation data set will be made publicly available to the wave energy community. For the physical model test, a controllable model of a floating wave energy converter has been designed and constructed. The instrumentation includes state-of-the-art devices to measure pressure fields, motions in 6 DOF, multi-axial load cells, torque transducers, position transducers, and encoders. The model also incorporates a fully programmable Power-Take-Off system which can be used to generate or absorb wave energy. Numerical simulations of the experiments using WEC-Sim will be

  4. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED IN AN UNSATURATED FRACTURED-CLAY FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured-clay system that is the confin...

  5. A Preliminary Assessment of Phase Separator Ground-Based and Reduced-Gravity Testing for ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Nancy Rabel

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of phase separator ground-based and reduced-gravity testing for Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Multiphase Flow Technology Program; 2) Types of Separators; 3) MOBI Phase Separators; 4) Experiment set-up; and 5) Preliminary comparison/results.

  6. ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg

    2009-04-01

    AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. A simulant of the DWPF SB4 feed was successfully fed and melted in a small pilot-scale CCIM system during two test series. The OGSE tests provide initial results that (a) provide melter operating conditions while feeding a DWPF SB4 simulant feed, (b) determine the fate of feed organic and metal feed constituents and metals partitioning, and (c) characterize the melter off-gas source term to a downstream off-gas system. The INL CCIM test system was operated continuously for about 30 hours during the parametric test series, and for about 58 hours during the OGSE test. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter

  7. Process Test Evaluation Report Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Emissions Collection (Phase 1 - 2 and 3)

    SciTech Connect

    PARKMAN, D.B.

    1999-12-29

    During sluicing of the first batch of sludge from tank 241-C-106 on November 18, 1998, an unexpected high concentration of volatile organic compounds was measured in the 296-C-006 ventilation stack. Eleven workers reported irritation related symptoms and were sent to Hanford Environmental Health Foundation (HEHF) and Kadlec Hospital for medical evaluations. No residual health effects were reported. As a result of the unexpectedly high concentrations of volatile organic compounds encountered during this November sluicing event, a phased process test designed to characterize the emission constituents was conducted on December 16, 1998, March 7, 1999, and March 28, 1999. The primary focus of this evaluation was to obtain samples of the 296-C-006 ventilation stack effluent and surrounding areas at elevated levels of volatile organic compounds initiated by sluicing. Characterization of the emission constituents was necessary to establish appropriate procedural and administrative exposure controls for continued sluicing. Additionally, this information would be used to evaluate the need for engineered equipment to mitigate any further potential chemical stack emissions. This evaluation confirms that the following actions taken during Phase I, Phase II, and Phase III of the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Emissions Collection Process Test were conservative and appropriate for continued sluicing: Implement stack limit of 500 ppm volatile organic compounds, with lower administrative limits; Ensure worker involvement through enhanced planning; Continue using the existing fenced boundary location; Continue using pressure demand fresh air respiratory protection inside the C-Farm as recommended by Industrial Hygiene; Continue using the existing respiratory protection/ take cover requirements outside the C-Farm boundary as recommended by Industrial Hygiene; Continue using existing anti-contamination clothing; Minimize the number of workers exposed to emissions; Maintain the

  8. SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

    2005-01-01

    Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low

  9. Lens collimation and testing using a Twyman-Green interferometer with a self-pumped phase-conjugating mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Ordinarily Twyman-Green interferometers are employed testing optical elements. In a modification of the basic configuration, the ordinary mirror in the test arm is replaced with a self-pumped phase-conjugating mirror using a barium titanate crystal. It is shown that, with a redefinition of components, the new configuration permits retention and improvement of the optical element testing function while simultaneously serving as a sensitive test for collimation. The optical path difference resulting from the double pass in the original Twyman-Green interferometer approximately equals that of the single pass and phase conjugation in the modification.

  10. Microscale neodymium distribution in sedimentary planktonic foraminiferal tests and associated mineral phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Kazuyo; Toyofuku, Takashi; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Delhaye, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Neodymium isotopic ratios recorded in calcareous foraminiferal tests (shells) and associated authigenic minerals were used to trace past water masses, although the origin of preserved Nd signals is still a matter of debate. We determined, for the first time, the microscale Nd distribution in two planktonic foraminifera species (Globigerinoides ruber and Neogloboquadrina dutertrei) and coexisting authigenic minerals from two selected time slices (15.6 and 129 kyr) of a marine sediment core in the Panama Basin. Elemental mapping of Nd, Ca, Fe, Mn, and Si was performed using NanoSIMS ion probe and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) on uncleaned tests together with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imagery. EPMA and SEM images revealed the presence of Fe-rich framboidal minerals inside test pores and inner chambers, particularly in the old samples. The young sample presented Fe- and Mn-rich patches on the inner test wall. The Nd intensity in Fe-Mn-rich patches and in some framboids was much higher than in foraminiferal calcite, where the Nd distribution was randomly heterogeneous with no systematic features such as an ontogenic Nd-rich layer or species-specific differences. The relationship between Nd, Fe, and Mn confirmed a significant role of Fe-Mn oxides as a Nd carrier. The high Nd enrichment in some framboids could be explained by Nd adsorption onto oxidized surface of Fe sulfides particles rather than direct incorporation. Since the authigenic precipitates are major Nd carrier phases, the Nd isotopic signals in sedimentary foraminiferal tests likely reflect bottom/pore water values rather than surface water ones.

  11. Testing and Failure Mechanisms of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Hawkins-Reynolds, Ebony

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as specific spacecraft orientations in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and low beta angle Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM s have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents the results of testing that occurred from March through September of 2010 and builds on testing that occurred during the previous year.

  12. A 210-min solid phase cytometry test for the enumeration of Escherichia coli in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, S O; Nelis, H J

    2000-09-01

    A 210-min-test for the enumeration of Escherichia coli in drinking water is described, based on solid phase cytometry (SPC) and a two-step enzymatic procedure for fluorescence labelling of single cells and small microcolonies. The test involves membrane filtration through a 25-mm black polyester filter, induction of beta-glucuronidase in the retained target cells, fluorescence labelling with fluorescein-di-beta-Dglucuronide as an enzyme substrate and laser scanning of the membrane filter. Scan results can be confirmed on-line by epifluorescence microscopy. Application to 149 naturally contaminated and uncontaminated well, tap, out-of-pump centre (distribution), surface and sewage-spiked water samples indicated > or =90% agreement and equivalence with plate count methods, including Chromocult Coliform agar and m FC agar. In 5.4% of all samples examined, SPC detected between 1 and 11 E. coli per 100 ml, while the two plate methods yielded negative results. Cases of a negative SPC result but a positive E. coli count on both reference media were not observed. This test would primarily be useful for 'emergency' monitoring of drinking water when rapid results are crucial. PMID:11021570

  13. 2006/07 Field Testing of Cellulose Fiber Insulation Enhanced with Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Yarbrough, David W; Miller, William A; Petrie, Thomas; Childs, Phillip W; Syed, Azam M

    2008-12-01

    Most recent improvements in building envelope technologies suggest that in the near future, residences will be routinely constructed to operate with very low heating and cooling loads. In that light, the application of novel building materials containing active thermal components (e.g., phase change materials [PCMs,] sub-venting, radiant barriers, and integrated hydronic systems) is like a final step in achieving relatively significant heating and cooling energy savings from technological improvements in the building envelope. It is expected that optimized building envelope designs using PCMs for energy storage can effectively bring notable savings in energy consumption and reductions in peak hour power loads. During 2006/07, a research team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a series of laboratory and field tests of several wall and roof assemblies using PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. This report summarizes the test results from the perspective of energy performance. The ORNL team is working on both inorganic and organic PCMs; this report discusses only paraffinic PCMs. A limited economical analysis also is presented. PCMs have been tested as a thermal mass component in buildings for at least 40 years. Most of the research studies found that PCMs enhanced building energy performance. In the case of the application of organic PCMs, problems such as high initial cost and PCM leaking (surface sweating) have hampered widespread adoption. Paraffinic hydrocarbon PCMs generally performed well, with the exception that they increased the flammability of the building envelope.

  14. Thermal Vacuum Test of Ice as a Phase Change Material Integrated with a Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Steve A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan; Le, Hung V.

    2010-01-01

    Water may be used as radiation shielding for Solar Particle Events (SPE) to protect crewmembers in the Lunar Electric Rover (LER). Because the water is already present for radiation protection, it could also provide a mass efficient solution to the vehicle's thermal control system. This water can be frozen by heat rejection from a radiator and used as a Phase Change Material (PC1V1) for thermal storage. Use of this water as a PCM can eliminate the need for a pumped fluid loop thermal control system as well as reduce the required size of the radiator. This paper describes the testing and analysis performed for the Rover Engineering Development Unit (REDU), a scaled-down version of a water PCM heat sink for the LER. The REDU was tested in a thermal-vacuum chamber at environmental temperatures similar to those of a horizontal radiator panel on the lunar surface. Testing included complete freeze and melt cycles along with scaled transient heat load profiles simulating a 24-hour day for the rover.

  15. Thermal Vacuum Test of Ice as a Phase Change Material Integrated with a Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Steve; Le, Hung; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Water may be used as radiation shielding for Solar Particle Events (SPE) to protect crewmembers in the Lunar Electric Rover (LER). Because the water is already present for radiation protection, it could also provide a mass efficient solution to the vehicle's thermal control system. This water can be frozen by heat rejection from a radiator and used as a Phase Change Material (PCM) for thermal storage. Use of this water as a PCM can eliminate the need for a pumped fluid loop thermal control system as well as reduce the required size of the radiator. This paper describes the testing and analysis performed for the Rover Engineering Development Unit (REDU), a scaled-down version of a water PCM heat sink for the LER. The REDU was tested in a thermal-vacuum chamber at environmental temperatures similar to those of a horizontal radiator panel on the lunar surface. Testing included complete freeze and melt cycles along with scaled transient heat load profiles simulating a 24-hour day for the rover.

  16. Acceptance Testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Kliss, Mark; Tleimat, Maher; Quinn, Gregory; Fort, James; Nalette, Tim; Baker, Gale

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of acceptance testing of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal (VPCAR) technology. The VPCAR technology is currently being developed by NASA as a Mars transit vehicle water recycling system. NASA has recently completed a grant to develop a next generation VPCAR system. This grant was peer reviewed and funded through the Advanced Life Support (ALS) National Research Announcement (NRA). The grant funded a contract with Water Reuse Technology Inc. to construct an engineering development unit. This contract concluded with the shipment of the final deliverable to NASA on 8/31/03. The objective of the acceptance testing was to characterize the performance of this new system. This paper presents the results of mass power, and volume measurements for the delivered system. In addition, product water purity analysis for a Mars transit mission and a planetary base wastewater ersatz are provided. Acoustic noise levels, interface specifications and system reliability results are also discussed. An assessment of the readiness of the technology for human testing and recommendations for future improvements are provided.

  17. Testing and Failure Mechanisms of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Hawkins-Reynolds, Ebony

    2010-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM s have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents the results of testing that occurred from March through September of 2010 and builds on testing that occurred during the previous year.

  18. Plastic film heat exchanger development project field test at Prime Tanning Company, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, G.B.; Guyer, E.C.; Brownell, D.L.; Yankee Scientific, Inc., Natick, MA )

    1989-08-25

    This report presents the results of the design, construction, and test of a plastic film heat exchanger for recovering heat from the liquid effluent waste stream from an animal hide tanning operation. This work is the third phase of a program to evaluate the use of plastic film heat exchangers for energy recovery from low temperature industrial commercial waste streams and processes. The effluent stream from a tanning operation is a corrosive liquid containing pieces of leather, animal fats, and various particulates. The test results from the field unit tests over a period of about five months demonstrated that the plastic films would handle this difficult waste stream satisfactorily, the plastic film would wet satisfactorily and could easily be cleaned of deposits by water sprays, and could achieve values close to the expected thermal heat transfer performance. Although there are practical equipment problems to solve to successfully handle large quantities of a high solids content waste stream such as tannery effluent, the plastic film heat exchanger elements will successfully work in this environment. The plastic films will perform even better for clean corrosive waste streams. 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 2, Well testing and analysis data evaluation and report preparation site reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  1. RESULTS FROM BETATRON PHASE MEASUREMENTS IN RHIC DURING THE SEXTANT TEST.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.

    1998-06-26

    The Sextant Test of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was an important step towards its completion. One sixth of the two RHIC accelerators was fully commissioned. Gold ion beam was injected and transported through one sextant of one of the two rings. The betatron phase advance per cell was measured by recording differences in the horizontal and vertical positions of the beam at the end of the sextant due to a sequence of correction dipole kicks along the beam line. Measurement results show excellent agreement with predicted values, confirming that production measurements of the integral functions of the quadrupoles were very accurate, and that the polarity of all elements (correction dipoles, quadrupoles, dipoles etc.) was correct.

  2. Results from betatron phase measurements in RHIC during the sextant test

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, D.; Connolly, R.; Fischer, W.

    1998-08-01

    The Sextant Test of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was an important step towards its completion. One sixth of the two RHIC accelerators was fully commissioned. gold ion beam was injected and transported through one sextant of one of the two rings. The betatron phase advance per cell was measured by recording differences in the horizontal and vertical positions of the beam at the end of the sextant due to a sequence of correction dipole kicks along the beam line. Measurement results show excellent agreement with predicted values, confirming that production measurements of the integral functions of the quadrupoles were very accurate, and that the polarity of all elements (correction dipoles, quadrupoles, dipoles etc.) was correct.

  3. Phase Transformations and Crack Initiation in a High-Chromium Cast Steel Under Hot Compression Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchuindjang, Jérôme Tchoufang; Torres, Ingrid Neira; Flores, Paulo; Habraken, Anne Marie; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical behavior of the fully austenitic matrix of high-chromium cast steel (HCCS) alloy is determined by external compression stress applied at 300 and 700 °C. The microstructure is roughly characterized toward both optical and scanning electron microscopy analyses. Dilatometry is used during heating from room temperature up to austenitization to study the solid-state phase transformations, precipitation, and dissolution reactions. Two various strengthening phenomena (precipitation hardening and stress-induced bainite transformation) and one softening mechanism (dynamic recovery) are highlighted from compression tests. The influence of the temperature and the carbide type on the mechanical behavior of the HCCS material is also enhanced. Cracks observed on grain boundary primary carbides allow establishing a rough damage model. The crack initiation within the HCCS alloy is strongly dependent on the temperature, the externally applied stress, and the matrix strength and composition.

  4. Impact of solid phase antibody testing on organ allocation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Reinsmoen, Nancy L

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of the solid phase antibody assays has allowed for the detection and characterization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) specific antibodies with greater sensitivity and specificity. This information can then be used along with the donor's HLA typing to predict crossmatch results (a virtual crossmatch). Using these data and the level of immunological risk assessed to the antibodies detected, the determination of unacceptable antigens can be made. The calculated panel reactive antibody (CPRA) provides for a means to determine the frequency of these unacceptable antigens in the donor population and thereby predict the probability of a positive crossmatch. In 2009, the Organ Procurement Transplant Network administered by the United Network for Organ Sharing adopted the CPRA as the means to define sensitization and to assign allocation points. Follow-up studies have shown that the number of organ offers refused due to a positive crossmatch has decreased significantly and has saved money through the elimination of unnecessary testing. An additional benefit has been the increased number of sensitized patients being transplanted successfully. Through technical improvements and the refined interpretation of the solid phase antibody assays, continual progress is being made in the definition of the unacceptable antigens and the ability to transplant sensitized patients. PMID:25095534

  5. Start-to-end simulations of SASE FEL at the TESLA Test Facility, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohlus, M.; Flöttmann, K.; Kozlov, O. S.; Limberg, T.; Piot, Ph.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2004-09-01

    Phase 1 of the vacuum ultra-violet free-electron laser (FEL) at the TESLA Test Facility recently concluded operation. It successfully demonstrated the saturation of a SASE FEL in the wavelength range of 80-120 nm. We present a posteriori start-to-end numerical simulations of this FEL. These simulations are based on the programs Astra and elegant for the generation and transport of the electron distribution. An independent simulation of the intricate beam dynamics in the magnetic bunch compressor is performed with the program CSRtrack. The SASE FEL process is simulated with the code FAST. From our detailed simulations and the resulting phase space distribution at the undulator entrance, we found that the FEL was driven only by a small fraction (slice) of the electron bunch. This "lasing slice" is located in the head of the bunch, and has a peak current of approximately 3 kA. A strong energy chirp (due to the space charge field after compression) within this slice had a significant influence on the FEL operation. Our study shows that the radiation pulse duration is about 40 fs (FWHM) with a corresponding peak power of 1.5 GW. The simulated FEL properties are compared with various experimental data and found to be in excellent agreement.

  6. Tests of a 2-Stage, Axial-Flow, 2-Phase Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    A two phase flow turbine with two stages of axial flow impulse rotors was tested with three different working fluid mixtures at a shaft power of 30 kW. The turbine efficiency was 0.55 with nitrogen and water of 0.02 quality and 94 m/s velocity, 0.57 with Refrigerant 22 of 0.27 quality and 123 m/s velocity, and 0.30 with steam and water of 0.27 quality and 457 m/s velocity. The efficiencies with nitrogen and water and Refrigerant 22 were 86 percent of theoretical. At that fraction of theoretical, the efficiencies of optimized two phase turbines would be in the low 60 percent range with organic working fluids and in the mid 50 percent range with steam and water. The recommended turbine design is a two stage axial flow impulse turbine followed by a rotary separator for discharge of separate liquid and gas streams and recovery of liquid pressure.

  7. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 4 discusses the following topics: Rod Compaction/Loading System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Collection System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Container Transfer Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; Staging and Cutting Table Test Results and Analysis Report; and Upper Cutting System Test Results and Analysis Report.

  8. Analysis of Droplet Size during the Ice Accumulation Phase Of Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric James

    2004-01-01

    There are numerous hazards associated with air travel. One of the most serious dangers to the pilot and passengers safety is the result of flying into conditions which are conducive to the formation of ice on the surface of an aircraft. Being a pilot myself I am very aware of the dangers that Icing can pose and the effects it can have on an airplane. A couple of the missions of the Icing branch is to make flying safer with more research to increase our knowledge of how ice effects the aerodynamics of an airfoil, and to increase are knowledge of the weather for better forecasting. The Icing Branch uses three different tools to determine the aerodynamic affects that icing has on a wing. The Icing research tunnel is an efficient way to test various airfoils in a controlled setting. To make sure the data received from the wind tunnel is accurate the Icing branch conducts real flight tests with the DHC-6 Twin Otter. This makes sure that the methods used in the wind tunnel accurately model what happens on the actual aircraft. These two tools are also compared to the LEWICE code which is a program that models the ice shape that would be formed on an airfoil in the particular weather conditions that are input by the user. One benefit of LEWICE is that it is a lot cheaper to run than the wind tunnel or flight tests which make it a nice tool for engineers designing aircraft that don t have the money to spend on icing research. Using all three of these tools is a way to cross check the data received from one and check it against the other two. industries, but it is also looked at by weather analysts who are trying to improve forecasting methods. The best way to avoid the troubles of icing encounters is to not go into it in the first place. By looking over the flight data the analyst can determine which conditions will most likely lead to an icing encounter and then this information will aid forecasters when briefing the pilots on the weather conditions. am looking at the

  9. Boehmite Actual Waste Dissolutions Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Lanee A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2008-07-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite, sodium aluminate and boehmite. Gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic. Boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Samples were taken from four Hanford tanks and homogenized in order to give a sample that is representative of REDOX (Reduction Oxidation process for Pu recovery) sludge solids. Bench scale testing was performed on the homogenized waste to study the dissolution of boehmite. Dissolution was studied at three different hydroxide concentrations, with each concentration being run at three different temperatures. Samples were taken periodically over the 170 hour runs in order to determine leaching kinetics. Results of the dissolution studies and implications for the proposed processing of these wastes will be discussed.

  10. The Waveform Correlation Event Detection System project, Phase II: Testing with the IDC primary network

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.J.; Beiriger, J.I.; Moore, S.G.

    1998-04-01

    Further improvements to the Waveform Correlation Event Detection System (WCEDS) developed by Sandia Laboratory have made it possible to test the system on the accepted Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) seismic monitoring network. For our test interval we selected a 24-hour period from December 1996, and chose to use the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) produced by the Prototype International Data Center (PIDC) as ground truth for evaluating the results. The network is heterogeneous, consisting of array and three-component sites, and as a result requires more flexible waveform processing algorithms than were available in the first version of the system. For simplicity and superior performance, we opted to use the spatial coherency algorithm of Wagner and Owens (1996) for both types of sites. Preliminary tests indicated that the existing version of WCEDS, which ignored directional information, could not achieve satisfactory detection or location performance for many of the smaller events in the REB, particularly those in the south Pacific where the network coverage is unusually sparse. To achieve an acceptable level of performance, we made modifications to include directional consistency checks for the correlations, making the regions of high correlation much less ambiguous. These checks require the production of continuous azimuth and slowness streams for each station, which is accomplished by means of FK processing for the arrays and power polarization processing for the three-component sites. In addition, we added the capability to use multiple frequency-banded data streams for each site to increase sensitivity to phases whose frequency content changes as a function of distance.

  11. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper (Brown, C.A., "Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Far-Field Noise Results," ASME paper GT2012-69639, June 2012.) discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  12. Microbiological Tests Performed During the Design of the International Space Station ECLSS: Part 1, Bulk Phase Water and Wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi C.; Mittelman, Marc W.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation summarizes the studies performed to assess the bulk phase microbial community during the Space Station Water Recover Tests (WRT) from 1990-1998. These tests show that it is possible to recycle water from different sources including urine, and produce water that can exceed the quality of municpally produced tap water.

  13. Durability of crystalline phase in concrete microstructure modified by the mineral powders: evaluation by nanoindentation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajczakowska, Magdalena; Łydżba, Dariusz

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the nanoindentation investigation of the evolution of concrete microstructure modified by the Internal Crystallization Technology mineral powders. The samples under study were retrieved from a fragment of a circular concrete lining of the vertical mine shaft at a depth of approximately 1,000 m. Due to the aggressive environment and exposure to contaminated water, the internal surface of the structure was deteriorated, decreasing its strength significantly. The mineral powders were applied directly on the surface lining. The specimens were investigated one month, three months and one year after the application of the aforementioned substance in order to verify the time dependence of the strengthening processes and durability of the crystalline phase. The microstructural changes of concrete were assessed with the use of nanoindentation technique. The testing procedure involved including the previously cut specimens in the epoxy resin and grinding and polishing in order to reduce the surface roughness. As a result of the nanoindentation tests the hardness as well as Young's modulus of the material were evaluated. The results were then compared and statistically analyzed. As a consequence, the disintegration time of the crystalline network in the pores of concrete was identified.

  14. Azimuthal cement evaluation with an acoustic phased-arc array transmitter: numerical simulations and field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Xiao-Hua; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Ju, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Rui-Jia

    2016-03-01

    We developed a novel cement evaluation logging tool, named the azimuthally acoustic bond tool (AABT), which uses a phased-arc array transmitter with azimuthal detection capability. We combined numerical simulations and field tests to verify the AABT tool. The numerical simulation results showed that the radiation direction of the subarray corresponding to the maximum amplitude of the first arrival matches the azimuth of the channeling when it is behind the casing. With larger channeling size in the circumferential direction, the amplitude difference of the casing wave at different azimuths becomes more evident. The test results showed that the AABT can accurately locate the casing collars and evaluate the cement bond quality with azimuthal resolution at the casing—cement interface, and can visualize the size, depth, and azimuth of channeling. In the case of good casing—cement bonding, the AABT can further evaluate the cement bond quality at the cement—formation interface with azimuthal resolution by using the amplitude map and the velocity of the formation wave.

  15. INTRAVAL Phase 2: Modeling testing at the Las Cruces Trench Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, R.G.; Wierenga, P.J.; Luis, S.; McLaughlin, D.; Rockhold, M.; Xiang, J.; Scanlon, B.; Wittmeyer, G.

    1994-01-01

    Several field experiments have been performed by scientists from the University of Arizona and New Mexico State University at the Las Cruces Trench Site to provide data tc test deterministic and stochastic models for water flow and solute transport. These experiments were performed in collaboration with INTRAVAL, an international effort toward validation of geosphere models for the transport of radionuclides. During Phase I of INTRAVAL, qualitative comparisons between experimental data and model predictions were made using contour plots of water contents and solute concentrations. Detailed quantitative comparisons were not made. To provide data for more rigorous model testing, a third Las Cruces Trench experiment was designed by scientists from the University of Arizona and New Mexico State University. Modelers from the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analysis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New Mexico State University, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and the University of Texas provided predictions of water flow and tritium transport to New Mexico State University for analysis. The corresponding models assumed soil characterizations ranging from uniform to deterministically heterogeneous to stochastic. This report presents detailed quantitative comparisons to field data.

  16. STEP: Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle. Report on the phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaser, J. P.; Bye, M.; Cavallo, G.; Damour, T.; Everitt, C. W. F.; Hedin, A.; Hellings, R. W.; Jafry, Y.; Laurance, R.; Lee, M.

    1993-01-01

    During Phase A, the STEP Study Team identified three types of experiments that can be accommodated on the STEP satellite within the mission constraints and whose performance is orders of magnitude better than any present or planned future experiment of the same kind on the ground. The scientific objectives of the STEP mission are to: test the Equivalence Principle to one part in 10(exp 17), six orders of magnitude better than has been achieved on the ground; search for a new interaction between quantum-mechanical spin and ordinary matter with a sensitivity of the mass-spin coupling constant g(sub p)g(sub s) = 6 x 10(exp -34) at a range of 1 mm, which represents a seven order-of-magnitude improvement over comparable ground-based measurements; and determine the constant of gravity G with a precision of one part in 10(exp 6) and to test the validity of the inverse square law with the same precision, both two orders of magnitude better than has been achieved on the ground.

  17. DARPA/AFRL Smart Wing Phase 2 wind tunnel test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Lewis B.; Martin, C. A.; Sanders, Brian P.; West, Mark N.; Pinkerton-Florance, Jennifer L.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Fleming, Gary A.

    2002-07-01

    Northrop Grumman Corporation built and twice tested a 30 percent scale wind tunnel model of a proposed uninhabited combat air vehicle under the DARPA/AFRL Smart Materials and Structures Development - Smart Wing Phase 2 program to demonstrate the applicability of smart control surfaces on advanced aircraft configurations. The model constructed was a full span, sting mounted model with smart leading and trailing edge control surfaces on the right wing and conventional, hinged trailing edge control surfaces on the left wing. Among the performance benefits that were quantified were increased pitching moment, increased rolling moment and improved pressure distribution of the smart wing over the conventional wing. This paper present an overview of the result from the wind tunnel test performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamic Tunnel in March 2000 and May 2001. Successful results included: (1) improved aileron effectiveness at high dynamic pressures, (2) demonstrated improvements in lateral and longitudinal effectiveness with smooth contoured smart trailing edge over conventional hinged control surfaces, (3) chordwise and spanwise shape control of the smart trailing edge control surface, and (4) smart trailing edge control surface deflection rates over 80 deg/sec.

  18. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 4Q97.

  19. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01

    rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

  20. Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) phase 3 simplified integrated test trace contaminant control subsystem performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station Freedom environmental control and life support system testing has been conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center since 1986. The phase 3 simplified integrated test (SIT) conducted from July 30, 1989, through August 11, 1989, tested an integrated air revitalization system. During this test, the trace contaminant control subsystem (TCCS) was directly integrated with the bleed stream from the carbon dioxide reduction subsystem. The TCCS performed as expected with minor anomalies. The test set the basis for further characterizing the TCCS performance as part of advance air revitalization system configurations.

  1. Moral Reasoning in Hypothetical and Actual Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumprer, Gerard F.; Butter, Eliot J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of this investigation suggest that moral reasoning of college students, when assessed using the DIT format, is the same whether the dilemmas involve hypothetical or actual situations. Subjects, when presented with hypothetical situations, become deeply immersed in them and respond as if they were actual participants. (Author/BEF)

  2. Factors Related to Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, H. Wayne; McWilliams, Jettie M.

    1978-01-01

    Provides data to further support the notions that females score higher in self-actualization measures and that self-actualization scores correlate inversely to the degree of undesirability individuals assign to their heights and weights. Finds that, contrary to predictions, greater androgyny was related to lower, not higher, self-actualization…

  3. Accelerated test methods for life prediction of hermetic motor insulation systems exposed to alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Phase 3: Reproducibility and discrimination testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P.F. II; Ferguson, A.F.; Fuentes, K.T.

    1996-05-06

    In 1992, the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc. (ARTI) contracted Radian Corporation to ascertain whether an improved accelerated test method or procedure could be developed that would allow prediction of the life of motor insulation materials used in hermetic motors for air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment operated with alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. This report presents the results of phase three concerning the reproducibility and discrimination testing.

  4. What Does the Force Concept Inventory Actually Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huffman, Douglas; Heller, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) is a 29-question, multiple-choice test designed to assess students' Newtonian and non-Newtonian conceptions of force. Presents an analysis of FCI results as one way to determine what the inventory actually measures. (LZ)

  5. Benchmark tests and spin adaptation for the particle-particle random phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yang; Steinmann, Stephan N.; Peng, Degao; Aggelen, Helen van; Yang, Weitao

    2013-11-07

    The particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) provides an approximation to the correlation energy in density functional theory via the adiabatic connection [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)]. It has virtually no delocalization error nor static correlation error for single-bond systems. However, with its formal O(N{sup 6}) scaling, the pp-RPA is computationally expensive. In this paper, we implement a spin-separated and spin-adapted pp-RPA algorithm, which reduces the computational cost by a substantial factor. We then perform benchmark tests on the G2/97 enthalpies of formation database, DBH24 reaction barrier database, and four test sets for non-bonded interactions (HB6/04, CT7/04, DI6/04, and WI9/04). For the G2/97 database, the pp-RPA gives a significantly smaller mean absolute error (8.3 kcal/mol) than the direct particle-hole RPA (ph-RPA) (22.7 kcal/mol). Furthermore, the error in the pp-RPA is nearly constant with the number of atoms in a molecule, while the error in the ph-RPA increases. For chemical reactions involving typical organic closed-shell molecules, pp- and ph-RPA both give accurate reaction energies. Similarly, both RPAs perform well for reaction barriers and nonbonded interactions. These results suggest that the pp-RPA gives reliable energies in chemical applications. The adiabatic connection formalism based on pairing matrix fluctuation is therefore expected to lead to widely applicable and accurate density functionals.

  6. A Liquid-Liquid Thermoelectric Heat Exchanger as a Heat Pump for Testing Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Makinen, Janice; Le, Hung V.

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of the Phase Change HX payload on the International Space Station (ISS) is to test and demonstrate the viability and performance of Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers (PCM HX). The system was required to pump a working fluid through a PCM HX to promote the phase change material to freeze and thaw as expected on Orion's Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. Due to limitations on ISS's Internal Thermal Control System, a heat pump was needed on the Phase Change HX payload to help with reducing the working fluid's temperature to below 0degC (32degF). This paper will review the design and development of a TEC based liquid-liquid heat exchanger as a way to vary to fluid temperature for the freeze and thaw phase of the PCM HX. Specifically, the paper will review the design of custom coldplates and sizing for the required heat removal of the HX.

  7. Development and Testing of the Phase 0 Autonomous Formation Flight Research System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Shane; Fantini, Jay; Norlin, Ken; Theisen, John; Krasiewski, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) project was initiated in 1995 to demonstrate at least 10-percent drag reduction by positioning a trailing aircraft in the wingtip vortex of a leading aircraft. If successful, this technology would provide increased fuel savings, reduced emissions, and extended flight duration for fleet aircraft flying in formation. To demonstrate this technology, the AFF project at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center developed a system architecture incorporating two F-18 aircraft flying in leading-trailing formation. The system architecture has been designed to allow the trailing aircraft to maintain station-keeping position relative to the leading aircraft within +/-10 ft. Development of this architecture would be directed at the design and development of a computing system to feed surface position commands into the flight control computers, thereby controlling the longitudinal and lateral position of the trailing aircraft. In addition, modification to the instrumentation systems of both aircraft, pilot displays, and a means of broadcasting the leading aircraft inertial and global positioning system-based positional data to the trailing aircraft would be needed. This presentation focuses on the design and testing of the AFF Phase 0 research system.

  8. Three-dimensional graphics simulator for testing mine machine computer-controlled algorithms -- phase 1 development

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, D.H. )

    1993-01-01

    Using three-dimensional (3-D) graphics computing to evaluate new technologies for computer-assisted mining systems illustrates how these visual techniques can redefine the way researchers look at raw scientific data. The US Bureau of Mines is using 3-D graphics computing to obtain cheaply, easily, and quickly information about the operation and design of current and proposed mechanical coal and metal-nonmetal mining systems. Bureau engineers developed a graphics simulator for a continuous miner that enables a realistic test for experimental software that controls the functions of a machine. Some of the specific simulated functions of the continuous miner are machine motion, appendage motion, machine position, and machine sensors. The simulator uses data files generated in the laboratory or mine using a computer-assisted mining machine. The data file contains information from a laser-based guidance system and a data acquisition system that records all control commands given to a computer-assisted mining machine. This report documents the first phase in developing the simulator and discusses simulator requirements, features of the initial simulator, and several examples of its application. During this endeavor, Bureau engineers discovered and appreciated the simulator's potential to assist their investigations of machine controls and navigation systems.

  9. Development, Testing, and Failure Mechanisms of a Replicative Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Hansen, Scott; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM s have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. Wax PCM units have been baselined for the Orion thermal control system and also provide risk mitigation for the Altair Lander. However, the use of water as a PCM has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. An ice PCM heat exchanger that replicates the thermal energy storage capacity of an existing wax PCM unit was fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion are investigated. This paper presents the results to date of this investigation.

  10. Euclid near infrared spectrophotometer instrument concept and first test results at the end of phase B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciaszek, Thierry; Ealet, Anne; Jahnke, Knud; Prieto, Eric; Barbier, Rémi; Mellier, Yannick; Costille, Anne; Ducret, Franck; Fabron, Christophe; Gimenez, Jean-Luc; Grange, Robert; Martin, Laurent; Rossin, Christelle; Pamplona, Tony; Vola, Pascal; Clémens, Jean Claude; Smadja, Gérard; Amiaux, Jérome; Barrière, Jean Christophe; Berthe, Michel; De Rosa, Adriano; Franceschi, Enrico; Morgante, Gianluca; Trifoglio, Massimo; Valenziano, Luca; Bonoli, Carlotta; Bortoletto, Favio; D'Alessandro, Maurizio; Corcione, Leonardo; Ligori, Sebastiano; Garilli, Bianca; Riva, Marco; Grupp, Frank; Vogel, Carolin; Hormuth, Felix; Seidel, Gregor; Wachter, Stefanie; Diaz, Jose Javier; Grañena, Ferran; Padilla, Cristobal; Toledo, Rafael; Lilje, Per B.; Solheim, Bjarte G. B.; Toulouse-Aastrup, Corinne; Andersen, Michael; Holmes, Warren; Israelsson, Ulf; Seiffert, Michael; Weber, Carissa; Waczynski, Augustyn; Laureijs, René J.; Racca, Giuseppe; Salvignol, Jean-Christophe; Strada, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    The Euclid mission objective is to understand why the expansion of the Universe is accelerating by mapping the geometry of the dark Universe by investigating the distance-redshift relationship and tracing the evolution of cosmic structures. The Euclid project is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision program with its launch planned for 2020. The NISP (Near Infrared Spectro-Photometer) is one of the two Euclid instruments and is operating in the near-IR spectral region (0.9-2μm) as a photometer and spectrometer. The instrument is composed of: - a cold (135K) optomechanical subsystem consisting of a SiC structure, an optical assembly (corrector and camera lens), a filter wheel mechanism, a grism wheel mechanism, a calibration unit and a thermal control system - a detection subsystem based on a mosaic of 16 Teledyne HAWAII2RG cooled to 95K with their front-end readout electronic cooled to 140K, integrated on a mechanical focal plane structure made with Molybdenum and Aluminum. The detection subsystem is mounted on the optomechanical subsystem structure - a warm electronic subsystem (280K) composed of a data processing / detector control unit and of an instrument control unit that interfaces with the spacecraft via a 1553 bus for command and control and via Spacewire links for science data This presentation describes the architecture of the instrument at the end of the phase B (Preliminary Design Review), the expected performance, the technological key challenges and preliminary test results obtained on a detection system demonstration model.

  11. Atmospheric Array Loss Statistics Derived from Short Time Scale Site Test Interferometer Phase Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, David D.; D'Addario, Larry R.

    2014-08-01

    NASA is interested in using the technique of arraying smaller-diameter antennas to increase effective aperture to replace the aging 70-m-diameter antennas of the Deep Space Network (DSN). Downlink arraying using the 34-m-diameter and 70-m-diameter antennas is routinely performed. Future scenarios include extending the technique to uplink arraying where a downlink signal may not be available. Atmospheric turbulence causes decorrelation of the arrayed signal, and becomes more severe at higher frequencies such as at the uplink allocations near 34 GHz and 40 GHz. This article expands the study initiated in a previous article that focused on average array loss statistics extracted from Site Test Interferometer (STI) data. In that study, cumulative distributions of the annual and monthly expected phasing loss were derived from STI data collected at the Goldstone and Canberra DSN complexes. For a two-element array, the average array loss cannot exceed 3 dB. This article considers the instantaneous (short time scale) array loss that sometimes exceeds 3 dB for a two-element array. We also consider cases of three-element arrays, which behave somewhat differently. The short time scale statistics of array loss at 7.15 GHz and 34.5 GHz are compared against the average array loss statistics for the best-case and worst-case weather months for the Goldstone and Canberra DSN sites.

  12. Wind Tunnel Tests on a Different Phase Three-Stage Savonius Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tsutomu; Li, Yan; Hara, Yutaka

    In order to decrease the torque variation of a Savonius rotor and improve the starting characteristics, a new type of Savonius rotor, which has three stages with 120-degree bucket phase shift between the adjacent stages, has been designed and made. Wind tunnel tests make it clear that both the static and dynamic torque variations in one revolution of this three-stage rotor have been greatly smoothed in comparison with an ordinary one-stage rotor, which means the improvement of the starting characteristics. The torque characteristics of the rotors with guide vanes were also measured. The guide vanes increased the torque coefficient on the average in the low tip speed ratio but decreased the torque coefficient in high tip speed ratio. Although the present three-stage rotor needs improvement of the aspect ratio of each stage, the three-stage rotor with no guide vane had better torque characteristics than the one-stage rotor with guide vanes for tip speed ratio larger than 0.8.

  13. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  14. Development, Testing, and Failure Mechanisms of a Replicative Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Hansen, Scott; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM's have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. Wax PCM units have been baselined for the Orion thermal control system and also provide risk mitigation for the Altair Lander. However, the use of water as a PCM has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. An ice PCM heat exchanger that replicates the thermal energy storage capacity of an existing wax PCM unit was fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion are investigated. This paper presents the results to date of this investigation. Nomenclature

  15. Energy Efficient Aluminum Production - Pilot-Scale Cell Tests - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Christini

    1999-12-30

    A cermet anode that produces oxygen and a cathode material that is wetted by aluminum can provide a dimensionally stable inter-electrode distance in the Hall-Heroult cell. This can be used to greatly improve the energy and/or productivity efficiencies. The concept, which was developed and tested, uses a system of vertically interleaved anodes and cathodes. The major advantage of this concept is the significant increase in electrochemical surface area compared to a horizontal orientation of anode and cathode that is presently used in the Hall-Heroult process. This creates an additional advantage for energy reduction of 1.3 kWh/lb or a 20% productivity improvement. The voltages obtained in an optimized cell test met the energy objectives of the project for at least two weeks. An acceptable current efficiency was never proven, however, during either pilot scale or bench scale tests with the vertical plate configuration. This must be done before a vertical cell can be considered viab le. Anode corrosion rate must be reduced by at least a factor of three in order to produce commercial purity aluminum. It is recommended that extensive theoretical and bench scale investigations be done to improve anode materials and to demonstrate acceptable current efficiencies in a vertical plate cell before pilot scale work is continued.

  16. Comparison of simulated and actual wind shear radar data products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.; Crittenden, Lucille H.

    1992-01-01

    Prior to the development of the NASA experimental wind shear radar system, extensive computer simulations were conducted to determine the performance of the radar in combined weather and ground clutter environments. The simulation of the radar used analytical microburst models to determine weather returns and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) maps to determine ground clutter returns. These simulations were used to guide the development of hazard detection algorithms and to predict their performance. The structure of the radar simulation is reviewed. Actual flight data results from the Orlando and Denver tests are compared with simulated results. Areas of agreement and disagreement of actual and simulated results are shown.

  17. Busted Butte Phase 2: of Post-Test Mineback and Overcore Rock Samples

    SciTech Connect

    H.J. Turin; M.A. McGraw; C.L. Jones; C.D. Scism; W.E. Soll

    2002-10-07

    A complex tracer mixture was injected continuously for over two years into a 10 x 10 x 7 m block of tuff as part of the unsaturated-zone (UZ) tracer test at Busted Butte. The test was designed to address uncertainties associated with flow and transport models within the Topopah Springs and Calico Hills tuffs. The tracer mixture included nonreactive (Br, I, and FBAs) and reactive tracers (Li, Ce, Sm, Ni, Coy and Mn) and synthetic colloids. Once injection was completed, samples from the block were collected in two ways. Overcores were taken from around and below injection holes. Then, the entire block was excavated via mineback--during which progressive vertical planes of the block were exposed. Samples from the overcores and mineback were analyzed to determine the distribution of tracers on different spatial scales than available from collection borehole data. Rock analyses confirmed collection pad results that the nonreactive tracers, Br and FBAs, moved several meters. Furthermore, Br and FBAs are observed above and lateral to the injector planes suggesting that capillarity was an important process for tracer movement. Lithium, the most mobile of the metals, was transported on a scale of meters. This is consistent with laboratory sorption measurements and observed breakthrough on the collection pads. Co and Ni show transport distances of tens of cm, while Sm and Ce moved far less, possibly due to precipitation and sorption effects. Colloid transport was assessed using 1 ft3 blocks extracted from the BB Phase 2 block. In the Calico Hills material, after 15 L of water was injected over 3.5 months, less than 1% of the colloids injected were recovered. Flow patterns in the block indicate that water injected at the center imbibed outward from the injection point. In a block taken from a boundary of the Calico Hills ashfall layer, breakthrough was observed only due to fractures formed during drying of the block. The colloid transport module for FEHM was tested against

  18. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume V - Transport Parameter and Source Term Data Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume V of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the transport parameter and source term data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  19. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume III - Groundwater Recharge and Discharge Data Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Volume III of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the data covering groundwater recharge and discharge. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  20. The choice of test in phase II cancer trials assessing continuous tumour shrinkage when complete responses are expected

    PubMed Central

    Mander, Adrian P

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, phase II cancer trials test a binary endpoint formed from a dichotomisation of the continuous change in tumour size. Directly testing the continuous endpoint provides considerable gains in power, although also results in several statistical issues. One such issue is when complete responses, i.e. complete tumour removal, are observed in multiple patients; this is a problem when normality is assumed. Using simulated data and a recently published phase II trial, we investigate how the choice of test affects the operating characteristics of the trial. We propose using parametric tests based on the censored normal distribution, comparing them to the t-test and Wilcoxon non-parametric test. The censored normal distribution fits the real dataset well, but simulations indicate its type-I error rate is inflated, and its power is only slightly higher than the t-test. The Wilcoxon test has deflated type I error. For two-arm designs, the differences are much smaller. We conclude that the t-test is suitable for use when complete responses are present, although positively skewed data can result in the non-parametric test having higher power. PMID:22179821

  1. OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) cold-water pipe at-sea test program. Phase 2. Suspended pipe test. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McHale, F.A.

    1984-08-01

    An important step in the development of technology for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) cold water pipes (CWP) is the at-sea testing and subsequent evaluation of a large-diameter fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) pipe. Focus has been on the CWP since it is the most critical element in any OTEC design. This report presents the results of the second phase of the CWP At-Sea Test Program. During this phase an 8-foot diameter, 400-foot long sandwich wall FRP syntactic foam configuration CWP test article was developed, constructed, deployed and used for data acquisition in the open ocean near Honolulu, Hawaii. This instrumented CWP was suspended from a moored platform for a three-week experiment in April - May, 1983. The CWP represented a scaled version of a 40-megawatt size structure, nominally 30 feet in diameter and 3000 feet long.

  2. Project FIRES. Volume 4: Prototype Protective Ensemble Qualification Test Report, Phase 1B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeles, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    The qualification testing of a prototype firefighter's protective ensemble is documented. Included are descriptions of the design requirements, the testing methods, and the test apparatus. The tests include measurements of individual subsystem characteristics in areas relating to both physical testing, such as heat, flame, impact penetration and human factors testing, such as dexterity, grip, and mobility. Also, measurements related to both physical and human factors testing of the complete ensemble, such as water protection, metabolic expenditures, and compatibility are considered.

  3. McDonnell 40-kW Giromill Wind System. Phase II. Fabrication and test

    SciTech Connect

    Brulle, R

    1980-06-01

    A 40 kW vertical axis windmill called a ''Giromill'' was fabricated, erected, and tested. The system design is described as well as some design changes made during fabrication. Manufacturing cost estimates are updated. Fabrication of the turbine blades, support arms, and fixed and rotating tower is described as well as the tests. Testing included control systems acceptance tests; Giromill system acceptance tests; structural, mechanical, control system and electric generation operational tests; and performance tests connected to the utility grid. (LEW)

  4. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Ground Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, Neal E.; Cabell, Karen F.; Storch, Andrea M.

    2010-01-01

    The initial phase of hydrocarbon-fueled ground tests supporting Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experiment (HIFiRE) Program has been conducted in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF). The HIFiRE Program, an Air Force-lead international cooperative program includes eight different flight test experiments designed to target specific challenges of hypersonic flight. The second of the eight planned flight experiments is a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet flight test intended to demonstrate dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools. A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink, direct-connect ground test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests are to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the Mach 6.0-8.0 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition prior to the HiFIRE payload Critical Design Review. Although the phase I test plans include testing over the Mach 6 to 8 flight simulation range, only Mach 6 testing will be reported in this paper. Experimental results presented here include flowpath surface pressure, temperature, and heat flux distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 6 simulation, as well as a range of fuel equivalence ratios and fuel injection distributions. Both ethylene and a mixture of ethylene and methane (planned for flight) were tested. Maximum back pressure and flameholding limits, as well as a baseline fuel schedule, that covers the Mach 5.84-6.5 test space have been

  5. Phase III Integrated Water Recovery Testing at MSFC - Closed hygiene and potable loop test results and lesson learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holder, Donald W., Jr.; Bagdigian, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    A series of tests has been conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to evaluate the performance of a Space Station Freedom (SSF) pre-development water recovery system. Potable, hygiene, and urine reclamation subsystems were integrated with end-use equipment items and successfully operated for a total of 35 days, including 23 days in closed-loop mode with man-in-the-loop. Although several significant subsystem physical anomalies were encountered, reclaimed potable and hygiene water routinely met current SSF water quality specifications. This paper summarizes the test objectives, system design, test activities/protocols, significant results/anomalies, and major lessons learned.

  6. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING PHASE 3 RESTRUCTURED (3R)

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-03-17

    This scope document defines the work scope for accomplishing the design of the GE MS7001H and MS9001H (7H and 9H) combined-cycle power systems under the original ATS Phase 3 DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-95MC31176, and incorporates changes in scope required to convert Phase 3 to the ''restructured'' Phase 3R as defined in Amendment A012 to the Cooperative Agreement.

  7. Second-phase validation study of short time exposure test for assessment of eye irritation potency of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hajime; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Sakaguchi, Hitoshi; Omori, Takashi; Otoizumi, Takuya; Sozu, Takashi; Kuwahara, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Sakaguchi, Mayumi; Toyoda, Akemi; Goto, Haruka; Watanabe, Shinichi; Ahiko, Kyoko; Nakamura, Tsuneaki; Morimoto, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A Short Time Exposure (STE) test is a cytotoxicity test that uses SIRC cells (rabbit corneal cell line) to assess eye irritation potency following a 5-min chemical exposure. This second-phase validation study assessed the predictive capacity of the STE test using 40 coded test substances at three laboratories. A Validation Management Team (VMT) then evaluated the predictivity of the STE test for United Nation (UN) Globally Harmonized System (GHS) categories using 63 test substances including the results of the first-phase validation study. The STE test can assess not only the severe or corrosive ocular irritants (corresponding to the UN GHS Category 1) but also non-irritant (corresponding to UN GHS Non Category) from other toxicity classes, especially for limited types of test substances. The predictivity by STE test, however, was insufficient for identification of UN GHS categories (Category 1, Category 2, or Non Category). These results suggest that the STE test can be recommended as an initial step in a top-down approach to identification of severe irritants and test substances that require classification for eye irritation (UN GHS Category 1) as well as an initial step in a bottom-up approach to identification of test substances that do not require classification for eye irritation (UN GHS Non Category) from other toxicity classes, especially for limited types of test substances. On the other hand, the STE test is not considered adequate for the identification of mild or moderate irritants (i.e., UN GHS Categories 2A and 2B) and severe irritants (UN GHS Category 1). PMID:23747838

  8. U.S. Bureau of Mines, Phase 1 Hanford low-level waste melter tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Oden, L.L.; O`Connor, W.K.

    1995-11-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the melter offgas report on testing performed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, Albany Research Center in Albany, Oregon. The Bureau of Mines (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate carbon electrode melter technology (also called carbon arc or electric arc) under WHC Subcontract number MMI-SVV-384216. The report contains description of the tests, observation, test data and some analysis of the data as it pertains to application of this technology for LLW vitrification. Testing consisted of melter feed preparation and three melter tests, the first of which was to fulfill the requirements of the statement of work (WHC-SD-EM-RD-044), and the second and third were to address issues identified during the first test. The document also contains summaries of the melter offgas report issued as a separate document U.S. Bureau of Mines, Phase 1 Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Melter Offgas Report (WHC-SD-WM-VI-032).

  9. Phase change paint tests on Rockwell orbiter/tank and orbiter alone configurations (OH3A/OH3B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quan, M.; Craig, C.

    1974-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted on scale models of the space shuttle orbiter and external tank. The tests were designed to determine the basic heating rate and interference effects on the orbiter-tank configuration and to analyze the effectiveness of the thermal protective system on the reentry vehicle. The phase change paint techniques were used to determine areodynamic heating rates. Oil flow and schlieren photographs were used for flow visualization.

  10. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W.; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2015-01-01

    This article presents some miscellaneous data from two low-slope and two steep-slope experimental roofs. The low-slope roofs were designed to compare the performance of various roof coatings exposed to natural weatherization. The steep-slope roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. The steep-slope roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. This article describes phase three (3) of a study that began in 2009 to evaluate the energy benefits of a sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing standing-seam metal roofing panels combined with energy efficient features like above-sheathing-ventilation (ASV), phase change material (PCM) and rigid insulation board. The data from phases 1 and 2 have been previously published and reported [Kosny et al., 2011; Biswas et al., 2011; Biswas and Childs, 2012; Kosny et al., 2012]. Based on previous data analyses and discussions within the research group, additional test roofs were installed in May 2012, to test new configurations and further investigate different components of the dynamic insulation systems. Some experimental data from phase 3 testing from May 2012 to December 2013 and some EnergyPlus modeling results have been reported in volumes 1 and 3, respectively, of the final report [Biswas et al., 2014; Biswas and Bhandari, 2014].

  11. HIV Prevention Among Mexican Migrants at Different Migration Phases: Exposure to Prevention Messages and Association With Testing Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Donate, Ana P; Rangel, M Gudelia; Zhang, Xiao; Simon, Norma-Jean; Rhoads, Natalie; Gonzalez-Fagoaga, J Eduardo; Gonzalez, Ahmed Asadi

    2015-12-01

    Mobile populations are at increased risk for HIV infection. Exposure to HIV prevention messages at all phases of the migration process may help decrease im/migrants' HIV risk. We investigated levels of exposure to HIV prevention messages, factors associated with message exposure, and the association between exposure to prevention messages and HIV testing behavior among Mexican im/migrants at different phases of the migration process. We conducted a cross-sectional, probability survey of Mexican im/migrants (N = 3,149) traveling through the border city of Tijuana, Mexico. The results indicate limited exposure to prevention messages (57-75%) and suboptimal last 12-month HIV testing rates (14-25%) across five migration phases. Compared to pre-departure levels (75%), exposure to messages decreases at all post-departure migration phases (57-63%, p < .001). In general, exposure to prevention messages is positively associated with greater odds of HIV testing at the pre-departure, destination, and interception phases. Binational efforts need to be intensified to reach and deliver HIV prevention to Mexican im/migrants across the migration continuum. PMID:26595267

  12. Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

    2005-10-27

    During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by ¾ of a mile toward the north and is located over ½ mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and

  13. HIFiRE Direct-Connect Rig (HDCR) Phase I Scramjet Test Results from the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Karen; Hass, Neal; Storch, Andrea; Gruber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A series of hydrocarbon-fueled direct-connect scramjet ground tests has been completed in the NASA Langley Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility (AHSTF) at simulated Mach 8 flight conditions. These experiments were part of an initial test phase to support Flight 2 of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) Program. In this flight experiment, a hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet is intended to demonstrate transition from dual-mode to scramjet-mode operation and verify the scramjet performance prediction and design tools A performance goal is the achievement of a combusted fuel equivalence ratio greater than 0.7 while in scramjet mode. The ground test rig, designated the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR), is a full-scale, heat sink test article that duplicates both the flowpath lines and a majority of the instrumentation layout of the isolator and combustor portion of the flight test hardware. The primary objectives of the HDCR Phase I tests were to verify the operability of the HIFiRE isolator/combustor across the simulated Mach 6-8 flight regime and to establish a fuel distribution schedule to ensure a successful mode transition. Both of these objectives were achieved prior to the HiFIRE Flight 2 payload Critical Design Review. Mach 8 ground test results are presented in this report, including flowpath surface pressure distributions that demonstrate the operation of the flowpath in scramjet-mode over a small range of test conditions around the nominal Mach 8 simulation, as well as over a range of fuel equivalence ratios. Flowpath analysis using ground test data is presented elsewhere; however, limited comparisons with analytical predictions suggest that both scramjet-mode operation and the combustion performance objective are achieved at Mach 8 conditions.

  14. Two-phase natural-circulation experiments in a test facility modeled after Three Mile Island Unit-2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kiang, R.L.

    1981-10-01

    A series of natural circulation experiments was conducted in a test facility that was configured after the primary and the secondary cooling systems of TMI-2. Results support the feasibility of core residual heat removal by two-phase natural circulation. Tests with noncondensable gas in the primary system indicate that two-phase natural circulation is quite tolerant of the presence of noncondensable gas. The different modes of natural circulation were discovered. Mode 1, during which only saturated steam flows in the hot leg, accomplishes the heat removal via phase changes in the vessel and in the steam generator tubes. Mode 2, during which a percolating flow exists in the hot leg, removes the heat by means of a much faster circulation in the primary loop.

  15. Extensive database of liquid phase diffusion coefficients of some frequently used test molecules in reversed-phase liquid chromatography and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Song, Huiying; Vanderheyden, Yoachim; Adams, Erwin; Desmet, Gert; Cabooter, Deirdre

    2016-07-15

    Diffusion plays an important role in all aspects of band broadening in chromatography. An accurate knowledge of molecular diffusion coefficients in different mobile phases is therefore crucial in fundamental column performance studies. Correlations available in literature, such as the Wilke-Chang equation, can provide good approximations of molecular diffusion under reversed-phase conditions. However, these correlations have been demonstrated to be less accurate for mobile phases containing a large percentage of acetonitrile, as is the case in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. A database of experimentally measured molecular diffusion coefficients of some 45 polar and apolar compounds that are frequently used as test molecules under hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and reversed-phase conditions is therefore presented. Special attention is given to diffusion coefficients of polar compounds obtained in large percentages of acetonitrile (>90%). The effect of the buffer concentration (5-10mM ammonium acetate) on the obtained diffusion coefficients is investigated and is demonstrated to mainly influence the molecular diffusion of charged molecules. Diffusion coefficients are measured using the Taylor-Aris method and hence deduced from the peak broadening of a solute when flowing through a long open tube. The validity of the set-up employed for the measurement of the diffusion coefficients is demonstrated by ruling out the occurrence of longitudinal diffusion, secondary flow interactions and extra-column effects, while it is also shown that radial equilibration in the 15m long capillary is effective. PMID:27240944

  16. Development and proof-testing of advanced absorption refrigeration cycle concepts. Report on Phases 1 and 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Modahl, R.J.; Hayes, F.C.

    1992-03-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to evaluate, develop, and proof-test advanced absorption refrigeration cycles that are applicable to residential and commercial heat pumps for space conditioning. The heat pump system is to be direct-fired with natural gas and is to use absorption working fluids whose properties are known. Target coefficients of performance (COPs) are 1.6 at 47{degrees}F and 1.2 at 17{degrees} in the heating mode, and 0.7 at 95{degree}F in the cooling mode, including the effect of flue losses. The project is divided into three phases. Phase I entailed the analytical evaluation of advanced cycles and included the selection of preferred concepts for further development. Phase II involves the development and testing of critical components and of a complete laboratory breadboard version of the selected system. Phase III calls for the development of a prototype unit and is contingent on the successful completion of Phase II. This report covers Phase I work on the project. In Phase 1, 24 advanced absorption cycle/fluid combinations were evaluated, and computer models were developed to predict system performance. COP, theoretical pump power, and internal heat exchange were calculated for each system, and these calculations were used as indicators of operating and installed costs in order to rank the relative promise of each system. The highest ranking systems involve the cycle concept of absorber/generator heat exchange, generator heat exchanger/absorber heat exchange, regeneration, and resorption/desorption, in combination with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary absorption fluid mixture or with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary solution. Based upon these conclusions, the recommendation was made to proceed to Phase II, the laboratory breadboard proof-of- concept.

  17. Uniform engine testing program. Phase 1: NASA Lewis Research Center participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blesiadny, T.; Burkardt, L.; Braithwaite, W.

    1982-01-01

    Two jet engines were tested under identical conditions in a variety of altitude and ground level facilities as a means to correlating these facilities. Two J57-19W turbojet engines were tested in an altitude test facility. The test results are summarized.

  18. Modulation of spatial and response strategies by phase of the menstrual cycle in women tested in a virtual navigation task.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Dema; Hanafi, Sarah; Konishi, Kyoko; Brake, Wayne G; Bohbot, Véronique D

    2016-08-01

    Different memory systems are employed to navigate an environment. It has been consistently shown in rodents that estrogen impacts multiple memory system bias such that low estradiol (E2) is associated with increased use of a striatal-mediated response strategy whereas high E2 increases use of a hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Low E2 also enhances performance on a response-based task whereas high E2 levels improve learning on a spatial task. The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate navigational strategies in young, healthy, naturally cycling women. Participants were split into either an early follicular (i.e., when E2 levels are low), ovulatory (i.e., when E2 levels are high) or mid/late luteal (i.e., end of the cycle, when E2 levels decrease and progesterone levels rise) phase group, using self-reported date of the menstrual cycle. Serum hormone level measurements (E2, progesterone, testosterone) were used to confirm cycle phase assignment. Participants were administered a verbal memory task as well as a virtual navigation task that can be solved by using either a response or spatial strategy. Women tested in the ovulatory phase, under high E2 conditions, performed better on a verbal memory task than women tested during the other phases of the cycle. Interestingly, women tested in the mid/late luteal phase, when progesterone is high, predominantly used a spatial strategy, whereas the opposite pattern was observed in the early follicular and ovulatory groups. Our data suggest that the specific memory system engaged differs depending on the phase of the menstrual cycle and may be mediated by both E2 and progesterone, rather than E2 alone. PMID:27213559

  19. Testing Models for the Shallow Decay Phase of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows with Polarization Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mi-Xiang; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao

    2016-08-01

    The X-ray afterglows of almost one-half of gamma-ray bursts have been discovered by the Swift satellite to have a shallow decay phase of which the origin remains mysterious. Two main models have been proposed to explain this phase: relativistic wind bubbles (RWBs) and structured ejecta, which could originate from millisecond magnetars and rapidly rotating black holes, respectively. Based on these models, we investigate polarization evolution in the shallow decay phase of X-ray and optical afterglows. We find that in the RWB model, a significant bump of the polarization degree evolution curve appears during the shallow decay phase of both optical and X-ray afterglows, while the polarization position angle abruptly changes its direction by 90°. In the structured ejecta model, however, the polarization degree does not evolve significantly during the shallow decay phase of afterglows whether the magnetic field configuration in the ejecta is random or globally large-scale. Therefore, we conclude that these two models for the shallow decay phase and relevant central engines would be testable with future polarization observations.

  20. Testing Single Phase IGBT H-Bridge Switch Plates for the High Voltage Converter Modulator at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Peplov, Vladimir V; Anderson, David E; Solley, Dennis J

    2014-01-01

    Three IGBT H-bridge switching networks are used in each High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) system at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to generate drive currents to three boost transformer primaries switching between positive and negative bus voltages at 20 kHz. Every switch plate assembly is tested before installing it into an operational HVCM. A Single Phase Test Stand has been built for this purpose, and it is used for adjustment, measurement and testing of different configurations of switch plates. This paper will present a description of the Test Stand configuration and discuss the results of testing switch plates with two different types of IGBT gate drivers currently in use on the HVCM systems. Comparison of timing characteristics of the original and new drivers and the resulting performance reinforces the necessity to replace the original H-bridge network drivers with the upgraded units.

  1. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  2. Power, Avionics and Software - Phase 1.0:. [Subsystem Integration Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 1.0 subsystem integration testing and test results that occurred in August and September of 2013. This report covers the capabilities of each PAS assembly to meet integration test objectives for non-safety critical, non-flight, non-human-rated hardware and software development. This test report is the outcome of the first integration of the PAS subsystem and is meant to provide data for subsequent designs, development and testing of the future PAS subsystems. The two main objectives were to assess the ability of the PAS assemblies to exchange messages and to perform audio testing of both inbound and outbound channels. This report describes each test performed, defines the test, the data, and provides conclusions and recommendations.

  3. Tank 12 data dump OME integrated thrust chamber test report, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.; Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The test program conducted to characterize the steady state stability, thermal, and performance characteristics of the integrated thrust chamber assembly, as well as limited tests to investigate transient characteristics are described.

  4. A comparison of atmospheric effects on differential phase for a two-element antenna array and nearby site test interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, David D.; D'Addario, Larry; Finley, Susan

    2016-02-01

    Phased arrays of reflector antennas can be used to obtain effective area and gain that are much larger than is practical with a single antenna. This technique is routinely used by NASA for receiving weak signals from deep space. Phase alignment of the signals can be disrupted by turbulence in the troposphere, which causes fluctuations in the differences of signal delays among the antennas. At the Deep Space Network stations, site test interferometers (STIs) are being used for long-term monitoring of these delay fluctuations using signals from geostationary satellites. In this paper, we compare the STI measurements with the phase variations seen by a nearby two-element array of 34 m diameter antennas tracking 8.4 GHz and 32 GHz signals from the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. It is shown that the statistics of the STI delay fluctuations, after appropriate scaling for differences in antenna separation and elevation angle and conversion to phase at the spacecraft frequencies, provide reliable estimates of the phase fluctuations seen by the large antennas on the deep space signal. Techniques for adaptive compensation of the phase fluctuations are available when receiving a sufficiently strong signal, but compensation is often impractical or impossible when using the array for transmitting. These results help to validate the use of long-term STI data for assessing the feasibility of large transmitting arrays at various sites.

  5. Realizing actual feedback control of complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengyi; Cheng, Yuhua

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we present the concept of feedbackability and how to identify the Minimum Feedbackability Set of an arbitrary complex directed network. Furthermore, we design an estimator and a feedback controller accessing one MFS to realize actual feedback control, i.e. control the system to our desired state according to the estimated system internal state from the output of estimator. Last but not least, we perform numerical simulations of a small linear time-invariant dynamics network and a real simple food network to verify the theoretical results. The framework presented here could make an arbitrary complex directed network realize actual feedback control and deepen our understanding of complex systems.

  6. PREDICTIVE TESTING FOR ENTRANCE IN VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL SCHOOLS, PHASE ONE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MILLER, JOHN G.

    THE FLANAGAN APTITUDE CLASSIFICATION TEST, THE GORDON OCCUPATIONAL CHECK LIST, THE STANFORD ACHIEVEMENT TEST, THE PRIMARY MENTAL ABILITIES TEST, AND THE GORDON SURVEY OF INTERPERSONAL VALUES WERE ADMINISTERED IN A PILOT STUDY UNDERTAKEN AS PART OF A LARGER STUDY DESIGNED TO DEFINE MORE EFFECTIVE INSTRUMENTS FOR IDENTIFYING VOCATIONALLY TALENTED…

  7. A final report on the Phase 1 testing of a molten-salt cavity receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, J M; Smith, D C

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and testing of a solar central receiver using molten nitrate salt as a heat exchange fluid. Design studies for large commercial plants (30--100 MWe) have shown molten salt to be an excellent fluid for solar thermal plants as it allows for efficient thermal storage. Plant design studies concluded that an advanced receiver test was required to address uncertainties not covered in prior receiver tests. This recommendation led to the current test program managed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Department of Energy. The 4.5 MWt receiver is installed at Sandia National Laboratories' Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The receiver incorporates features of large commercial receiver designs. This report describes the receiver's configuration, heat absorption surface (design and sizing), the structure and supporting systems, and the methods for control. The receiver was solar tested during a six-month period at the Central Receiver Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. The purpose of the testing was to characterize the operational capabilities of the receiver under a number of solar operating and stand-by conditions. This testing consisted of initial check-out of the systems, followed by steady-state performance, transient receiver operation, receiver operation in clouds, receiver thermal loss testing, receiver start-up operation, and overnight thermal conditioning tests. This report describes the design, fabrication, and results of testing of the receiver.

  8. Kaman 40-kW wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and tests. Volume II. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, H; Perley, R

    1981-01-01

    A program is underway to design, fabricate and test a horizontal axis Wind Turbine Generator (WTG) capable of producing 40 kW electrical output power in a 20 mph wind. Results are presented of the program effort covering fabrication and testing of the Wing Turbine Generator designed earlier. A minimum of difficulties were experienced during fabrication and, after successful completion of Contractor tests through 20 mph winds, the WTG was shipped to Rocky Flats, assembled and operated there. The 40 kW WTG is presently undergoing extended tests at Rockwell's Rocky Flats test facility.

  9. Development of a test and flight engineering oriented language, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamsler, W. F.; Case, C. W.; Kinney, E. L.; Gyure, J.

    1970-01-01

    Based on an analysis of previously developed test oriented languages and a study of test language requirements, a high order language was designed to enable test and flight engineers to checkout and operate the proposed space shuttle and other NASA vehicles and experiments. The language is called ALOFT (a language oriented to flight engineering and testing). The language is described, its terminology is compared to similar terms in other test languages, and its features and utilization are discussed. The appendix provides the specifications for ALOFT.

  10. High Temperature Turbine Technology Program: Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Technical progress report, July 1-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The status of work performed on the High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Phase II Technology Test and Support Studies during the third quarter of 1981, July 1-September 30, 1981 is reported. Testing of the Turbine Spool Technology Rig (TSTR) was initiated. Performance calibrations were performed at several turbine stator throat area settings, followed by steady-state operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine inlet temperature with fly ash particulates injected into the hot gas stream at the primary zone of the combustor. After approximately 36-1/2 hours of test time, a labyrinth seal on the turbine vane cooling air impeller failed, causing foreign object damage to a number of turbine blades. The test has been interrupted to repair blades, to make changes ot the impeller seal arrangement to preclude future failures and to ensure adequate sealing at the failure location. Observations of the turbine indicate minimal effects from the high temperature and gas stream contaminants. The development status of both the low Btu gas fuel cooled combustor and high temperature, low emissions coal-derived liquid-fueled combustor are reviewed. Both of these programs are in the component fabrication phase leading to test evaluation during the fourth quarter. Control systems status and descriptions for the above items are given. The anaytical studies to support the TSTR and combustor programs are described. Extended time oxidation testing of Nichrome V-Cb material porous mesh for transpiration air cooled turbine airfoils is continuing; furnace exposure time is now over 3000 h.

  11. Testing QCD factorization with phase determinations in B →K π , K ρ , and K*π decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, T. N.

    2016-06-01

    The success of QCD factorization (QCDF) in predicting branching ratios for charmless B decays to light pseudoscalar and vector mesons and the small C P asymmetries measured at BABAR, Belle, and LHCb show that the phase in these decays, as predicted by QCDF, are not large. For a precise test of QCDF, one needs to extract from the measured decay rates the phase of the decay amplitude which appears in the interference terms between the tree and penguin contribution. Since the tree amplitude is known at the leading order in ΛQCD/mb and is consistent with the measured tree-dominated decay rates, the QCDF value for the tree amplitude can be used with the measured decay rates to obtain the phases in B →K π , K ρ , and K*π decay rates. This is similar to the extraction of the final-state interaction phases in the interference term between p p ¯→J /Ψ →e+e- and p p ¯→e+e- and in J /Ψ →0-0- done previously. In this paper, we present a determination of the phase between the I =3 /2 tree and I =1 /2 penguin amplitudes in B →K π , K ρ , and K*π decays using the measured decay rates and the QCDF I =3 /2 tree amplitude obtained from the I =2 B+→π+π0,ρ0π+,ρ+π0 tree-dominated decays and compare the result with the phase given by QCDF. It is remarkable that the phase extracted from experiments differs only slightly from the QCDF values. This shows that there is no large final-state interaction strong phase in B →K π , K ρ , and K*π decays.

  12. Inertial Coupling in Two-Phase Flow: a Few Test Cases and Their Impacts on Two-Fluid Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiaolong

    Two-phase flow makes up about one-half of all industrial, biological and environmental fluid mechanics. Analytical methods that are presently useful in these are still mostly ad hoc. Unlike in (single phase) fluid mechanics, there are no universal macroscopic fundamental equations existing yet, although the Navier-Stokes equations describe the microscopic details of the motion of each phase. One promising recent theoretical development in two-phase flow is the two-fluid theory. The modeling of the interfacial interaction force terms are very crucial in this theory since they govern the interfacial momentum transfer and couple the two phases together. One of the interaction forces is the inertial coupling force, or the added (virtual) mass force, which plays a significant role in deciding the well -posedness of the model, especially when dynamic interactions (relative acceleration) between phases are important (Drew, 1983). Attention is focused on the inertial coupling aspect of two-phase modeling in this thesis, following Wallis (1989). Although the concept is classic, there is still much to be known about added mass effects in two -phase flow. The boundary (be it fluid boundary or other surfaces) effect on the added mass coefficient of a sphere is studied, resulting in several new, essentially exact solutions which are valuable contributions to the understanding of hydrodynamic interaction in potential flow. The added masses for isotropic and nonisotropic dispersions of spheres in an unbounded flow are studied. Among the new results are: (i) the "conditional" convergence experienced is physically meaningful; (ii) Geurst's conjecture (1985) is correct, contrary to Smereka & Milton's (1991) finding; (iii) predictions from the "tube model" proposed in Cai & Wallis (1992) are further validated by predictions from the image method. Some new phenomena about the added mass of dispersed flow in finite pipes with different end conditions are also studied. Experimental

  13. Phase change measurement, and speed of sound and attenuation determination, from underwater acoustic panel tests.

    PubMed

    Piquette, Jean C; Paolero, Anthony E

    2003-03-01

    A technique for measuring the change in phase produced by the insertion of a panel between a projector and receiver is described. Presented also is a procedure for determining the phase speed and attenuation of the panel material. Although the methods were developed over the frequency decade 10-100 kHz, they are not limited to that band. It was observed that a "settling time" of approximately 20 min is required to obtain reproducible phase measurements if the experiment is disturbed even slightly. For example, rotating the panel 10 degrees, then immediately returning to the original position, causes the observed phases to differ by up to 10 deg from those obtained prior to the disturbance. These differences are distributed randomly across frequency. Temperature stabilization within the medium as well as the material is also required before measurements can take place. After the stated 20 min settling time, however, the phases return to the values obtained prior to rotation, or after temperature stabilization, to within +/- 1/2 deg. The sound speed and attenuation determination technique employs least-squares fitting of a causal model to the measurements. Four (or fewer) adjusted parameters accommodate the measurements over the stated frequency decade, even for samples that exhibit significant dispersion. The sound speed is typically determined to an accuracy of +/- 30 m/s, as judged from a propagation-of-error calculation. This model assumes single-layered panels. PMID:12656386

  14. Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Test Measurement of NAPL-Water Interfacial Areas in Porous Media under Two-Phase Flow Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, H.; El Ouni, A.; Lin, D.; Wang, B.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    The NAPL-water interface is of critical importance for the transport, fate, and remediation of organic contaminants in the subsurface due to its influence on contaminant mass transfer, transport, and biotransformation. In this work, the interfacial areas between tetrachloroethene (PCE) liquid (non-wetting phase) and water (wetting phase) in porous media were measured under two-phase flow conditions using the interfacial partitioning tracer test (IPTT) method. Three wetting scenarios of primary drainage, secondary imbibition, and secondary drainage were investigated. Two porous media were used, a well-sorted 45/50 mesh quartz sand and a sandy soil. The theoretical maximum interfacial areas determined from the measured data are compared to the specific solid surface area determined in two ways, based on geometrical calculations for smooth spheres and as measured with the N2/BET method. The results obtained for the NAPL-water system are compared to measurements conducted for comparable air-water systems.

  15. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  16. 50 CFR 253.16 - Actual cost.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Actual cost. 253.16 Section 253.16 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance Program §...

  17. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  18. Children's Rights and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1982-01-01

    Educators need to seriously reflect upon the concept of children's rights. Though the idea of children's rights has been debated numerous times, the idea remains vague and shapeless; however, Maslow's theory of self-actualization can provide the children's rights idea with a needed theoretical framework. (Author)

  19. Culture Studies and Self-Actualization Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rod

    1983-01-01

    True citizenship education is impossible unless students develop the habit of intelligently evaluating cultures. Abraham Maslow's theory of self-actualization, a theory of innate human needs and of human motivation, is a nonethnocentric tool which can be used by teachers and students to help them understand other cultures. (SR)

  20. Group Counseling for Self-Actualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streich, William H.; Keeler, Douglas J.

    Self-concept, creativity, growth orientation, an integrated value system, and receptiveness to new experiences are considered to be crucial variables to the self-actualization process. A regular, year-long group counseling program was conducted with 85 randomly selected gifted secondary students in the Farmington, Connecticut Public Schools. A…

  1. Racial Discrimination in Occupations: Perceived and Actual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Castellano B.; Turner, Barbara F.

    The relationship between the actual representation of Blacks in certain occupations and individual perceptions of the occupational opportunity structure were examined. A scale which rated the degree of perceived discrimination against Blacks in 21 occupations was administered to 75 black male, 70 black female, 1,429 white male and 1,457 white…

  2. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  3. Fuel containment and damage tolerance in large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 2: Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandifer, J. P.; Denny, A.; Wood, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Technical issues associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite wing structures for transport aircraft were investigated. Material evaluation tests were conducted on two toughened resin composites: Celion/HX1504 and Celion/5245. These consisted of impact, tension, compression, edge delamination, and double cantilever beam tests. Another test series was conducted on graphite/epoxy box beams simulating a wing cover to spar cap joint configuration of a pressurized fuel tank. These tests evaluated the effectiveness of sealing methods with various fastener types and spacings under fatigue loading and with pressurized fuel. Another test series evaluated the ability of the selected coatings, film, and materials to prevent fuel leakage through 32-ply AS4/2220-1 laminates at various impact energy levels. To verify the structural integrity of the technology demonstration article structural details, tests were conducted on blade stiffened panels and sections. Compression tests were performed on undamaged and impacted stiffened AS4/2220-1 panels and smaller element tests to evaluate stiffener pull-off, side load and failsafe properties. Compression tests were also performed on panels subjected to Zone 2 lightning strikes. All of these data were integrated into a demonstration article representing a moderately loaded area of a transport wing. This test combined lightning strike, pressurized fuel, impact, impact repair, fatigue and residual strength.

  4. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Corrosion Test Report (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, W. C.; Fritz, R. L.

    1993-12-27

    This report documents the results of the corrosion tests that were performed to aid in the selection of the construction materials for multi-function waste tanks to be built in the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. Two alloys were tested: 304L and Alloy 20 austenitic stainless steel. The test media were aqueous solutions formulated to represent the extreme of the chemical compositions of waste to be stored in the tanks. The results summerized by alloy are as follows: For 304L the tests showed no stress-corrosion cracking in any of the nine test solutions. The tests showed pitting in on of the solutions. There were no indications of any weld heat-tint corrosion, nor any sign of preferential corrosion in the welded areas. For Alloy 20 the tests showed no general, pitting, or stress-corrosion cracking. One crevice corrosion coupon cracked at the web between a hole and the edge of the coupon in one of the solutions. Mechanical tests showed some possible crack extension in the same solution. Because of the failure of both alloys to meet test acceptance criteria, the tank waste chemistry will have to be restricted or an alternative alloy tested.

  5. Whiteheadian Actual Entitities and String Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, Joseph A.

    2012-06-01

    In the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, the ultimate units of reality are actual entities, momentary self-constituting subjects of experience which are too small to be sensibly perceived. Their combination into "societies" with a "common element of form" produces the organisms and inanimate things of ordinary sense experience. According to the proponents of string theory, tiny vibrating strings are the ultimate constituents of physical reality which in harmonious combination yield perceptible entities at the macroscopic level of physical reality. Given that the number of Whiteheadian actual entities and of individual strings within string theory are beyond reckoning at any given moment, could they be two ways to describe the same non-verifiable foundational reality? For example, if one could establish that the "superject" or objective pattern of self- constitution of an actual entity vibrates at a specific frequency, its affinity with the individual strings of string theory would be striking. Likewise, if one were to claim that the size and complexity of Whiteheadian 'societies" require different space-time parameters for the dynamic interrelationship of constituent actual entities, would that at least partially account for the assumption of 10 or even 26 instead of just 3 dimensions within string theory? The overall conclusion of this article is that, if a suitably revised understanding of Whiteheadian metaphysics were seen as compatible with the philosophical implications of string theory, their combination into a single world view would strengthen the plausibility of both schemes taken separately. Key words: actual entities, subject/superjects, vibrating strings, structured fields of activity, multi-dimensional physical reality.

  6. Hypersonic research engine project. Phase 2: Aerothermodynamic Integration Model (AIM) test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, W. L.; Kado, L.

    1975-01-01

    The Hypersonic Research Engine-Aerothermodynamic Integration Model (HRE-AIM) was designed, fabricated, and tested in the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility. The HRE-AIM is described along with its installation in the wind tunnel facility. Test conditions to which the HRE-AIM was subjected and observations made during the tests are discussed. The overall engine performance, component interaction, and ignition limits for the design are evaluated.

  7. Fuel containment and damage tolerance for large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 1: Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandifer, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Technical problems associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite material wings for transport aircraft were identified. The major tasks are the following: (1) the preliminary design of damage tolerant wing surface using composite materials; (2) the evaluation of fuel sealing and lightning protection methods for a composite material wing; and (3) an experimental investigation of the damage tolerant characteristics of toughened resin graphite/epoxy materials. The test results, the test techniques, and the test data are presented.

  8. Experimental investigation of the two-phase flow regimes and pressure drop in horizontal mini-size rectangular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elazhary, Amr Mohamed; Soliman, Hassan M.

    2012-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted in order to investigate two-phase flow regimes and fully developed pressure drop in a mini-size, horizontal rectangular channel. The test section was machined in the form of an impacting tee junction in an acrylic block (in order to facilitate visualization) with a rectangular cross-section of 1.87-mm height on 20-mm width on the inlet and outlet sides. Pressure drop measurement and flow regime identification were performed on all three sides of the junction. Air-water mixtures at 200 kPa (abs) and room temperature were used as the test fluids. Four flow regimes were identified visually: bubbly, plug, churn, and annular over the ranges of gas and liquid superficial velocities of 0.04 ≤ JG ≤ 10 m/s and 0.02 ≤ JL ≤ 0.7 m/s, respectively, and a flow regime map was developed. Accuracy of the pressure-measurement technique was validated with single-phase, laminar and turbulent, fully developed data. Two-phase experiments were conducted for eight different inlet conditions and various mass splits at the junction. Comparisons were conducted between the present data and former correlations for the fully developed two-phase pressure drop in rectangular channels with similar sizes. Wide deviations were found among these correlations, and the correlations that agreed best with the present data were identified.

  9. Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

  10. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems, phase 2 program results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A.; Minning, C.; Breen, R. T.; Coakley, J. F.; Duncan, L. B.; Gllaspy, D. M.; Kiewert, R. H.; Mckinney, F. G.; Taylor, W. E.; Vaughn, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    Optical, electrical isolation, thermal structural, structural deflection, and thermal tests are reported. The utility of the optical, series capacitance, and structural deflection models was verified.

  11. Development and Testing of Industrial Scale, Coal-Fired Combustion System: Phase 3.

    SciTech Connect

    Zauderer, B.

    1997-04-21

    In the first quarter of calendar year 1997, 17 days of combustor- boiler tests were performed, including one day of tests on a parallel DOE sponsored project on sulfur retention in a slagging combustor. Between tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. This brings the total number of test days required to meet the task 5 project plan. The key project objectives in the areas of combustor performance and environmental performance have been exceeded. With sorbent injection in the combustion gas train, NO{sub x} emissions as low as 0.07 lb/MMBtu and SO{sub 2} emissions as low as 0.2 lb/MMBtu have been measured in tests in this quarter. Tests in the present quarter have resulted in further optimizing the sorbent injection and NO{sub x} control processes. A very important milestone in this quarter was two successful combustor tests on a very high ash (37%) Indian coal. Work in the next quarter will focus on commercialization of the combustor- boiler system. In addition, further tests of the NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} control process and on the Indian coal will be performed.

  12. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the D3-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.; Menon, M. M.

    1994-06-01

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the D3-D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the heat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid . helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,000 1/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  13. Two phase liquid helium flow testing to simulate the operation of a cryocondensation pump in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughon, G. J.; Baxi, C. B.; Campbell, G. L.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Makariou, C. C.; Menon, M. M.; Smith, J. P.; Schaffer, M. J.; Schaubel, K. M.

    A liquid helium-cooled cryocondensation pump has been installed in the DIII=D tokamak fusion energy research experiment at General Atomics. The pump is located within the tokamak vacuum chamber beneath the divertor baffle plates and is utilized for plasma density and contamination control. Two-phase helium flows through the pump at 5 to 10 g/s utilizing the beat transfer and constant temperature characteristics of boiling liquid helium. The pump is designed for a pumping speed of 32,0001/s. Extensive testing was performed with a prototypical pump test fixture. Several pump geometries (simple tube, coaxial flow plug, and coaxial slotted insert) were tested, in an iterative process, to determine which was the most satisfactory for stable cryocondensation pumping. Results from the different tests illustrating the temperature distribution and flow characteristics for each configuration are presented.

  14. A systems-oriented single event effects test approach for high speed digital phase-locked loops

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, K.; Shoga, M.; Koga, R.

    1996-12-01

    A systems-oriented single event effects (SEE) test approach is outlined here for two different phase-locked loop (PLL) application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) used for spaceborne local oscillator (LO) generation. The system considerations in designing the upset detection technique is described. This is the only known technique for getting information critical to the system about single event upset (SEU) sensitivity at speed for PLLs. Test results are presented for PLL devices operating at clock speeds of 1.0 and 1.5 GHz. Significant frequency effects were not observed in these devices since the clock speed varied only 50%.

  15. Simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal testing and toxics characterization. Milestone report, phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Whitcomb, J.; Tseng, Shiaw; Lani, B.W.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the work completed in the first phase of the Simultaneous SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} Removal Testing and Toxics Characterization test program. Tasks covered in this report as specified in the Statement of Work included: Task 1.2.0 Equipment Modification and Reagents Procurement; Task 1.3.0 Testing at the 5 kW Scale; Task 1.3.1 Temperature Enhanced Fe(III)EDTA Reduction; Task 1.3.2 Electrolytic Cell Fe(III) EDTA Reduction; Task 1.3.3 Chemical Regeneration Agents Testing; Task 1.3.4 Combination of Strategies; Task 1.4.0 Data Analysis and Phase I Report. Proposed in Task 1.3.4 are combinations of regeneration methods (based on data generated in Tasks 1.3.1 to 1.3.3) that gave the best results at the lowest possible cost. The Test Plan approval (Task 1.1.0) was previously submitted under separate cover.

  16. U.S. Bureau of Mines, phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: Melter offgas report

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-10-27

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the melter offgas report on testing performed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, Albany Research Center in Albany, Oregon. The Bureau of Mines (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate carbon electrode melter technology (also called carbon arc or electric arc) under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384216. The document contains the complete offgas report for the first 24-hour melter test (WHC-1) as prepared by Entropy Inc. A summary of this report is also contained in the``U.S. Bureau of Mines, Phase 1 Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Final Report`` (WHC-SD-WM-VI-030).

  17. Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Soluble Substrate Field Test: Interim Data Summary for the Substrate Injection and Process Monitoring Phases of the Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Mackley, Rob D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Johnson, Christian D.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.

    2008-06-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier by reducing the concentration of the primary oxidizing species in groundwater (i.e., nitrate and dissolved oxygen) and chromate, and thereby increasing the longevity of the ISRM barrier. This report summarizes the initial results from field testing of an in situ biological treatment zone implemented through injection of a soluble substrate. The field test is divided into operational phases that include substrate injection, process monitoring, and performance monitoring. The results summarized herein are for the substrate injection and process monitoring phase encompassing the first approximately three months of field testing. Performance monitoring is ongoing at the time this report was prepared and is planned to extend over approximately 18 months. As such, this report is an interim data summary report for the field test. The treatability testing has multiple objectives focused on evaluating the performance of biostimulation as a reducing barrier for nitrate, oxygen, and chromate. The following conclusions related to these objectives are supported by the data provided in this report. Substrate was successfully distributed to a radius of about 15 m (50 ft) from the injection well. Monitoring data indicate that microbial growth initiated rapidly, and this rapid growth would limit the ability to inject substrate to significantly larger zones from a single injection well. As would be expected, the uniformity of substrate distribution was impacted by subsurface heterogeneity. However, subsequent microbial activity and ability to reduce the targeted species was observed throughout the monitored zone during the process monitoring

  18. Cardiogenic oscillation phase relationships during single-breath tests performed in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Lauzon, A M; Elliott, A R; Paiva, M; West, J B; Prisk, G K

    1998-02-01

    We studied the phase relationships of the cardiogenic oscillations in the phase III portion of single-breath washouts (SBW) in normal gravity (1 G) and in sustained microgravity (microG). The SBW consisted of a vital capacity inspiration of 5% He-1.25% sulfurhexafluoride-balance O2, preceded at residual volume by a 150-ml Ar bolus. Pairs of gas signals, all of which still showed cardiogenic oscillations, were cross-correlated, and their phase difference was expressed as an angle. Phase relationships between inspired gases (e.g., He) and resident gas (n2) showed no change from 1 G (211 +/- 9 degrees) to microG (163 +/- 7 degrees). Ar bolus and He were unaltered between 1 G (173 +/- 15 degrees) and microG (211 +/- 25 degrees), showing that airway closure in microG remains in regions of high specific ventilation and suggesting that airway closure results from lung regions reaching low regional volume near residual volume. In contrast, CO2 reversed phase with He between 1 G (332 +/- 6 degrees) and microG (263 +/- 27 degrees), strongly suggesting that, in microG, areas of high ventilation are associated with high ventilation-perfusion ratio (VA/Q). This widening of the range of VA/Q in microG may explain previous measurements (G.K. Prisk, A.R. Elliott, H.J.B. Guy, J.M. Kosonen, and J.B. West J. Appl. Physiol. 79: 1290-1298, 1995) of an overall unaltered range of VA/Q in microG, despite more homogeneous distributions of both ventilation and perfusion. PMID:9475878

  19. Cardiogenic oscillation phase relationships during single-breath tests performed in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauzon, A. M.; Elliott, A. R.; Paiva, M.; West, J. B.; Prisk, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the phase relationships of the cardiogenic oscillations in the phase III portion of single-breath washouts (SBW) in normal gravity (1 G) and in sustained microgravity (microG). The SBW consisted of a vital capacity inspiration of 5% He-1.25% sulfurhexafluoride-balance O2, preceded at residual volume by a 150-ml Ar bolus. Pairs of gas signals, all of which still showed cardiogenic oscillations, were cross-correlated, and their phase difference was expressed as an angle. Phase relationships between inspired gases (e.g., He) and resident gas (n2) showed no change from 1 G (211 +/- 9 degrees) to microG (163 +/- 7 degrees). Ar bolus and He were unaltered between 1 G (173 +/- 15 degrees) and microG (211 +/- 25 degrees), showing that airway closure in microG remains in regions of high specific ventilation and suggesting that airway closure results from lung regions reaching low regional volume near residual volume. In contrast, CO2 reversed phase with He between 1 G (332 +/- 6 degrees) and microG (263 +/- 27 degrees), strongly suggesting that, in microG, areas of high ventilation are associated with high ventilation-perfusion ratio (VA/Q). This widening of the range of VA/Q in microG may explain previous measurements (G.K. Prisk, A.R. Elliott, H.J.B. Guy, J.M. Kosonen, and J.B. West J. Appl. Physiol. 79: 1290-1298, 1995) of an overall unaltered range of VA/Q in microG, despite more homogeneous distributions of both ventilation and perfusion.

  20. TESTING OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES IN CENTRAL OHIO HOUSES: PHASE 2 (WINTER 1988-1989)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests of developmental indoor radon reduction techniques in nine slab-on-grade and four crawl-space houses near Dayton. Ohio. he slab-on-grade tests indicated that, when there is a good layer of aggregate under the slab, the sub-slab ventilation (SSV) ...

  1. 43 CFR 11.64 - Injury determination phase-testing and sampling methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... “National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Source Test and Analytical Methods,” 40 CFR 61.14... respiration shall be tested by measuring uptake of oxygen or release of carbon dioxide by bacterial, fungal... growth, root elongation, plant uptake, or soil-core microcosms. (7) Injury to mineral resources shall...

  2. Test of charge injection device, phase 1. [prospective star tracker application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradinger, A.; Sayles, M. B.; Peters, D.; Buckley, P.

    1981-01-01

    A computer-controlled automatic facility containing two interactive microprocessors, peripherals, and an optical bench was used to obtain device characteristics for use in evaluating CID's as the sensor element in a prospective star tracker application. Each of the ST-256 chips tested contains a 256 x 256 pixel element array with 65536 picture elements. Two ST-256 devices were tested at 20 C under light levels of 10%, 0.1%, and 0.01% saturation, and in darkness. The saturation level was established at 0.95 microwatts sq cm as measured by the radiometeric sensor. Two test runs under each condition were performed for each chip. Two complete sets of data for each of the devices were thus obtained. A separate data field was used to store the results of each test condition. Repetitive runs of a test condition were stored sequentially in the same file. Examination of the data using print-outs is shown in examples.

  3. Electric Vehicle Communications Standards Testing and Validation - Phase II: SAE J2931/1

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Richard M.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2013-01-15

    Vehicle to grid communication standards enable interoperability among vehicles, charging stations and utility providers and provide the capability to implement charge management. Several standards initiatives by the Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE), International Standards Organization and International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC), and ZigBee/HomePlug Alliance are developing requirements for communication messages and protocols. Recent work by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with SAE and automobile manufacturers has identified vehicle to grid communication performance requirements and developed a test plan as part of SAE J2931/1 committee work. This laboratory test plan was approved by the SAE J2931/1 committee and included test configurations, test methods, and performance requirements to verify reliability, robustness, repeatability, maximum communication distance, and authentication features of power line carrier (PLC) communication modules at the internet protocol layer level. The goal of the testing effort was to select a communication technology that would enable automobile manufacturers to begin the development and implementation process. The EPRI/Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) testing teams divided the testing so that results for each test could be presented by two teams, performing the tests independently. The PNNL team performed narrowband PLC testing including the Texas Instruments (TI) Concerto, Ariane Controls AC-CPM1, and the MAXIM Tahoe 2 evaluation boards. The scope of testing was limited to measuring the vendor systems communication performance between Electric Vehicle Support Equipment (EVSE) and plug-in electric vehicles (PEV). The testing scope did not address PEV’s CAN bus to PLC or PLC to EVSE (Wi-Fi, cellular, PLC Mains, etc.) communication integration. In particular, no evaluation was performed to delineate the effort needed to translate the IPv6

  4. Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) System Integration Project, Phase 2. Topical report for test circuit operation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The objective of the task (Task 6) covered in this document was to operate the refurbished/modified test circuit of the Gravimeh Process in a continuous integrated manner to obtain the engineering and operational data necessary to assess the technical performance and reliability of the circuit. This data is critical to the development of this technology as a feasible means of producing premium clean burning fuels that meet New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Significant refurbishments and design modifications had been made to the facility (in particular to the vacuum filtration and evaporation units) during Tasks 1 and 2, followed by off-line testing (Task 3). Two weeks of continuous around-the-clock operation of the refurbished/modified MCL test circuit were performed. During the second week of testing, all sections of the plant were operated in an integrated fashion for an extended period of time, including a substantial number of hours of on-stream time for the vacuum filters and the caustic evaporation unit. A new process configuration was tested in which centrate from the acid wash train (without acid addition) was used as the water makeup for the water wash train, thus-eliminating the one remaining process waste water stream. A 9-inch centrifuge was tested at various solids loadings and at flow rates up to 400 lbs/hr of coal feed to obtain a twenty-fold scaleup factor over the MCL integrated test facility centrifuge performance data.

  5. Evaluation of RELAP5 MOD 3.1.1 code with GIRAFFE Test Facility: Phase 1, Step 2 nitrogen venting tests

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, B.D.; Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgl, U.S.

    1995-11-01

    The Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) proposed by General Electric (GE) is an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design that utilizes passive safety systems. The PCCS is a series of heat exchangers submerged in water and open to the containment. Since the containment is inerted with nitrogen during normal operation, the PCCS must condense the steam in the presence of noncondensable gases during an accident. To model the transient behavior of the SBWR with a system code, the code should properly simulate the expected phenomena. To validate the applicability of RELAP5 MOD 3.1.1, the data from three Phase 1, Step 2 nitrogen venting tests at Toshiba`s Gravity-Driven Integral Full-Height Test for Passive Heat Removal facility and RELAP5 calculations of these tests were compared. The comparison of the GIRAFFE data against the results from the RELAP5 calculations showed that it can predict condensation and gas purging phenomena occurring in the long-term decay heat rejection phase. In this phase of the transient, condensation in the PCCS is the only means to reject heat from the SBWR containment. In the two tests where the nitrogen purge vent line was at its deepest submergence in the Suppression Pool (SIP), the RELAP5 results mirrored the behavior of the containment pressures and of the water levels in the Horizontal Vent (HV) and the nitrogen purge line tube of the GIRAFFE data. However, in the test with the shallowest purge line submergence, there was appreciable direct contact condensation on the pool surface of the HV despite modeling efforts to deter these phenomena. This surface condensation, unobserved in the GIRAFFE tests, was a major cause of RELAP5 predicting early containment depressurization and the subsequent early rise in HV and nitrogen purge line water levels. The present RELAP5 MOD3.1.1 interfacial heat and mass transfer model does not properly degrade direct contact steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases sitting on a pool.

  6. Solar power satellite system definition study. Volume 4: Silicon solar cell annealing test, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, F.

    1979-01-01

    Laser annealing tests were conducted on ten 50 micron cells. Two were control cells that were not irradiated. These showed no loss in output due to exposure to the laser. Two cells were broken in handling. Six cells were successfully tested. All cells tested without breakage showed some recovery. One cell was subjected to two cycles and showed recovery on both cycles. Cells that were moderately degraded appeared to recover more completely than those more severly degraded. Exposure times ranged from two to ten seconds at 500 degrees centigrade. There was some indication that longer exposure was beneficial.

  7. Mechanism of mark deformation in phase-change media tested in an accelerated environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotsune, Akemi; Terao, Motoyasu; Miyauchi, Yasushi; Tokushuku, Nobuhiro; Tamura, Reiji

    2007-04-01

    Increased jitter caused by recording marks becoming deformed in an accelerated environmental test was investigated and a model where the change in the speed of crystallization is affected by passive oxidation on the amorphous surface of the recording layer was devised. The model clarified the mechanism by which deformation in the marks caused increased jitter in the accelerated environmental test. Adding nitrogen into the gas when sputtering the protective layer adjacent to the recording film was investigated. It was confirmed that a prototype disk with this protective layer has decreased jitter after a 500 h accelerated test and superior power margins.

  8. A test of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation. [for phase transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation is evaluated for the special case of two-dimensional crystallization. The volume fraction transformed is determined directly by computer modeling, and the evaluation of the secondary phase obtained is compared with predictions of the JMA equation. The JMA equation if found to be highly acccurate over virtually the entire range of the transformation process.

  9. Nondestructive testing of rocket engine injector panel using ultrasonic burst phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zhang, Cunlin; Wu, Naiming; Zeng, Zhi; Xing, Chunfei; Li, Yue; Zhao, Shibin; Ning, Tao

    2010-10-01

    As the key parts of the liquid rocket oxyhydrogen engine, the injector panel is a kind of transpiration material, which is braided and Sintered with stainless steel wire. If some hidden delaminition defects that are difficult to detect appear in the process of Sintering and rolling, a significant safety problem would occur. In this paper, we use the Ultrasonic Burst Phase Thermography (UBP) to detect the delamination defects in the injector panel, UBP is a rapid and reliable nondestructive technique derived from Ultrasonic Lock-in Thermography(ULT). It uses a controllable, adjustable ultrasonic burst as the heat source to stimulate the sample, the defects within the material are revealed through their heat generation caused by friction, clapping and thermoelastic effect, as the resulting surface temperature distribution is observed by an infrared camera. The original thermal images sequence is processed by Fast Fourier Transformation to obtain the phase information of the defects. In the experiments of the delamination sample, the UBP realized the selective heating of delamination defects in the injector panel, and the signal to noise of phase image is higher than the original thermal image because the phase information can not be disturbed by the initial conditions (such as the reflective surface of sample). However, the result of the detection of flat bottom hole transpiration panel sample reflects that UBP is not appropriate for the detection of this kind of defects, because it is difficult to induce frictional heating of flat bottom holes. As contrast, Flash Pulse Thermography is used to detect the flat bottom holes, all of the holes of different depth and sizes can be seen distinctly. The results show that PT is more appropriate for the detection of flat bottom holes defects than UBP, therefore, it is important to select the appropriate excitation method according to different defects.

  10. Test of finite temperature random-phase approximation on a Lipkin model

    SciTech Connect

    Hagino, K.; Minato, F.

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the applicability of the finite temperature random phase approximation (RPA) using a solvable Lipkin model. We show that the finite temperature RPA reproduces reasonably well the temperature dependence of total strength, both for the positive energy (i.e., the excitation) and the negative energy (i.e., the de-excitation) parts. This is the case even at very low temperatures, which may be relevant to astrophysical purposes.

  11. IQ testing

    MedlinePlus

    Many IQ tests are used today. Whether they measure actual intelligence or simply certain abilities is controversial. IQ tests measure a specific functioning ability and may not accurately ... any intelligence test may be culturally biased. The more widely ...

  12. IQ testing

    MedlinePlus

    IQ (intelligence quotient) testing is a series of exams used to determine your general intelligence in relation ... Many IQ tests are used today. Whether they measure actual intelligence or simply certain abilities is controversial. IQ tests ...

  13. Space shuttle phase B wind tunnel model and test information. Volume 3: Launch configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glynn, J. L.; Poucher, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Archived wind tunnel data are available for flyback booster or other alternative recoverable configurations as well as reusable orbiters studied during initial development (Phase B) of the Space Shuttle. Considerable wind tunnel data was acquired by the competing contractors and the NASA Centers for an extensive variety of configurations with an array of wing and body planforms. All contractor and NASA wind tunnel data acquired in the Phase B development have been compiled into a data base and are available for application to current winged flyback or recoverable booster aerodynamic studies. The Space Shuttle Phase B Wind Tunnel Database is structured by vehicle component and configuration type. Basic components include booster, orbiter and launch vehicle. Booster configuration types include straight and delta wings, canard, cylindrical, retroglide and twin body. Orbital configuration types include straight and delta wings, lifting body, drop tanks and double delta wings. This is Volume 3 (Part 2) of the report -- Launch Configuration -- which includes booster and orbiter components in various stacked and tandem combinations.

  14. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide Generated Using the HB-Line Phase IIFlowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, J

    2003-08-29

    The hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas generation rate for neptunium dioxide (NpO{sub 2}) samples produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet has been measured following exposure to 75% relative humidity (RH). As expected, the observed H{sub 2} generation rates for these samples increase with increasing moisture content. A maximum H{sub 2} generation rate of 1.8 x 10{sup -6} moles per day per kilogram (mol {center_dot} day{sup -1} kg{sup -1}) was observed for NpO{sub 2} samples with approximately one and one-half times (1 1/2 X) the expected specific surface area (SSA) for the HB-Line Phase II product. The SSA of NpO{sub 2} samples calcined at 650 C is similar to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) calcined at 950 C according to the Department of Energy (DOE) standard for packaging and storage of PuO{sub 2}. This low SSA of the HB-Line Phase II product limits moisture uptake to less than 0.2 weight percent (wt %) even with extended exposure to 75% RH.

  15. The Actual Apollo 13 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The actual Apollo 13 lunar landing mission prime crew from left to right are: Commander, James A. Lovell Jr., Command Module pilot, John L. Swigert Jr.and Lunar Module pilot, Fred W. Haise Jr. The original Command Module pilot for this mission was Thomas 'Ken' Mattingly Jr. but due to exposure to German measles he was replaced by his backup, Command Module pilot, John L. 'Jack' Swigert Jr.

  16. 43 CFR 11.64 - Injury determination phase-testing and sampling methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... “National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Source Test and Analytical Methods,” 40 CFR 61.14... growth, root elongation, plant uptake, or soil-core microcosms. (7) Injury to mineral resources shall...

  17. Phase I and II Results from Sr and TRU Precipitation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.

    2000-07-27

    The BNFL removal processes for strontium and transuranic components from the AN-102 and AN-107 supernate originally proposed are co-precipitation methods. In initial testing, the precipitates formed during the strontium and ferric nitrate additions were not filterable.

  18. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, materials, tooling, manufacturing processes, quality control, test procedures, and results associated with the fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components exhibiting a near zero coefficient of thermal expansion are described. Analytical methods were utilized, with the aid of a computer program, to define the most efficient laminate configurations in terms of thermal behavior and structural requirements. This was followed by an extensive material characterization and selection program, conducted for several graphite/graphite/hybrid laminate systems to obtain experimental data in support of the analytical predictions. Mechanical property tests as well as the coefficient of thermal expansion tests were run on each laminate under study, the results of which were used as the selection criteria for the single most promising laminate. Further coefficient of thermal expansion measurement was successfully performed on three subcomponent tubes utilizing the selected laminate.

  19. Task 12 data dump (phase 2) OME integrated thrust chamber test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.; Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics and performance of the orbit maneuvering engine for the space shuttle are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the regeneratively cooled thrust chamber of the engine. Tests were conducted to determine engine operating parameters during the start, shutdown, and restart. Characteristics of the integrated thrust chamber and the performance and thermal conditions for blowdown operation without supplementary boundary layer cooling were investigated. The results of the test program are presented.

  20. Aquifer Testing Recommendations for Supporting Phase II of the T Area Technetium-99 Data Objectives Process

    SciTech Connect

    Spane, Frank A.

    2008-04-02

    Aquifer characterization needs are currently being assessed to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies within the 200-ZP-1 operable unit, specifically for the immediate area of the 241-T Tank Farm. This report provides a general discussion of the six identified hydrologic test methods for possible subsequent characterization within the 241-T Tank Farm area and details for implementing the large-scale recovery test after terminating pumping at the 241-Tank Farm extraction well locations.

  1. Final phase testing and evaluation of the 500 kW direct contact pilot plant at East Mesa

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, R.; Oshmyansky, S.; Nichols, K.; Werner, D.

    1983-12-01

    The testing performed during the last phase of the geothermal direct contact heat exchanger program utilizing the 500 kW pilot plant provided more insight into the capabilities and limits of the direct contact approach and showed that more work needs to be done to understand the inner workings of a large direct contact heat exchanger if they are to be modeled analytically. Testing of the column demonstrated that the performance was excellent and that the sizing criteria is conservative. The system operated smoothly and was readily controlled over a wide range of operating conditions. Performance evaluation showed pinch differentials of 4/sup 0/F or less and better than predicted heat transfer capability. Testing during this final phase was directed towards establishing the limits of the column to transfer heat. The working column height was shortened progressively to approximately 16 feet from a design length of 28 feet. The short column performed as well as a full length column and there are indications that the column could have been shortened even more without affecting its ability to transfer heat. The column's ability to perform as well with shortened lengths indicates that the heat transfer coefficients and criteria derived from the small scale tests are very conservative.

  2. Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth; Capps, Gary J; Siekmann, Adam

    2011-05-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

  3. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research: Phase II- Volume III-Truss Braced Wing Aeroelastic Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Allen, Timothy J.; Droney, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This Test Report summarizes the Truss Braced Wing (TBW) Aeroelastic Test (Task 3.1) work accomplished by the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team, which includes the time period of February 2012 through June 2014. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Virginia Tech, and NextGen Aeronautics. The model was fabricated by NextGen Aeronautics and designed to meet dynamically scaled requirements from the sized full scale TBW FEM. The test of the dynamically scaled SUGAR TBW half model was broken up into open loop testing in December 2013 and closed loop testing from January 2014 to April 2014. Results showed the flutter mechanism to primarily be a coalescence of 2nd bending mode and 1st torsion mode around 10 Hz, as predicted by analysis. Results also showed significant change in flutter speed as angle of attack was varied. This nonlinear behavior can be explained by including preload and large displacement changes to the structural stiffness and mass matrices in the flutter analysis. Control laws derived from both test system ID and FEM19 state space models were successful in suppressing flutter. The control laws were robust and suppressed flutter for a variety of Mach, dynamic pressures, and angle of attacks investigated.

  4. Revised Phase II Plan for the National Education Practice File Development Project Including: Creation; Pilot Testing; and Evaluation of a Test Practice File. Product 1.7/1.8 (Product 1.6 Appended).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Gregory, Jr.; And Others

    A detailed work plan is presented for the conduct of Phase II activities, which are concerned with creating a pilot test file, conducting a test of it, evaluating the process and input of the file, and preparing the file management plan. Due to the outcomes of activities in Phase I, this plan was revised from an earlier outline. Included in the…

  5. Development of a pseudo phased array technique using EMATs for DM weld testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, Adam C. Fisher, Jay L.; Shiokawa, Nobuyuki; Hamano, Toshiaki; Horikoshi, Ryoichi; Ido, Nobukazu

    2015-03-31

    Ultrasonic inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in piping with cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) has been an area ongoing research for many years given its prevalence in the petrochemical and nuclear industries. A typical inspection strategy for pipe welds is to use an ultrasonic phased array system to scan the weld from a sensor located on the outer surface of the pipe. These inspection systems generally refract either longitudinal or shear vertical (SV) waves at varying angles to inspect the weld radially. In DM welds, however, the welding process can produce a columnar grain structure in the CASS material in a specific orientation. This columnar grain structure can skew ultrasonic waves away from their intended path, especially for SV and longitudinal wave modes. Studies have shown that inspection using the shear horizontal (SH) wave mode significantly reduces the effect of skewing. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) are known to be effective for producing SH waves in field settings. This paper presents an inspection strategy that seeks to reproduce the scanning and imaging capabilities of a commercial phase array system using EMATs. A custom-built EMAT was used to collect data at multiple propagation angles, and a processing strategy known as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) was used to combine the data to produce an image. Results are shown using this pseudo phased array technique to inspect samples with a DM weld and artificial defects, demonstrating the potential of this approach in a laboratory setting. Recommendations for future work to transition the technique to the field are also provided.

  6. Development of a pseudo phased array technique using EMATs for DM weld testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Adam C.; Fisher, Jay L.; Shiokawa, Nobuyuki; Hamano, Toshiaki; Horikoshi, Ryoichi; Ido, Nobukazu

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in piping with cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) has been an area ongoing research for many years given its prevalence in the petrochemical and nuclear industries. A typical inspection strategy for pipe welds is to use an ultrasonic phased array system to scan the weld from a sensor located on the outer surface of the pipe. These inspection systems generally refract either longitudinal or shear vertical (SV) waves at varying angles to inspect the weld radially. In DM welds, however, the welding process can produce a columnar grain structure in the CASS material in a specific orientation. This columnar grain structure can skew ultrasonic waves away from their intended path, especially for SV and longitudinal wave modes. Studies have shown that inspection using the shear horizontal (SH) wave mode significantly reduces the effect of skewing. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) are known to be effective for producing SH waves in field settings. This paper presents an inspection strategy that seeks to reproduce the scanning and imaging capabilities of a commercial phase array system using EMATs. A custom-built EMAT was used to collect data at multiple propagation angles, and a processing strategy known as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) was used to combine the data to produce an image. Results are shown using this pseudo phased array technique to inspect samples with a DM weld and artificial defects, demonstrating the potential of this approach in a laboratory setting. Recommendations for future work to transition the technique to the field are also provided.

  7. Evaluation of an Extended Autocorrelation Phase Estimator for Ultrasonic Velocity Profiles Using Nondestructive Testing Systems.

    PubMed

    Ofuchi, César Yutaka; Coutinho, Fabio Rizental; Neves, Flávio; de Arruda, Lucia Valéria Ramos; Morales, Rigoberto Eleazar Melgarejo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the extended autocorrelation velocity estimator is evaluated and compared using a nondestructive ultrasonic device. For this purpose, three velocity estimators are evaluated and compared. The autocorrelation method (ACM) is the most used and well established in current ultrasonic velocity profiler technology, however, the technique suffers with phase aliasing (also known as the Nyquist limit) at higher velocities. The cross-correlation method (CCM) is also well known and does not suffer with phase aliasing as it relies on time shift measurements between emissions. The problem of this method is the large computational burden due to several required mathematical operations. Recently, an extended autocorrelation method (EAM) which combines both ACM and CCM was developed. The technique is not well known within the fluid engineering community, but it can measure velocities beyond the Nyquist limit without the ACM phase aliasing issues and with a lower computational cost than CCM. In this work, all three velocity estimation methods are used to measure a uniform flow of the liquid inside a controlled rotating cylinder. The root-mean-square deviation variation coefficient (CVRMSD) of the velocity estimate and the reference cylinder velocity was used to evaluate the three different methods. Results show that EAM correctly measures velocities below the Nyquist limit with less than 2% CVRMSD. Velocities beyond the Nyquist limit are only measured well by EAM and CCM, with the advantage of the former of being computationally 15 times faster. Furthermore, the maximum value of measurable velocity is also investigated considering the number of times the velocity surpasses the Nyquist limit. The combination of number of pulses and number of samples, which highly affects the results, are also studied in this work. Velocities up to six times the Nyquist limit could be measurable with CCM and EAM using a set of parameters as suggested in this work. The results validate

  8. Injury Potential Testing of Suited Occupants During Dynamic Spacecraft Flight Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Constellation Program, a space-suit architecture was envisioned for support of Launch, Entry, Abort, Micro-g EVA, Post Landing crew operations, and under emergency conditions, survival. This space suit architecture is unique in comparison to previous launch, entry, and abort (LEA) suit architectures in that it utilized rigid mobility elements in the scye and the upper arm regions. The suit architecture also employed rigid thigh disconnect elements to allow for quick disconnect functionality above the knee which allowed for commonality of the lower portion of the suit across two suit configurations. This suit architecture was designed to interface with the Orion seat subsystem, which includes seat components, lateral supports, and restraints. Due to this unique configuration of spacesuit mobility elements, combined with the need to provide occupant protection during dynamic landing events, risks were identified with potential injury due to the suit characteristics described above. To address the risk concerns, a test series was developed to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of these potential issues. Testing included use of Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs), Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS), and representative seat/suit hardware in combination with high linear acceleration events. The ensuing treatment focuses o detailed results of the testing that has ben conducted under this test series thus far.

  9. Injury Potential Testing of Suited Occupants During Dynamic Spacecraft Flight Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane M.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the NASA Constellation Program, a space-suit architecture was envisioned for support of Launch, Entry, Abort, Micro-g EVA, Post Landing crew operations, and under emergency conditions, survival. This space suit architecture is unique in comparison to previous launch, entry, and abort (LEA) suit architectures in that it utilized rigid mobility elements in the scye and the upper arm regions. The suit architecture also employed rigid thigh disconnect elements to allow for quick disconnect functionality above the knee which allowed for commonality of the lower portion of the suit across two suit configurations. This suit architecture was designed to interface with the Orion seat subsystem, which includes seat components, lateral supports, and restraints. Due to this unique configuration of spacesuit mobility elements, combined with the need to provide occupant protection during dynamic landing events, risks were identified with potential injury due to the suit characteristics described above. To address the risk concerns, a test series was developed to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of these potential issues. Testing included use of Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs), Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS), and representative seat/suit hardware in combination with high linear acceleration events. The ensuing treatment focuses on detailed results of the testing that has been conducted under this test series thus far.

  10. Phase I Field Test Results of an Innovative DNAPL Remediation Technology: The Hydrophobic Lance

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-01-28

    An innovative technology for recovery of pure phase DNAPL was deployed in the subsurface near the M-Area Settling Basin, continuing the support of the A/M Area Ground Water Corrective Action Program (per Part B requirements). This technology, the Hydrophobic Lance, operates by placing a neutral/hydrophobic surface (Teflon) in contact with the DNAPL. This changes the in situ conditions experienced by the DNAPL, allowing it to selectively drain into a sump from which it can be pumped. Collection of even small amounts of DNAPL can save years of pump-and-treat operation because of the generally low solubility of DNAPL components.

  11. Simulation and testing of a vertical organometallic vapor phase epitaxy reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, R. A.; Barmawi, M.; Mindara, J. Y.

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to design a single wafer vertical organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) reactor which gives a uniform deposition around the symmetry axis. The vertical reactor under the consideration consist of a diffuser and a system of coaxial cylinders to laminarize the flow which may lead to a uniform deposition without rotating the susceptor. The simulation shows that for a susceptor with a radius of 2.5 cm, a uniformity can be achieved in a region of a radius of 2 cm within 1% for certain operating condition. The result is compared with the experimental measurement of TiO2 deposition from TTIP.

  12. Null test fourier domain alignment technique for phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth Alan

    2000-01-01

    Alignment technique for calibrating a phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer involves three independent steps where the first two steps independently align the image points and pinholes in rotation and separation to a fixed reference coordinate system, e.g, CCD. Once the two sub-elements have been properly aligned to the reference in two parameters (separation and orientation), the third step is to align the two sub-element coordinate systems to each other in the two remaining parameters (x,y) using standard methods of locating the pinholes relative to some easy to find reference point.

  13. Coupled Analysis of Change in Fracture Permeability during the Cooling Phase of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Tsang, Y.W.; Min, K.B.; Elsworth, D.

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents results from a coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical analysis of thermally-induced permeability changes during heating and cooling of fractured volcanic rock at the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The analysis extends the previous analysis of the four-year heating phase to include newly available data from the subsequent four year cooling phase. The new analysis of the cooling phase shows that the measured changes in fracture permeability follows that of a thermo-hydro-elastic model on average, but at several locations the measured permeability indicates (inelastic) irreversible behavior. At the end of the cooling phase, the air-permeability had decreased at some locations (to as low as 0.2 of initial), whereas it had increased at other locations (to as high as 1.8 of initial). Our analysis shows that such irreversible changes in fracture permeability are consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). These data are important for bounding model predictions of potential thermally-induced changes in rock-mass permeability at a future repository at Yucca Mountain.

  14. Enertech 2-kW high-reliability wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J A; Johnson, B A

    1981-06-01

    A high-reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW in a 9 m/s wind has been developed. Activities are summarized that are centered on the fabrication and testing of prototypes of the wind machine. The test results verified that the wind machine met the power output specification and that the variable-pitch rotor effectively controlled the rotor speed for wind speeds up to 50 mph. Three prototypes of the wind machine were shipped to the Rocky Flats test center in September through November of 1979. Work was also performed to reduce the start-up wind speed. The start-up wind speed to the Enertech facility has been reduced to 4.5 m/s.

  15. Near-term electric test vehicle ETV-2. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    A unique battery-powered passenger vehicle has been developed that provides a significant improvement over conventional electric vehicle performance, particularly during stop-and-go driving. The vehicle is unique in two major respects: (1) the power system incorporates a flywheel that stores energy during regenerative braking and makes possible the acceleration capability needed to keep up with traffic without reducing range to unacceptable values; and (2) lightweight plastic materials are used for the vehicle unibody to minimize weight and increase range. These features were analyzed and demonstrated in an electric test vehicle, ETV-2. Characteristics of this vehicle are summarized. Information is presented on: vehicle design, fabrication, safety testing, and performance testing; power system design and operation; flywheel; battery pack performance; and controls and electronic equipment. (LCL)

  16. Hypersonic research engine project. Phase 2: Some combustor test results of NASA aerothermodynamic integration model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Y. H.; Gaede, A. E.; Sainio, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Combustor test results of the NASA Aerothermodynamic Integration Model are presented of a ramjet engine developed for operation between Mach 3 and 8. Ground-based and flight experiments which provide the data required to advance the technology of hypersonic air-breathing propulsion systems as well as to evaluate facility and testing techniques are described. The engine was tested with synthetic air at Mach 5, 6, and 7. The hydrogen fuel was heated to 1500 R prior to injection to simulate a regeneratively cooled system. Combustor efficiencies up to 95 percent at Mach 6 were achieved. Combustor process in terms of effectiveness, pressure integral factor, total pressure recovery and Crocco's pressure-area relationship are presented and discussed. Interactions between inlet-combustor, combustor stages, combustor-nozzle, and the effects of altitude, combustor step, and struts are observed and analyzed.

  17. Ice Growth Measurements from Image Data to Support Ice Crystal and Mixed-Phase Accretion Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Lynch, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the imaging techniques as well as the analysis methods used to measure the ice thickness and growth rate in support of ice-crystal icing tests performed at the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac). A detailed description of the camera setup, which involves both still and video cameras, as well as the analysis methods using the NASA Spotlight software, are presented. Two cases, one from two different test entries, showing significant ice growth are analyzed in detail describing the ice thickness and growth rate which is generally linear. Estimates of the bias uncertainty are presented for all measurements. Finally some of the challenges related to the imaging and analysis methods are discussed as well as methods used to overcome them.

  18. Road load simulator tests of the Gould phase 1 functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gourash, F.

    1984-01-01

    The test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator are presented. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  19. Road load simulator tests of the Gould phase 1 functional model silicon controlled rectifier ac motor controller for electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourash, F.

    1984-02-01

    The test results for a functional model ac motor controller for electric vehicles and a three-phase induction motor which were dynamically tested on the Lewis Research Center road load simulator are presented. Results show that the controller has the capability to meet the SAE-J227a D cycle test schedule and to accelerate a 1576-kg (3456-lb) simulated vehicle to a cruise speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). Combined motor controller efficiency is 72 percent and the power inverter efficiency alone is 89 percent for the cruise region of the D cycle. Steady state test results for motoring, regeneration, and thermal data obtained by operating the simulator as a conventional dynamometer are in agreement with the contractor's previously reported data. The regeneration test results indicate that a reduction in energy requirements for urban driving cycles is attainable with regenerative braking. Test results and data in this report serve as a data base for further development of ac motor controllers and propulsion systems for electric vehicles. The controller uses state-of-the-art silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) power semiconductors and microprocessor-based logic and control circuitry. The controller was developed by Gould Laboratories under a Lewis contract for the Department of Energy's Electric and Hybrid Vehicle program.

  20. Uniform engine testing program phase 7: NASA Lewis Research Center second entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, T. J.; Burkardt, L. A.; Abdelwahab, M.; Braithwaite, W. M.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Silver, D.

    1986-01-01

    The propulsion and Energetics Panel, Working Group 15, of the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) is sponsoring a Uniform Engine Testing Program (UETP). In this program, two jet engines were tested under identical conditions in certain NATO altitude and ground-level facilities as a means of correlating these facilities. With this second entry, NASA documented engine deterioration that may have occurred since inception of the UETP. Additionally, NASA investigated anomalies discovered during review of data from the five facilities which had participated in the program between the two NASA entries.

  1. Thermal-Hydraulic Mockup Tests with Two-Phase Thermosyphon for Cold Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Chan, Y.K.; Lee, D.J.; Chang, C.J.; Hong, W.T.

    2002-07-01

    The improvement and utilization promotion project of the Taiwan Research Reactor (TRR-II) is carrying out at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER). The Cold Neutron Source (CNS) with a two-phase thermosyphon will be installed in the heavy water reactor of TRR-II. The hydrogen cold loop of TRR-II CNS consists of a cylindrical moderator cell, a single transfer tube, and a condenser. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a two-phase thermosyphon are investigated against the variations of mass inventory, tube geometry and heat loads. The thermal-hydraulic experiments have been performed using a full-scale mockup loop and a Freon-11 as a working fluid. The scaling approach is that the mass-fluxes of the liquid and the vapor in the Wallis correlation are identical between hydrogen and Freon-11. So, the same density ratio and a scaling heat load are applied to the loop. The flooding limitations as a function of initial Freon-11 inventory, transfer tube diameter, transfer tube geometry, and heat loads are presented. (authors)

  2. Tung FDG Test Facility. Phase 2, Pilot plant demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Tung FGD Process is a regenerative process which extracts SO{sub 2} from a scrubbing liquor into an organic medium using mixer-settlers followed by steam-stripping the SO{sub 2} off from the organic medium. For the process to operate satisfactorily, (1) the organic must be stable, (2) phase separation must be relatively fast, (3) crud (i.e. solids in-between two phases) must not form and (4) SO{sub 2} must be able to be stripped off from the organic medium readily. The demonstration confirmed that the first three conditions can be met satisfactorily. Much lower stripping efficiency was attained in the pilot plant demonstration than what was previously attained in a bench-scale demonstration. Engineering analysis showed that the pilot plant stripping column was scaled up from the bench-scale column incorrectly. A new scale-up criterion for stripping a relatively viscous liquid medium is proposed based upon pilot plant data.

  3. First-order quantum phase transitions: Test ground for emergent chaoticity, regularity and persisting symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, M. Leviatan, A.

    2014-12-15

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the emerging order and chaos and enduring symmetries, accompanying a generic (high-barrier) first-order quantum phase transition (QPT). The interacting boson model Hamiltonian employed, describes a QPT between spherical and deformed shapes, associated with its U(5) and SU(3) dynamical symmetry limits. A classical analysis of the intrinsic dynamics reveals a rich but simply-divided phase space structure with a Hénon–Heiles type of chaotic dynamics ascribed to the spherical minimum and a robustly regular dynamics ascribed to the deformed minimum. The simple pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics persists in the coexistence region and traces the crossing of the two minima in the Landau potential. A quantum analysis discloses a number of regular low-energy U(5)-like multiplets in the spherical region, and regular SU(3)-like rotational bands extending to high energies and angular momenta, in the deformed region. These two kinds of regular subsets of states retain their identity amidst a complicated environment of other states and both occur in the coexistence region. A symmetry analysis of their wave functions shows that they are associated with partial U(5) dynamical symmetry (PDS) and SU(3) quasi-dynamical symmetry (QDS), respectively. The pattern of mixed but well-separated dynamics and the PDS or QDS characterization of the remaining regularity, appear to be robust throughout the QPT. Effects of kinetic collective rotational terms, which may disrupt this simple pattern, are considered.

  4. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Subsonic jets are relatively simple. The peak noise source location gradually moves upstream toward the nozzle as frequency increases. 2) Supersonic jets are more complicated. The peak noise source location moves downstream as frequency increases through a BBSN hump. 3) In both subsonic and supersonic jets the peak noise source location corresponding to a given frequency of noise moves downstream as jet Mach number increases. 4) The noise generated at a given frequency in a BBSN hump is generated by a small number of shocks, not from all the shocks at the same time. 5) Single microphone spectrum levels decrease when the noise source locations measured with the phased array are blocked by a shielding surface. This consistency validates the phased array data and the stationary monopole source model used to process it. 6) Reflecting surface data illustrate that the law of reflection must be satisfied for noise to reflect off a surface toward an observer. Depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface and the observer only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement. 7) The low frequency noise created when a jet flow impinges on a surface comes primarily from the trailing edge regardless of the axial extent impacted by the flow.

  5. Bilingual Education Instructional and Training Materials. Field Test Results and Final Phase II Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahone, Alicia

    The report describes a federally funded project for the development of an innovative approach to bilingual curriculum and instruction and inservice teacher training. A needs assessment and research process resulted in development and field testing of a set of bilingual Spanish-English instructional materials for limited-English-speaking urban…

  6. Test driving ToxCast: endocrine profiling for1858 chemicals included in phase II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Identifying chemicals to test for potential endocrine disruption beyond those already implicated in the peer-reviewed literature is a challenge. This review is intended to help by summarizing findings from the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) ToxCast™ high th...

  7. Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI: Wind Tunnel Test Configurations and Available Data Campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, M. M.; Simms, D. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Jager, D. W.; Cotrell, J. R.; Schreck, S.; Larwood, S. M.

    2001-12-01

    The primary objective of the insteady aerodynamics experiment was to provide information needed to quantify the full-scale, three-dimensional aerodynamic behavior of horizontal-axis wind turbines. This report is intended to familiarize the user with the entire scope of the wind tunnel test and to support the use of the resulting data.

  8. Second generation PFBC systems research and development: Phase 2, Topping combustor testing at UTSI

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, N.R.; Foote, J.P.

    1992-12-01

    This report describes a second generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant. The topping combustor testing is briefly described. The topping combustor burns low BTU gas produced from substoichiometric combustion of coal in a pressurized carbonizer. Char produced is burned in a PFBC.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT: SOURCE TEST AND EVALUATION REPORT - LURGI (KOSOVO) MEDIUM-BTU GASIFICATION, PHASE 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes an ongoing test program involving a commercial medium-Btu Lurgi coal gasification plant in the Kosovo region of Yugoslavia. The environmental data acquisition program is sponsored by the U.S. EPA and the government of Yugoslavia. The objective of the program...

  10. Electric Vehicle Communication Standards Testing and Validation Phase I: SAE J2847/1

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Richard M.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2011-09-21

    Executive Summary Vehicle to grid communication standards are critical to the charge management and interoperability among vehicles, charging stations and utility providers. Several standards initiatives by the Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE), International Standards Organization and International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC), and ZigBee / HomePlug Alliance are developing requirements for communication messages and protocols. While the standard development is in progress for more than two years, no definitive guidelines are available for the automobile manufacturers, charging station manufacturers and utility backhaul network systems. At present, there is a wide range of proprietary communication options developed and supported in the industry. Recent work by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with SAE and automobile manufacturers has identified performance requirements and test plan based on possible communication pathways using power line communication over the control pilot and mains. Though the communication pathways and power line communication technology options are identified, much work needs to be done in developing application software and testing of communication modules before these can be deployed in production vehicles. This report presents a test plan and results from initial testing of two power line communication modules developed to meet the requirements of SAE J2847/1 standard.

  11. A High-Stakes-Test Intervention: Moon-Phase Models as Viewed from Earth and Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Julie; Castro, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Schools are under increasing pressure to meet accountability requirements and show growth in student achievement across tested content areas. As a result, throughout the school year, student achievement data are analyzed to discover data trends that highlight both student gains and gaps in learning. Achievement gaps are identified and addressed…

  12. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

    2008-06-15

    This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

  13. Analysis and Modeling of a Two-Phase Jet Pump of a Flow Boiling Test Facility for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherif, S. A.; Steadham, Justin M.

    1996-01-01

    research known to the authors apart from that of Anand (1992) which accounted for condensation shocks. One of the objectives of this research effort is to develop a comprehensive model in which the effects of phase slip and inter-phase heat transfer as well as the wall friction and shock waves are accounted for. While this modeling effort is predominantly analytical in nature and is primarily intended to provide a parametric understanding of the jet pump performance under different operating scenarios, another parallel effort employing a commercial CFD code is also implemented. The latter effort is primarily intended to model an axisymmetric counterpart of the problem in question. The viability of using the CFD code to model a two-phase flow jet pump will be assessed by attempting to recreate some of the existing performance data of similar jet pumps. The code will eventually be used to generate the jet pump performance characteristics of several scenarios involving jet pump geometries as well as flow regimes in order to be able to determine an optimum design which would be suitable for a two-phase flow boiling test facility at NASA-Marshall. Because of the extensive nature of the analytical model developed, the following section will only provide very brief highlights of it, while leaving the details to a more complete report submitted to the NASA colleague. This report will also contain some of the simulation results obtained using the CFD code.

  14. Fracture in columnar phases as a test for the presence of quasi long-range order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Matthieu; Caillé, Alain

    1997-03-01

    A mechanism has been proposed for the effective free sliding of columns in an ordered columnar liquid crystal composed of disk-like molecules(A. Caillé and M. Hébert, to appear in Phys. Rev. E - Rapid Comm. (1996)). The hexa(hexylthio)triphenylene (HHTT) compound in the ordered helical H phase is the prototype for such a behavior. This mechanism is a result of a coupling between positional and orientational degrees of freedom in the free energy and gives rise to positional quasi long-range order inside the columns. We discuss the Griffith problem for this system where a thin cavity perpendicular to the columnar axis is extended by a tensile stress σ_zz. The shape of the cavity is characteristic of the type of order present inside the columns. This fracture mode should be observable in polymerized samples.

  15. Dual phase versus TRIP strip steels: Microstructural changes as a consequence of quasi-static and dynamic tensile testing

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, S.; Jones, T.B.; Fourlaris, G. . E-mail: g.fourlaris@swan.ac.uk

    2007-04-15

    The development of present day and future vehicles is being driven by the need to simultaneously reduce mass and increase passenger and pedestrian safety. For this reason, the steel industry has developed strip steel grades with suitable properties, as required for meeting the demands placed on the automotive manufacturers. Two of these strip steel grades are the Dual Phase (DP) and the Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, which are thought to offer solutions for critical crash component criteria. Limited published information is available on the changes in microstructure of these novel strip steel grades at different rates of deformation. This paper examines the change in microstructure of a range of both commercial and experimental DP and TRIP strip steel grades, which were tensile tested at low (0.001 s{sup -1}) and very high strain rates (200 s{sup -1}). The DP and TRIP microstructures were characterised in terms of ferrite grain size, ferrite grain elongation and volume fraction of constituent phases. The specimens were examined following deformation and compared to the as-received condition to assess microstructural changes. This paper concentrates only on microstructural changes through dynamic tensile testing of DP and TRIP grades at low and high strain rates. The full crash performance data from the dynamic tensile tests and crushing of box sections is presented in a separate publication. [S. Oliver, G. Fourlaris and T.B. Jones, 'Dual Phase versus TRIP strip steels: a comparison of dynamic properties for automotive crash performance', Materials Science and Technology, 2006 (submitted for publication)].

  16. Flight- and ground-test correlation study of BMDO SDS materials: Phase 1 report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Shirley Y.; Brinza, David E.; Minton, Timothy K.; Stiegman, Albert E.; Kenny, James T.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials-3 (EOIM-3) experiment served as a test bed for a variety of materials that are candidates for Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) space assets. The materials evaluated on this flight experiment were provided by BMDO contractors and technology laboratories. A parallel ground exposure evaluation was conducted using the FAST atomic-oxygen simulation facility at Physical Sciences, Inc. The EOIM-3 materials were exposed to an atomic oxygen fluence of approximately 2.3 x 10(exp 2) atoms/sq. cm. The ground-exposed materials' fluence of 2.0 - 2.5 x 10(exp 2) atoms/sq. cm permits direct comparison of ground-exposed materials' performance with that of the flight-exposed specimens. The results from the flight test conducted aboard STS-46 and the correlative ground exposure are presented in this publication.

  17. Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell technology program, phase 2/2A. [testing and evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Test evaluations were performed on a fabricated single solid polymer electrolyte cell unit. The cell operated at increased current density and at higher performance levels. This improved performance was obtained through a combination of increased temperature, increased reactant pressures, improved activation techniques and improved thermal control over the baseline cell configuration. The cell demonstrated a higher acid content membrane which resulted in increased performance. Reduced catalyst loading and low cost membrane development showed encouraging results.

  18. Photovoltaic power system tests on an 8-kilowatt single-phase line-commutated inverter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stover, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Efficiency and power factor were measured as functions of solar array voltage and current. The effects of input shunt capacitance and series inductance were determined. Tests were conducted from 15 to 75 percent of the 8 kW rated inverter input power. Measured efficiencies ranged from 76 percent to 88 percent at about 50 percent of rated inverter input power. Power factor ranged from 36 percent to 72 percent.

  19. Program for refan JT8D engine design, fabrication and test, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, J. A.; Zimmerman, E. S.; Scaramella, V. M.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of the JT8D refan program was to design, fabricate, and test certifiable modifications of the JT8D engine which would reduce noise generated by JT8D powered aircraft. This was to be accomplished without affecting reliability and maintainability, at minimum retrofit cost, and with no performance penalty. The mechanical design, engine performance and stability characteristics at sea-level and altitude, and the engine noise characteristics of the test engines are documented. Results confirmed the structural integrity of the JT8D-109. Engine operation was stable throughout the airplane flight envelope. Fuel consumption of the test engines was higher than that required to meet the goal of no airplane performance penalty, but the causes were identified and corrected during a normal pre-certification engine development program. Compared to the baseline JT8D-109 engine, the acoustically treated JT8D-109 engine showed noise reductions of 6 PNdB at takeoff and 11 PNdB at a typical approach power setting.

  20. Multisystem corrosion monitoring in a cyclic reheat test facility: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, D.M.; Cox, W.M.; Gearey, D.

    1988-04-01

    The work described in this report was the first stage of an EPRI-sponsored corrosion investigation utilizing the CAPCIS electrochemical monitoring system installed in a cyclic reheat test facility on a flue gas slipstream at the Scholz Steam Plant of Gulf Power Company. The primary reasons for incorporating the continuous corrosion monitoring system in the cyclic reheat investigation were that unexpectedly high corrosion rates had been observed in earlier tests at certain locations within the test exchanger and the precise reasons for these high rates of attack were not well understood. The corrosion behavior was not typical of the limited service experience on full scale units and the reasons for this required clarification. Controlled temperature weight loss and electrochemical probes were installed in the unit in place of three of the 1-inch diameter heat exchanger tubes. The corrosion behavior of Inconel Alloy 625 over the temperature range 260/degree/ to 120/degree/F (127/degree/ to 49/degree/C) was evaluated at mid-stream and sidewall locations. The efects on corrosion of operational variables and cleaning procedures were also evaluated. The severe corrosion attack sustained on the Inconel Alloy 625 was proved to result from a combination of effects which included the flue gas flow pattern, local cool-spots within the unit and preferential locations at which ash deposits could accumulate. 5 refs., 50 figs., 17 tabs.