Science.gov

Sample records for actual water samples

  1. GROUND WATER SAMPLING ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and
    remedial performance monitoring objectives. Issues which must be considered prior to initiating a ground-water monitoring program include defining monitoring goals and objectives, sampling point...

  2. Developing Water Sampling Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Participants in the D-19 symposium on aquatic sampling and measurement for water pollution assessment were informed that determining the extent of waste water stream pollution is not a cut and dry procedure. Topics discussed include field sampling, representative sampling from storm sewers, suggested sampler features and application of improved…

  3. CHARACTERIZATION AND ACTUAL WASTE TEST WITH TANK 5F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. S.; Crapse, K. P.; Fink, S. D.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2007-08-30

    The initial phase of bulk waste removal operations was recently completed in Tank 5F. Video inspection of the tank indicates several mounds of sludge still remain in the tank. Additionally, a mound of white solids was observed under Riser 5. In support of chemical cleaning and heel removal programs, samples of the sludge and the mound of white solids were obtained from the tank for characterization and testing. A core sample of the sludge and Super Snapper sample of the white solids were characterized. A supernate dip sample from Tank 7F was also characterized. A portion of the sludge was used in two tank cleaning tests using oxalic acid at 50 C and 75 C. The filtered oxalic acid from the tank cleaning tests was subsequently neutralized by addition to a simulated Tank 7F supernate. Solids and liquid samples from the tank cleaning test and neutralization test were characterized. A separate report documents the results of the gas generation from the tank cleaning test using oxalic acid and Tank 5F sludge. The characterization results for the Tank 5F sludge sample (FTF-05-06-55) appear quite good with respect to the tight precision of the sample replicates, good results for the glass standards, and minimal contamination found in the blanks and glass standards. The aqua regia and sodium peroxide fusion data also show good agreement between the two dissolution methods. Iron dominates the sludge composition with other major contributors being uranium, manganese, nickel, sodium, aluminum, and silicon. The low sodium value for the sludge reflects the absence of supernate present in the sample due to the core sampler employed for obtaining the sample. The XRD and CSEM results for the Super Snapper salt sample (i.e., white solids) from Tank 5F (FTF-05-07-1) indicate the material contains hydrated sodium carbonate and bicarbonate salts along with some aluminum hydroxide. These compounds likely precipitated from the supernate in the tank. A solubility test showed the material

  4. Water Sample Concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2009-07-21

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  5. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-07-12

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  6. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-09

    .A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  7. Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-20

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

  8. Water sample filtration unit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skougstad, M.W.; Scarbro, G.F.

    1968-01-01

    A readily portable, all plastic, pressure filtration unit is described which greatly facilitates rapid micropore membrane field filtration of up to several liters of water with a minimum risk of inorganic chemical alteration or contamination of the sample. The unit accommodates standard 10.2-cm. (4-inch) diameter filters. The storage and carrying case serves as a convenient filter stand for both field and laboratory use.

  9. Considerations in sampling of water.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Sampling water is no different than sampling any other media. It starts with the development of Sample Quality Criteria, understanding of material properties, then application of the Theory of Sampling. The main difference with sampling water as opposed to solids is the material properties. This paper addresses some of the material properties and consequences of those properties for the development of the sampling protocols. Two properties that must be addressed for water are the temporal nature and the inclusion of suspended solids. Examples are provided for three specific water sampling scenarios which may have application to other water sampling scenarios.

  10. Variation in actual relationship as a consequence of Mendelian sampling and linkage

    PubMed Central

    HILL, W.G.; WEIR, B.S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Although the expected relationship or proportion of genome shared by pairs of relatives can be obtained from their pedigrees, the actual quantities deviate as a consequence of Mendelian sampling and depend on the number of chromosomes and map length. Formulae have been published previously for the variance of actual relationship for a number of specific types of relatives but no general formula for non-inbred individuals is available. We provide here a unified framework that enables the variances for distant relatives to be easily computed, showing, for example, how the variance of sharing for great grandparent–great grandchild, great uncle–great nephew, half uncle–nephew and first cousins differ, even though they have the same expected relationship. Results are extended in order to include differences in map length between sexes, no recombination in males and sex linkage. We derive the magnitude of skew in the proportion shared, showing the skew becomes increasingly large the more distant the relationship. The results obtained for variation in actual relationship apply directly to the variation in actual inbreeding as both are functions of genomic coancestry, and we show how to partition the variation in actual inbreeding between and within families. Although the variance of actual relationship falls as individuals become more distant, its coefficient of variation rises, and so, exacerbated by the skewness, it becomes increasingly difficult to distinguish different pedigree relationships from the actual fraction of the genome shared. PMID:21226974

  11. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form

  12. TESTING OF THE SPINTEK ROTARY MICROFILTER USING ACTUAL HANFORD WASTE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    HUBER HJ

    2010-04-13

    The SpinTek rotary microfilter was tested on actual Hanford tank waste. The samples were a composite of archived Tank 241-AN-105 material and a sample representing single-shell tanks (SST). Simulants of the two samples have been used in non-rad test runs at the 222-S laboratory and at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The results of these studies are compared in this report. Two different nominal pore sizes for the sintered steel rotating disk filter were chosen: 0.5 and 0.1 {micro}m. The results suggest that the 0.5-{micro}m disk is preferable for Hanford tank waste for the following reasons: (1) The filtrate clarity is within the same range (<<4 ntu for both disks); (2) The filtrate flux is in general higher for the 0.5-{micro}m disk; and (3) The 0.1-{micro}m disk showed a higher likelihood of fouling. The filtrate flux of the actual tank samples is generally in the range of 20-30% compared to the equivalent non-rad tests. The AN-105 slurries performed at about twice the filtrate flux of the SST slurries. The reason for this difference has not been identified. Particle size distributions in both cases are very similar; comparison of the chemical composition is not conclusive. The sole hint towards what material was stuck in the filter pore holes came from the analysis of the dried flakes from the surface of the fouled 0.1-{micro}m disk. A cleaning approach developed by SRNL personnel to deal with fouled disks has been found adaptable when using actual Hanford samples. The use of 1 M nitric acid improved the filtrate flux by approximately two times; using the same simulants as in the non-rad test runs showed that the filtrate flux was restored to 1/2 of its original amount.

  13. Fenton's treatment of actual agriculture runoff water containing herbicides.

    PubMed

    Sangami, Sanjeev; Manu, Basavaraju

    2017-01-01

    This research was to study the efficiency of the Fenton's treatment process for the removal of three herbicides, namely 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), ametryn and dicamba from the sugarcane field runoff water. The treatment process was designed with the Taguchi approach by varying the four factors such as H2O2/COD (1-3.5), H2O2/Fe(2+) (5-50), pH (2-5) and reaction time (30-240 min) as independent variables. Influence of these parameters on chemical oxygen demand (COD), ametryn, dicamba and 2,4-D removal efficiencies (dependent variables) were investigated by performing signal to noise ratio and other statistical analysis. The optimum conditions were found to be H2O2/COD: 2.125, H2O2/Fe(2+): 27.5, pH: 3.5 and reaction time of 135 min for removal efficiencies of 100% for ametryn, 95.42% for dicamba, 88.2% for 2,4-D and with 75% of overall COD removal efficiencies. However, the percentage contribution of H2O2/COD ratio was observed to be significant among all four independent variables and were 44.16%, 67.57%, 51.85% and 50.66% for %COD, ametryn, dicamba and 2,4-D removal efficiencies, respectively. The maximum removal of herbicides was observed with the H2O2 dosage of 5.44 mM and Fe(2+) dosage of 0.12 mM at pH 3.5.

  14. Does equilibrium passive sampling reflect actual in situ bioaccumulation of PAHs and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures in aquatic worms?

    PubMed

    Muijs, Barry; Jonker, Michiel T O

    2012-01-17

    Over the past couple of years, several analytical methods have been developed for assessing the bioavailability of environmental contaminants in sediments and soils. Comparison studies suggest that equilibrium passive sampling methods generally provide the better estimates of internal concentrations in organisms and thus of subsequent risks. However, field studies to validate the potential of passive sampling to predict actual in situ bioaccumulation are scarce and limited information only exists on selected, individual compounds. The present study investigated whether bioaccumulation of PAH and complex petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures in field-exposed aquatic worms could be predicted properly with passive samplers. To this end, in situ bioaccumulation in aquatic worms at 6 PAH-contaminated locations and 8 petroleum hydrocarbon (oil)-contaminated locations was compared with the results of in situ solid phase micro extraction (SPME) applications. For the oil-contaminated sediments, bioaccumulation was also assessed in the lab with polyoxymethylene solid phase extraction (POM-SPE). Actual PAH bioaccumulation was generally predicted within a factor of 4 with in situ SPME, using temperature-adjusted SPME fiber-water partition coefficients and lab-derived bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for the worm species used, demonstrating the method's potential under field conditions. In situ SPME appeared to be less suitable for predicting bioaccumulation of oil however, in contrast to POM-SPE in the lab, which assessed in situ oil bioaccumulation within a factor of 3, while also closely reflecting the actual distribution of oil boiling point fractions (the hydrocarbon block profile) as accumulated by the worms. All in all, the results indicated that (specific) equilibrium passive samplers, either applied in the field or the lab, have great potential for assessing bioaccumulation of environmental contaminant mixtures from field-contaminated sediments.

  15. Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Reid A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rapko, Brian M.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-06-27

    The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution.

  16. Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, L.A.; Rapko, B.M.; Poloski, A.P.; Peterson, R.A.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Southwest Washington State. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate, which can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, and boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, but is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Chromium, which makes up a much smaller amount ({approx}3%) of the sludge, must also be removed because there is a low tolerance for chromium in the HLW immobilization process. In this work, the coupled dissolution kinetics of aluminum and chromium species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford HLW samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a model that provides a basis for predicting dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. (authors)

  17. The inequality of water scarcity events: who is actually being affected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldkamp, Ted I. E.; Wada, Yoshihide; Kummu, Matti; Aerts, Jeroen C. J. H.; Ward, Philip J.

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades, changing hydro-climatic and socioeconomic conditions increased regional and global water scarcity problems. In the near future, projected changes in human water use and population growth - in combination with climate change - are expected to aggravate water scarcity conditions and its associated impacts on our society. Whilst a wide range of studies have modelled past and future regional and global patterns of change in population or land area impacted by water scarcity conditions, less attention is paid on who is actually affected and how vulnerable this share of the population is to water scarcity conditions. The actual impact of water scarcity events, however, not only depends on the numbers being affected, but merely on how sensitive this population is to water scarcity conditions, how quick and efficient governments can deal with the problems induced by water scarcity, and how many (financial and infrastructural) resources are available to cope with water scarce conditions. Only few studies have investigated the above mentioned interactions between societal composition and water scarcity conditions (e.g. by means of the social water scarcity index and the water poverty index) and, up to our knowledge, a comprehensive global analysis including different water scarcity indicators and multiple climate and socioeconomic scenarios is missing. To address this issue, we assess in this contribution the adaptive capacity of a society to water scarcity conditions, evaluate how this may be driven by different societal factors, and discuss how enhanced knowledge on this topic could be of interest for water managers in their design of adaptation strategies coping with water scarcity events. For that purpose, we couple spatial information on water scarcity conditions with different components from, among others, the Human Development Index and the Worldwide Governance Indicators, such as: the share of the population with an income below the poverty

  18. ADVANCES IN GROUND WATER SAMPLING PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and remedial performance monitoring objectives. Issues which must be considered prior to initiating a ground-water monitoring program include defining monitoring goals and objectives, sampling point...

  19. 12 CFR Appendix M3 to Part 226 - Sample Calculations of Generic Repayment Estimates and Actual Repayment Disclosures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sample Calculations of Generic Repayment Estimates and Actual Repayment Disclosures M3 Appendix M3 to Part 226 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z)...

  20. The dynamic role of root-water uptake in coupling potential to actual transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chun-Ta; Katul, Gabriel

    The relationship between actual ( Eact) and potential ( Ep) transpiration above a grass-covered forest clearing was investigated numerically and experimentally from simultaneous measurements of soil moisture content profiles, mean meteorological conditions, turbulent heat and water vapor fluxes in the atmospheric surface layer, and soil hydraulic properties for two drying periods. The relationship between Eact/ Ep was found to be approximately constant and insensitive to variability in near-surface soil moisture content. To explore this near-constant Eact/ Ep, a model that relates potential and actual transpiration and accounts for root-uptake efficiency, potential transpiration rate, and root-density distribution was proposed and field-tested. The total amount of water consumed by the root system was integrated and compared with eddy-correlation latent heat flux measurements (field scale) and total water storage changes (local scale). Model calculations suggested that the deeper and more efficient roots are primarily responsible for the total water loss within the root zone when the near-surface soil layer approaches their wilting point.

  1. Ocean Surface Water Sampling Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1963-10-01

    also parachuted, captures a volume of the water surface by a cookie cutter action and drew it into a 1-liter Thermos bottle for protection from...effective in landing upright on the water. Faster Dewar samplers without the cookie cutter action but with the same intake method proved about 95

  2. Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-13

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  3. Magnificent Ground Water Connection. [Sample Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    Water conservation and usage is an important concept in science. This document, geared specifically to New England, provides many activities for protecting and discussing ground water situations. Sample activities for grades K-6 include: (1) All the Water in the World; (2) The Case of the Disappearing Water; (3) Deep Subjects--Wells and Ground…

  4. Early detection of nonnative alleles in fish populations: When sample size actually matters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croce, Patrick Della; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Payne, Robert A.; Gresswell, Bob

    2017-01-01

    Reliable detection of nonnative alleles is crucial for the conservation of sensitive native fish populations at risk of introgression. Typically, nonnative alleles in a population are detected through the analysis of genetic markers in a sample of individuals. Here we show that common assumptions associated with such analyses yield substantial overestimates of the likelihood of detecting nonnative alleles. We present a revised equation to estimate the likelihood of detecting nonnative alleles in a population with a given level of admixture. The new equation incorporates the effects of the genotypic structure of the sampled population and shows that conventional methods overestimate the likelihood of detection, especially when nonnative or F-1 hybrid individuals are present. Under such circumstances—which are typical of early stages of introgression and therefore most important for conservation efforts—our results show that improved detection of nonnative alleles arises primarily from increasing the number of individuals sampled rather than increasing the number of genetic markers analyzed. Using the revised equation, we describe a new approach to determining the number of individuals to sample and the number of diagnostic markers to analyze when attempting to monitor the arrival of nonnative alleles in native populations.

  5. Flame spread over thick polymethylmethacrylate samples in a simulated and actual microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Tirthesh Jayesh

    The NASA Burning and Suppression of Solids-II (BASS II) experiment examines the combustion of different solid materials and material geometries in microgravity. While flames in microgravity are driven by diffusion and weak advection due to crew movements and ventilation, the current NASA spacecraft material selection test method (NASA-STD- 6001 Test 1) is driven by buoyant forces as gravity is present. The overall goal of this project is to understand the burning of intermediate and thick fuels in microgravity, and devise a normal gravity test to apply to future materials. Clear cast polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) samples 10 cm long by 1 or 2 cm wide with thicknesses ranging from 1-5 mm were investigated. PMMA is the ideal choice since it is widely used and we know its stoichiometric chemistry. Tests included both one sided and two sided burns. Samples are ignited by heating a wire behind the sample. The samples are burned in a flow duct within the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) on the International Space Station (ISS) to ensure true microgravity conditions. The experiment takes place in opposed flow with varying Oxygen concentrations and flow velocities. Flames are recorded on two cameras and later tracked to determine spread rate. Currently we are modeling combustion of PMMA using Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS 5.5.3) and Smokeview. The entire modelling for BASS-II is done in DNS mode because of the laminar conditions and small domain. In DNS mode the Navier Stokes equations are solved without the Turbulence model. The model employs the same test sample and MSG geometry as the experiment; but in 2D. The experimental data gave upstream velocity at several points using an anemometer. A flow profile for the inlet velocity is obtained using Matlab and input into the model. The flame spread rates obtained after tracking are then compared with the experimental data and the results follow the trends but the spread rates are higher.

  6. Characterization and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2008-07-10

    This report describes processing and analysis results of boehmite waste type (Group 5) and insoluble high Cr waste type (Group 6). The sample selection, compositing, subdivision, physical and chemical characterization are described. Extensive batch leach testing was conducted to define kinetics and leach factors of selected analytes as functions of NaOH concentration and temperature. Testing supports issue M-12 resolution for the Waste Treatment Plant.

  7. Soil water availability as controlling factor for actual evapotranspiration in urban soil-vegetation-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Simon; Reisdorff, Christoph; Gröngröft, Alexander; Jensen, Kai; Eschenbach, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The City of Hamburg is characterized by a large number of greens, parks and roadside trees: 600.000 trees cover about 14% of the city area, and moreover, 245.000 roadside trees can be found here. Urban vegetation is generally known to positively contribute to the urban micro-climate via cooling by evapotranspiration (ET). The water for ET is predominantly stored in the urban soils. Hence, the actual evapotranspiration (ETa) is - beside atmospheric drivers - determined by soil water availability at the soil surface and in the rooting zones of the respective vegetation. The overall aim of this study is to characterize soil water availability as a regulative factor for ETa in urban soil-vegetation systems. The specific questions addressed are: i) What is the spatio-temporal variation in soil water availability at the study sites? ii) Which soil depths are predominantly used for water uptake by the vegetation forms investigated? and iii) Which are the threshold values of soil water tension and soil water content (Θ), respectively, that limit ETa under dry conditions on both grass-dominated and tree-dominated sites? Three study areas were established in the urban region of Hamburg, Germany. We selected areas featuring both single tree stands and grass-dominated sites, both representing typical vegetation forms in Hamburg. The areas are characterized by relatively dry soil conditions. However, they differ in regard to soil water availability. At each area we selected one site dominated by Common Oak (Quercus ruber L.) with ages from 40 to 120 years, and paired each oak tree site with a neighboring grass-dominated site. All field measurements were performed during the years 2013 and 2014. At each site, we continuously measured soil water tension and Θ up to 160 cm depth, and xylem sap flux of each of three oak trees per site in a 15 min-resolution. Furthermore, we measured soil hydraulic properties as pF-curve, saturated and unsaturated conductivity at all sites

  8. Chapter A5. Processing of Water Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses methods to be used in processing water samples to be analyzed for inorganic and organic chemical substances, including the bottling of composite, pumped, and bailed samples and subsamples; sample filtration; solid-phase extraction for pesticide analyses; sample preservation; and sample handling and shipping. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http:/ /water.usgs.gov/lookup/get?newpubs.

  9. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-02-19

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  10. Chapter A4. Collection of Water Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.

    1999-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data that are used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses preparations and appropriate methods for the collection of surface-water, groundwater, and associated quality-control samples. Among the topics covered are considerations and procedures to prevent sample contamination; establishing site files; instructions for collecting depth-integrated isokinetic and nonisokinetic samples at flowing- and still-water sites; and guidelines for collecting formation water from wells having various types of construction and hydraulic and aquifer characteristics.

  11. Actual distribution of Cronobacter spp. in industrial batches of powdered infant formula and consequences for performance of sampling strategies.

    PubMed

    Jongenburger, I; Reij, M W; Boer, E P J; Gorris, L G M; Zwietering, M H

    2011-11-15

    The actual spatial distribution of microorganisms within a batch of food influences the results of sampling for microbiological testing when this distribution is non-homogeneous. In the case of pathogens being non-homogeneously distributed, it markedly influences public health risk. This study investigated the spatial distribution of Cronobacter spp. in powdered infant formula (PIF) on industrial batch-scale for both a recalled batch as well a reference batch. Additionally, local spatial occurrence of clusters of Cronobacter cells was assessed, as well as the performance of typical sampling strategies to determine the presence of the microorganisms. The concentration of Cronobacter spp. was assessed in the course of the filling time of each batch, by taking samples of 333 g using the most probable number (MPN) enrichment technique. The occurrence of clusters of Cronobacter spp. cells was investigated by plate counting. From the recalled batch, 415 MPN samples were drawn. The expected heterogeneous distribution of Cronobacter spp. could be quantified from these samples, which showed no detectable level (detection limit of -2.52 log CFU/g) in 58% of samples, whilst in the remainder concentrations were found to be between -2.52 and 2.75 log CFU/g. The estimated average concentration in the recalled batch was -2.78 log CFU/g and a standard deviation of 1.10 log CFU/g. The estimated average concentration in the reference batch was -4.41 log CFU/g, with 99% of the 93 samples being below the detection limit. In the recalled batch, clusters of cells occurred sporadically in 8 out of 2290 samples of 1g taken. The two largest clusters contained 123 (2.09 log CFU/g) and 560 (2.75 log CFU/g) cells. Various sampling strategies were evaluated for the recalled batch. Taking more and smaller samples and keeping the total sampling weight constant, considerably improved the performance of the sampling plans to detect such a type of contaminated batch. Compared to random sampling

  12. Chapter A1. Preparations for Water Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses field-trip preparations, including selection of sample-collection sites for studies of surface-water quality, site reconnaissance and well selection for studies of groundwater quality, and the establishment of electronic files and field files and folders for a sampling site. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed Jan. 31, 2005).

  13. Methodology to Analyse the actual and the future effect of water scarcity on the available water resources in Meguellil watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oueslati, I.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.; Shabou, M.; Zribi, M.; Ben Issa, N.; chakroun, H.; Galafassi, D.; Rathwell, K.; Hoff, H.; Pizzigalli, C.

    2012-04-01

    Scarcity often has its roots in water shortage, and it is in the arid and semiarid regions affected by droughts and wide climate variability, combined with population growth and economic development, that the problems of water scarcity are most acute. The Merguellil watershed, situated in the center of Tunisia, represents exactly this state of fact where the agriculture is the main consumer with about 80% of the total water resources because of the continuous increase and intensification of irrigated area. The surface water can satisfy a very low portion of this demand; consequently, the groundwater is overexploited. The irrigation sector is divided into public and private. While the public irrigated areas are well known, the private ones are not sufficiently controlled mainly the water volumes pumped from the aquifer. Therefore, a sustainable management of all available water resources and meeting as much as possible all water demands, is crucial. To analyze the actual and future water balance of the Merguellil watershed, and to identify critical trends and thresholds and effective solutions, a WEAP (Water Evaluation and Planning system) application has been developed. It utilizes a constrained optimization algorithm to allocate water among competing demands in a basin. The year 2009 is considered as the reference one which represents the basic definition of the water system as it currently exists, and forms the foundation of all scenarios analysis. Three scenarios were compared to the reference one. The first combines between the reduction of 10% in precipitation, as it is forseen by the regional climate model RCA (driven by ECHAM5) that provides statistic data of precipitation until 2050, and the increase of 2% per year in irrigated area in the kairouan plain deduced from the land use maps dating from 1991/1992 to 2009/2010 obtained by multi dates remote sensing data. The second scenario is the application of a deficit irrigation that respects the yield

  14. SUPERFUND GROUND WATER ISSUE: GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR METALS ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Filtration of ground-water samples for metals analysis is an issue identified by the Forum as a concern of Superfund decision-makers. Inconsistency in EPA Syperfund cleanup pracices occurs where one EPA Region implements a remedial action based on unfiltered ground-water samples,...

  15. Approach for environmental baseline water sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    Samples collected during the exploration phase of mining represent baseline conditions at the site. As such, they can be very important in forecasting potential environmental impacts should mining proceed, and can become measurements against which future changes are compared. Constituents in stream water draining mined and mineralized areas tend to be geochemically, spatially, and temporally variable, which presents challenges in collecting both exploration and baseline water-quality samples. Because short-term (daily) variations can complicate long-term trends, it is important to consider recent findings concerning geochemical variability of stream-water constituents at short-term timescales in designing sampling plans. Also, adequate water-quality information is key to forecasting potential ecological impacts from mining. Therefore, it is useful to collect baseline water samples adequate tor geochemical and toxicological modeling. This requires complete chemical analyses of dissolved constituents that include major and minor chemical elements as well as physicochemical properties (including pH, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen) and dissolved organic carbon. Applying chemical-equilibrium and appropriate toxicological models to water-quality information leads to an understanding of the speciation, transport, sequestration, bioavailability, and aquatic toxicity of potential contaminants. Insights gained from geochemical and toxicological modeling of water-quality data can be used to design appropriate mitigation and for economic planning for future mining activities.

  16. Profile sampling to characterize particulate lead risks in potable water.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brandi; Masters, Sheldon; Edwards, Marc

    2014-06-17

    Traditional lead (Pb) profiling, or collecting sequential liters of water that flow from a consumer tap after a stagnation event, has recently received widespread use in understanding sources of Pb in drinking water and risks to consumer health, but has limitations in quantifying particulate Pb risks. A new profiling protocol was developed in which a series of traditional profiles are collected from the same tap at escalating flow rates. The results revealed marked differences in risks of Pb exposure from one consumer home to another as a function of flow rate, with homes grouped into four risk categories with differing flushing requirements and public education to protect consumers. On average, Pb concentrations detected in water at high flow without stagnation were at least three to four times higher than in first draw samples collected at low flow with stagnation, demonstrating a new "worst case" lead release scenario, contrary to the original regulatory assumption that stagnant, first draw samples contain the highest lead concentrations. Testing also revealed that in some cases water samples with visible particulates had much higher Pb than samples without visible particulates, and tests of different sample handling protocols confirmed that some EPA-allowed methods would not quantify as much as 99.9% of the Pb actually present (avg. 27% of Pb not quantified).

  17. Gas-driven pump for ground-water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signor, Donald C.

    1978-01-01

    Observation wells installed for artificial-recharge research and other wells used in different ground-water programs are frequently cased with small-diameter steel pipe. To obtain samples from these small-diameter wells in order to monitor water quality, and to calibrate solute-transport models, a small-diameter pump with unique operating characteristics is required that causes a minimum alternation of samples during field sampling. A small-diameter gas-driven pump was designed and built to obtain water samples from wells of two-inch diameter or larger. The pump is a double-piston type with the following characteristics: (1) The water sample is isolated from the operating gas, (2) no source of electricity is ncessary, (3) operation is continuous, (4) use of compressed gas is efficient, and (5) operation is reliable over extended periods of time. Principles of operation, actual operation techniques, gas-use analyses and operating experience are described. Complete working drawings and a component list are included. Recent modifications and pump construction for high-pressure applications also are described. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Ground Water Sampling for Metal Analyses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Filtration of ground-water samples for metals analysis is an issue identified by the Forum as a concern of Superfund decision-makers. Inconsistency in EPA Superfund cleanup ractices occurs where one EPA Region implements a remedial action based on...

  19. Reliability of chemical analyses of water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Beardon, R.

    1989-11-01

    Ground-water quality investigations require reliable chemical analyses of water samples. Unfortunately, laboratory analytical results are often unreliable. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s solution to this problem was to establish a two phase quality assurance program for the analysis of water samples. In the first phase, eight laboratories analyzed three solutions of known composition. The analytical accuracy of each laboratory was ranked and three laboratories were awarded contracts. The second phase consists of on-going monitoring of the reliability of the selected laboratories. The following conclusions are based on two years experience with the UMTRA Project`s Quality Assurance Program. The reliability of laboratory analyses should not be taken for granted. Analytical reliability may be independent of the prices charged by laboratories. Quality assurance programs benefit both the customer and the laboratory.

  20. A new method of snowmelt sampling for water stable isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penna, D.; Ahmad, M.; Birks, S. J.; Bouchaou, L.; Brencic, M.; Butt, S.; Holko, L.; Jeelani, G.; Martinez, D. E.; Melikadze, G.; Shanley, J.B.; Sokratov, S. A.; Stadnyk, T.; Sugimoto, A.; Vreca, P.

    2014-01-01

    We modified a passive capillary sampler (PCS) to collect snowmelt water for isotopic analysis. Past applications of PCSs have been to sample soil water, but the novel aspect of this study was the placement of the PCSs at the ground-snowpack interface to collect snowmelt. We deployed arrays of PCSs at 11 sites in ten partner countries on five continents representing a range of climate and snow cover worldwide. The PCS reliably collected snowmelt at all sites and caused negligible evaporative fractionation effects in the samples. PCS is low-cost, easy to install, and collects a representative integrated snowmelt sample throughout the melt season or at the melt event scale. Unlike snow cores, the PCS collects the water that would actually infiltrate the soil; thus, its isotopic composition is appropriate to use for tracing snowmelt water through the hydrologic cycle. The purpose of this Briefing is to show the potential advantages of PCSs and recommend guidelines for constructing and installing them based on our preliminary results from two snowmelt seasons.

  1. Ground Water Sampling at ISCO Sites - Residual Oxidant Impact on Sample Quality and Sample Preservation Guideline

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) involves the delivery of a chemical oxidant into the subsurface where oxidative reactions transform ground water contaminants into less toxic or harmless byproducts. Due to oxidant persistence, ground water samples collected at hazardous waste si...

  2. Actual ET modelling based on the Budyko framework and the sustainability of vegetation water use in the loess plateau.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuerui; Sun, Miao; Zhao, Qi; Wu, Pute; Zhao, Xining; Pan, Wenxiang; Wang, Yubao

    2017-02-01

    Jointly influenced by the natural factors and the artificial protection measures, the ecological environment of Loess Plateau has been significantly improved in recent years, but which has already brought about some water-related problems. To maintain the balance between precipitation and water consumption is an important foundation for sustainable development of the ecology remediation. This study used Budyko Framework to simulate the actual water consumption of 161 sub-basins from 1990 to 2014. Based on the simulation results, the research also analyzed the evolution characteristics of water balance in Loess Plateau from 1990 to 2014. Results show that, with the increase of vegetation coverage, the regional precipitation and actual evapotranspiration were both showing a significant increasing trend, and the increasing rate of precipitation was 1.91mm/a on average, which was greater than the increasing rate of actual evapotranspiration of 1.34mm/a. To further demonstrate the water balance regime in Loess Plateau, the evapotranspiration coefficient (ECC) was used to quantitatively indicate the ratio of the vegetation water consumption and the total precipitation. The average values of ECC were 0.868, 0.863, 0.851 and 0.837 respectively in four sub-periods of 1990-1999, 2000-2004, 2005-2009 and 2010-2014. The above analyses indicate that with the vegetation recovery and ecological restoration, the percentage of evapotranspiration in the total precipitation is keeping decreasing and in turn the percentage of water yield in the total precipitation is keeping increasing. Consequently, it seems more sustainable for vegetation water use in most areas of Loess Plateau currently.

  3. Evaluation of Water Stress Coefficient Methods to Estimate Actual Corn Evapotranspiration in Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract for Kullberg Hydrology Days: Abstract. Increased competition for water resources is placing pressure on the agricultural sector to remain profitable while reducing water use. Remote sensing techniques have been developed to monitor crop water stress and produce information for evapotranspi...

  4. Water evaporation: a transition path sampling study.

    PubMed

    Varilly, Patrick; Chandler, David

    2013-02-07

    We use transition path sampling to study evaporation in the SPC/E model of liquid water. On the basis of thousands of evaporation trajectories, we characterize the members of the transition state ensemble (TSE), which exhibit a liquid-vapor interface with predominantly negative mean curvature at the site of evaporation. We also find that after evaporation is complete, the distributions of translational and angular momenta of the evaporated water are Maxwellian with a temperature equal to that of the liquid. To characterize the evaporation trajectories in their entirety, we find that it suffices to project them onto just two coordinates: the distance of the evaporating molecule to the instantaneous liquid-vapor interface and the velocity of the water along the average interface normal. In this projected space, we find that the TSE is well-captured by a simple model of ballistic escape from a deep potential well, with no additional barrier to evaporation beyond the cohesive strength of the liquid. Equivalently, they are consistent with a near-unity probability for a water molecule impinging upon a liquid droplet to condense. These results agree with previous simulations and with some, but not all, recent experiments.

  5. Continuous water sampling and water analysis in estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, L.E.; Dedini, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    Salinity, temperature, light transmission, oxygen saturation, pH, pCO2, chlorophyll a fluorescence, and the concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, dissolved silica, orthophosphate, and ammonia are continuously measured with a system designed primarily for estuarine studies. Near-surface water (2-m depth) is sampled continuously while the vessel is underway; on station, water to depths of 100 m is sampled with a submersible pump. The system is comprised of commercially available instruments, equipment, and components, and of specialized items designed and fabricated by the authors. Data are read from digital displays, analog strip-chart recorders, and a teletype printout, and can be logged in disc storage for subsequent plotting. Data records made in San Francisco Bay illustrate physical, biological, and chemical estuarine processes, such as mixing and phytoplankton net production. The system resolves large- and small-scale events, which contributes to its reliability and usefulness.

  6. Determination of dissolved aluminum in water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afifi, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A technique has been modified for determination of a wide range of concentrations of dissolved aluminum (Al) in water and has been tested. In this technique, aluminum is complexed with 8-hydroxyquinoline at pH 8.3 to minimize interferences, then extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The extract is analyzed colorimetrically at 395 nm. This technique is used to analyze two forms of monomeric Al, nonlabile (organic complexes) and labile (free, Al, Al sulfate, fluoride and hydroxide complexes). A detection limit 2 ug/L is possible with 25-ml samples and 10-ml extracts. The detection limit can be decreased by increasing the volume of the sample and (or) decreasing the volume of the methyl isobutyl ketone extract. The analytical uncertainty of this method is approximately + or - 5 percent. The standard addition technique provides a recovery test for this technique and ensures precision in samples of low Al concentrations. The average percentage recovery of the added Al plus the amount originally present was 99 percent. Data obtained from analyses of filtered standard solutions indicated that Al is adsorbed on various types of filters. However, the relationship between Al concentrations and adsorption remains linear. A test on standard solutions also indicated that Al is not adsorbed on nitric acid-washed polyethylene and polypropylene bottle wells. (USGS)

  7. Nodal Network Modelling by Integrating Remote Sensing Derived Actual Evapotranspiration with Spatial Water Balance in a Demand Driven Irrigation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Kaleem; Hafeez, Mohsin; Sixsmith, Josh; Faux, Ralph

    2010-05-01

    The long-term sustainability of water for agriculture is in doubt in many regions of the world. The major withdrawals of water are for agriculture, industry, and domestic consumption. Irrigated agriculture is major consumer of fresh water, but a large part of the water devour for irrigation is wasted due to poor management of irrigation systems. Improving water management in irrigated areas and assessment of irrigation performance are critical activities for this endeavour. These activities are needed not only to improve water productivity, but also to increase the sustainability of irrigated agriculture and improving the irrigation efficiency. The improvement of the water use efficiency entail the complete understanding of various components of water balances such as rainfall, surface water, groundwater and evapotranspiration (ET). Evapotranspiration is the overriding aspect of water balance at farm to catchment scale. Many models have been used to measure the Evapotranspiration rate, either empirical or functional. The major disadvantage of this approach is that most methods generate only point values, resulting in estimates that are not representative of large areas. These methods are based on crop factors under ideal conditions and cannot therefore represent actual crop ET. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful mean to estimate ET over various spatial and temporal scales. The use of remote sensing techniques to estimate ET is achieved by solving the energy balance thermodynamics fluxes at the surface of the earth. For improved irrigation system management and operation, a holistic approach of integrating remote sensing derived ET from SAM-ET (spatial algorithm for mapping evapotranspiration) algorithm, for Australian agro-ecosystem with spatial water balance by using nodal network model was applied to evaluate agricultural water management in Coleambally Irrigation Area (CIA), New South Wales, Australia. It covers approximately 79,000 ha of intensive

  8. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-09-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of forest stands in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The tested approach for calculating the water use by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results reveal that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  9. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of a forest stand in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The approach tested for calculating the water consumption by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time-series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results show that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  10. Water Purification Characteristic of the Actual Constructed Wetland with Carex dispalata in a Cold Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Morio; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Hiratsuka, Akira; Tsukada, Hiroko

    Carex dispalata, a native plant species applied in cold districts for water purification in constructed wetlands, has useful characteristics for landscape creation and maintenance. In this study, seasonal differences in purification ability were verified, along with comparison of frozen and non-frozen periods' performance. A wetland area was constructed using a “hydroponics method” and a “coir fiber based method”. Results show that the removal rates of BOD, SS, and Chl-a were high. On this constructed wetland reduces organic pollution, mainly phytoplankton, but the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus was insufficient. The respective mean values of influent and treated water during three years were 26.6 mg/L and 12.2 mg/L for BOD, and 27.9 mg/L and 7.5 mg/L for SS. The mean value of the BOD removal rate for the non-frozen period was 2.99 g/m2/d that for the frozen period was 1.86 g/m2/d. The removal rate followed the rise of the BOD load rate. The removal rate limits were about 4 g/m2/d during the frozen period and 15 g/m2/d during the non-frozen period. For operations, energy was unnecessary. The required working hours were about 20 h annually for all maintenance and management during operations.

  11. Modeling water retention of sludge simulants and actual saltcake tank wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, C.S.

    1996-07-01

    The Ferrocyanide Tanks Safety Program managed by Westinghouse hanford Company has been concerned with the potential combustion hazard of dry tank wastes containing ferrocyanide chemical in combination with nitrate salts. Pervious studies have shown that tank waste containing greater than 20 percent of weight as water could not be accidentally ignited. Moreover, a sustained combustion could not be propagated in such a wet waste even if it contained enough ferrocyanide to burn. Because moisture content is a key critical factor determining the safety of ferrocyanide-containing tank wastes, physical modeling was performed by Pacific Northwest National laboratory to evaluate the moisture-retaining behavior of typical tank wastes. The physical modeling reported here has quantified the mechanisms by which two main types of tank waste, sludge and saltcake, retain moisture in a tank profile under static conditions. Static conditions usually prevail after a tank profile has been stabilized by pumping out any excess interstitial liquid, which is not naturally retained by the waste as a result of physical forces such as capillarity.

  12. Handbook for Sampling and Sample Preservation of Water and Wastewater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    high water line or outside the manhole to an above ground stake by means of a rope . Place the intake tubing vertically or at such a slope to ensure...upstream. Limit the orientation of the intake 20 degrees on either side of the head-on. Secure the intake by a rope at all times with no drag placed on...Marked cableways and bridges, steel or metallic taps or tag lines are used for width determinations. For details or procedures for depth and width

  13. UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Papusch, R.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is to provide a basis for groundwater and surface water sampling at the Green River Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring locations.

  14. GROUND WATER SAMPLING USING LOW-FLOW TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and remedial performance monitoring objectives. The sampling device or method used to collect samples from monitoring or compliance well can significantly impact data quality and reliability. Low-flo...

  15. ACQUISITION OF REPRESENTATIVE GROUND WATER QUALITY SAMPLES FOR METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    R.S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory (RSKERL) personnel have evaluated sampling procedures for the collection of representative, accurate, and reproducible ground water quality samples for metals for the past four years. Intensive sampling research at three different field...

  16. Methods for collection and analysis of water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainwater, Frank Hays; Thatcher, Leland Lincoln

    1960-01-01

    This manual contains methods used by the U.S. Geological Survey to collect, preserve, and analyze water samples. Throughout, the emphasis is on obtaining analytical results that accurately describe the chemical composition of the water in situ. Among the topics discussed are selection of sampling sites, frequency of sampling, field equipment, preservatives and fixatives, analytical techniques of water analysis, and instruments. Seventy-seven laboratory and field procedures are given for determining fifty-three water properties.

  17. LABORATORY ANALYSES: WATER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    To be presented at the Workshop for Improving the Recognition, Investigation, and Reporting of Waterborne Disease Outbreaks Associated with Drinking, Recreational and Other Waters in Nashville, TN, May 29 - June 1, 2007

  18. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan -- Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is required for each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to provide a basis for ground water and surface water sampling at disposal and former processing sites. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring stations at the Navaho Reservation in Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site. The purposes of the water sampling at Shiprock for fiscal year (FY) 1994 are to (1) collect water quality data at new monitoring locations in order to build a defensible statistical data base, (2) monitor plume movement on the terrace and floodplain, and (3) monitor the impact of alluvial ground water discharge into the San Juan River. The third activity is important because the community of Shiprock withdraws water from the San Juan River directly across from the contaminated alluvial floodplain below the abandoned uranium mill tailings processing site.

  19. Hybrid quantitative simulation on the in-line phase-contrast x-ray imaging of three dimensional samples under actual clinic imaging parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Hong; Han Shensheng; Ding Jianhui; Jiang Zhaoxia; Peng Weijun

    2009-07-06

    A hybrid model combining Monte Carlo method with diffraction theory of wave optics has been developed and applied to quantitatively simulate the in-line diffractive phase-contrast x-ray imaging of three dimensional tissue samples under actual clinic imaging parameters. The primary microcosmic interactions of medical-energy x-ray within matter including photoabsorption, Compton scattering, and coherent scattering, have been taken into account in the Monte Carlo simulation. A diffraction processing based on Fresnel diffraction theory is carried out to simulate the macroscopic diffraction effect. A comparison with experiment results has also been performed.

  20. Analysis of uranium concentration in drinking water samples using ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Rani, Asha; Mehra, Rohit; Duggal, Vikas; Balaram, V

    2013-03-01

    Uranium concentration in drinking water samples collected from some areas of Northern Rajasthan has been measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The water samples were taken from hand pumps. The uranium concentration in water samples varies from 2.54-133.0 μg L with a mean value of 38.48 μg L. The uranium concentration in most of the drinking water samples exceeds the safe limit (30 μg L) recommended by the World Health Organization. The annual effective dose associated with drinking water due to uranium concentration is estimated from its annual intake using dosimetric information based on ICRP 72. The resulting value of the annual effective dose from drinking water sources is in the range of 2.11-110.45 μSv. The annual effective dose in one of the samples was found to be greater than WHO-recommended level of 100 μSv y.

  1. Development of Sampling and Preservation Techniques to Retard Chemical and Biological Changes in Water Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-24

    I/ DRXTH-TE-CR-82182 DEVELOPMENT OF SAMPLING AND PRESERVATION TECHNIQUES TO RETARD CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHANGES IN WATER SAMPLES by H Rope H...Changes in Water Samples MRI ProjecL No. 7050-A 7. AUTI4OR(c) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUM[ER(.) DAAK1l-8l-C-0007 I. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME ANO...Tetryl; Diphenylamine, DPA; Nitrobenzane, NB; 2,6-Dinitrotoluene, 2,6-DNT; Nitroglycerin, NG; and Picric Acid, PA) in water samples. The samples were

  2. Microbial Condition of Water Samples from Foreign Fuel Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, C.J.; Fliermans, C.B.; Santo Domingo, J.

    1997-10-30

    In order to assess the microbial condition of foreign nuclear fuel storage facilities, fourteen different water samples were received from facilities outside the United States that have sent spent nuclear fuel to SRS for wet storage. Each water sample was analyzed for microbial content and activity as determined by total bacteria, viable aerobic bacteria, viable anaerobic bacteria, viable sulfate- reducing bacteria, viable acid-producing bacteria and enzyme diversity. The results for each water sample were then compared to other foreign samples and to data from the receiving basin for off- site fuel (RBOF) at SRS.

  3. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Surface remedial action will be completed at the Grand Junction processing site during the summer of 1994. Results of 1993 water sampling indicate that ground water flow conditions and ground water quality at the processing site have remained relatively constant with time. Uranium concentrations in ground water continue to exceed the maximum concentration limits, providing the best indication of the extent of contaminated ground water. Evaluation of surface water quality of the Colorado River indicate no impact from uranium processing activities. No compliance monitoring at the Cheney disposal site has been proposed because ground water in the Dakota Sandstone (uppermost aquifer) is classified as limited-use (Class 111) and because the disposal cell is hydrogeologically isolated from the uppermost aquifer. The following water sampling and water level monitoring activities are planned for calendar year 1994: (i) Semiannual (early summer and late fall) sampling of six existing monitor wells at the former Grand Junction processing site. Analytical results from this sampling will be used to continue characterizing hydrogeochemical trends in background ground water quality and in the contaminated ground water area resulting from source term (tailings) removal. (ii) Water level monitoring of approximately three proposed monitor wells projected to be installed in the alluvium at the processing site in September 1994. Data loggers will be installed in these wells, and water levels will be electronically monitored six times a day. These long-term, continuous ground water level data will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site. Water level and water quality data eventually will be used in future ground water modeling to establish boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Grand Junction processing site. Modeling results will be used to help demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing.

  4. A low cost multi-level sampling device for synchronous aseptic collection of environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael L; Banishki, Nikola; Powell, Sarah; Rumack, Amy; Garrett, Jinnie M

    2014-10-01

    We describe a simple device for the aseptic collection of environmental water samples at high spatial resolution to depths of 50m. To demonstrate the utility of this technique we present geochemical and archaeal community data from samples collected throughout the water column of a stratified lake.

  5. UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Tuba City, Arizona. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide background, guidance, and justification for fiscal year (FY) 1994 water sampling activities for the uranium mil tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona. This sampling and analysis plan will form the basis for groundwater sampling and analysis work orders to be implemented in FY94.

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Tuba City, Arizona, are described in the following sections of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). This plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the stations routinely monitored at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and the final EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), and the most effective technical approach for the site.

  7. Sampling colloids and colloid-associated contaminants in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Backhus, Debera A.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Groher, Daniel M.; MacFarlane, John K.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that mobile colloids may affect the transport of contaminants in ground water. To determine the significance of this process, knowledge of both the total mobile load (dissolved + colloid-associated) and the dissolved concentration of a ground-water contaminant must be obtained. Additional information regarding mobile colloid characteristics and concentrations are required to predict accurately the fate and effects of contaminants at sites where significant quantities of colloids are found. To obtain this information, a sampling scheme has been designed and refined to collect mobile colloids while avoiding the inclusion of normally immobile subsurface and well-derived solids. The effectiveness of this sampling protocol was evaluated at a number of contaminated and pristine sites.The sampling results indicated that slow, prolonged pumping of ground water is much more effective at obtaining ground-water samples that represent in situ colloid populations than bailing. Bailed samples from a coal tar-contaminated site contained 10–100 times greater colloid concentrations and up to 750 times greater polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations as were detected in slowly pumped samples. The sampling results also indicated that ground-water colloid concentrations should be monitored in the field to determine the adequacy of purging if colloid and colloid-associated contaminants are of interest. To avoid changes in the natural ground-water colloid population through precipitation or coagulation, in situ ground-water chemistry conditions must be preserved during sampling and storage. Samples collected for determination of the total mobile load of colloids and low-solubility contaminants must not be filtered because some mobile colloids are removed by this process. Finally, suggestions that mobile colloids are present in ground water at any particular site should be corroborated with auxiliary data, such as colloid levels in

  8. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters.

  9. UMTRA water sampling and analysis plan, Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-29

    The purpose of this document is to provide background, guidance, and justification for water sampling activities for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) processing and disposal sites. This water sampling and analysis plan will form the basis for groundwater sampling and analysis work orders (WSAWO) to be implemented during 1993. Monitoring at the former Lakeview processing site is for characterization purposes and in preparation for the risk assessment, scheduled for the fall of 1993. Compliance monitoring was conducted at the disposal site. Details of the sampling plan are discussed in Section 5.0.

  10. Estimation of total available water in the soil layer by integrating actual evapotranspiration data in a remote sensing-driven soil water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Isidro; González-Piqueras, Jose; Carrara, Arnaud; Villodre, Julio; Calera, Alfonso

    2016-03-01

    The total available water (τ) by plants that could be stored in its root soil layer is a key parameter when applying soil water balance models. Since the transpiration rate of a vegetation stand could be the best proxy about the soil water content into the root soil layer, we propose a methodology for estimating τ by using as basic inputs the evapotranspiration rate of the stand and time series of multispectral imagery. This methodology is based on the inverted formulation of the soil water balance model. The inversion of the model was addressed by using an iterative approach, which optimizes the τ parameter to minimize the difference between measured and modeled ET. This methodology was tested for a Mediterranean holm oak savanna (dehesa) for which eddy covariance measurements of actual ET were available. The optimization procedure was performed by using a continuous dataset (in 2004) of daily ET measurements and 16 sets of 8 daily ET measurements, resulting in τ values of 325 and 305 mm, respectively. The use of these τ values in the RSWB model for the validation period (2005-2008) allowed us to estimate dehesa ET with a RMSE = 0.48 mm/day. The model satisfactorily reproduces the water stress process. The sensitivity of τ estimates was evaluated regarding two of the more uncertain parameters in the RSWB model. These parameters are the average fraction of τ that can be depleted from the root zone without producing moisture stress (pτ) and the soil evaporation component. The results of this analysis indicated relatively little influence from the evaporation component and the need for adequate knowledge about pτ for estimating τ.

  11. 4. VIEW TO NORTHEAST, SKINNER SALT ROASTERS, SAMPLING BUILDING, WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW TO NORTHEAST, SKINNER SALT ROASTERS, SAMPLING BUILDING, WATER TOWER, AND OFFICE BUILDING. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  12. 10. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, SAMPLING BUILDING, FOUNDATION, WATER TOWER, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST, SAMPLING BUILDING, FOUNDATION, WATER TOWER, AND SKINNER SALT ROASTERS. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  13. 5. VIEW TO SOUTH, SAMPLING BUILDING AND WATER TOWER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW TO SOUTH, SAMPLING BUILDING AND WATER TOWER. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  14. Preparation of water samples for carbon-14 dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feltz, H.R.; Hanshaw, Bruce B.

    1963-01-01

    For most natural water, a large sample is required to provide the 3 grams of carbon needed for a carbon-14 determination. A field procedure for isolating total dissolved-carbonate species is described. Carbon dioxide gas is evolved by adding sulfuric acid to the water sample; the gas is then collected in a sodium hydroxide trap by recycling in a closed system. The trap is then transported to the dating laboratory where the carbon-14 is counted.

  15. ISS Potable Water Sampling and Chemical Analysis Results for 2016

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, John E., II; Plumlee, Debrah K.; Wallace William T.; Alverson, James T.; Benoit, Mickie J.; Gillispie, Robert L.; Hunter, David; Kuo, Mike; Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Hudson, Edgar K.; Loh, Leslie J.; Gazda, Daniel B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper continues the annual tradition of summarizing at this conference the results of chemical analyses performed on archival potable water samples returned from the International Space Station (ISS). 2016 represented a banner year for life on board the ISS, including the successful conclusion for two crew members of a record one-year mission. Water reclaimed from urine and/or humidity condensate remained the primary source of potable water for the crew members of ISS Expeditions 46-50. The year 2016 was also marked by the end of a long-standing tradition of U.S. sampling and monitoring of Russian Segment potable water sources. Two water samples taken during Expedition 46 in February 2016 and returned on Soyuz 44, represented the final Russian Segment samples to be collected and analyzed by the U.S. side. Although anticipated for 2016, a rise in the total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of the product water from the U.S. water processor assembly due to breakthrough of organic contaminants from the system did not materialize, as evidenced by the onboard TOC analyzer and archive sample results.

  16. Reduction of hexavalent chromium in water samples acidified for preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.; Grove, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in water samples, preserved by standard techniques, was investigated. The standard preservation technique for water samples that are to be analyzed for Cr(VI) consists of filtration through a 0.45-??m membrane, acidification to a pH < 2, and storage in plastic bottles. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of H+ concentration, NO2, temperature, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO2, DOC, H+, and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4??C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0.45-??m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred needs to be considered.The rate of reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) increased with increasing NO//2, DOC, H** plus , and temperature. Reduction of Cr(VI) by organic matter occurred in some samples even though the samples were unacidified. Reduction of Cr(VI) is inhibited to an extent by storing the sample at 4 degree C. Stability of Cr(VI) in water is variable and depends on the other constituents present in the sample. Water samples collected for the determination of Cr(VI) should be filtered (0. 45- mu m membrane), refrigerated, and analyzed as quickly as possible. Water samples should not be acidified. Measurement of total Cr in addition to Cr(VI) can serve as a check for Cr(VI) reduction. If total Cr is greater than Cr(VI), the possibility that Cr

  17. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  18. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  19. RAPID DETERMINATION OF {sup 210} PO IN WATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-05-22

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for emergency response or routine water analyses. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD) event or a radiological attack associated with drinking water supplies occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of water samples, including drinking water, ground water and other water effluents. Current analytical methods for the assay of {sup 210}Po in water samples have typically involved spontaneous auto-deposition of {sup 210}Po onto silver or other metal disks followed by counting by alpha spectrometry. The auto-deposition times range from 90 minutes to 24 hours or more, at times with yields that may be less than desirable. If sample interferences are present, decreased yields and degraded alpha spectrums can occur due to unpredictable thickening in the deposited layer. Separation methods have focused on the use of Sr Resin, often in combination with 210Pb analysis. A new rapid method for {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that utilizes a rapid calcium phosphate co-precipitation method, separation using DGA Resin (N,N,N,N-tetraoctyldiglycolamide extractant-coated resin, Eichrom Technologies or Triskem-International), followed by rapid microprecipitation of {sup 210}Po using bismuth phosphate for counting by alpha spectrometry. This new method can be performed quickly with excellent removal of interferences, high chemical yields and very good alpha peak resolution, eliminating any potential problems with the alpha source preparation for emergency or routine samples. A rapid sequential separation method to separate {sup 210} Po and actinide isotopes was also developed. This new approach, rapid separation with DGA Resin plus microprecipitation for alpha source preparation, is a significant advance in radiochemistry for the rapid

  20. Impact of Oxidant Residuals on Ground Water Samples at ISCO Sites: Recommended Guidelines for Sample Preservation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) involves the introduction of a chemical oxidant into the subsurface for the purpose of transforming ground water contaminants into less toxic or harmless byproducts. Due to oxidant persistence, ground water samples collected at hazardous waste si...

  1. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  2. ENHANCED DAPI STAINING FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Method 1623 is used to detect and quantify the presence of {ital Cryptosporidium} spp. oocysts in water. The protocol consists of concentrating a sample, staining this concentrate with a fluorescent antibody, and examining the sample mi...

  3. GROUND WATER PURGING AND SAMPLING METHODS: HISTORY VS. HYSTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been over 10 years since the low-flow ground water purging and sampling method was initially reported in the literature. The method grew from the recognition that well purging was necessary to collect representative samples, bailers could not achieve well purging, and high...

  4. Oxygen Isotopic Analyses of Water Extracted from Lunar Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn Martinez, M.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen exists in lunar materials in distinct phases having unique sources and equilibration histories. The oxygen isotopic composition (δ17O, δ18O) of various components of lunar materials has been studied extensively, but analyses of water in these samples are relatively sparse [1-3]. Samples collected on the lunar surface reflect not only the composition of their source reservoirs but also contributions from asteroidal and cometary impacts, interactions with solar wind and cosmic radiation, among other surface processes. Isotopic characterization of oxygen in lunar water could help resolve the major source of water in the Earth-Moon system by revealing if lunar water is primordial, asteroidal, or cometary in origin [1]. Methods: A lunar rock/soil sample is pumped to high vacuum to remove physisorbed water before heating step-wise to 50, 150, and 1000°C to extract extraterrestrial water without terrestrial contamination. The temperature at which water is evolved is proportional to the strength with which the water is bound in the sample and the relative difficulty of exchanging oxygen atoms in that water. This allows for the isolated extraction of water bound in different phases, which could have different source reservoirs and/or histories, as evidenced by the mass (in)dependence of oxygen compositions. A low blank procedure was developed to accommodate the low water content of lunar material [4]. Results: Oxygen isotopic analyses of lunar water extracted by stepwise heating lunar basalts and breccias with a range of compositions, petrologic types, and surface exposure ages will be presented. The cosmic ray exposure age of these samples varies by two orders of magnitude, and we will consider this in discussing the effects of solar wind and cosmic radiation on the oxygen isotopic composition (Δ17O). I will examine the implications of our water analyses for the composition of the oxygen-bearing reservoir from which that water formed, the effects of surface

  5. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is a former uranium mill that is undergoing surface remediation in the form of on-site tailings stabilization. Contaminated surface materials from the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat site and are being consolidated with the Mexican Hat tailings. The scheduled completion of the tailings disposal cell is August 1995. Water is found in two geologic units at the site: the Halgaito Shale Formation and the Honaker Trail Formation. The tailings rest on the Halgaito Shale, and water contained in that unit is a result of milling activities and, to a lesser extent, water released from the tailings from compaction during remedial action construction of the disposal cell. Water in the Halgaito Shale flows through fractures and discharges at seeps along nearby arroyos. Flow from the seeps will diminish as water drains from the unit. Ground water in the lower unit, the Honaker Trail Formation, is protected from contamination by an upward hydraulic gradient. There are no nearby water supply wells because of widespread poor background ground water quality and quantity, and the San Juan River shows no impacts from the site. This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) recommends sampling six seeps and one upgradient monitor well compared in the Honaker Trail Formation. Samples will be taken in April 1994 (representative of high group water levels) and September 1994 (representative of low ground water levels). Analyses will be performed on filtered samples for plume indicator parameters.

  6. Chapter A3. Cleaning of Equipment for Water Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A3 describes procedures for cleaning the equipment used to collect and process samples of surface water and ground water and procedures for assessing the efficacy of the equipment-cleaning process. This chapter is designed for use with the other chapters of this field manual. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be posted on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed September 20, 2004).

  7. Construction Site Storm Water Sampling California's New Construction Sampling and Analysis Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, C.L.; Mathews, S.

    2002-04-02

    The California State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) originally issued a National Pollutant Discharge System (NPDES) permit for storm water discharges associated with construction activities in 1992. This NPDES permit was issued as a general permit, applicable throughout the state (with certain exceptions). The general construction permit was made site-specific by a discharger-developed Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP). As with most NPDES construction storm water permits, monitoring requirements were limited to inspections. Sampling and analysis of discharges was not specifically required, but a Regional Water Quality Control Board (Regional Board) could require additional monitoring. In 1999, the State -Board revised and reissued its construction general permit. While the 1999 permit significantly enhanced the erosion and sediment control descriptions and requirements, and expanded the inspection program, sampling and analysis was still not required. Environmental advocacy groups took exception to the absence of sampling requirements and sought relief in court to add sampling and analysis. In 2001, the State Board in response to the court order adopted a resolution requiring sampling and analysis of construction site runoff under two conditions. Turbidity and/or sediment sampling is required when construction site runoff enters water bodies determined to impaired for sediment or turbidity. Sampling for non-visible pollutants is required when construction operations expose materials to storm water. Sampling construction site runoff is relatively new concept for NPDES permits. Only a few permits throughout the country require sampling and analysis for sediment-related pollutants, and California is one of the only permitting entities to require sampling for non-visible pollutants in construction site runoff. The added complexity of sampling runoff requires construction operators and erosion and sediment control professionals to expand their

  8. Chapter A2. Selection of Equipment for Water Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual addresses the selection of equipment commonly used by USGS personnel to collect and process water-quality samples. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed March 20, 2003).

  9. Adsorption of Water on JSC-1A Lunar Simulant Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, John; Sah, Shweta; Burghaus, Uwe; Street, Kenneth W.

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing probes sent to the moon in the 1990s indicated that water may exist in areas such as the bottoms of deep, permanently shadowed craters at the lunar poles, buried under regolith. Water is of paramount importance for any lunar exploration and colonization project which would require self-sustainable systems. Therefore, investigating the interaction of water with lunar regolith is pertinent to future exploration. The lunar environment can be approximated in ultra-high vacuum systems such as those used in thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Questions about water dissociation, surface wetting, degree of crystallization, details of water-ice transitions, and cluster formation kinetics can be addressed by TDS. Lunar regolith specimens collected during the Apollo missions are still available though precious, so testing with simulant is required before applying to use lunar regolith samples. Hence, we used for these studies JSC-1a, mostly an aluminosilicate glass and basaltic material containing substantial amounts of plagioclase, some olivine and traces of other minerals. Objectives of this project include: 1) Manufacturing samples using as little raw material as possible, allowing the use of surface chemistry and kinetics tools to determine the feasibility of parallel studies on regolith, and 2) Characterizing the adsorption kinetics of water on the regolith simulant. This has implications for the probability of finding water on the moon and, if present, for recovery techniques. For condensed water films, complex TDS data were obtained containing multiple features, which are related to subtle rearrangements of the water adlayer. Results from JSC-1a TDS studies indicate: 1) Water dissociation on JSC-1a at low exposures, with features detected at temperatures as high as 450 K and 2) The formation of 3D water clusters and a rather porous condensed water film. It appears plausible that the sub- m sized particles act as nucleation centers.

  10. RAPID ANALYSIS OF EMERGENCY URINE AND WATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S

    2007-02-26

    There is a need for fast, reliable methods for the determination of actinides and Sr-89/90 analysis on environmental and bioassay samples in response to an emergency radiological incident. The SRS (Savannah River Site) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory participated in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Radiochemistry Intercomparison Program (NRIP-06) and analyzed water and urine samples within 8 hours of receipt. The SRS Environmental Laboratory was the only lab that participated in the program that analyzed these samples for both actinides and Sr-89/90 within the requested 8 hour turnaround time. A new, rapid actinide and strontium 89/90 separation method was used for both urine and water samples. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and Sr-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U), and americium (Am), curium (Cm) and thorium (Th) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. By using vacuum box cartridge technology and stacked cartridges with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time was minimized. This paper discusses the technology and conditions employed for both water and urine samples and presents the SRS performance data on the NRIP-06 samples.

  11. Mutagenicity of water samples from five cities in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Kang, K S; Lee, Y S

    2001-07-01

    Four doses (equivalent to 4, 2, 1, and 0.5 liter water) of organic extracts from raw, treated and drinking waters sampled from seven different treatment plants in five cities in Korea were challenged to the Ames test using S. typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 in the presence/absence of S9 mix. The mutagenicity was usually observed from chlorine-treated (28.6%) and drinking (42.9%) waters rather than raw (3.4%) waters. The strain TA98 (33.3%) was more sensitive to detect the mutagenicity of water samples than the strain TA100 (16.7%). However, the absence of S9 mix showed higher mutagenic activity of waters compared to the presence of S9 mix, corresponding to the detection of 42.9% and 7.1%, respectively. These results indicate that the bacterial mutagenicity of treated and drinking waters may be derived from chlorination in water treatment plants but that the mutagenicity in humans may be limited due to enzymatic metabolism.

  12. Holding effects on coliform enumeration in drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    McDaniels, A E; Bordner, R H; Gartside, P S; Haines, J R; Brenner, K P; Rankin, C C

    1985-10-01

    Standard procedures for analyzing drinking water stress the need to adhere to the time and temperature conditions recommended for holding samples collected for microbiological testing. The National Drinking Water Laboratory Certification Program requires compliance with these holding limits, but some investigators have reported difficulties in meeting them. Research was conducted by standard analytical methods to determine if changes occurred when samples were held at 5 and 22 degrees C and analyzed at 0, 24, 30, and 48 h. Samples were analyzed for coliforms by the membrane filter and fermentation-tube procedures and for heterotrophs by the pour plate method. A total of 17 treated water samples were collected from a large municipal distribution system from August to December 1981, and 12 samples were collected from January to May 1983. The samples were dosed with coliforms previously isolated from the water system, Enterobacter cloacae in 1981 and Citrobacter freundii in 1983. The coliform counts declined linearly over time, and the rates of decline were significant at both 5 and 22 degrees C. Within 24 h at 22 degrees C, levels of E. cloacae and C. freundii decreased by 47 and 26%, respectively, and at 5 degrees C, E. cloacae numbers declined by 23%. Results from these representative laboratory-grown coliforms reinforced those previously obtained with naturally occurring coliforms under the same experimental conditions. Significantly, some samples with initially unacceptable counts (greater than 4/100 ml) met the safe drinking water limits after storage at 24 h at 5 and 22 degrees C and would have been classified as satisfactory.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Sampling and quantifying invertebrates from drinking water distribution mains.

    PubMed

    van Lieverloo, J Hein M; Bosboom, Dick W; Bakker, Geo L; Brouwer, Anke J; Voogt, Remko; De Roos, Josje E M

    2004-03-01

    Water utilities in the Netherlands aim at controlling the multiplication of (micro-) organisms by distributing biologically stable water through biologically stable materials. Disinfectant residuals are absent or very low. To be able to assess invertebrate abundance, methods for sampling and quantifying these animals from distribution mains were optimised and evaluated. The presented method for collecting invertebrates consists of unidirectionally flushing a mains section with a flow rate of 1 ms(-1) and filtering the flushed water in two separate flows with 500 microm and 100 microm mesh plankton gauze filters. Removal efficiency from mains was evaluated in nine experiments by collecting the invertebrates removed from the mains section by intensive cleaning immediately subsequent to sampling. Of 12 taxa distinguished, all except case-building Chironomidae larvae (2%) and Oligochaeta (30%) were removed well (51-75%). Retention of invertebrates in 100 microm filters was evaluated by filtering 39 filtrates using 30 microm filters. Except for flexible and small invertebrates such as Turbellaria (13%), Nematoda (11%) and Copepoda larvae (24%), most taxa were well retained in the 100 microm filters (53-100%). During sample processing, the method for taking sub-samples with a 10 ml pipette from the suspension of samples with high sediment concentrations was found to perform well in 75% of the samples. During a 2-year national survey in the Netherlands and consecutive investigations, the method appeared to be very suitable to assess the abundance of most invertebrate taxa in drinking water distribution systems and to be practicable for relatively inexperienced sampling and lab technicians. Although the numbers of small, less abundant or sessile taxa were not accurately assessed using the method, these taxa probably should not be the primary focus of monitoring by water utilities, as consumer complaints are not likely to be caused by these invertebrates. The accuracy of

  14. Isotope evidence of hexavalent chromium stability in ground water samples.

    PubMed

    Čadková, Eva; Chrastný, Vladislav

    2015-11-01

    Chromium stable isotopes are of interest in many geochemical studies as a tool to identify Cr(VI) reduction and/or dilution in groundwater aquifers. For such studies the short term stability of Cr(VI) in water samples is required before the laboratory analyses can be carried out. Here the short term stability of Cr(VI) in groundwater samples was studied using an isotope approach. Based on commonly available methods for Cr(VI) stabilization, water samples were filtered and the pH value was adjusted to be equal to or greater than 8 before Cr isotope analysis. Based on our Cr isotope data (expressed as δ(53)CrNIST979), Cr(VI) was found to be unstable over short time periods in anthropogenically contaminated groundwater samples regardless of water treatment (e.g., pH adjustment, different storage temperatures). Based on our laboratory experiments, δ(53)CrNIST979 of the Cr(VI) pool was found to be unstable in the presence of dissolved Fe(II), Mn(IV) and/or SO2. Threshold concentrations of Fe(II) causing Cr(VI) reduction range between 10 mg L(-1) and 100 mg L(-1)and less than 1 mg L(-1) for Mn. Hence our isotope data show that water samples containing Cr(VI) should be processed on-site through anion column chemistry to avoid any isotope shifts.

  15. A simple supported liquid hollow fiber membrane microextraction for sample preparation of trihalomethanes in water samples.

    PubMed

    Vora-adisak, Narongchai; Varanusupakul, Pakorn

    2006-07-21

    A simple and efficient liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) technique using a supported liquid hollow fiber membrane, in conjunction with gas chromatography-electron capture detector has been developed for extraction and determination of trihalomethanes (THMs) in water samples. THMs were extracted from water samples through an organic extracting solvent impregnated in the pores and filled inside the porous hollow fiber membrane. Our simple conditions were conducted at 35 degrees C with no stirring and no salt addition in order to minimize sample preparation steps. Parameters such as types of hollow fiber membranes, extracting solvents and extraction time were studied and optimized. The method exhibited enrichment factors ranged from 28- to 62-fold within 30 min extraction time. The linearity of the method ranged from 0.2 to 100 microg l(-1). The limits of detection were in the low microg l(-1) level, ranging between 0.01 and 0.2 microg l(-1). The recoveries of spiked THMs at 5 microg l(-1) in water were between 98 and 105% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 4%. Furthermore, the method was applied for determination of THMs in drinking water and tap water samples was reported.

  16. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    Surface remedial action has been completed at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Durango, Colorado. Contaminated soil and debris have been removed from the former processing site and placed in the Bodo Canyon disposal cell. Ground water at the former uranium mill/tailings site and raffinate pond area has been contaminated by the former milling operations. The ground water at the disposal site was not impacted by the former milling operations at the time of the cell`s construction. Activities for fiscal 1994 involve ground water sampling and site characterization of the disposal site.

  17. Stability of low levels of perchlorate in drinking water and natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stetson, S.J.; Wanty, R.B.; Helsel, D.R.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Macalady, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Perchlorate ion (ClO4-) is an environmental contaminant of growing concern due to its potential human health effects, impact on aquatic and land animals, and widespread occurrence throughout the United States. The determination of perchlorate cannot normally be carried out in the field. As such, water samples for perchlorate analysis are often shipped to a central laboratory, where they may be stored for a significant period before analysis. The stability of perchlorate ion in various types of commonly encountered water samples has not been generally examined-the effect of such storage is thus not known. In the present study, the long-term stability of perchlorate ion in deionized water, tap water, ground water, and surface water was examined. Sample sets containing approximately 1000, 100, 1.0, and 0.5 ??g l-1 perchlorate ion in deionized water and also in local tap water were formulated. These samples were analyzed by ion chromatography for perchlorate ion concentration against freshly prepared standards every 24 h for the first 7 days, biweekly for the next 4 weeks, and periodically after that for a total of 400 or 610 days for the two lowest concentrations and a total of 428 or 638 days for the high concentrations. Ground and surface water samples containing perchlorate were collected, held and analyzed for perchlorate concentration periodically over at least 360 days. All samples except for the surface water samples were found to be stable for the duration of the study, allowing for holding times of at least 300 days for ground water samples and at least 90 days for surface water samples. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An evaluation of drinking water samples treated with alternative disinfectants

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, K.S.; Lykins, B.W. Jr.; Garner, L.M.

    1995-10-01

    Due to concern over potential human health risks associated with the use of chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) for disinfection of drinking water, many utilities are considering alternative disinfectants. An evaluation is thus needed of the potential risks associated with the use of alternative disinfectants relative to those posed by Cl{sub 2}. At a pilot-scale drinking water plant in Jefferson Parish, LA., two studies were conducted in which clarified and sand filtered Mississippi River water was treated with either ozone (O{sub 3}), monochloramine (NH{sub 2}Cl), Cl{sub 2} or was not disinfected. Ozonated water was also post-disinfected with either NH{sub 2}Cl or Cl{sub 2}, to provide a disinfectant residual. For each treatment stream total organic carbon (TOC), total organic halide (TOX) and microbiological contaminants were determined. XAD resin concentrates were also prepared for mutagenicity testing in the Ames Salmonella assay. Water samples disinfected with O{sub 3} alone had low levels of mutagenic activity, the same as the non-disinfected water. The level of mutagenicity observed following chlorination was approximately twice that observed following treatment with NH{sub 2}Cl. Disinfection with O{sub 3} prior to treatment with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl resulted in a significantly lower level of mutagenicity than when either disinfectant was used alone. The concentrations of TOX present in the water samples showed a pattern similar to that of the mutagenicity data. The levels of TOC, by contrast, were similar for all the treatment streams. No significant baterial contamination was observed in water samples treated with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl alone or in combination with O{sub 3}, as determined by heterotrophic plate counts. However, O{sub 3} alone did not insure an acceptable level of disinfection at the end of the treatment stream.

  19. Analysis of water in Autonomous Biological Systems (ABS) samples.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Y; Kobayashi, K; Seki, K; Mizutani, H; Kawasaki, Y; Koike, J; Ijiri, K; Yamashita, M; Sugiura, K; Poynter, J; MacCallum, T; Anderson, G

    1998-12-01

    Several soluble components, peptidase and amino acids, and carbon isotopic ratio in the water retrieved from flight experiments of Autonomous Biological Systems (ABS) as well as ground control samples are analyzed to interpret the condition, dynamics, material balance of the ABS ecosystems. Organic carbons in flight samples were found to be more abundant compared with the control ones, which suggested the uniform ecosystems in low gravity might easily dissolve more soluble components. The Mir-1997 flight sample showed higher C/N ratio probably because of the dissolution of carbon-rich plant materials.

  20. Downhole pumps for water sampling in small diameter wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koopman, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    The relatively high cost and difficulty in locating a source of pumps for use in obtaining ground-water samples from small-diameter wells has demonstrated a need for this report. Criteria for selection of a pump and pumping equipment to meet specific requirements has been tabulated to assist field personnel in making a selection from commercial sources. (Kosco-USGS)

  1. THE EMPACT BEACHES: A CASE STUDY IN RECREATIONAL WATER SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various chapters describe sample and experimental design, use of a geometric mean or an arithmetic mean, modeling and forecasting, and risk assessment in relation to monitoring recreational waters for fecal indicators. All of these aspects of monitoring are dependent on the spat...

  2. Filtration recovery of extracellular DNA from environmental water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    qPCR methods are able to analyze DNA from microbes within hours of collecting water samples, providing the promptest notification and public awareness possible when unsafe pathogenic levels are reached. Health risk, however, may be overestimated by the presence of extracellular ...

  3. Guidelines and techniques for obtaining water samples that accurately represent the water chemistry of an aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claassen, Hans C.

    1982-01-01

    Obtaining ground-water samples that accurately represent the water chemistry of an aquifer is a complex task. Before a ground-water sampling program can be started, an understanding of the kind of chemical data needed and the potential changes in water chemistry resulting from various drilling, well-completion, and sampling techniques is needed. This report provides a basis for such an evaluation and permits a choice of techniques that will result in obtaining the best possible data for the time and money allocated.

  4. Determination of estrogenic potential in waste water without sample extraction.

    PubMed

    Avberšek, Miha; Žegura, Bojana; Filipič, Metka; Uranjek-Ževart, Nataša; Heath, Ester

    2013-09-15

    This study describes the modification of the ER-Calux assay for testing water samples without sample extraction (NE-(ER-Calux) assay). The results are compared to those obtained with ER-Calux assay and a theoretical estrogenic potential obtained by GC-MSD. For spiked tap and waste water samples there was no statistical difference between estrogenic potentials obtained by the three methods. Application of NE-(ER-Calux) to "real" influent and effluents from municipal waste water treatment plants and receiving surface waters found that the NE-(ER-Calux) assay gave higher values compared to ER-Calux assay and GC-MSD. This is explained by the presence of water soluble endocrine agonists that are usually removed during extraction. Intraday dynamics of the estrogenic potential of a WWTP influent and effluent revealed an increase in the estrogenic potential of the influent from 12.9 ng(EEQ)/L in the morning to a peak value of 40.0 ng(EEQ)/L in the afternoon. The estrogenic potential of the effluent was

  5. Total Water Content Measurements with an Isokinetic Sampling Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Miller, Dean R.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a Total Water Content (TWC) Isokinetic Sampling Probe. Since it is not sensitive to cloud water particle phase nor size, it is particularly attractive to support super-cooled large droplet and high ice water content aircraft icing studies. The instrument is comprised of the Sampling Probe, Sample Flow Control, and Water Vapor Measurement subsystems. Analysis and testing have been conducted on the subsystems to ensure their proper function and accuracy. End-to-end bench testing has also been conducted to ensure the reliability of the entire instrument system. A Stokes Number based collection efficiency correction was developed to correct for probe thickness effects. The authors further discuss the need to ensure that no condensation occurs within the instrument plumbing. Instrument measurements compared to facility calibrations from testing in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel are presented and discussed. There appears to be liquid water content and droplet size effects in the differences between the two measurement techniques.

  6. Local and profile soil water content monitoring: A comparison of methods in terms of apparent and actual spatial variation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although many soil water sensors are now available, questions about their accuracy, precision, and representativeness still abound. This study examined down-hole (access tube profiling type) and insertion or burial (local) type sensors for their ability to assess soil profile water content (depth of...

  7. Investigations of Sample Stability in Water Chemistry Samples: Implications for the National Aquatic Resource Surveys

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water samples collected for the EPA's National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) typically arrive at an analytical laboratory 2 or 3 days after collection (longer if collected from a remote location), at which point they are stabilized (filtration and/or acid preservation) until an...

  8. Standard reference water samples for rare earth element determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, P.L.; Antweiler, R.C.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Taylor, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    Standard reference water samples (SRWS) were collected from two mine sites, one near Ophir, CO, USA and the other near Redding, CA, USA. The samples were filtered, preserved, and analyzed for rare earth element (REE) concentrations (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These two samples were acid mine waters with elevated concentrations of REEs (0.45-161 ??g/1). Seventeen international laboratories participated in a 'round-robin' chemical analysis program, which made it possible to evaluate the data by robust statistical procedures that are insensitive to outliers. The resulting most probable values are reported. Ten to 15 of the participants also reported values for Ba, Y, and Sc. Field parameters, major ion, and other trace element concentrations, not subject to statistical evaluation, are provided.

  9. Spectral analysis of water samples using modulated resonance features for monitoring of public water resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.; Yapijakis, C.; Aiken, D.; Shabaev, A.; Ramsey, S.; Peak, J.

    2015-05-01

    Hyperspectral analysis of water samples taken from public water resources in the New York City metro area has demonstrated the potential application of this type of analysis for water monitoring, treatment and evaluation prior to filtration. Hyperspectral monitoring of contaminants with respect to types and relative concentrations requires tracking statistical profiles of water contaminants in terms of spatial-temporal distributions of electromagnetic absorption spectra ranging from the ultraviolet to infrared, which are associated with specific water resources. To achieve this, it is necessary to establish correlation between hyperspectral signatures and types of contaminants to be found within specific water resources. Correlation between absorption spectra and changes in chemical and physical characteristics of contaminants requires sufficient sensitivity. The present study examines the sensitivity of modulated resonance features with respect to characteristics of water contaminants for hyperspectral analysis of water samples.

  10. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Leg 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayles, F.L.; Waterman, L.S.; Manheim, F. T.

    1972-01-01

    The chemistry of the pore fluids obtained on Leg 9 is remarkable primarily in its constancy. Excepting silicon and strontium, only at one site do the concentrations of the major and minor constituents deviate notably from sea water concentrations (see Tables 1 and 2). The trends, or lack of them, seen in these samples have been discussed previously and only references will be given here. The constancy of composition and similarity to sea water is particularly noteworthy, as the sediments at all of the 9 sites are thought to be intruded by the basal basalt. The pore fluid chemistry exhibits no evidence of intrusion except possibly at Site 84.

  11. Silicone rubber selection for passive sampling of pesticides in water.

    PubMed

    Martin, A; Margoum, C; Randon, J; Coquery, M

    2016-11-01

    Silicone rubber can extract organic compounds with a broad range of polarities (logKow>2-3) from aqueous samples. Such compounds include substances of major concern in the protection of aquatic ecosystems and human health, e.g. pesticides. Silicone rubbers (SRs) with various characteristics have been successfully used in sorptive methods for water sample extraction in the laboratory (SPME, SBSE), and for passive sampling in aquatic environments. However, only few studies have evaluated variability in organic compound sorption due to the origin of SRs, particularly for pesticides. The aim of this study was to select an SR for the extraction of pesticides from water samples by passive sampling. To this end we measured the impact of seven SR formulations on sorption capacity, defined by the partition coefficient (Ksw). Kinetic experiments and sorption isotherms were performed to determine extraction recovery as a selection criterion for SRs, and pesticide partition coefficients. Very large differences in affinity for pesticides were found between two kinds of SRs: "Polymerized SR kits" and "Manufactured SRs". One SR was chosen among the "Manufactured SRs", and the Ksw values of 21 pesticides were determined, filling a gap in the literature (1.50

  12. Siting analyses for water quality sampling in a catchment.

    PubMed

    Kao, Jehng-Jung; Li, Pei-Hao; Lin, Chin-Lien; Hu, Wen-Hsin

    2008-04-01

    Pollution loads discharged from upstream development or human activities significantly degrade the water quality of a reservoir. The design of an appropriate water quality sampling network is therefore important for detecting potential pollution events and monitoring pollution trends. However, under a limited budgetary constraint, how to site an appropriate number of sampling stations is a challenging task. A previous study proposed a method applying the simulated annealing algorithm to design the sampling network based on three cost factors including the number of reaches, bank length, and subcatchment area. However, these factors are not directly related to the distribution of possible pollution. Thus, this study modified the method by considering three additional factors, i.e. total phosphorus, nitrogen, and sediment loads. The larger the possible load, the higher the probability of a pollution event may occur. The study area was the Derchi reservoir catchment in Taiwan. Pollution loads were derived from the AGNPS model with rainfall intensity estimated using the Thiessen method. Analyses for a network with various numbers of sampling sites were implemented. The results obtained based on varied cost factors were compared and discussed. With the three additional factors, the chosen sampling network is expected to properly detect pollution events and monitor pollution distribution and temporal trends.

  13. Water vapor measurement system in global atmospheric sampling program, appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Dudzinski, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The water vapor measurement system used in the NASA Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) is described. The system used a modified version of a commercially available dew/frostpoint hygrometer with a thermoelectrically cooled mirror sensor. The modifications extended the range of the hygrometer to enable air sample measurements with frostpoint temperatures down to -80 C at altitudes of 6 to 13 km. Other modifications were made to permit automatic, unattended operation in an aircraft environment. This report described the hygrometer, its integration with the GASP system, its calibration, and operational aspects including measurement errors. The estimated uncertainty of the dew/frostpoint measurements was + or - 1.7 Celsius.

  14. Performance evaluation of 24 ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated N-Reactor storage basin water

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the evaluation of 24 organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated waters from the 100 Area 105 N-Reactor fuel storage basin. The data described in this report can be applied for developing and evaluating ion exchange pre-treatment process flowsheets. Cesium and strontium batch distribution ratios (K{sub d}`s), decontamination factors (DF), and material loadings (mmol g{sup -1}) are compared as a function of ion exchange material and initial cesium concentration. The actual and simulated N-Basin waters contain relatively low levels of aluminum, barium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (ranging from 8.33E-04 to 6.40E-05 M), with slightly higher levels of boron (6.63E-03 M) and sodium (1.62E-03 M). The {sup 137}Cs level is 1.74E-06 Ci L-{sup 1} which corresponds to approximately 4.87E-10 M Cs. The initial Na/Cs ratio was 3.33E+06. The concentration of total strontium is 4.45E-06 M, while the {sup 90}Sr radioactive component was measured to be 6.13E-06 Ci L{sup -1}. Simulant tests were conducted by contacting 0.067 g or each ion exchange material with approximately 100 mL of either the actual or simulated N-Basin water. The simulants contained variable initial cesium concentrations ranging from 1.00E-04 to 2.57E- 10 M Cs while all other components were held constant. For all materials, the average cesium K{sub d} was independent of cesium concentration below approximately 1.0E-06 M. Above this level, the average cesium K{sub d} values decreased significantly. Cesium K{sub d} values exceeding 1.0E+07 mL g{sup -1} were measured in the simulated N-Basin water. However, when measured in the actual N-Basin water the values were several orders of magnitude lower, with a maximum of 1.24E+05 mL g{sup -1} observed.

  15. Spectrophotometric determination of trace copper in water samples with thiomichlersketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dayou; Yuan, Dong

    2007-02-01

    A simple and sensitive spectrophotometric method for determination of trace copper in water samples is proposed. In the presence of pH 4.6 HAc-NaAc buffer solution and surfactant polyethylene octyl phenyl ether (OP) medium, copper reacts with thiomichlersketone (TMK) to form a stable 1:4 complex. The complex Cu(II)-TMK-OP shows maximum absorbance at 500 nm with a molar absorptivity value of 5.7 × 10 4 l mol -1 cm -1. Beer's law is obeyed for copper concentrations in the range of 0-15 μg/25 ml. The average recovery of copper is between 95.8 and 106%. The method has been applied for determination of trace copper in different water samples with satisfactory results.

  16. Evaluation of wastewater contaminant transport in surface waters using verified Lagrangian sampling.

    PubMed

    Antweiler, Ronald C; Writer, Jeffrey H; Murphy, Sheila F

    2014-02-01

    Contaminants released from wastewater treatment plants can persist in surface waters for substantial distances. Much research has gone into evaluating the fate and transport of these contaminants, but this work has often assumed constant flow from wastewater treatment plants. However, effluent discharge commonly varies widely over a 24-hour period, and this variation controls contaminant loading and can profoundly influence interpretations of environmental data. We show that methodologies relying on the normalization of downstream data to conservative elements can give spurious results, and should not be used unless it can be verified that the same parcel of water was sampled. Lagrangian sampling, which in theory samples the same water parcel as it moves downstream (the Lagrangian parcel), links hydrologic and chemical transformation processes so that the in-stream fate of wastewater contaminants can be quantitatively evaluated. However, precise Lagrangian sampling is difficult, and small deviations - such as missing the Lagrangian parcel by less than 1h - can cause large differences in measured concentrations of all dissolved compounds at downstream sites, leading to erroneous conclusions regarding in-stream processes controlling the fate and transport of wastewater contaminants. Therefore, we have developed a method termed "verified Lagrangian" sampling, which can be used to determine if the Lagrangian parcel was actually sampled, and if it was not, a means for correcting the data to reflect the concentrations which would have been obtained had the Lagrangian parcel been sampled. To apply the method, it is necessary to have concentration data for a number of conservative constituents from the upstream, effluent, and downstream sites, along with upstream and effluent concentrations that are constant over the short-term (typically 2-4h). These corrections can subsequently be applied to all data, including non-conservative constituents. Finally, we show how data

  17. Surface Water Sampling Data for BP Spill/Deepwater Horizon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (also referred to as the BP oil spill) began on 20 April 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico on the BP-operated Macondo Prospect. Following the explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, a sea-floor oil gusher flowed for 87 days, until it was capped on 15 July 2010.In response to the BP oil spill, EPA sampled air, water, sediment, and waste generated by the cleanup operations.

  18. Water Sampling Data for BP Spill/Deepwater Horizon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (also referred to as the BP oil spill) began on 20 April 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico on the BP-operated Macondo Prospect. Following the explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, a sea-floor oil gusher flowed for 87 days, until it was capped on 15 July 2010.In response to the BP oil spill, EPA sampled air, water, sediment, and waste generated by the cleanup operations.

  19. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR EMERGENCY WATER AND URINE SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-08-27

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Bioassay Lab participated in the 2008 NRIP Emergency Response program administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in May, 2008. A new rapid column separation method was used for analysis of actinides and {sup 90}Sr the NRIP 2008 emergency water and urine samples. Significant method improvements were applied to reduce analytical times. As a result, much faster analysis times were achieved, less than 3 hours for determination of {sup 90}Sr and 3-4 hours for actinides. This represents a 25%-33% improvement in analysis times from NRIP 2007 and a {approx}100% improvement compared to NRIP 2006 report times. Column flow rates were increased by a factor of two, with no significant adverse impact on the method performance. Larger sample aliquots, shorter count times, faster cerium fluoride microprecipitation and streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation were also employed. Based on initial feedback from NIST, the SRS Environmental Bioassay Lab had the most rapid analysis times for actinides and {sup 90}Sr analyses for NRIP 2008 emergency urine samples. High levels of potential matrix interferences may be present in emergency samples and rugged methods are essential. Extremely high levels of {sup 210}Po were found to have an adverse effect on the uranium results for the NRIP-08 urine samples, while uranium results for NRIP-08 water samples were not affected. This problem, which was not observed for NRIP-06 or NRIP-07 urine samples, was resolved by using an enhanced {sup 210}Po removal step, which will be described.

  20. An opacity-sampled treatment of water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, David R.; Augason, Gordon C.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1989-01-01

    Although the bands of H2O are strong in the spectra of cool stars and calculations have repeatedly demonstrated their significance as opacity sources, only approximate opacities are currently available, due both to the difficulty of accounting for the millions of lines involved and to the inadequacy of laboratory and theoretical data. To overcome these obstacles, a new treatment is presented, based upon a statistical representation of the water vapor spectrum derived from available laboratory data. This statistical spectrum of water vapor employs an exponential distribution of line strengths and random positions of lines whose overall properties are forced to reproduce the mean opacities observed in the laboratory. The resultant data set is then treated by the opacity-sampling method exactly as are all other lines, both molecular and atomic. Significant differences are found between the results of this improved treatment and the results obtained with previous treatments of water-vapor opacity.

  1. Study of Cloud Water Samples Collected over Northern Poland.

    PubMed

    Polkowska, Ż; Błaś, M; Lech, D; Namieśnik, J

    2014-01-01

    The paper gives the results of the first studies on the chemistry of cloud water collected during 3 mo (Aug.-Oct. 2010) in the free atmosphere over the area to the south of the Tri-City (Gdansk-Sopot-Gdynia) conurbation on the Gulf of Gdansk, Poland. Taken from cumulus, stratus, and stratocumulus clouds by means of an aircraft-mounted collector, the water samples were analyzed for the following contaminants: anions (chlorides, fluorides, nitrates, sulfates, and phosphates), cations (lithium, sodium, potassium, ammonium, calcium, and magnesium), and trace metals. In addition, pH values were measured, and the type and composition of suspended particulate matter was determined. We discuss the relationship between the concentration of inorganic ions and the type of cloud from which water was sampled. The chemistry is also likely related to the circulation pattern and inflow of clean air masses from the Baltic Sea. Moreover, a relationship was found between the composition of the samples examined and the location of pollutant emission sources.

  2. GROUND WATER SAMPLING OF VOCS IN THE WATER/CAPILLARY FRINGE AREA FOR VAPOR INTRUSION ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vapor intrusion has recently been considered a major pathway for increased indoor air contamination from certain volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). The recent Draft EPA Subsurface Vapor Intrusion Guidance Document states that ground water samples should be obtained from the u...

  3. Gross-beta activity in ground water: natural sources and artifacts of sampling and laboratory analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Alan H.

    1995-01-01

    activities are expected to be low.Ingrowth of beta-emitting radionuclides during sample holding times can contribute to gross-beta activity, particularly in ground water with gross-beta activities > 10 pCi/L. Ingrowth of beta-emitting progeny of238U, specifically234Pa and234Th, contributes much of the measured gross-beta activity in ground water from 4 of the 5 areas studied. Consequently, gross-beta activity measurements commonly overestimate the abundance of beta-emitting radionuclides actually present in ground water. Differing sample holding times before analysis lead to differing amounts of ingrowth of the two progeny. Therefore, holding times can affect observed gross-beta measurements, particularly in ground water with238U activities that are moderate to high compared with the activity of40K plus228Ra. Uncertainties associated with counting efficiencies for beta particles with different energies further complicate the interpretation of gross-beta measurements.

  4. EPA GROUND WATER ISSUE: Ground Water Sample Preservation at ISCO Sites – Recommended Guidelines

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) involves the introduction of a chemical oxidant into the subsurface for the purpose of transforming ground water contaminants into harmless byproducts. Due to oxidant persistence, ground water samples collected at hazardous waste sites may contai...

  5. Engaging the Public in the MESSENGER Spacecraft's Confirmation of Water Ice on Mercury by Using Actual Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallau, K.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J. P.; Goldstein, J. J.; Hamel, S.; Hirshon, B.; Malaret, E.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.; Weir, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft have provided compelling support for the 20-year-old hypothesis that Mercury hosts abundant water ice and other frozen volatile materials in its permanently shadowed polar craters. MESSENGER's Education and Public Outreach (EPO) team is creating a suite of materials to engage the public in the scientific process that led to this discovery. The Water Ice Data Exploration (WIDE) suite will consist of a video presentation from a mission scientist and engineer, a pencil-and-paper activity, and a web-based interactive data-mapping tool. Each of these individual parts will examine Mariner 10 flyby data from the 1970s, Earth-based radar data from the early 1990s, and MESSENGER flyby and orbital data from various instruments to help show the progression of evidence in support of this conclusion. The QuickMap interactive data mapping tool will be customized for this project and will also serve as an introduction to the larger QuickMap tool, with which publicly released MESSENGER data can be viewed (http://messenger-act.actgate.com/msgr_public_released/react_quickmap.html). The WIDE suite of materials will be accessible from a dedicated HTML page on the MESSENGER EPO website (temporary draft: http://www.messenger-education.org/workshops/cod.php), enabling free and simple dissemination to broad audiences.

  6. Actual evapotranspiration (water use) assessment of the Colorado River Basin at the Landsat resolution using the operational simplified surface energy balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Bohms, Stefanie; Russell L, Scott; Verdin, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Accurately estimating consumptive water use in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) is important for assessing and managing limited water resources in the basin. Increasing water demand from various sectors may threaten long-term sustainability of the water supply in the arid southwestern United States. We have developed a first-ever basin-wide actual evapotranspiration (ETa) map of the CRB at the Landsat scale for water use assessment at the field level. We used the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model for estimating ETa using 328 cloud-free Landsat images acquired during 2010. Our results show that cropland had the highest ETa among all land cover classes except for water. Validation using eddy covariance measured ETa showed that the SSEBop model nicely captured the variability in annual ETa with an overall R2 of 0.78 and a mean bias error of about 10%. Comparison with water balance-based ETa showed good agreement (R2 = 0.85) at the sub-basin level. Though there was good correlation (R2 = 0.79) between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based ETa (1 km spatial resolution) and Landsat-based ETa (30 m spatial resolution), the spatial distribution of MODIS-based ETa was not suitable for water use assessment at the field level. In contrast, Landsat-based ETa has good potential to be used at the field level for water management. With further validation using multiple years and sites, our methodology can be applied for regular production of ETa maps of larger areas such as the conterminous United States.

  7. Visualizing Water Quality Sampling-Events in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolt, M. D.

    2015-07-01

    Water quality sampling in Florida is acknowledged to be spatially and temporally variable. The rotational monitoring program that was created to capture data within the state's thousands of miles of coastline and streams, and millions of acres of lakes, reservoirs, and ponds may be partly responsible for inducing the variability as an artifact. Florida's new dissolved-oxygen-standard methodology will require more data to calculate a percent saturation. This additional data requirement's impact can be seen when the new methodology is applied retrospectively to the historical collection. To understand how, where, and when the methodological change could alter the environmental quality narrative of state waters requires addressing induced bias from prior sampling events and behaviors. Here stream and coastal water quality data is explored through several modalities to maximize understanding and communication of the spatiotemporal relationships. Previous methodology and expected-retrospective calculations outside the regulatory framework are found to be significantly different, but dependent on the spatiotemporal perspective. Data visualization is leveraged to demonstrate these differences, their potential impacts on environmental narratives, and to direct further review and analysis.

  8. Asotin Creek ISCO Water Sample Data Summary: Water Year 2002, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Stacia

    2003-08-01

    The Pomeroy Ranger District operates 3 automated water samplers (ISCOs) in the Asotin Creek drainage in cooperation with the Asotin Model Watershed. The samplers are located on Asotin Creek: Asotin Creek at the mouth, Asotin Creek at Koch site, and South Fork Asotin Creek above the forks. At the end of Water Year (WY) 2001 we decided to sample from Oct. 1 through June 30 of each water year. This decision was based on the difficulty of obtaining good low flow samples, since the shallow depth of water often meant that instrument intakes were on the bed of the river and samples were contaminated with bed sediments. The greatest portion of suspended sediment is transported during the higher flows of fall and especially during the spring snow runoff period, and sampling the shorter season should allow characterization of the sediment load of the river. The ISCO water samplers collected a daily composite sample of 4 samples per day into one bottle at 6-hour intervals until late March when they were reprogrammed to collect 3 samples per day at 8-hour intervals. This was done to reduce battery use since battery failure had become an ongoing problem. The water is picked up on 24-day cycles and brought to the Forest Service Water Lab in Pendleton, OR. The samples are analyzed for total suspended solids (TSS), conductivity, and turbidity. A total dissolved solids value is estimated based on conductivity. The USGS gage, Asotin Creek at the mouth, No.13335050 has been discontinued and there are no discharge records available for this period.

  9. Micellar electrokinetic chromatographic determination of triazine herbicides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Shuaihua; Yin, Xiaofang; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2014-09-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with online sweeping preconcentration in micellar electrokinetic chromatography was developed for the simultaneous determination of five triazine herbicides (atrazine, simazine, propazine, prometon and simetryn) in water samples. Several experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiencies such as the type and volume of both the extraction and dispersive solvents, the addition of salt to sample solution, the extraction time and the pH of the sample solution were investigated. Under optimum conditions, the linearity of the method was good in the range from 0.33 to 20 ng mL(-1) for simazine, propazine, atrazine and simetryn, and from 0.17 to 20 ng mL(-1) for prometon, respectively. The sensitivity enrichment factors were in the range from 1750 to 2100, depending on the compound. The limit of detection (S/N = 3) ranged from 0.05 to 0.10 ng mL(-1). The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of the five triazines in river, ground and well waters.

  10. Adsorption of Water on Simulated Moon Dust Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goering, John P.; Sah, Shweta; Burghaus, Uwe; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    A lunar regolith simulant dust sample (JSC-1a) supported on a silica wafer (SiO2/Si(111)) has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The adsorption kinetics of water has been studied primarily by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and also by collecting isothermal adsorption transients. The support has been characterized by water TDS. JSC-1a consists mostly of aluminosilicate glass and other minerals containing Fe, Na, Ca, and Mg. The particle sizes span the range from a few microns up to 100 microns. At small exposures, H2O TDS is characterized by broad (100 to 450 K) structures; at large exposures distinct TDS peaks emerge that are assigned to amorphous solid water (145 K) and crystalline ice (165 K). Water dissociates on JSC-1a at small exposures but not on the bare silica support. It appears that rather porous condensed ice layers form at large exposures. At thermal impact energies, the initial adsorption probability amounts to 0.92+/-0.05.

  11. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Salt Lake City, Utah. This plan identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring of ground water, sediments, and surface waters at monitoring stations on the site.

  12. Electrochemical determination of pharmaceuticals in spiked water samples.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Antiochia, Riccarda; Campanella, Luigi; Dragone, Roberto; Lavagnini, Irma

    2005-07-15

    The electrochemical behaviour of acidic and neutral pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs) was studied by cyclic voltammetry and pulse voltammetric techniques on mercury, carbon nanotube paste, carbon paste and gold electrodes. The best results, in terms of sensitivity, linearity range and detection limits, were obtained by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) for ofloxacin (LOD 5.2 microM), differential pulse polarography (DPP) for clofibric acid (LOD 4.7 microM) and normal pulse voltammetry (NPV) for diclofenac (LOD 0.8 microM) and propranolol (LOD 0.5 microM). An enrichment step of approximately two orders of magnitude was performed by a solid-phase extraction procedure (SPE) in order to concentrate the samples. The developed method was optimized and tested on spiked river water samples.

  13. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Surface remediation was completed at the former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, in 1990. Residual radioactive materials (contaminated soil and debris) were removed and disposed of at Union Carbide Corporation`s (Umetco) nearby Gas Hills Title 2 facility. Ground water in the surficial and semiconfined aquifers (known collectively as the `uppermost aquifer`) below the former mill and tailings site has been contaminated. No contamination has been detected in the deeper, confined sandstone aquifer. The contaminant plume extends off site to the south and east. The plume is constrained by surface wetlands and small streams to the east and west of the site and by the Little Wind River to the south. Fifteen monitor wells installed in 1993 were sampled to better define the contaminant plume and to provide additional water quality data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples also were collected from domestic wells in response to a request by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in January 1994. No contamination attributable to the former uranium milling operations have ever been detected in any of the domestic wells used for potable supplies.

  14. Decontaminating materials used in ground water sampling devices: Organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.V.; Ranney, T.A.

    2000-12-31

    In these studies, the efficiency of various decontamination protocols was tested on small pieces of materials commonly used in ground water sampling devices. Three materials, which ranged in ability to sorb organic solutes, were tested: stainless steel (SS), rigid polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The test pieces were exposed to two aqueous test solutions: One contained three volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and one nitroaromatic compound, and the other contained four pesticides. Also, three types of polymetic tubing were exposed to pesticide solutions. Generally, the contact times were 10 minutes and 24 hours for sorption and desorption. The contaminants were removed from the nonpermeable SS and the less-sorptive rigid PVC test pieces simply by washing with a hot detergent solution and rinsing with hot water. Additional treatment was required for the PTFE test pieces exposed to the VOCs and for the low-density polyethylene (LDPE) tubing exposed to the pesticide test solution. Solvent rinsing did not improve removal of the three VOCs form the PTFE and only marginally improved removal of the residual pesticides from the LDPE. However, a hot water and detergent wash and rinse followed by oven drying at approximately 105 C was effective for removing the VOCs from the PTFE and substantially reduced pesticide contamination from the LDPE.

  15. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Levin, Saurabh; Krishnan, Sunderrajan; Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep

    2016-05-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0-2mgl(-1). Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field.

  16. Rapid detection of Naegleria fowleri in water distribution pipeline biofilms and drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Puzon, Geoffrey J; Lancaster, James A; Wylie, Jason T; Plumb, Iason J

    2009-09-01

    Rapid detection of pathogenic Naegleria fowler in water distribution networks is critical for water utilities. Current detection methods rely on sampling drinking water followed by culturing and molecular identification of purified strains. This culture-based method takes an extended amount of time (days), detects both nonpathogenic and pathogenic species, and does not account for N. fowleri cells associated with pipe wall biofilms. In this study, a total DNA extraction technique coupled with a real-time PCR method using primers specific for N. fowleri was developed and validated. The method readily detected N. fowleri without preculturing with the lowest detection limit for N. fowleri cells spiked in biofilm being one cell (66% detection rate) and five cells (100% detection rate). For drinking water, the detection limit was five cells (66% detection rate) and 10 cells (100% detection rate). By comparison, culture-based methods were less sensitive for detection of cells spiked into both biofilm (66% detection for <10 cells) and drinking water (0% detection for <10 cells). In mixed cultures of N. fowleri and nonpathogenic Naegleria, the method identified N. fowleri in 100% of all replicates, whereastests with the current consensus primers detected N. fowleri in only 5% of all replicates. Application of the new method to drinking water and pipe wall biofilm samples obtained from a distribution network enabled the detection of N. fowleri in under 6 h, versus 3+ daysforthe culture based method. Further, comparison of the real-time PCR data from the field samples and the standard curves enabled an approximation of N. fowleri cells in the biofilm and drinking water. The use of such a method will further aid water utilities in detecting and managing the persistence of N. fowleri in water distribution networks.

  17. Issues concerning spectral analysis of water samples for monitoring and treatment of public water resources.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Lambrakos, S G; Yapijakis, C; Huang, L; Ramsey, S; Shabaev, A; Massa, L; Peak, J

    2014-01-01

    Experimental measurements conducted in the laboratory, involving hyperspectral analysis of water samples taken from public water resources, have motivated a re-evaluation of issues concerning the potential application of this type of analysis for water monitoring, treatment and evaluation prior to filtration. One issue concerns hyperspectral monitoring of contaminants with respect to types and relative concentrations. This implies a need to better understand the statistical profiles of water contaminants in terms of spatial-temporal distributions of electromagnetic absorption spectra ranging from the ultraviolet to infrared, which are associated with specific water resources. This issue also implies the need to establish correlations between hyperspectral signatures and types of contaminants to be found within specific water resources. Another issue concerns the use of absorption spectra to determine changes in chemical and physical characteristics of contaminants after application of water treatments, in order to determine levels of toxicity with respect to the environment. This paper presents a prototype spectral analysis showing various aspects relevant to water monitoring and discusses the use of basic theory for the interpretation of spectral features associated with water contaminants, as well as discussing inverse analysis of hyperspectral measurements.

  18. Liquid Water from First Principles: Validation of Different Sampling Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Mundy, C J; Kuo, W; Siepmann, J; McGrath, M J; Vondevondele, J; Sprik, M; Hutter, J; Parrinello, M; Mohamed, F; Krack, M; Chen, B; Klein, M

    2004-05-20

    A series of first principles molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for liquid water to assess the validity and reproducibility of different sampling approaches. These simulations include Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations using the program CPMD with different values of the fictitious electron mass in the microcanonical and canonical ensembles, Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics using the programs CPMD and CP2K in the microcanonical ensemble, and Metropolis Monte Carlo using CP2K in the canonical ensemble. With the exception of one simulation for 128 water molecules, all other simulations were carried out for systems consisting of 64 molecules. It is found that the structural and thermodynamic properties of these simulations are in excellent agreement with each other as long as adiabatic sampling is maintained in the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations either by choosing a sufficiently small fictitious mass in the microcanonical ensemble or by Nos{acute e}-Hoover thermostats in the canonical ensemble. Using the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr exchange and correlation energy functionals and norm-conserving Troullier-Martins or Goedecker-Teter-Hutter pseudopotentials, simulations at a fixed density of 1.0 g/cm{sup 3} and a temperature close to 315 K yield a height of the first peak in the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function of about 3.0, a classical constant-volume heat capacity of about 70 J K{sup -1} mol{sup -1}, and a self-diffusion constant of about 0.1 Angstroms{sup 2}/ps.

  19. Voltammetric Determination of Ni and Co in Water Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Melian, Jose Alberto; Dona-Rodriguez, Jose Miguel; Hernandez-Brito, Joaquin; Perez Pena, Jesus

    1997-12-01

    Stripping voltammetry has attracted considerable attention for the determination of trace and ultratrace metals. This is mainly due to its high sensitivity and low cost of instrumentation. In adsorptive stripping voltammetry an organometallic complex is formed by the addition of a suitable ligand to the sample. The complex is adsorbed onto the Hg-drop by the application of the proper adsorption potential (more positive than E1/2) and solution stirring. After an adsorption period a cathodic (negative going) potential scan is applied and the metal concentration is calculated by the standard addition method. Nickel is found in natural waters at nM levels and is closely related with phosphates and silicates. Cobalt is a component of vitamin B12 and occurs in natural waters at concentration about 0.1 nM. We propose the voltammetric analysis of these elements by adsorptive stripping voltammetry as an introductory laboratory experiment for advanced chemistry or for chemical or environmental engineering students. The experiment has been proven to be very suitable for the laboratory part of the instrumental analysis course at the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain). In general, about 70% of the students have obtained good agreement (less than 10% of difference) between their results and the expected ones. Two hours is enough for the overall instrumental performance and the preparation of Ni and Co standards.

  20. Evaluation of selected information on splitting devices for water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, P.D.; Larson, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Four devices for splitting water samples into representative aliquots are used by the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division. A thorough evaluation of these devices (14-liter churn, 8-liter churn, plastic cone, and Teflon cone) encompasses a wide variety of concerns, based on both chemical and physical considerations. This report surveys the existing data (as of April 1994) on cleaning efficiency and splitting capability of these devices and presents the data in a systematic framework for evaluation. From the existing data, some of these concerns are adequately or partially addressed, but the majority of concerns could not be addressed because of the lack of data. In general, the existing cleaning and transport protocols are adequate at the milligram per liter level, but the adequacy is largely unknown for trace elements and organic chemicals at lower concen- trations. The existing data indicate that better results are obtained when the splitters are cleaned in the laboratory rather than in the field. Two conclusions that can be reached on the splitting capability of solids are that more work must be done with all four devices to characterize and quantify their limitations and range of usefulness, and that the 14-liter churn (and by association, the 8-liter churn) is not useful in obtaining representative splits of sand-sized particles.

  1. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coes, Alissa L.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Foreman, William T.; Iverson, Jana L.; Alvarez, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19–23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method.

  2. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Coes, Alissa L; Paretti, Nicholas V; Foreman, William T; Iverson, Jana L; Alvarez, David A

    2014-03-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19-23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method.

  3. Estimation of Actual Crop ET of Paddy Using the Energy Balance Model SMARET and Validation with Field Water Balance Measurements and a Crop Growth Model (ORYZA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallasamy, N. D.; Muraleedharan, B. V.; Kathirvel, K.; Narasimhan, B.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainable management of water resources requires reliable estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ET) at fine spatial and temporal resolution. This is significant in the case of rice based irrigation systems, one of the major consumers of surface water resources and where ET forms a major component of water consumption. However huge tradeoff in the spatial and temporal resolution of satellite images coupled with lack of adequate number of cloud free images within a growing season act as major constraints in deriving ET at fine spatial and temporal resolution using remote sensing based energy balance models. The scale at which ET is determined is decided by the spatial and temporal scale of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which form inputs to energy balance models. In this context, the current study employed disaggregation algorithms (NL-DisTrad and DisNDVI) to generate time series of LST and NDVI images at fine resolution. The disaggregation algorithms aimed at generating LST and NDVI at finer scale by integrating temporal information from concurrent coarse resolution data and spatial information from a single fine resolution image. The temporal frequency of the disaggregated images is further improved by employing composite images of NDVI and LST in the spatio-temporal disaggregation method. The study further employed half-hourly incoming surface insolation and outgoing long wave radiation obtained from the Indian geostationary satellite (Kalpana-1) to convert the instantaneous ET into daily ET and subsequently to the seasonal ET, thereby improving the accuracy of ET estimates. The estimates of ET were validated with field based water balance measurements carried out in Gadana, a subbasin predominated by rice paddy fields, located in Tamil Nadu, India.

  4. Sampling and analysis for radon-222 dissolved in ground water and surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWayne, Cecil L.; Gesell, T.F.

    1992-01-01

    Radon-222 is a naturally occurring radioactive gas in the uranium-238 decay series that has traditionally been called, simply, radon. The lung cancer risks associated with the inhalation of radon decay products have been well documented by epidemiological studies on populations of uranium miners. The realization that radon is a public health hazard has raised the need for sampling and analytical guidelines for field personnel. Several sampling and analytical methods are being used to document radon concentrations in ground water and surface water worldwide but no convenient, single set of guidelines is available. Three different sampling and analytical methods - bubbler, liquid scintillation, and field screening - are discussed in this paper. The bubbler and liquid scintillation methods have high accuracy and precision, and small analytical method detection limits of 0.2 and 10 pCi/l (picocuries per liter), respectively. The field screening method generally is used as a qualitative reconnaissance tool.

  5. GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR VERTICAL PROFILING OF CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate delineation of plume boundaries and vertical contaminant distribution are necessary in order to adequately characterize waste sites and determine remedial strategies to be employed. However, it is important to consider the sampling objectives, sampling methods, and sampl...

  6. Iron analysis in atmospheric water samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in water-methanol.

    PubMed

    Sofikitis, A M; Colin, J L; Desboeufs, K V; Losno, R

    2004-01-01

    To distinguish between Fe(II) and Fe(III) species in atmospheric water samples, we have adapted an analytical procedure based on the formation of a specific complex between Fe(II) and ferrozine (FZ) on a chromatographic column. After elution of Fe(III), the Fe(II) complex is recovered with water-methanol (4:1). The possibility of trace iron measurements in this complex medium by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry has been investigated. A simplex optimization routine was required to complete the development of the analytical method.

  7. Electromembrane extraction for the determination of parabens in water samples.

    PubMed

    Villar-Navarro, Mercedes; Moreno-Carballo, María Del Carmen; Fernández-Torres, Rut; Callejón-Mochón, Manuel; Bello-López, Miguel Ángel

    2016-02-01

    To our knowledge, for the first time an electromembrane extraction combined with a high-performance liquid chromatography procedure using diode-array detection has been developed for the determination of five of the most widely used parabens: ethyl 4-hydroxybenzoate, propyl 4-hydroxybenzoate, butyl 4-hydroxybenzoate, isobutyl 4-hydroxybenzoate, and benzyl 4-hydroxybenzoate. Parabens were extracted from pH 4 aqueous sample solutions with use of an Accurel® S6/2 polypropylene hollow fiber that supports a liquid membrane of 1-octanol to a pH 12 aqueous acceptor solution placed inside the lumen of the hollow fiber. An electric current of 30 V was applied over the supported liquid membrane by means of platinum wires placed in the donor and acceptor phases. Parabens were extracted in 40 min with enrichment factors in the 30-49 range. The procedure has detection limits between 0.98 and 1.43 μg L(-1). The method was applied to the determination of parabens in surface environmental waters with excellent results.

  8. Sampling and Analysis for Lead in Water and Soil Samples on a University Campus: A Student Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butala, Steven J.; Zarrabi, Kaveh

    1995-01-01

    Describes a student research project that determined concentrations of lead in water drawn from selected drinking fountains and in selected soil samples on the campus of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. (18 references) (DDR)

  9. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  10. Escherichia coli in marine water: Comparison of methods for the assessment of recreational bathing water samples.

    PubMed

    Lušić, Darija Vukić; Jozić, Slaven; Cenov, Arijana; Glad, Marin; Bulić, Marko; Lušić, Dražen

    2016-12-15

    Bathing Water Directive (2006/7/EC) specifies two reference methods for Escherichia coli detection: ISO 9308-1 and 9308-3. The revised ISO 9308-1 is recommended only for waters with a low bacterial background flora. Considering the extended time needed for analysis and, generally, the lack of experience in using ISO 9308-3 in the Mediterranean, the suitability of ISO 9308-1 for the examination of E. coli in bathing water was evaluated. The present study was aimed at a comparison of data obtained by the reference method in seawater samples (110 beaches, N=477) with data received from six alternative methods. Results show that recently used TSA/TBA method may overestimate E. coli numbers in marine waters. The temperature modified ISO 9308-1 (44°C) did not significantly alter the results, but outperformed the antibiotic supplemented agar at reducing non-E. coli bacteria on the plates, allowing the use of the respective method for monitoring coastal water.

  11. Ballast water sampling as a critical component of biological invasions risk management.

    PubMed

    David, Matej; Perkovic, Marko

    2004-08-01

    The human mediated transfer of harmful organisms via shipping, specifically via ballast water transport, leading to the loss of biodiversity, alteration of ecosystems, negative impacts on human health and in some regions economic loss, has raised considerable attention especially in the last decade. Ballast water sampling is very important for biological invasions risk management. The complexity of ballast water sampling is a result of both the variety of organism diversity and behaviour, as well as ship design including availability of ballast water sampling points. Furthermore, ballast water sampling methodology is influenced by the objectives of the sampling study. In the course of research conducted in Slovenia, new sampling equipment for ships' ballast water was developed and tested. In this paper new ballast water sampling methods and equipment together with practical shipboard testing results are presented.

  12. The effect of sampling strategies on assessment of water quality criteria attainment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxin; Wilson, Jessica M; VanBriesen, Jeanne M

    2015-05-01

    Sample locations for large river studies affect the representativeness of data, and thus can alter decisions made regarding river conditions and the need for interventions to improve water quality. The present study evaluated three water-quality sampling programs for Total Dissolved Solid (TDS) assessment in the Monongahela River from 2008 to 2012. The sampling plans cover the same 145 km of river but differ in frequency, sample location and type (e.g., river water sample vs drinking water plant intake sample). Differences resulting from temporal and spatial variability in sampling lead to different conclusions regarding water quality in the river (including regulatory listing decisions), especially when low flow leads to concentrations at or near the water quality criteria (500mg/L TDS). Drinking water samples exceeded the criteria 82 out of 650 samples (12.6%), while river water samples exceeded the criteria 47 out of 464 samples (10.1%). Different water sample types could provide different pictures of water quality in the river and lead to different regulatory listing decisions.

  13. Preparation and assessment of a candidate reference sample of Lake Baikal deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suturin, A. N.; Paradina, L. F.; Epov, V. N.; Semenov, A. R.; Lozhkin, V. I.; Petrov, L. L.

    2003-02-01

    The possibility of the creation of a multi-element reference sample of Lake Baikal deep-water composition is justified. This is a new type of reference sample composed of natural water with a wide range of macro- and microelements. This candidate reference sample has a matrix composition consisting of hydrocarbonate and calcium water, a composition that is typical of many rivers and lakes of the world, as well as rain water. The creation of a candidate reference sample of Lake Baikal water is possible due to the stable water composition at a depth of 500 m, and to the use of water sampling technology which results in the preservation of the initial composition of water and its absolute sterility. Trial batches of Baikal water collected annually and stored in special polyethylenetereftalate bottles for a period of 9 years remained stable and homogenous for most elements. Preliminary data for a range of elements and compounds are presented.

  14. Measurement of Mercury Methylation in Lake Water and Sediment Samples

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Akira; Rudd, John W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Biological mercury methylation was assayed by a new radiochemical technique in the water column and sediments of a mercury-contaminated lake. In 24 weeks during 1979, there were three episodes of methylating activity in surface floc and in water, each lasting 3 to 5 weeks. Periods of methylation in the water column coincided with surface sediment methylation and appeared to be related to overall microbial activity. Mercury was actively methylated in the presence of bound sulfide. PMID:16345649

  15. LABORATORY ANALYSIS FOR ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has established maximum contaminant levels ( MCLs ), for many inorganic contaminants found in drinking water, to protect the health of consumers. Some of these chemicals occur naturally in source waters while some are the result o...

  16. Precision of a splitting device for water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, Paul D.; Nacionales, Fernando C.; Larson, Steven J.

    1995-01-01

    Two identical cone splitters, devices designed to split water and its suspended solids into equal aliquots for semi-volatile organic chemical and trace element analyses, were evaluated for their precision. The water-splitting evaluations consisted of experiments to test the effect of water volume, the effect of combining outlet ports, and the effect of different techniques of water introduction. The solids-splitting evaluations consisted of experi- ments to test the effect of particle size (nine different particle diameters ranging from very coarse sand to clay) and suspended-solids concentration. In general, water was equally split with a precision of less than 5 percent relative standard deviation. The accuracy of splitting the solids was a function of particle size. Clay, silt, and fine and medium sand were split with a precision relative standard deviation of less than 7 percent, and coarse sand was split with a relative standard deviation between 12 and 45 percent.

  17. Trace level determination of u, zn, cd, pb and cu in drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Singh, Surinder; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2006-01-01

    The concentration of uranium has been assessed in drinking water samples collected from different locations in Bathinda district, Punjab, India. The water samples are taken from hand pumps and tube wells. Uranium is determined using fission track technique. Uranium concentration in the water samples varies from 2.23+/- 0.05 to 87.05+/- 0.29 microg/L. These values are compared with safe limit values recommended for drinking water. The uranium concentration in almost all drinking water samples is found to be more than the safe limit. Analysis of some heavy metals viz. Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in water is made. The concentration of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chlorine and total hardness along with the pH value and conductivity of the water samples are measured. Some of the samples show stunningly high values of these parameters.

  18. Produced water chemistry data for samples from four petroleum wells, Southern San Joaquin Valley, California, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin; McMahon, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the California State Water Resources Control Board collected produced water samples from four petroleum wells in the southern San Joaquin Valley on November 5, 2014. This digital dataset contains the site information, analyzing laboratories and methods, and water chemistry and quality control results for these samples. Water chemistry results include concentrations of dissolved hydrocarbon gases and their isotopic composition; concentrations of inorganic constituents including salinity, major ions, and nutrients; dissolved organic carbon; and stable isotopes of water and strontium dissolved in water. Samples were analyzed by 5 laboratories operated or contracted by the USGS.

  19. 40 CFR 258.53 - Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....53 Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements. (a) The ground-water monitoring program must... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements. 258.53 Section 258.53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  20. Mutagenicity of drinking water sampled from the Yangtze River and Hanshui River (Wuhan section) and correlations with water quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xuemin; Lu, Yi; Yang, Xiaoming; Dong, Xiaorong; Ma, Kunpeng; Xiao, Sanhua; Wang, Yazhou; Tang, Fei

    2015-03-31

    A total of 54 water samples were collected during three different hydrologic periods (level period, wet period, and dry period) from Plant A and Plant B (a source for Yangtze River and Hanshui River water, respectively), and several water parameters, such as chemical oxygen demand (COD), turbidity, and total organic carbon (TOC), were simultaneously analyzed. The mutagenicity of the water samples was evaluated using the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. According to the results, the organic compounds in the water were largely frame-shift mutagens, as positive results were found for most of the tests using TA98. All of the finished water samples exhibited stronger mutagenicity than the relative raw and distribution water samples, with water samples collected from Plant B presenting stronger mutagenic strength than those from Plant A. The finished water samples from Plant A displayed a seasonal-dependent variation. Water parameters including COD (r = 0.599, P = 0.009), TOC (r = 0.681, P = 0.02), UV254 (r = 0.711, P = 0.001), and total nitrogen (r = 0.570, P = 0.014) exhibited good correlations with mutagenicity (TA98), at 2.0 L/plate, which bolsters the argument of the importance of using mutagenicity as a new parameter to assess the quality of drinking water.

  1. Mutagenicity of drinking water sampled from the Yangtze River and Hanshui River (Wuhan section) and correlations with water quality parameters

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xuemin; Lu, Yi; Yang, Xiaoming; Dong, Xiaorong; Ma, Kunpeng; Xiao, Sanhua; Wang, Yazhou; Tang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    A total of 54 water samples were collected during three different hydrologic periods (level period, wet period, and dry period) from Plant A and Plant B (a source for Yangtze River and Hanshui River water, respectively), and several water parameters, such as chemical oxygen demand (COD), turbidity, and total organic carbon (TOC), were simultaneously analyzed. The mutagenicity of the water samples was evaluated using the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. According to the results, the organic compounds in the water were largely frame-shift mutagens, as positive results were found for most of the tests using TA98. All of the finished water samples exhibited stronger mutagenicity than the relative raw and distribution water samples, with water samples collected from Plant B presenting stronger mutagenic strength than those from Plant A. The finished water samples from Plant A displayed a seasonal-dependent variation. Water parameters including COD (r = 0.599, P = 0.009), TOC (r = 0.681, P = 0.02), UV254 (r = 0.711, P = 0.001), and total nitrogen (r = 0.570, P = 0.014) exhibited good correlations with mutagenicity (TA98), at 2.0 L/plate, which bolsters the argument of the importance of using mutagenicity as a new parameter to assess the quality of drinking water. PMID:25825837

  2. Demonstration/Validation of the Snap Sampler Passive Ground Water Sampling Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    sampling 5. Carefully selecting a sampling order that reduces sampler impacts on subsequent sampling events. 6.1.2 Baseline Characterization Prior to...sampling • Carefully selecting a sampling order that reduces sampler impacts on subsequent sampling events. 27 6.2.2 Baseline...Validation of the Snap Sampler Passive Ground Water Sampling Device June 2011 i COST & PERFORMANCE REPORT Project: ER-200630 TABLE OF CONTENTS

  3. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  4. Sample Return from Water Worlds: Requirements, Risks, and Enabling Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatapathy, E.; Gage, P.; Munk, M.; Ellerby, D.; Stackpoole, M.

    2017-02-01

    Planetary protection requirements make sample return missions from Mars, Enceladus, Titan, and Europa a grand challenge for entry, descent, and landing. Ways to address the challenges are explored with emerging new technologies.

  5. METALS IN GROUND WATER: SAMPLING ARTIFACTS AND REPRODUCIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies evaluated sampling procedures for determination of aqueous inorganic geochemistry and assessment of contaminant transport by colloidal mobility. esearch at three different metal-contaminated sites has shown that 0.45 tm filtration has not removed potentially mobile ...

  6. EVALUATION OF FISH SAMPLING DESIGNS FOR COASTAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because no objective assessment of fish sampling methodologies has been completed for Great Lakes coastal wetlands we evaluated catches from several techniques and studies to determine the most effective combinations for these habitats. Data from six underdeveloped sites in Green...

  7. Reconnaissance water sampling for radium-226 in central and northern Florida, December 1974-March 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irwin, G.A.; Hutchinson, C.B.

    1976-01-01

    Analyses of 115 water samples collected from December 1974 through March 1976 in eight Florida Counties indicated that 22 samples (19 percent) had radium-226 activities equal to or in excess of 3 piC/liter (picocuries per liter), the concentration limit recommended for drinking water by the U.S. Public Health Service. The maximum radium-226 activity was 90 piC/liter in water from a shallow well in Polk County. The sampling reconnaissance was generally limited to areas of active phosphate mining and areas of undisturbed phosphate deposits. Most of the sampling was from water wells. Thirteen surface-water samples were collected in the Peace River drainage basin. The maximum radium-226 detected in surface-water samples was 3.6 piC/liter in Little Charlie Creek at State Road 664A in Hardee County. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. MICROBIOLOGICAL FIELD SAMPLING AND INSTRUMENTATION IN THE ASSESSMENT OF SOIL AND GROUND-WATER POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter emphasizes the importance of microbiological sampling of soil and ground water with respect to human heath risks, laws and regulations dealing with safe drinking water, and more prevalent subsurface monitoring activities associated with chlorinated organic compounds,...

  9. EPA Technology Available for Licensing: Portable Device to Concentrate Water Samples for Microorganism Analysis

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Using a computer controlled system, this ultrafiltration device automates the process of concentrating a water sample and can be operated in the field. The system was also designed to reduce human exposure to potentially contaminated water.

  10. PORTABLE ULTRAFILTRATION DEVICE FOR CONCENTRATION PATHOGENS FROM LARGE VOUME SAMPLES OF DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Symposium Paper in proceedings of Water Security Congress, Washington, D.C., 12 Sep 2006 - Development and testing of several potential protocols utilizing ultrafiltration to collect and concentrate microorganisms from large volume water samples.

  11. High-frequency isotopic analysis of liquid water samples in the field - initial results from continuous water sampling and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Freyberg, Jana; Studer, Bjørn; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    Studying rapidly changing hydrochemical signals in catchments can help to improve our mechanistic understanding of their water flow pathways and travel times. For these purposes, stable water isotopes (18O and 2H) are commonly used as natural tracers. However, high-frequency isotopic analyses of liquid water samples are challenging. One must capture highly dynamic behavior with high precision and accuracy, but the lab workload (and sample storage artifacts) involved in collecting and analyzing thousands of bottled samples should also be avoided. Therefore, we have tested Picarro, Inc.'s newly developed Continuous Water Sampler Module (CoWS), which is coupled to their L2130-i Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer to enable real-time on-line measurements of 18O and 2H in liquid water samples. We coupled this isotope analysis system to a dual-channel ion chomatograph (Metrohm AG, Herisau, Switzerland) for analysis of major cations and anions, as well as a UV-Vis spectroscopy system (s::can Messtechnik GmbH, Vienna, Austria) and electrochemical probes for characterization of basic water quality parameters. The system was run unattended for up to a week at a time in the laboratory and at a small catchment. At the field site, stream-water and precipitation samples were analyzed, alternating at sub-hourly intervals. We observed that measured isotope ratios were highly sensitive to the liquid water flow rate in the CoWS, and thus to the hydraulic head difference between the CoWS and the samples from which water was drawn. We used a programmable high-precision dosing pump to control the injection flow rate and eliminate this flow-rate artifact. Our experiments showed that the precision of the CoWS-L2130-i-system for 2-minute average values was typically better than 0.06‰ for δ18O and 0.16‰ for δ2H. Carryover effects were 1% or less between isotopically contrasting water samples for 30-minute sampling intervals. Instrument drift could be minimized through periodic analysis of

  12. June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect

    2011-10-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

  13. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1, Version 6

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes the planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the Grand Junction US DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (GRJ-01) in Grand Junction, Colorado, and at the Cheney Disposal Site (GRJ-03) near Grand Junction. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the routine monitoring stations at the sites. Regulatory basis is in the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA ground water quality standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). This plan summarizes results of past water sampling activities, details water sampling activities planned for the next 2 years, and projects sampling activities for the next 5 years.

  14. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts in fecal and water samples in Austria.

    PubMed

    Hassl, A; Benyr, G; Sommer, R

    2001-10-22

    Oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected and differentiated by a modular arranged gene amplification procedure in various samples, mostly human stool, feces of herpetotaxa, and water, in different locations of South and Eastern Austria. Cryptosporidium parvum was found in stool samples of immunocompromised persons, in reptile feces, and in water samples. The presence of Cryptosporidium in an area is probably associated with high human population densities since water from protected sources in sparsely inhabited areas is rarely contaminated.

  15. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Gunnison, Colorado: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan summarizes the results of previous water sampling activities and the plan for future water sampling activities, in accordance with the Guidance Document for Preparing Sampling and Analysis Plans for UMTRA Sites. A buffer zone monitoring plan for the Dos Rios Subdivision is included as an appendix. The buffer zone monitoring plan was developed to ensure continued protection to the public from residual contamination. The buffer zone is beyond the area depicted as contaminated ground water due to former milling operations. Surface remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site began in 1992; completion is expected in 1995. Ground water and surface water will be sampled semiannually at the Gunnison processing site and disposal site. Results of previous water sampling at the Gunnison processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated by the former uranium processing activities. Background ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer at the Gunnison disposal site. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents that are related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation.

  16. Factors controlling elevated lead concentrations in water samples from aquifer systems in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, B.G.; Berndt, M.P.; Bullen, T.D.; Hansard, P.

    1999-07-01

    This report presents results of detailed statistical analyses of total and dissolved Pb concentrations in water samples collected from the major aquifer systems in Florida for the FGWQMN [Florida Ground Water Quality Monitoring Network] to determine the influence of anthropogenic factors on elevated Pb concentrations. In addition, Pb isotopic data are presented for water samples collected from a subset of 13 wells in the monitoring network, samples of aquifer material, rainfall, and Pb counterweights. The Pb-isotope data provide a better understanding of the relative contributions of anthropogenic and natural sources of Pb in ground water samples from Florida`s major aquifer systems.

  17. The representativeness of pore water samples collected from the unsaturated zone using pressure-vacuum lysimeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, C.A.; Healy, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the chemistry of water samples may be altered by the collection technique, creating concern about the representativeness of the pore water samples obtained. A study using soil water pressure-vacuum lysimeters in outwash sand and glacial till deposits demonstrates that for non-dilute-solution samples the effect of pH of sampling with lysimeters is minimal, and that measured major cation and anion concentrations are representative of the natural pore water; trace-metal concentrations can be significantly altered by collection procedures at low concentrations. -from Authors

  18. IMPROVED METHOD FOR THE STORAGE OF GROUND WATER SAMPLES CONTAINING VOLATILE ORGANIC ANALYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sorption of volatile organic analytes from water samples by the Teflon septum surface used with standard glass 40-ml sample collection vials was investigated. Analytes tested included alkanes, isoalkanes, olefins, cycloalkanes, a cycloalkene, monoaromatics, a polynuclear arom...

  19. The Influence of Pumping on Observed Bacterial Counts in Groundwater Samples: Implications for Sampling Protocol and Water Quality Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuskanich, J.; Novakowski, K.; Anderson, B.

    2008-12-01

    Drinking water quality has become an important issue in Ontario following the events in Walkerton in 2000. Many rural communities are reliant on private groundwater wells for drinking water, and it is the responsibility of the owner to have the water tested to make sure it is safe for human consumption. Homeowners can usually take a sample to the local health unit for total coliform and E. Coli analysis at no charge to determine if the water supply is being tainted by surface water or fecal matter, both of which could indicate the potential for negative impacts on human health. However, is the sample coming out of the tap representative of what is going on the aquifer? The goal of this study is to observe how bacterial counts may vary during the course of well pumping, and how those changing results influence the assessment of water quality. Multiple tests were conducted in bedrock monitoring wells to examine the influence of pumping rate and pumped volume on observed counts of total coliform, E. Coli, fecal streptococcus, fecal coliform and heterotrophic plate count. Bacterial samples were collected frequently during the course of continuous purging events lasting up to 8 hours. Typical field parameters (temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen and ORP) were also continuously monitored during the course of each test. Common practice in groundwater studies is to wait until these parameters have stabilized or three well volumes have been removed prior to sampling, to ensure the sample is taken from new water entering the well from the aquifer, rather than the original water stored in the borehole prior to the test. In general, most bacterial counts were low, but did go above the drinking water standard of 0 counts/100mL (total coliform and E. Coli) at times during the tests. Results show the greatest variability in the observed bacterial counts at the onset of pumping prior to the removal of three well volumes. Samples taken after the removal of three well

  20. The stability of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in ground-water samples archived in borosilicate ampoules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Stephanie Dunkle; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L. Niel

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) Laboratory in Reston, Va., has been measuring concentrations of CFCs in ground-water samples since 1989 to estimate the year that a water sample was recharged to a ground-water flow system. The water samples have been collected in flame-sealed borosilicate ampoules. Typically for each site, three samples were analyzed within days to a few months after collection, and additional samples were archived for extended periods of time (up to four years). The stability of CFC concentrations in the archived water samples from the USGS CFC Laboratory was investigated by analyzing the CFC concentrations in archived water samples and comparing them with the CFC concentrations that were obtained soon after the samples were collected. The archived samples selected for analysis were chosen from sites with a wide variety of hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions. For CFC-11 and CFC-12 concentrations, approximately 14% and 10.5%, respectively, of the archived samples were statistically different (both higher and lower) from the concentrations obtained from analyses conducted soon after the sample collection. Most of the extraneous values were attributed to natural variability of CFC concentrations originally in the water discharged from wells, rather than to microbial degradation within the ampoule on storage.

  1. 400 area secondary cooling water sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, L.L.

    1996-10-29

    This is a total rewrite of the Sampling and Analysis Plan in response to, and to ensure compliance with, the State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4501 issued on July 31, 1996. This revision describes changes in facility status and implements requirements of the permit.

  2. A laboratory and field evaluation of a portable immunoassay test for triazine herbicides in environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulze, P.A.; Capel, P.D.; Squillace, P.J.; Helsel, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness and sensitivity, of a portable immunoassay test for the semiquantitative field screening of water samples was evaluated by means of laboratory and field studies. Laboratory results indicated that the tests were useful for the determination of atrazine concentrations of 0.1 to 1.5 μg/L. At a concentration of 1 μg/L, the relative standard deviation in the difference between the regression line and the actual result was about 40 percent. The immunoassay was less sensitive and produced similar errors for other triazine herbicides. After standardization, the test results were relatively insensitive to ionic content and variations in pH (range, 4 to 10), mildly sensitive to temperature changes, and quite sensitive to the timing of the final incubation step, variances in timing can be a significant source of error. Almost all of the immunoassays predicted a higher atrazine concentration in water samples when compared to results of gas chromatography. If these tests are used as a semiquantitative screening tool, this tendency for overprediction does not diminish the tests' usefulness. Generally, the tests seem to be a valuable method for screening water samples for triazine herbicides.

  3. Lake and river bottom sampling. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning techniques and results related to the collection of samples from the bottom of ponds, lakes, and rivers. Techniques include sampling devices, platforms for mounting or operating the sampling devices, and analytical techniques for the collected samples. Results include analysis of organic, chemical, and metallic components for bottom sediments. Statements on resulting water quality or environmental aspects are often included. Citations include investigations covering porosity of bottom soils, and ground water beneath the lake or river studied. Many of the samples include benthic fauna to assess the condition of the water. (Contains a minimum of 214 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Magnetic metal-organic framework-titanium dioxide nanocomposite as adsorbent in the magnetic solid-phase extraction of fungicides from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Su, Hao; Lin, Yunliang; Wang, Zhenhua; Wong, Y-L Elaine; Chen, Xiangfeng; Chan, T-W Dominic

    2016-09-30

    In this work, a core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2@MOF/TiO2 nanocomposite was synthesized and used to as adsorbent for magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of triazole fungicides from environmental water samples. Five triazole fungicides, namely, triadimenol, hexaconazole, diniconazole, myclobutanil, and tebuconazole, were selected as target analytes for MSPE. These analytes were quantitatively adsorbed on microspheres, and the sorbents were separated from the solution by using a magnet. The analytes were desorbed by methanol and determined through liquid-chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The extraction parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were optimized through response surface methodology. The limits of detection and limits of quantification for the selected fungicides were 0.19-1.20ngL(-1) and 0.61-3.62ngL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was applied to determine the concentration of fungicides in actual environmental water samples. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by measuring the recovery of the spiked samples. The satisfying recoveries of the four water samples ranged from 90.2% to 104.2%. Therefore, the magnetic metal-organic framework/TiO2 nanocomposite based MSPE is a potential approach to analyze fungicides in actual water samples.

  5. Chloride in ground water and surface water in the vicinity of selected surface-water sampling sites of the beneficial use monitoring program of Oklahoma, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mashburn, Shana L.; Sughru, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    The Oklahoma Water Resources Board Beneficial Use Monitoring Program reported exceedances of beneficial-use standards for chloride at 11 surface-water sampling sites from January to October 2002. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, conducted a study to determine the chloride concentrations in ground water in the vicinity of Beneficial Use Monitoring Program surface-water sampling sites not meeting beneficial use standards for chloride and compare chloride concentrations in ground water and surface water. The chloride-impaired Beneficial Use Monitoring Program surface-water sampling sites are located in the western and southern regions of Oklahoma. The ground-water sampling sites were placed in proximity to the 11 surface-water sampling sites designated impaired by chloride by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Two surface-water sampling sites were located on the Beaver River (headwaters of the North Canadian River), three sites on the Cimarron River, one site on Sandy Creek, one site on North Fork Red River, and four sites on the Red River. Six ground-water samples were collected, when possible, from two test holes located upstream from each of the 11 Beneficial Use Monitoring Program surface-water sampling sites. One test hole was placed on the left bank and right bank, when possible, of each Beneficial Use Monitoring Program surfacewater sampling site. All test holes were located on alluvial deposits adjacent to the Beneficial Use Monitoring Program surface-water sampling sites within 0.5 mile of the stream. Top, middle, and bottom ground-water samples were collected from the alluvium at each test hole, when possible. Water properties of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen were recorded in the field before sampling for chloride. The ground-water median chloride concentrations at 8 of the 11 Beneficial Use Monitoring Program sites were less than the surface-water median

  6. Application of Solid Sorbent Collection Techniques and High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Electrochemical Detection to the Analysis of Explosives in Water Samples.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    Methods were developed for the determination of several explosives components (nitro-organic compounds) in environmental waters. The methods are based on Porapak resin adsorption and Amberlite XAD-4 resin adsorption of the explosives are measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The technique provides a high degree of selectivity and sensitivity for these compounds in actual samples. Detection limits approach 1 microgram/l for many components.

  7. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    Surface remedial action is scheduled to begin at the Belfield and Bowman Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in the spring of 1996. Water sampling was conducted in 1993 at both the Belfield processing site and the Bowman processing/disposal site. Results of the sampling at both sites indicate that ground water conditions have remained relatively stable over time. Water sampling activities are not scheduled for 1994 because ground water conditions at the two sites are relatively stable, the 1993 sampling was comprehensive, and surface remediation activities are not scheduled to start until 1996. The next water sampling event is scheduled before the start of remedial activities and will include sampling selected monitor wells at both sites and several domestic wells in the vicinity.

  8. July 2010 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis was conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites. (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analysis. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. An additional water sample was collected from well 29-6 Water Hole for analysis of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743.

  9. Sample volume optimization for radon-in-water detection by liquid scintillation counting.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Michael; Kopitz, Juergen; Chałupnik, Stanisław

    2014-08-01

    Radon is used as environmental tracer in a wide range of applications particularly in aquatic environments. If liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is used as detection method the radon has to be transferred from the water sample into a scintillation cocktail. Whereas the volume of the cocktail is generally given by the size of standard LSC vials (20 ml) the water sample volume is not specified. Aim of the study was an optimization of the water sample volume, i.e. its minimization without risking a significant decrease in LSC count-rate and hence in counting statistics. An equation is introduced, which allows calculating the ²²²Rn concentration that was initially present in a water sample as function of the volumes of water sample, sample flask headspace and scintillation cocktail, the applicable radon partition coefficient, and the detected count-rate value. It was shown that water sample volumes exceeding about 900 ml do not result in a significant increase in count-rate and hence counting statistics. On the other hand, sample volumes that are considerably smaller than about 500 ml lead to noticeably lower count-rates (and poorer counting statistics). Thus water sample volumes of about 500-900 ml should be chosen for LSC radon-in-water detection, if 20 ml vials are applied.

  10. Demonstration of the Gore Module for Passive Ground Water Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    exposure period using a co-located (dedicated) submersible pump . (Samples were collected in 12-hour intervals so that a time-weighted average...Program (ESTCP), 4800 Mark Center Drive , Suite 17D08,Alexandria,VA,22350-3605 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING...APG Aberdeen Proving Ground ASTM ASTM International bgs below ground surface BNZ benzene BP bladder pump BTEX benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene

  11. Total and inorganic arsenic in fish samples from Norwegian waters.

    PubMed

    Julshamn, Kaare; Nilsen, Bente M; Frantzen, Sylvia; Valdersnes, Stig; Maage, Amund; Nedreaas, Kjell; Sloth, Jens J

    2012-01-01

    The contents of total arsenic and inorganic arsenic were determined in fillet samples of Northeast Artic cod, herring, mackerel, Greenland halibut, tusk, saithe and Atlantic halibut. In total, 923 individual fish samples were analysed. The fish were mostly caught in the open sea off the coast of Norway, from 40 positions. The determination of total arsenic was carried out by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following microwave-assisted wet digestion. The determination of inorganic arsenic was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography-ICP-MS following microwave-assisted dissolution of the samples. The concentrations found for total arsenic varied greatly between fish species, and ranged from 0.3 to 110 mg kg(-1) wet weight. For inorganic arsenic, the concentrations found were very low (<0.006 mg kg(-1)) in all cases. The obtained results question the assumptions made by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on the inorganic arsenic level in fish used in the recent EFSA opinion on arsenic in food.

  12. Simple Method for High-Sensitivity Determination of Cosmogenic (35)S in Snow and Water Samples Collected from Remote Regions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mang; Wang, Kun; Kang, Shichang; Thiemens, Mark H

    2017-03-15

    Cosmogenic (35)S is useful in understanding a wide variety of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the cryosphere. The 87.4-day half-life and the ubiquity of sulfur in natural environments renders it an ideal tracer of many phenomena. Measurements of (35)S in snow and water samples are scarce as existing analytical methods require a large volume of sample (>20 L) due to their high analytical activity background and low counting efficiency. Here, we present a new set of snow/water sample collecting and handling procedures for high-sensitivity determination of cosmogenic (35)S using a low-level liquid scintillation spectrometer. Laboratory experiments using diluted (35)S standards (with activities of <5 disintegrations per minute) showed a (35)S recovery percentage of ∼95%, demonstrating a relatively small deviation from the true value. Using this method, we successfully measured (35)S in ∼1 L of fresh snow sample collected from a glacier on the Tibetan Plateau to be 47 ± 7 mBq/L. On the basis of (35)S activities in 9 natural samples measured in this study, a first proof-of-concept approximation for age determinations and source attributions was presented. This new method will provide a powerful tool in studying (35)S in small volumes of snow and water samples, especially those from remote but climatically important regions such as the polar regions and the Tibetan Plateau and Himalayas. The measurements are particularly important as the radioactive sulfur provides an actual clock of glacial melting processes. With the growing rate of glacial loss, the need for measurements from remote locations becomes all the more important.

  13. Water Sample Analysis With the Integrated Virus Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    ultrafiltered to reduce and concentrate the volume from 1 L to 1.2 mL. This ultrafiltration (UF) was accomplished in -60 min. The remaining volume was...collected and analyzed with the IVDS. In general, the samples were concentrated with the tangential flow ( ultrafiltration ) filter system before IVDS...Biological Center: Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 1999; UNCLASSIFIED Report (AD-A368 535). 2. Wick, C.H.; McCubbin, P.E. Removing Complex Growth Media from MS2

  14. Estimation of uranium and radon concentration in some drinking water samples of Upper Siwaliks, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Joga; Singh, Harmanjit; Singh, Surinder; Bajwa, B S

    2009-07-01

    Uranium and radon concentration was assessed in water samples taken from hand pumps, natural sources and wells collected from some areas of Upper Siwaliks, Northern India. Fission track registration technique was used to estimate the uranium content of water samples. The uranium concentration in water samples was found to vary from 1.08 +/- 0.03 to 19.68 +/- 0.12 microg l(-1). These values were compared with safe limit values recommended for drinking water. Most of the water samples were found to have uranium concentration below the safe limit of 15 microg l(-1) (WHO, World Health Organization, Guidelines for drinking-water quality (3rd ed.). Geneva, Switzerland: WHO, 2004). The radon estimation in these water samples was made using alpha-scintillometry to study its correlation with uranium. The radon concentration in these samples was found to vary from 0.87 +/- 0.29 to 32.10 +/- 1.79 Bq l(-1). The recorded values of radon concentration were within the recommended safe limit of 4 to 40 Bq l(-1) (UNSCEAR, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiations, Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. New York: United Nations, 1993). No direct correlation was found between uranium concentration and radon concentration in water samples belonging to Upper Siwaliks. The values of uranium and radon concentration in water were compared with that from the adjoining areas of Punjab state, India.

  15. Actual evapotranspiration (water use) assessment of the Colorado River Basin at the Landsat resolution using the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurately estimating consumptive water use in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) is important for assessing and managing limited water resources in the basin. Increasing water demand from various sectors may threaten long-term sustainability of the water supply in the arid southwestern United States. L...

  16. 40 CFR 257.23 - Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and analysis requirements. (a) The ground-water monitoring program must include consistent sampling... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ground-water sampling and analysis requirements. 257.23 Section 257.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  17. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Surface remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site began in 1992; completion is expected in 1995. Ground water and surface water will be sampled semiannually at the Gunnison processing site (GUN-01) and disposal site (GUN-08). Results of previous water sampling at the Gunnison processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated by the former uranium processing activities. Background ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer (Tertiary gravels) at the Gunnison disposal site. Semiannual water sampling is scheduled for the spring and fall. Water quality sampling is conducted at the processing site (1) to ensure protection of human health and the environment, (2) for ground water compliance monitoring during remedial action construction, and (3) to define the extent of contamination. At the processing site, the frequency and duration of sampling will be dependent upon the nature and extent of residual contamination and the compliance strategy chosen. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents that are related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation.

  18. Automated syringe sampler. [remote sampling of air and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgold, G. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A number of sampling services are disposed in a rack which slides into a housing. In response to a signal from an antenna, the circutry elements are activated which provide power individually, collectively, or selectively to a servomechanism thereby moving an actuator arm and the attached jawed bracket supporting an evaculated tube towards a stationary needle. One open end of the needle extends through the side wall of a conduit to the interior and the other open end is maintained within the protective sleeve, supported by a bifurcated bracket. A septum in punctured by the end of the needle within the sleeve and a sample of the fluid medium in the conduit flows through the needle and is transferred to a tube. The signal to the servo is then reversed and the actuator arm moves the tube back to its original position permitting the septum to expand and seal the hole made by the needle. The jawed bracket is attached by pivot to the actuator to facilitate tube replacement.

  19. Rapid and non-destructive identification of water-injected beef samples using multispectral imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxia; Cao, Yue; Wang, Qiu; Pan, Wenjuan; Ma, Fei; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianbo; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Water-injected beef has aroused public concern as a major food-safety issue in meat products. In the study, the potential of multispectral imaging analysis in the visible and near-infrared (405-970 nm) regions was evaluated for identifying water-injected beef. A multispectral vision system was used to acquire images of beef injected with up to 21% content of water, and partial least squares regression (PLSR) algorithm was employed to establish prediction model, leading to quantitative estimations of actual water increase with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.923. Subsequently, an optimized model was achieved by integrating spectral data with feature information extracted from ordinary RGB data, yielding better predictions (r = 0.946). Moreover, the prediction equation was transferred to each pixel within the images for visualizing the distribution of actual water increase. These results demonstrate the capability of multispectral imaging technology as a rapid and non-destructive tool for the identification of water-injected beef.

  20. USE OF NATURAL WATERS AS U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY REFERENCE SAMPLES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janzer, Victor J.

    1985-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey conducts research and collects hydrologic data relating to the Nation's water resources. Seven types of natural matrix reference water samples are prepared for use in the Survey's quality assurance program. These include samples containing major constituents, trace metals, nutrients, herbicides, insecticides, trace metals in a water and suspended-sediment mixture, and precipitation (snowmelt). To prepare these reference samples, natural water is collected in plastic drums and the sediment is allowed to settle. The water is then filtered, selected constituents are added, and if necessary the water is acidified and sterilized by ultraviolet irradiation before bottling in plastic or glass. These reference samples are distributed twice yearly to more than 100 laboratories for chemical analysis. The most probable values for each constituent are determined by evaluating the data submitted by the laboratories using statistical techniques recommended by ASTM.

  1. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Durango, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used to characterize the site ground water compliance strategies and to monitor contaminants of potential concern identified in the baseline risk assessment (DOE, 1995a). Regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site.

  2. Considerations for sampling inorganic constituents in ground water using diffusion samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Petkewich, M.D.; Campbell, T.R.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Data indicate that nylon-screen and dialysis diffusion samplers are capable of obtaining concentrations of inorganic solutes in ground water from wells that closely correspond to concentrations obtained by low-flow sampling. Conservative solutes, such as chloride, can be sampled by filling the diffusion samplers with oxygenated water. The samplers should be filled with anaerobic water for sampling redoxsensitive solutes. Oxidation of iron within the samplers, either by using aerobic fill water or by in-well oxygenation events, can lead to erroneous iron concentrations. Lithologic and chemical heterogeneity and sampler placement depth can lead to differences between concentrations from diffusion samples and low-flow samples because of mixing during pumping. A disadvantage of regenerated cellulose dialysis samplers is that they can begin to biodegrade within the two weeks of deployment. Nylon-screen samplers buried beneath streambed sediment along the unnamed tributary in a discharge zone of arseniccontaminated ground water were useful in locating the specific discharge zone.

  3. Filtration of water-sediment samples for the determination of organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandstrom, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the equipment and procedures used for on-site filtration of surface-water and ground-water samples for determination of organic compounds. Glass-fiber filters and a positive displacement pumping system are suitable for processing most samples for organic analyses. An optional system that uses disposable in-line membrane filters is suitable for a specific gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, selected-ion monitoring analytical method for determination of organonitrogen herbicides. General procedures to minimize contamination of the samples include preparing a clean workspace at the site, selecting appropriate sample-collection materials, and cleaning of the equipment with detergent, tap water, and methanol.

  4. Procedures for Handling and Chemical Analysis of Sediment and Water Samples,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    8217 poe oh wou(.,ldy Arobably n d equlirte anr mixingr ,! I t- 10Percent of the total samUple load. It is a ,ii- robin -sample alyistudies. Add itioa...established to prevent undue sample contamination as a consequence of the previous sampling effort. Surface water samples should receive the highest priority ...anhydrous sodium sulfate column containing 20 g of the desiccant. Collect the sample in a round -bottomed flask. Rinse the column with 25 ml methylene

  5. Evaluation of the Snap Sampler for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring Wells for VOCs and Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    ER D C/ CR R EL T R -0 7 -1 4 Evaluation of the Snap Sampler for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring Wells for VOCs and Explosives Louise...release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CRREL TR-07-14 August 2007 Evaluation of the Snap Sampler for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring...determine the ability of the Snap Sampler to recover representative concentrations of VOC and explosives in ground water . For the laboratory studies

  6. Development of a benthic-flux chamber for measurement of ground-water seepage and water sampling for mercury analysis at the sediment-water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menheer, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    A benthic-flux chamber was constructed to collect data to determine the relation between ground- and surface-water interaction and mercury concentrations in water at the sediment- water interface. The benthic-flux chamber was successfully used to measure the rate of ground water seeping to surface water or surface water seeping to ground water, and to collect water samples for mercury analysis from the sedimentwater interface in a lake setting. The benthic-flux chamber was designed to be deployed in relatively calm fresh water lakes, in areas of water less than 2 meters deep. The groundwater seepage rate data were comparable to data from an in-line flow meter in a calibration tank and with data from two 55-gallon drum seepage meters concurrently deployed in two different lakes. The benthic-flux chamber was used to collect possible water samples for analysis of total mercury and methylmercury concentrations.

  7. Detection and genetic characterization of norovirus in environmental water samples in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kittigul, Leera; Panjangampatthana, Apinya; Pombubpa, Kannika; Taweekate, Yuthana; Pungchitton, Supornwit; Diraphat, Pornphan; Siripanichgon, Kanokrat

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to detect and characterize noroviruses (NoVs) in environmental water samples. One hundred and fourteen water samples were collected from a river and irrigation canals in central Thailand during 2006-2007. NoVs were detected by RT-nested PCR in 13% of the samples. The river samples (22%) contained NoVs at a higher frequency than the irrigation canal samples (4%). Among the 15 NoV-positive samples, 9 harbored genogroup (G) I, 2 samples with GII, and 4 samples with mixed GI and GII. DNA sequencing of PCR amplicons and phylogenetic analysis of partial capsid gene revealed that 5 samples were of genotype GI-2, 1 sample was GI-6, and 1 sample was a mix of GI-2 and GII-unclassified genotypes. NoVs in water samples quantified using quantitative RT-PCR were in the range of 4.91 x 10(2) -1.26 x 10(3) copies/ml for NoV GI and 3.51 x 10(3) copies/ml for NoV GII. This is the first study demonstrating the presence of NoV variants in water samples collected from a river and the adjacent canals of Thailand.

  8. An instrument for collecting discrete large-volume water samples suitable for ecological studies of microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wommack, K. Eric; Williamson, Shannon J.; Sundbergh, Arthur; Helton, Rebekah R.; Glazer, Brian T.; Portune, Kevin; Craig Cary, S.

    2004-11-01

    Microbiological investigations utilizing molecular genetic approaches to characterize microbial communities can require large volume water samples, tens to hundreds of liters. The requirement for large volume samples can be especially challenging in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments of the oceanic ridge system. By and large studies of these environments rely on deep submergence vehicles. However collection of large volume (>100 L) water samples adjacent to the benthos is not feasible due to weight considerations. To address the technical difficulty of collecting large volume water samples from hydrothermal diffuse flow environments, a semi-autonomous large-volume water sampler (LVWS) was designed. The LVWS is capable of reliably collecting and bringing to the surface 120 L water samples from diffuse flow environments. Microscopy, molecular genetic and chemical analyses of water samples taken from 9°N East Pacific Rise are shown to demonstrate the utility of the LVWS for studies of near-benthos environments. To our knowledge this is the first report of virioplankton abundance within diffuse-flow waters of a deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment. Because of its simple design and relatively low cost, the LVWS should be applicable to a variety of studies which require large-volume water samples collected immediately adjacent to the benthos.

  9. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Leg 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sayles, Fred L.; Manheim, Frank T.; Waterman, Lee S.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses of pore fluids from reducing environments demonstrate that reduction of SO4 is accompanied by large increases in alkalinity and strong depletion of Ca and Mg. The data are compatible with a model of replacement of Fe3+ in clay lattices by Mg from the interstitial solutions and the precipitation of pyrite. Depletions of Na in the interstitial solutions are related to Mg losses by a ratio of approximately 1:3. Pore fluids from oxidizing pelagic sediments exhibit little SO4 depletion. Losses of Mg are accompanied by the addition of Ca to the pore solutions on a nearly 1:1 basis. Strong Sr enrichment is also found in these solutions. The magnitude of the Sr increase suggests that considerable carbonate recrystallization has occurred. As part of an extensive interlaboratory and analytical calibration, the effect of squeezing sediment at different temperatures has been studied in depth. Samples of a variety of lithologies have been included. Enrichment of K by as much as 24 percent and depletion of Mg and Ca by up to 7 percent occurs during warming. However, no significant effect upon Cl and SO4 could be detected. The strongest effects are seen in the minor constituents studied. On warming, Sr, Si, and B are enriched as much as 19, 40, and 60 percent, respectively. The size of the observed concentration changes varies with the mineralogy of the sediment, but is significant in all types studied, particularly with regards to Mg and K.

  10. Lead (Pb) quantification in potable water samples: implications for regulatory compliance and assessment of human exposure.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllidou, Simoni; Nguyen, Caroline K; Zhang, Yan; Edwards, Marc A

    2013-02-01

    Assessing the health risk from lead (Pb) in potable water requires accurate quantification of the Pb concentration. Under worst-case scenarios of highly contaminated water samples, representative of public health concerns, up to 71-98 % of the total Pb was not quantified if water samples were not mixed thoroughly after standard preservation (i.e., addition of 0.15 % (v/v) HNO(3)). Thorough mixing after standard preservation improved recovery in all samples, but 35-81 % of the total Pb was still un-quantified in some samples. Transfer of samples from one bottle to another also created high errors (40-100 % of the total Pb was un-quantified in transferred samples). Although the United States Environmental Protection Agency's standard protocol avoids most of these errors, certain methods considered EPA-equivalent allow these errors for regulatory compliance sampling. Moreover, routine monitoring for assessment of human Pb exposure in the USA has no standardized protocols for water sample handling and pre-treatment. Overall, while there is no reason to believe that sample handling and pre-treatment dramatically skew regulatory compliance with the US Pb action level, slight variations from one approved protocol to another may cause Pb-in-water health risks to be significantly underestimated, especially for unusual situations of "worst case" individual exposure to highly contaminated water.

  11. Change Of Electrical Resistivity Depending On Water Saturation Of The Concrete Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbaǧ, Nevbahar; Uyanık, Osman

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the changes of electrical apparent resistivity values depending on the water saturation of cubic concrete samples which designed according to different strength were investigated. For this purpose, 3 different concrete design as poor, middle and good strength 150x150x150mm dimensions 9 for each design cubic samples were prepared. After measuring the weight of the prepared samples, in oven were dried at 105 ° C for 24 hours and then the dry weights were measured. Then the samples were placed into the curing pool and saturated weight of the samples were measured in specific time periods during the 90 day take out from the curing pool and the water content were calculated at each stage of these processes. The water content of the samples were obtained during 90 days specific points in time and as well as electrical apparent resistivity method of the different surfaces of the samples the potential difference measurements made by electrical resistivity method and electrical apparent resistivity values of the samples were calculated. Depending on time obtained from this study with respect to time curves of the water content and the apparent resistivity values were constructed. Results showed that the electrical apparent resistivity values increased depends on the water content. This study was supported with OYP05277-DR-14 Project No. by SDU and State Hydraulic Works 13th Regional/2012-01 Project No. Keywords: Concrete, cubic sample, Resistivity, water content, time

  12. Screening of ground water samples for volatile organic compounds using a portable gas chromatograph

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchmiller, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    A portable gas chromatograph was used to screen 32 ground water samples for volatile organic compounds. Seven screened samples were positive; four of the seven samples had volatile organic substances identified by second-column confirmation. Four of the seven positive, screened samples also tested positive in laboratory analyses of duplicate samples. No volatile organic compounds were detected in laboratory analyses of samples that headspace screening indicated to be negative. Samples that contained volatile organic compounds, as identified by laboratory analysis, and that contained a volatile organic compound present in a standard of selected compounds were correctly identified by using the portable gas chromatography. Comparisons of screened-sample data with laboratory data indicate the ability to detect selected volatile organic compounds at concentrations of about 1 microgram per liter in the headspace of water samples by use of a portable gas chromatography. -Author

  13. The Course of Actualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Smet, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Actualization is traditionally seen as the process following syntactic reanalysis whereby an item's new syntactic status manifests itself in new syntactic behavior. The process is gradual in that some new uses of the reanalyzed item appear earlier or more readily than others. This article accounts for the order in which new uses appear during…

  14. Comparison of the mutagenic activity of XAD4 and blue rayon extracts of surface water and related drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Kummrow, Fábio; Rech, Celia M; Coimbrão, Carlos A; Roubicek, Deborah A; Umbuzeiro, Gisela de A

    2003-11-10

    The combination of mutagenicity tests and selective extraction methodologies can be useful to indicate the possible classes of genotoxic organic contaminants in water samples. Treated and source water samples from two sites were analyzed: a river under the influence of an azo dye-processing plant discharge and a reservoir not directly impacted with industrial discharges, but contaminated with untreated domestic sewage. Organic extraction was performed in columns packed with XAD4 resin, that adsorbs a broad class of mutagenic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), arylamines, nitrocompounds, quinolines, antraquinones, etc., including the halogenated disinfection by-products; and with blue rayon that selectively adsorbs polycyclic planar structures. The organic extracts were tested for mutagenicity with the Salmonella assay using TA98 and TA100 strains and the potencies were compared. A protocol for cleaning the blue rayon fibers was developed and the efficiency of the reused fibers was analyzed with spiked samples. For the river water samples under the influence of the azo-type dye-processing plant, the mutagenicity was much higher for both blue rayon and XAD4 extracts when compared to the water from the reservoir not directly impacted with industrial discharges. For the drinking water samples, although both sites showed mutagenic responses with XAD4, only samples from the site under the influence of the industrial discharge showed mutagenic activity with the blue rayon extraction, suggesting the presence of polycyclic compounds in those samples. As expected, negative results were found with the blue rayon extracts of the drinking water collected from the reservoir not contaminated with industrial discharges. In this case, it appears that using the blue rayon to extract drinking water samples and comparing the results with the XAD resin extracts we were able to distinguish the mutagenicity caused by industrial contaminants from the halogenated

  15. Measurement of radon concentration in some water samples belonging to some adjoining areas of Pathankot, Punjab

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ajay Sharma, Sumit

    2015-08-28

    The study of radon concentration was measured in some areas of Pathankot district, Punjab, India, from the health hazard point of view due to radon. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. RAD 7, an electronic solid state silicon detector (Durridgeco., USA) was used to measure the radon concentration in drinking water samples of the study area. The recorded values of radon concentration in these water samples are below the recommended limit by UNSCEAR and European commission. The recommended limit of radon concentration in water samples is 4 to 40 Bq/l given by UNSCEAR [1] and European commission has recommended the safe limit for radon concentration in water sample is 100 Bq/l [2].

  16. Measurement of radon concentration in some water samples belonging to some adjoining areas of Pathankot, Punjab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Sharma, Sumit

    2015-08-01

    The study of radon concentration was measured in some areas of Pathankot district, Punjab, India, from the health hazard point of view due to radon. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. RAD 7, an electronic solid state silicon detector (Durridgeco., USA) was used to measure the radon concentration in drinking water samples of the study area. The recorded values of radon concentration in these water samples are below the recommended limit by UNSCEAR and European commission. The recommended limit of radon concentration in water samples is 4 to 40 Bq/l given by UNSCEAR [1] and European commission has recommended the safe limit for radon concentration in water sample is 100 Bq/l [2].

  17. A new collector for in situ pore water sampling in wetland sediment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Deng, Jiancai; Li, Qinqin; Hu, Liuming; Zhu, Jinge; Hang, Hongjuan; Hu, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Currently available pore water samplers generally do not allow continuous monitoring of temporal variations in pore water composition. Therefore, a new type of pore water collector was designed and constructed. These collectors were constructed of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) materials, including PVC tubing with one end sealed and another end topped with a removable PVC screw-cap. A row of holes was drilled 10 cm from the sealed end of each collector. These new collectors were deployed in different layers of the sediment in a constructed wetland in Lake Taihu, China, to reveal variations in the nutrient composition of pore water with high spatial and temporal resolution. Specifically, the collectors were driven into the sediment, and the pore water flowed into the tubing via gravity. The pore water was then sampled from the PVC tubing using a portable vacuum pump, and then was taken to the lab within 20 min for analysis of the dissolved oxygen (DO) and nutrient concentration. The DO concentration of the pore water was below the detection limit for all samples, indicating that the pore water was probably not influenced by the air and that the water in the collector tube was representative of the pore water. These findings suggest that the collector is capable of measuring the temporal and spatial variations in the nutrient concentrations in pore water. Furthermore, the inexpensive material, ease of construction, minimal disturbance to the sediment and applicability for wetland sediments are advantages of the collector presented here compared with traditional pore water sampling techniques.

  18. Recovery of diverse microbes in high turbidity surface water samples using dead-end ultrafiltration

    PubMed Central

    Mull, Bonnie; Hill, Vincent R.

    2015-01-01

    Dead-end ultrafiltration (DEUF) has been reported to be a simple, field-deployable technique for recovering bacteria, viruses, and parasites from large-volume water samples for water quality testing and waterborne disease investigations. While DEUF has been reported for application to water samples having relatively low turbidity, little information is available regarding recovery efficiencies for this technique when applied to sampling turbid water samples such as those commonly found in lakes and rivers. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a DEUF technique for recoveringMS2 bacteriophage, enterococci, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in surface water samples having elevated turbidity. Average recovery efficiencies for each study microbe across all turbidity ranges were: MS2 (66%), C. parvum (49%), enterococci (85%), E. coli (81%), and C. perfringens (63%). The recovery efficiencies for MS2 and C. perfringens exhibited an inversely proportional relationship with turbidity, however no significant differences in recovery were observed for C. parvum, enterococci, or E. coli. Although ultrafilter clogging was observed, the DEUF method was able to process 100-L surface water samples at each turbidity level within 60 min. This study supports the use of the DEUF method for recovering a wide array of microbes in large-volume surface water samples having medium to high turbidity. PMID:23064261

  19. Solventless and solvent-minimized sample preparation techniques for determining currently used pesticides in water samples: a review.

    PubMed

    Tankiewicz, Maciej; Fenik, Jolanta; Biziuk, Marek

    2011-10-30

    The intensification of agriculture means that increasing amounts of toxic organic and inorganic compounds are entering the environment. The pesticides generally applied nowadays are regarded as some of the most dangerous contaminants of the environment. Their presence in the environment, especially in water, is hazardous because they cause human beings to become more susceptible to disease. For these reasons, it is essential to monitor pesticide residues in the environment with the aid of all accessible analytical methods. The analysis of samples for the presence of pesticides is problematic, because of the laborious and time-consuming operations involved in preparing samples for analysis, which themselves may be a source of additional contaminations and errors. To date, it has been standard practice to use large quantities of organic solvents in the sample preparation process; but as these solvents are themselves hazardous, solventless and solvent-minimized techniques are coming into use. This paper discusses the most commonly used over the last 15 years sample preparation techniques for monitoring organophosphorus and organonitrogen pesticides residue in water samples. Furthermore, a significant trend in sample preparation, in accordance with the principles of 'Green Chemistry' is the simplification, miniaturization and automation of analytical techniques. In view of this aspect, several novel techniques are being developed in order to reduce the analysis step, increase the sample throughput and to improve the quality and the sensitivity of analytical methods. The paper describes extraction techniques requiring the use of solvents - liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and its modifications, membrane extraction techniques, hollow fibre-protected two-phase solvent microextraction, liquid phase microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (LPME-SFO), solid-phase extraction (SPE) and single-drop microextraction (SDME) - as well as solvent

  20. Analysis of uranium in drinking water samples using laser induced fluorimetry.

    PubMed

    Rani, Asha; Singh, Surinder

    2006-08-01

    Uranium concentration in drinking water samples collected from some areas of Punjab and Himachal Pradesh has been measured using a laser induced fluorimetry technique. The sources of water comprise hand pumps and tube wells. Uranium concentration in the water samples from Punjab varies from 1.39 +/- 0.16 to 98.25 +/- 2.06 ppb with a mean value of 19.84 +/- 0.87 ppb. The uranium concentration in most of the drinking water samples from Punjab exceeds the safe limit recommended by the World Health Organization. However, the uranium concentration in water samples from Himachal Pradesh is well within the recommended levels. The annual effective dose equivalent associated with drinking water due to uranium concentration is estimated from its annual intake using dosimetric information based on ICRP Report 72. The resulting value of the annual effective dose from drinking water sources is in the range of 0.13 to 81.59 muSv. The annual effective dose received by the population due to the consumption of drinking water from these areas is well within the recommended limit. In order to check the accuracy of the technique a few water samples were also analyzed using a fission track registration technique. A good agreement has been observed between the uranium values determined by these techniques.

  1. A study on the prevalence of Aeromonas spp. and its enterotoxin genes in samples of well water, tap water, and bottled water

    PubMed Central

    Didugu, Hareesh; Thirtham, Madhavarao; Nelapati, Krishnaiah; Reddy, K Kondal; Kumbhar, Baba Saheb; Poluru, Anusha; Pothanaboyina, Guruvishnu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this work was to study the prevalence of Aeromonas spp. and its enterotoxin genes in various water sources. Materials and Methods: 125 samples (50 from well water, 50 from tap water, and 25 from bottled water) were collected from various sources in and around Greater Hyderabad Municipal Corporation and examined for the presence of aeromonads by both cultural and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Alkaline peptone water with ampicillin was used as enrichment. Aeromonas isolation medium and ampicillin dextrin agar were used as selective media. The boiling and snap chilling method was used for DNA extraction. Primers targeted against 16S rRNA, aer, and ast were used to identify aeromonads and its enterotoxins. Results: 48%, 18%, and 12% of well water, tap water, and bottled water samples were found positive by cultural assay with an overall prevalence of 28.8%. Aeromonads were detected in 32 % (52% in well water, 20% in tap water, and 16% in bottled water) of samples by PCR assay. Aerolysin (aer) gene was noticed in 34.6%, 20%, and 0% of well water, tap water, and bottled water samples, respectively, with an overall prevalence of 27.5%. Thermostable cytotonic enterotoxin (ast) was observed in 37.5% (42.3% in well water, 30% in tap water, and 25% in bottled mineral water) of samples. Conclusions: Presence of aeromonads and its toxin genes in various sources of water is of public health concern and emphasizes the need for necessary preventive measures to tackle the problem. PMID:27047024

  2. Multiport well design for sampling of ground water at closely spaced vertical intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Delin, G.N.; Landon, M.K.

    1996-11-01

    Detailed vertical sampling is useful in aquifers where vertical mixing is limited and steep vertical gradients in chemical concentrations are expected. Samples can be collected at closely spaced vertical intervals from nested wells with short screened intervals. However, this approach may not be appropriate in all situations. An easy-to-construct and easy-to-install multiport sampling well to collect ground-water samples from closely spaced vertical intervals was developed and tested. The multiport sampling well was designed to sample ground water from surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers. The device consists of multiple stainless-steel tubes within a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) protective casing. The tubes protrude through the wall of the PVC casing at the desired sampling depths. A peristaltic pump is used to collect ground-water samples form the sampling ports. The difference in hydraulic head between any two sampling ports can be measured with a vacuum pump and a modified manometer. The usefulness and versatility of this multiport well design was demonstrated at an agricultural research site near Princeton, Minnesota where sampling ports were installed to a maximum depth of about 12 m below land surface. Trace experiments were conducted using potassium bromide to document the degree to which short-circuiting occurred between sampling ports. Samples were successfully collected for analysis of major cations and anions, nutrients, selected herbicides, isotopes, dissolved gases, and chlorofluorocarbon concentrations.

  3. Multiport well design for sampling of ground water at closely spaced vertical intervals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delin, G.N.; Landon, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    Detailed vertical sampling is useful in aquifers where vertical mixing is limited and steep vertical gradients in chemical concentrations are expected. Samples can be collected at closely spaced vertical intervals from nested wells with short screened intervals. However, this approach may not be appropriate in all situations. An easy-to-construct and easy-to-install multiport sampling well to collect ground-water samples from closely spaced vertical intervals was developed and tested. The multiport sampling well was designed to sample ground water from surficial sand-and-gravel aquifers. The device consists of multiple stainless-steel tubes within a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) protective casing. The tubes protrude through the wall of the PVC casing at the desired sampling depths. A peristaltic pump is used to collect ground-water samples from the sampling ports. The difference in hydraulic head between any two sampling ports can be measured with a vacuum pump and a modified manometer. The usefulness and versatility of this multiport well design was demonstrated at an agricultural research site near Princeton, Minnesota where sampling ports were installed to a maximum depth of about 12 m below land surface. Tracer experiments were conducted using potassium bromide to document the degree to which short-circuiting occurred between sampling ports. Samples were successfully collected for analysis of major cations and anions, nutrients, selected herbicides, isotopes, dissolved gases, and chlorofluorcarbon concentrations.

  4. STANDARD-REFERENCE WATER-SUSPENDED SEDIMENT SAMPLE FOR TOTAL RECOVERABLE METALS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J.; Malo, Bernard A.; Boyle, Delora K.

    1984-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey has been preparing and maintaining a library of standard-reference water samples for dissolved inorganic constituents for 19 years. Recently, the reference-sample program was expanded to include a water-suspended sediment mixture for the determination of total recoverable metals. An interlaboratory round-robin study was conducted. Digestion procedures used by the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency were used to solubilize the metals before their measurement. The data indicate that both digestion procedures for total recoverable metals are essentially equivalent. Precision data are comparable to those data obtained in standard-reference water samples for dissolved metals.

  5. Monitoring the aftermath of Flint drinking water contamination crisis: Another case of sampling bias?

    PubMed

    Goovaerts, Pierre

    2017-07-15

    The delay in reporting high levels of lead in Flint drinking water, following the city's switch to the Flint River as its water supply, was partially caused by the biased selection of sampling sites away from the lead pipe network. Since Flint returned to its pre-crisis source of drinking water, the State has been monitoring water lead levels (WLL) at selected "sentinel" sites. In a first phase that lasted two months, 739 residences were sampled, most of them bi-weekly, to determine the general health of the distribution system and to track temporal changes in lead levels. During the same period, water samples were also collected through a voluntary program whereby concerned citizens received free testing kits and conducted sampling on their own. State officials relied on the former data to demonstrate the steady improvement in water quality. A recent analysis of data collected by voluntary sampling revealed, however, an opposite trend with lead levels increasing over time. This paper looks at potential sampling bias to explain such differences. Although houses with higher WLL were more likely to be sampled repeatedly, voluntary sampling turned out to reproduce fairly well the main characteristics (i.e. presence of lead service lines (LSL), construction year) of Flint housing stock. State-controlled sampling was less representative; e.g., sentinel sites with LSL were mostly built between 1935 and 1950 in lower poverty areas, which might hamper our ability to disentangle the effects of LSL and premise plumbing (lead fixtures and pipes present within old houses) on WLL. Also, there was no sentinel site with LSL in two of the most impoverished wards, including where the percentage of children with elevated blood lead levels tripled following the switch in water supply. Correcting for sampling bias narrowed the gap between sampling programs, yet overall temporal trends are still opposite.

  6. Effects of water sample preservation and storage conditions on nitrate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.C.; Alva, A.K.; Calvert, D.V.; Zhang, M. |

    1995-12-31

    USEPA method 300 requires water samples should be stored at 4 C immediately after collection and NO{sub 3}-N concentration analyzed within 48 hr of sample collection. Many research and commercial laboratories find it is difficult to meet this holding time. Water samples are often stored for several days at 4 C or {minus}20 C until analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects of groundwater sample pretreatment, storage temperatures, and holding times on concentrations of NO{sub 3}-N. The storage of samples at 25 C decreased concentrations of NO{sub 3}-N by 1.7% and 12.5% for 48 hr and 50 days, respectively. No significant changes were observed during the 50 days storage at 4 C or {minus}20 C. Acidification of water samples at 4 C had no significant effect on NO{sub 3}-N concentration up to 50-day holding time.

  7. Well installation and documentation, and ground-water sampling protocols for the pilot National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hardy, M.A.; Leahy, P.P.; Alley, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Several pilot projects are being conducted as part of the National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The purpose of the pilot program is to test and refine concepts for a proposed full-scale program. Three of the pilot projects are specifically designed to assess groundwater. The purpose of this report is to describe the criteria that are being used in the NAWQA pilot projects for selecting and documenting wells, installing new wells, and sampling wells for different water quality constituents. Guidelines are presented for the selection of wells for sampling. Information needed to accurately document each well includes site characteristics related to the location of the well, land use near the well, and important well construction features. These guidelines ensure the consistency of the information collected and will provide comparable data for interpretive purposes. Guidelines for the installation of wells are presented and include procedures that need to be followed for preparations prior to drilling, the selection of the drilling technique and casing type, the grouting procedure, and the well-development technique. A major component of the protocols is related to water quality sampling. Tasks are identified that need to be completed prior to visiting the site for sampling. Guidelines are presented for purging the well prior t sampling, both in terms of the volume of water pumped and the chemical stability of field parameters. Guidelines are presented concerning sampler selection as related to both inorganic and organic constituents. Documentation needed to describe the measurements and observations related to sampling each well and treating and preserving the samples are also presented. Procedures are presented for the storage and shipping of water samples, equipment cleaning, and quality assurance. Quality assurance guidelines include the description of the general distribution of the various quality assurance samples (blanks, spikes, duplicates, and

  8. Understanding the origin and evolution of water in the Moon through lunar sample studies.

    PubMed

    Anand, Mahesh; Tartèse, Romain; Barnes, Jessica J

    2014-09-13

    A paradigm shift has recently occurred in our knowledge and understanding of water in the lunar interior. This has transpired principally through continued analysis of returned lunar samples using modern analytical instrumentation. While these recent studies have undoubtedly measured indigenous water in lunar samples they have also highlighted our current limitations and some future challenges that need to be overcome in order to fully understand the origin, distribution and evolution of water in the lunar interior. Another exciting recent development in the field of lunar science has been the unambiguous detection of water or water ice on the surface of the Moon through instruments flown on a number of orbiting spacecraft missions. Considered together, sample-based studies and those from orbit strongly suggest that the Moon is not an anhydrous planetary body, as previously believed. New observations and measurements support the possibility of a wet lunar interior and the presence of distinct reservoirs of water on the lunar surface. Furthermore, an approach combining measurements of water abundance in lunar samples and its hydrogen isotopic composition has proved to be of vital importance to fingerprint and elucidate processes and source(s) involved in giving rise to the lunar water inventory. A number of sources are likely to have contributed to the water inventory of the Moon ranging from primordial water to meteorite-derived water ice through to the water formed during the reaction of solar wind hydrogen with the lunar soil. Perhaps two of the most striking findings from these recent studies are the revelation that at least some portions of the lunar interior are as water-rich as some Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt source regions on Earth and that the water in the Earth and the Moon probably share a common origin.

  9. Understanding the origin and evolution of water in the Moon through lunar sample studies

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Mahesh; Tartèse, Romain; Barnes, Jessica J.

    2014-01-01

    A paradigm shift has recently occurred in our knowledge and understanding of water in the lunar interior. This has transpired principally through continued analysis of returned lunar samples using modern analytical instrumentation. While these recent studies have undoubtedly measured indigenous water in lunar samples they have also highlighted our current limitations and some future challenges that need to be overcome in order to fully understand the origin, distribution and evolution of water in the lunar interior. Another exciting recent development in the field of lunar science has been the unambiguous detection of water or water ice on the surface of the Moon through instruments flown on a number of orbiting spacecraft missions. Considered together, sample-based studies and those from orbit strongly suggest that the Moon is not an anhydrous planetary body, as previously believed. New observations and measurements support the possibility of a wet lunar interior and the presence of distinct reservoirs of water on the lunar surface. Furthermore, an approach combining measurements of water abundance in lunar samples and its hydrogen isotopic composition has proved to be of vital importance to fingerprint and elucidate processes and source(s) involved in giving rise to the lunar water inventory. A number of sources are likely to have contributed to the water inventory of the Moon ranging from primordial water to meteorite-derived water ice through to the water formed during the reaction of solar wind hydrogen with the lunar soil. Perhaps two of the most striking findings from these recent studies are the revelation that at least some portions of the lunar interior are as water-rich as some Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalt source regions on Earth and that the water in the Earth and the Moon probably share a common origin. PMID:25114308

  10. Identification and quantification of pesticide residues in water samples of Dhamrai Upazila, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanuzzaman, M.; Rahman, M. A.; Salam, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    Being agricultural country, different types of pesticides are widely used in Bangladesh to prevent the crop losses due to pest attack which are ultimately drain to the water bodies. The present study was conducted to identify and quantify the organochlorine (DDT, DDE and DDD), organophosphorus (malathion, diazinon and chloropyrifos) and carbamate (carbaryl) residues in water samples of different sources from Dhamrai upazila of Bangladesh using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipped with ultra violate (UV) detector. Thirty water samples from fish pond, cultivated land and tube-well were collected in winter season to analyze the pesticide residues. Among the organophosphorus pesticides, malathion was present in seven water samples ranging from 42.58 to 922.8 μg/L, whereas diazinon was detected in water sample-8 (WS-8) and the concentration was 31.5 μg/L. None of the tested water samples was found to be contaminated with chlorpyrifos, carbaryl or DDT and its metabolites (DDE and DDD). Except for a tube-well water sample, concentrations of the detected residues are above the acceptable limit for human body as assigned by different organizations. To avoid the possible health hazards, the indiscriminate application of pesticides should be restricted and various substitute products like bio-pesticide should be introduced in a broad scale as soon as possible.

  11. Detection of Acanthamoeba and Toxoplasma in River Water Samples by Molecular Methods in Iran

    PubMed Central

    MAHMOUDI, Mohammad Reza; KAZEMI, Bahram; HAGHIGHI, Ali; KARANIS, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Background: Free-living amoebae such as Acanthamoeba species may act as carriers of Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma oocysts, thus, may play an important role in the water-borne transmission of these parasites. In the present study, a loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for detection of Toxoplasma and a PCR assay were developed for investigation of Acanthamoeba in environmental water samples. Methods: A total of 34 samples were collected from the surface water in Guilan Province. Water samples were filtrated with membrane filters and followed by DNA extraction. PCR and LAMP methods used for detection of the protozoan parasites Acanthamoeba and Toxoplasma respectively. Results: Totally 30 and 2 of 34 samples were positive for Acanthamoeba and Toxoplasma oocysts respectively. Two samples were positive for both investigated parasites. Conclusion: The investigated water supplies, are contaminated by Toxoplasma and Acanthamoeba (oo)cystes. Acanthamoeba may play an important role in water-borne transmission of Toxoplasma in the study area. For the first time in Iran, protocol of LAMP method was used effectively for the detection of Toxoplasma in surface water samples in Iran. PMID:26246823

  12. Determination of natural radioactivity by gross alpha and beta measurements in ground water samples.

    PubMed

    Turhan, S; Ozçitak, E; Taşkin, H; Varinlioğlu, A

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the activity concentrations of the gross α and β in ground water samples collected from the different drilled wells in Nevşehir province were measured to assess annual effective dose due to the ingestion of the water samples. Nevşehir province is one of the major cities of Cappadocia Region which is a popular tourist destination as it has many areas with unique geological, historic, and cultural features. Sampling and measurements were carried out in the autumn of 2011 and the spring of 2012. The values of the activity concentrations of the gross α and β measured in the water samples ranged from 80 to 380 mBq L(-1) with a mean of 192 mBq L(-1) and 120-3470 mBq L(-1) with a mean of 579 mBq L(-1) respectively. All values of the gross α were lower than the limit value of 500 mBq L(-1) while two ground water samples were found to have gross β activity concentrations of greater than 1000 mBq L(-1). Therefore two water samples were the subject of further radioisotope-specific analysis. The obtained result indicated that the elevated activity concentrations of the gross β in these water samples are dominated by (40)K activity. Annual effective doses ranged from 0.04 to 0.20 mSv y(-1).

  13. Genotypic Characterization of Cryptosporidium hominis from Water Samples in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Ronalda S.; Dropa, Milena; Fernandes, Licia N.; Carvalho, Terezinha T.; Sato, Maria Inês Z.; Soares, Rodrigo M.; Matté, Glavur R.; Matté, Maria Helena

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium has emerged as one of the most important water contaminants, causing waterborne outbreaks of diarrheal diseases worldwide. The small size of oocysts under the microscope and the possibility of changes in characteristics of oocysts, mainly in environmental samples, make the taxonomy of the genus difficult if morphologic characteristics are considered. This limitation encouraged the application of molecular methods to identify this microorganism. The aim of this study was to detect and identify by nested-polymerase chain reaction oocysts of Cryptosporidium present in water samples in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Water samples were concentrated through a membrane filter, DNA was extracted by using a standard technique, and both amplification reactions used forward and reverse oligonucleotides that were complementary to Cryptosporidium 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Thirty water samples from different sites of collection in the state of São Paulo were evaluated. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 30% of the samples. By genoptyping, C. hominis and Cryptosporidium sp. were identified in recreational water and C. meleagridis was identified in surface water samples. This is the first report of C. hominis in environmental samples in Brazil. Although identification of Cryptosporidium is still a difficult task, molecular methods are essential for specific identification and are a helpful tool to aid to understand the epidemiology of this parasite in Brazil. PMID:22049036

  14. Sampling vadose-zone water for a volatile organic compound at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, James A.; Cho, H. Jean; Jaffe, Peter R.; MacLeod, Cecilia L.; Koehnlein, Susan A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of collecting samples of unsaturated-zone water for quantitative analysis for a volatile organic compound, trichloroethene (TCE), was compared to three other, previously described sampling methodologies in the laboratory and in the field. In the laboratory, prepared water samples containing TCE in a known concentration (20 µg/L) were sampled repeatedly by using each of the four methods to quantify method precision and accuracy. To compare the four methods in the field, unsaturated-zone water above a TCE-contaminated water-table aquifer was transferred from a depth of 2 m to land surface with 0.15-m-long suction lysimeters attached to 1.85-m lengths of stainless-steel tubing. Statistical analyses of the laboratory and field data indicate that the new method, which involves collecting the water samples in gas-tight glass syringes, is superior to the other three methods for the quantitative sampling and analysis of TCE on the basis of its high precision and accuracy and ease of use. This method was used to collect additional samples from the field site to quantify the spatial variability of TCE concentrations in the unsaturated-zone water. Results of analysis of variance of the data indicate that the spatial concentration variability is important, and that differences in TCE concentration are statistically significant for horizontal distances less than 3.6 m.

  15. Methods for collecting algal samples as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Stephen D.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Gurtz, Martin E.; Meador, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Benthic algae (periphyton) and phytoplankton communities are characterized in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program as part of an integrated physical, chemical, and biological assessment of the Nation's water quality. This multidisciplinary approach provides multiple lines of evidence for evaluating water-quality status and trends, and for refining an understanding of the factors that affect water-quality conditions locally, regionally, and nationally. Water quality can be characterized by evaluating the results of qualitative and quantitative measurements of the algal community. Qualitative periphyton samples are collected to develop of list of taxa present in the sampling reach. Quantitative periphyton samples are collected to measure algal community structure within selected habitats. These samples of benthic algal communities are collected from natural substrates, using the sampling methods that are most appropriate for the habitat conditions. Phytoplankton samples may be collected in large nonwadeable streams and rivers to meet specific program objectives. Estimates of algal biomass (chlorophyll content and ash-free dry mass) also are optional measures that may be useful for interpreting water-quality conditions. A nationally consistent approach provides guidance on site, reach, and habitat selection, as well as information on methods and equipment for qualitative and quantitative sampling. Appropriate quality-assurance and quality-control guidelines are used to maximize the ability to analyze data locally, regionally, and nationally.

  16. Idaho's surface-water-quality monitoring program: results from five sites sampled during water years 1990-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1994-01-01

    In 1990, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Environmental Quality, implemented a statewide water-quality monitoring program in response to Idaho's antidegradation policy as required by the Clean Water Act. The program objective is to provide water-quality managers with a coordinated statewide network to detect trends in surface-water quality. The monitoring program includes the collection and analysis of samples from 56 sites on the Bear, Clearwater, Kootenai, Pend Oreille, Salmon, Snake, and Spokane Rivers and their tributaries (fig. 1). Samples are collected every year at 5 sites (annual sites) in drainage basins where long-term water-quality management is practiced, every other year at 19 sites (biennial sites) in basins where land and water uses change slowly, and every third year at 32 sites (triennial sites) where future development may affect water quality. Each year, 25 of the 56 sites are sampled. This report discusses results of sampling at five annual sites. During water years 1990-93 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1993), samples were collected six times per year at the five annual sites (fig. 1). Onsite analyses were made for discharge, specific conductance, pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, bacteria (fecal coliform and fecal streptococci), and alkalinity. Laboratory analyses were made for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, and suspended sediment. Suspended sediment, nitrate, fecal coliform, trace elements, and specific conductance were used to characterize surface-water quality. Because concentrations of all trace elements except zinc were near detection limits, only zinc is discussed.

  17. Ground-Water Data-Collection Protocols and Procedures for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program: Collection and Documentation of Water-Quality Samples and Related Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koterba, Michael T.; Wilde, Franceska D.; Lapham, Wayne W.

    1995-01-01

    Protocols for ground-water sampling are described in a report written in 1989 as part of the pilot program for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). These protocols have been reviewed and revised to address the needs of the full-scale implementation of the NAWQA Program that began in 1991. This report, which is a collaborative effort between the NAWQA Program and the USGS Office of Water Quality, is the result of that review and revision. This report describes protocols and recommended procedures for the collection of water-quality samples and related data from wells for the NAWQA Program. Protocols and recommended procedures discussed include (1) equipment setup and other preparations for data collection; (2) well purging and field measurements; (3) collecting and processing ground-water-quality samples; (4) equipment decontamination; (5) quality-control sampling; and (6) sample handling and shipping.

  18. “Nanofiltration” Enabled by Super-Absorbent Polymer Beads for Concentrating Microorganisms in Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xing; Bahnemann, Janina; Wang, Siwen; Yang, Yang; Hoffmann, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Detection and quantification of pathogens in water is critical for the protection of human health and for drinking water safety and security. When the pathogen concentrations are low, large sample volumes (several liters) are needed to achieve reliable quantitative results. However, most microbial identification methods utilize relatively small sample volumes. As a consequence, a concentration step is often required to detect pathogens in natural waters. Herein, we introduce a novel water sample concentration method based on superabsorbent polymer (SAP) beads. When SAP beads swell with water, small molecules can be sorbed within the beads, but larger particles are excluded and, thus, concentrated in the residual non-sorbed water. To illustrate this approach, millimeter-sized poly(acrylamide-co-itaconic acid) (P(AM-co-IA)) beads are synthesized and successfully applied to concentrate water samples containing two model microorganisms: Escherichia coli and bacteriophage MS2. Experimental results indicate that the size of the water channel within water swollen P(AM-co-IA) hydrogel beads is on the order of several nanometers. The millimeter size coupled with a negative surface charge of the beads are shown to be critical in order to achieve high levels of concentration. This new concentration procedure is very fast, effective, scalable, and low-cost with no need for complex instrumentation. PMID:26876979

  19. "Nanofiltration" Enabled by Super-Absorbent Polymer Beads for Concentrating Microorganisms in Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xing; Bahnemann, Janina; Wang, Siwen; Yang, Yang; Hoffmann, Michael R

    2016-02-15

    Detection and quantification of pathogens in water is critical for the protection of human health and for drinking water safety and security. When the pathogen concentrations are low, large sample volumes (several liters) are needed to achieve reliable quantitative results. However, most microbial identification methods utilize relatively small sample volumes. As a consequence, a concentration step is often required to detect pathogens in natural waters. Herein, we introduce a novel water sample concentration method based on superabsorbent polymer (SAP) beads. When SAP beads swell with water, small molecules can be sorbed within the beads, but larger particles are excluded and, thus, concentrated in the residual non-sorbed water. To illustrate this approach, millimeter-sized poly(acrylamide-co-itaconic acid) (P(AM-co-IA)) beads are synthesized and successfully applied to concentrate water samples containing two model microorganisms: Escherichia coli and bacteriophage MS2. Experimental results indicate that the size of the water channel within water swollen P(AM-co-IA) hydrogel beads is on the order of several nanometers. The millimeter size coupled with a negative surface charge of the beads are shown to be critical in order to achieve high levels of concentration. This new concentration procedure is very fast, effective, scalable, and low-cost with no need for complex instrumentation.

  20. “Nanofiltration” Enabled by Super-Absorbent Polymer Beads for Concentrating Microorganisms in Water Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xing; Bahnemann, Janina; Wang, Siwen; Yang, Yang; Hoffmann, Michael R.

    2016-02-01

    Detection and quantification of pathogens in water is critical for the protection of human health and for drinking water safety and security. When the pathogen concentrations are low, large sample volumes (several liters) are needed to achieve reliable quantitative results. However, most microbial identification methods utilize relatively small sample volumes. As a consequence, a concentration step is often required to detect pathogens in natural waters. Herein, we introduce a novel water sample concentration method based on superabsorbent polymer (SAP) beads. When SAP beads swell with water, small molecules can be sorbed within the beads, but larger particles are excluded and, thus, concentrated in the residual non-sorbed water. To illustrate this approach, millimeter-sized poly(acrylamide-co-itaconic acid) (P(AM-co-IA)) beads are synthesized and successfully applied to concentrate water samples containing two model microorganisms: Escherichia coli and bacteriophage MS2. Experimental results indicate that the size of the water channel within water swollen P(AM-co-IA) hydrogel beads is on the order of several nanometers. The millimeter size coupled with a negative surface charge of the beads are shown to be critical in order to achieve high levels of concentration. This new concentration procedure is very fast, effective, scalable, and low-cost with no need for complex instrumentation.

  1. Arsenic-related water quality with depth and water quality of well-head samples from production wells, Oklahoma, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, Carol J.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Greer, James R.; Smith, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey well profiler was used to describe arsenic-related water quality with well depth and identify zones yielding water with high arsenic concentrations in two production wells in central and western Oklahoma that yield water from the Permian-aged Garber-Wellington and Rush Springs aquifers, respectively. In addition, well-head samples were collected from 12 production wells yielding water with historically large concentrations of arsenic (greater than 10 micrograms per liter) from the Garber-Wellington aquifer, Rush Springs aquifer, and two minor aquifers: the Arbuckle-Timbered Hills aquifer in southern Oklahoma and a Permian-aged undefined aquifer in north-central Oklahoma. Three depth-dependent samples from a production well in the Rush Springs aquifer had similar water-quality characteristics to the well-head sample and did not show any substantial changes with depth. However, slightly larger arsenic concentrations in the two deepest depth-dependent samples indicate the zones yielding noncompliant arsenic concentrations are below the shallowest sampled depth. Five depth-dependent samples from a production well in the Garber-Wellington aquifer showed increases in arsenic concentrations with depth. Well-bore travel-time information and water-quality data from depth-dependent and well-head samples showed that most arsenic contaminated water (about 63 percent) was entering the borehole from perforations adjacent to or below the shroud that overlaid the pump. Arsenic concentrations ranged from 10.4 to 124 micrograms per liter in 11 of the 12 production wells sampled at the well head, exceeding the maximum contaminant level of 10 micrograms per liter for drinking water. pH values of the 12 well-head samples ranged from 6.9 to 9. Seven production wells in the Garber-Wellington aquifer had the largest arsenic concentrations ranging from 18.5 to 124 micrograms per liter. Large arsenic concentrations (10.4-18.5) and near neutral to slightly alkaline

  2. Instrumental neutron activation analysis data for cloud-water particulate samples, Mount Bamboo, Taiwan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Neng-Huei; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Debey, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Cloud water was sampled on Mount Bamboo in northern Taiwan during March 22-24, 2002. Cloud-water samples were filtered using 0.45-micron filters to remove particulate material from the water samples. Filtered particulates were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) at the U.S. Geological Survey National Reactor Facility in Denver, Colorado, in February 2012. INAA elemental composition data for the particulate materials are presented. These data complement analyses of the aqueous portion of the cloud-water samples, which were performed earlier by the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, National Central University, Taiwan. The data are intended for evaluation of atmospheric transport processes and air-pollution sources in Southeast Asia.

  3. Vacuum hand pump apparatus for collecting water samples from a horizontal intragravel pipe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.

    1996-01-01

    We describe a lightweight, portable vacuum hand pump apparatus for use in collecting water samples from horizontal intragravel pipe samplers buried in the stream bottom. The apparatus is easily fabricated from relatively inexpensive materials available at many laboratory supply houses.

  4. A new experimental design for laser-driven shocks on precompressed and preheated water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sollier, A.; Auroux, E.; Vauthier, J.-S.; Desbiens, N.; Bourasseau, E.; Maillet, J.-B.; Boustie, M.; He, H.; Resseguier, T. de; Berterretche, P.

    2007-12-12

    Laser driven shock measurements have been performed on precompressed and preheated water samples in order to reach states lying above the standard water Hugoniot in the pressure versus temperature diagram, which are representative of the thermodynamic parameters of water in the detonation products of high condensed explosives. In this experimental system, water is used as both target sample and window medium for VISAR diagnosis. We report the first experiments performed with the LCD's laser system at low shock pressure, on water samples preheated up to 300 deg. C and precompressed up to 300 bar. The results are used to check the predictions of the CARTE thermochemical code, and compared with the Sesame equation of state and with molecular Monte Carlo calculations.

  5. GROUND WATER ISSUE: LOW-FLOW (MINIMAL DRAWDOWN) GROUND-WATER SAMPLING PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is intended to provide background information on the development of low-flow sampling procedures and its application under a variety of hydrogeologic settings. The sampling methodology described in this paper assumes that the monitoring goal is to sample monitoring wel...

  6. Exploring the Legionella pneumophila positivity rate in hotel water samples from Antalya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sepin Özen, Nevgün; Tuğlu Ataman, Şenay; Emek, Mestan

    2017-03-29

    The genus Legionella is a fastidious Gram-negative bacteria widely distributed in natural waters and man made water supply systems. Legionella pneumophila is the aetiological agent of approximately 90% of reported Legionellosis cases, and serogroup 1 is the most frequent cause of infections. Legionnaires' disease is often associated with travel and continues to be a public health concern at present. The correct water management quality practices and rapid methods for analyzing Legionella species in environmental water is a key point for the prevention of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks. This study aimed to evaluate the positivity rates and serotyping of Legionella species from water samples in the region of Antalya, Turkey, which is an important tourism center. During January-December 2010, a total of 1403 samples of water that were collected from various hotels (n = 56) located in Antalya were investigated for Legionella pneumophila. All samples were screened for L. pneumophila by culture method according to "ISO 11731-2" criteria. The culture positive Legionella strains were serologically identified by latex agglutination test. A total of 142 Legionella pneumophila isolates were recovered from 21 (37.5%) of 56 hotels. The total frequency of L. pneumophila isolation from water samples was found as 10.1%. Serological typing of 142 Legionella isolates by latex agglutination test revealed that strains belonging to L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 predominated in the examined samples (85%), while strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 were less numerous (15%). According to our knowledge, our study with the greatest number of water samples from Turkey demonstrates that L. pneumophila serogroups 2-14 is the most common isolate. Rapid isolation of L. pneumophila from environmental water samples is essential for the investigation of travel related outbreaks and the possible resources. Further studies are needed to have epidemiological data and to determine the types of L

  7. Atrazine, triketone herbicides, and their degradation products in sediment, soil and surface water samples in Poland.

    PubMed

    Barchanska, Hanna; Sajdak, Marcin; Szczypka, Kornelia; Swientek, Angelika; Tworek, Martyna; Kurek, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the sediment, soil and surface water contamination with selected popular triketone herbicides (mesotrione (MES) and sulcotrione(SUL)), atrazine (ATR) classified as a possible carcinogen and endocrine disrupting chemical, as well as their degradation products, in Silesia (Poland). Seventeen sediment samples, 24 soil samples, and 64 surface water samples collected in 2014 were studied. After solid-liquid extraction (SLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE), analytes were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode array detection (DAD). Ten years after the withdrawal from the use, ATR was not detected in any of the collected samples; however, its degradation products are still present in 41 % of sediment, 71 % of soil, and 8 % of surface water samples. SUL was determined in 85 % of soil samples; its degradation product (2-chloro-4-(methylosulfonyl) benzoic acid (CMBA)) was present in 43 % of soil samples. In 17 % of sediment samples, CMBA was detected. Triketones were detected occasionally in surface water samples. The chemometric analysis (clustering analysis (CA), single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), N-Way ANOVA) was applied to find relations between selected soil and sediment parameters and herbicides concentration. In neither of the studied cases a statistically significant relationship between the concentrations of examined herbicides, their degradation products and soil parameters (organic carbon (OC), pH) was observed.

  8. Rapid screening of 90Sr activity in water and milk samples using Cherenkov radiation.

    PubMed

    Stamoulis, K C; Ioannides, K G; Karamanis, D T; Patiris, D C

    2007-01-01

    A method for screening 90Sr in milk samples is proposed. This method is based on a liquid scintillation technique taking advantage of Cherenkov radiation, which is produced in a liquid medium and then detected by the photomultipliers of a Liquid Scintillation Counter (LSC). Twenty millilitres of water and milk samples spiked with various concentrations of 90Sr/90Y in equilibrium were added in plastic vials and then were measured with an LSC (TriCarb 3170 TR/SL). The derived efficiencies were 49% for water samples and 14% for milk samples. The detection limit was 470 mBq L(-1)(90)Sr for water, without any pretreatment. Milk contains potassium, which also produces Cherenkov radiation due to the presence of 40K. For this reason, the interference of 40K in the measurements of 90Sr in milk samples was also investigated. The detection limit for milk was 1.7 Bq L(-1)90Sr.

  9. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities for calendar year 1995 to 1997 at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Naturita, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, sampling frequency, and specific rationale for each routine monitoring station at the site. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site.

  10. Hepatitis A virus in environmental water samples from the Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    De Paula, V S; Diniz-Mendes, L; Villar, L M; Luz, S L B; Silva, L A; Jesus, M S; da Silva, N M V S; Gaspar, A M C

    2007-03-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a significant waterborne human pathogen. Of the global supply of potable water, Brazil retains 13%, of which 75% resides in the Amazon Basin. Although hepatitis A morbidity has declined progressively in Brazil as a whole, it remains high in the Amazon region. We used nested and real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect and quantify the viral load in water samples from the Amazon Basin. Most samples tested positive (92%), with viral loads varying from 60 to 5500 copies /L, depending on sanitary conditions and the degree of flooding. Nested RT-PCR of the VP1-2A region detected HAV RNA in 23% of the samples. In low viral load samples, HAV was detected only with real-time RT-PCR, suggesting that this technique is useful for monitoring HAV contamination. The presence of HAV in water samples constitutes a serious public health problem.

  11. An immunomagnetic separation-real-time PCR method for quantification of Cryptosporidium parvum in water samples.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Melanie; Guillot, Emmanuelle

    2003-07-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is known to occur widely in both raw and drinking water and is the cause of waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis throughout the world. The routinely used method for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water is based on an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). It is both time-consuming and nonspecific for the human pathogenic species C. parvum. We have developed a TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test that accurately quantifies C. parvum oocysts in treated and untreated water samples. The protocol consisted of the following successive steps: Envirochek capsule filtration, immunomagnetic separation (IMS), thermal lysis followed by DNA purification using Nanosep centrifugal devices and, finally, real-time PCR using fluorescent TaqMan technology. Quantification was accomplished by comparing the fluorescence signals obtained from test samples with those from standard dilutions of C. parvum oocysts. This IMS-real-time PCR assay permits rapid and reliable quantification over six orders of magnitude, with a detection limit of five oocysts for purified oocyst solutions and eight oocysts for spiked water samples. Replicate samples of spiked tap water and Seine River water samples (with approximately 78 and 775 oocysts) were tested. C. parvum oocyst recoveries, which ranged from 47.4% to 99% and from 39.1% to 68.3%, respectively, were significantly higher and less variable than those reported using the traditional US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) method 1622. This new molecular method offers a rapid, sensitive and specific alternative for C. parvum oocyst quantification in water.

  12. Water quality in dental chair units. A random sample in the canton of St. Gallen.

    PubMed

    Barben, Jürg; Kuehni, Claudia E; Schmid, Jürg

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the microbial contamination of water from dental chair units (DCUs) using the prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella species and heterotrophic bacteria as a marker of pollution in water in the area of St. Gallen, Switzerland. Water (250 ml) from 76 DCUs was collected twice (early on a morning before using all the instruments and after using the DCUs for at least two hours) either from the high-speed handpiece tube, the 3 in 1 syringe or the micromotor for water quality testing. An increased bacterial count (>300 CFU/ml) was found in 46 (61%) samples taken before use of the DCU, but only in 29 (38%) samples taken two hours after use. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found in both water samples in 6/76 (8%) of the DCUs. Legionella were found in both samples in 15 (20%) of the DCUs tested. Legionella anisa was identified in seven samples and Legionella pneumophila was found in eight. DCUs which were less than five years old were contaminated less often than older units (25% und 77%, p<0.001). This difference remained significant (0=0.0004) when adjusted for manufacturer and sampling location in a multivariable logistic regression. A large proportion of the DCUs tested did not comply with the Swiss drinking water standards nor with the recommendations of the American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

  13. Ground-water quality in east-central New Jersey and a plan for sampling networks

    SciTech Connect

    Harriman, D.A.; Sargent, B.P.

    1985-01-01

    Groundwater quality was evaluated in seven confined aquifers and the water table aquifer in east-central New Jersey based on 237 analyses of samples collected in 1981-82, and 225 older analyses. Investigation of the effect of land use on water quality and several sampling network proposals for the region are reported. Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) concentrations exceed US EPA drinking water standards in some wells screened in the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system. Sodium (Na) concentrations in samples from three wells more than 800 ft deep in the Englishtown aquifer exceed the standard. Iron and Mn concentrations in this aquifer may also exceed the standards. Iron concentrations in the Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifer exceed the standard. Based on 15 analyses of water from the Vincetown aquifer, Mn is the only constituent that exceeds the drinking water standard. In the Manasquan aquifer, 4 of the 16 Na determinations exceed the standard, and 8 of 16 Fe determinations exceed the standard. Water quality in the Atlantic City 800-ft sand is generally satisfactory. However, 12 Fe and 1 of 12 Mn determinations exceed the standards. For the Rio Grande water-bearing zone, 1 of 3 Fe determinations exceed the standard. The Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system was the most thoroughly sampled (249 chemical analyses from 209 wells). Dissolved solids, chloride, Fe, nitrate, and Mn concentrations exceed drinking water standards in some areas. 76 refs., 36 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Natural radioactivity in various water samples and radiation dose estimations in Bolu province, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gorur, F Korkmaz; Camgoz, H

    2014-10-01

    The level of natural radioactivity for Bolu province of north-western Turkey was assessed in this study. There is no information about radioactivity measurement reported in water samples in the Bolu province so far. For this reason, gross α and β activities of 55 different water samples collected from tap, spring, mineral, river and lake waters in Bolu were determined. The mean activity concentrations were 68.11 mBq L(-1), 169.44 mBq L(-1) for gross α and β in tap water. For all samples the gross β activity is always higher than the gross α activity. All value of the gross α were lower than the limit value of 500 mBq L(-1) while two spring and one mineral water samples were found to have gross β activity concentrations of greater than 1000 mBq L(-1). The associated age-dependent dose from all water ingestion in Bolu was estimated. The total dose for adults had an average value exceeds the WHO recommended limit value. The risk levels from the direct ingestion of the natural radionuclides in tap and mineral water in Bolu were determinated. The mean (210)Po and (228)Ra risk the value of tap and mineral waters slightly exceeds what some consider on acceptable risk of 10(-4) or less.

  15. Soil and Water – What is Detectable through Microbiological Sample Preparation Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concerns of a potential terrorist’s use of biological agents in soil and ground water are articulated by comparisons to major illnesses in this Country involving contaminated drinking water sources. Objectives are focused on the importance of sample preparation in the rapid, ...

  16. Comparison of water-quality samples collected by siphon samplers and automatic samplers in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graczyk, David J.; Robertson, Dale M.; Rose, William J.; Steur, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    In small streams, flow and water-quality concentrations often change quickly in response to meteorological events. Hydrologists, field technicians, or locally hired stream ob- servers involved in water-data collection are often unable to reach streams quickly enough to observe or measure these rapid changes. Therefore, in hydrologic studies designed to describe changes in water quality, a combination of manual and automated sampling methods have commonly been used manual methods when flow is relatively stable and automated methods when flow is rapidly changing. Auto- mated sampling, which makes use of equipment programmed to collect samples in response to changes in stage and flow of a stream, has been shown to be an effective method of sampling to describe the rapid changes in water quality (Graczyk and others, 1993). Because of the high cost of automated sampling, however, especially for studies examining a large number of sites, alternative methods have been considered for collecting samples during rapidly changing stream conditions. One such method employs the siphon sampler (fig. 1). also referred to as the "single-stage sampler." Siphon samplers are inexpensive to build (about $25- $50 per sampler), operate, and maintain, so they are cost effective to use at a large number of sites. Their ability to collect samples representing the average quality of water passing though the entire cross section of a stream, however, has not been fully demonstrated for many types of stream sites.

  17. Classification and authentication of unknown water samples using machine learning algorithms.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Palash K; Panchariya, P C; Kundu, Madhusree

    2011-07-01

    This paper proposes the development of water sample classification and authentication, in real life which is based on machine learning algorithms. The proposed techniques used experimental measurements from a pulse voltametry method which is based on an electronic tongue (E-tongue) instrumentation system with silver and platinum electrodes. E-tongue include arrays of solid state ion sensors, transducers even of different types, data collectors and data analysis tools, all oriented to the classification of liquid samples and authentication of unknown liquid samples. The time series signal and the corresponding raw data represent the measurement from a multi-sensor system. The E-tongue system, implemented in a laboratory environment for 6 numbers of different ISI (Bureau of Indian standard) certified water samples (Aquafina, Bisleri, Kingfisher, Oasis, Dolphin, and McDowell) was the data source for developing two types of machine learning algorithms like classification and regression. A water data set consisting of 6 numbers of sample classes containing 4402 numbers of features were considered. A PCA (principal component analysis) based classification and authentication tool was developed in this study as the machine learning component of the E-tongue system. A proposed partial least squares (PLS) based classifier, which was dedicated as well; to authenticate a specific category of water sample evolved out as an integral part of the E-tongue instrumentation system. The developed PCA and PLS based E-tongue system emancipated an overall encouraging authentication percentage accuracy with their excellent performances for the aforesaid categories of water samples.

  18. Water intoxication presenting as a suspected contaminated urine sample for drug testing.

    PubMed

    Finkel, Kevin W

    2004-06-01

    A patient was evaluated medically after submitting a urine sample for drug screening that was considered inappropriately dilute. Although it was thought that the dilute urine was the result of purposely adding water, the medical evaluation revealed that the patient had chronic water intoxication from a very strict weight loss regimen. The effect of dietary solute intake on water metabolism by the kidneys and the development of hyponatremia are discussed.

  19. Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

  20. An Optimized Method for Quantification of Pathogenic Leptospira in Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Riediger, Irina N.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Biondo, Alexander W.; Ko, Albert I.; Stoddard, Robyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease usually acquired by contact with water contaminated with urine of infected animals. However, few molecular methods have been used to monitor or quantify pathogenic Leptospira in environmental water samples. Here we optimized a DNA extraction method for the quantification of leptospires using a previously described Taqman-based qPCR method targeting lipL32, a gene unique to and highly conserved in pathogenic Leptospira. QIAamp DNA mini, MO BIO PowerWater DNA and PowerSoil DNA Isolation kits were evaluated to extract DNA from sewage, pond, river and ultrapure water samples spiked with leptospires. Performance of each kit varied with sample type. Sample processing methods were further evaluated and optimized using the PowerSoil DNA kit due to its performance on turbid water samples and reproducibility. Centrifugation speeds, water volumes and use of Escherichia coli as a carrier were compared to improve DNA recovery. All matrices showed a strong linearity in a range of concentrations from 106 to 10° leptospires/mL and lower limits of detection ranging from <1 cell /ml for river water to 36 cells/mL for ultrapure water with E. coli as a carrier. In conclusion, we optimized a method to quantify pathogenic Leptospira in environmental waters (river, pond and sewage) which consists of the concentration of 40 mL samples by centrifugation at 15,000×g for 20 minutes at 4°C, followed by DNA extraction with the PowerSoil DNA Isolation kit. Although the method described herein needs to be validated in environmental studies, it potentially provides the opportunity for effective, timely and sensitive assessment of environmental leptospiral burden. PMID:27487084

  1. Evaluation of the Validity of Groundwater Samples Obtained Using the Purge Water Management System at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, C.C.

    1999-04-27

    As part of the demonstration testing of the Purge Water Management System (PWMS) technology at the Savannah River Site (SRS), four wells were equipped with PWMS units in 1997 and a series of sampling events were conducted at each during 1997-1998. Three of the wells were located in A/M Area while the fourth was located at the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground in the General Separations Area.The PWMS is a ''closed-loop'', non-contact, system used to collect and return purge water to the originating aquifer after a sampling event without having significantly altered the water quality. One of the primary concerns as to its applicability at SRS, and elsewhere, is whether the PWMS might resample groundwater that is returned to the aquifer during the previous sampling event. The purpose of the present investigation was to compare groundwater chemical analysis data collected at the four test wells using the PWMS vs. historical data collected using the standard monitoring program methodology to determine if the PWMS provides representative monitoring samples.The analysis of the groundwater chemical concentrations indicates that the PWMS sampling methodology acquired representative groundwater samples at monitoring wells ABP-1A, ABP-4, ARP-3 and BGO-33C. Representative groundwater samples are achieved if the PWMS does not resample groundwater that has been purged and returned during a previous sampling event. Initial screening calculations, conducted prior to the selection of these four wells, indicated that groundwater velocities were high enough under the ambient hydraulic gradients to preclude resampling from occurring at the time intervals that were used at each well. Corroborating evidence included a tracer test that was conducted at BGO-33C, the high degree of similarity between analyte concentrations derived from the PWMS samples and those obtained from historical protocol sampling, as well as the fact that PWMS data extend all previously existing concentration

  2. GROUND WATER MONITORING AND SAMPLING: MULTI-LEVEL VERSUS TRADITIONAL METHODS WHATS WHAT?

    EPA Science Inventory

    After years of research and many publications, the question still remains: What is the best method to collect representative ground water samples from monitoring wells? Numerous systems and devices are currently available for obtaining both multi-level samples as well as traditi...

  3. HYDROLYSIS OF MTBE IN GROUND WATER SAMPLES PRESERVED WITIH HYDROCHLORIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional sampling and analytical protocols have poor sensitivity for fuel oxygenates that are alcohols, such as TBA. Because alcohols tend to stay with the water samples, they are not efficiently transferred to the gas chromatograph for separation and analysis. A common tec...

  4. Qualilty, isotopes, and radiochemistry of water sampled from the Upper Moenkopi Village water-supply wells, Coconino County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carruth, Rob; Beisner, Kimberly; Smith, Greg

    2013-01-01

    The Hopi Tribe Water Resources Program has granted contracts for studies to evaluate water supply conditions for the Moenkopi villages in Coconino County, Arizona. The Moenkopi villages include Upper Moenkopi Village and the village of Lower Moencopi, both on the Hopi Indian Reservation south of the Navajo community of Tuba City. These investigations have determined that water supplies are limited and vulnerable to several potential sources of contamination, including the Tuba City Landfill and a former uranium processing facility known as the Rare Metals Mill. Studies are ongoing to determine if uranium and other metals in groundwater beneath the landfill are greater than regional groundwater concentrations. The source of water supply for the Upper Moenkopi Village is three public-supply wells. The wells are referred to as MSW-1, MSW-2, and MSW-3 and all three wells obtain water from the regionally extensive N aquifer. The N aquifer is the principal aquifer in this region of northern Arizona and consists of thick beds of sandstone between less permeable layers of siltstone and mudstone. The relatively fine-grained character of the N aquifer inhibits rapid movement of water and large yields to wells. In recent years, water levels have declined in the three public-supply wells, causing concern that the current water supply will not be able to accommodate peak demand and allow for residential and economic growth. Analyses of major ions, nutrients, selected trace metals, stable and radioactive isotopes, and radiochemistry were performed on the groundwater samples from the three public-supply wells to describe general water-quality conditions and groundwater ages in and immediately surrounding the Upper Moenkopi Village area. None of the water samples collected from the public-supply wells exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards. The ratios of the major dissolved ions from the samples collected from MSW-1 and MSW-2 indicate

  5. May 2011 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 16-17, 2011, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location Johnson Artesian WL. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry, and for tritium using the conventional method. Tritium was not measured using the enrichment method because the EPA laboratory no longer offers that service. Results of this monitoring at the Rio Blanco site demonstrate that groundwater and surface water outside the boundaries have not been affected by project-related contaminants.

  6. Identification of Phyllosilicates in Mudstone Samples Using Water Releases Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogancamp, J. V. (Clark); Ming, D. W.; McAdam, A. C.; Archer, P. D.; Morris, R. V.; Bristow, T. F.; Rampe, E. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Gellert, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the Curiosity Rover has detected high temperature water releases from mud-stones in the areas of Yellowknife Bay, Pahrump Hills, Naukluft Plateau, and Murray Buttes in Gale crater. Dehydroxylation of phyllosilicates may have caused the high temperature water releases observed in these samples. Because each type of phyllosilicate undergoes dehydroxylation at distinct temperatures, these water releases can be used to help constrain the type of phyllosilicate present in each sample.

  7. May 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 14-16, 2013, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location CER #1 Black Sulphur. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods.

  8. Proton transfer pathways in an aspartate-water cluster sampled by a network of discrete states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidelbach, Marco; Betz, Fridtjof; Mäusle, Raquel Maya; Imhof, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Proton transfer reactions are complex transitions due to the size and flexibility of the hydrogen-bonded networks along which the protons may ;hop;. The combination of molecular dynamics based sampling of water positions and orientations with direct sampling of proton positions is an efficient way to capture the interplay of these degrees of freedom in a transition network. The energetically most favourable pathway in the proton transfer network computed for an aspartate-water cluster shows the pre-orientation of water molecules and aspartate side chains to be a pre-requisite for the subsequent concerted proton transfer to the product state.

  9. Salinity of ground water at sampling wells located in southeastern Nassau County, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lusczynski, Norbert J.

    1950-01-01

    In 1939, a special program for the systematic collection of chloride data in southeastern Nassau County was inaugurated in which three agencies participated. The Nassau County Department of Public Works constructed the sampling wells, the Ground Water Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey began to collect at period intervals water samples which were analysed at the Mount Prospect Laboratory of the New York Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity, The Nassau County Department of Public Works and the U.S. Geological Survey have continued financial cooperation for the maintenance of this program up to the present time.

  10. Comparison of sampling strategies for monitoring water quality in mesoscale Canadian Prairie watersheds.

    PubMed

    Ross, Cody; Petzold, Halya; Penner, Amber; Ali, Genevieve

    2015-07-01

    The Canadian Prairies are subject to cold winter dynamics, spring snowmelt runoff, and summer storms; a process variability that makes it difficult to identify an adequate sampling strategy for capturing representative water quality data. Hence, our research objective was to compare multiple water quality sampling strategies for Prairie watersheds and rank them based on operational and statistical criteria. The focus was on the Catfish Creek Watershed (Manitoba, Canada), which drains into the hypereutrophic Lake Winnipeg. Water samples were collected every 7 h during the 2013 open-water season and notably analyzed for nitrate and orthophosphate. The original high-frequency dataset (7 h) was then deconstructed into lower-frequency datasets to mimic strategies involving sample collection on a daily, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, and seasonal basis. A comparison and decision matrix was also built to assess the ability of the lower-frequency datasets to retain the statistical properties of the original (7 h) dataset. Results indicate that nutrient concentrations vary significantly over short timescales and are affected by both sampling time (day versus night) and water level fluctuations. The decision matrix revealed that seasonal sampling is sufficient when the goal is only to capture mean water quality conditions; however, sub-daily to daily sampling is required for accurate process signal representation. While we acknowledge that sampling programs designed by researchers and public agencies are often driven by different goals, we found daily sampling to be the most parsimonious strategy for the study watershed and suggest that it would help to better quantify nutrient loads to Lake Winnipeg.

  11. Concentration of ions in selected bottled water samples sold in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Kam, Ryan Chuan Yang; Lim, Ai Phing; Praveena, Sarva Mangala

    2013-03-01

    Many consumers around the world, including Malaysians, have turned to bottled water as their main source of drinking water. The aim of this study is to determine the physical and chemical properties of bottled water samples sold in Selangor, Malaysia. A total of 20 bottled water brands consisting of `natural mineral (NM)' and `packaged drinking (PD)' types were randomly collected and analyzed for their physical-chemical characteristics: hydrogen ion concentration (pH), electrical conductivity (EC) and total dissolved solids (TDS), selected major ions: calcium (Ca), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and sodium (Na), and minor trace constituents: copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) to ascertain their suitability for human consumption. The results obtained were compared with guideline values recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) and Malaysian Ministry of Health (MMOH), respectively. It was found that all bottled water samples were in accordance with the guidelines set by WHO and MMOH except for one sample (D3) which was below the pH limit of 6.5. Both NM and PD bottled water were dominated by Na + K > Ca > Mg. Low values for EC and TDS in the bottled water samples showed that water was deficient in essential elements, likely an indication that these were removed by water treatment. Minerals like major ions were present in very low concentrations which could pose a risk to individuals who consume this water on a regular basis. Generally, the overall quality of the supplied bottled water was in accordance to standards and guidelines set by WHO and MMOH and safe for consumption.

  12. Ground-water quality in east-central New Jersey, and a plan for sampling networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harriman, D.A.; Sargent, B.P.

    1985-01-01

    Groundwater quality was evaluated in seven confined aquifers and the water table aquifer in east-central New Jersey based on 237 analyses of samples collected in 1981-82, and 225 older analyses. Investigation of the effect of land use on water quality and several sampling network proposals for the region are reported. Generally, water in the confined aquifers is of satisfactory quality for human consumption and most other uses. Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) concentrations exceed U.S. EPA drinking water standards in some wells screened in the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system. Sodium (Na) concentrations in samples from three wells more than 800 ft deep in the Englishtown aquifer exceed the standard. Iron and Mn concentrations in this aquifer may also exceed the standards. Iron concentrations in the Wenonah-Mount Laurel aquifer exceed the standard. Based on 15 analyses of water from the Vincetown aquifer, Mn is the only constituent that exceeds the drinking water standard. In the Manasquan aquifer, 4 of the 16 Na determinations exceed the standard, and 8 of 16 Fe determinations exceed the standard. Water quality in the Atlantic City 800-ft sand is generally satisfactory. However, 12 Fe and 1 of 12 Mn determinations exceed the standards. For the Rio Grande water-bearing zone, 1 of 3 Fe determinations exceed the standard. The Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer system (the water table aquifer) was the most thoroughly sampled (249 chemical analyses from 209 wells). Dissolved solids, chloride, Fe, nitrate, and Mn concentrations exceed drinking water standards in some areas. The results of chi-square tests of constituent distributions based on analyses from 158 wells in the water table aquifer indicate that calcium is higher in industrial and commercial areas; and Mg, chloride, and nitrate-plus-nitrite is higher in residential areas. (Author 's abstract)

  13. Analysis of core soil and water samples from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.

    1981-02-18

    Core soil samples and water samples were collected from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak for analysis of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am by both gamma spectroscopy and, through a contractor laboratory, by wet chemistry procedures. The samples processing methods, the analytical methods and the analytical quality control are all procedures developed for the continuing Marshall Island radioecology and dose assessment work.

  14. White HDPE bottles as source of serious contamination of water samples with Ba and Zn.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Clemens; Grimstvedt, Andreas; Frengstad, Bjørn; Finne, Tor Erik

    2007-03-15

    During a recent study of surface water quality factory new white high-density polyethylene (HDPE) bottles were used for collecting the water samples. According to the established field protocol of the Geological Survey of Norway the bottles were twice carefully rinsed with water in the field prior to sampling. Several blank samples using milli-Q (ELGA) water (>18.2 MOmega) were also prepared. On checking the analytical results the blanks returned values of Ag, Ba, Sr, V, Zn and Zr. For Ba and Zn the values (c. 300 microg/l and 95 microg/l) were about 10 times above the concentrations that can be expected in natural waters. A laboratory test of the bottles demonstrated that the bottles contaminate the samples with significant amounts of Ba and Zn and some Sr. Simple acid washing of the bottles prior to use did not solve the contamination problem for Ba and Zn. The results suggest that there may exist "clean" and "dirty" HDPE bottles depending on manufacturer/production process. When collecting water samples it is mandatory to check bottles regularly as a possible source of contamination.

  15. Backflushing Filters for Field Processing of Water Samples Prior to Trace-Element Analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, V.C.; Jenne, E.A.; Burchard, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A portable unit is described for filtering water samples at field sites in such a manner that the filtrate is suitable for analysis not only of major constituents but also of trace elments at the mocrogram-per-liter level. A battery-operated peristaltic pump forces the water sample through medical-grade silicone tubing into and through an all-plastic in-line filter which can be backflushed when sediment clogs the filter membrane. Initial filtration rate exceeds 500 milliliter/minute and, because of the backflushing feature, a total time for filtering high-sediment-bearing waster samples is greatly reduced. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Regression modeling of particle size distributions in urban storm water: advancements through improved sample collection methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fienen, Michael N.; Selbig, William R.

    2012-01-01

    A new sample collection system was developed to improve the representation of sediment entrained in urban storm water by integrating water quality samples from the entire water column. The depth-integrated sampler arm (DISA) was able to mitigate sediment stratification bias in storm water, thereby improving the characterization of suspended-sediment concentration and particle size distribution at three independent study locations. Use of the DISA decreased variability, which improved statistical regression to predict particle size distribution using surrogate environmental parameters, such as precipitation depth and intensity. The performance of this statistical modeling technique was compared to results using traditional fixed-point sampling methods and was found to perform better. When environmental parameters can be used to predict particle size distributions, environmental managers have more options when characterizing concentrations, loads, and particle size distributions in urban runoff.

  17. Analysis of bromate in drinking water using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry without sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Koji; Asami, Mari; Takei, Kanako; Akiba, Michihiro

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method for determining bromate in drinking water was developed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The (18)O-enriched bromate was used as an internal standard. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of bromate was 0.2 µg/L. The peak of bromate was separated from those of coexisting ions (i.e., chloride, nitrate and sulfate). The relative and absolute recoveries of bromate in two drinking water samples and in a synthesized ion solution (100 mg/L chloride, 10 mg N/L nitrate, and 100 mg/L sulfate) were 99-105 and 94-105%, respectively. Bromate concentrations in 11 drinking water samples determined by LC-MS/MS were <0.2-2.3 µg/L. The results of the present study indicated that the proposed method was suitable for determining bromate concentrations in drinking water without sample pretreatment.

  18. Set up of an automatic water quality sampling system in irrigation agriculture.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Emanuel; Kraft, Philipp; Buchen, Caroline; Frede, Hans-Georg; Aquino, Eugenio; Breuer, Lutz

    2013-12-23

    We have developed a high-resolution automatic sampling system for continuous in situ measurements of stable water isotopic composition and nitrogen solutes along with hydrological information. The system facilitates concurrent monitoring of a large number of water and nutrient fluxes (ground, surface, irrigation and rain water) in irrigated agriculture. For this purpose we couple an automatic sampling system with a Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry System (WS-CRDS) for stable water isotope analysis (δ2H and δ18O), a reagentless hyperspectral UV photometer (ProPS) for monitoring nitrate content and various water level sensors for hydrometric information. The automatic sampling system consists of different sampling stations equipped with pumps, a switch cabinet for valve and pump control and a computer operating the system. The complete system is operated via internet-based control software, allowing supervision from nearly anywhere. The system is currently set up at the International Rice Research Institute (Los Baños, The Philippines) in a diversified rice growing system to continuously monitor water and nutrient fluxes. Here we present the system's technical set-up and provide initial proof-of-concept with results for the isotopic composition of different water sources and nitrate values from the 2012 dry season.

  19. Determination of UV filters and antimicrobial agents in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Cuderman, Petra; Heath, Ester

    2007-02-01

    Although there is increasing concern about residues from personal care products entering the aquatic environment and their potential to accumulate to levels that pose a health threat to humans and wildlife, we still know little about the extent and magnitude of their presence in the aquatic environment. In this study we describe a procedure for isolation, and subsequent determination, of compounds commonly added to personal care products. The compounds of interest include UV filters with the commercial name Eusolex (homosalate, 4-methylbenzylidenecamphor, benzophenone-3, octocrylene, butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate) and two common anti-microbial agents, clorophene and triclosan. Water samples were filtered, acidified, and extracted by use of solid-phase extraction. Extracted compounds were then derivatised before analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. By use of our method we obtained limits of detection of 13-266 ng L(-1) for UV filters, and 10-186 ng L(-1) for triclosan and clorophene. Recoveries were 82-98% for deionised water and 50-98% for natural water (seawater, pool water, lake water, and river water). Samples collected in Slovenia included seventeen recreational waters (seawater, pool water, lake water, and river water; August 2004) and four wastewaters (January 2005). The most abundant UV filter was benzophenone-3 (11-400 ng L(-1)). Of the two anti-microbial agents studied, trace amounts, only, of triclosan were present in the river Kolpa (68 ng L(-1)) and in an hospital effluent (122 ng L(-1)).

  20. Helicobacter sp. recovered from drinking water biofilm sampled from a water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Park, S R; Mackay, W G; Reid, D C

    2001-04-01

    Workers examining the transmission route(s) and reservoir(s) of infection for Helicobacter pylori have postulated several environmental reservoirs for the organism, including water. Such work has, to date, concentrated on the bulk liquid in drinking water systems rather than on biofilms. Previous investigations by the authors have suggested biofilms in water distribution systems are a possible reservoir of infection. This current study comprised of an analysis of a section of cast iron mains distribution pipe removed from an urban environment in the north-east of Scotland during routine maintenance work. Immediately upon removal of the pipe section, the interior lumen was swabbed to remove the biofilm layer. Subsequent analysis for the presence of Helicobacter DNA using a nested PCR approach produced a positive result. This data provides the first evidence for the existence of Helicobacter in biofilms found in water distribution systems anywhere in the world.

  1. Calculating of river water quality sampling frequency by the analytic hierarchy process (AHP).

    PubMed

    Do, Huu Tuan; Lo, Shang-Lien; Phan Thi, Lan Anh

    2013-01-01

    River water quality sampling frequency is an important aspect of the river water quality monitoring network. A suitable sampling frequency for each station as well as for the whole network will provide a measure of the real water quality status for the water quality managers as well as the decision makers. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is an effective method for decision analysis and calculation of weighting factors based on multiple criteria to solve complicated problems. This study introduces a new procedure to design river water quality sampling frequency by applying the AHP. We introduce and combine weighting factors of variables with the relative weights of stations to select the sampling frequency for each station, monthly and yearly. The new procedure was applied for Jingmei and Xindian rivers, Taipei, Taiwan. The results showed that sampling frequency should be increased at high weighted stations while decreased at low weighted stations. In addition, a detailed monitoring plan for each station and each month could be scheduled from the output results. Finally, the study showed that the AHP is a suitable method to design a system for sampling frequency as it could combine multiple weights and multiple levels for stations and variables to calculate a final weight for stations, variables, and months.

  2. Organic Substances Interfere with Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR-Based Virus Detection in Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Hiroyuki; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-based virus detection from water samples is occasionally hampered by organic substances that are coconcentrated during virus concentration procedures. To characterize these organic substances, samples containing commercially available humic acid, which is known to inhibit RT-PCR, and river water samples were subjected to adsorption-elution-based virus concentration using an electronegative membrane. In this study, the samples before, during, and after the concentration were analyzed in terms of organic properties and virus detection efficiencies. Two out of the three humic acid solutions resulted in RT-quantitative PCR (qPCR) inhibition that caused >3-log10-unit underestimation of spiked poliovirus. Over 60% of the organics contained in the two solutions were recovered in the concentrate, while over 60% of the organics in the uninhibited solution were lost during the concentration process. River water concentrates also caused inhibition of RT-qPCR. Organic concentrations in the river water samples increased by 2.3 to 3.9 times after the virus concentration procedure. The inhibitory samples contained organic fractions in the 10- to 100-kDa size range, which are suspected to be RT-PCR inhibitors. According to excitation-emission matrices, humic acid-like and protein-like fractions were also recovered from river water concentrates, but these fractions did not seem to affect virus detection. Our findings reveal that detailed organic analyses are effective in characterizing inhibitory substances. PMID:25527552

  3. Aqueous Processing of Atmospheric Organic Particles in Cloud Water Collected via Aircraft Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Eric J.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Wirth, Christopher; Shepson, Paul B.; Stirm, Brian H.; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2015-07-21

    Cloud water and below-cloud atmospheric particle samples were collected onboard a research aircraft during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) over a forested region of Alabama in June 2013. The organic molecular composition of the samples was studied to gain insights into the aqueous-phase processing of organic compounds within cloud droplets. High resolution mass spectrometry with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization and direct infusion electrospray ionization were utilized to compare the organic composition of the particle and cloud water samples, respectively. Isoprene and monoterpene-derived organosulfates and oligomers were identified in both the particles and cloud water, showing the significant influence of biogenic volatile organic compound oxidation above the forested region. While the average O:C ratios of the organic compounds were similar between the atmospheric particle and cloud water samples, the chemical composition of these samples was quite different. Specifically, hydrolysis of organosulfates and formation of nitrogen-containing compounds were observed for the cloud water when compared to the atmospheric particle samples, demonstrating that cloud processing changes the composition of organic aerosol.

  4. Spatio-temporal representativeness of euphotic depth in situ sampling in transitional coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhtala, Hanna; Tolvanen, Harri

    2016-06-01

    In dynamic coastal waters, the representativeness of spot sampling is limited to the measurement time and place due to local heterogeneity and irregular water property fluctuations. We assessed the representativeness of in situ sampling by analysing spot-sampled depth profiles of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in dynamic coastal archipelago waters in the south-western Finnish coast of the Baltic Sea. First, we assessed the role of spatio-temporality within the underwater light dynamics. As a part of this approach, an anomaly detection procedure was tested on a dataset including a large archipelago area and extensive temporal coverage throughout the ice-free season. The results suggest that euphotic depth variability should be treated as a spatio-temporal process rather than considering spatial and temporal dimensions separately. Second, we assessed the representativeness of spot sampling through statistical analysis of comparative data from spatially denser sampling on three test sites on two optically different occasions. The datasets revealed variability in different dimensions and scales. The suitability of a dataset to reveal wanted phenomena can usually be improved by careful planning and by clearly defining the data sampling objectives beforehand. Nonetheless, conducting a sufficient in situ sampling in dynamic coastal area is still challenging: detecting the general patterns at all the relevant dimensions is complicated by the randomness effect, which reduces the reliability of spot samples on a more detailed scale. Our results indicate that good representativeness of a euphotic depth sampling location is not a stable feature in a highly dynamic environment.

  5. Detection of Legionella pneumophila in environmental water samples using a fluorescein conjugated monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Makin, T.; Hart, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-three environmental water samples from various sources were examined for the presence of Legionella pneumophila with a commercially available direct fluorescent monoclonal antibody (GS), an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and culture. GS detected L. pneumophila in 94% and 100% of environmental water samples which were culture and IFAT positive for L. pneumophila, respectively. IFAT detected 69% of L. pneumophila culture positive samples. Cultures of L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 12, 14 and non-L. pneumophila bacteria which may be found in water, and bacteria containing non-specific binding proteins, were stained by GS and IFAT. GS identified all serogroups of L. pneumophila and did not cross react with any non-L. pneumophila bacteria. L. pneumophila in environmental samples was easy to detect against a clear dark background when stained with GS. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2673821

  6. Water-quality assessment of south-central Texas : comparison of water quality in surface-water samples collected manually and by automated samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ging, Patricia B.

    1999-01-01

    Surface-water sampling protocols of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program specify samples for most properties and constituents to be collected manually in equal-width increments across a stream channel and composited for analysis. Single-point sampling with an automated sampler (autosampler) during storms was proposed in the upper part of the South-Central Texas NAWQA study unit, raising the question of whether property and constituent concentrations from automatically collected samples differ significantly from those in samples collected manually. Statistical (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) analyses of 3 to 16 paired concentrations for each of 26 properties and constituents from water samples collected using both methods at eight sites in the upper part of the study unit indicated that there were no significant differences in concentrations for dissolved constituents, other than calcium and organic carbon.

  7. Detection of protozoa in water samples by formalin/ether concentration method.

    PubMed

    Lora-Suarez, Fabiana; Rivera, Raul; Triviño-Valencia, Jessica; Gomez-Marin, Jorge E

    2016-09-01

    Methods to detect protozoa in water samples are expensive and laborious. We evaluated the formalin/ether concentration method to detect Giardia sp., Cryptosporidium sp. and Toxoplasma in water. In order to test the properties of the method, we spiked water samples with different amounts of each protozoa (0, 10 and 50 cysts or oocysts) in a volume of 10 L of water. Immunofluorescence assay was used for detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Toxoplasma oocysts were identified by morphology. The mean percent of recovery in 10 repetitions of the entire method, in 10 samples spiked with ten parasites and read by three different observers, were for Cryptosporidium 71.3 ± 12, for Giardia 63 ± 10 and for Toxoplasma 91.6 ± 9 and the relative standard deviation of the method was of 17.5, 17.2 and 9.8, respectively. Intraobserver variation as measured by intraclass correlation coefficient, was fair for Toxoplasma, moderate for Cryptosporidium and almost perfect for Giardia. The method was then applied in 77 samples of raw and drinkable water in three different plant of water treatment. Cryptosporidium was found in 28 of 77 samples (36%) and Giardia in 31 of 77 samples (40%). Theses results identified significant differences in treatment process to reduce the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium. In conclusion, the formalin ether method to concentrate protozoa in water is a new alternative for low resources countries, where is urgently need to monitor and follow the presence of theses protozoa in drinkable water.

  8. Identification and Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolated From Water and Soil Samples of a Metropolitan City

    PubMed Central

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Malekshahian, Donya; Farahbod, Amir Masoud; Seif, Shima; Rahideh, Snaz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The potential role of environmental Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the epidemiology of TB remains unknown. We investigated the transmission of M tuberculosis from humans to the environment and the possible transmission of M tuberculosis from the environment to humans. METHODS: A total of 1,500 samples were collected from three counties of the Tehran, Iran metropolitan area from February 2012 to January 2014. A total of 700 water samples (47%) and 800 soil samples (53%) were collected. Spoligotyping and the mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats typing method were performed on DNA extracted from single colonies. Genotypes of M tuberculosis strains isolated from the environment were compared with the genotypes obtained from 55 patients with confirmed pulmonary TB diagnosed during the study period in the same three counties. RESULTS: M tuberculosis was isolated from 11 of 800 soil samples (1%) and 71 of 700 water samples (10%). T family (56 of 82, 68%) followed by Delhi/CAS (11 of 82, 13.4%) were the most frequent M tuberculosis superfamilies in both water and soil samples. Overall, 27.7% of isolates in clusters were related. No related typing patterns were detected between soil, water, and clinical isolates. The most frequent superfamily of M tuberculosis in clinical isolates was Delhi/CAS (142, 30.3%) followed by NEW-1 (127, 27%). The bacilli in contaminated soil (36%) and damp water (8.4%) remained reculturable in some samples up to 9 months. CONCLUSIONS: Although the dominant M tuberculosis superfamilies in soil and water did not correspond to the dominant M tuberculosis family in patients, the presence of circulating genotypes of M tuberculosis in soil and water highlight the risk of transmission. PMID:25340935

  9. The Salmonella mutagenicity of industrial, surface and ground water samples of Aligarh region of India.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Athar Habib; Ahmad, Masood

    2003-11-10

    The genotoxicity of three water bodies, viz. industrial waste water of Aligarh city, ground water pumped out from the industrial area of Aligarh, and river water of Yamuna, downstream of Agra, was carried out by means of Ames plate incorporation test and the Ames fluctuation test. All the test samples were significantly mutagenic in both the testing systems. The ground water and river water samples were subjected to XAD concentration prior to the mutagenicity/genotoxicity testing, while the industrial waste water was used directly. Whereas TA98, TA102 and TA104 strains have been found to be maximally sensitive in the Ames plate incorporation assay conducted for various water samples, TA98 and TA100 strains were the most responsive strains in the Ames fluctuation test. The apparent disparity in the sensitivity patterns of various Ames strains by plate incorporation and fluctuation assays could be attributed to a large extent to the different conventional ways of interpretation of the data in these systems.

  10. Influence of water content on Raman spectroscopy characterization of skin sample

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soogeun; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-01-01

    We report that the Raman spectrum obtained from porcine skin varies significantly with the change of skin water content. At different water contents from 40 to 55 wt.%, the Raman spectra results using confocal Raman spectroscopy show that the spectral variation of porcine skin is highly affected by skin water content. Experimental data are consistent with the Monte Carlo calculation and it is proved that the intensity of the Raman spectrum depends on the angle distribution and collection efficiency of backscattered light from the sample surface for a varied water content. It is suggested that water content for a given skin sample should be controlled carefully to minimize errors and deviations in the Raman peak analyses. PMID:28271008

  11. Influence of water content on Raman spectroscopy characterization of skin sample.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soogeun; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-02-01

    We report that the Raman spectrum obtained from porcine skin varies significantly with the change of skin water content. At different water contents from 40 to 55 wt.%, the Raman spectra results using confocal Raman spectroscopy show that the spectral variation of porcine skin is highly affected by skin water content. Experimental data are consistent with the Monte Carlo calculation and it is proved that the intensity of the Raman spectrum depends on the angle distribution and collection efficiency of backscattered light from the sample surface for a varied water content. It is suggested that water content for a given skin sample should be controlled carefully to minimize errors and deviations in the Raman peak analyses.

  12. Effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on water-quality samples obtained from wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Gibs, Jacob

    1993-01-01

    Factors that affect the mass of chemical constituents entering a well include the distributions of flow rate and chemical concentrations along and near the screened or open section of the well. Assuming a layered porous medium (with each layer being characterized by a uniform hydraulic conductivity and chemical concentration), a knowledge of the flow from each layer along the screened zone and of the chemical concentrations in each layer enables the total mass entering the well to be determined. Analyses of hypothetical systems and a site at Galloway, NJ, provide insight into the temporal variation of water-quality data observed when withdrawing water from screened wells in heterogeneous ground-water systems.The analyses of hypothetical systems quantitatively indicate the cause-and-effect relations that cause temporal variability in water samples obtained from wells. Chemical constituents that have relatively uniform concentrations with depth may not show variations in concentrations in the water discharged from a well after the well is purged (evacuation of standing water in the well casing). However, chemical constituents that do not have uniform concentrations near the screened interval of the well may show variations in concentrations in the well discharge water after purging because of the physics of ground-water flow in the vicinity of the screen.Water-quality samples were obtained through time over a 30 minute period from a site at Galloway, NJ. The water samples were analyzed for aromatic hydrocarbons, and the data for benzene, toluene, and meta+para xylene were evaluated for temporal variations. Samples were taken from seven discrete zones, and the flow-weighted concentrations of benzene, toluene, and meta+para xylene all indicate an increase in concentration over time during pumping. These observed trends in time were reproduced numerically based on the estimated concentration distribution in the aquifer and the flow rates from each zone.The results of

  13. Preserving ground water samples with hydrochloric acid does not result in the formation of chloroform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, Paul J.; Pankow, James F.; Barbash, Jack E.; Price, Curtis V.; Zogorski, John S.

    1999-01-01

    Water samples collected for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are often preserved with hydrochloric acid (HCl) to inhibit the biotransformation of the analytes of interest until the chemical analyses can he performed. However, it is theoretically possible that residual free chlorine in the HCl can react with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to form chloroform via the haloform reaction. Analyses of 1501 ground water samples preserved with HCl from the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program indicate that chloroform was the most commonly detected VOC among 60 VOCs monitored. The DOC concentrations were not significantly larger in samples with detectable chloroform than in those with no delectable chloroform, nor was there any correlation between the concentrations of chloroform and DOC. Furthermore, chloroform was detected more frequently in shallow ground water in urban areas (28.5% of the wells sampled) than in agricultural areas (1.6% of the wells sampled), which indicates that its detection was more related to urban land-use activities than to sample acidification. These data provide strong evidence that acidification with HCl does not lead to the production of significant amounts of chloroform in ground water samples. To verify these results, an acidification study was designed to measure the concentrations of all trihalomethanes (THMs) that can form as a result of HCl preservation in ground water samples and to determine if ascorbic acid (C6H8O6) could inhibit this reaction if it did occur. This study showed that no THMs were formed as a result of HCl acidification, and that ascorbic acid had no discernible effect on the concentrations of THMs measured.

  14. Interim results of quality-control sampling of surface water for the Upper Colorado River National Water-Quality Assessment Study Unit, water years 1995-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spahr, N.E.; Boulger, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Quality-control samples provide part of the information needed to estimate the bias and variability that result from sample collection, processing, and analysis. Quality-control samples of surface water collected for the Upper Colorado River National Water-Quality Assessment study unit for water years 1995?96 are presented and analyzed in this report. The types of quality-control samples collected include pre-processing split replicates, concurrent replicates, sequential replicates, post-processing split replicates, and field blanks. Analysis of the pre-processing split replicates, concurrent replicates, sequential replicates, and post-processing split replicates is based on differences between analytical results of the environmental samples and analytical results of the quality-control samples. Results of these comparisons indicate that variability introduced by sample collection, processing, and handling is low and will not affect interpretation of the environmental data. The differences for most water-quality constituents is on the order of plus or minus 1 or 2 lowest rounding units. A lowest rounding unit is equivalent to the magnitude of the least significant figure reported for analytical results. The use of lowest rounding units avoids some of the difficulty in comparing differences between pairs of samples when concentrations span orders of magnitude and provides a measure of the practical significance of the effect of variability. Analysis of field-blank quality-control samples indicates that with the exception of chloride and silica, no systematic contamination of samples is apparent. Chloride contamination probably was the result of incomplete rinsing of the dilute cleaning solution from the outlet ports of the decaport sample splitter. Silica contamination seems to have been introduced by the blank water. Sampling and processing procedures for water year 1997 have been modified as a result of these analyses.

  15. Hydrogen isotopes from source water to leaf lipid in a continental-scale sample network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Daniel; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary plant waxes are useful paleoclimate proxies because they are preserved in depositional settings on geologic timescales and the isotopic composition of the hydrogen in these molecules reflects that of the source water available during biosynthesis. This application is based largely on empirical calibrations that have demonstrated continental-scale correlations between source water and lipid hydrogen isotope values. However, the importance of variable net isotopic fractionation between source water and lipid for different species and environmental conditions is increasingly recognized. Isotopic enrichment of leaf water during transpiration is key among these secondary factors, and is itself sensitive to changes in hydroclimate. Leaf water enrichment also occurs prior to photosynthetic water uptake, and is therefore independent from cellular-level biomarker synthesis. Mechanistic models can predict the mean leaf water hydrogen isotope composition from readily available meteorological variables. This permits global-scale isoscape maps of leaf water isotopic composition and enrichment above source water to be generated, but these models have not been widely validated at continental spatial scales. We have established a network of twenty-one sites across Europe where we are sampling for leaf-, xylem-, and soil-water isotopes (H and O) at approximately 5-week intervals over the summer growing season. We augment the sample set with weekly to monthly precipitation samples and early- and late-season plant wax lipid samples. Collaborators at each site are conducting the sampling, and most sites are members of the FLUXNET tower network that also record high-resolution meteorological data. We present information on the implementation of the network and preliminary results from the 2014 summer season. The complete dataset will be used to track the evolution of water isotopes from source to leaf water and from leaf water to lipid hydrogen across diverse environments

  16. Hydrogeologic framework and sampling design for an assessment of agricultural pesticides in ground water in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Bickford, Tammy M.

    1999-01-01

    State agencies responsible for regulating pesticides are required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop state management plans for specific pesticides. A key part of these management plans includes assessing the potential for contamination of ground water by pesticides throughout the state. As an example of how a statewide assessment could be implemented, a plan is presented for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to illustrate how a hydrogeologic framework can be used as a basis for sampling areas within a state with the highest likelihood of having elevated pesticide concentrations in ground water. The framework was created by subdividing the state into 20 areas on the basis of physiography and aquifer type. Each of these 20 hydrogeologic settings is relatively homogeneous with respect to aquifer susceptibility and pesticide use?factors that would be likely to affect pesticide concentrations in ground water. Existing data on atrazine occurrence in ground water was analyzed to determine (1) which areas of the state already have suffi- cient samples collected to make statistical comparisons among hydrogeologic settings, and (2) the effect of factors such as land use and aquifer characteristics on pesticide occurrence. The theoretical vulnerability and the results of the data analysis were used to rank each of the 20 hydrogeologic settings on the basis of vulnerability of ground water to contamination by pesticides. Example sampling plans are presented for nine of the hydrogeologic settings that lack sufficient data to assess vulnerability to contamination. Of the highest priority areas of the state, two out of four have been adequately sampled, one of the three areas of moderate to high priority has been adequately sampled, four of the nine areas of moderate to low priority have been adequately sampled, and none of the three low priority areas have been sampled. Sampling to date has shown that, even in the most vulnerable hydrogeologic settings

  17. Solid-phase microextraction for the analysis of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in water samples.

    PubMed

    Castells, P; Santos, F J; Galceran, M T

    2003-01-10

    A novel solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method coupled to gas chromatography with electron capture detection (GC-ECD) was developed as an alternative to liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction for the analysis of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in water samples. The extraction efficiency of five different commercially available fibres was evaluated and the 100-microm polydimethylsiloxane coating was the most suitable for the absorption of the SCCPs. Optimisation of several SPME parameters, such as extraction time and temperature, ionic strength and desorption time, was performed. Quality parameters were established using Milli-Q, tap water and river water. Linearity ranged between 0.06 and 6 microg l(-1) for spiked Milli-Q water and between 0.6 and 6 microg l(-1) for natural waters. The precision of the SPME-GC-ECD method for the three aqueous matrices was similar and gave relative standard deviations (RSD) between 12 and 14%. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.02 microg l(-1) for Milli-Q water and 0.3 microg l(-1) for both tap water and river water. The optimised SPME-GC-ECD method was successfully applied to the determination of SCCPs in river water samples.

  18. Determination of (210)Po in drinking water and urine samples using copper sulfide microprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Dai, Xiongxin

    2014-06-17

    Polonium-210 ((210)Po) can be rapidly determined in drinking water and urine samples by alpha spectrometry using copper sulfide (CuS) microprecipitation. For drinking water, Po in 10 mL samples was directly coprecipitated onto the filter for alpha counting without any purification. For urine, 10 mL of sample was heated, oxidized with KBrO3 for a short time (∼5 min), and subsequently centrifuged to remove the suspended organic matter. The CuS microprecipitation was then applied to the supernatant. Large batches of samples can be prepared using this technique with high recoveries (∼85%). The figures of merit of the methods were determined, and the developed methods fulfill the requirements for emergency and routine radioassays. The efficiency and reliability of the procedures were confirmed using spiked samples.

  19. Formation of an artifact of diclofenac during acidic extraction of environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Reddersen, K; Heberer, Th

    2003-09-05

    Solid-phase extraction at an acidic pH is used as a common sample preparation method for analyzing residues of the analgesic drug diclofenac (2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino] benzeneacetic acid) in environmental water samples. This paper describes the matrix-dependent formation of an artifact of diclofenac during sample preparation resulting in an up to 40% underestimation of diclofenac concentrations especially in matrix-prone samples such as sewage effluents or surface water. The artifact most likely being formed during acidification of the sample was unequivocally identified as 1-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)indolin-2-one by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To avoid an underestimation of the analytical results quantification of both diclofenac and its artifact is recommended.

  20. May 2012 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-01

    Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 9-10, 2012, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location Johnson Artesian WL. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods. Results of this monitoring at the Rio Blanco site demonstrate that groundwater and surface water outside the site boundaries have not been affected by project-related contaminants.

  1. Factors controlling elevated lead concentrations in water samples from aquifer systems in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Bullen, M.P.; Bullen, T.D.; Hansard, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of total lead (Pb) and dissolved Pb exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action level of 15 micrograms per liter (mg/L) in approximately 19 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively, of ground-water samples collected during 1991-96 from a statewide network of monitoring wells designed to delineate background water quality of Florida's major aquifer systems. Differences in total Pb concentrations among aquifer systems reflect the combined influence of anthropogenic sources and chemical conditions in each system. A highly significant (p<0.001) difference in median total Pb concentrations was found for water samples from wells with water-level recording devices that contain Pb-counterweights (14 mg/L) compared to non-recorder wells (2 mg/L). Differences between total Pb concentrations for recorder and non-recorder wells are even more pronounced when compared for each aquifer system. The largest differences for recorder status are found for the surficial aquifer system, where median total Pb concentrations are 44 and 2.4 mg/L for recorder wells and non-recorder wells, respectively. Leaching of Pb from metal casing materials is another potential source of Pb in ground water samples. Median total Pb concentrations in water samples from the surficial, intermediate, and Floridan aquifer systems are higher from recorder wells cased with black iron than for recorder wells with steel and PVC casing material. Stable isotopes of Pb were used in this study to distinguish between anthropogenic and natural sources of Pb in ground water, as Pb retains the isotopic signature of the source from which it is derived. Based on similarities between slopes and intercepts of trend lines for various sample types (plots of 206Pb/204Pb versus 208Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb versus 208Pb/204Pb) the predominant source of total Pb in water samples from the surficial aquifer system is corrosion of Pb counterweights. It is likely that only ground-water samples, not the aquifer

  2. Effects of holding time and measurement error on culturing Legionella in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Flanders, W Dana; Kirkland, Kimberly H; Shelton, Brian G

    2014-10-01

    Outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease require environmental testing of water samples from potentially implicated building water systems to identify the source of exposure. A previous study reports a large impact on Legionella sample results due to shipping and delays in sample processing. Specifically, this same study, without accounting for measurement error, reports more than half of shipped samples tested had Legionella levels that arbitrarily changed up or down by one or more logs, and the authors attribute this result to shipping time. Accordingly, we conducted a study to determine the effects of sample holding/shipping time on Legionella sample results while taking into account measurement error, which has previously not been addressed. We analyzed 159 samples, each split into 16 aliquots, of which one-half (8) were processed promptly after collection. The remaining half (8) were processed the following day to assess impact of holding/shipping time. A total of 2544 samples were analyzed including replicates. After accounting for inherent measurement error, we found that the effect of holding time on observed Legionella counts was small and should have no practical impact on interpretation of results. Holding samples increased the root mean squared error by only about 3-8%. Notably, for only one of 159 samples, did the average of the 8 replicate counts change by 1 log. Thus, our findings do not support the hypothesis of frequent, significant (≥= 1 log10 unit) Legionella colony count changes due to holding.

  3. Isolation and identification of Arcobacter species from environmental and drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Talay, Funda; Molva, Celenk; Atabay, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-11-01

    Water plays an important role in the transmission of Arcobacter spp. to animals and humans. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize Arcobacter spp. from 115 different water samples (66 sewage, 25 rivers, 16 spring water, and 8 drinking water) in Izmir, Turkey. In total, 41 samples (35.7 %) were found positive for Arcobacter spp. by the genus-specific PCR. Arcobacter butzleri was detected in 39 out of 115 samples (33.9 %) including 24 sewage, 13 rivers, and 2 spring water. The remaining Arcobacter spp. (n = 2) isolates could not be identified by m-PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Based on the phenotypic characterization, most of the Arcobacter species (87.8 %) indicated weak catalase activity. In addition, there were differences in phenotypic patterns among isolated species during growth at 37 °C under microaerobic and aerobic conditions, in the presence of 2 % (39/41) and 3.5 % (32/41) NaCl and 0.04 % TTC (39/41) and on MacConkey agar (38/41). The results of this study indicated that environmental water samples are common sources for Arcobacter spp. Therefore, effective control measures should be taken to protect human health.

  4. Geophysical methods to support correct water sampling locations for salt dilution gauging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comina, C.; Lasagna, M.; De Luca, D. A.; Sambuelli, L.

    2014-08-01

    To improve water management design, particularly in irrigation areas, it is important to evaluate the baseline state of the water resources, including canal discharge. Salt dilution gauging is a traditional and well-documented technique in this respect. The complete mixing of salt used for dilution gauging is required; this condition is difficult to test or verify and, if not fulfilled, is the largest source of uncertainty in the discharge calculation. In this paper, a geophysical technique (FERT, fast electrical resistivity tomography) is proposed for imaging the distribution of the salt plume used for dilution gauging at every point along a sampling cross section. With this imaging, complete mixing can be verified. If the mixing is not complete, the image created by FERT can also provide a possible guidance for selecting water-sampling locations in the sampling cross section. A water multi-sampling system prototype aimed to potentially take into account concentration variability is also proposed and tested. The results reported in the paper show that FERT provides a three-dimensional image of the dissolved salt plume and that this can potentially help in the selection of water sampling points.

  5. Electrothermal Vaporization Sample Introduction for Spaceflight Water Quality Monitoring via Gas Chromatography-Differential Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wallace, William T; Gazda, Daniel B; Limero, Thomas F; Minton, John M; Macatangay, Ariel V; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernández, Facundo M

    2015-06-16

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension in mission duration up to one year, an enhanced, real-time method for environmental monitoring is necessary. The station air is currently monitored for trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS) via the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), while water is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. As mission scenarios extend beyond low Earth orbit, a convergence in analytical instrumentation to analyze both air and water samples is highly desirable. Since the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for air samples and many of the targets in air are also common to water, this platform is a logical starting point for developing a multimatrix monitor. Here, we report on the interfacing of an electrothermal vaporization (ETV) sample introduction unit with a ground-based AQM for monitoring target analytes in water. The results show that each of the compounds tested from water have similar GC-DMS parameters as the compounds tested in air. Moreover, the ETV enabled AQM detection of dimethlsilanediol (DMSD), a compound whose analysis had proven challenging using other sample introduction methods. Analysis of authentic ISS water samples using the ETV-AQM showed that DMSD could be successfully quantified, while the concentrations obtained for the other compounds also agreed well with laboratory results.

  6. Using Absolute Humidity and Radiochemical Analyses of Water Vapor Samples to Correct Underestimated Atmospheric Tritium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhart, C.F.

    1999-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) emits a wide variety of radioactive air contaminants. An extensive ambient air monitoring network, known as AIRNET, is operated on-site and in surrounding communities to estimate radioactive doses to the public. As part of this monitoring network, water vapor is sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These water vapor samples are collected every two weeks by absorbing the water vapor in the sampled air with silica gel and then radiochemically analyzing the water for tritium. The data have consistently indicated that LANL emissions cause a small, but measurable impact on local concentrations of tritium. In early 1998, while trying to independently verify the presumed 100% water vapor collection efficiency, the author found that this efficiency was normally lower and reached a minimum of 10 to 20% in the middle of summer. This inefficient collection was discovered by comparing absolute humidity (g/m{sup 3}) calculated from relative humidity and temperature to the amount of water vapor collected by the silica gel per cubic meter of air sampled. Subsequent experiments confirmed that the elevated temperature inside the louvered housing was high enough to reduce the capacity of the silica gel by more than half. In addition, their experiments also demonstrated that, even under optimal conditions, there is not enough silica gel present in the sampling canister to absorb all of the moisture during the higher humidity periods. However, there is a solution to this problem. Ambient tritium concentrations have been recalculated by using the absolute humidity values and the tritium analyses. These recalculated tritium concentrations were two to three times higher than previously reported. Future tritium concentrations will also be determined in the same manner. Finally, the water vapor collection process will be changed by relocating the sampling canister outside the housing to increase collection efficiency and, therefore

  7. Estimates of the hydrologic impact of drilling water on core samples taken from partially saturated densely welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the extent to which drill water might be expected to be imbibed by core samples taken from densely welded tuff. In a related experimental study conducted in G-Tunnel, drill water imbibition by the core samples was observed to be minimal. Calculations were carried out with the TOUGH code with the intent of corroborating the imbibition observations. Due to the absence of hydrologic data pertaining directly to G-Tunnel welded tuff, it was necessary to apply data from a similar formation. Because the moisture retention curve was not available for imbibition conditions, the drainage curve was applied to the model. The poor agreement between the observed and calculated imbibition data is attributed primarily to the inappropriateness of the drainage curve. Also significant is the value of absolute permeability (k) assumed in the model. Provided that the semi-log plot of the drainage and imbibition moisture retention curves are parallel within the saturation range of interest, a simple relationship exists between the moisture retention curve, k, and porosity ({phi}) which are assumed in the model and their actual values. If k and {phi} are known, we define the hysteresis factor {lambda} to be the ratio of the imbibition and drainage suction pressures for any saturation within the range of interest. If k and {phi} are unknown, {lambda} also accounts for the uncertainties in their values. Both the experimental and modeling studies show that drill water imbibition by the core has a minimal effect on its saturation state. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Towards a robust water content determination of freeze-dried samples by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grohganz, Holger; Gildemyn, Delphine; Skibsted, Erik; Flink, James M; Rantanen, Jukka

    2010-08-31

    The possibility for determination of the water content in pharmaceutical samples by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been more widely investigated in the past few years. However, many studies claim that changes in sample composition will require the establishment of a new method. The aim of this study was several fold: firstly to investigate validation aspects of water content determination in samples with varying composition and furthermore to see if a model based solely on freeze-dried mannitol-sucrose mixtures can be established that will be able to predict water contents for samples containing proteins, excipients or having a lower density of freeze-dried solids. Samples were measured by NIR, standard normal variate (SNV) corrected and the obtained spectra were compared with the results from a conventional Karl-Fischer titration by means of multivariate analysis, namely principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square regression (PLS). For the overall sample set, a highly linear correlation between the NIR and the Karl-Fischer method with a slope of 1.00, an R(2) value of 0.98 and a root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 0.15% were found. In a second step samples solely consisting of mannitol and sucrose mixtures were used to build a calibration set, which resulted in a RMSECV of 0.16%. The prediction of the remaining samples, which included protein or excipient containing samples, as well as lower density samples, resulted in a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.19%. Thus the present study demonstrated, that a general model for the determination of the water content by NIR could be established, within the limits investigated.

  9. 9 CFR 318.9 - Samples of products, water, dyes, chemicals, etc., to be taken for examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Samples of products, water, dyes... ESTABLISHMENTS; REINSPECTION AND PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.9 Samples of products, water, dyes, chemicals, etc., to be taken for examination. Samples of products, water, dyes, chemicals,...

  10. 9 CFR 318.9 - Samples of products, water, dyes, chemicals, etc., to be taken for examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Samples of products, water, dyes... ESTABLISHMENTS; REINSPECTION AND PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.9 Samples of products, water, dyes, chemicals, etc., to be taken for examination. Samples of products, water, dyes, chemicals,...

  11. 9 CFR 318.9 - Samples of products, water, dyes, chemicals, etc., to be taken for examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Samples of products, water, dyes... ESTABLISHMENTS; REINSPECTION AND PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS General § 318.9 Samples of products, water, dyes, chemicals, etc., to be taken for examination. Samples of products, water, dyes, chemicals,...

  12. Cyto- and genotoxic potential of water samples from polluted areas in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Alija, Avdulla J; Bajraktari, Ismet D; Bresgen, Nikolaus; Bojaxhi, Ekramije; Krenn, Margit; Asllani, Fisnik; Eckl, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    Reports on the state of the environment in Kosovo have emphasized that river and ground water quality is affected by pollution from untreated urban water as well as the waste water from the industry. One of the main contributors to this pollution is located in Obiliq (coal power plants). Prishtina-the capital city of Kosovo-is heavily influenced too. Furthermore, the pollutants combined together with those from heavy traffic are dissolved in Prishtina runoff water, which is discharged into the creek entering the river Sitnica together with urban waste water. The available data show the complex pollution with excessive quantities of nitrites, suspended materials, organic compounds, detergents, heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, etc. In this study, the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of water samples taken at these sites was tested in primary rat hepatocytes. The results obtained indicate that water samples collected in Prishtina and Obiliq had a significant cytotoxic potential in primary rat hepatocyte cultures even when diluted to 1 %. The increased cytotoxicity, however, was not accompanied by an increased genotoxicity as measured by the percentage of micronucleated cells. Further investigations addressing the chemical composition of the samples and the identification of the toxicants responsible for the cytotoxic effects found will be carried out in a next step.

  13. Monitoring water quality in Toronto's urban stormwater ponds: Assessing participation rates and data quality of water sampling by citizen scientists in the FreshWater Watch.

    PubMed

    Scott, Andrew B; Frost, Paul C

    2017-03-16

    From 2013 to 2015, citizen scientist volunteers in Toronto, Canada were trained to collect and analyze water quality in urban stormwater ponds. This volunteer sampling was part of the research program, FreshWater Watch (FWW), which aimed to standardize urban water sampling efforts from around the globe. We held training sessions for new volunteers twice yearly and trained a total of 111 volunteers. Over the course of project, ~30% of volunteers participated by collecting water quality data after the training session with 124 individual sampling events at 29 unique locations in Toronto, Canada. A few highly engaged volunteers were most active, with 50% of the samples collected by 5% of trainees. Stormwater ponds generally have poor water quality demonstrated by elevated phosphate concentrations (~30μg/L), nitrate (~427μg/L), and turbidity relative to Canadian water quality standards. Compared to other urban waterbodies in the global program, nutrient concentrations in Toronto's urban stormwater ponds were lower, while turbidity was not markedly different. Toronto FWW (FWW-TO) data was comparable to that measured by standard lab analyses and matched results from previous studies of stormwater ponds in Toronto. Combining observational and chemical data acquired by citizen scientists, macrophyte dominated ponds had lower phosphate concentrations while phytoplankton dominated ponds had lower nitrate concentrations, which indicates a potentially important and unstudied role of internal biogeochemical processes on pond nutrient dynamics. This experience in the FWW demonstrates the capabilities and constraints of citizen science when applied to water quality sampling. While analytical limits on in-field analyses produce higher uncertainty in water quality measurements of individual sites, rapid data collection is possible but depends on the motivation and engagement of the group of volunteers. Ongoing efforts in citizen science will thus need to address sampling effort

  14. Pilot study for U.S. Geological Survey Standard Reference Water Samples for pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, L.C.; Fishman, M. J.; Boyle, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey has been preparing and maintaining a library of standard reference water samples for inorganic constituents for 19 years. Recently, a pilot study was conducted to see if the reference-sample program could be expanded to include pesticides and other organic materials. Two samples containing organochlorine and organophosphorus insecticides, and chlorophenoxy acid herbicides were distributed to a number of laboratories in the United States. One of the samples also contained polychlorinated biphenyls. Interlaboratory data obtained from these round robin studies are presented with intralaboratory information on long-term stability.

  15. Locations of Sampling Stations for Water Quality Monitoring in Water Distribution Networks.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Shweta; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-04-01

    Water quality is required to be monitored in the water distribution networks (WDNs) at salient locations to assure the safe quality of water supplied to the consumers. Such monitoring stations (MSs) provide warning against any accidental contaminations. Various objectives like demand coverage, time for detection, volume of water contaminated before detection, extent of contamination, expected population affected prior to detection, detection likelihood and others, have been independently or jointly considered in determining optimal number and location of MSs in WDNs. "Demand coverage" defined as the percentage of network demand monitored by a particular monitoring station is a simple measure to locate MSs. Several methods based on formulation of coverage matrix using pre-specified coverage criteria and optimization have been suggested. Coverage criteria is defined as some minimum percentage of total flow received at the monitoring stations that passed through any upstream node included then as covered node of the monitoring station. Number of monitoring stations increases with the increase in the value of coverage criteria. Thus, the design of monitoring station becomes subjective. A simple methodology is proposed herein which priority wise iteratively selects MSs to achieve targeted demand coverage. The proposed methodology provided the same number and location of MSs for illustrative network as an optimization method did. Further, the proposed method is simple and avoids subjectivity that could arise from the consideration of coverage criteria. The application of methodology is also shown on a WDN of Dharampeth zone (Nagpur city WDN in Maharashtra, India) having 285 nodes and 367 pipes.

  16. Relationship of land use to water quality in the Chesapeake Bay region. [water sampling and photomapping river basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correll, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Both the proportions of the various land use categories present on each watershed and the specific management practices in use in each category affect the quality of runoff waters, and the water quality of the Bay. Several permanent and portable stations on various Maryland Rivers collect volume-integrated water samples. All samples are analyzed for a series of nutrient, particulate, bacterial, herbicide, and heavy metal parameters. Each basin is mapped with respect to land use by the analysis of low-elevation aerial photos. Analyses are verified and adjusted by ground truth surveys. Data are processed and stored in the Smithsonian Institution data bank. Land use categories being investigated include forests/old fields, pastureland, row crops, residential areas, upland swamps, and tidal marshes.

  17. Efficacy of the detection of Legionella in hot and cold water samples by culture and PCR. II. Examination of native samples from various sources.

    PubMed

    Stojek, Nimfa Maria; Wójcik-Fatla, Angelina; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    A total of 123 water samples were examined in parallel by culture and semi-nested PCR for the presence of Legionella. They comprised: 35 samples of hot water distributed by the urban municipal water supply system (MWSS) taken in institutions, 45 samples of hot water distributed by urban MWSS taken in dwellings, 27 samples of cold water distributed by rural MWSS taken in dwellings, and 16 samples of cold well water taken in rural areas. The greatest frequency of the isolation of Legionella by culture (88.6%) was recorded in the samples of hot water from the urban institutions, having been greater compared to all other sources (p<0.001). The frequency of Legionella isolation from hot water in urban dwellings (28.9%) was significantly greater compared to the combined value (2.3%) for cold water from rural MWSS and wells (p<0.001). Strains belonging to Legionella pneumophila serogroups 2-14 predominated in the examined samples, while strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and strains of Legionella spp. (other than L. pneumophila) were 3-fold less numerous. The rates of positive findings in the semi-nested PCR (stage 2) were greater than culture isolations in all kinds of samples, except for urban institutions. The correlation between the culture and PCR results was positive for samples of hot water from urban MWSS (p<0.01), but not for samples of cold water from rural MWSS and wells (p>0.5). A significant correlation was found between rates of PCR-positive results and numbers of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 2-14 strains, but not for other Legionella serogroups or species. In conclusion, our results support the opinion that though PCR cannot be a substitute for the isolation of Legionella by culture, it could be regarded as an useful complementary method.

  18. Concentration and Detection of Caliciviruses in Water Samples by Reverse Transcription-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Huang, P. W.; Laborde, D.; Land, V. R.; Matson, D. O.; Smith, A. W.; Jiang, X.

    2000-01-01

    Human caliciviruses (HuCVs) cause waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Standard indicators of a safe water supply do not adequately predict contamination of water by viruses, including HuCVs. We developed a method to concentrate and detect HuCVs in water samples by using a cultivable primate calicivirus (Pan-1) as a model. Viable Pan-1 was seeded in different types of water and then filtered with a 1MDS filter, eluted with beef extract (BE), and reconcentrated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation. The viruses in the final samples were tested by plaque assay or by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR following extraction of the RNA with Trizol. Pan-1 was more sensitive to high-pH treatment than poliovirus was; a pH 9.0 BE solution was found to recover 35% more viable Pan-1 than a pH 9.5 BE solution recovered. Pan-1 was recovered from small volumes of deionized, finished, ground, and surface waters at efficiencies of 94, 73, 67, and 64%, respectively, when samples were assayed after elution without further concentration. When larger volumes of water (up to 40 liters) were tested after elution and concentration with PEG, 38, 19, and 14% of the seeded Pan-1 were recovered from finished, ground, and surface waters, respectively. The limit of detection of Pan-1 by RT-PCR was estimated to be 0.75 to 1.5 PFU in 40 liters of finished water. This method may be adapted for monitoring HuCVs in drinking water and other types of water for public health safety. PMID:11010887

  19. Using SPMDs for monitoring hydrophobic organic compounds in urban river water in Korea compared with using conventional water grab samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, Un-Jung; Kim, Hee Young; Alvarez, David A.; Lee, In-Seok; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to verify the effectiveness of semi-permeablemembrane devices (SPMDs) formonitoring hydrophobic organic compounds, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), that are not easy to detect using conventional grab samples (because of their low concentrations), in water.We used SPMDs and grab samples to monitor PCBs and PBDEs upstream and downstream of a sewage treatment plant (STP) in the Suyeong River in Busan, Korea. Concentrations in three different phases (freely dissolved, apparently dissolved, and particulate) were measured, to investigate the aquatic fate of PCBs and PBDEs. The freely dissolved (SPMD) concentrations were 2–3 times higher than the apparently dissolved and particulate phase (grab sample) concentrations. No meaningful relationships were found between the total PCB and PBDE concentrations of the grab sample and SPMD sample because of the different partitioning behaviors and detection frequencies of the individual chemicals. However, the summed concentrations of specific PCB and PBDE congeners (that were abundant in all samples) in the grab and SPMD samples correlated well (r2 = 0.7451 for PCBs 28 + 52 + 153, r2 = 0.9987 for PBDEs 28 + 47 + 99). The PBDE concentrations measured using SPMDs decreased with increasing distance from the STP, but no apparent dilution effect was found in the grab samples. Our results show that SPMDs could be used to support grab sampling for specific chemicals, or to trace chemical sources (such as STPs) to the aquatic environment.

  20. Field guide for collecting and processing stream-water samples for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Larry R.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment program includes extensive data- collection efforts to assess the quality of the Nations's streams. These studies require analyses of stream samples for major ions, nutrients, sediments, and organic contaminants. For the information to be comparable among studies in different parts of the Nation, consistent procedures specifically designed to produce uncontaminated samples for trace analysis in the laboratory are critical. This field guide describes the standard procedures for collecting and processing samples for major ions, nutrients, organic contaminants, sediment, and field analyses of conductivity, pH, alkalinity, and dissolved oxygen. Samples are collected and processed using modified and newly designed equipment made of Teflon to avoid contamination, including nonmetallic samplers (D-77 and DH-81) and a Teflon sample splitter. Field solid-phase extraction procedures developed to process samples for organic constituent analyses produce an extracted sample with stabilized compounds for more accurate results. Improvements to standard operational procedures include the use of processing chambers and capsule filtering systems. A modified collecting and processing procedure for organic carbon is designed to avoid contamination from equipment cleaned with methanol. Quality assurance is maintained by strict collecting and processing procedures, replicate sampling, equipment blank samples, and a rigid cleaning procedure using detergent, hydrochloric acid, and methanol.

  1. A continuous water sampling and multi-parameter measurement system for estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schemel, Laurence E.; Dedini, Lee A.

    1979-01-01

    Salinity, temperature, light transmissivity, oxygen saturation, turbidity, pH, pCO2, and chlorophyll a fluorescence of a pumped water sample are continuously measured with a system designed primarily for estuarine studies. Near-surface water from a depth of 2 m is sampled continuously while the vessel is underway or water at depths to 100 m can be collected with an in situ pump, in which case the sampling depth and temperature are measured by an in situ probe. The system is comprised of commercially available instruments, equipment, and components, and of specialized items designed and fabricated by the authors. Data can be read from digital displays and analog strip-chart recorders. Tables and figures describing specialized items are included.

  2. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    STAGGEMEIER, Rodrigo; BORTOLUZZI, Marina; HECK, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; SPILKI, Fernando Rosado; ALMEIDA, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively. PMID:26422153

  3. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Bortoluzzi, Marina; Heck, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; Spilki, Fernando Rosado; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively.

  4. Guidance document for preparing water sampling and analysis plans for UMTRA sites. Final [report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    A water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is required for each Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site to provide rationale for groundwater and surface water sampling at disposal sites and former processing sites. The WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the groundwater and surface water monitoring stations at each site. Section 2.0 of this WSAP Guidance Document describes the WSAP format. Sections 3.0 and 4.0 provide guidance for selecting sampling frequencies and sampling locations, respectively. Section 5.0 contains criteria for selecting analytical parameters. Section 6.0 provides guidance for the contents of each site`s WSAP file. Finally, Section 7.0 presents the references used to prepare this document. The purpose of this guidance document is to provide a consistent technical approach for sampling and monitoring activities performed under WSAPs and a consistent format for WSAP documents. This document is designed for use by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to prepare WSAPs and by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Nuclear Regulatory Commission, state and tribal agencies, regulatory agencies, and the public to evaluate the contents of the WSAPS. This guidance document may be updated periodically based on new or changing regulations.

  5. Water column and bed-sediment core samples collected from Brownlee Reservoir near Oxbow, Oregon, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fosness, Ryan L.; Naymik, Jesse; Hopkins, Candice B.; DeWild, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Idaho Power Company, collected water-column and bed-sediment core samples from eight sites in Brownlee Reservoir near Oxbow, Oregon, during May 5–7, 2012. Water-column and bed-sediment core samples were collected at each of the eight sites and analyzed for total mercury and methylmercury. Additional bed-sediment core samples, collected from three of the eight sites, were analyzed for pesticides and other organic compounds, trace metals, and physical characteristics, such as particle size. Total mercury and methylmercury were detected in each of the water column and bed-sediment core samples. Only 17 of the 417 unique pesticide and organic compounds were detected in bed-sediment core samples. Concentrations of most organic wastewater compounds detected in bed sediment were less than the reporting level. Trace metals detected were greater than the reporting level in all the bed-sediment core samples submitted for analysis. The particle size distribution of bed-sediment core samples was predominantly clay mixed with silt.

  6. Active Sampling Device for Determining Pollutants in Surface and Pore Water – the In Situ Sampler for Biphasic Water Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supowit, Samuel D.; Roll, Isaac B.; Dang, Viet D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2016-02-01

    We designed and evaluated an active sampling device, using as analytical targets a family of pesticides purported to contribute to honeybee colony collapse disorder. Simultaneous sampling of bulk water and pore water was accomplished using a low-flow, multi-channel pump to deliver water to an array of solid-phase extraction cartridges. Analytes were separated using either liquid or gas chromatography, and analysis was performed using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Achieved recoveries of fipronil and degradates in water spiked to nominal concentrations of 0.1, 1, and 10 ng/L ranged from 77 ± 12 to 110 ± 18%. Method detection limits (MDLs) were as low as 0.040–0.8 ng/L. Extraction and quantitation of total fiproles at a wastewater-receiving wetland yielded concentrations in surface water and pore water ranging from 9.9 ± 4.6 to 18.1 ± 4.6 ng/L and 9.1 ± 3.0 to 12.6 ± 2.1 ng/L, respectively. Detected concentrations were statistically indistinguishable from those determined by conventional, more laborious techniques (p > 0.2 for the three most abundant fiproles). Aside from offering time-averaged sampling capabilities for two phases simultaneously with picogram-per-liter MDLs, the novel methodology eliminates the need for water and sediment transport via in situ solid phase extraction.

  7. Active Sampling Device for Determining Pollutants in Surface and Pore Water – the In Situ Sampler for Biphasic Water Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Supowit, Samuel D.; Roll, Isaac B.; Dang, Viet D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2016-01-01

    We designed and evaluated an active sampling device, using as analytical targets a family of pesticides purported to contribute to honeybee colony collapse disorder. Simultaneous sampling of bulk water and pore water was accomplished using a low-flow, multi-channel pump to deliver water to an array of solid-phase extraction cartridges. Analytes were separated using either liquid or gas chromatography, and analysis was performed using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Achieved recoveries of fipronil and degradates in water spiked to nominal concentrations of 0.1, 1, and 10 ng/L ranged from 77 ± 12 to 110 ± 18%. Method detection limits (MDLs) were as low as 0.040–0.8 ng/L. Extraction and quantitation of total fiproles at a wastewater-receiving wetland yielded concentrations in surface water and pore water ranging from 9.9 ± 4.6 to 18.1 ± 4.6 ng/L and 9.1 ± 3.0 to 12.6 ± 2.1 ng/L, respectively. Detected concentrations were statistically indistinguishable from those determined by conventional, more laborious techniques (p > 0.2 for the three most abundant fiproles). Aside from offering time-averaged sampling capabilities for two phases simultaneously with picogram-per-liter MDLs, the novel methodology eliminates the need for water and sediment transport via in situ solid phase extraction. PMID:26905924

  8. Detection by PCR of pathogenic protozoa in raw and drinkable water samples in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Triviño-Valencia, Jessica; Lora, Fabiana; Zuluaga, Juan David; Gomez-Marin, Jorge E

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the presence of DNA of Giardia, Toxoplasma, and Cryptosporidium by PCR, and of Giardia and Cryptosporidium genera by immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT), in water samples, before, during, and after plant treatment for drinkable water. We applied this method in 38 samples of 10 l of water taken from each of the water treatment steps and in 8 samples taken at home (only for Toxoplasma PCR) in Quindio region in Colombia. There were 8 positive samples for Cryptosporidium parvum (21 %), 4 for Cryptosporidium hominis (10.5 %), 27 for Toxoplasma gondii (58.6 %), 2 for Giardia duodenalis assemblage A (5.2 %), and 5 for G. duodenalis assemblage B (13.1 %). By IFAT, 23 % were positive for Giardia and 21 % for Cryptosporidium. An almost perfect agreement was found between IFAT and combined results of PCR, by Kappa composite proportion analysis. PCR positive samples were significantly more frequent in untreated raw water for C. parvum (p = 0.02). High mean of fecal coliforms, high pH values, and low mean of chlorine residuals were strongly correlated with PCR positivity for G. duodenalis assemblage B. High pH value was correlated with PCR positivity for C. parvum. Phylogenetic analysis of DNA sequences was possible, showing water and human clinical sequences for Toxoplasma within the same phylogenetic group for B1 repeated sequence. PCR assay is complementary to IFAT assay for monitoring of protozoa in raw and drinkable water, enabling species identification and to look for phylogenetic analysis in protozoa from human and environmental sources.

  9. Field portable mobile phone based fluorescence microscopy for detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Gorocs, Zoltan; McLeod, Euan; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a waterborne parasite that causes an intestinal infection, known as giardiasis, and it is found not only in countries with inadequate sanitation and unsafe water but also streams and lakes of developed countries. Simple, sensitive, and rapid detection of this pathogen is important for monitoring of drinking water. Here we present a cost-effective and field portable mobile-phone based fluorescence microscopy platform designed for automated detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in large volume water samples (i.e., 10 ml) to be used in low-resource field settings. This fluorescence microscope is integrated with a disposable water-sampling cassette, which is based on a flow-through porous polycarbonate membrane and provides a wide surface area for fluorescence imaging and enumeration of the captured Giardia cysts on the membrane. Water sample of interest, containing fluorescently labeled Giardia cysts, is introduced into the absorbent pads that are in contact with the membrane in the cassette by capillary action, which eliminates the need for electrically driven flow for sample processing. Our fluorescence microscope weighs ~170 grams in total and has all the components of a regular microscope, capable of detecting individual fluorescently labeled cysts under light-emitting-diode (LED) based excitation. Including all the sample preparation, labeling and imaging steps, the entire measurement takes less than one hour for a sample volume of 10 ml. This mobile phone based compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform together with its machine learning based cyst counting interface is easy to use and can even work in resource limited and field settings for spatio-temporal monitoring of water quality.

  10. Evaluation of the Snap Sampler for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring Wells for Inorganic Analytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    within the well. The slits in the two discs were misaligned to limit water exchange. The discs are attached to the Snap Sampler trigger line with...ER D C/ CR R EL T R -0 8 -2 5 Evaluation of the Snap Sampler for Sampling Ground Water Monitoring Wells for Inorganic Analytes...Louise V. Parker, Nathan D. Mulherin, and Gordon E. Gooch December 2008 Well Screen Baffle Snap Sampler Trigger Line Pump Tubing Top Snap Sampler RGC

  11. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L−1 (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L−1 in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10–1000 μg·L−1. Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L−1 gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (<2 min per sample) quantitative detection of malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples. PMID:27529262

  12. Quantitative Detection of Trace Malachite Green in Aquiculture Water Samples by Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaowei; Yang, Shuiping; Chingin, Konstantin; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Xinglei; Zhou, Zhiquan; Zhao, Zhanfeng

    2016-08-11

    Exposure to malachite green (MG) may pose great health risks to humans; thus, it is of prime importance to develop fast and robust methods to quantitatively screen the presence of malachite green in water. Herein the application of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) has been extended to the trace detection of MG within lake water and aquiculture water, due to the intensive use of MG as a biocide in fisheries. This method has the advantage of obviating offline liquid-liquid extraction or tedious matrix separation prior to the measurement of malachite green in native aqueous medium. The experimental results indicate that the extrapolated detection limit for MG was ~3.8 μg·L(-1) (S/N = 3) in lake water samples and ~0.5 μg·L(-1) in ultrapure water under optimized experimental conditions. The signal intensity of MG showed good linearity over the concentration range of 10-1000 μg·L(-1). Measurement of practical water samples fortified with MG at 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 mg·L(-1) gave a good validation of the established calibration curve. The average recoveries and relative standard deviation (RSD) of malachite green in lake water and Carassius carassius fish farm effluent water were 115% (6.64% RSD), 85.4% (9.17% RSD) and 96.0% (7.44% RSD), respectively. Overall, the established EESI-MS/MS method has been demonstrated suitable for sensitive and rapid (<2 min per sample) quantitative detection of malachite green in various aqueous media, indicating its potential for online real-time monitoring of real life samples.

  13. Radon levels in drinking water and soil samples of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts of Rajasthan, India.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sudhir; Rani, Asha; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-07-01

    Radon causes lung cancer when it is trapped inside the lungs. Therefore it is very important to analyze the radon concentration in water and soil samples. In the present investigation, water and soil samples collected from 20 different locations of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts of Northern Rajasthan, India have been studied by using RAD7. The measured radon concentration in water samples varies from 0.5 to 15Bql(-1). The observed values lie within the safe limit as set by UNSCEAR, 2008. The total annual effective dose due to radon in water corresponding to all studied locations has been found to be well within the safe limit of 0.1mSvy(-1) as recommended by World Health Organization (WHO, 2004) and European Council (EU, 1998). The measurements carried out on radon concentration in soil samples reveal a variation from 1750 to 9850Bqm(-3). These results explore that the water of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts is suitable for drinking purpose without posing any health hazard but soil hazards depend upon its permeability and radon concentration.

  14. Glufosinate ammonium clean-up procedure from water samples using SPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayeb M., A.; Ismail B., S.; Mardiana-Jansar, K.; Ta, Goh Choo; Agustar, Hani Kartini

    2015-09-01

    For the determination of glufosinate ammonium residue in soil and water samples, different solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent efficiency was studied. Four different SPE sorbents i.e.: CROMABOND PS-H+, CROMABOND PS-OH-, ISOLUTE ENV+, Water Sep-Pak and OASIS HLB were used. Sample clean-up performance was evaluated using high performance liquid chromatography (Agilent 1220 infinity LC) with fluorescence detector. Detection of FMO-derivatives was done at λ ex = 260 nm and λ em= 310 nm. OASIS HLB column was the most suitable for the clean-up in view of the overall feasibility of the analysis.

  15. Environmental radioactivity of water samples collected in Higashi-Hiroshima campus, Hiroshima University, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, S; Sasai, A; Koga, K; Yasuhara, H; Matsushima, A; Inada, K

    2015-11-01

    The relation between concentration of elements and microbial activity in the water samples of Higashi-Hiroshima Campus, Hiroshima University was investigated. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that microbial mat contains iron, aluminium, silicon and phosphorus. Model experiment revealed that the potassium was adsorbed by living microorganism in the microbial mats, while it was not adsorbed by dead microbial mat. Iron was adsorbed by both living and dead microbial mats. The present results explain the increase in the total β-radioactivity of water sample in summer and the decrease in winter.

  16. Development of an electrolysis system for tritium enrichment in superficial water samples.

    PubMed

    Garbarino, G; Magnoni, M; Bertino, S; Losana, M C

    2009-12-01

    Tritium present in the environment gradually decreased in the last decades and nowadays it has reached extremely low activity concentrations. The purpose of the present work is the implementation of a tritium enrichment system in water samples using electrolytic techniques and pure nickel and iron electrodes. In the present work a mean tritium enrichment factor of 13.0 +/- 3.2 was obtained. This result should allow to reach a minimum detectable activity of tritium in water samples of about 1 tritium unit (TU) or less. The present enrichment system necessitates further adjustments and improvements, such as a cooling system in order to reduce the tritium losses due to evaporation.

  17. [Drinking water analysis for Legionella. Suggestions for sampling, laboratory analysis and assessment].

    PubMed

    Schaefer, B

    2007-03-01

    Drinking water analysis for Legionella from building installations is done quite frequently. Some questions arise from experience with this analysis. They will be discussed to allow uniform and comparable execution. Application of DIN EN ISO 19458 will lead to changes in the sampling procedure. This may make changes necessary even in current sampling and assessment programs. Concerning laboratory investigation, quality control of membrane filters and media turned out to be crucial. The assessment of quantitative results requires knowledge of the drinking water distribution system and of other facts that may be relevant for hygiene. Therefore, the assessment ought to be conducted by somebody with the respective knowledge.

  18. Hydrochemical reactions and origin of offshore relatively fresh pore water from core samples in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Hiu Tung; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    2016-06-01

    The existence of relatively fresh pore water offshore has been well recognised over the globe but studies on the chemistry of the pore water from offshore geological formations are extremely limited. This study aims to characterize the hydrochemistry of the submarine groundwater body in Hong Kong. It looks into the major ion concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of pore water extracted from core samples from an offshore 42.30-m vibrocore in the southwestern Hong Kong waters. A minimum Cl- level of about one-third of that in typical seawater was noted in the terrestrial sediments, suggesting the presence of offshore relatively fresh water. Unexpectedly high NH4+ levels are attributed to organic matter decomposition in the terrestrial sediments. The leaching of shells due to exposure of marine sediments at sea-level low stands raises the Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations. Base Exchange Indices show weak cation exchange reactions in which Na+ and K+ are released while Mg2+ and Ca2+ are adsorbed. Isotopic compositions of pore water reveal that the low-salinity water is probably the relic water sequestered in fluvial systems during relative sea-level low stands. Cores properly stored in a freezer for a long time has been used to study the pore water chemistry. For the first time, this study introduces an approach to correct the measured data by considering the possible evaporation effect during the transportation and storage of the samples. Corrections for evaporation were applied to the major ion concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of pore water measured. It is found that the corrections determined by the Cl- mass balance approach are more reliable. The corrected measurements give more reasonable observations and hence allow sensible conclusions on the hydrochemical reactions and the origin of pore water.

  19. Set Up of an Automatic Water Quality Sampling System in Irrigation Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Emanuel; Kraft, Philipp; Buchen, Caroline; Frede, Hans-Georg; Aquino, Eugenio; Breuer, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Climate change has already a large impact on the availability of water resources. Many regions in South-East Asia are assumed to receive less water in the future, dramatically impacting the production of the most important staple food: rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice is the primary food source for nearly half of the World's population, and is the only cereal that can grow under wetland conditions. Especially anaerobic (flooded) rice fields require high amounts of water but also have higher yields than aerobic produced rice. In the past different methods were developed to reduce the water use in rice paddies, like alternative wetting and drying or the use of mixed cropping systems with aerobic (non-flooded) rice and alternative crops such as maize. A more detailed understanding of water and nutrient cycling in rice-based cropping systems is needed to reduce water use, and requires the investigation of hydrological and biochemical processes as well as transport dynamics at the field scale. New developments in analytical devices permit monitoring parameters at high temporal resolutions and at acceptable costs without much necessary maintenance or analysis over longer periods. Here we present a new type of automatic sampling set-up that facilitates in situ analysis of hydrometric information, stable water isotopes and nitrate concentrations in spatially differentiated agricultural fields. The system facilitates concurrent monitoring of a large number of water and nutrient fluxes (ground, surface, irrigation and rain water) in irrigated agriculture. For this purpose we couple an automatic sampling system with a Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry System (WS-CRDS) for stable water isotope analysis (δ2H and δ18O), a reagentless hyperspectral UV photometer for monitoring nitrate content and various water level sensors for hydrometric information. The whole system is maintained with special developed software for remote control of the system via internet. We

  20. A chemodynamic approach for estimating losses of target organic chemicals from water during sample holding time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capel, P.D.; Larson, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Minimizing the loss of target organic chemicals from environmental water samples between the time of sample collection and isolation is important to the integrity of an investigation. During this sample holding time, there is a potential for analyte loss through volatilization from the water to the headspace, sorption to the walls and cap of the sample bottle; and transformation through biotic and/or abiotic reactions. This paper presents a chemodynamic-based, generalized approach to estimate the most probable loss processes for individual target organic chemicals. The basic premise is that the investigator must know which loss process(es) are important for a particular analyte, based on its chemodynamic properties, when choosing the appropriate method(s) to prevent loss.

  1. Automated measurement and quantification of heterotrophic bacteria in water samples based on the MPN method.

    PubMed

    Fuchsluger, C; Preims, M; Fritz, I

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of heterotrophic bacteria is a widely used measure for water analysis. Especially in terms of drinking water analysis, testing for microorganisms is strictly regulated by the European Drinking Water Directive, including quality criteria and detection limits. The quantification procedure presented in this study is based on the most probable number (MPN) method, which was adapted to comply with the need for a quick and easy screening tool for different kinds of water samples as well as varying microbial loads. Replacing tubes with 24-well titer plates for cultivation of bacteria drastically reduces the amount of culture media and also simplifies incubation. Automated photometric measurement of turbidity instead of visual evaluation of bacterial growth avoids misinterpretation by operators. Definition of a threshold ensures definite and user-independent determination of microbial growth. Calculation of the MPN itself is done using a program provided by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For evaluation of the method, real water samples of different origins as well as pure cultures of bacteria were analyzed in parallel with the conventional plating methods. Thus, the procedure described requires less preparation time, reduces costs and ensures both stable and reliable results for water samples.

  2. Cryptosporidium spp. in drinking water. Samples from rural sites in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Füchslin, Hans Peter; Kötzsch, Stefan; Egli, Thomas

    2012-10-04

    In most rural areas and small communities in Switzerland the drinking water is supplied to the consumers after a minimum or even no treatment at all. However, it is just in these areas where drinking water from sources of agricultural activities can be contaminated by liquid manure and faeces of pasturing animals. The Swiss drinking water regulations are limited to the monitoring of E. coli, Enterococcus spp. and total plate counts only. Hence, resistant pathogens, as for example Cryptosporidium spp., remain unnoticed. During a drinking water survey, which lasted from June 2003 to December 2004, water samples were collected from 3 selected rural sites in Switzerland. The drinking water was investigated for Cryptosporidium spp., E. coli, Enterococcus spp., Clostridium perfringens and other parameters. In all samples oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected at elevated concentrations of up to 0.18 oocysts/l. Between 28% and 75% of the oocysts were found to be vital by the excystation method. Sampled oocysts collected from the three sites were subjected to genotyping and in one case the isolate was found to belong to the genotype of C. parvum. No evidence for increased incidents of diarrhoea in the past years was noted by local authorities.

  3. (90)Sr determination in water samples using Čerenkov radiation.

    PubMed

    Todorović, Nataša; Stojković, Ivana; Nikolov, Jovana; Tenjović, Branislava

    2017-04-01

    A procedure for the determination of (90)Sr in environmental water samples using Čerenkov radiation and low-level liquid scintillation counter Quantulus 1220 was applied and optimized. Low diffusion polyethylene vials, high performance glass counting vials and low potassium borosilicate glass vilas of 20 ml volume (all from PerkinElmer) were used in order to examine their potential effect on counting process. The derived efficiencies were 45.86(9)%, and a minimum detectable activity of 0.32 Bq l(-1) in a 20 ml polyethylene vial (20 ml water sample) has been achieved during 300 min of measurement. Environmental water samples might be colored and this will lead to color quenching, which one of the most important problems that affect Čerenkov is counting (Mosqueda et al., 2005). The sample channel ratio (SCR) method has been applied to correct this effect. The analytical procedures and measurement techniques were tested by participating in the IAEA-TEL-2015-03 world-wide proficiency test on determination of (90)Sr in water sample.

  4. Analyses of native water, bottom material, and elutriate samples of southern Louisiana waterways, 1977-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dupuy, Alton J.; Couvillion, Nolan P.

    1979-01-01

    From March 1977 to July 1978 the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducted a series of elutriate studies to determine water quality in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of southern Louisiana. Sample were collected from the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet areas; Mississippi River, South Pass; Baptiste Collette Bayou; Tiger Pass area; Baou Long; Bayou Barataria and Barataria Bay Waterway area (gulf section); Bayou Segnette Waterway, Lake Pontchartrain near Tangipahoa River mouth; Bayou Grand Caillou; Bayou la Carpe at Homa; Houma Navigation Canal and Terrebonne Bay; Bayou Boeuf, Bayou Chene, and Baou Black, Atchafalaya River Channel, Atchafalaya Bay; Old River Lock tailbay; Red River below mouth of Black River; Freshwaer Canal; Mermentau River and Lake Arthur Mermentau River outlet; and Calcasieu Ship Channel. The studies were initiated at the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to evaluate possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in those waterways. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Geological Survey collected 189 samples of native water and 172 samples of bottom (bed) material from 163 different sites. A total of 117 elutriates (Mixtures of native water and bottom material) were prepared. The native water and elutriate samples were analyzed for selected metals, pesticides, nutrients organics, and pysical constituents. Particle-size determinations were made on bottom-material samples. (Kosco-USGS)

  5. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Falls City, Texas, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. The Falls City site is in Karnes County, Texas, approximately 8 miles [13 kilometers southwest of the town of Falls City and 46 mi (74 km) southeast of San Antonio, Texas. Before surface remedial action, the tailings site consisted of two parcels. Parcel A consisted of the mill site, one mill building, five tailings piles, and one tailings pond south of Farm-to-Market (FM) Road 1344 and west of FM 791. A sixth tailings pile designated Parcel B was north of FM 791 and east of FM 1344.

  6. Exploring water cycle dynamics by sampling multiple stable water isotope pools in a developed landscape in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowski, Natalie; Kraft, Philipp; Pferdmenges, Jakob; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-09-01

    A dual stable water isotope (δ2H and δ18O) study was conducted in the developed (managed) landscape of the Schwingbach catchment (Germany). The 2-year weekly to biweekly measurements of precipitation, stream, and groundwater isotopes revealed that surface and groundwater are isotopically disconnected from the annual precipitation cycle but showed bidirectional interactions between each other. Apparently, snowmelt played a fundamental role for groundwater recharge explaining the observed differences to precipitation δ values. A spatially distributed snapshot sampling of soil water isotopes at two soil depths at 52 sampling points across different land uses (arable land, forest, and grassland) revealed that topsoil isotopic signatures were similar to the precipitation input signal. Preferential water flow paths occurred under forested soils, explaining the isotopic similarities between top- and subsoil isotopic signatures. Due to human-impacted agricultural land use (tilling and compression) of arable and grassland soils, water delivery to the deeper soil layers was reduced, resulting in significant different isotopic signatures. However, the land use influence became less pronounced with depth and soil water approached groundwater δ values. Seasonally tracing stable water isotopes through soil profiles showed that the influence of new percolating soil water decreased with depth as no remarkable seasonality in soil isotopic signatures was obvious at depths > 0.9 m and constant values were observed through space and time. Since classic isotope evaluation methods such as transfer-function-based mean transit time calculations did not provide a good fit between the observed and calculated data, we established a hydrological model to estimate spatially distributed groundwater ages and flow directions within the Vollnkirchener Bach subcatchment. Our model revealed that complex age dynamics exist within the subcatchment and that much of the runoff must has been stored

  7. Distribution of Cryptosporidium Genotypes in Storm Event Water Samples from Three Watersheds in New York

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianlin; Alderisio, Kerri A.; Xiao, Lihua

    2005-01-01

    To assess the source and public health significance of Cryptosporidium oocyst contamination in storm runoff, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique based on the small-subunit rRNA gene was used in the analysis of 94 storm water samples collected from the Malcolm Brook and N5 stream basins in New York over a 3-year period. The distribution of Cryptosporidium in this study was compared with the data obtained from 27 storm water samples from the Ashokan Brook in a previous study. These three watersheds represented different levels of human activity. Among the total of 121 samples analyzed from the three watersheds, 107 were PCR positive, 101 of which (94.4%) were linked to animal sources. In addition, C. hominis (W14) was detected in six samples collected from the Malcolm Brook over a 2-week period. Altogether, 22 Cryptosporidium species or genotypes were found in storm water samples from these three watersheds, only 11 of which could be attributed to known species/groups of animals. Several Cryptosporidium spp. were commonly found in these three watersheds, including the W1 genotype from an unknown animal source, the W4 genotype from deer, and the W7 genotype from muskrats. Some genotypes were found only in a particular watershed. Aliquots of 113 samples were also analyzed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1623; 63 samples (55.7%) were positive for Cryptosporidium by microscopy, and 39 (78%) of the 50 microscopy-negative samples were positive by PCR. Results of this study demonstrate that molecular techniques can complement traditional detection methods by providing information on the source of contamination and the human-infective potential of Cryptosporidium oocysts found in water. PMID:16085835

  8. Influence of various water quality sampling strategies on load estimates for small streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.M.; Roerish, E.D.

    1999-01-01

    Extensive streamflow and water quality data from eight small streams were systematically subsampled to represent various water-quality sampling strategies. The subsampled data were then used to determine the accuracy and precision of annual load estimates generated by means of a regression approach (typically used for big rivers) and to determine the most effective sampling strategy for small streams. Estimation of annual loads by regression was imprecise regardless of the sampling strategy used; for the most effective strategy, median absolute errors were ~30% based on the load estimated with an integration method and all available data, if a regression approach is used with daily average streamflow. The most effective sampling strategy depends on the length of the study. For 1-year studies, fixed-period monthly sampling supplemented by storm chasing was the most effective strategy. For studies of 2 or more years, fixed-period semimonthly sampling resulted in not only the least biased but also the most precise loads. Additional high-flow samples, typically collected to help define the relation between high streamflow and high loads, result in imprecise, overestimated annual loads if these samples are consistently collected early in high-flow events.

  9. Umbrella sampling of proton transfer in a creatine-water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivchenko, Olga; Bachert, Peter; Imhof, Petra

    2014-04-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most common processes in chemistry and biology. Proton transfer between creatine and surrounding solvent water is underlying the chemical exchange saturation transfer used as a contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. The free energy barrier, determined by first-principles umbrella sampling simulations (EaDFT 3 kcal/mol) is in the same order of magnitude as the experimentally obtained activation energy. The underlying mechanism is a first proton transfer from the guanidinium group to the water pool, followed by a second transition where a proton is "transferred back" from the nearest water molecule to the deprotonated nitrogen atom of creatine.

  10. Sample survey of traditional water wheels and small water turbines in nepal: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, C.B.

    1981-01-01

    The main purposes of this survey were to study the technical, economical, and social aspects of water wheels and turbines; to assess the possibility of developing these modern and traditional technologies together or improving them separately; to assess the awareness of the local people of the need for improvement on their existing technologies; and to find out the possible role of RECAST for mutual cooperation. This survey is intended to provide planners financiers, researchers, and manufacturers with further information regarding better use of small hydro resources and locally available skills for development.

  11. Water-quality sampling by the U.S. Geological Survey-Standard protocols and procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.

    2010-01-01

    Thumbnail of and link to report PDF (1.0 MB) The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) develops the sampling procedures and collects the data necessary for the accurate assessment and wise management of our Nation's surface-water and groundwater resources. Federal and State agencies, water-resource regulators and managers, and many organizations and interested parties in the public and private sectors depend on the reliability, timeliness, and integrity of the data we collect and the scientific soundness and impartiality of our data assessments and analysis. The standard data-collection methods uniformly used by USGS water-quality personnel are peer reviewed, kept up-to-date, and published in the National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/).

  12. [CCA of water beetles' distribution and environmental factors in lentic samples of north Changbai Mountain].

    PubMed

    We, Yulian; Ji, Lanzhu; Wang, Miao; Zhao, Min

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between 28 species water beetles in 12 lentic samples and environmental factors of North Chang-bai Mountain was studied by Cononical Correspondence Analysis (CCA). The results showed that degree of underwater humus and altitude are the major factors correlated with beetles distribution, and the correlation coefficients of environmental factors and axes of CCA were 0.8371 and 0.7206 respectively, while water temperature and plant density also had certain effects. Under the influence of environmental factors, the water beetles' populations were different in different habitat. Coelambus impressopunctatus, Colymbetes magnus, Helophorus browni, Haliplus spp. distributed in deep water pool. Water temperature was not important for those beetles. Ilybius sp. and Limnebius glabriventris correlated with altitude and humus.

  13. Quantifying indicatively living phytoplankton cells in ballast water samples--recommendations for Port State Control.

    PubMed

    Gollasch, Stephan; David, Matej; Francé, Janja; Mozetič, Patricija

    2015-12-30

    Different phytoplankton analysis methods (pulse-amplitude modulated fluorometry (PAM) and microscopy) were compared in preparation for compliance monitoring and enforcement with ballast water discharge standards. The key objective was to practically evaluate the performance of different new methods and tools to identify indicatively living phytoplankton cells of the size <50 μm in minimum dimension and ≥ 10 μm in minimum dimension as addressed by the Ballast Water Performance Standard (Regulation D-2, International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004). Four different PAM instruments were selected for the tests based upon knowledge and experience gained in different ballast water sample processing studies. The measurements of the PAM instruments were compared with epifluorescence microscope algae cell counts using fluorescein diacetate as viability stain. It was concluded that PAM fluorometry is a suitable method for indicative phytoplankton analysis of ballast water and the most accurate PAM instruments were identified.

  14. Physiological response of wild dugongs (Dugong dugon) to out-of-water sampling for health assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanyon, Janet M.; Sneath, Helen L.; Long, Trevor; Bonde, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    The dugong (Dugong dugon) is a vulnerable marine mammal with large populations living in urban Queensland waters. A mark-recapture program for wild dugongs has been ongoing in southern Queensland since 2001. This program has involved capture and in-water sampling of more than 700 dugongs where animals have been held at the water surface for 5 min to be gene-tagged, measured, and biopsied. In 2008, this program expanded to examine more comprehensively body condition, reproductive status, and the health of wild dugongs in Moreton Bay. Using Sea World's research vessel, captured dugongs were lifted onto a boat and sampled out-of-water to obtain accurate body weights and morphometrics, collect blood and urine samples for baseline health parameters and hormone profiles, and ultrasound females for pregnancy status. In all, 30 dugongs, including two pregnant females, were sampled over 10 d and restrained on deck for up to 55 min each while biological data were collected. Each of the dugongs had their basic temperature-heart rate-respiration (THR) monitored throughout their period of handling, following protocols developed for the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus). This paper reports on the physiological response of captured dugongs during this out-of-water operation as indicated by their vital signs and the suitability of the manatee monitoring protocols to this related sirenian species. A recommendation is made that the range of vital signs of these wild dugongs be used as benchmark criteria of normal parameters for other studies that intend to sample dugongs out-of-water.

  15. Tracer sampling frequency influences estimates of young water fraction and streamwater transit time distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockinger, Michael P.; Bogena, Heye R.; Lücke, Andreas; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Cornelissen, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-10-01

    The streamwater transit time distribution (TTD) of a catchment is used to derive insights into the movement of precipitation water via various flow paths to the catchment's stream. Typically, TTDs are estimated by using the convolution integral to model a weekly tracer signal measured in streamflow. Another approach for evaluating the transit time of water to the catchment stream is the fraction of young water (Fyw) in streamflow that is younger than a certain threshold age, which also relies on tracer data. However, few studies used tracer data with a higher sampling frequency than weekly. To investigate the influence of the sampling frequency of tracer data on estimates of TTD and Fyw, we estimated both indicators for a humid, mesoscale catchment in Germany using tracer data of weekly and higher sampling frequency. We made use of a 1.5 year long time series of daily to sub-daily precipitation and streamwater isotope measurements, which were aggregated to create the weekly resolution data set. We found that a higher sampling frequency improved the stream isotope simulation compared to a weekly one (0.35 vs. 0.24 Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency) and showed more pronounced short-term dynamics in the simulation result. The TTD based on the high temporal resolution data was considerably different from the weekly one with a shift towards faster transit times, while its corresponding mean transit time of water particles was approximately reduced by half (from 9.5 to 5 years). Similar to this, Fyw almost doubled when applying high resolution data compared to weekly one. Thus, the different approaches yield similar results and strongly support each other. This indicates that weekly isotope tracer data lack information about faster water transport mechanisms in the catchment. Thus, we conclude that a higher than weekly sampling frequency should be preferred when investigating a catchment's water transport characteristics. When comparing TTDs or Fyw of different catchments, the

  16. Robowell: An automated process for monitoring ground water quality using established sampling protocols

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, G.E.; Smith, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    Robowell is an automated process for monitoring selected ground water quality properties and constituents by pumping a well or multilevel sampler. Robowell was developed and tested to provide a cost-effective monitoring system that meets protocols expected for manual sampling. The process uses commercially available electronics, instrumentation, and hardware, so it can be configured to monitor ground water quality using the equipment, purge protocol, and monitoring well design most appropriate for the monitoring site and the contaminants of interest. A Robowell prototype was installed on a sewage treatment plant infiltration bed that overlies a well-studied unconfined sand and gravel aquifer at the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, during a time when two distinct plumes of constituents were released. The prototype was operated from May 10 to November 13, 1996, and quality-assurance/quality-control measurements demonstrated that the data obtained by the automated method was equivalent to data obtained by manual sampling methods using the same sampling protocols. Water level, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and dissolved ammonium were monitored by the prototype as the wells were purged according to U.S Geological Survey (USGS) ground water sampling protocols. Remote access to the data record, via phone modem communications, indicated the arrival of each plume over a few days and the subsequent geochemical reactions over the following weeks. Real-time availability of the monitoring record provided the information needed to initiate manual sampling efforts in response to changes in measured ground water quality, which proved the method and characterized the screened portion of the plume in detail through time. The methods and the case study described are presented to document the process for future use.

  17. Catchment-wide impacts on water quality: the use of 'snapshot' sampling during stable flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, R. B.; Gippel, C. J.; Finlayson, B. L.; Hart, B. T.

    1997-12-01

    Water quality is usually monitored on a regular basis at only a small number of locations in a catchment, generally focused at the catchment outlet. This integrates the effect of all the point and non-point source processes occurring throughout the catchment. However, effective catchment management requires data which identify major sources and processes. As part of a wider study aimed at providing technical information for the development of integrated catchment management plans for a 5000 km 2 catchment in south eastern Australia, a 'snapshot' of water quality was undertaken during stable summer flow conditions. These low flow conditions exist for long periods so water quality at these flow levels is an important constraint on the health of in-stream biological communities. Over a 4 day period, a study of the low flow water quality characteristics throughout the Latrobe River catchment was undertaken. Sixty-four sites were chosen to enable a longitudinal profile of water quality to be established. All tributary junctions and sites along major tributaries, as well as all major industrial inputs were included. Samples were analysed for a range of parameters including total suspended solids concentration, pH, dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity, turbidity, flow rate and water temperature. Filtered and unfiltered samples were taken from 27 sites along the main stream and tributary confluences for analysis of total N, NH 4, oxidised N, total P and dissolved reactive P concentrations. The data are used to illustrate the utility of this sampling methodology for establishing specific sources and estimating non-point source loads of phosphorous, total suspended solids and total dissolved solids. The methodology enabled several new insights into system behaviour including quantification of unknown point discharges, identification of key in-stream sources of suspended material and the extent to which biological activity (phytoplankton growth) affects water quality

  18. Performance of a novel high throughput method for the determination of VX in drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Knaack, Jennifer S; Zhou, Yingtao; Magnuson, Matthew; Silvestri, Erin; Johnson, Rudolph C

    2013-03-05

    VX (O-ethyl-S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate) is a highly toxic organophosphorus nerve agent, and even low levels of contamination in water can be harmful. Measurement of low concentrations of VX in aqueous matrixes is possible using an immunomagnetic scavenging technique and detection using liquid chromatography/tandem-mass spectrometry. Performance of the method was characterized in high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-grade water preserved with sodium omadine, an antimicrobial agent, and sodium thiosulfate, a dechlorinating agent, over eight analytical batches with quality control samples analyzed over 10 days. The minimum reportable level was 25 ng/L with a linear dynamic range up to 4.0 μg/L. The mean accuracies for two quality control samples containing VX at concentrations of 0.250 and 2.00 μg/L were 102 ± 3% and 103 ± 6%, respectively. The stability of VX was determined in five tap water samples representing a range of water quality parameters and disinfection practices over a 91 day period. In preserved tap water samples, VX recovery was between 81 and 92% of the fortified amount, 2.0 μg/L, when analyzed immediately after preparation. Recovery of VX decreased to between 31 and 45% of the fortified amount after 91 days, indicating hydrolysis of VX. However, the preservatives minimized the hydrolysis rate to close to the theoretical limit. The ability to detect low concentrations of VX in preserved tap water 91 days after spiking suggests applicability of this method for determining water contamination with VX and utility during environmental remediation.

  19. Water Quality Sampling Locations Along the Shoreline of the Columbia River, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Robert E.; Patton, Gregory W.

    2009-12-14

    As environmental monitoring evolved on the Hanford Site, several different conventions were used to name or describe location information for various sampling sites along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. These methods range from handwritten descriptions in field notebooks to the use of modern electronic surveying equipment, such as Global Positioning System receivers. These diverse methods resulted in inconsistent archiving of analytical results in various electronic databases and published reports because of multiple names being used for the same site and inaccurate position data. This document provides listings of sampling sites that are associated with groundwater and river water sampling. The report identifies names and locations for sites associated with sampling: (a) near-river groundwater using aquifer sampling tubes; (b) riverbank springs and springs areas; (c) pore water collected from riverbed sediment; and (d) Columbia River water. Included in the listings are historical names used for a particular site and the best available geographic coordinates for the site, as of 2009. In an effort to create more consistency in the descriptive names used for water quality sampling sites, a naming convention is proposed in this document. The convention assumes that a unique identifier is assigned to each site that is monitored and that this identifier serves electronic database management requirements. The descriptive name is assigned for the convenience of the subsequent data user. As the historical database is used more intensively, this document may be revised as a consequence of discovering potential errors and also because of a need to gain consensus on the proposed naming convention for some water quality monitoring sites.

  20. Measured phenol concentrations in air and rain water samples collected near a wood preserving facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.K.; Allen, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    Phenol concentrations were determined in air and rain water samples collected downwind from a coal tar creosote wood preserving facility in Terre Haute, IN. Coal tar creosote is known to contain a large number of constituents and is composed chiefly of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), phenols, and N-, S-, and O-heterocycles. Phenol was chosen as a marker compound for coal tar creosote emissions because it is present at a large mole fraction in coal tar creosote. Phenol was determined by HPLC with UV-Visible detection. Phenol in collected rain water samples was determined directly by HPLC after acidification and filtration. Phenol concentrations in collected air samples ranged from 4.1 to 15.7 {micro}g/m3 while rain water concentrations ranged from 7.9 to 28.2 {micro}g/L. Using a value for the thermodynamic Henry`s law constant of K{sub H} = 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} L atm/mole at 20 C for phenol and measured gas-phase phenol concentrations, even higher rain water concentrations would be expected if equilibrium was established. This indicates that the amount of phenol present in the air parcels sampled exceeded the amount that could be scavenged by rain drops under the conditions prevailing at the time of sampling. The values for phenol concentrations reported here are roughly two orders of magnitude higher than results from previous studies where phenol concentrations in air and rain water samples collected in urban areas were reported. It is likely that other more toxic constituents of coal tar creosote are also present at high concentrations in air parcels that receive emissions from wood treatment facilities.

  1. Determination of radon and radium concentrations in drinking water samples around the city of Kutahya.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Latife; Cetinkaya, Hakan; Murat Saç, Müslim; Içhedef, Mutlu

    2013-08-01

    The concentration of radium and radon has been determined in drinking water samples collected from various locations of Kutahya city, Turkey. The water samples are taken from public water sources and tap water, with the collector chamber method used to measure the radon and radium concentration. The radon concentration ranges between 0.1 and 48.6±1.7 Bq l(-1), while the radium concentration varies from a minimum detectable activity of <0.02-0.7±0.2 Bq l(-1) in Kutahya city. In addition to the radon and radium levels, parameters such as pH, conductivity and temperature of the water, humidity, pressure, elevation and the coordinates of the sampling points have also been measured and recorded. The annual effective dose from radon and radium due to typical water usage has been calculated. The resulting contribution to the annual effective dose due to radon ingestion varies between 0.3 and 124.2 μSv y(-1); the contribution to the annual effective dose due to radium ingestion varies between 0 and 143.3 μSv y(-1); the dose contribution to the stomach due to radon ingestion varies between 0.03 and 14.9 μSv y(-1). The dose contribution due to radon inhalation ranges between 0.3 and 122.5 μSv y(-1), assuming a typical transfer of radon in water to the air. For the overwhelming majority of the Kutahya population, it is determined that the average radiation exposure from drinking water is less than 73.6 µSv y(-1).

  2. Sampling Impacts on the NVAP-M Global Water Vapor Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonder Haar, T. H.; Forsythe, J. M.; Cronk, H. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a fundamental ingredient both for regulating climate as a greenhouse gas and as a necessary precursor for high impact weather events such as heavy precipitation. Water vapor concentration varies geographically because of its close linkage with surface temperature and as a component of synoptic and mesoscale weather systems. Satellite observations provide the only means to quantify the global occurrence and variability of water vapor. In common with other long-term climate data records such as clouds and precipitation, intercalibrating and blending diverse measurements of water vapor to create a consistent record through time is a challenge. The NASA Making Earth Science Data Records for Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program supported the development of the NASA Water Vapor Project (NVAP-M) dataset. The dataset was released to the science community in 2013 via the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center. The dataset is a global (land and ocean) water vapor dataset created by merging multiple satellite infrared and microwave sources of atmospheric water vapor along with surface data to form global gridded fields of total and layered precipitable water vapor. NVAP-M spans 22 years (1988-2009) of data. The challenges in creating this multisensor, multidecadal satellite-driven climate data record are illustrative of challenges for all satellite climate data records. While advances in sensor intercalibration and retrieval algorithms have improved the quality of the global water vapor climate data record, uncertainties arise due to sampling biases of the input sensors. These biases are particularly evident on a regional scale, in cloudy regions or over desert surfaces. The changing mixture of sensors with varying sensitivity to clear/cloudy, land/ocean and even day/night conditions can lead to different results on trends and variability of water vapor. We explore this variability via the NVAP-M data set. Connections and collaborations

  3. A water quality monitoring network design methodology for the selection of critical sampling points: Part I.

    PubMed

    Strobl, R O; Robillard, P D; Shannon, R D; Day, R L; McDonnell, A J

    2006-01-01

    The principal instrument to temporally and spatially manage water resources is a water quality monitoring network. However, to date in most cases, there is a clear absence of a concise strategy or methodology for designing monitoring networks, especially when deciding upon the placement of sampling stations. Since water quality monitoring networks can be quite costly, it is very important to properly design the monitoring network so that maximum information extraction can be accomplished, which in turn is vital when informing decision-makers. This paper presents the development of a methodology for identifying the critical sampling locations within a watershed. Hence, it embodies the spatial component in the design of a water quality monitoring network by designating the critical stream locations that should ideally be sampled. For illustration purposes, the methodology focuses on a single contaminant, namely total phosphorus, and is applicable to small, upland, predominantly agricultural-forested watersheds. It takes a number of hydrologic, topographic, soils, vegetative, and land use factors into account. In addition, it includes an economic as well as logistical component in order to approximate the number of sampling points required for a given budget and to only consider the logistically accessible stream reaches in the analysis, respectively. The methodology utilizes a geographic information system (GIS), hydrologic simulation model, and fuzzy logic.

  4. Analysis of native water, bed material, and elutriate samples of major Louisiana waterways, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demas, Charles R.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, conducted a series of elutriate studies in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of Louisiana. As defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, an elutriate is the supernatant resulting from the vigorous 30-minute shaking of one part bottom sediment from the dredging site with four parts water (vol/vol) collected from the dredging site followed by one hour settling time and appropriate centrifugation and a 0.45-micron filtration. The elutriate studies were initiated to evaluate possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in selected reaches of Louisiana waterways. The waterways investigated were the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, Breton Sound, Mississippi River downstream from Baton Rouge, Bayou Long, Intracoastal Waterway (east and west of the Harvey Canal), Three Rivers area, Ouachita River, Barataria Bay, Houma Navigation Canal, Atchafalaya Bay (Ship Channel), Berwick Bay, Intracoastal Waterway (Port Allen to Morgan City), Petite Anse area, and Calcasieu River and Ship Channel. The Geological Survey collected 227 samples of native water and bed (bottom) material from 130 different sites. These samples (as well as elutriates prepared from mixtures of native water and bed material) were analyzed for selected metal, pesticide, nutrient, and organic constituents. An additional 116 bed samples collected at 58 sites were analyzed for selected pesticides; and 4 additional native-water samples from 2 sites were analyzed for selected metal pesticide, nutrient, and organic constituents. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. EPA Awards Grant to Virginia Tech for Water Sampling in Flint

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FLINT, MICH. -- U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced an $80,000 grant to Virginia Tech University which will fund sampling to measure lead levels in Flint's drinking water. Beginning this week, Virginia Tech researchers will work with resid

  6. Measurement of the tritium concentration in the fractionated distillate from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Robert; Eddy, Teresa; Kuhne, Wendy; Jannik, Tim; Brandl, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Standard procedures for the measurement of tritium in water samples often require distillation of an appropriate sample aliquot. This distillation process may result in a fractionation of tritiated water and regular light water due to the vapor pressure isotope effect, introducing either a bias or an additional contribution to the total tritium measurement uncertainty. The current study investigates the relative change in vapor pressure isotope effect in the course of the distillation process, distinguishing it from and extending previously published measurements. The separation factor as a quantitative measure of the vapor pressure isotope effect is found to assume values of 1.04 ± 0.036, 1.05 ± 0.026, and 1.07 ± 0.038, depending on the vigor of the boiling process during distillation of the sample. A lower heat setting in the experimental setup, and therefore a less vigorous boiling process, results in a larger value for the separation factor. For a tritium measurement in water samples where the first 5 mL are discarded, the tritium concentration could be underestimated by 4-7%.

  7. Evaluation of polyethersulfone performance for the microextraction of polar chlorinated herbicides from environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Ailette; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Cela, Rafael; Möder, Monika; Rodríguez, Isaac

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the suitability of bulk polyethersulfone (PES) for sorptive microextraction of eight polar, chlorinated phenoxy acids and dicamba from environmental water samples is assessed and the analytical features of the optimized method are compared to those reported for other microextraction techniques. Under optimized conditions, extractions were performed with samples (18 mL) adjusted at pH 2 and containing a 30% (w/v) of sodium chloride, using a tubular PES sorbent (1 cm length × 0.7 mm o.d., sorbent volume 8 µL). Equilibrium conditions were achieved after 3h of direct sampling, with absolute extraction efficiencies ranging from 39 to 66%, depending on the compound. Analytes were recovered soaking the polymer with 0.1 mL of ethyl acetate, derivatized and determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Achieved quantification limits (LOQs) varied between 0.005 and 0.073 ng mL(-1). After normalization with the internal surrogate (IS), the efficiency of the extraction was only moderately affected by the particular characteristics of different water samples (surface and sewage water); thus, pseudo-external calibration, using spiked ultrapure water solutions, can be used as quantification technique. The reduced cost of the PES polymer allowed considering it as a disposable sorbent, avoiding variations in the performance of the extraction due to cross-contamination problems and/or surface modification with usage.

  8. TECHNICAL FACT SHEET: A Systematic Evaluation of Dissolved Metals Loss during Water Sample Filtration

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research study examined how water quality collection and filtration approaches, including commonly used capsule and disc syringe filters, may cause losses in the amounts of soluble lead and copper found in a sample. A variety of commercially available filter materials with a...

  9. SMALL VOLUME SAMPLING & GC/MS ANALYSIS FOR PAH CONCENTRATIONS IN WATER ABOVE CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure for measuring very low concentrations of potentially toxic petroleum residues in small water samples has been developed by EPA's Office of Research and Development. Many of these compounds, called Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons or PAHs, are included in EPA's list o...

  10. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton (DOE, 1994). Further, the supplement serves to confirm the Project`s present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as the intent to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 and 60 FR 2854. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Riverton site are the Riverton Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) (DOE, 1995a) and the Riverton Site Observational Work Plan (SOWP) (DOE, 1995b).

  11. Trends in analytical methodologies for the determination of alkylphenols and bisphenol A in water samples.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro-González, N; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2017-04-15

    In the last decade, the impact of alkylphenols and bisphenol A in the aquatic environment has been widely evaluated because of their high use in industrial and household applications as well as their toxicological effects. These compounds are well-known endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) which can affect the hormonal system of humans and wildlife, even at low concentrations. Due to the fact that these pollutants enter into the environment through waters, and it is the most affected compartment, analytical methods which allow the determination of these compounds in aqueous samples at low levels are mandatory. In this review, an overview of the most significant advances in the analytical methodologies for the determination of alkylphenols and bisphenol A in waters is considered (from 2002 to the present). Sample handling and instrumental detection strategies are critically discussed, including analytical parameters related to quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC). Special attention is paid to miniaturized sample preparation methodologies and approaches proposed to reduce time- and reagents consumption according to Green Chemistry principles, which have increased in the last five years. Finally, relevant applications of these methods to the analysis of water samples are examined, being wastewater and surface water the most investigated.

  12. Collecting Stream Samples for Water Quality. Module 16. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on collecting stream samples for water quality. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) using a job aid to…

  13. HYDROLYSIS OF MTBE TO TBA IN GROUND WATER SAMPLES WITH HYDROCHLORIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional sampling and analytical protocols have poor sensitivity for fuel oxygenates that are alcohols, such as tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Because alcohols are miscible or highly soluble in water, alcohols are not efficiently transferred to the gas chromatograph for analysis....

  14. Extraction of pesticides in water samples using vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chunhong; Zhu, Xiaodan; Wang, Jihua; Zhao, Ercheng; He, Min; Chen, Li; Yu, Pingzhong

    2010-09-10

    A simple solvent microextraction method termed vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) coupled with gas chromatography micro electron-capture detector (GC-microECD) has been developed and used for the pesticide residue analysis in water samples. In the VALLME method, aliquots of 30 microL toluene used as extraction solvent were directly injected into a 25 mL volumetric flask containing the water sample. The extraction solvent was dispersed into the water phase under vigorously shaking with the vortex. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the proposed VALLME such as extraction solvent, vortex time, volumes of extraction solvent and salt addition were investigated. Under the optimum condition, enrichment factors (EFs) in a range of 835-1115 and limits of detection below 0.010 microg L(-1) were obtained for the determination of target pesticides in water. The calculated calibration curves provide high levels of linearity yielding correlation coefficients (r(2)) greater than 0.9958 with the concentration level ranged from 0.05 to 2.5 microg L(-1). Finally, the proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of pesticides from real water samples and acceptable recoveries over the range of 72-106.3% were obtained.

  15. Using SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS Analysis to Assess Disperse Dyes in Environmental Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Zocolo, Guilherme Julião; Pilon dos Santos, Glauco; Vendemiatti, Josiane; Vacchi, Francine Inforçato; Umbuzeiro, Gisela de Aragão; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin

    2015-09-01

    We have optimized an SPE-LC-ESI-MS/MS method and used it to monitor disperse azo dyes in environmental aquatic samples. Calibration curves constructed for nine disperse dyes-Red 1, Violet 93, Blue 373, Orange 1, Orange 3, Orange 25, Yellow 3, Yellow 7 and Red 13-in aqueous solution presented good linearity between 2.0 and 100.0 ng mL(-1). The method provided limits of detection and quantification around 2.0 and 8.0 ng L(-1), respectively. For dyes at concentrations of 25.0 ng mL(-1), the intra- and interday analyses afforded relative standard deviation lower than 6 and 13%, respectively. The recovery values obtained for each target analyte in Milli-Q water, receiving waters and treated water samples spiked with the nine studied dyes at concentrations of 8.0, 25.0 and 50.0 ng L(-1) (n = 3) gave average recoveries greater than 70%, with RSD <20%. Statistical evaluation aided method validation. The validated method proved to be useful for analysis of organic extracts from effluents and receiving water samples after an SPE extraction step. More specifically, the method enabled detection of the dyes Disperse Red 1, Disperse Blue 373 and Disperse Violet 93 at concentrations ranging from 84 to 3452 ng L(-1) in the treated effluent (TE), affluent and points collected upstream and downstream of the drinking water treatment plant of a textile dye industry in Brazil.

  16. Methods for collecting benthic invertebrate samples as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cuffney, Thomas F.; Gurtz, Martin E.; Meador, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Benthic invertebrate communities are evaluated as part of the ecological survey component of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These biological data are collected along with physical and chemical data to assess water-quality conditions and to develop an understanding of the factors that affect water-quality conditions locally, regionally, and nationally. The objectives of benthic invertebrate community characterizations are to (1) develop for each site a list of tax a within the associated stream reach and (2) determine the structure of benthic invertebrate communities within selected habitats of that reach. A nationally consistent approach is used to achieve these objectives. This approach provides guidance on site, reach, and habitat selection and methods and equipment for qualitative multihabitat sampling and semi-quantitative single habitat sampling. Appropriate quality-assurance and quality-control guidelines are used to maximize the ability to analyze data within and among study units.

  17. Quantitative reverse sample genome probing of microbial communities and its application to oil field production waters

    SciTech Connect

    Voordouw, G.; Shen, Y.; Harrington, C.S.; Teland, A.J. ); Jack, T.R. ); Westlake, W.S. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper presents a protocol for quantitative analysis of microbial communities by reverse sample genome probing is presented in which (i) whole community DNA is isolated and labeled in the presence of a known amount of an added internal standard and (ii) the resulting spiked reverse genome probe is hybridized with a master filter on which denatured genomic DNAs from bacterial standards isolated from the target environment were spotted in large amounts (up to 1,500 ng) in order to improve detection sensitivity. This protocol allowed reproducible fingerprinting of the microbial community in oil field production waters at 19 sites from which water and biofilm samples were collected. It appeared that selected sulfate-reducing bacteria were significantly enhanced in biofilms covering the metal surfaces in contact with the production waters.

  18. Report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

    1995-08-18

    Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs.

  19. Determination of air-loop volume and radon partition coefficient for measuring radon in water sample.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kil Yong; Burnett, William C

    A simple method for the direct determination of the air-loop volume in a RAD7 system as well as the radon partition coefficient was developed allowing for an accurate measurement of the radon activity in any type of water. The air-loop volume may be measured directly using an external radon source and an empty bottle with a precisely measured volume. The partition coefficient and activity of radon in the water sample may then be determined via the RAD7 using the determined air-loop volume. Activity ratios instead of absolute activities were used to measure the air-loop volume and the radon partition coefficient. In order to verify this approach, we measured the radon partition coefficient in deionized water in the temperature range of 10-30 °C and compared the values to those calculated from the well-known Weigel equation. The results were within 5 % variance throughout the temperature range. We also applied the approach for measurement of the radon partition coefficient in synthetic saline water (0-75 ppt salinity) as well as tap water. The radon activity of the tap water sample was determined by this method as well as the standard RAD-H2O and BigBottle RAD-H2O. The results have shown good agreement between this method and the standard methods.

  20. Summary report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir (which is considered part of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir System), and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Results of this study indicated that the levels of contamination in the samples from the Watts Bar and Melton Hill Reservoir sites did not pose a threat to human health. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. Eleven of the sampling sites were selected based on existence of pollutant discharge permits, known locations of hazardous waste sites, and knowledge of past practices. The twelfth sample site was selected as a relatively less contaminated reference site for comparison purposes.

  1. Determination of colloidal and dissolved silver in water samples using colorimetric solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Hill, April A; Lipert, Robert J; Porter, Marc D

    2010-03-15

    The increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics has led to resurgence in the use of silver as a biocidal agent in applications ranging from washing machine additives to the drinking water treatment system on the International Space Station (ISS). However, growing concerns about the possible toxicity of colloidal silver to bacteria, aquatic organisms and humans have led to recently issued regulations by the US EPA and FDA regarding the usage of silver. As part of an ongoing project, we have developed a rapid, simple method for determining total silver, both ionic (silver(I)) and colloidal, in 0.1-1mg/L aqueous samples, which spans the ISS potable water target of 0.3-0.5mg/L (total silver) and meets the US EPA limit of 0.1mg/L in drinking water. The method is based on colorimetric solid-phase extraction (C-SPE) and involves the extraction of silver(I) from water samples by passage through a solid-phase membrane impregnated with the colorimetric reagent DMABR (5-[4-(dimethylamino)benzylidene]rhodanine). Silver(I) exhaustively reacts with impregnated DMABR to form a colored compound, which is quantified using a handheld diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer. Total silver is determined by first passing the sample through a cartridge containing Oxone, which exhaustively oxidizes colloidal silver to dissolved silver(I). The method, which takes less than 2 min to complete and requires only approximately 1 mL of sample, has been validated through a series of tests, including a comparison with the ICP-MS analysis of a water sample from ISS that contained both silver(I) and colloidal silver. Potential earth-bound applications are also briefly discussed.

  2. [Analysis of amines in water samples by high performance liquid chromatography-laser induced fluorescence detection].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; Gao, Fangyuan; Tang, Tao; Sun, Yuanshe; Li, Tong; Zhang, Weibing

    2013-11-01

    A sensitive high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-laser induced fluorescence detection (LIFD) method was developed for the determination of amines. The derivatization and separation conditions were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, spermidine, putrescine and histamine were analyzed. The limits of detection (LODs) of the three biogenic amines (S/N = 3) were as low as 10(-10) mol/L. This method showed excellent stability. The RSDs of retention times and peak areas of the three biogenic amines were lower than 0.3% and 3%, respectively. This method was applied in biogenic amine analysis in water samples, and the average recoveries were in the range of 94.99%-104.7%. Furthermore, the amines in seven tea samples were analyzed by this method, and satisfactory results were achieved. The developed assay is of excellent sensitivity and good reproducibility, which can be used in the analysis of the amines in water samples.

  3. A survey of results for passive air and water sampling via semipermeable membrane devices

    SciTech Connect

    Prest, H.F.; Jacobson, L.; Hodgins, M.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Richardson, B.; Wilson, M.; Martin, M.

    1994-12-31

    Passive sampling techniques have progressed and are providing new possibilities for measuring trace contaminants in environmental compartments. One such device, the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) developed by Huckins, et al in Columbia, MO. is especially promising. The authors present an overview of results for sampling in air and water with semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDS) for organochlorines and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and comment on possible future applications and potential. Differences in organohalogen profiles for SPMDs and green-lipped mussels deployed along transacts of Corio Bay, Australia show marked differences in sequestering ``windows``. An illustration of the application of SPMDs to the measurement of the half-life of chemicals is presented using PAH data from SPMD deployments in an irrigation canal in New Mexico. Results for simultaneous sampling of water and coastal air in Northern California illustrate the promise of SPMDs as global monitors.

  4. Comment on 'Shang S. 2012. Calculating actual crop evapotranspiration under soil water stress conditions with appropriate numerical methods and time step. Hydrological Processes 26: 3338-3343. DOI: 10.1002/hyp.8405'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yatheendradas, Soni; Narapusetty, Balachandrudu; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Funk, Christopher; Verdin, James

    2014-01-01

    A previous study analyzed errors in the numerical calculation of actual crop evapotranspiration (ET(sub a)) under soil water stress. Assuming no irrigation or precipitation, it constructed equations for ET(sub a) over limited soil-water ranges in a root zone drying out due to evapotranspiration. It then used a single crop-soil composite to provide recommendations about the appropriate usage of numerical methods under different values of the time step and the maximum crop evapotranspiration (ET(sub c)). This comment reformulates those ET(sub a) equations for applicability over the full range of soil water values, revealing a dependence of the relative error in numerical ET(sub a) on the initial soil water that was not seen in the previous study. It is shown that the recommendations based on a single crop-soil composite can be invalid for other crop-soil composites. Finally, a consideration of the numerical error in the time-cumulative value of ET(sub a) is discussed besides the existing consideration of that error over individual time steps as done in the previous study. This cumulative ET(sub a) is more relevant to the final crop yield.

  5. Removal of sea salt hydrate water from seawater-derived samples by dehydration.

    PubMed

    Frossard, Amanda A; Russell, Lynn M

    2012-12-18

    Aerosol particles produced from bubble bursting of natural seawater contain both sea salts and organic components. Depending on the temperature, pressure, and speed of drying, the salt components can form hydrates that bind water, slowing evaporation of the water, particularly if large particles or thick layers of salts undergo drying that is nonuniform and incomplete. The water bound in these salt hydrates interferes with measuring organic hydroxyl and amine functional groups by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy because it absorbs at the same infrared wavelengths. Here, a method for separating the hydrate water in sea salt hydrates using freezing and then heating in warm, dry air (70 °C) is evaluated and compared to other methods, including spectral subtraction. Laboratory-generated sea salt analogs show an efficient removal of 89% of the hydrate water absorption peak height by 24 h of heating at atmospheric pressure. The heating method was also applied to bubbled submicrometer (Sea Sweep), generated bulk (Bubbler), and atomized seawater samples, with efficient removal of 5, 22, and 39 μg of hydrate water from samples of initial masses of 11, 30, 58 μg, respectively. The strong spectral similarity between the difference of the initial and dehydrated spectra and the laboratory-generated sea salt hydrate spectrum provided verification of the removal of hydrate water. In contrast, samples of submicrometer atmospheric particles from marine air masses did not have detectable signatures of sea salt hydrate absorbance, likely because their smaller particles and lower filter loadings provided higher surface area to volume ratios and allowed faster and more complete drying.

  6. Electrophoretic concentration and sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography analysis of cationic drugs in water samples.

    PubMed

    Wuethrich, Alain; Haddad, Paul R; Quirino, Joselito P

    2015-07-03

    Sample preparation by electrophoretic concentration, followed by analysis using sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography, was studied as a green and simple analytical strategy for the trace analysis of cationic drugs in water samples. Electrophoretic concentration was conducted using 50 mmol/L ammonium acetate at pH 5 as acceptor electrolyte. Electrophoretic concentration was performed at 1.0 kV for 50 min and 0.5 kV and 15 min for purified and 10-fold diluted waste water samples, respectively. Sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography was with 100 mmol/L sodium phosphate at pH 2, 100 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfate and 27.5%-v/v acetonitrile as separation electrolyte. The separation voltage was -20 kV, UV-detection was at 200 nm, and the acidified concentrate was injected for 36 s at 1 bar (or 72% of the total capillary length, 60 cm). Both purified water and 10-fold diluted waste water exhibited a linear range of two orders of concentration magnitude. The coefficient of determination, and intra- and interday repeatability were 0.991-0.997, 2.5-6.2, and 4.4-9.7%RSD (n=6), respectively, for purified water. The values were 0.991-0.997, 3.4-7.1, and 8.7-9.8%RSD (n=6), correspondingly, for 10-fold diluted waste water. The method detection limit was in the range from 0.04-0.09 to 1.20-6.97 ng/mL for purified and undiluted waste water, respectively.

  7. Array capillary in-tube solid-phase microextraction: a rapid preparation technique for water samples.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaohui; Wu, Dapeng; Peng, Hong; Ding, Kun; Duan, Chunfeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2012-06-29

    A rapid sample preparation technique, namely array capillary in-tube solid-phase microextraction (ACIT-SPME) for direct extraction of organic pollutants from water samples, was developed and evaluated. The ACIT-SPME cartridge consisted of a bundle of glass capillary tubes of 0.5 mm I.D. × 30mm contained inside a quartz liner of 4 mm I.D. The high ratio of cross-section area of channel-to-wall allowed water sample flow through the cartridge just under gravity. Both the internal/external surfaces of the array capillary tubing were coated with extraction phase of 2-5 μm in thickness, which provided large extraction surface area up to 30 cm² for a cartridge containing 19 glass capillaries. The large surface area and thin extraction phase improved greatly both the mass transfer process of extraction and the thermo desorption process, leading to fast extraction and fast desorption. The extracted analytes were thermally desorbed in a homemade thermal desorption unit (TDU), which was coupled to a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector for analysis. By using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the extraction phase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the model analytes, the performance of the ACIT-SPME cartridge was systematically investigated. The extraction time was 2 min for 350 mL of water sample, and detection limits were between 0.8 and 1.7 ng/L with deviation of 2.8-9.7% RSD. Relative recoveries of analytes for real water samples were between 65.0% and 116%. The extraction time can even be further shortened to 10s for 250 mL sample by applying vacuum at the outlet of the cartridge, with detection limits of 2.2-5.3 ng/L and deviation of 4.0-12% RSD.

  8. Pesticide-sampling equipment, sample-collection and processing procedures, and water-quality data at Chicod Creek, North Carolina, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, T.K.; Smith, K.E.; Wood, C.D.; Williams, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Water-quality samples were collected from Chicod Creek in the Coastal Plain Province of North Carolina during the summer of 1992 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Chicod Creek is in the Albemarle-Pamlico drainage area, one of four study units designated to test equipment and procedures for collecting and processing samples for the solid-phase extraction of selected pesticides, The equipment and procedures were used to isolate 47 pesticides, including organonitrogen, carbamate, organochlorine, organophosphate, and other compounds, targeted to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Sample-collection and processing equipment equipment cleaning and set-up procedures, methods pertaining to collecting, splitting, and solid-phase extraction of samples, and water-quality data resulting from the field test are presented in this report Most problems encountered during this intensive sampling exercise were operational difficulties relating to equipment used to process samples.

  9. Summary of inorganic compositional data for groundwater, soil-water, and surface-water samples collected at the Headgate Draw subsurface drip irrigation site, Johnson County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupancic, John W.

    2011-01-01

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  10. Summary of Inorganic Compositional Data for Groundwater, Soil-Water, and Surface-Water Samples at the Headgate Draw Subsurface Drip Irrigation Site

    SciTech Connect

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupanic, John W.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  11. Combination of in vitro bioassays for the determination of cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of wastewater, surface water and drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Zegura, Bojana; Heath, Ester; Cernosa, Andrej; Filipic, Metka

    2009-06-01

    In this study we evaluated genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of native samples of wastewaters (15 samples), surface waters (28 samples) and potable waters (8 samples) with the SOS/umuC assay with Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 and MTT assay with human hepatoma HepG2 cells. The genotoxicity of selected samples was confirmed with the comet assay with HepG2 cells. In the SOS/umuC assay 13 out of the 51 samples were genotoxic: two effluent samples from chemical industry; one sample of wastewater treatment plant effluent; two hospital wastewater samples; three river water samples and four lake water samples. Six samples were cytotoxic for HepG2 cells: both effluent samples of chemical industry, two wastewater treatment plant effluent samples, and two river water samples, however, only the chemical industry effluent samples were genotoxic and cytotoxic, indicating that different contaminants are responsible for genotoxic and toxic effects. Comparing genotoxicity of river and lake water samples with the chemical analytical data of the presence of the residues of pharmaceutical and personal care products (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, UV filters and disinfectants) in these samples, indicated that the presence of UV filters might be linked to the genotoxicity of these samples. The results showed that the application of the bacterial SOS/umuC assay and mammalian cell assays (MTT and comet assay) with HepG2 cells was suitably sensitive combination of assays to monitor genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of native samples of wastewaters and surface waters. With this study we also confirmed that the toxicity/genotoxicity bioassays should be an integral tool in the evaluation of toxicity of complex wastewaters before the release into environment, as well as for the monitoring of surface water quality, providing data useful in risk assessment.

  12. Effect of storage method and associated holding time on nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in surface water samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessments were conducted to determine the effect of sample storage method and associated holding time on surface water nutrient concentrations from field sites. Six surface water sites and two nutrient spiked, laboratory water samples were evaluated for nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, filtered orthop...

  13. Well installation and ground-water sampling plan for 1100 Area environmental monitoring wells

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    This report outlines a plan for the installation and sampling of five wells between inactive waste sites in the 1100 Area of the Hanford Site and Richland City water supply wells. No contamination has been detected in water pumped from the water supply wells to date. The five wells are being installed to provide for early detection of contaminants and to provide data that may be used to make decisions concerning the management of the North Richland Well Field. This plan describes the existing waste disposal facilities and water supply wells, hydrogeology of the area, well completion specifics, and the data to be gathered from the five new wells. 26 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Using continuous in-situ measurements to adaptively trigger urban storm water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, B. P.; Kerkez, B.

    2015-12-01

    Until cost-effective in-situ sensors are available for biological parameters, nutrients and metals, automated samplers will continue to be the primary source of reliable water quality measurements. Given limited samples bottles, however, autosamplers often obscure insights on nutrient sources and biogeochemical processes which would otherwise be captured using a continuous sampling approach. To that end, we evaluate the efficacy a novel method to measure first-flush nutrient dynamics in flashy, urban watersheds. Our approach reduces the number of samples required to capture water quality dynamics by leveraging an internet-connected sensor node, which is equipped with a suite of continuous in-situ sensors and an automated sampler. To capture both the initial baseflow as well as storm concentrations, a cloud-hosted adaptive algorithm analyzes the high-resolution sensor data along with local weather forecasts to optimize a sampling schedule. The method was tested in a highly developed urban catchment in Ann Arbor, Michigan and collected samples of nitrate, phosphorus, and suspended solids throughout several storm events. Results indicate that the watershed does not exhibit first flush dynamics, a behavior that would have been obscured when using a non-adaptive sampling approach.

  15. Phosphorus Concentrations in Stream-Water and Reference Samples - An Assessment of Laboratory Comparability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McHale, Michael R.; McChesney, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, a study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and precision of 10 laboratories that analyze water-quality samples for phosphorus concentrations in the Catskill Mountain region of New York State. Many environmental studies in this region rely on data from these different laboratories for water-quality analyses, and the data may be used in watershed modeling and management decisions. Therefore, it is important to determine whether the data reported by these laboratories are of comparable accuracy and precision. Each laboratory was sent 12 samples for triplicate analysis for total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus, and soluble reactive phosphorus. Eight of these laboratories reported results that met comparability criteria for all samples; the remaining two laboratories met comparability criteria for only about half of the analyses. Neither the analytical method used nor the sample concentration ranges appeared to affect the comparability of results. The laboratories whose results were comparable gave consistently comparable results throughout the concentration range analyzed, and the differences among methods did not diminish comparability. All laboratories had high data precision as indicated by sample triplicate results. In addition, the laboratories consistently reported total phosphorus values greater than total dissolved phosphorus values, and total dissolved phosphorus values greater than soluble reactive phosphorus values, as would be expected. The results of this study emphasize the importance of regular laboratory participation in sample-exchange programs.

  16. Chemcatcher and DGT passive sampling devices for regulatory monitoring of trace metals in surface water.

    PubMed

    Allan, Ian J; Knutsson, Jesper; Guigues, Nathalie; Mills, Graham A; Fouillac, Anne-Marie; Greenwood, Richard

    2008-07-01

    This work aimed to evaluate whether the performance of passive sampling devices in measuring time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations supports their application in regulatory monitoring of trace metals in surface waters, such as for the European Union's Water Framework Directive (WFD). The ability of the Chemcatcher and the diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) device sampler to provide comparable TWA concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn was tested through consecutive and overlapping deployments (7-28 days) in the River Meuse (The Netherlands). In order to evaluate the consistency of these TWA labile metal concentrations, these were assessed against total and filtered concentrations measured at relatively high frequencies by two teams using standard monitoring procedures, and metal species predicted by equilibrium speciation modeling using Visual MINTEQ. For Cd and Zn, the concentrations obtained with filtered water samples and the passive sampling devices were generally similar. The samplers consistently underestimated filtered concentrations of Cu and Ni, in agreement with their respective predicted speciation. For Pb, a small labile fraction was mainly responsible for low sampler accumulation and hence high measurement uncertainty. While only the high frequency of spot sampling procedures enabled the observation of higher Cd concentrations during the first 14 days, consecutive DGT deployments were able to detect it and provide a reasonable estimate of ambient concentrations. The range of concentrations measured by spot and passive sampling, for exposures up to 28 days, demonstrated that both modes of monitoring were equally reliable. Passive sampling provides information that cannot be obtained by a realistic spot sampling frequency and this may impact on the ability to detect trends and assess monitoring data against environmental quality standards when concentrations fluctuate.

  17. Microfluidic chip with optical sensor for rapid detection of nerve agent Sarin in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hsih Yin; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Loke, Weng Keong; Tan, Yong Teng

    2007-12-01

    The chemical warfare agent Sarin is an organophosphate that is highly toxic to humans as they can act as cholinesterase inhibitors, that disrupts neuromuscular transmission. As these nerve agents are colorless, odorless and highly toxic, they can be introduced into drinking water as a means of terrorist sabotage. Hence, numerous innovative devices and methods have been developed for rapid detection of these organophosphates. Microfluidic technology allows the implementation of fast and sensitive detection of Sarin. In this paper, a micro-total analysis systems (TAS), also known as Lab-on-a-chip, fitted with an optical detection system has been developed to analyze the presence of the nerve agent sarin in water samples. In the present set-up, inhibition of co-introduced cholinesterase and water samples containing trace amounts of nerve agent sarin into the microfluidic device was used as the basis for selective detection of sarin. The device was fabricated using polymeric micromachining with PMMA (poly (methymethacrylate)) as the substrate material. A chromophore was utilized to measure the activity of remnant cholinesterase activity, which is inversely related to the amount of sarin present in the water samples. Comparisons were made between two different optical detection techniques and the findings will be presented in this paper. The presented measurement method is simple, fast and as sensitive as Gas Chromatography.

  18. Triplex reverse transcription-PCR for detecting viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae in water samples in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kanoktippornchai, Boonnapa; Chomvarin, Chariya; Engchanil, Chulapan; Wongboot, Warawan

    2014-03-01

    Abstract. Detection of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1/O139 in aquatic environment is difficult to achieve using the culture method. For direct detection of viable toxigenic V. cholerae in aquatic environment, we developed a triplex reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, targeting genes for the outer membrane protein (ompW), cholera toxin A (ctxA) and toxin-coregulated pilli (tcpA) and compared the assay with the culture method. After enrichment of the bacteria-containing filters in alkaline peptone water for 6 hours, the sensitivity of triplex RT-PCR for detecting V. cholerae was 7 cfu/ml. Of the 80 environmental water samples collected from various regions in Northeast Thailand, triplex RT-PCR detected 15 toxigenic and 20 non-toxigenic V. cholerae, whereas the culture method detected only 3 toxigenic V. cholerae--containing water samples. These results show that this triplex RT-PCR method could be used as an alternative tool for rapid and sensitive identification of viable toxigenic V cholerae in environmental water samples.

  19. Flow injection sample pretreatment in the determination of trace elements in waters by atomic spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Flow injection (FI) techniques are a way of automating sampling pretreatment procedures with direct coupling to the instrument. For a variety of reasons, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) would be the method of choice for the determination of trace elements in water samples were it not for some of the inherent limitations of this technique. These limitations are concerned with the various interferences that arise from matrix components and with the atom number density in the source. This together with the various noise sources sets detection limits which are not low enough for many applications. Thus many FI procedures are devised with the aim of overcoming these limitations and thus solid phase extraction (SPE) as a means of preconcentration features largely in recently published work. Results will be presented for the determination of trace elements in water samples (both fresh and saline) in which SPE procedures were used to (a) remove the potentially interfering sea-water matrix for determinations using ICP-MS and (b) preconcentrate cadmium from surface waters prior to determination by FAAS. Hydride generation methods have been applied for the determination of selenium and arsenic. In highly saline media the elevated recoveries of Se have been investigated and for the determination of As, an evaluation of the claim that the use of surfactants improves the performance of a flow based hydride generation system has critically evaluated.

  20. Estimating occupancy and abundance of stream amphibians using environmental DNA from filtered water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Arkle, Robert S.; Waits, Lisette P.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods for detecting aquatic species are advancing rapidly, but with little evaluation of field protocols or precision of resulting estimates. We compared sampling results from traditional field methods with eDNA methods for two amphibians in 13 streams in central Idaho, USA. We also evaluated three water collection protocols and the influence of sampling location, time of day, and distance from animals on eDNA concentration in the water. We found no difference in detection or amount of eDNA among water collection protocols. eDNA methods had slightly higher detection rates than traditional field methods, particularly when species occurred at low densities. eDNA concentration was positively related to field-measured density, biomass, and proportion of transects occupied. Precision of eDNA-based abundance estimates increased with the amount of eDNA in the water and the number of replicate subsamples collected. eDNA concentration did not vary significantly with sample location in the stream, time of day, or distance downstream from animals. Our results further advance the implementation of eDNA methods for monitoring aquatic vertebrates in stream habitats.

  1. Comparison of concentration methods for detection of hepatitis A virus in water samples.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuting; Sui, Zhiwei; Hu, Guoliang; Cao, Huabin; Yang, Guoxiang; Li, Yong; Lei, Yongsong; Zhao, Lihua; Chen, Quanjiao

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis A virus is a pathogen associated with water pollution. Contaminated drinking water can cause hepatitis A outbreaks, lead to economic losses, and even threaten human lives. It is difficult to detect low levels of hepatitis A virus in water, so the virus must be concentrated in order to quantify it accurately. Here, we present a simple, rapid, efficient technique for the concentration and detection of hepatitis A virus in water. Our data showed that adding phosphate-buffered saline to the water, pre-filtering the water, and adding Trizol reagent directly to the filtration membrane can significantly improve concentration efficiency. Of three types of filtration membranes studied (mixed cellulose ester membrane, polyvinylidene fluoride membrane, and nylon membrane), the concentration efficiency using mixed cellulose ester membrane with a 0.1-μm pore size was the highest, reaching 92.62 ± 5.17%. This method was used to concentrate hepatitis A virus in water samples from Donghu Lake. Using SYBR Green real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, the detection sensitivity of this method reached 10(1) copies/μL and its concentration efficiency reached 79.45 ± 9.88%.

  2. Dispersion and toxicity of selected manufactured nanomaterials in natural river water samples: effects of water chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Youn, Sejin; Hovsepyan, Anna; Llaneza, Veronica L; Wang, Yu; Bitton, Gabriel; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude J

    2009-05-01

    Experimental conditions that mimic likely scenarios of manufactured nanomaterials (MNs) introduction to aquatic systems were used to assessthe effect of nanoparticle dispersion/solubility and water chemical composition on MN-toxicity. Aqueous suspensions of fullerenes (C60), nanosilver (nAg), and nanocopper (nCu) were prepared in both deionized water and filtered (0.45 microm) natural river water samples collected from the Suwannee River basin, to emphasize differences in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and solution ionic strengths (I). Two toxicity tests, the Ceriodaphnia dubia and MetPLATE bioassays were used. Results obtained from exposure studies show that water chemistry affects the suspension/solubility of MNs as well as the particle size distribution, resulting in a wide range of biological responses depending on the type of toxicity test used. Under experimental conditions used in this study, C60 exhibited no toxicity even when suspended concentrations exceeded 3 mg L(-1). MetPLATE results showed that the toxicity of aqueous suspensions of nCu tends to increase with increasing DOC concentrations, while increasing I reduces nCu toxicity. The use of the aquatic invertebrate C. dubia on the other hand showed a tendency for decreased mortality with increasing DOC and I. MetPLATE results for nAg showed decreasing trends in toxicity with increasing DOC concentrations and I. However, C. dubia exhibited contrasting biological responses, in that increasing DOC concentrations reduced toxicity, while the latter increased with increasing I. Overall, our results show that laboratory experiments that use DI-water and drastic MN-suspension methods may not be realistic as MN-dispersion and suspension in natural waters vary significantly with water chemistry and the reactivity of MNs.

  3. Determination of benzimidazole fungicides in water samples by on-line MISPE-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Zamora, O; Paniagua, E E; Cacho, C; Vera-Avila, L E; Perez-Conde, C

    2009-03-01

    An analytical methodology based on an on-line sample enrichment of water samples by means of an imprinted polymer, and the separation of benzimidazole compounds within a C(18) column by ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography, has been developed. The molecularly imprinted polymer has been synthesized by precipitation polymerization using thiabendazole as template molecule, methacrylic acid as functional monomer, and divinylbenzene as cross-linker. Initial experiments carried out by solid-phase extraction on cartridges demonstrated a clear imprint effect for thiabendazole, as well as the ability of the imprinted polymer to selectively rebind several benzimidazole compounds. The developed methodology has been applied to the quantification of thiabendazole, carbendazim, and benomyl in river, tap, and well water samples within a single analytical run at concentration levels below the legislated maximum concentration levels. In this sense, detection limits of 2.3-5.7 ng.L(-1) have been obtained for the analysis of benzimidazole fungicides in different water matrices. Recoveries obtained for the determination of benzimidazole fungicides in spiked samples ranged from 87% to 95%, with RSD below 5% in all cases.

  4. Application of environmental DNA analysis for the detection of Opisthorchis viverrini DNA in water samples.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hiroki; Sato, Megumi; Sato, Marcello Otake; Ikeda, Sumire; Yoonuan, Tippayarat; Sanguankiat, Surapol; Pongvongsa, Tiengkham; Moji, Kazuhiko; Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2017-05-01

    Opisthorchiasis, which can lead to cholangiocarcinoma in cases of chronic infection, is a major public health problem in Southeast Asian countries. The trematode, Opisthorchis viverrini, is the causative agent of the disease. Accurate and rapid monitoring of O. viverrini is crucial for disease prevention and containment. Therefore, in this study we sought to develop a novel species-specific real-time PCR assay for detecting O. viverrini using environmental DNA (eDNA). The diagnostic sensitivity of the newly developed real-time PCR assay was similar to that of the traditional PCR assay for 50 fecal samples collected in Lao PDR (21 and 19 samples were positive by real-time PCR and traditional PCR, respectively). The efficacy of eDNA analysis and its applicability in the field were tested using a total of 94 environmental water samples collected from 44 sites in Savannakhet, Lao PDR during May and October 2015 and February 2016. O. viverrini eDNA was detected in five samples by real-time PCR, indicating the presence of the fluke in the area and the risk of infection for individuals consuming fish from these water sources. The application of eDNA analysis would facilitate the identification of O. viverrini endemic hotspots and contribute to the ecological control of opisthorchiasis, and this strategy can be applied to other eukaryotic water pathogens.

  5. Suitability of polydimethylsiloxane rods for the headspace sorptive extraction of polybrominated diphenyl ethers from water samples.

    PubMed

    Montes, R; Rodríguez, I; Rubí, E; Cela, R

    2007-03-02

    The suitability of an inexpensive polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) sorbent, produced on an industrial scale, for the extraction of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), from tetra- to hexabrominated congeners, from water samples was assessed. Experiments were carried out using samples spiked with a pentabromo diphenyl ether (pentaBDE) mixture, PDMS rods with a diameter of 2 mm and gas chromatography with micro-electron-capture detection (GC-micro-ECD). Influence of several variables on the efficiency of the enrichment step and the further desorption of the analytes was investigated in detail. The best performance was achieved in the headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) mode, at 95 degrees C, using 80 mL water samples containing a 30% of sodium chloride. Extractions were performed overnight using disposable PDMS rods with a length of 10 mm (31 microL volume). Analytes were further recovered from the PDMS sorbent using just 1 mL of diethyl ether. This solvent was evaporated and extracts reconstituted with 25 microL of isooctane. Under final working conditions absolute extraction efficiencies from 69 to 93% and enrichment factors higher than 2200 folds were achieved for all species. The proposed method provided acceptable precisions (relative standard deviations values under 12%), correlation coefficients higher than 0.998 and the yield of the HSSE process remained constant for different water samples.

  6. Lead in drinking water: sampling in primary schools and preschools in south central Kansas.

    PubMed

    Massey, Anne R; Steele, Janet E

    2012-03-01

    Studies in Philadelphia, New York City, Houston, Washington, DC, and Greenville, North Carolina, have revealed high lead levels in drinking water. Unlike urban areas, lead levels in drinking water in suburban and rural areas have not been adequately studied. In the study described in this article, drinking water in primary schools and preschools in five suburban and rural south central Kansas towns was sampled to determine if any exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) guidance level for schools and child care facilities of 20 parts per billion (ppb). The results showed a total of 32.1% of the samples had detectable lead levels and 3.6% exceeded the U.S. EPA guidance level for schools and child care providers of 20 ppb. These results indicate that about one-third of the drinking water consumed by children age six and under in the five suburban and rural south central Kansas towns studied has some lead contamination, exposing these children to both short-term and long-term health risks. The authors suggest a need for increased surveillance of children's drinking water in these facilities.

  7. Optimizing stream water mercury sampling for calculation of fish bioaccumulation factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riva-Murray, Karen; Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste; Brigham, Mark E.; Scudder Eikenberry, Barbara C.; Knightes, Christopher; Button, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for game fishes are widely employed for monitoring, assessment, and regulatory purposes. Mercury BAFs are calculated as the fish Hg concentration (Hgfish) divided by the water Hg concentration (Hgwater) and, consequently, are sensitive to sampling and analysis artifacts for fish and water. We evaluated the influence of water sample timing, filtration, and mercury species on the modeled relation between game fish and water mercury concentrations across 11 streams and rivers in five states in order to identify optimum Hgwater sampling approaches. Each model included fish trophic position, to account for a wide range of species collected among sites, and flow-weighted Hgwater estimates. Models were evaluated for parsimony, using Akaike’s Information Criterion. Better models included filtered water methylmercury (FMeHg) or unfiltered water methylmercury (UMeHg), whereas filtered total mercury did not meet parsimony requirements. Models including mean annual FMeHg were superior to those with mean FMeHg calculated over shorter time periods throughout the year. FMeHg models including metrics of high concentrations (80th percentile and above) observed during the year performed better, in general. These higher concentrations occurred most often during the growing season at all sites. Streamflow was significantly related to the probability of achieving higher concentrations during the growing season at six sites, but the direction of influence varied among sites. These findings indicate that streamwater Hg collection can be optimized by evaluating site-specific FMeHg - UMeHg relations, intra-annual temporal variation in their concentrations, and streamflow-Hg dynamics.

  8. Measurements of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in water samples with nanofiltration pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Li, Da-Peng; Li, Wei; Xia, Sheng-Ji; Lin, Yi-Li; Hu, Chen-Yan; Zhang, Cao-Jie; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2010-10-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) measurements for water samples with a high dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, including nitrite, nitrate and ammonia) to total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) ratio using traditional methods are inaccurate due to the cumulative analytical errors of independently measured nitrogen species (TDN and DIN). In this study, we present a nanofiltration (NF) pretreatment to increase the accuracy and precision of DON measurements by selectively concentrating DON while passing through DIN species in water samples to reduce the DIN/TDN ratio. Three commercial NF membranes (NF90, NF270 and HL) were tested. The rejection efficiency of finished water from the Yangshupu drinking water treatment plant (YDWTP) is 12%, 31%, 8% of nitrate, 26%, 28%, 23% of ammonia, 77%, 78%, 82% of DOC (dissolved organic carbon), and 83%, 87% 88% of UV(254) for HL, NF90 and NF270, respectively. NF270 showed the best performance due to its high DIN permeability and DON retention (∼80%). NF270 can lower the DIN/TDN ratio from around 1 to less than 0.6 mg N/mg N, and satisfactory DOC recoveries as well as DON measurements in synthetic water samples were obtained using optimized operating parameters. Compared to the available dialysis pretreatment method, the NF pretreatment method shows a similar improved performance for DON measurement for aqueous samples and can save at least 20 h of operating time and a large volume of deionized water, which is beneficial for laboratories involved in DON analysis. DON concentration in the effluent of different treatment processes at the YDWTP and the SDWTP (Shijiuyang DWTP) in China were investigated with and without NF pretreatment; the results showed that DON with NF pretreatment and DOC both gradually decreased after each water treatment process at both treatment plants. The advanced water treatment line, including biological pretreatment, clarification, sand filtration, ozone-BAC processes at the SDWTP showed greater efficiency of DON

  9. Effects of Subsurface Sampling & Processing on Martian Simulant Containing Varying Quantities of Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menard, J.; Sangillo, J.; Savain, A.; McNamara, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of water-ice in the Martian subsurface is a subject of much debate and excited speculation. Recent results from the gammaray spectrometer (GRS) on board NASA's Mars Odyssey spacecraft indicate the presence of large amounts of hydrogen in regions of predicted ice stability. The combination of chemistry, low gravitational field (3.71 m/s(exp 2)) and a surface pressure of about 6.36 mbar at the mean radius, place limits on the stability of H2O on the surface, however, results from the GRS indicate that the hydrogen rich phase may be present at a depth as shallow as one meter in some locations on Mars. The potential for water on Mars leads directly to the speculation that life may once have existed there, since liquid water is the unifying factor for environments known to support life on Earth. Lubricant-free drilling has been considered as a means of obtaining water-rich subsurface samples on Mars, and two recent white papers sponsored by the Mars Program have attempted to identify the problems associated with this goal. The two major issues identified were: the engineering challenges of drilling into a water-soil mixture where phase changes may occur; and the potential to compromise the integrity of in-situ scientific analysis due to contamination, volatilization, and mineralogical or chemical changes as a result of processing. This study is a first attempt to simulate lubricantfree drilling into JSC Mars-1 simulant containing up to 50% water by weight. The goal is to address the following: 1) Does sample processing cause reactions or changes in mineralogy which will compromise the interpretation of scientific measurements conducted on the surface? 2) Does the presence of water-ice in the sample complicate (1)? 3) Do lubricant-free drilling and processing leave trace contaminants which may compromise our understanding of sample composition? 4) How does the torque/power required for drilling change as a function of water content and does this lead to

  10. Volatile organic compound matrix spike recoveries for ground- and surface-water samples, 1997-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, Barbara L.; Delzer, Gregory C.; Bender, David A.; Zogorski, John S.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program used field matrix spikes (FMSs), field matrix spike replicates (FMSRs), laboratory matrix spikes (LMSs), and laboratory reagent spikes (LRSs), in part, to assess the quality of volatile organic compound (VOC) data from water samples collected and analyzed in more than 50 of the Nation's largest river basins and aquifers (Study Units). The data-quality objectives of the NAWQA Program include estimating the extent to which variability, degradation, and matrix effects, if any, may affect the interpretation of chemical analyses of ground- and surface-water samples. In order to help meet these objectives, a known mass of VOCs was added (spiked) to water samples collected in 25 Study Units. Data within this report include recoveries from 276 ground- and surface-water samples spiked with a 25-microliter syringe with a spike solution containing 85 VOCs to achieve a concentration of 0.5 microgram per liter. Combined recoveries for 85 VOCs from spiked ground- and surface-water samples and reagent water were used to broadly characterize the overall recovery of VOCs. Median recoveries for 149 FMSs, 107 FMSRs, 20 LMSs, and 152 LRSs were 79.9, 83.3, 113.1, and 103.5 percent, respectively. Spike recoveries for 85 VOCs also were calculated individually. With the exception of a few VOCs, the median percent recoveries determined from each spike type for individual VOCs followed the same pattern as for all VOC recoveries combined, that is, listed from least to greatest recovery-FMSs, FMSRs, LRSs, and LMSs. The median recoveries for individual VOCs ranged from 63.7 percent to 101.5 percent in FMSs; 63.1 percent to 101.4 percent in FMSRs; 101.7 percent to 135.0 percent in LMSs; and 91.0 percent to 118.7 percent in LRSs. Additionally, individual VOC recoveries were compared among paired spike types, and these recoveries were used to evaluate potential bias in the method. Variability associated with field

  11. Measuring experimental cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients for the SAMPL5 challenge.

    PubMed

    Rustenburg, Ariën S; Dancer, Justin; Lin, Baiwei; Feng, Jianwen A; Ortwine, Daniel F; Mobley, David L; Chodera, John D

    2016-11-01

    Small molecule distribution coefficients between immiscible nonaqueuous and aqueous phases-such as cyclohexane and water-measure the degree to which small molecules prefer one phase over another at a given pH. As distribution coefficients capture both thermodynamic effects (the free energy of transfer between phases) and chemical effects (protonation state and tautomer effects in aqueous solution), they provide an exacting test of the thermodynamic and chemical accuracy of physical models without the long correlation times inherent to the prediction of more complex properties of relevance to drug discovery, such as protein-ligand binding affinities. For the SAMPL5 challenge, we carried out a blind prediction exercise in which participants were tasked with the prediction of distribution coefficients to assess its potential as a new route for the evaluation and systematic improvement of predictive physical models. These measurements are typically performed for octanol-water, but we opted to utilize cyclohexane for the nonpolar phase. Cyclohexane was suggested to avoid issues with the high water content and persistent heterogeneous structure of water-saturated octanol phases, since it has greatly reduced water content and a homogeneous liquid structure. Using a modified shake-flask LC-MS/MS protocol, we collected cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients for a set of 53 druglike compounds at pH 7.4. These measurements were used as the basis for the SAMPL5 Distribution Coefficient Challenge, where 18 research groups predicted these measurements before the experimental values reported here were released. In this work, we describe the experimental protocol we utilized for measurement of cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients, report the measured data, propose a new bootstrap-based data analysis procedure to incorporate multiple sources of experimental error, and provide insights to help guide future iterations of this valuable exercise in predictive modeling.

  12. Determination of rhodamine B in soft drink, waste water and lipstick samples after solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Unsal, Yunus Emre; Yilmaz, Erkan; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2011-08-01

    A new solid phase extraction method is described for sensitive and selective determination of trace levels of rhodamine B in soft drink, food and industrial waste water samples. The method is based on the adsorption of rhodamine B on the Sepabeads SP 70 resin and its elution with 5 mL of acetonitrile in a mini chromatographic column. Rhodamine B was determined by using UV visible spectrophotometry at 556 nm. The effects of different parameters such as pH, amount of rhodamine B, flow rates of sample and eluent solutions, resin amount, and sample volume were investigated. The influences of some alkali, alkali earth and transition metals on the recoveries of rhodamine B were investigated. The preconcentration factor was found 40. The detection limit based on three times the standard deviation of the reagent blank for rhodamine B was 3.14 μg L⁻¹. The relative standard deviations of the procedure were found as 5% in 1×10⁻⁵ mol L⁻¹ rhodamine B. The presented procedure was successfully applied to real samples including soft drink, food and industrial waste water and lipstick samples.

  13. TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, R.

    2012-07-31

    Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

  14. First Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence round-robin test of water samples: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgese, Laura; Bilo, Fabjola; Tsuji, Kouichi; Fernández-Ruiz, Ramón; Margui, Eva; Streli, Christina; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Stosnach, Hagen; Yamada, Takashi; Vandenabeele, Peter; Maina, David M.; Gatari, Michael; Shepherd, Keith D.; Towett, Erick K.; Bennun, Leonardo; Custo, Graciela; Vasquez, Cristina; Depero, Laura E.

    2014-11-01

    Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is a mature technique to evaluate quantitatively the elemental composition of liquid samples deposited on clean and well polished reflectors. In this paper the results of the first worldwide TXRF round-robin test of water samples, involving 18 laboratories in 10 countries are presented and discussed. The test was performed within the framework of the VAMAS project, interlaboratory comparison of TXRF spectroscopy for environmental analysis, whose aim is to develop guidelines and a standard methodology for biological and environmental analysis by means of the TXRF analytical technique.

  15. Measurement of drinking water contaminants by solid phase microextraction initially quantified in source water samples by the USGS.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Robert; Yang, Ill; Lippincott, Robert Lee; Murphy, Eileen; Buckley, Brian

    2008-04-15

    Two adsorbent solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers, 70 microm Carbowax divinylbenzene (CW/DVB) and 65 microm polydimethylsiloxane divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB), were selected for the analysis of several target analytes (phenols, phosphates, phthalates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and chlorinated pesticides) identified by the USGS in surface waters. Detection limits for standards ranged from 0.1 to 1 ng/mL for the CW/ DVB fiber and 0.1 to 2 ng/mL for the PDMS/DVB fiber for 20 of the analytes. The remaining analytes were not extracted because their polarity precluded their partition to the solid phase of the SPMEfiber. Groundwater and treated water samples collected from wells in northern New Jersey were then sampled for the USGS analytes by the SPME method as well as a modified version of EPA 525.5 using C-18 bonded solid phase extraction columns. Nine of the USGS analytes-bisphenol A, bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, butylated hydroxytoluene, butlyated hydroxyanisole, diethyltoulamide, diethyl phthalate, bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and triphenyl phosphate-were detected in groundwater samples using the CW/ DVB fiber.

  16. Statistical Methods and Sampling Design for Estimating Step Trends in Surface-Water Quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hirsch, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses two components of the problem of estimating the magnitude of step trends in surface water quality. The first is finding a robust estimator appropriate to the data characteristics expected in water-quality time series. The J. L. Hodges-E. L. Lehmann class of estimators is found to be robust in comparison to other nonparametric and moment-based estimators. A seasonal Hodges-Lehmann estimator is developed and shown to have desirable properties. Second, the effectiveness of various sampling strategies is examined using Monte Carlo simulation coupled with application of this estimator. The simulation is based on a large set of total phosphorus data from the Potomac River. To assure that the simulated records have realistic properties, the data are modeled in a multiplicative fashion incorporating flow, hysteresis, seasonal, and noise components. The results demonstrate the importance of balancing the length of the two sampling periods and balancing the number of data values between the two periods.

  17. A horizontal sampler for collection of water samples near the bottom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joeris, Leonard S.

    1964-01-01

    The need to obtain adequate water samples immediately above a lake bottom or at a precisely defined depth is not new. The problem is of particular concern in a large section of central Lake Erie, where dissolved oxygen concentration may be reduced to 1 ppm or less in the hypolimnion and where the metalimnion frequently extends to or within 30 or 60 cm of the bottom (Becton 1963; Cam 1962).It is impossible to sample the hypolimnrtic waters satisfactorily with the usual Nanscn, Kemmerer, and Frautschy bottles (Carr 1962). Although the 500-ml sampler described here was designed, constructed, and used extensively and successfully to meet the particular problem in Lake Erie, it should be equally useful in a varirty of situations.

  18. Growth in Acanthamoeba sp. and antibiotic susceptibility of Legionella micdadei isolated from hot spring water samples.

    PubMed

    Furuhata, Katsunori; Ogihara, Kikumi; Okuno, Rumi; Oonaka, Kenji; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2009-12-01

    As part of an epidemiological study on legionellosis, we attempted to isolate Legionella spp. from hot spring water samples, and were able to isolate Legionella micdadei from 3 (5.5%) of 55 samples. All of these isolates were able to grow within Acanthamoeba sp., suggesting that the isolates will be pathogens. We also confirmed that the K-2 strain from hot spring water grew in guinea pig monocytes. Sensitivity tests using 10 drugs showed that the isolates were most sensitive to imipenem, with the MIC90 of 0.032 microg/ml, were least sensitive to minocycline, with the MIC90 of 4 microg/ml, and were not sensitive to low amounts of other drugs.

  19. Problems associated with using filtration to define dissolved trace element concentrations in natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Lum, K.R.; Garbarino, J.R.; Hall, G.E.M.; Lemieux, C.; Demas, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Field and laboratory experiments indicate that a number of factors associated with filtration other than just pore size (e.g., diameter, manufacturer, volume of sample processed, amount of suspended sediment in the sample) can produce significant variations in the 'dissolved' concentrations of such elements as Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, and Ni. The bulk of these variations result from the inclusion/exclusion of colloidally associated trace elements in the filtrate, although dilution and sorption/desorption from filters also may be factors. Thus, dissolved trace element concentrations quantitated by analyzing filtrates generated by processing whole water through similar pore-sized filters may not be equal or comparable. As such, simple filtration of unspecified volumes of natural water through unspecified 0.45-??m membrane filters may no longer represent an acceptable operational definition for a number of dissolved chemical constituents.

  20. Stable isotope analysis of saline water samples on a cavity ring-down spectroscopy instrument.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Grzegorz; Ford, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope composition of water using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instruments utilizing infrared absorption spectroscopy have been comprehensively tested. However, potential limitations of infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of highly saline water have not yet been evaluated. In this study, we assessed uncertainty arising from elevated salt concentrations in water analyzed on a CRDS instrument and the necessity of a correction procedure. We prepared various solutions of mixed salts and separate solutions with individual salts (NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2) using deionized water with a known stable isotope composition. Most of the individual salt and salt mixture solutions (some up to 340 g L(-1)) had δ-values within the range usual for CRDS analytical uncertainty (0.1‰ for δ (18)O and 1.0‰ for δ (2)H). Results were not compromised even when the total load of salt in the vaporizer reached ∼38.5 mg (equivalent to build up after running ∼100 ocean water samples). Therefore, highly saline mixtures can be successfully analyzed using CRDS, except highly concentrated MgCl2 solutions, without the need for an additional correction if the vaporizer is frequently cleaned and MgCl2 concentration in water is relatively low.

  1. Determination of metronidazole residues in water, sediment and fish tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Wagil, Marta; Maszkowska, Joanna; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Caban, Magda; Stepnowski, Piotr; Kumirska, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole (MNZ) is an antibacterial and antiprotozoal drug used in veterinary and human medicine. Its continual entry into the environment and its biological properties may have significant, long-term effects on the stability of ecosystems because MNZ and its metabolites possess mutagenic, carcinogenic and toxic properties. For this reason, the application of MNZ in food-producing species is prohibited in the EU, the USA and other countries. To ensure human food safety and to protect the environment, robust and reliable screening and confirmatory tests capable of the low-level detection of MNZ residues are required. The development of methods for MNZ determination in biological and environmental samples is thus an important analytical task in environmental and food science. This work focuses on the evaluation of a method for determining MNZ in water, sediment and fish tissue samples using liquid chromatography--ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). MNZ was extracted from waters on Strata XC cartridges using solid phase extraction (SPE), and from sediments and fish tissues by solid-liquid extraction (sediment: 15 mL 0.1 M HCl (pH=0.6), 15 min; fish tissue: 15 mL 1% CH3COOH in ACN, 1 min; drying: 5 g MgSO4(anhyd.; 30 s) with SPE purification of the extracts (from sediment: Strata XC cartridge; from fish tissue: Supelco NH2 cartridge). The optimal procedure that we developed was validated in order to confirm its reliability and sensitivity. Matrix effects (ME) were established. Absolute recoveries ranged from 89.3% to 97.2%, and the method detection limits were 3.4 ng L(-1) (water samples), 0.4 ng g(-1) (sediment samples) and 0.3 ng g(-1) (tissue samples). These methods were used to determine MNZ in surface waters, sediments and fish tissues from the Polish River Gościcina; MNZ was found in all these matrices. The highest concentrations in water, sediment and tissue were 136.2 ng L(-1), 12.0 ng g(-1) and 1.5 ng g(-1) respectively. The results confirmed that

  2. Validation of a non-invasive blood-sampling technique for doubly-labelled water experiments.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christian C; Helversen, Otto Von; Michener, Robert H; Kunz, Thomas H

    2003-04-01

    Two techniques for bleeding small mammals have been used in doubly-labeled water (DLW) studies, including vena puncture and the use of starved nymphal stages of hematophagous reduviid bugs (Reduviidae, Hemiptera). In this study, we tested the validity of using reduviid bugs in doubly-labeled water experiments. We found that the isotope enrichment in initial blood samples collected with bugs was significantly lower compared to isotope enrichment in blood samples obtained using vena puncture. We therefore used the desiccation method for estimating total body water (TBW) in DLW experiments because TBW calculated using the isotope dilution method was overestimated when blood samples were collected using reduviid bugs. In our validation experiment with nectar-feeding bats (Glossophaga soricina), we compared estimates of daily energy expenditure (DEE) using DLW with those derived from the energy balance method. We considered Speakman's equation (controlling for 25% fractionated water loss) as the most appropriate for our study animal and calculated DEE accordingly. On average, DEE estimated with DLW was not significantly different from the mean value obtained with the energy balance method (mean deviation 1.2%). We conclude that although bug hemolymph or intestinal liquids most likely contaminate the samples, estimates of DEE are still valid because the DLW method does not depend on absolute isotope enrichments but on the rate of isotope decrease over time. However, dilution of blood with intestinal liquids or hemolymph from a bug may lead to larger variation in DEE estimates. We also tested how the relative error of DLW estimates changed with varying assumptions about fractionation. We used three additional equations for calculating DEE in DLW experiments. The basic equation for DLW experiments published by Lifson and McClintock (LM-6) assumes no fractionation, resulted in an overestimate of DEE by 10%. Nagy's equation (N-2) controls for changes in body mass but not for

  3. Analyses of water, bank material, bottom material, and elutriate samples collected near Belzoni, Mississippi (upper Yazoo projects)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brightbill, David B.; Treadway, Joseph B.

    1980-01-01

    Four core-material-sampling sites and one bottom-material site were chosen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to represent areas of proposed dredging activity along a 24.9-mile reach of the upper Yazoo River. Five receiving-water sites also were selected to represent the water that will contact the proposed dredged material. Chemical and physical analyses were performed upon core or bottom material and native-water (receiving-water) samples from these sites as well as upon elutriate samples of the mixture of sediment and receiving water. The results of these analyses are presented without interpertation. (USGS)

  4. Molecular method for detection of total coliforms in drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Andrée F; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bisson, Marc-Antoine; Dion-Dupont, Vanessa; Bouchard, Sébastien; Nkuranga, Martine; Bergeron, Michel G; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2014-07-01

    This work demonstrates the ability of a bacterial concentration and recovery procedure combined with three different PCR assays targeting the lacZ, wecG, and 16S rRNA genes, respectively, to detect the presence of total coliforms in 100-ml samples of potable water (presence/absence test). PCR assays were first compared to the culture-based Colilert and MI agar methods to determine their ability to detect 147 coliform strains representing 76 species of Enterobacteriaceae encountered in fecal and environmental settings. Results showed that 86 (58.5%) and 109 (74.1%) strains yielded a positive signal with Colilert and MI agar methods, respectively, whereas the lacZ, wecG, and 16S rRNA PCR assays detected 133 (90.5%), 111 (75.5%), and 146 (99.3%) of the 147 total coliform strains tested. These assays were then assessed by testing 122 well water samples collected in the Québec City region of Canada. Results showed that 97 (79.5%) of the samples tested by culture-based methods and 95 (77.9%), 82 (67.2%), and 98 (80.3%) of samples tested using PCR-based methods contained total coliforms, respectively. Consequently, despite the high genetic variability of the total coliform group, this study demonstrated that it is possible to use molecular assays to detect total coliforms in potable water: the 16S rRNA molecular assay was shown to be as efficient as recommended culture-based methods. This assay might be used in combination with an Escherichia coli molecular assay to assess drinking water quality.

  5. Detection and spatial mapping of mercury contamination in water samples using a smart-phone.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingshan; Nagi, Richie; Sadeghi, Kayvon; Feng, Steve; Yan, Eddie; Ki, So Jung; Caire, Romain; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2014-02-25

    Detection of environmental contamination such as trace-level toxic heavy metal ions mostly relies on bulky and costly analytical instruments. However, a considerable global need exists for portable, rapid, specific, sensitive, and cost-effective detection techniques that can be used in resource-limited and field settings. Here we introduce a smart-phone-based hand-held platform that allows the quantification of mercury(II) ions in water samples with parts per billion (ppb) level of sensitivity. For this task, we created an integrated opto-mechanical attachment to the built-in camera module of a smart-phone to digitally quantify mercury concentration using a plasmonic gold nanoparticle (Au NP) and aptamer based colorimetric transmission assay that is implemented in disposable test tubes. With this smart-phone attachment that weighs <40 g, we quantified mercury(II) ion concentration in water samples by using a two-color ratiometric method employing light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at 523 and 625 nm, where a custom-developed smart application was utilized to process each acquired transmission image on the same phone to achieve a limit of detection of ∼ 3.5 ppb. Using this smart-phone-based detection platform, we generated a mercury contamination map by measuring water samples at over 50 locations in California (USA), taken from city tap water sources, rivers, lakes, and beaches. With its cost-effective design, field-portability, and wireless data connectivity, this sensitive and specific heavy metal detection platform running on cellphones could be rather useful for distributed sensing, tracking, and sharing of water contamination information as a function of both space and time.

  6. Iodide-assisted total lead measurement and determination of different lead fractions in drinking water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Ng, Ding-Quan; Lin, Yi-Pin

    2012-07-01

    Lead and its compounds are toxic and can harm human health, especially the intelligence development in children. Accurate measurement of total lead present in drinking water is crucial in determining the extent of lead contamination and human exposure due to drinking water consumption. The USEPA method for total lead measurement (no. 200.8) is often used to analyze lead levels in drinking water. However, in the presence of high concentration of the tetravalent lead corrosion product PbO(2), the USEPA method was not able to fully recover particulate lead due to incomplete dissolution of PbO(2) particles during strong acid digestion. In this study, a new procedure that integrates membrane separation, iodometric PbO(2) measurement, strong acid digestion and ICP-MS measurement was proposed and evaluated for accurate total lead measurement and quantification of different lead fractions including soluble Pb(2+), particulate Pb(II) carbonate and PbO(2) in drinking water samples. The proposed procedure was evaluated using drinking water reconstituted with spiked Pb(2+), spiked particulate Pb(II) carbonate and in situ formed or spiked PbO(2). Recovery tests showed that the proposed procedure and the USEPA method can achieve 93-112% and 86-103% recoveries respectively for samples containing low PbO(2) concentrations (0.018-0.076 mg Pb per L). For samples containing higher concentrations of PbO(2) (0.089-1.316 mg Pb per L), the USEPA method failed to meet the recovery requirement for total lead (85-115%) while the proposed method can achieve satisfactory recoveries (91-111%) and differentiate the soluble Pb(2+), particulate Pb(II) carbonate and PbO(2).

  7. Analysis of carbonic acid in water samples by ion-exclusion chromatography with pure water as eluent.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hui; Ding, Mingyu; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Hu, Wenzhi

    2005-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid ion-exclusion chromatographic method for the simultaneous separation of carbonic acid and short chain organic acids (formic acid, acetic acid, and propionic acid) has been developed. A weakly acidic cation exchange resin column TSKgel OApak-A was used for the separation; pure water, owing to its lower background conductance, was employed as eluent in order to obtain high detection sensitivity. A good separation of these weak acids was achieved in 16 min. The linear range of the peak area calibration curve for carbonic acid was from 3.0 mg/L to 500 mg/L. The conductivity detection limit calculated at S/N = 3 was 0.084 mg/L for carbonic acid. The method developed in this work was successfully applied to the determination of carbonic acid in several environmental water samples without any pretreatment.

  8. Versatile magnetic carbon nanotubes for sampling and pre concentration of pesticides in environmental water.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Frederico Hayala Fernandes; Menezes, Helvécio Costa; de Carvalho Teixeira, Ana Paula; Serp, Philippe; Antipoff, Vitor; de Lourdes Cardeal, Zenilda

    2017-05-15

    This article describes a simple, efficient, and versatile magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNT) method for sampling and pre-concentration of pesticides in environmental water samples. The multi-walled magnetic carbon nanotubes were obtained by chemical deposition vapor (CVD) process. The MCNTs structures are formed of hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions that provide great dispersion at any water matrix allowing simultaneously a high efficiency of pesticides sorption. Following the extraction, analytes were desorbed with minor amounts of solvent and analyzed by gas chromatography coupled mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The parameters amount of MCNTs used to extraction, desorption time, and desorption temperature were optimized. The method showed good linearity with determination coefficients between 0.9040 and 0.9733. The limits of detection and quantification were ranged between 0.51 and 2.29µgL(-1) and between 1.19 and 5.35µgL(-1) respectively. The recovery ranged from 79.9% to 111.6%. The method was applied to the determination of fifteen multiclass pesticides in real samples of environmental water collected in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

  9. Analytical methods for the endocrine disruptor compounds determination in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Marcello; Sciascia, Francesco; Cifelli, Roberta; Malatesta, Luciano; Bruni, Pantaleone; Croce, Fausto

    2016-02-19

    The potential risk of exposure to different xenobiotics, which can modulate the endocrine system and represent a treat for the wellness of an increasing number of people, has recently drawn the attention of international environmental and health agencies. Several agents, characterized by structural diversity, may interfer with the normal endocrine functions that regulate cell growth, homeostasis and development. Substances such as pesticides, herbicides, plasticizers, metals, etc. having endocrine activity (EDCs) are used in agriculture and industry and are also used as drugs for humans and animals. A difficulty in the analytical determination of these substances is the complexity of the matrix in which they are present. In fact, the samples most frequently analyzed consist of groundwater and surface water, including influent and effluent of wastewater treatment plants and drinking water. In this review, several sample pretreatment protocols, assays and different instrumental techniques recently used in the EDCs determination have been considered. This review concludes with a paragraph in which the most recent hyphenated-instrument techniques are treated, highlighting their sensitivity and selectivity for the analyses of environmental water samples.

  10. Evaluation of surface sampling techniques for collection of Bacillus spores on common drinking water pipe materials.

    PubMed

    Packard, Benjamin H; Kupferle, Margaret J

    2010-01-01

    Drinking water utilities may face biological contamination of the distribution system from a natural incident or deliberate contamination. Determining the extent of contamination or the efficacy of decontamination is a challenge, because it may require sampling of the wetted surfaces of distribution infrastructure. This study evaluated two sampling techniques that utilities might use to sample exhumed pipe sections. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC), cement-lined ductile iron, and ductile iron pipe coupons (3 cm x 14 cm) cut from new water main piping were conditioned for three months in dechlorinated Cincinnati, Ohio tap water. Coupons were spiked with Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii, a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis. Brushing and scraping were used to recover the inoculated spores from the coupons. Mean recoveries for all materials ranged from 37 +/- 30% to 43 +/- 20% for brushing vs. 24 +/- 10% to 51 +/- 29% for scraping. On cement-lined pipe, brushing yielded a significantly different recovery than scraping. No differences were seen between brushing and scraping the PVC and iron pipe coupons. Mean brushing and scraping recoveries from PVC coupons were more variable than mean recoveries from cement-lined and iron coupons. Spore retention differed between pipe materials and the presence of established biofilms also had an impact. Conditioned PVC coupons (with established biofilms) had significantly lower spore retention (31 +/- 11%) than conditioned cement-lined coupons (61 +/- 14%) and conditioned iron coupons (71 +/- 8%).

  11. A method for simultaneous determination of 210Pb and 212Pb in drinking water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guogang; Torri, G.; Leandro, M.

    2012-04-01

    A sensitive and accurate method for determination of 210Pb and 212Pb in drinking water samples was developed. In the method Pb was pre-concentrated as hydroxides, separated from alkaline earth elements as PbS precipitate, purified by an anion exchange resin chro-matography column, precipitated as PbSC4 for source preparation and counted by a low background β-counter. The procedure was checked with a reference material supplied by the IAEA, and the obtained data were in good agreement with the recommended values, showing the recommended procedure can provide reliable results. The minimum detectable activity of the method was 0.039 mBq L-1 for 210Pb and 0.033 mBq L-1 for 212Pb if a 48 liter of water sample was analyzed. Seventeen drinking water samples were analyzed with a Pb recovery of 88.8 ± 5.5%, and the typical activity concentration was in the range of 0.191-15.1 mBq L-1 for 210Pb and of 1.12-5.77 mBq L-1 for 212Pb.

  12. Graphene-coated fiber for solid-phase microextraction of triazine herbicides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuhua; Feng, Cheng; Zhao, Guangying; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2012-01-01

    Graphene is a novel and interesting carbon material that could be used for the separation and purification of some chemical compounds. In this investigation, graphene was used as a novel fiber-coating material for the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) of four triazine herbicides (atrazine, prometon, ametryn and prometryn) in water samples. The main parameters that affect the extraction and desorption efficiencies, such as the extraction time, stirring rate, salt addition, desorption solvent and desorption time, were investigated and optimized. The optimized SPME by graphene-coated fiber coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) was successfully applied for the determination of the four triazine herbicides in water samples. The linearity of the method was in the range from 0.5 to 200 ng/mL, with the correlation coefficients (r) ranging from 0.9989 to 0.9998. The limits of detection of the method were 0.05-0.2 ng/mL. The relative standard deviations varied from 3.5 to 4.9% (n=5). The recoveries of the triazine herbicides from water samples at spiking levels of 20.0 and 50.0  ng/mL were in the range between 86.0 and 94.6%. Compared with two commercial fibers (CW/TPR, 50 μm; PDMS/DVB, 60 μm), the graphene-coated fiber showed higher extraction efficiency.

  13. Rapid Column Extraction Method for Actinides and Sr-89/90 in Water Samples

    SciTech Connect

    MAXWELL III, SHERROD L.

    2005-06-15

    The SRS Environmental Laboratory analyzes water samples for environmental monitoring, including river water and ground water samples. A new, faster actinide and strontium 89/90 separation method has been developed and implemented to improve productivity, reduce labor costs and add capacity to this laboratory. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and Sr-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), uranium (U), americium (Am), curium (Cm) and thorium (Th) using a single multi-stage column combined with alpha spectrometry. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized. The method can be used for routine analysis or as a rapid method for emergency preparedness. Thorium and curium are often analyzed separately due to the interference of the daughter of Th-229 tracer, actinium (Ac)-225, on curium isotopes when measured by alpha spectrometry. This new method also adds a separation step using DGA Resin{reg_sign}, (Diglycolamide Resin, Eichrom Technologies) to remove Ac-225 and allow the separation and analysis of thorium isotopes and curium isotopes at the same time.

  14. Determination of imidacloprid in water samples via photochemically induced fluorescence and second-order multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Edwar; Cid, Camila; Báez, María E

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for the determination of imidacloprid in water samples; one of the most widely used neonicotinoid pesticides in the farming industry. The method is based on the measurement of excitation-emission spectra of photo-induced fluorescence (PIF-EEMs) associated with second-order multivariate calibration with a parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and unfolded partial least squares coupled to residual bilinearization (U-PLS/RBL). The second order advantage permitted the determination of imidacloprid in the presence of potential interferences, which also shows photo-induced fluorescence (other pesticides and/or unexpected compounds of the real samples). The photoreaction was performed in 100-μl disposable micropipettes. As a preliminary step, solid phase extraction on C18 (SPE-C18) was applied to concentrate the analyte and diminish the limit of detection. The LOD was approximately 1 ng mL(-1), which is suitable for detecting imidacloprid in water according to the guidelines established in North America and Europe. The PIF-EEMs coupled to PARAFAC or U-PLS/RBL was successfully applied for the determination of imidacloprid in different real water samples, with an average recovery of 101±10%.

  15. Design and testing of a new aircraft-based cloud water sampling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, Derek John

    2002-01-01

    Experimental studies of cloud processing mechanisms necessitate the collection of representative samples of cloud water for chemical analysis. In order to provide samples from clouds that are inaccessible from ground-based sampling stations, a new aircraft-based cloud water collection system has been developed. The objective of the design process was to produce an automated collector that can acquire well-characterized cloud water samples and is portable between multiple research aircraft. Issues such as cloud drop shatter and re-entrainment, system size and weight, and material compatibility with the anticipated chemical analyses were considered during the design process. The new cloud water collection system utilizes an axial-flow cyclone to centrifugally separate cloud drops from the air stream. An analysis of the axial-flow cyclone was performed with a finite volume based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The predicted continuous phase (air) velocity field indicates that the cyclone generates a strong rotational flow field with a tangential velocity of 85 m s-1. Trajectory simulations predict that entrained cloud drops move rapidly to the wall of the axial-flow cyclone where they can be removed for storage. Collection efficiency as a function of drop size was ascertained and the 50% cut diameter was determined to be approximately 8 microns. An experimental laboratory calibration involving monodisperse fluorescein-tagged drops was performed to verify the numerical modeling results. The system was deployed during the Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus, Phase II (DYCOMS-II) field project in July 2001. The DYCOMS-II campaign served as an evaluation program for the system as well as an opportunity to study the chemical composition of stratocumulus clouds in the remote marine environment. Over the course of the project, 50 samples were obtained during nine flights. Sample pH was measured on-site after each flight. Peroxide, formaldehyde, S

  16. Multiclass determination of sunscreen chemicals in water samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; López-Mahía, Purificación; Muniategui-Lorenzo, Soledad; Prada-Rodríguez, Darío

    2008-02-15

    A novel analytical method based on solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) for the determination of UV sunscreen agents in the water environment is presented. After a thorough investigation of SPE and LC-MS/MS conditions, it permits the enrichment and determination of nine of these compounds in a single methodology, including three very polar sulfonates (e.g., 2-phenylbenzimidazole-5-sulfonic acid, PBSA) and six other less polar compounds (e.g., benzophenone-3, BP-3; octocrylene, OC,...). Other important matters of concern in the determination of UV filters at trace levels in water, i.e., adsorption on glassware and blank contamination problems, have also been discussed and minimized. This methodology affords detection limits between 7 and 46 ng L-1 and SPE recoveries in the range 63-102% from different real water matrixes, except for butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane (BM-DBM), which was not determinable in wastewater samples due to adsorption problems. The application of the method allowed reporting the levels of benzophenone-4 (BP-4) in environmental water samples for the first time, where it was identified as one of the most important in concentration among the UV filters studied, particularly in wastewater (237-1481 ng L-1).

  17. Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1998-06-01

    The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal field, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of steam pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption and desorption runs were made in order to investigate the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were made on the same rock samples. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there was no direct correlation between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The hysteresis decreased significantly at 250 C. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption, rather than capillary condensation, is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

  18. Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1998-06-01

    The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal reservoir, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there is in general no proportionality between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption rather than capillary condensation is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

  19. Improving the solid-phase extraction of "quat" pesticides from water samples. Removal of interferences.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, M; Picó, Y; Mañes, J

    1998-10-09

    A novel strategy, based on the addition of a cationic surfactant, for preventing the interferences associated with a diminution in the efficacy of solid-phase extraction (SPE) with silica cartridges of diquat, paraquat and difenzoquat in water is developed. Conditions for extraction are optimised with respect to pH, cationic surfactant and its concentration. Humic acids, anionic surfactants, inorganic salts and other organic contaminants like pesticides, phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls produce the studied interferences. The best performance is shown in the improvement of the "quats" recovery from waters with high levels of humic acids and anionic surfactants (recovery is increased from ca. 30% to more than 80%). Unfortunately, the strong interference from inorganic salts remains. The presence in the water sample of other organic contaminants only affected the extraction efficiency of difenzoquat at high concentrations (more than 1 mg/l). Analytic utility is illustrated by selective measurements of the three herbicides, in real water samples. Overall, the results show that in spite of its drawbacks, SPE is a useful technique that allows the detection and quantification of the "quats" at limits below 100 ng/l as established by the European Union.

  20. Flotation-spectrophotometric determination of mercury in water samples using iodide and ferroin.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Saeid; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a simple and highly selective method for separation, preconcentration and spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of mercury. The method is based on the flotation of an ion-associate of HgI4(2-) and ferroin between aqueous and n-heptane interface at pH 5. The ion-associate was then separated and dissolved in acetonitrile to measure its absorbance. Quantitative flotation of the ion-associate was achieved when the volume of the water sample containing Hg(II) was varied over 50 - 800 ml. Beer's law was obeyed over the concentration range of 3.2 x 10(-8) - 9.5 x 10(-7) mol l(-1) with an apparent molar absorptivity of 1 x 10(6) l mol(-1) cm(-1) for a 500 ml aliquot of the water sample. The detection limit (n = 25) was 6.2 x 10(-9) mol l(-1), and the RSD (n = 5) for 3.19 x 10(-7) mol l(-1) of Hg(II) was 1.9%. A notable advantage of the method is that the determination of Hg(II) is free from the interference of the almost all cations and anions found in the environmental and waste water samples. The determination of Hg(II) in tap, synthetic waste, and seawater samples was carried out by the present method and a well-established method of extraction with dithizone. The results were satisfactorily comparable so that the applicability of the proposed method was confirmed in encountering with real samples.

  1. Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Specific Differences in Estrogen Signaling in Response to Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves. Citation: Gorelick DA, Iwanowicz LR, Hung AL, Blazer VS, Halpern ME. 2014. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to

  2. Application of polydimethylsiloxane rod extraction to the determination of sixteen halogenated flame retardants in water samples.

    PubMed

    Valls-Cantenys, Carme; Villaverde-de-Sáa, Eugenia; Rodil, Rosario; Quintana, José Benito; Iglesias, Mònica; Salvadó, Victòria; Cela, Rafael

    2013-04-03

    An extraction and preconcentration procedure for the determination in water samples of several halogenated flame retardants (FRs), nine brominated diphenyls ethers (BDEs) and seven non-BDE FRs, was developed and validated. The optimised procedure is based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rods as sorptive extraction material, followed by liquid desorption and gas chromatography coupled to negative chemical ionisation-mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS) determination, rendering an efficient and inexpensive method. The final optimised protocol consists of overnight extraction of 100mL of sample solutions containing 40% MeOH and 4% NaCl, followed by a 15-min sonication-assisted desorption with 300 μL of ethyl acetate, solvent evaporation and GC-NCI-MS analysis. Under these conditions, extraction efficiencies in the 9 to 70% range were obtained, leading to enrichment factors between 108 and 840, detection limits in the range from 0.4 to 10 ng L(-1)and RSD values in the 2-23% range. After method validation, different real water samples, including river, ria, sea, landfill leachate, influent and effluent wastewater from an urban sewage treatment plant (STP) and effluent wastewater from a textile industry, were analysed. BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100 and BDE-197 were detected in wastewater and landfill leachate samples at concentration levels up to 2887 ng L(-1). Among the non-BDE FRs, bis (2-ethylhexyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrabromo-phthalate (DEHTBP) was detected in surface water samples (sea, river and ria) between 1.3 and 2.2 ng L(-1) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) in the landfill leachate (64 ng L(-1)).

  3. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Old and New Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Surface remedial action at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site began in the spring of 1992. Results of water sampling at the Old and New Rifle processing sites for recent years indicate that ground water contamination occurs in the shallow unconfined alluvial aquifer (the uppermost aquifer) and less extensively in the underlying Wasatch Formation. Uranium and sulfate continue to exceed background ground water concentrations and/or maximum concentration limits at and downgradient from the former processing sites. These constituents provide the best indication of changes in contaminant distribution. Contamination in the uppermost (alluvial) aquifer at New Rifle extends a minimum of approximately 5000 feet (ft) (1,524 meters [m]) downgradient. At Old Rifle, the extent of contamination in the alluvial aquifer is much less (a minimum of approximately 1,000 ft [305 m]), partially due to differences in hydrologic regime. For example, the Old Rifle site lies in a relatively narrow alluvial floodplain; the New Rifle site lies in a broad floodplain. Data gathering for the Rifle baseline risk assessment is under way. The purpose of this effort is to determine with greater precision the background ground water quality and extent of ground water contamination at the processing sites. Historical surface water quality indicates that the Colorado River has not been affected by uranium processing activities. No compliance monitoring of the Estes Gulch disposal cell has been proposed, because ground water in the underlying Wasatch Formation is limited use (Class 111) ground water and because the disposal cell is hydrogeologically isolated from the uppermost aquifer.

  4. Measuring experimental cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients for the SAMPL5 challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustenburg, Ariën S.; Dancer, Justin; Lin, Baiwei; Feng, Jianwen A.; Ortwine, Daniel F.; Mobley, David L.; Chodera, John D.

    2016-11-01

    Small molecule distribution coefficients between immiscible nonaqueuous and aqueous phases—such as cyclohexane and water—measure the degree to which small molecules prefer one phase over another at a given pH. As distribution coefficients capture both thermodynamic effects (the free energy of transfer between phases) and chemical effects (protonation state and tautomer effects in aqueous solution), they provide an exacting test of the thermodynamic and chemical accuracy of physical models without the long correlation times inherent to the prediction of more complex properties of relevance to drug discovery, such as protein-ligand binding affinities. For the SAMPL5 challenge, we carried out a blind prediction exercise in which participants were tasked with the prediction of distribution coefficients to assess its potential as a new route for the evaluation and systematic improvement of predictive physical models. These measurements are typically performed for octanol-water, but we opted to utilize cyclohexane for the nonpolar phase. Cyclohexane was suggested to avoid issues with the high water content and persistent heterogeneous structure of water-saturated octanol phases, since it has greatly reduced water content and a homogeneous liquid structure. Using a modified shake-flask LC-MS/MS protocol, we collected cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients for a set of 53 druglike compounds at pH 7.4. These measurements were used as the basis for the SAMPL5 Distribution Coefficient Challenge, where 18 research groups predicted these measurements before the experimental values reported here were released. In this work, we describe the experimental protocol we utilized for measurement of cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients, report the measured data, propose a new bootstrap-based data analysis procedure to incorporate multiple sources of experimental error, and provide insights to help guide future iterations of this valuable exercise in predictive modeling.

  5. Water stable isotope measurements of Antarctic samples by means of IRMS and WS-CRDS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, Marzia; Bonazza, Mattia; Braida, Martina; Flora, Onelio; Dreossi, Giuliano; Stenni, Barbara

    2010-05-01

    In the last years in the scientific community there has been an increasing interest for the application of stable isotope techniques to several environmental problems such as drinking water safeguarding, groundwater management, climate change, soils and paleoclimate studies etc. For example, the water stable isotopes, being natural tracers of the hydrological cycle, have been extensively used as tools to characterize regional aquifers and to reconstruct past temperature changes from polar ice cores. Here the need for improvements in analytical techniques: the high request for information calls for technologies that can offer a great quantity of analyses in short times and with low costs. Furthermore, sometimes it is difficult to obtain big amount of samples (as is the case for Antarctic ice cores or interstitial water) preventing the possibility to replicate the analyses. Here, we present oxygen and hydrogen measurements performed on water samples covering a big range of isotopic values (from very negative antarctic precipitation to mid-latitude precipitation values) carried out with both the conventional Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technique and with a new method based on laser absorption techniques, the Wavelenght Scanned Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (WS-CRDS). This study is focusing on improving the precision of the measurements carried out with WS-CRDS in order to extensively apply this method to Antarctic ice core paleoclimate studies. The WS-CRDS is a variation of the CRDS developed in 1988 by O'Keef and Deacon. In CRDS a pulse of light goes through a box with high reflective inner surfaces; when there is no sample in the box the light beam doesn't find any obstacle in its path, but the reflectivity of the walls is not perfect so eventually there will be an absorption of the light beam; when the sample is injected in the box there is absorption and the difference between the time of absorption without and with sample is proportional to the quantity

  6. Demonstration/Validation of the Snap Sampler Passive Ground Water Sampling Device for Sampling Inorganic Analytes at the Former Pease Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    tightly within the well. The slits in the two discs were misaligned to limit water exchange. The discs are attached to the Snap Sampler trigger line...was developed to reduce the influence of the various samplers on each other, and to minimize the impact of sampling on sample quality (integrity...han- dling the Snap Sampler samples. However, because of concerns by one of our reviewers about the possible impact the bladder pump might have on

  7. Genotoxicity Assessment of Water Samples from the Sungai Dua River in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia, Using the Allium cepa Test.

    PubMed

    Akinboro, Akeem; Mohammed, Kamaruzaman; Rathnasamy, Selestin; Muniandy, Vijay Raj

    2011-12-01

    Unwanted side effects from a polluted water body may not be limited to the flora and fauna, they may also be transferred to the organisms along the food chain. Four water samples collected immediately and five days after rainfall from two locations inside the polluted Sungai Dua River (SGD) were tested for toxicity using the Allium cepa assay. The samples were analysed for metal content and were both macroscopically and microscopically evaluated. The water samples contained more sodium (Na(+)) and calcium (Ca(2+)) than the control tap water, and they showed root growth and mitotic inhibitions (MI) in A. cepa. However, the inhibitory effects were not dose-dependent. No chromosomal aberration (CA) was induced at 100.00% (undiluted water sample). These results suggest the water samples from SGD had weak mitodepressive and genotoxic effects on the A. cepa cells.

  8. Genotoxicity Assessment of Water Samples from the Sungai Dua River in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia, Using the Allium cepa Test

    PubMed Central

    Akinboro, Akeem; Mohammed, Kamaruzaman; Rathnasamy, Selestin; Muniandy, Vijay Raj

    2011-01-01

    Unwanted side effects from a polluted water body may not be limited to the flora and fauna, they may also be transferred to the organisms along the food chain. Four water samples collected immediately and five days after rainfall from two locations inside the polluted Sungai Dua River (SGD) were tested for toxicity using the Allium cepa assay. The samples were analysed for metal content and were both macroscopically and microscopically evaluated. The water samples contained more sodium (Na+) and calcium (Ca2+) than the control tap water, and they showed root growth and mitotic inhibitions (MI) in A. cepa. However, the inhibitory effects were not dose-dependent. No chromosomal aberration (CA) was induced at 100.00% (undiluted water sample). These results suggest the water samples from SGD had weak mitodepressive and genotoxic effects on the A. cepa cells. PMID:24575215

  9. [Fluorescent and Magnetic Relaxation Switch Immunosensor for the Detecting Foodborne Pathogen Salmonella enterica in Water Samples].

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-bai; Zhang, Yan; An, Wen-ting; Wei, Yan-li; Wang, Yu; Shuang, Shao-min

    2015-11-01

    Fluoroimmunoassay based on quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic relaxation switch (MRS) immunoassay based on superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SMN) were constructed to detect Salmonella enterica (S. enterica) in water samples. In fluoroimmunoassay, magnetic beads was conjugated with S. enterica capture antibody (MB-Ab2) to enrich S. enterica from sample solution, then the QDs was conjugated with the S. enterica detection antibody (QDs-Ab1) to detect S. enterica based on sandwich immunoassay format. And the fluorescence intensity is positive related to the bacteria concentration of the sample. Results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) of this method was 102 cfu · mL⁻¹ and analysis time was 2 h. In MRS assay, magnetic nanoparticle-antibody conjugate (MN-Ab1) can switch their dispersed and aggregated state in the presence of the target. This state of change can modulate the spin-spin relaxation time (T₂) of the neighboring water molecule. The change in T₂(ΔT₂) positively correlates with the amount of the target in the sample. Thus, AT can be used as a detection signal in MRS immunosensors. Results showed that LOD of MRS sensor for S. enterica was 10³ cfu · mL⁻¹ and analysis time was 0.5 h. Two methods were compared in terms of advantages and disadvantages in detecting S. enterica.

  10. Water-quality sampling plan for evaluating the distribution of bigheaded carps in the Illinois Waterway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duncker, James J.; Terrio, Paul J.

    2017-02-27

    The two nonnative invasive bigheaded carp species (bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and silver carp H. molitrix) that were accidentally released in the 1970s have spread widely into the rivers and waterways of the Mississippi River Basin. First detected in the lower reaches of the Illinois Waterway (IWW, the combined Illinois River-Des Plaines River-Chicago Area Waterway System) in the 1990s, bighead and silver carps moved quickly upstream, approaching the Chicago Area Waterway System. The potential of substantial negative ecological and economic impact to the Great Lakes from the presence of these species is a concern. However, since 2006, the population front of bigheaded carps has remained in the vicinity of Joliet, Illinois, near river mile 278. This reach of the IWW is characterized by stark changes in habitat, water quality, and food resources as the waterway transitions from a primarily agricultural landscape to a metropolitan and industrial canal system. This report describes a 2015 plan for sampling the IWW to establish water-quality conditions that might be contributing to the apparent stalling of the population front of bigheaded carps in this reach. A detailed description of the study plan, Lagrangian-style sampling approach, selected analytes, sampling methods and protocols are provided. Hydrographs from streamflow-gaging stations show IWW conditions during the 2015 sampling runs.

  11. Mutagens in urine sampled repetitively from municipal refuse incinerator workers and water treatment workers.

    PubMed

    Ma, X F; Babish, J G; Scarlett, J M; Gutenmann, W H; Lisk, D J

    1992-12-01

    Municipal refuse incinerator workers may be exposed to mutagenic compounds from combustion gases and particulates during plant operation, maintenance, and ash removal procedures. The frequency of mutagens was measured by the Ames assay in 3 urine samples collected from each of 37 workers in 4 refuse incinerators and 35 (control) workers from 8 water treatment plants during June-August 1990. When comparing the first urine samples contributed by workers in each cohort, incinerator workers had a significantly (p < .05) increased risk of both direct-acting mutagens and promutagens (8/37 or 22% for each mutagen type) compared with water treatment workers (2/35 or 6% for each mutagen type). Smoking within 24 h before urine sampling was not a confounder of these results. Interestingly, there was no significant (p > .05) difference for risk of urinary mutagens or promutagens between the two cohorts when comparing, respectively, the second and third urine samples from each cohort. The repeatability of demonstrating urinary mutagens in individual incinerator workers was poor, suggesting that their exposure was highly variable and/or that these workers modified their exposure (e.g., wore masks) as a consequence of being studied. Factors that influence production of mutagenic compounds during refuse incineration and subsequent worker exposure are discussed.

  12. Evidence of microplastics in samples of zooplankton from Portuguese coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Frias, J P G L; Otero, V; Sobral, P

    2014-04-01

    Records of high concentrations of plastic and microplastic marine debris floating in the ocean have led to investigate the presence of microplastics in samples of zooplankton from Portuguese coastal waters. Zooplankton samples collected at four offshore sites, in surveys conducted between 2002 and 2008, with three different sampling methods, were used in this preliminary study. A total of 152 samples were processed and microplastics were identified in 93 of them, corresponding to 61% of the total. Costa Vicentina, followed by Lisboa, were the regions with higher microplastic concentrations (0.036 and 0.033 no. m⁻³) and abundances (0.07 and 0.06 cm³ m⁻³), respectively. Microplastic: zooplankton ratios were also higher in these two regions, which is probably related to the proximity of densely populated areas and inputs from the Tejo and Sado river estuaries. Microplastics polymers were identified using Micro Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (μ-FTIR), as polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polyacrylates (PA). The present work is the first report on the composition of microplastic particles collected with plankton nets in Portuguese coastal waters. Plankton surveys from regular monitoring campaigns conducted worldwide may be used to monitor plastic particles in the oceans and constitute an important and low cost tool to address marine litter within the scope of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (2008/56/EC).

  13. Biota monitoring and the Water Framework Directive-can normalization overcome shortcomings in sampling strategies?

    PubMed

    Fliedner, Annette; Rüdel, Heinz; Teubner, Diana; Buchmeier, Georgia; Lowis, Jaqueline; Heiss, Christiane; Wellmitz, Jörg; Koschorreck, Jan

    2016-11-01

    We compare the results of different monitoring programs regarding spatial and temporal trends of priority hazardous substances of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD). Fish monitoring data for hexachlorobenzene (HCB), mercury (Hg), and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) sampled in German freshwaters between the mid-1990s and 2014 were evaluated according to the recommendations of the 2014 adopted WFD guidance document on biota monitoring, i.e., normalization to 5 % lipid content (HCB) or 26 % dry mass (Hg, PFOS) and adjustment to trophic level (TL) 4. Data of the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) (annual pooled samples of bream) were compared to monitoring data of the German federal states (FS), which refer to individual fish of different species. Significant decreasing trends (p < 0.01) were detected for Hg in bream (Abramis brama) sampled by both, the ESB and the FS between 1993 and 2013 but not for FS samples comprising different fish species. Data for HCB and PFOS were more heterogeneous due to a smaller database and gave no consistent results. Obviously, normalization could not compensate differences in sampling strategies. The results suggest that the data treatment procedure proposed in the guidance document has shortcomings and emphasize the importance of highly standardized sampling programs in trend monitoring or whenever results between sites have to be compared.

  14. A comparison of surface-grab and cross sectionally integrated stream-water-quality sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, G.R.; Smoot, J.L.; White, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    Stream sampling for water quality data has commonly employed simple surface-grab procedures as opposed to more involved, cross sectionally integrated techniques. Paired samples for analysis of selected constituents were collected over various flow conditions at four sites to evaluate differences between the two sampling methods. Concentrations of dissolved constituents were not consistently different. However, concentrations of suspended sediment and the total forms of some sediment-associated constituents, such as phosphorus, iron, and manganese, were significantly lower in the surface-grab samples than in the cross sectionally integrated samples. The largest median percent difference in concentration for a site was 60% (total recoverable manganese). Median percent differences in concentration for sediment-associated constituents considering all sites grouped were in the range of 20-25%. The surface-grab samples underrepresented concentrations of suspended sediment and some sediment-associated constituents, thus limiting the applicability of such data for certain purposes. An association was also demonstrated between site streamflow characteristics and the observed differences.

  15. Application of hollow cylindrical wheat stem for electromembrane extraction of thorium in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Barkhordar, Afsaneh; Bohlooli, Mousa

    2015-02-01

    In this study, wheat stem was used for electromembrane extraction (EME) for the first time. The EME technique involved the use of a wheat stem whose channel was filled with 3 M HCl, immersed in 10 mL of an aqueous sample solution. Thorium migrated from aqueous samples, through a thin layer of 1-octanol and 5%v/v Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (DEHP) immobilized in the pores of a porous stem, and into an acceptor phase solution present inside the lumen of the stem. The pH of donor and acceptor phases, extraction time, voltage, and stirring speed were optimized. At the optimum conditions, an enrichment factor of 50 and a limit of detection of 0.29 ng mL-1 was obtained for thorium. The developed procedure was then applied to the extraction and determination of thorium in water samples and in reference material.

  16. Application of hollow cylindrical wheat stem for electromembrane extraction of thorium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Khajeh, Mostafa; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Barkhordar, Afsaneh; Bohlooli, Mousa

    2015-02-25

    In this study, wheat stem was used for electromembrane extraction (EME) for the first time. The EME technique involved the use of a wheat stem whose channel was filled with 3 M HCl, immersed in 10 mL of an aqueous sample solution. Thorium migrated from aqueous samples, through a thin layer of 1-octanol and 5%v/v Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (DEHP) immobilized in the pores of a porous stem, and into an acceptor phase solution present inside the lumen of the stem. The pH of donor and acceptor phases, extraction time, voltage, and stirring speed were optimized. At the optimum conditions, an enrichment factor of 50 and a limit of detection of 0.29 ng mL(-1) was obtained for thorium. The developed procedure was then applied to the extraction and determination of thorium in water samples and in reference material.

  17. Pushpoint sampling for defining spatial and temporal variations in contaminant concentrations in sediment pore water near the ground-water / surface-water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Marc J.; Massey, Andrew J.; Campo, Kimberly W.

    2005-01-01

    During four periods from April 2002 to June 2003, pore-water samples were taken from river sediment within a gaining reach (Mill Pond) of the Sudbury River in Ashland, Massachusetts, with a temporary pushpoint sampler to determine whether this device is an effective tool for measuring small-scale spatial variations in concentrations of volatile organic compounds and selected field parameters (specific conductance and dissolved oxygen concentration). The pore waters sampled were within a subsurface plume of volatile organic compounds extending from the nearby Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund site to the river. Samples were collected from depths of 10, 30, and 60 centimeters below the sediment surface along two 10-meter-long, parallel transects extending into the river. Twenty-five volatile organic compounds were detected at concentrations ranging from less than 1 microgram per liter to hundreds of micrograms per liter (for example, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 490 micrograms per liter; cis-1,2-dichloroethene, 290 micrograms per liter). The most frequently detected compounds were either chlorobenzenes or chlorinated ethenes. Many of the compounds were detected only infrequently. Quality-control sampling indicated a low incidence of trace concentrations of contaminants. Additional samples collected with passive-water-diffusion-bag samplers yielded results comparable to those collected with the pushpoint sampler and to samples collected in previous studies at the site. The results demonstrate that the pushpoint sampler can yield distinct samples from sites in close proximity; in this case, sampling sites were 1 meter apart horizontally and 20 or 30 centimeters apart vertically. Moreover, the pushpoint sampler was able to draw pore water when inserted to depths as shallow as 10 centimeters below the sediment surface without entraining surface water. The simplicity of collecting numerous samples in a short time period (routinely, 20 to 30 per day) validates the use of a

  18. Sampling design and procedures for fixed surface-water sites in the Georgia-Florida coastal plain study unit, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatzell, H.H.; Oaksford, E.T.; Asbury, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of design guidelines for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program has resulted in the development of new sampling procedures and the modification of existing procedures commonly used in the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. The Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain (GAFL) study unit began the intensive data collection phase of the program in October 1992. This report documents the implementation of the NAWQA guidelines by describing the sampling design and procedures for collecting surface-water samples in the GAFL study unit in 1993. This documentation is provided for agencies that use water-quality data and for future study units that will be entering the intensive phase of data collection. The sampling design is intended to account for large- and small-scale spatial variations, and temporal variations in water quality for the study area. Nine fixed sites were selected in drainage basins of different sizes and different land-use characteristics located in different land-resource provinces. Each of the nine fixed sites was sampled regularly for a combination of six constituent groups composed of physical and chemical constituents: field measurements, major ions and metals, nutrients, organic carbon, pesticides, and suspended sediments. Some sites were also sampled during high-flow conditions and storm events. Discussion of the sampling procedure is divided into three phases: sample collection, sample splitting, and sample processing. A cone splitter was used to split water samples for the analysis of the sampling constituent groups except organic carbon from approximately nine liters of stream water collected at four fixed sites that were sampled intensively. An example of the sample splitting schemes designed to provide the sample volumes required for each sample constituent group is described in detail. Information about onsite sample processing has been organized into a flowchart that describes a pathway for each of

  19. Does the bathing water classification depend on sampling strategy? A bootstrap approach for bathing water quality assessment, according to Directive 2006/7/EC requirements.

    PubMed

    López, Iago; Alvarez, César; Gil, José L; Revilla, José A

    2012-11-30

    Data on the 95th and 90th percentiles of bacteriological quality indicators are used to classify bathing waters in Europe, according to the requirements of Directive 2006/7/EC. However, percentile values and consequently, classification of bathing waters depend both on sampling effort and sample-size, which may undermine an appropriate assessment of bathing water classification. To analyse the influence of sampling effort and sample size on water classification, a bootstrap approach was applied to 55 bacteriological quality datasets of several beaches in the Balearic Islands (Spain). Our results show that the probability of failing the regulatory standards of the Directive is high when sample size is low, due to a higher variability in percentile values. In this way, 49% of the bathing waters reaching an "Excellent" classification (95th percentile of Escherichia coli under 250 cfu/100 ml) can fail the "Excellent" regulatory standard due to sampling strategy, when 23 samples per season are considered. This percentage increases to 81% when 4 samples per season are considered. "Good" regulatory standards can also be failed in bathing waters with an "Excellent" classification as a result of these sampling strategies. The variability in percentile values may affect bathing water classification and is critical for the appropriate design and implementation of bathing water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Programs. Hence, variability of percentile values should be taken into account by authorities if an adequate management of these areas is to be achieved.

  20. Results of chemical and stable isotopic analyses of water samples collected in the Patagonia Mountains, southern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanty, Richard B.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Lamothe, Paul; Meier, A.L.; Lichte, Fred; Briggs, Paul H.; Berger, Byron R.

    2001-01-01

    Water samples were collected in the Patagonia Mountains in February, 1997. Most of the samples were collected from portals of abandoned mines, or from stream drainages immediately downstream from abandoned mines. Most of the samples have low pH ( 1000 mg/L). Anion composition of the water samples is dominated by sulfate, while cation compositions range from calcium-dominated to mixed calcium-magnesium or calcium-sodium-dominated waters. Metals such as iron, manganese, copper, zinc, and aluminum contribute a significant portion (>10%) of the cation content to the water samples. Because of the low pH?s, protons contribute up to several percent of the cation character of the waters in some of the samples. The data are presented in tabular and graphical formats, with descriptions of data quality and brief descriptions of results.

  1. Screening and Quantification of Aliphatic Primary Alkyl Corrosion Inhibitor Amines in Water Samples by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Damon, Deidre E; Barrett, Richard M; Syed, S U; Heeren, Ron M A; Taylor, Stephen; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-01-19

    Direct analysis and identification of long chain aliphatic primary diamine Duomeen O (n-oleyl-1,3-diaminopropane), corrosion inhibitor in raw water samples taken from a large medium pressure water tube boiler plant water samples at low LODs (<0.1 pg) has been demonstrated for the first time, without any sample preparation using paper spray mass spectrometry (PS-MS). The presence of Duomeen O in water samples was confirmed via tandem mass spectrometry using collision-induced dissociation and supported by exact mass measurement and reactive paper spray experiments using an LTQ Orbitrap Exactive instrument. Data shown herein indicate that paper spray ambient ionization can be readily used as a rapid and robust method for in situ direct analysis of polymanine corrosion inhibitors in an industrial water boiler plant and other related samples in the water treatment industry. This approach was applied for the analysis of three complex water samples including feedwater, condensate water, and boiler water, all collected from large medium pressure (MP) water tube boiler plants, known to be dosed with varying amounts of polyamine and amine corrosion inhibitor components. Polyamine chemistry is widely used for example in large high pressure (HP) boilers operating in municipal waste and recycling facilities to prevent corrosion of metals. The samples used in this study are from such a facility in Coventry waste treatment facility, U.K., which has 3 × 40 tonne/hour boilers operating at 17.5 bar.

  2. Solid-phase extraction and field-amplified sample injection-capillary zone electrophoresis for the analysis of benzophenone UV filters in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Purrà, Miquel; Cinca, Roser; Legaz, Jessica; Núñez, Oscar

    2014-10-01

    A field-amplified sample injection-capillary zone electrophoresis (FASI-CZE) method for the analysis of benzophenone (BP) UV filters in environmental water samples was developed, allowing the separation of all compounds in less than 8 min. A 9- to 25-fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained with FASI-CZE, achieving limits of detection down to 21-59 μg/L for most of the analyzed BPs, with acceptable run-to-run and day-to-day precisions (relative standard deviations lower than 17%). In order to remove water sample salinity and to enhance FASI sensitivity, an off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure using a Strata X polymeric reversed-phase sorbent was used and afforded recoveries up to 72-90% for most BPs. With the combination of off-line SPE and FASI-CZE, limits of detection in the range 0.06-0.6 μg/L in a river water matrix, representing a 2,400- to 6,500-fold enhancement, were obtained. Method performance was evaluated by quantifying a blank river water sample spiked at 1 μg/L. For a 95% confidence level, no statistical differences were observed between found concentrations and spiked concentrations (probability at the confidence level, p value, of 0.60), showing that the proposed off-line SPE-FASI-CZE method is suitable for the analysis of BP UV filters in environmental water samples at low microgram per liter levels. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of BPs in river water samples collected up- and downstream of industrialized and urban areas, and in some drinking water samples.

  3. Dynamics and Kinetics Study of "In-Water" Chemical Reactions by Enhanced Sampling of Reactive Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Y Isaac; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-11-12

    High potential energy barriers and engagement of solvent coordinates set challenges for in silico studies of chemical reactions, and one is quite commonly limited to study reactions along predefined reaction coordinate(s). A systematic protocol, QM/MM MD simulations using enhanced sampling of reactive trajectories (ESoRT), is established to quantitatively study chemical transitions in complex systems. A number of trajectories for Claisen rearrangement in water and toluene were collected and analyzed, respectively. Evidence was found that the bond making and breaking during this reaction are concerted processes in solutions, preferentially through a chairlike configuration. Water plays an important dynamic role that helps stabilize the transition sate, and the dipole-dipole interaction between water and the solute also lowers the transition barrier. The calculated rate coefficient is consistent with the experimental measurement. Compared with water, the reaction pathway in toluene is "narrower" and the reaction rate is slower by almost three orders of magnitude due to the absence of proper interactions to stabilize the transition state. This study suggests that the "in-water" nature of the Claisen rearrangement in aqueous solution influences its thermodynamics, kinetics, as well as dynamics.

  4. High-frequency, long-duration water sampling in acid mine drainage studies: a short review of current methods and recent advances in automated water samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hand-collected grab samples are the most common water sampling method but using grab sampling to monitor temporally variable aquatic processes such as diel metal cycling or episodic events is rarely feasible or cost-effective. Currently available automated samplers are a proven, widely used technology and typically collect up to 24 samples during a deployment. However, these automated samplers are not well suited for long-term sampling in remote areas or in freezing conditions. There is a critical need for low-cost, long-duration, high-frequency water sampling technology to improve our understanding of the geochemical response to temporally variable processes. This review article will examine recent developments in automated water sampler technology and utilize selected field data from acid mine drainage studies to illustrate the utility of high-frequency, long-duration water sampling.

  5. Nutrient sampling slam: high resolution surface-water sampling in streams reveals patterns in groundwater chemistry and flow paths

    EPA Science Inventory

    The groundwater–surface water interface (GSWI), consisting of shallow groundwater adjacent to stream channels, is a hot spot for nitrogen removal processes, a storage zone for other solutes, and a target for restoration activities. Characterizing groundwater-surface water intera...

  6. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manheim, F. T.; Chan, K.M.; Sayles, F.L.

    1970-01-01

    Leg 5 samples fall into two categories with respect to interstitial water composition: 1) rapidly deposited terrigenous or appreciably terrigenous deposits, such as in Hole 35 (western Escanaba trough, off Cape Mendocino, California); and, 2) slowly deposited pelagic clays and biogenic muds and oozes. Interstitial waters in the former show modest to slight variations in chloride and sodium, but drastic changes in non-conservative ions such as magnesium and sulfate. The pelagic deposits show only relatively minor changes in both conservative and non-conservative pore fluid constituents. As was pointed out in earlier Leg Reports, it is believed that much of the variation in chloride in pore fluids within individual holes is attributable to the manipulation of samples on board ship and in the laboratory. On the other hand, the scatter in sodium is due in part to analytical error (on the order of 2 to 3 per cent, in terms of a standard deviation), and it probably accounts for most of the discrepancies in total anion and cation balance. All constituents reported here, with the exception of bulk water content, were analyzed on water samples which were sealed in plastic tubes aboard ship and were subsequently opened and divided into weighed aliquots in the laboratory. Analytical methods follow the atomic absorption, wet chemical and emission spectrochemical techniques briefly summarized in previous reports, e.g. Manheim et al., 1969, and Chan and Manheim, 1970. The authors acknowledge assistance from W. Sunda, D. Kerr, C. Lawson and H. Richards, and thank D. Spencer, P. Brewer and E. Degens for allowing the use of equipment and laboratory facilities.

  7. Electro-driven extraction of inorganic anions from water samples and water miscible organic solvents and analysis by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nojavan, Saeed; Bidarmanesh, Tina; Memarzadeh, Farkhondeh; Chalavi, Soheila

    2014-09-01

    A simple electromembrane extraction (EME) procedure combined with ion chromatography (IC) was developed to quantify inorganic anions in different pure water samples and water miscible organic solvents. The parameters affecting extraction performance, such as supported liquid membrane (SLM) solvent, extraction time, pH of donor and acceptor solutions, and extraction voltage were optimized. The optimized EME conditions were as follows: 1-heptanol was used as the SLM solvent, the extraction time was 10 min, pHs of the acceptor and donor solutions were 10 and 7, respectively, and the extraction voltage was 15 V. The mobile phase used for IC was a combination of 1.8 mM sodium carbonate and 1.7 mM sodium bicarbonate. Under these optimized conditions, all anions had enrichment factors ranging from 67 to 117 with RSDs between 7.3 and 13.5% (n = 5). Good linearity values ranging from 2 to 1200 ng/mL with coefficients of determination (R(2) ) between 0.987 and 0.999 were obtained. The LODs of the EME-IC method ranged from 0.6 to 7.5 ng/mL. The developed method was applied to different samples to evaluate the feasibility of the method for real applications.

  8. Rapid determination of (210)Pb and (210)Po in water and application to marine samples.

    PubMed

    Villa-Alfageme, M; Mas, J L; Hurtado-Bermudez, S; Masqué, P

    2016-11-01

    Measurement of radionuclides in marine samples, specifically radioactive pairs disequilibrium, has gained interest lately due to their ability to trace cutting edge biogeochemical processes. In this context, we developed a fast, direct method for determining (210)Pb and (210)Po water through the use of ultra low-level liquid scintillation counting and alpha-particle spectrometry respectively and through Eichrom Sr resins for the Po-Pb separation. For (210)Pb analysis, the method uses stable lead as a yield tracer measured by a robust ICP-MS technique, and (210)Po is determined through self-deposition using the conventional (209)Po yield tracer. The improvements of the method over other techniques are: a) the analysis can be completed within 6 days, simplifying other methods, b) very low limits of detection have been achieved -0.12 and 0.005mBqL(-1) for (210)Pb and (210)Po, respectively - and c) most of the method could be carried out in on-board analysis. We applied the method to different aqueous samples and specifically to marine samples. We determined (210)Pb and (210)Po in the dissolved fraction of Mediterranean Sea water and an estuary at the South-West of Spain. We found that it can be successfully employed to marine samples but we recommend to i) use a minimum of 20L water to measure the (210)Pb in the dissolved phase by LSC and lower volumes to measure total concentrations; ii) wait for (210)Pb and (210)Bi in secular equilibrium and measure the total spectrum to minimise the limit of detection and improve accuracy.

  9. Micro-TLC Approach for Fast Screening of Environmental Samples Derived from Surface and Sewage Waters.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Paweł K; Slączka, Magdalena M; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta; Baran, Michał J

    2013-01-01

    In this work we demonstrated analytical capability of micro-planar (micro-TLC) technique comprising one and two-dimensional (2D) separation modes to generate fingerprints of environmental samples originated from sewage and ecosystems waters. We showed that elaborated separation and detection protocols are complementary to previously invented HPLC method based on temperature-dependent inclusion chromatography and UV-DAD detection. Presented 1D and 2D micro-TLC chromatograms of SPE (solid-phase extraction) extracts were optimized for fast and low-cost screening of water samples collected from lakes and rivers located in the area of Middle Pomerania in northern part of Poland. Moreover, we studied highly organic compounds loaded in the treated and untreated sewage waters obtained from municipal wastewater treatment plant "Jamno" near Koszalin City (Poland). Analyzed environmental samples contained number of substances characterized by polarity range from estetrol to progesterone as well as chlorophyll-related dyes previously isolated and pre-purified by simple SPE protocol involving C18 cartridges. Optimization of micro-TLC separation and quantification protocols of such samples were discussed from the practical point of view using simple separation efficiency criteria including total peaks number, log(product ΔhRF), signal intensity and peak asymmetry. Outcomes of the presented analytical approach, especially using detection involving direct fluorescence (UV366/Vis) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) visualization are compared with UV-DAD HPLC-generated data reported previously. Chemometric investigation based on principal components analysis revealed that SPE extracts separated by micro-TLC and detected under fluorescence and PMA visualization modes can be used for robust sample fingerprinting even after long-term storage of the extracts (up to 4 years) at subambient temperature (-20 °C). Such approach allows characterization of wide range of sample components that

  10. Differences in soluble organic carbon chemistry in pore waters sampled from different pore size domains

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, Malak; ...

    2017-01-11

    Spatial isolation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in different sized pores may be a mechanism by which otherwise labile carbon (C) could be protected in soils. When soil water content increases, the hydrologic connectivity of soil pores also increases, allowing greater transport of SOC and other resources from protected locations, to microbially colonized locations more favorable to decomposition. The heterogeneous distribution of specialized decomposers, C, and other resources throughout the soil indicates that the metabolism or persistence of soil C compounds is highly dependent on short-distance transport processes. The objective of this research was to characterize the complexity of Cmore » in pore waters held at weak and strong water tensions (effectively soil solution held behind coarse- and fine-pore throats, respectively) and evaluate the microbial decomposability of these pore waters. We saturated intact soil cores and extracted pore waters with increasing suction pressures to sequentially sample pore waters from increasingly fine pore domains. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry of the SOC was used to profile the major biochemical classes (i.e., lipids, proteins, lignin, carbohydrates, and condensed aromatics) of compounds present in the pore waters; some of these samples were then used as substrates for growth of Cellvibrio japonicus (DSMZ 16018), Streptomyces cellulosae (ATCC® 25439™), and Trichoderma reseei (QM6a) in 7 day incubations. The soluble C in finer pores was more complex than the soluble C in coarser pores, and the incubations revealed that the more complex C in these fine pores is not recalcitrant. The decomposition of this complex C led to greater losses of C through respiration than the simpler C from coarser pore waters. Our research suggests that soils that experience repeated cycles of drying and wetting may be accompanied by repeated cycles of increased CO2 fluxes that are driven by i) the transport of C from protected pools into

  11. High-resolution passive sampling of dissolved methane in the water column of lakes in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A. E.; Cadieux, S. B.; White, J. R.; Pratt, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic lakes are important participants in the global carbon cycle, releasing methane in a warming climate and contributing to a positive feedback to climate change. In order to yield detailed methane budgets and understand the implications of warming on methane dynamics, high-resolution profiles revealing methane behavior within the water column need to be obtained. Single day sampling using disruptive techniques has the potential to result in biases. In order to obtain high-resolution, undisturbed profiles of methane concentration and isotopic composition, this study evaluates a passive sampling method over a multi-day equilibration period. Selected for this study were two small lakes (<1km2) within a narrow valley stretching between Russells Glacier and Søndre Strømfjord in southwestern Greenland, which are part of an ongoing study of a series of seven lakes. Commercially available, 150 mL, polyethylene Passive Diffusion Bags (PDB's) were deployed in July 2013 for five days at 0.5-meter depth intervals. PDB samples were compared to samples collected with a submersible, electric pump taken immediately before PBD deployment. Preliminary CH4 concentrations and carbon isotopes for one lake were obtained in the field using a Los Gatos Research Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer. PDB sampling and pump sampling resulted in statistically similar concentrations (R2=0.89), ranging from 0.85 to 135 uM from PDB and 0.74 to 143 uM from pump sampling. In anoxic waters of the lake, where concentrations were high enough to yield robust isotopic results on the LGR MCIA, δ13C were also similar between the two methods, yielding -73‰ from PDB and -74‰ from pump sampling. Further investigation will produce results for a second lake and methane carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition for both lakes. Preliminary results for this passive sampling method are promising. We envision the use of this technique in future studies of dissolved methane and expect that it will provide a

  12. Automation of high-frequency sampling of environmental waters for reactive species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Bishop, J. K.; Wood, T.; Fung, I.; Fong, M.

    2011-12-01

    Trace metals, particularly iron and manganese, play a critical role in some ecosystems as a limiting factor to determine primary productivity, in geochemistry, especially redox chemistry as important electron donors and acceptors, and in aquatic environments as carriers of contaminant transport. Dynamics of trace metals are closely related to various hydrologic events such as rainfall. Storm flow triggers dramatic changes of both dissolved and particulate trace metals concentrations and affects other important environmental parameters linked to trace metal behavior such as dissolved organic carbon (DOC). To improve our understanding of behaviors of trace metals and underlying processes, water chemistry information must be collected for an adequately long period of time at higher frequency than conventional manual sampling (e.g. weekly, biweekly). In this study, we developed an automated sampling system to document the dynamics of trace metals, focusing on Fe and Mn, and DOC for a multiple-year high-frequency geochemistry time series in a small catchment, called Rivendell located at Angelo Coast Range Reserve, California. We are sampling ground and streamwater using the automated sampling system in daily-frequency and the condition of the site is substantially variable from season to season. The ranges of pH of ground and streamwater are pH 5 - 7 and pH 7.8 - 8.3, respectively. DOC is usually sub-ppm, but during rain events, it increases by an order of magnitude. The automated sampling system focuses on two aspects- 1) a modified design of sampler to improve sample integrity for trace metals and DOC and 2) remote controlling system to update sampling volume and timing according to hydrological conditions. To maintain sample integrity, the developed method employed gravity filtering using large volume syringes (140mL) and syringe filters connected to a set of polypropylene bottles and a borosilicate bottle via Teflon tubing. Without filtration, in a few days, the

  13. U.S. Geological Survey nutrient preservation experiment; nutrient concentration data for surface-, ground-, and municipal-supply water samples and quality-assurance samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Truitt, Earl P.

    1995-01-01

    This report is a compilation of analytical results from a study conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey, National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) in 1992 to assess the effectiveness of three field treatment protocols to stabilize nutrient concentra- tions in water samples stored for about 1 month at 4C. Field treatments tested were chilling, adjusting sample pH to less than 2 with sulfuric acid and chilling, and adding 52 milligrams of mercury (II) chloride per liter of sample and chilling. Field treatments of samples collected for determination of ammonium, nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen, orthophosphate, and dissolved phosphorus included 0.45-micrometer membrane filtration. Only total Kjeldahl nitrogen and total phosphorus were determined in unfiltered samples. Data reported here pertain to water samples collected in April and May 1992 from 15 sites within the continental United States. Also included in this report are analytical results for nutrient concentrations in synthetic reference samples that were analyzed concurrently with real samples.

  14. Use of field-applied quality control samples to monitor performance of a Goulden large-sample extractor/GC-MS method for pesticides in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foreman, W.T.; Gates, Paul M.; Foster, G.D.; Rinella, F.A.; McKenzie, S.W.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1985, the Goulden large-sample extractor (GLSE) has been used to isolate a broad array of trace-organic contaminants from large volumes of water. In this study, field-applied quality control measures, including matrix and surrogate spikes and blanks, were used to monitor method performance from GLSE extraction through GC-MS analysis. The method was applied to the determination of multiple classes of pesticides isolated from 4- to 112-L filtered surface-water samples. Av