Science.gov

Sample records for actuarial biochemical control

  1. Monitoring Actuarial Present Values of Term Life Insurance By a Statistical Process Control Chart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafidz Omar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Tracking performance of life insurance or similar insurance policy using standard statistical process control chart is complex because of many factors. In this work, we present the difficulty in doing so. However, with some modifications of the SPC charting framework, the difficulty can be manageable to the actuaries. So, we propose monitoring a simpler but natural actuarial quantity that is typically found in recursion formulas of reserves, profit testing, as well as present values. We shared some simulation results for the monitoring process. Additionally, some advantages of doing so is discussed.

  2. Actuarial Valuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachers Retirement System of Louisiana, Baton Rouge.

    This report presents the results of the actuarial valuation of assets and liabilities as well as funding requirements for the Teachers Retirement System of Louisiana as of June 30, 1996. Data reported include current funding, actuarial assets and valuation assets. These include the Louisiana State University Agriculture and Extension Service Fund,…

  3. Actuarial Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Bette

    1982-01-01

    Details are provided of a program on actuarial training developed at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Binghamton through the Department of Mathematical Sciences. An outline of its operation, including a few statistics on students in the program, is included. (MP)

  4. Clinical versus actuarial judgment.

    PubMed

    Dawes, R M; Faust, D; Meehl, P E

    1989-03-31

    Professionals are frequently consulted to diagnose and predict human behavior; optimal treatment and planning often hinge on the consultant's judgmental accuracy. The consultant may rely on one of two contrasting approaches to decision-making--the clinical and actuarial methods. Research comparing these two approaches shows the actuarial method to be superior. Factors underlying the greater accuracy of actuarial methods, sources of resistance to the scientific findings, and the benefits of increased reliance on actuarial approaches are discussed.

  5. Biochemical Control of Marine Fouling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-14

    amino acid and catecholamine analyses by ion-exchange chromatography, and determination with ninhydrin , performed in collaboration with Dr. Herbert...attempted to design and test new, potentially specific (nonhazardous, environmentally safe) biochemical inhibitors of the recruitment and fouling...reaction- sequences. In this effort, we have concentrated first on the design and testing of agents which specifically block the larval receptors and

  6. The Casualty Actuarial Society: Helping Universities Train Future Actuaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boa, J. Michael; Gorvett, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) believes that the most effective way to advance the actuarial profession is to work in partnership with universities. The CAS stands ready to assist universities in creating or enhancing courses and curricula associated with property/casualty actuarial science. CAS resources for university actuarial science…

  7. The case for an actuary.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Patrick N

    2002-12-01

    The author describes the role of the actuary, the need for qualified actuaries and how to find them. Qualified actuarial help, in the form of a Fellow of the Society of Actuaries (FSA), is necessary to ensure the best outcome when setting annual premium rates and realistic budgets for self-funded group benefit plans.

  8. Actually, What Is an Actuary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oudshoorn, Susan; Finkelstein, Gary

    1991-01-01

    The actuarial profession is described to provide secondary school mathematics teachers insights into how actuaries use mathematics in solving real life problems. Examples are provided involving compound interest, the probability of dying, and inflation with computer modeling. (MDH)

  9. Controllability of non-linear biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Ervadi-Radhakrishnan, Anandhi; Voit, Eberhard O

    2005-07-01

    Mathematical methods of biochemical pathway analysis are rapidly maturing to a point where it is possible to provide objective rationale for the natural design of metabolic systems and where it is becoming feasible to manipulate these systems based on model predictions, for instance, with the goal of optimizing the yield of a desired microbial product. So far, theory-based metabolic optimization techniques have mostly been applied to steady-state conditions or the minimization of transition time, using either linear stoichiometric models or fully kinetic models within biochemical systems theory (BST). This article addresses the related problem of controllability, where the task is to steer a non-linear biochemical system, within a given time period, from an initial state to some target state, which may or may not be a steady state. For this purpose, BST models in S-system form are transformed into affine non-linear control systems, which are subjected to an exact feedback linearization that permits controllability through independent variables. The method is exemplified with a small glycolytic-glycogenolytic pathway that had been analyzed previously by several other authors in different contexts.

  10. Underlying theory of actuarial analyses.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, B

    1985-05-01

    The developments in theory governing the calculation of mortality rates for use in survival measurements working through the initial basic concept of exposure to risk to the later introduction of stochastic elements are reviewed. I have indicated the way in which actuaries and statisticians who work closely with those in the fields of medicine and biology have, by the exchange of methodologic ideas, come to an identity of approach. Recent new actuarial work and likely future developments in actuarial interests are reviewed.

  11. A look inside the actuarial black box.

    PubMed

    Math, S E; Youngerman, H

    1992-12-01

    Hospital executives often rely on actuaries (and their "black boxes") to determine self-insurance program liabilities and funding contributions. Typically, the hospital supplies the actuary with a myriad of statistics, and eventually the hospital receives a liability estimate and recommended funding level. The mysterious actuarial calculations that occur in between data reporting and receipt of the actuary's report are akin to a black box--a complicated device whose internal mechanism is hidden from or mysterious to the user.

  12. [Strategies for diagnosis and biochemical control of porphyrias].

    PubMed

    Brock, Axel; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2014-02-17

    Porphyrias are rare, distinct and well characterized diseases due to impairment of one of the eight steps in the biosynthesis of haem, which is the functional group of haemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochromes, including the cytochrome P-450 family. The actual strategies for diagnosis and biochemical control of the five most common porphyrias are described.

  13. 20 CFR 901.2 - Eligibility to perform actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 901.2 Section 901.2 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS.... (a) Enrolled actuary. Subject to the standards of performance set forth in subpart C of this part, any individual who is an enrolled actuary as defined in § 901.1(g) may perform actuarial...

  14. 26 CFR 301.6059-1 - Periodic report of actuary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Periodic report of actuary. 301.6059-1 Section...-1 Periodic report of actuary. (a) In general. The actuarial report described in this section must be... funding deficiency (as defined in section 412(a)) to zero, (4) A statement by the enrolled actuary...

  15. Guiding lights: recent developments in optogenetic control of biochemical signals.

    PubMed

    Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I

    2013-03-01

    Optogenetics arises from the innovative application of microbial opsins in mammalian neurons and has since been a powerful technology that fuels the advance of our knowledge in neuroscience. In recent years, there has been growing interest in designing optogenetic tools extendable to broader cell types and biochemical signals. To date, a variety of photoactivatable proteins (refers to induction of protein activity in contrast to fluorescence) have been developed based on the understanding of plant and microbial photoreceptors including phototropins, blue light sensors using flavin adenine dinucleotide proteins, cryptochromes, and phytochromes. Such tools offered researchers reversible, quantitative, and precise spatiotemporal control of enzymatic activity, protein-protein interaction, protein translocation, as well as gene transcription in cells and in whole animals. In this review, we will briefly introduce these photosensory proteins, describe recent developments in optogenetics, and compare and contrast different methods based on their advantages and limitations.

  16. Spatial Control of Biochemical Modification Cascades and Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Alam-Nazki, Aiman; Krishnan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Information transmission in cells occurs through complex networks of proteins and genes and is relayed through cascades of biochemical modifications, which are typically studied through ordinary differential equations. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that spatial factors can strongly influence chemical information transmission in cells. In this article, we systematically disentangle the effects of space in signaling cascades. This is done by examining the effects of localization/compartmentalization and diffusion of enzymes and substrates in multiple variants of chemical modification cascades. This includes situations where the modified form of species at one stage 1) acts as an enzyme for the next stage; 2) acts as a substrate for the next stage; and 3) is involved in phosphotransfer. Our analysis reveals the multiple effects of space in signal transduction cascades. Although in some cases space plays a modulatory effect (itself of interest), in other cases, spatial regulation and control can profoundly affect the nature of information processing as a result of the subtle interplay between the patterns of localization of species, diffusion, and the nature of the modification cascades. Our results provide a platform for disentangling the role of space and spatial control in multiple cellular contexts and a basis for engineering spatial control in signaling cascades through localization/compartmentalization. PMID:26083931

  17. Diabetes, biochemical markers of bone turnover, diabetes control, and bone.

    PubMed

    Starup-Linde, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to have late complications including micro vascular and macro vascular disease. This review focuses on another possible area of complication regarding diabetes; bone. Diabetes may affect bone via bone structure, bone density, and biochemical markers of bone turnover. The aim of the present review is to examine in vivo from humans on biochemical markers of bone turnover in diabetics compared to non-diabetics. Furthermore, the effect of glycemic control on bone markers and the similarities and differences of type 1- and type 2-diabetics regarding bone markers will be evaluated. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, Cinahl, and SveMed+ with the search terms: "Diabetes mellitus," "Diabetes mellitus type 1," "Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus," "Diabetes mellitus type 2," "Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus," "Bone," "Bone and Bones," "Bone diseases," "Bone turnover," "Hemoglobin A Glycosylated," and "HbA1C." After removing duplicates from this search 1,188 records were screened by title and abstract and 75 records were assessed by full text for inclusion in the review. In the end 43 records were chosen. Bone formation and resorption markers are investigated as well as bone regulating systems. T1D is found to have lower osteocalcin and CTX, while osteocalcin and tartrate-resistant acid are found to be lower in T2D, and sclerostin is increased and collagen turnover markers altered. Other bone turnover markers do not seem to be altered in T1D or T2D. A major problem is the lack of histomorphometric studies in humans linking changes in turnover markers to actual changes in bone turnover and further research is needed to strengthen this link.

  18. Strategic Curricular Decisions in Butler University's Actuarial Science Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Christopher James

    2014-01-01

    We describe specific curricular decisions employed at Butler University that have resulted in student achievement in the actuarial science major. The paper includes a discussion of how these decisions might be applied in the context of a new actuarial program.

  19. Actuarial considerations of medical malpractice evaluations in M&As.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C

    2014-11-01

    To best project an actuarial estimate for medical malpractice exposure for a merger and acquisition, a organization's leaders should consider the following factors, among others: How to support an unbiased actuarial estimation. Experience of the actuary. The full picture of the organization's malpractice coverage. The potential for future loss development. Frequency and severity trends.

  20. 75 FR 63505 - Renewal of Advisory Committee on Actuarial Examinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Renewal of Advisory Committee on Actuarial Examinations AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries. ACTION: Renewal of Advisory Committee. ] SUMMARY: The Joint Board for the...

  1. 26 CFR 300.7 - Enrollment of enrolled actuary fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enrollment of enrolled actuary fee. 300.7... AND ADMINISTRATION USER FEES § 300.7 Enrollment of enrolled actuary fee. (a) Applicability. This section applies to the initial enrollment of enrolled actuaries with the Joint Board for the Enrollment...

  2. 29 CFR 4231.10 - Actuarial calculations and assumptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actuarial calculations and assumptions. 4231.10 Section... MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4231.10 Actuarial calculations and assumptions. (a) Most recent valuation. All calculations required by this part must be based on the most recent actuarial valuation as of the date...

  3. Recruiting and Advising Challenges in Actuarial Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Bettye Anne; Guan, Yuanying Michelle; Paris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Some challenges to increasing actuarial science program size through recruiting broadly among potential students are identified. Possible solutions depend on the structures and culture of the school. Up to three student cohorts may result from partition of potential students by the levels of academic progress before program entry: students…

  4. Actuarial assessment of risk among sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Harris, Grant T; Rice, Marnie E

    2003-06-01

    The appraisal of risk among sex offenders has seen recent advances through the advent of actuarial assessments. Statistics derived from Relative Operating Characteristics (ROCs) permit the comparison of predictive accuracies achieved by different instruments even among samples that exhibit different base rates of recidivism. Such statistics cannot, however, solve problems introduced when items from actuarial tools are omitted, when reliability is low, or when there is high between-subject variability in the duration of the follow-up. We present empirical evidence suggesting that when comprehensive actuarial tools (VRAG and SORAG) are scored with high reliability, without missing items, and when samples of offenders have fixed and equal opportunity for recidivism, predictive accuracies are maximized near ROC areas of 0.90. Although the term "dynamic" has not been consistently defined, such accuracies leave little room for further improvement in long-term prediction by dynamic risk factors. We address the mistaken idea that long-term, static risk levels have little relevance for clinical intervention with sex offenders. We conclude that highly accurate prediction of violent criminal recidivism can be achieved by means of highly reliable and thorough scoring of comprehensive multi-item actuarial tools using historical items (at least until potent therapies are identified). The role of current moods, attitudes, insights, and physiological states in causing contemporaneous behavior notwithstanding, accurate prediction about which sex offenders will commit at least one subsequent violent offense can be accomplished using complete information about past conduct.

  5. 20 CFR 200.9 - Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... actuaries to serve on an Actuarial Advisory Committee. This section describes how the two actuaries are selected. (b) Carrier actuary. One member of the Actuarial Advisory Committee shall be selected by... railroad mileage within the United States. (c) Railway labor actuary. The other member of the...

  6. Punishing the lemon: the ethics of actuarial fairness.

    PubMed

    Jha, Saurabh

    2012-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act rejects the notion that actuarial fairness is a normative ideal. The author discusses the ethics of actuarial fairness and attempts to draw a distinction between actuarial fairness and moral fairness. The ethics of wellness programs are discussed with both actuarial fairness and moral fairness in mind. The potential tension between physicians and patients in the zealous pursuit of healthy goals is described. Finally, the logical end point of actuarial fairness with the widespread availability of genetic information is highlighted.

  7. Population projections for AIDS using an actuarial model.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, A D

    1989-09-05

    This paper gives details of a model for forecasting AIDS, developed for actuarial purposes, but used also for population projections. The model is only appropriate for homosexual transmission, but it is age-specific, and it allows variation in the transition intensities by age, duration in certain states and calendar year. The differential equations controlling transitions between states are defined, the method of numerical solution is outlined, and the parameters used in five different Bases of projection are given in detail. Numerical results for the population of England and Wales are shown.

  8. Actuarial contributions to life table analysis.

    PubMed

    Lew, E A

    1985-05-01

    The correct principles for the construction of life tables and more particularly select life tables were developed by actuaries in England in the first half of the 19th century. Actuaries explored the phenomenon of selection not only between the insured and annuitants but also in the general population, distinguishing among initial temporary selection, antiselection, and class selection. The conclusion was reached early that no such thing as an unselected population exists. Group life insurance experience among the actively employed has been shown to provide a more appropriate standard of expected mortality than general population death rates in studies of medical impairments and occupational hazards at ages under 65 years. Mortality rates derived from the Cancer Prevention Study can serve as a useful standard of expected mortality when the objective is determination of excess mortality compared with ostensibly healthy persons at ages 65 years and older.

  9. Biochemical Mechanisms Controlling Terminal Electron Transfer in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmus, R.; Liermann, L. J.; Brantley, S. L.; Tien, M.

    2009-04-01

    The ability of Geobacter sulfurreducens to use a variety of metals as terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for cellular respiration makes it attractive for use in bioremediation and implies its importance to mineral cycling in the environment. This study is aimed at understanding the biochemical mechanisms that allow Geobacter sulfurreducens to use soluble and insoluble iron and manganese forms as TEAs for cellular respiration and is the first of its kind to address the kinetics of manganese use as a TEA by G. sulfurreducens. First, G. sulfurreducens was conditioned to grow on various soluble and insoluble iron and manganese forms. G. sulfurreducens demonstrated enhanced growth rates when cultured using soluble TEAs compared with insoluble TEAs. However, the lower growth rate on insoluble iron compared with soluble iron was observed concomitantly with a 1-2 log lower cell density in stationary phase in insoluble iron cultures and a lower growth yield per electron donor used in log growth phase. Furthermore, the growth yield per electron was similar with both soluble and insoluble iron. These results suggest that the net amount of energy available for biomass production achieved from reducing insoluble iron is lower than with soluble iron, which may be due to a different biochemical mechanism catalyzing the electron transfer to TEA dependent upon the solubility of the TEA. One scenario consistent with this notion is that protein(s) in the outer membrane of G. sulfurreducens that transfers electrons to insoluble TEAs does so in a manner that uncouples electron flow from the proton pump in the cellular membrane, similar to what we have observed with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Both the growth rate and growth yield of G. sulfurreducens on insoluble manganese were higher than on insoluble iron, indicating that there is a difference in the flow of electrons to the TEA in these two situations. While the different redox potentials of these elements may affect these values

  10. Psychotherapy: theory, experience, and personalized actuarial tables.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, D B; Shemberg, K M

    1977-12-01

    This paper addresses the issue of the role of theory in the actual application of psychotherapeutic operations. Within the present framework, psychotherapeutic effectiveness is seen as an empirical, actuarial process which occurs in an interpersonal setting separate from theoretical considerations. The role of theory is discussed and a rationale for the coexistence of equally 'effective' contradictory theories is presented. Suggestions for future research in the area of behaviour change are made and an argument for the eventual development of a 'therapeutic cookbook' is presented.

  11. A controlled biochemical release device with embedded nanofluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Hong, Wei; Dong, Liang

    2012-04-01

    A controlled release device is developed by embedding nanofluidic biomolecule reservoirs into a polymer network of a stimuli-responsive hydrogel. The reservoirs are made of liquid core-polymer shell nanofibers using co-electrospinning. The mechanism of controlled release is based on buckling instability of the polymer shell under combined axial and radial compression, caused by volume changes of hydrogel responding to a specific stimulus. The device decouples releasable biomolecules from a hydrogel polymer matrix, avoiding chemical interactions between biomolecules and hydrogel polymer chains, and thus, alleviating nontrivial chemical and biological engineering design of hydrogel formulations. Temperature-sensitive hydrogel is used as a model hydrogel.

  12. An Application of Actuarial Methods in Psychiatric Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overall, John E.; Higgins, C. Wayne

    1977-01-01

    This research provides an initial evaluation of an actuarial diagnostic testing program that is being conducted by the Psychometric Laboratory at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. It was hoped that an actuarial program for psychiatric diagnosis would create greater efficiency, lower cost, and superior validity with respect…

  13. Development of an Actuarial Science Program at Salisbury University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainwright, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of an actuarial science track for the mathematics major at Salisbury University (SU). A timeline from the initial investigation into such a program through the proposal and approval processes is shared for those who might be interested in developing a new actuarial program. It is wise to start small and take…

  14. Potential Utility of Actuarial Methods for Identifying Specific Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Nicholas; Newman, Isadore

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how actuarial methods can supplant discrepancy models and augment problem solving and Response to Intervention (RTI) efforts by guiding the process of identifying specific learning disabilities (SLD). Actuarial methods use routinized selection and execution of formulas derived from empirically established relationships to…

  15. New Possibilities for Magnetic Control of Chemical and Biochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly; Lawler, Ronald G

    2017-02-20

    Chemistry is controlled by Coulomb energy; magnetic energy is lower by many orders of magnitude and may be confidently ignored in the energy balance of chemical reactions. The situation becomes less clear, however, when reaction rates are considered. In this case, magnetic perturbations of nearly degenerate energy surface crossings may produce observable, and sometimes even dramatic, effects on reactions rates, product yields, and spectroscopic transitions. A case in point that has been studied for nearly five decades is electron spin-selective chemistry via the intermediacy of radical pairs. Magnetic fields, external (permanent or oscillating) and the internal magnetic fields of magnetic nuclei, have been shown to overcome electron spin selection rules for pairs of reactive paramagnetic intermediates, catalyzing or inhibiting chemical reaction pathways. The accelerating effects of magnetic stimulation may therefore be considered to be magnetic catalysis. This type of catalysis is most commonly observed for reactions of a relatively long-lived radical pair containing two weakly interacting electron spins formed by dissociation of molecules or by electron transfer. The pair may exist in singlet (total electron spin is zero) or triplet (total spin is unity) spin states. In virtually all cases, only the singlet state yields stable reaction products. Magnetic interactions with nuclear spins or applied fields may therefore affect the reactivity of radical pairs by changing the angular momentum of the pairs. Magnetic catalysis, first detected via its effect on spin state populations in nuclear and electron spin resonance, has been shown to function in a great variety of well-characterized reactions of organic free radicals. Considerably less well studied are examples suggesting that the basic mechanism may also explain magnetic effects that stimulate ATP synthesis, eliminating ATP deficiency in cardiac diseases, control cell proliferation, killing cancer cells, and

  16. Biochemical and physical signal gradients in hydrogels to control stem cell behavior**

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Oju; Alt, Daniel S.; Linderman, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gradients of biochemical and physical signals in macroscale, degradable hydrogels have been engineered that can regulate photoencapsulated human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) behavior. This simple, cytocompatible and versatile gradient system may be a valuable tool for researchers in biomaterials science to control stem cell fate in 3D and guide tissue regeneration. PMID:23983019

  17. 76 FR 81362 - Regulations Governing the Performance of Actuarial Services Under the Employee Retirement Income...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES 20 CFR Part 901 RIN 1545-BC82 Regulations Governing the Performance of Actuarial... Enrollment of Actuaries. ACTION: Correction to final regulations. SUMMARY: This document contains corrections..., 2011 (76 FR 17762) relating to the enrollment of actuaries. DATES: This correction is effective...

  18. 77 FR 63337 - Renewal of Charter of Advisory Committee on Actuarial Examinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Renewal of Charter of Advisory Committee on Actuarial Examinations AGENCY: Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries. ACTION: Notice of Renewal of Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries announces the renewal of the charter of the...

  19. 20 CFR 901.32 - Receipt of information concerning enrolled actuaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... actuaries. 901.32 Section 901.32 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS... Suspension or Termination of Enrollment § 901.32 Receipt of information concerning enrolled actuaries. If an... Guaranty Corporation, or a member of the Joint Board has reason to believe that an enrolled actuary...

  20. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... in calculating the expected loss ratio are appropriate and reasonable, taking into account...

  1. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... in calculating the expected loss ratio are appropriate and reasonable, taking into account...

  2. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... in calculating the expected loss ratio are appropriate and reasonable, taking into account...

  3. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... in calculating the expected loss ratio are appropriate and reasonable, taking into account...

  4. Thrown a curve. CMS' actuaries: healthcare spending will continue to increase, despite reform law promises.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2011-08-01

    While CMS actuaries say the 2010 reform law will not slow the nation's healthcare spending in the coming decade, Mary Grealy, of the Healthcare Leadership Council, says the law "was basically a coverage bill. We just didn't get to the other half, which would be aimed at the cost-drivers in the system." She adds that the healthcare system will not control ongoing steep increases in spending until additional legislation reshapes the dominant public insurance plans.

  5. Classification accuracy of actuarial risk assessment instruments.

    PubMed

    Neller, Daniel J; Frederick, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    Users of commonly employed actuarial risk assessment instruments (ARAIs) hope to generate numerical probability statements about risk; however, ARAI manuals often do not explicitly report data that are essential for understanding the classification accuracy of the instruments. In addition, ARAI manuals often contain data that have the potential for misinterpretation. The authors of the present article address the accurate generation of probability statements. First, they illustrate how the reporting of numerical probability statements based on proportions rather than predictive values can mislead users of ARAIs. Next, they report essential test characteristics that, to date, have gone largely unreported in ARAI manuals. Then they discuss a graphing method that can enhance the practice of clinicians who communicate risk via numerical probability statements. After the authors review several strategies for selecting optimal cut-off scores, they show how the graphing method can be used to estimate positive predictive values for each cut-off score of commonly used ARAIs, across all possible base rates. They also show how the graphing method can be used to estimate base rates of violent recidivism in local samples.

  6. Radiation Dose Predicts for Biochemical Control in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Alice Y.; Burri, Ryan J.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of patient- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From a prospectively collected database of 2250 men treated at Mount Sinai Hospital from 1990 to 2004 with low-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer, 558 men with either one or more intermediate-risk features (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level 10-20 ng/mL, Gleason score 7, or Stage T2b) were identified who had a minimum follow-up of 24 months and postimplant CT-based dosimetric analysis. Biologically effective dose (BED) values were calculated to compare doses from different isotopes and treatment regimens. Patients were treated with brachytherapy with or without hormone therapy and/or external-beam radiotherapy. Patient- and treatment-related factors were analyzed with respect to FFbF. The median follow-up was 60 months (range, 24-167 months). Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Univariate analyses were used to determine whether any variable was predictive of FFbF. A two-sided p value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Overall, the actuarial FFbF at 10 years was 86%. Dose (BED <150 Gy{sub 2} vs. {>=}150 Gy{sub 2}) was the only significant predictor of FFbF (p < 0.001). None of the other variables (PSA, external-beam radiotherapy, Gleason score, treatment type, hormones, stage, and number of risk factors) was found to be a statistically significant predictor of 10-year FFbF. Conclusions: Radiation dose is an important predictor of FFbF in intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Treatment should continue to be individualized according to presenting disease characteristics until results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 0232 become available.

  7. Impact of actuarial assumptions on pension costs: A simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Shaira; Ibrahim, Rose Irnawaty

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of pension costs to changes in the underlying assumptions of a hypothetical pension plan in order to gain a perspective on the relative importance of the various actuarial assumptions via a simulation analysis. Simulation analyses are used to examine the impact of actuarial assumptions on pension costs. There are two actuarial assumptions will be considered in this study which are mortality rates and interest rates. To calculate pension costs, Accrued Benefit Cost Method, constant amount (CA) modification, constant percentage of salary (CS) modification are used in the study. The mortality assumptions and the implied mortality experience of the plan can potentially have a significant impact on pension costs. While for interest rate assumptions, it is inversely related to the pension costs. Results of the study have important implications for analyst of pension costs.

  8. Actuarial risk assessment: commentary on Berlin et al.

    PubMed

    Hart, Stephen D

    2003-10-01

    F. S. Berlin, N. W. Galbreath, B. Geary, and G. McGlone (this issue) have raised some important questions regarding the use of acturial risk assessment instruments in sex offender civil commitment proceedings, also known as sexually violent predator or SVP proceedings. Their primary point is that interpreting the findings of existing actuarial risk assessment instruments is a tricky business because it is not certain whether the extent to which probability estimates derived from group data can be applied to individual cases. I agree completely with Berlin et al. on this point, but disagree with them concerning the extent to which probability estimates--and, therefore, actuarial instruments--are legally relevant in SVP proceedings. I outline some potential problems with respect to the legal admissibility of actuarial instruments, including their legal relevance.

  9. Sex offenders and actuarial risk assessments: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Terence W

    2003-01-01

    When assessing the recidivism risk of previously convicted sex offenders, the relevant ethical standards and practice guidelines obligate psychologists to acknowledge numerous limits related to their data and conclusions. For the actuarial instruments used in these assessments, the highest rates of classification accuracy are associated with greater specificity compared with sensitivity. Selecting cut-off scores to maximize sensitivity results in an inordinate frequency of false positive classifications. Attempts at maximizing specificity create an undesirable frequency of false negative classifications.Unfortunately, adjusted actuarial assessment cannot remedy these problems created by the sensitivity-specificity tradeoff. As an unstandardized procedure, the accuracy of adjusted actuarial assessment is severely limited. Consequently, civil proceedings for previously convicted sexual offenders rely on assessments of very limited accuracy. Undertaking these assessments, therefore, may be inconsistent with relevant ethical standards and practice guidelines.

  10. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik E.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    In Nature, protons (H+) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H+ channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H+ currents and H+ concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H+ between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymatic flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. The transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH.

  11. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; ...

    2016-04-07

    In Nature, protons (H+) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H+ channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H+ currents and H+ concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H+ between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymatic flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenasemore » and alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, the transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH.« less

  12. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik E.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-04-07

    In Nature, protons (H+) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H+ channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H+ currents and H+ concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H+ between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymatic flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, the transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH.

  13. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik E.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, protons (H+) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H+ channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H+ currents and H+ concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H+ between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymatic flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. The transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH. PMID:27052724

  14. Eating disorders and biochemical composition of saliva: a retrospective matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ann-Katrin; Norring, Claes; Unell, Lennart; Johansson, Anders

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to compare the biochemical composition of saliva from patients with eating disorders (EDs) with saliva from control subjects with no ED. All patients who initiated outpatient treatment in an ED clinic during a 12-month period were invited to participate. Of the 65 patients who started treatment during the period, 54 (50 female patients/four male patients; mean age: 21.5 yr) agreed to participate. The controls were 54 sex- and age-matched patients from a dental health clinic. All participants completed a questionnaire and underwent dental clinical examinations, including laboratory analyses of saliva. The proportion of subjects with unstimulated salivary hyposalivation was lower in the ED group and not correlated with intake of xerogenic drugs. Significant differences in the biochemical composition of saliva were found almost exclusively in the unstimulated state, with albumin, inorganic phosphate, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), chloride, magnesium, and total protein all being significantly higher in the ED group. Conditional logistic regression showed that higher ASAT and total protein concentrations were relatively good predictors of ED, with sensitivity and specificity of 65% and 67%, respectively. In conclusion, elevated salivary concentrations of ASAT and total protein may serve as indicators of ED as well as of disease severity. Future studies are needed to corroborate these initial findings.

  15. An Overview of the Society of Actuaries and Its Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klugman, Stuart; Long, Gena

    2014-01-01

    The Society of Actuaries (SOA) is the world's largest actuarial organization. This article describes the SOA with particular attention paid to its education and qualification processes and resources available for university and college programs.

  16. Relationship between delay in radiotherapy and biochemical control in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Winkle . E-mail: wkwan@bccancer.bc.ca; Pickles, Tom; Duncan, Graeme; Liu, Mitchell; Paltiel, Chuck

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether a delay in radiotherapy is associated with a poorer biochemical control for prostate cancer. Methods: The time to treatment (TTT) from diagnosis of prostate cancer to radiotherapy was analyzed with respect to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control in 1024 hormone-naive patients. The Kaplan-Meier PSA control curves for patients with TTT less than the median were compared with those for patients with TTT greater than the median in 3 predefined risk groups. Statistical significant differences in PSA control were further analyzed using Cox multivariate analysis with pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, T stage, and radiotherapy dose as covariates. Results: The median TTT and median follow-up are 3.7 months and 49 months respectively. Patients with a longer TTT have a statistically significant better PSA control than patients with a shorter TTT if they have intermediate- or high-risk disease. However in multivariate analysis TTT was not found to be significant in predicting PSA control, with pretreatment PSA and Gleason score emerging as highly significant in predicting PSA failure in both intermediate- and high-risk disease. Conclusion: In this study in prostate cancer patients in British Columbia, there was no evidence that a longer time interval between diagnosis and radiotherapy was associated with poorer PSA control.

  17. 20 CFR 901.20 - Standards of performance of actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standards of performance of actuarial services. 901.20 Section 901.20 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS... enrolled actuary shall exercise due care, skill, prudence and diligence to ensure that: (1) The...

  18. Including an Exam P/1 Prep Course in a Growing Actuarial Science Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the actuarial science program at our university and the development of a course to enhance students' problem solving skills while preparing them for Exam P/1 of the Society of Actuaries (SOA) and the Casualty Actuary Society (CAS). The Exam P/1 prep course, formally titled Mathematical Foundations of…

  19. 29 CFR 2520.104-42 - Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... Reporting and Disclosure Requirements § 2520.104-42 Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... ERISA that the annual report include as part of the actuarial statement (Schedule B) 1 the present...

  20. The Undergraduate Statistics Major--A Prelude to Actuarial Science Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Michael I.; Williams, Raymond E.

    Recently there has been increased interest related to the Actuarial Science field. An actuary is a business professional who uses mathematical skills to define, analyze, and solve financial and social problems. This paper examines: (1) the interface between Statistical and Actuarial Science training; (2) statistical courses corresponding to…

  1. 75 FR 6359 - Federal Advisory Committee; DoD Board of Actuaries; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; DoD Board of Actuaries; Meeting AGENCY: Department of... amended), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the DoD Board of Actuaries will..., VA 22203. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Inger Pettygrove at the DoD Office of the Actuary, 4040...

  2. 75 FR 22754 - Federal Advisory Committee; Department of Defense Board of Actuaries; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Department of Defense Board of Actuaries; Charter... Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the Department of Defense Board of Actuaries... members appointed by the Secretary of Defense from among qualified professional actuaries who are...

  3. 76 FR 67774 - Actuarial Advisory Committee With Respect to the Railroad Retirement Account; Notice of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... hold a meeting on November 14, 2011, at 9:30 a.m. at the office of the Chief Actuary of the U.S... experience on which the recommendations are based will have been sent by the Chief Actuary to the Committee... Advisory Committee, cio Chief Actuary, U.S. Railroad Retirement Board, 844 North Rush Street,...

  4. 75 FR 47650 - Actuarial Advisory Committee With Respect to the Railroad Retirement Account; Notice of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... hold a meeting on September 23, 2010, at 9:30 a.m. at the office of the Chief Actuary of the U.S... experience on which the recommendations are based will have been sent by the Chief Actuary to the Committee... Advisory Committee, c/o Chief Actuary, U.S. Railroad Retirement Board, 844 North Rush Street,...

  5. 26 CFR 300.8 - Renewal of enrollment of enrolled actuary fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Renewal of enrollment of enrolled actuary fee...) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION USER FEES § 300.8 Renewal of enrollment of enrolled actuary fee. (a) Applicability. This section applies to the renewal of enrollment of enrolled actuaries with the Joint Board...

  6. 77 FR 24233 - Actuarial Advisory Committee With Respect to the Railroad Retirement Account; Notice of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... hold a meeting on May 30, 2012, at 9:30 a.m. at the office of the Chief Actuary of the U.S. Railroad... communications or notices to the RRB Actuarial Advisory Committee, c/o Chief Actuary, U.S. Railroad...

  7. The Role of an Actuarial Director in the Development of an Introductory Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staples, Susan G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the roles and duties of a director in developing an introductory actuarial program. Degree plan design, specialized exam courses, internship classes, coordination of efforts with Economics and Finance Departments, opportunities for creating a minor in actuarial mathematics, actuarial clubs, career advice, and interaction with actuarial…

  8. Actuarial Science at One Four-Year Comprehensive University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlwood, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Building an Actuarial Science program designated as advanced requires dedicated faculty, support from the administration, and a core group of strong students. Washburn University may serve as a model for those wishing to start or enhance such a program at their institution. We face three main ongoing challenges: first, the hiring and retention of…

  9. Quantitative Synthesis: An Actuarial Base for Planning Impact Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordray, David S.; Sonnefeld, L. Joseph

    1985-01-01

    There are numerous micro-level methods decisions associated with planning an impact evaluation. Quantitative synthesis methods can be used to construct an actuarial data base for establishing the likelihood of achieving desired sample sizes, statistical power, and measurement characteristics. (Author/BS)

  10. Starting an Actuarial Science Major at a Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The article provides details of the process of starting an actuarial science major at a small, liberal arts college. Some critique of the major is included, as well as some challenges that may be faced by others wanting to start such a major at their institution.

  11. Conversations with your actuary: getting to the right number.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C

    2013-05-01

    A healthcare finance leader can guarantee recognition of his or her organization's insurance program and better manage the program's liability by discussing changes in the following areas with an actuary: Claims management. Exposure. Coverage or retention Financial reporting of losses. Management goals. Other insurance and operational matters.

  12. Connecting clinical and actuarial prediction with rule-based methods.

    PubMed

    Fokkema, Marjolein; Smits, Niels; Kelderman, Henk; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2015-06-01

    Meta-analyses comparing the accuracy of clinical versus actuarial prediction have shown actuarial methods to outperform clinical methods, on average. However, actuarial methods are still not widely used in clinical practice, and there has been a call for the development of actuarial prediction methods for clinical practice. We argue that rule-based methods may be more useful than the linear main effect models usually employed in prediction studies, from a data and decision analytic as well as a practical perspective. In addition, decision rules derived with rule-based methods can be represented as fast and frugal trees, which, unlike main effects models, can be used in a sequential fashion, reducing the number of cues that have to be evaluated before making a prediction. We illustrate the usability of rule-based methods by applying RuleFit, an algorithm for deriving decision rules for classification and regression problems, to a dataset on prediction of the course of depressive and anxiety disorders from Penninx et al. (2011). The RuleFit algorithm provided a model consisting of 2 simple decision rules, requiring evaluation of only 2 to 4 cues. Predictive accuracy of the 2-rule model was very similar to that of a logistic regression model incorporating 20 predictor variables, originally applied to the dataset. In addition, the 2-rule model required, on average, evaluation of only 3 cues. Therefore, the RuleFit algorithm appears to be a promising method for creating decision tools that are less time consuming and easier to apply in psychological practice, and with accuracy comparable to traditional actuarial methods.

  13. Physico-chemical and Bio-chemical Controls on Soil C Saturation Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Six, Johan; Plante, Alain F.

    2011-05-31

    In this project, we tested through a multitude of lab and field experiments the concept of soil C stabilization and determined metrics for the level of C saturation across soils and soil organic matter fractions. The basic premise of the soil C saturation concept is that there is a maximum amount of C that can be stabilized within a soil, even when C input is further increased. In a first analysis, our results showed that linear regression models do not adequately predict maximal organic C stabilization by fine soil particles. Soil physical and chemical properties associated with soil clay mineralogy, such as specific surface area and organic C loading, should be incorporated into models for predicting maximal organic C stabilization. In a second analysis, we found significantly greater maximal C stabilization in the microaggregate-protected versus the non-microaggregate protected mineral fractions, which provides independent validation that microaggregation plays an important role in increasing the protection and stabilization of soil C leading to greater total soil C accumulation in these pools. In a third study, our results question the role of biochemical preference in mineral C stabilization and of the chemical recalcitrance of specific plant-derived compounds in non-protected soil C accumulation. Because C biochemical composition of slowly turning over mineral protected C pools does not change with C saturation, input C composition is unlikely to affect long-term C stabilization. Rather, C saturation and stabilization in soil is controlled only by the quantity of C input to the soil and the physical and chemical protection mechanisms at play in long-term C stabilization. In conclusion, we have further corroborated the concept of soil C saturation and elucidated several mechanisms underlying this soil C saturation.

  14. Actuarial and actual analysis of surgical results: empirical validation.

    PubMed

    Grunkemeier, G L; Anderson, R P; Starr, A

    2001-06-01

    This report validates the use of the Kaplan-Meier (actuarial) method of computing survival curves by comparing 12-year estimates published in 1978 with current assessments. It also contrasts cumulative incidence curves, referred to as "actual" analysis in the cardiac-related literature with Kaplan-Meier curves for thromboembolism and demonstrates that with the former estimate the percentage of events that will actually occur.

  15. Biochemical evidence of efficacy of potash alum for the control of dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus).

    PubMed

    Preet, Shabad; Sneha, A

    2011-06-01

    Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya in India and other South East Asian countries, and novel insecticides for vector control are urgently needed. In the present investigation, efficacy of potash alum, a traditionally known double salt in Indian and Chinese medicine system, was tested against the larvae of dengue vector, A. aegypti. LC(50,) LC(90) and LC(99) values were recorded for various instar larvae where I instar larvae were found to be the most susceptible and IV instar larvae as the least susceptible one. The LC(50) values of crude and standard potash alum of various instar larvae ranged between 15.29 and 48.53 ppm and 20.50-65.10 ppm, respectively. Biochemical changes were also evidenced in IV instar A. aegypti larvae following a sublethal exposure for 24 h in the levels of various nutrient reserves and primary metabolites such as sugar, glycogen, lipids and proteins suggesting possible mode of action responsible for larval mortality. Sugar and glycogen concentrations were measured as 24.6 and 10.67 μg per five larvae in controls which were significantly (p<0.05) reduced by 32.11-93.98% and 39.26-94.47%, respectively, in larvae treated with crude alum. In controls, protein and lipid content were recorded as 210.74 and 94.71 μg per five larvae which dropped up to 26.53% and 25.5%, respectively, in larvae following treatment with crude alum. Moreover, drastic changes were also recorded for DNA content with 25.39-44.17% decrease in crude alum-treated larvae. It is evident from these results that potash alum, a fairly cheaper and readily available ecofriendly compound could be recommended as a potential chemical larvicide against dengue vector at mosquito breeding sites in the vicinity of human dwellings.

  16. Different strategies of metabolic regulation in cyanobacteria: from transcriptional to biochemical control

    PubMed Central

    Jablonsky, Jiri; Papacek, Stepan; Hagemann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 show similar changes in the metabolic response to changed CO2 conditions but exhibit significant differences at the transcriptomic level. This study employs a systems biology approach to investigate the difference in metabolic regulation of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Presented multi-level kinetic model for Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a new approach integrating and analysing metabolomic, transcriptomic and fluxomics data obtained under high and ambient CO2 levels. Modelling analysis revealed that higher number of different isozymes in Synechocystis 6803 improves homeostatic stability of several metabolites, especially 3PGA by 275%, against changes in gene expression, compared to Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942. Furthermore, both cyanobacteria have the same amount of phosphoglycerate mutases but Synechocystis 6803 exhibits only ~20% differences in their mRNA levels after shifts from high to ambient CO2 level, in comparison to ~500% differences in the case of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942. These and other data imply that the biochemical control dominates over transcriptional regulation in Synechocystis 6803 to acclimate central carbon metabolism in the environment of variable inorganic carbon availability without extra cost carried by large changes in the proteome. PMID:27611502

  17. A microfluidic platform for controlled biochemical stimulation of twin neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Emilia; Piraino, Francesco; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Redaelli, Alberto; Menegon, Andrea; Rasponi, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Spatially and temporally resolved delivery of soluble factors is a key feature for pharmacological applications. In this framework, microfluidics coupled to multisite electrophysiology offers great advantages in neuropharmacology and toxicology. In this work, a microfluidic device for biochemical stimulation of neuronal networks was developed. A micro-chamber for cell culturing, previously developed and tested for long term neuronal growth by our group, was provided with a thin wall, which partially divided the cell culture region in two sub-compartments. The device was reversibly coupled to a flat micro electrode array and used to culture primary neurons in the same microenvironment. We demonstrated that the two fluidically connected compartments were able to originate two parallel neuronal networks with similar electrophysiological activity but functionally independent. Furthermore, the device allowed to connect the outlet port to a syringe pump and to transform the static culture chamber in a perfused one. At 14 days invitro, sub-networks were independently stimulated with a test molecule, tetrodotoxin, a neurotoxin known to block action potentials, by means of continuous delivery. Electrical activity recordings proved the ability of the device configuration to selectively stimulate each neuronal network individually. The proposed microfluidic approach represents an innovative methodology to perform biological, pharmacological, and electrophysiological experiments on neuronal networks. Indeed, it allows for controlled delivery of substances to cells, and it overcomes the limitations due to standard drug stimulation techniques. Finally, the twin network configuration reduces biological variability, which has important outcomes on pharmacological and drug screening.

  18. Season-controlled changes in biochemical constituents and oxidase enzyme activities in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Sen, Supatra; Mukherji, S

    2009-07-01

    Season-controlled changes in biochemical constituents viz. carotenoids (carotene and xanthophyll) and pectic substances along with IAA-oxidase and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) enzyme activities were estimated/assayed in leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. (tomato) in two developmental stages--pre-flowering (35 days after sowing) and post-flowering (75 days after sowing) in three different seasons--summer rainy and winter Carotenoid content along with pectic substances were highest in winter and declined significantly in summer followed by rainy i.e. winter > summer > rainy. Carotenoid content was significantly higher in the pre-flowering as compared to post-flowering in all three seasons while pectic substances increased in the post-flowering as compared to pre-flowering throughout the annual cycle. IAA oxidase and PPO enzyme activities were enhanced in rainy and decreased sharply in summer and winter i.e. rainy > summer > winter. Both the enzymes exhibited higher activity in the post-flowering stage as compared to pre-flowering in all three seasons. These results indicate winter to be the most favourable season for tomato plants while rainy season environmental conditions prove to be unfavourable (stressful) with diminished content of carotenoid and pectic substances and low activities of IAA oxidase and PPO, ultimately leading to poor growth and productivity.

  19. Biochemical Control of Fungal Biomass and Enzyme Production During Native Hawaiian Litter Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatangelo, K. L.; Cordova, T. P.; Vitousek, P. M.

    2007-12-01

    Microbial growth and enzyme production during decomposition is controlled by the availability of carbon substrates, essential elements, and the ratios of these (such as lignin:N). We manipulated carbon:nutrient stoichiometry during decomposition using a natural fertility gradient in Hawaii and litter of varying initial biochemistry. We collected freshly senesced litter of seven biochemically distinct species from three sites offering differing levels of N, P, cations, and 15N , but similar yearly rainfall and temperature patterns. Litter types were decomposed at both the sites they were collected, and at the other site(s) that species was found. Litter was collected at multiple time points, and after one year of decomposition, calculated K constants varied an order of magnitude, from 0.276 to 2.76. Decomposition rates varied significantly with both litter site of origin and deployment, except at the oldest, P-limited site, where litter site of origin was not significantly correlated with decomposition within species. As microbial exocellular enzymes provide the catalyst for the breakdown of organic molecules including phenols, cellulose, and cutin, we assayed polyphenol oxidase, cellobiohydrolase, cutinase, chitinase, and lignin peroxidase to evaluate the breakdown sequence of different litter types. To measure the fungal biomass accumulating during decomposition, we extracted (22E)-Ergosta-5,7,22-trien-3beta- ol (ergosterol) on a subset of samples. The production of particular exocellular enzymes on litter species responded distinctly to origin and decomposition sites: after six months, chitinase and cellobiohydrolase were significantly affected by origin site, whereas polyphenol oxidase activity was controlled by deployment site. We conclude that site characteristics can alter the interaction between litter carbon:nutrient ratios and decomposition rate, mediated through microbial biomass and enzyme production.

  20. 78 FR 9890 - DoD Board of Actuaries; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... of the Secretary DoD Board of Actuaries; Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: DoD... Committee meeting of the DoD Board of Actuaries will take place. DATES: July 18, 2013, from 1:00 p.m. to 5... Human Resource Activity, DoD Office of the Actuary, 4800 Mark Center Drive, STE 06J25-01, Alexandria,...

  1. A detailed radiobiological and dosimetric analysis of biochemical outcomes in a case-control study of permanent prostate brachytherapy patients

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Wayne M.; Stewart, Renee R.; Merrick, Gregory S.

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine dosimetric and radiobiological predictors of biochemical control after recalculation of prostate implant dosimetry using updated AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) parameters and the radiobiological parameters recommended by TG-137. All biochemical failures among patients implanted with {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd sources between 1994 and March 2006 were matched 2:1 with nonfailure controls. The individual matching was by risk group, radionuclide, prescribed dose, and time of implant (one match before and one after the failed patient) resulting in a median follow-up of 10.9 years. Complete dose volume histogram (DVH) data were recalculated for all 55 cases and 110 controls after updating the original source strength by the retrospectively determined ratios of TG-43. Differential DVH data were acquired in 179 increments of prostate volume versus percentage prescribed dose. At each incremental dose level i, the biologically equivalent dose BED{sub i}, equivalent uniform dose EUD{sub i}, and tumor control probability TCP{sub i} were calculated from the implant dose plus any external beam delivered to the patient. Total BED, EUD, and TCP were then derived from the incremental values for comparison with single point dosimetric quality parameters and DVH-based averages. There was no significant difference between failures and controls in terms of total BED (143 vs 142 Gy), EUD (95 vs 94 Gy), or TCP (0.87 vs 0.89). Conditional logistic regression analysis factored out the matching variables and stratified the cohort into each case and its controls, but no radiobiological parameter was predictive of biochemical failure. However, there was a significant difference between radiobiological parameters of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd due to less complete coverage of the target volume by the former isotope. The implant BED and TCP were highly correlated with the D{sub 90} and natural prescription doses and a series of mean DVH-based doses such as

  2. A detailed radiobiological and dosimetric analysis of biochemical outcomes in a case-control study of permanent prostate brachytherapy patients.

    PubMed

    Butler, Wayne M; Stewart, Renee R; Merrick, Gregory S

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine dosimetric and radiobiological predictors of biochemical control after recalculation of prostate implant dosimetry using updated AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) parameters and the radiobiological parameters recommended by TG-137. All biochemical failures among patients implanted with 125I Or 103Pd sources between 1994 and March 2006 were matched 2:1 with nonfailure controls. The individual matching was by risk group, radionuclide, prescribed dose, and time of implant (one match before and one after the failed patient) resulting in a median follow-up of 10.9 years. Complete dose volume histogram (DVH) data were recalculated for all 55 cases and 110 controls after updating the original source strength by the retrospectively determined ratios of TG-43. Differential DVH data were acquired in 179 increments of prostate volume versus percentage prescribed dose. At each incremental dose level i, the biologically equivalent dose BEDi, equivalent uniform dose EUDi, and tumor control probability TCPi were calculated from the implant dose plus any external beam delivered to the patient. Total BED, EUD, and TCP were then derived from the incremental values for comparison with single point dosimetric quality parameters and DVH-based averages. There was no significant difference between failures and controls in terms of total BED (143 vs 142 Gy), EUD (95 vs 94 Gy), or TCP (0.87 vs 0.89). Conditional logistic regression analysis factored out the matching variables and stratified the cohort into each case and its controls, but no radiobiological parameter was predictive of biochemical failure. However, there was a significant difference between radiobiological parameters of 125I and 103Pd due to less complete coverage of the target volume by the former isotope. The implant BED and TCP were highly correlated with the D90 and natural prescription doses and a series of mean DVH-based doses such as the harmonic mean and expressions of the

  3. Actuarial risk assessment models: a review of critical issues related to violence and sex-offender recidivism assessments.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, S; Kirkish, P; Garrick, T; Weinberger, L E; Phenix, A

    2000-01-01

    Risk assessment in the area of identification of violence has been dichotomized by several prominent researchers as the "clinical approach" versus the "actuarial method". The proponents of the actuarial approach argue for actuarially derived decisions to replace existing clinical practice. The actuarial method requires no clinical input, just a translation of the relevant material from the records to calculate the risk score. A risk appraisal approach based upon a sole actuarial method raises several questions: those of public safety, peer-accepted standards of practice, liability issues, and concordance with evidence-based medicine practice. We conclude that the sole actuarial approach fails to satisfy these critical issues.

  4. Actual and actuarial probabilities of competing risks: apples and lemons.

    PubMed

    Grunkemeier, Gary L; Jin, Ruyun; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M

    2007-05-01

    The probability of a type of failure that is not inevitable, but can be precluded by other events such as death, is given by the cumulative incidence function. In cardiac research articles, it has become known as the actual probability, in contrast to the actuarial methods of estimation, usually implemented by the Kaplan-Meier (KM) estimate. Unlike cumulative incidence, KM attempts to predict what the latent failure probability would be if death were eliminated. To do this, the KM method assumes that the risk of dying and the risk of failure are independent. But this assumption is not true for many cardiac applications in which the risks of failure and death are negatively correlated (ie, patients with a higher risk of dying have a lower risk of failure, and patients with a lower risk of death have a higher risk of failure, which is a condition called informative censoring). Recent editorials in two cardiac journals have promoted the use of the KM method (actuarial estimate) for competing risk events (specifically for heart valve performance) and criticized the use of the cumulative incidence (actual) estimates. This report has two aims: to explain the difference between these two estimates and to show why the KM is generally not appropriate. In the process we will rely on alternative representations of the KM estimator (using redistribution to the right and inverse probability weighting) to explain the difference between the two estimates and to show how it may be possible to adjust KM to overcome the informative censoring.

  5. An actuarial approach to retrofit savings in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Subbarao, Krishnappa; Etingov, Pavel V.; Reddy, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    An actuarial method has been developed for determining energy savings from retrofits from energy use data for a number of buildings. This method should be contrasted with the traditional method of using pre- and post-retrofit data on the same building. This method supports the U.S. Department of Energy Building Performance Database of real building performance data and related tools that enable engineering and financial practitioners to evaluate retrofits. The actuarial approach derives, from the database, probability density functions (PDFs) for energy savings from retrofits by creating peer groups for the user’s pre post buildings. From the energy use distribution of the two groups, the savings PDF is derived. This provides the basis for engineering analysis as well as financial risk analysis leading to investment decisions. Several technical issues are addressed: The savings PDF is obtained from the pre- and post-PDF through a convolution. Smoothing using kernel density estimation is applied to make the PDF more realistic. The low data density problem can be mitigated through a neighborhood methodology. Correlations between pre and post buildings are addressed to improve the savings PDF. Sample size effects are addressed through the Kolmogorov--Smirnov tests and quantile-quantile plots.

  6. 76 FR 17762 - Regulations Governing the Performance of Actuarial Services Under the Employee Retirement Income...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... enrolled actuary who wishes to return to active status from inactive status that depends on how long the... inactive status to demonstrate their return to active practice with more recent experience. It can be... build up, or return to, an active independent practice. For such actuaries, the Joint Board...

  7. A Comparison of Logistic Regression, Neural Networks, and Classification Trees Predicting Success of Actuarial Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Phyllis; Olinsky, Alan; Quinn, John; Smith, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The authors extended previous research by 2 of the authors who conducted a study designed to predict the successful completion of students enrolled in an actuarial program. They used logistic regression to determine the probability of an actuarial student graduating in the major or dropping out. They compared the results of this study with those…

  8. Clinical versus Actuarial Predictions of Violence in Patients with Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, William; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Compared accuracy of an actuarial procedure for the prediction of community violence by patients with mental illnesses to accuracy of clinicians' concern ratings of patient violence. Data came from a study of 357 pairs of patients seen in a psychiatric emergency room. Actuarial predictions based only on patients' histories of violence were more…

  9. Risk Assessment in Child Protective Services: Consensus and Actuarial Model Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Christopher; Wagner, Dennis; Healy, Theresa; Johnson, Kristen

    1999-01-01

    Compared reliability of three widely used child protective service risk-assessment models (one actuarial, two consensus based). Found that, although no system approached 100% interrater reliability, raters employing the actuarial model made consistent estimates of risk for a high percentage of cases they assessed. Interrater reliability for the…

  10. Is More Better? Combining Actuarial Risk Scales to Predict Recidivism among Adult Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seto, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether combining the results of multiple actuarial risk scales increases accuracy in predicting sex offender recidivism. Multiple methods of combining 4 validated actuarial risk scales--the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide, the Sex Offender Risk Appraisal Guide, the Rapid Risk Assessment for Sexual…

  11. An analysis of possible applications of fuzzy set theory to the actuarial credibility theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostaszewski, Krzysztof; Karwowski, Waldemar

    1992-01-01

    In this work, we review the basic concepts of actuarial credibility theory from the point of view of introducing applications of the fuzzy set-theoretic method. We show how the concept of actuarial credibility can be modeled through the fuzzy set membership functions and how fuzzy set methods, especially fuzzy pattern recognition, can provide an alternative tool for estimating credibility.

  12. 75 FR 68790 - Medicare Program; Medicare Part B Monthly Actuarial Rates, Premium Rate, and Annual Deductible...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... monthly Part B premium rate for 2011 is $115.40, which is equal to 50 percent of the monthly actuarial.... These amounts, according to actuarial estimates, will equal, respectively, one-half the expected average... Security Amendments of 1972 (Pub. L. 92-603), the premium rate, which was determined on a fiscal year...

  13. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: a model study.

    PubMed

    Brandt-Pollmann, U; Lebiedz, D; Diehl, M; Sager, S; Schlöder, J

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  14. Real-time nonlinear feedback control of pattern formation in (bio)chemical reaction-diffusion processes: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt-Pollmann, U.; Lebiedz, D.; Diehl, M.; Sager, S.; Schlöder, J.

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies related to manipulation of pattern formation in self-organizing reaction-diffusion processes by appropriate control stimuli become increasingly important both in chemical engineering and cellular biochemistry. In a model study, we demonstrate here exemplarily the application of an efficient nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm to real-time optimal feedback control of pattern formation in a bacterial chemotaxis system modeled by nonlinear partial differential equations. The corresponding drift-diffusion model type is representative for many (bio)chemical systems involving nonlinear reaction dynamics and nonlinear diffusion. We show how the computed optimal feedback control strategy exploits the system inherent physical property of wave propagation to achieve desired control aims. We discuss various applications of our approach to optimal control of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  15. Physiological and biochemical characterization of Trichoderma harzianum, a biological control agent against soilborne fungal plant pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Grondona, I; Hermosa, R; Tejada, M; Gomis, M D; Mateos, P F; Bridge, P D; Monte, E; Garcia-Acha, I

    1997-01-01

    Monoconidial cultures of 15 isolates of Trichoderma harzianum were characterized on the basis of 82 morphological, physiological, and biochemical features and 99 isoenzyme bands from seven enzyme systems. The results were subjected to numerical analysis which revealed four distinct groups. Representative sequences of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS 1)-ITS 2 region in the ribosomal DNA gene cluster were compared between groups confirming this distribution. The utility of the groupings generated from the morphological, physiological, and biochemical data was assessed by including an additional environmental isolate in the electrophoretic analysis. The in vitro antibiotic activity of the T. harzianum isolates was assayed against 10 isolates of five different soilborne fungal plant pathogens: Aphanomyces cochlioides, Rhizoctonia solani, Phoma betae, Acremonium cucurbitacearum, and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis lycopersici. Similarities between levels and specificities of biological activity and the numerical characterization groupings are both discussed in relation to antagonist-specific populations in known and potential biocontrol species. PMID:9251205

  16. Different actuarial risk measures produce different risk rankings for sexual offenders.

    PubMed

    Barbaree, Howard E; Langton, Calvin M; Peacock, Edward J

    2006-10-01

    Percentile ranks were computed for N=262 sex offenders using each of 5 actuarial risk instruments commonly used with adult sex offenders (RRASOR, Static-99, VRAG, SORAG, and MnSOST-R). Mean differences between percentile ranks obtained by different actuarial measures were found to vary inversely with the correlation between the actuarial scores. Following studies of factor analyses of actuarial items, we argue that the discrepancies among actuarial instruments can be substantially accounted for by the way in which the factor Antisocial Behavior and various factors reflecting sexual deviance are represented among the items contained in each instrument. In the discussion, we provide guidance to clinicians in resolving discrepancies between instruments and we discuss implications for future developments in sex offender risk assessment.

  17. Metabolomic profiling and genomic analysis of wheat aneuploid lines to identify genes controlling biochemical pathways in mature grain.

    PubMed

    Francki, Michael G; Hayton, Sarah; Gummer, Joel P A; Rawlinson, Catherine; Trengove, Robert D

    2016-02-01

    Metabolomics is becoming an increasingly important tool in plant genomics to decipher the function of genes controlling biochemical pathways responsible for trait variation. Although theoretical models can integrate genes and metabolites for trait variation, biological networks require validation using appropriate experimental genetic systems. In this study, we applied an untargeted metabolite analysis to mature grain of wheat homoeologous group 3 ditelosomic lines, selected compounds that showed significant variation between wheat lines Chinese Spring and at least one ditelosomic line, tracked the genes encoding enzymes of their biochemical pathway using the wheat genome survey sequence and determined the genetic components underlying metabolite variation. A total of 412 analytes were resolved in the wheat grain metabolome, and principal component analysis indicated significant differences in metabolite profiles between Chinese Spring and each ditelosomic lines. The grain metabolome identified 55 compounds positively matched against a mass spectral library where the majority showed significant differences between Chinese Spring and at least one ditelosomic line. Trehalose and branched-chain amino acids were selected for detailed investigation, and it was expected that if genes encoding enzymes directly related to their biochemical pathways were located on homoeologous group 3 chromosomes, then corresponding ditelosomic lines would have a significant reduction in metabolites compared with Chinese Spring. Although a proportion showed a reduction, some lines showed significant increases in metabolites, indicating that genes directly and indirectly involved in biosynthetic pathways likely regulate the metabolome. Therefore, this study demonstrated that wheat aneuploid lines are suitable experimental genetic system to validate metabolomics-genomics networks.

  18. Effect of controlled release formulations of diuron and alachlor herbicides on the biochemical activity of agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Tejada, Manuel; Morillo, Esmeralda; Gómez, Isidoro; Madrid, Fernando; Undabeytia, Tomás

    2017-01-15

    The use of pesticides in agriculture is essential because it reduces the economic losses caused by pests, improving crop yields. In spite of the growing number of studies concerning the development and application of controlled release formulations (CRFs) of pesticides in agricultural soils, there are no studies about the effects of such formulations on the biochemical properties. In this paper the dissipation of diuron and alachlor in three agricultural soils for 127days, applied either as commercial or CRFs, was determined as well as their concomitant effects on soil biochemical properties. Dehydrogenase, urease, β-glucosidase and phosphatase activities were measured thought the experimental period. The application of alachlor as CRF increases its half-life time in soils, whereas no differences were noticed between diuron formulations due to its slower degradation, which takes longer than its release from the CRF. At the end of the incubation period, the enzymatic activities were the same after the use of diuron either as commercial or CRF, recovering the soil previous status. For alachlor formulations, no differences in enzymatic activities were again observed between both formulations, but their levels in soils were enhanced. Therefore, the use of these CRFs does not adversely affect the soil biochemical properties.

  19. A multisite comparison of actuarial risk instruments for sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Harris, Grant T; Rice, Marnie E; Quinsey, Vernon L; Lalumière, Martin L; Boer, Douglas; Lang, Carol

    2003-09-01

    Four actuarial instruments for the prediction of violent and sexual reoffending (the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide [VRAG], Sex Offender Risk Appraisal Guide [SORAG], Rapid Risk Assessment for Sex Offender Recidivism [RRASOR] and Static-99) were evaluated in 4 samples of sex offenders (N = 396). Although all 4 instruments predicted violent (including sexual) recidivism and recidivism known to be sexually motivated, areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) were consistently higher for the VRAG and the SORAG. The instruments performed better when there were fewer missing items and follow-up time was fixed, with an ROC area up to .84 for the VRAG, for example, under such favorable conditions. Predictive accuracy was higher for child molesters than for rapists, especially for the Static-99 and the RRASOR. Consistent with past research, survival analyses revealed that those offenders high in both psychopathy and sexual deviance were an especially high-risk group.

  20. The Actuarial Society of South Africa AIDS model.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The AIDS Committee of the Actuarial Society of South Africa has developed a demographic model to allow researchers to project the impact of HIV and AIDS in South Africa. The model is available for use as a projection tool rather than to endorse a given projected scenario as being representative. It is very flexible and can be adapted to suit different purposes by anyone with a working knowledge of Microsoft Excel. The need for a model, calibration of the model, the lack of allowance in the model for racial and cultural heterogeneity in the underlying population, and default scenario projections are discussed. The model is available free of charge via E-mail and on the worldwide web at the following respective addresses: awhitelo@oldmutual.com and http://www.und.ac.za/und/eco/eru/eru.htm.

  1. [Fundamentals of quality control systems in medical-biochemical laboratories--the role of marketing].

    PubMed

    Topić, E; Turek, S

    2000-01-01

    The basic criterion for the overall quality system in medical biochemistry laboratories concerning equipment, premises and laboratory staff in primary health care (PHC) (Regulations on quality systems and good laboratory practice of the Croatian Medical Biochemists Chamber, 1995, Regulations on categorization of medical biochemistry laboratories of the Croatian Medical Biochemists Chamber, 1996, EC4: Essential criteria for quality systems in medical laboratories. Eur J Clin Chem Clin Biochem 1997 in medical biochemical laboratories included in the First Croatia health project, Primary health care subproject, has been met by the marketing approach to the project. The equipment ensuring implementation of the complete laboratory program (NN/96), more accurate and precise analytical procedures, and higher reliability of laboratory test results compared with previous equipment, has been purchased by an international tender. Uniform technology and methods of analysis have ensured high standards of good laboratory services, yielding test results than can be transferred from primary to secondary health care level. The new equipment has improved organization between central and detached medical biochemistry laboratory units, while the high quality requirement has led to improvement in the staff structure, e.g., medical biochemists have been employed in laboratories that had previously worked without such a professional. Equipment renewal has been accompanied by proper education for all levels of PHC professionals.

  2. Set-reset flip-flop memory based on enzyme reactions: toward memory systems controlled by biochemical pathways.

    PubMed

    Pita, Marcos; Strack, Guinevere; MacVittie, Kevin; Zhou, Jian; Katz, Evgeny

    2009-12-10

    The enzyme-based set-reset flip-flop memory system was designed with the core part composed of horseradish peroxidase and diaphorase biocatalyzing oxidation and reduction of redox species (2,6-dichloroindophenol or ferrocyanide). The biocatalytic redox reactions were activated by H(2)O(2) and NADH produced in situ by different enzymatic reactions allowing transformation of various biochemical signals (glucose, lactate, d-glucose-6-phosphate, ethanol) into reduced or oxidized states of the redox species. The current redox state of the system, controlled by the set and reset signals, was read out by optical and electrochemical means. The multiwell setup with the flip-flop units separately activated by various set/reset signals allowed encoding of complex information. For illustrative purposes, the words "Clarkson" and then "University" were encoded using ASCII character codes. The present flip-flop system will allow additional functions of enzyme-based biocomputing systems, thus enhancing the performance of multisignal biosensors and actuators controlled by logically processed biochemical signals. The integrated enzyme logic systems and flip-flop memories associated with signal-responsive chemical actuators are envisaged as basic elements of future implantable biomedical devices controlled by immediate physiological conditions.

  3. 78 FR 12102 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Sigma Aldrich Research Biochemicals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Sigma Aldrich... Administration (DEA) to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of the following classes of controlled...

  4. 78 FR 773 - Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc., Commercial/Actuarial/Information Delivery Services (IDS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... Employment and Training Administration Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc., Commercial/Actuarial/ Information Delivery Services (IDS)/Corporate & Financial Reporting Group, Hartford, CT; Notice of Affirmative... (IDS)/Corporate & Financial Reporting group, Hartford, Connecticut (The Hartford-IDS Group)....

  5. 20 CFR 901.20 - Standards of performance of actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... representation if such document is necessary for the taxpayer to comply with his or her current obligations under... actuarial document he/she has signed upon discovery of the non-filing. Such notification shall be made...

  6. 20 CFR 901.20 - Standards of performance of actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... representation if such document is necessary for the taxpayer to comply with his or her current obligations under... actuarial document he/she has signed upon discovery of the non-filing. Such notification shall be made...

  7. A classification tree approach to the development of actuarial violence risk assessment tools.

    PubMed

    Steadman, H J; Silver, E; Monahan, J; Appelbaum, P S; Robbins, P C; Mulvey, E P; Grisso, T; Roth, L H; Banks, S

    2000-02-01

    Since the 1970s, a wide body of research has suggested that the accuracy of clinical risk assessments of violence might be increased if clinicians used actuarial tools. Despite considerable progress in recent years in the development of such tools for violence risk assessment, they remain primarily research instruments, largely ignored in daily clinical practice. We argue that because most existing actuarial tools are based on a main effects regression approach, they do not adequately reflect the contingent nature of the clinical assessment processes. To enhance the use of actuarial violence risk assessment tools, we propose a classification tree rather than a main effects regression approach. In addition, we suggest that by employing two decision thresholds for identifying high- and low-risk cases--instead of the standard single threshold--the use of actuarial tools to make dichotomous risk classification decisions may be further enhanced. These claims are supported with empirical data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study.

  8. A Bayesian approach to the group versus individual prediction controversy in actuarial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Scurich, Nicholas; John, Richard S

    2012-06-01

    Recent attempts to indict the use of actuarial risk assessment instruments have relied on confidence intervals to demonstrate that risk estimates derived at the group level do not necessarily apply to any specific individual within that group. This article contends that frequentist confidence intervals are inapposite to the current debate. Instead, Bayesian credible intervals are necessary-in principle-to accomplish what commentators are concerned about: describing the precision of an actuarial risk estimate. After illustrating both the calculation and interpretation of credible intervals, this article shows how such intervals can be used to characterize the precision of actuarial risk estimates. It then explores the legal implications of wide and overlapping intervals. Contrary to what detractors claim, the fact that risk estimate intervals overlap is not a germane to legal (logical) relevance, and therefore actuarial risk estimates cannot be per se "inadmissible" on this basis.

  9. 78 FR 64943 - Medicare Program; Medicare Part B Monthly Actuarial Rates, Premium Rate, and Annual Deductible...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... health clinics, ambulatory surgical centers, comprehensive outpatient rehabilitation facilities, and... health centers, rehabilitation and psychiatric hospitals, etc. Table 3--Derivation of Monthly Actuarial... facilities, rural health clinics, Federally qualified health centers, rehabilitation and...

  10. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM.

    PubMed

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Block, Stephan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela; Hofacker, Ivo; Müller, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions.

  11. Sequence-controlled RNA self-processing: computational design, biochemical analysis, and visualization by AFM

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Sonja; Badelt, Stefan; Flamm, Christoph; Delcea, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Reversible chemistry allowing for assembly and disassembly of molecular entities is important for biological self-organization. Thus, ribozymes that support both cleavage and formation of phosphodiester bonds may have contributed to the emergence of functional diversity and increasing complexity of regulatory RNAs in early life. We have previously engineered a variant of the hairpin ribozyme that shows how ribozymes may have circularized or extended their own length by forming concatemers. Using the Vienna RNA package, we now optimized this hairpin ribozyme variant and selected four different RNA sequences that were expected to circularize more efficiently or form longer concatemers upon transcription. (Two-dimensional) PAGE analysis confirms that (i) all four selected ribozymes are catalytically active and (ii) high yields of cyclic species are obtained. AFM imaging in combination with RNA structure prediction enabled us to calculate the distributions of monomers and self-concatenated dimers and trimers. Our results show that computationally optimized molecules do form reasonable amounts of trimers, which has not been observed for the original system so far, and we demonstrate that the combination of theoretical prediction, biochemical and physical analysis is a promising approach toward accurate prediction of ribozyme behavior and design of ribozymes with predefined functions. PMID:25999318

  12. Soil biochemical properties and microbial resilience in agroforestry systems: effects on wheat growth under controlled drought and flooding conditions.

    PubMed

    Rivest, David; Lorente, Miren; Olivier, Alain; Messier, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Agroforestry is increasingly viewed as an effective means of maintaining or even increasing crop and tree productivity under climate change while promoting other ecosystem functions and services. This study focused on soil biochemical properties and resilience following disturbance within agroforestry and conventional agricultural systems and aimed to determine whether soil differences in terms of these biochemical properties and resilience would subsequently affect crop productivity under extreme soil water conditions. Two research sites that had been established on agricultural land were selected for this study. The first site included an 18-year-old windbreak, while the second site consisted in an 8-year-old tree-based intercropping system. In each site, soil samples were used for the determination of soil nutrient availability, microbial dynamics and microbial resilience to different wetting-drying perturbations and for a greenhouse pot experiment with wheat. Drying and flooding were selected as water stress treatments and compared to a control. These treatments were initiated at the beginning of the wheat anthesis period and maintained over 10 days. Trees contributed to increase soil nutrient pools, as evidenced by the higher extractable-P (both sites), and the higher total N and mineralizable N (tree-based intercropping site) found in the agroforestry compared to the conventional agricultural system. Metabolic quotient (qCO2) was lower in the agroforestry than in the conventional agricultural system, suggesting higher microbial substrate use efficiency in agroforestry systems. Microbial resilience was higher in the agroforestry soils compared to soils from the conventional agricultural system (windbreak site only). At the windbreak site, wheat growing in soils from agroforestry system exhibited higher aboveground biomass and number of grains per spike than in conventional agricultural system soils in the three water stress treatments. At the tree

  13. A new approach to the control of biochemical reactions in a magnetic nanosuspension using a low-frequency magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Yu. I.; Klyachko, N. L.; Golovin, D. Yu.; Efremova, M. V.; Samodurov, A. A.; Sokolski-Papkov, M.; Kabanov, A. V.

    2013-03-01

    A new approach to the control of biochemical reactions in magnetic nanosuspensions exposed to a low-frequency (nonheating) magnetic field, which has a nanomechanical effect on macro-molecules chemically linked to magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), is described. Experimental verification of this approach showed that a magnetic field with an intensity of from 15 to 220 kA/m and a frequency of 50 Hz affected the kinetics of a chemical reaction in an aqueous solution containing suspended MNPs of magnetite (FeO · Fe2O3) and chymotrypsin molecules linked to them through polymer bridges. The field dependence of the effect is shown. The effect is interpreted within the framework of a nanomechanical model taking into account the deformations, conformational change, and destruction of weak bonds in the enzyme macromolecule under the action of the forces applied to it during the orientation of MNPs in the field.

  14. Pasture management controls soil organic matter stocks, properties, and biochemical functioning in Tibetan grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielvogel, Sandra; Breidenbach, Andreas; de la Haye, Tilman; Schleuß, Per; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Guggenberger, Georg

    2016-04-01

    subsoil with advancing degradation (from stages 1 to 5) was indicated by increasing contributions of cutin to OC in the subsoils. Microbial community composition in the subsoil changed progressively from stage 1 to 5 with most pronounced changes of the fungal community. These findings were confirmed by the enzyme activities involved in the degradation of more complex OC compounds (e.g. fungal phenoloxidases) that were highest in the subsoil of degradation stage 4. In contrast, degradation stages 2 and 3 showed low enzyme activities in the subsoil if related to soil OC amount. We conclude that pasture degradation decreases not only the mechanical protection of soil surface by Kobresia root mats, but also changes their biochemical and microbial functions. Moderate grazing improves the pastures, increases OC sequestration and may stop the degradation of soils on Tibetan plateau.

  15. 77 FR 60145 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Sigma Aldrich Research Biochemicals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Sigma Aldrich..., Natick, Massachusetts 01760- 2447, made application by letter to the Drug Enforcement Administration...

  16. Effectual comparison of quinoa and amaranth supplemented diets in controlling appetite; a biochemical study in rats.

    PubMed

    Mithila, M V; Khanum, Farhath

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of two current cynosure protein substitutes; quinoa and amaranth in controlling short term food intake and satiety in rats. Experimental rats were allotted to three groups (n = 8 per group) and fed with diets containing casein, quinoa and amaranth as major protein sources, with casein diet kept as control. At the end of the experiment it was observed that the rats ingesting quinoa and amaranth supplemented diets exhibited lesser food intake (p < 0.01) and lesser body weight gain significantly in amaranth (p < 0.05) as compared to control. They seemed to bring down plasma ghrelin levels while meliorating plasma leptin and cholecystokinin (CCK) levels postprandially (p < 0.01). Although both quinoa diet and amaranth diet were effective in improving blood glucose response and maintaining plasma free fatty acids (FFA) and general lipid profiles subsequently after the meal, amaranth diet showed significant effects when compared to control and amaranth diets. There was 15 % improvement in blood glucose profile in the amaranth group with respect to the control at 90 min, where as there was only 3.4 % improvement in the quinoa group. These findings provide a scientific rationale to consider incorporation of these modest cereals in a diet meant to fight against growing obesity and poverty.

  17. Walk-through survey report: control technology for fermentation processes at Novo Biochemical Industries, Inc. , Franklinton, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, K.F.

    1983-09-01

    A walkthrough survey of control technology for fermentation processes at Novo Biochemical Industries, Incorporated (SIC-2869), Franklinton, North Carolina was conducted in June, 1983. The company produced two industrial enzymes, alpha-amylase and amyl glucosidase, from microbial strains of Bacillus and Aspergillus. Engineering controls included enclosure of the production process and local exhaust ventilation of all bag dumping stations. Employee contact with the production process was minimal except for equipment maintenance and manual broth sample extraction. The majority of the large scale processes were computer controlled or monitored. All employees were required to maintain a clean work environment. The company used a computerized preventive-maintenance program. Routine industrial hygiene monitoring for active aerosilized liquid enzymes was conducted. The company had a relatively complete medical and biological monitoring program. Appropriate personal-protective equipment was required in all departments of the facility. The company employed a standardized procedure for entering a deep tank reactor vessel. The author concludes that the company employs state of the art technology and provides a work environment that minimizes potential exposure to microorganisms, process chemical intermediates, and biological products. An indepth survey of the facility is recommended.

  18. Age-dependent effects of atorvastatin on biochemical bone turnover markers: a randomized controlled trial in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Berthold, Heiner K; Unverdorben, Susanne; Zittermann, Armin; Degenhardt, Ralf; Baumeister, Bernhard; Unverdorben, Martin; Krone, Wilhelm; Vetter, Hans; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna

    2004-06-01

    The use of HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins) has been associated with decreased risk of bone fractures in epidemiological studies. In vitro evidence suggests that statins may stimulate bone formation, but the data are still preliminary. We assessed the effects of the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor atorvastatin on biochemical parameters of bone metabolism in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted between October 2001 and October 2002 in three hospital-based outpatient metabolism clinics. Forty-nine postmenopausal women, mean age 61 +/- 5 years, mean time postmenopause 12.6 +/- 8.8 years, were treated with atorvastatin, 20 mg per day ( n=24) or matching placebos ( n=25) for 8 weeks. Comparing the differences to baseline between the groups, there were no statistically significant effects of atorvastatin either on the bone formation markers intact osteocalcin and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase or on the bone resorption markers C-telopeptide and intact parathyroid hormone. The marker of bone fractures, undercarboxylated osteocalcin, was also unchanged. When analyzed in dependence of age, atorvastatin increased C-telopeptide and osteocalcin in the younger subjects, while it decreased them in older subjects. Most interestingly, in older subjects, atorvastatin caused a significant decrease in the ratio of C-telopeptide to osteocalcin, an indicator of bone remodeling, while the ratio was increased in younger subjects, suggesting beneficial effects on bone turnover exclusively in older individuals (approx. >63 years). In summary, the present data suggest that short-term treatment with atorvastatin may have age-dependent effects on biochemical markers of bone turnover in postmenopausal women.

  19. Generation and precise control of dynamic biochemical gradients for cellular assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, Yasushi; MacPherson, Murray; Giuraniuc, Claudiu V.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial gradients of diffusible signalling molecules play crucial roles in controlling diverse cellular behaviour such as cell differentiation, tissue patterning and chemotaxis. In this paper, we report the design and testing of a microfluidic device for diffusion-based gradient generation for cellular assays. A unique channel design of the device eliminates cross-flow between the source and sink channels, thereby stabilizing gradients by passive diffusion. The platform also enables quick and flexible control of chemical concentration that makes highly dynamic gradients in diffusion chambers. A model with the first approximation of diffusion and surface adsorption of molecules recapitulates the experimentally observed gradients. Budding yeast cells cultured in a gradient of a chemical inducer expressed a reporter fluorescence protein in a concentration-dependent manner. This microfluidic platform serves as a versatile prototype applicable to a broad range of biomedical investigations.

  20. Failure to Achieve a PSA Level {<=}1 ng/mL After Neoadjuvant LHRHA Therapy Predicts for Lower Biochemical Control Rate and Overall Survival in Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darren M. McAleese, Jonathan; Park, Richard M.; Stewart, David P.; Stranex, Stephen; Eakin, Ruth L.; Houston, Russell F.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether failure to suppress the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to {<=}1 ng/mL after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy in patients scheduled to undergo external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma is associated with reduced biochemical failure-free survival. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case note review of consecutive patients with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer treated between January 2001 and December 2002 with neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy, followed by concurrent hormonal therapy and radiotherapy was performed. Patient data were divided for analysis according to whether the PSA level in Week 1 of radiotherapy was {<=}1.0 ng/mL. Biochemical failure was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (Phoenix) definition. Results: A total of 119 patients were identified. The PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy was {<=}1 ng/mL in 67 patients and >1 ng/mL in 52. At a median follow-up of 49 months, the 4-year actuarial biochemical failure-free survival rate was 84% vs. 60% (p = 0.0016) in favor of the patients with a PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy of {<=}1 ng/mL. The overall survival rate was 94% vs. 77.5% (p = 0.0045), and the disease-specific survival rate at 4 years was 98.5% vs. 82.5%. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that patients with a PSA level >1 ng/mL at the beginning of external beam radiotherapy after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy have a significantly greater rate of biochemical failure and lower survival rate compared with those with a PSA level of {<=}1 ng/mL. Patients without adequate PSA suppression should be considered a higher risk group and considered for dose escalation or the use of novel treatments.

  1. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer in Patients at Moderate or High Risk of Biochemical Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskin, Peter; Rojas, Ana; Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Rob; Milner, Jessica; Cladd, Helen

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) morbidity and biochemical control of disease in patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma treated with escalating doses per fraction of high-dose rate brachytherapy alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 197 patients were treated with 34 Gy in four fractions, 36 Gy in four fractions, 31.5 Gy in three fractions, or 26 Gy in two fractions. Median follow-up times were 60, 54, 36, and 6 months, respectively. Results: Incidence of early Grade {>=} 3 GU morbidity was 3% to 7%, and Grade 4 was 0% to 4%. During the first 12 weeks, the highest mean International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) value was 14, and between 6 months and 5 years it was 8. Grade 3 or 4 early GI morbidity was not observed. The 3-year actuarial rate of Grade 3 GU was 3% to 16%, and was 3% to 7% for strictures requiring surgery (4-year rate). An incidence of 1% Grade 3 GI events was seen at 3 years. Late Grade 4 GU or GI events were not observed. At 3 years, 99% of patients with intermediate-risk and 91% with high-risk disease were free of biochemical relapse (log-rank p = 0.02). Conclusions: There was no significant difference in urinary and rectal morbidity between schedules. Biochemical control of disease in patients with intermediate and high risk of relapse was good.

  2. Nano-Storage Wires for the Controlled Release of Biochemical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Haneul; Lee, Dongjun; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Daesan; Park, Juhun; Hong, Seunghun

    2015-03-01

    We herein report ``nano-storage wires'' (NSWs) that can store chemical species and release them at a desired moment by electrical stimulations. Here, we utilized the electrodeposition process through an anodized aluminium oxide template to fabricate multi-segmented nanowires which consisted of a polypyrrole (PPy) segment containing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecules, a ferromagnetic nickel segment, and a conductive gold segment. We could drive and deposit the NSWs onto desired positions on electrode surfaces via external magnetic fields. When the external electric potential was applied from the electrodes, the NSWs released ATPs from the PPy segments, and the released ATPs could change the activities of motor proteins near the NSWs. Furthermore, through direct writing or magnetic manipulation strategies, we could print NSWs onto various substrates such as flexible or three-dimensional structured substrates to build versatile chemical storage devices. Since our strategy enables the controllable storage and release of chemicals, our development should open up various applications such as drug delivery systems, biosensors and biochips for the controlled release of chemicals to biosystems.

  3. The redox control of photorespiration: from biochemical and physiological aspects to biotechnological considerations.

    PubMed

    Keech, Olivier; Gardeström, Per; Kleczkowski, Leszek A; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2016-01-21

    Photorespiration is a complex and tightly regulated process occurring in photosynthetic organisms. This process can alter the cellular redox balance, notably via the production and consumption of both reducing and oxidizing equivalents. Under certain circumstances, these equivalents, as well as reactive oxygen or nitrogen species, can become prominent in subcellular compartments involved in the photorespiratory process, eventually promoting oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins. Keeping these changes under tight control should therefore be of primary importance. In order to review the current state of knowledge about the redox control of photorespiration, we primarily performed a careful description of the known and potential redox-regulated or oxidation sensitive photorespiratory proteins, and examined in more details two interesting cases: the glycerate kinase and the glycine cleavage system. When possible, the potential impact and subsequent physiological regulations associated with these changes have been discussed. In a second part, we reviewed the extent to which photorespiration contributes to cellular redox homeostasis considering, in particular, the set of peripheral enzymes associated with the canonical photorespiratory pathway. Finally, some recent biotechnological strategies to circumvent photorespiration for future growth improvements are discussed in the light of these redox regulations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. A biochemical network can control formation of a synthetic material by sensing numerous specific stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hun Yeon, Ju; Chan, Karen Y. T.; Wong, Ting-Chia; Chan, Kelvin; Sutherland, Michael R.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.; Pryzdial, Edward L. G.; Kastrup, Christian J.

    2015-05-01

    Developing bio-compatible smart materials that assemble in response to environmental cues requires strategies that can discriminate multiple specific stimuli in a complex milieu. Synthetic materials have yet to achieve this level of sensitivity, which would emulate the highly evolved and tailored reaction networks of complex biological systems. Here we show that the output of a naturally occurring network can be replaced with a synthetic material. Exploiting the blood coagulation system as an exquisite biological sensor, the fibrin clot end-product was replaced with a synthetic material under the biological control of a precisely regulated cross-linking enzyme. The functions of the coagulation network remained intact when the material was incorporated. Clot-like polymerization was induced in indirect response to distinct small molecules, phospholipids, enzymes, cells, viruses, an inorganic solid, a polyphenol, a polysaccharide, and a membrane protein. This strategy demonstrates for the first time that an existing stimulus-responsive biological network can be used to control the formation of a synthetic material by diverse classes of physiological triggers.

  5. Probing the input-output behavior of biochemical and genetic systems system identification methods from control theory.

    PubMed

    Ang, Jordan; Ingalls, Brian; McMillen, David

    2011-01-01

    A key aspect of the behavior of any system is the timescale on which it operates: when inputs change, do responses take milliseconds, seconds, minutes, hours, days, months? Does the system respond preferentially to inputs at certain timescales? These questions are well addressed by the methods of frequency response analysis. In this review, we introduce these methods and outline a procedure for applying this analysis directly to experimental data. This procedure, known as system identification, is a well-established tool in engineering systems and control theory and allows the construction of a predictive dynamic model of a biological system in the absence of any mechanistic details. When studying biochemical and genetic systems, the required experiments are not standard laboratory practice, but with advances in both our ability to measure system outputs (e.g., using fluorescent reporters) and our ability to generate precise inputs (with microfluidic chambers capable of changing cells' environments rapidly and under fine control), these frequency response methods are now experimentally practical for a wide range of biological systems, as evidenced by a number of successful recent applications of these techniques. We use a yeast G-protein signaling cascade as a running example, illustrating both theoretical concepts and practical considerations while keeping mathematical details to a minimum. The review aims to provide the reader with the tools required to design frequency response experiments for their own biological system and the background required to analyze and interpret the resulting data.

  6. Biochemical Defenses Induced by Mycorrhizae Fungi Glomus Mosseae in Controlling Strawberry Fusarium Wilt.

    PubMed

    Yanan, Wang; Xusheng, Zhao; Baozhong, Yin; Wenchao, Zhen; Jintang, Guo

    2015-01-01

    The effect of VAM on reducing wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. f.sp. fragariae Winks et Williams (FO) infection in strawberry and the possible mechanisms involved were investigated. Two key substance involved in disease defenses, lignin and hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein were induced and formed in the cell wall of strawberry root, and the peak content of lignin and hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein occurred on the 25(th) day (149.52mg/g) and on the 15(th) day (10.08 mg/g). The activity of protective enzymes SOD, POD and CAT inoculation with VAM significantly increased when compared with the control under both CK (natural growth) and inoculated with FO. The conductivity of VAM plus FO treatment was higher than the CK treatment, but significantly was lower than the FO treatment.

  7. Interacting biochemical and diffusive controls on trace gas sources in unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubol, S.; Manzoni, S.; Bellin, A.; Porporato, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Microbes react to environmental conditions on different timescales. When conditions improve (e.g., rewetting, substrate amendment), the residing population exits the dormant state, becomes active and starts synthesizing extra-cellular enzymes. If substrate availability, and hence energy, is sufficient, microbes may start to reproduce and increase the size of their population. These dynamics make it complicated to interpret measured relationships between microbial activity (e.g., respiration, denitrification, N mineralization) and environmental conditions. In particular, the relationship between bacterial activity and soil moisture, which is derived by incubating soil samples at constant soil moisture levels, seems to vary under dynamic hydrological conditions. This may be related to both soil physical properties and the resilience of bacteria to adapt to rapid changes in soil moisture. We present a process-based model that includes both the above effects and test the hypothesis that the ratio of the time scale of biological versus physical factors determines the shape describing the relationship between microbial activity and soil moisture. In particular, we focus on the role of oxygen dynamics, which regulate the prevalence of aerobic versus anaerobic conditions and thus the prevalence of nitrification versus denitrification. We identify and compare the time scale of the biological oxygen consumption with the time scale of physical diffusion. Starting from well-aerated conditions, as bacteria consume O2 in solution, more oxygen dissolves from the atmosphere - depending on gas-filled porosity. If water dynamics or tillage limits re-aeration, this can affect the equilibrium between the aqueous and the gaseous phase and thus alter the time scale of the reactions. This balance between consumption and re-aeration by diffusion ultimately controls the water quality as well the production of trace gases.

  8. Applying a forensic actuarial assessment (the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide) to nonforensic patients.

    PubMed

    Harris, Grant T; Rice, Marnie E; Camilleri, Joseph A

    2004-09-01

    The actuarial Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG) was developed for male offenders where it has shown excellent replicability in many new forensic samples using officially recorded outcomes. Clinicians also make decisions, however, about the risk of interpersonal violence posed by nonforensic psychiatric patients of both sexes. Could an actuarial risk assessment developed for male forensic populations be used for a broader clientele? We modified the VRAG to permit evaluation using data from the MacArthur Violence Risk Assessment Study that included nonforensic male and female patients and primarily self-reported violence. The modified VRAG yielded a large effect size in the prediction of dichotomous postdischarge severe violence over 20 and 50 weeks. Accuracy of VRAG predictions was unrelated to sex. The results provide evidence about the robustness of comprehensive actuarial risk assessments and the generality of the personal factors that underlie violent behavior.

  9. Biochemical markers of type 2 diabetes as a late complication of myocardial infarction: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Barbarash, Olga; Gruzdeva, Olga; Belik, Ekaterina; Dyleva, Yulia; Karetnikova, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Introduction On average, 19–23% of patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) suffer from type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is newly diagnosed in a significant number of patients. Both classic carbohydrate metabolism and lipid metabolism may be promising diagnostic markers for insulin resistance in acute coronary syndrome. Material and methods Two hundred patients (130 males and 70 females aged 61.4 ±1.12 years) with ST-segment elevation MI were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups based on manifestations of diabetes: (1) 171 patients without diabetes within 1 year after MI; and (2) 29 patients with manifestations of diabetes. The control group comprised 33 people without diseases of the cardiovascular system and diabetes and was matched by age and gender with patients. Results In patients with an imbalanced adipokine state during the acute phase of MI, we noted an increased concentration of free fatty acids (p > 0.05) and reduced ghrelin levels (p > 0.05) and activation of the proinflammatory and thrombotic potentials of blood plasma. Patients who developed diabetes 1 year after MI showed hospital stays with more pronounced changes in the study parameters. Conclusions The most informative biochemical parameters associated with the development of diabetes at 1 year after MI were adiponectin, retinol protein, ghrelin, tumor necrosis factor α, and plasminogen activator inhibitor. PMID:28261283

  10. 77 FR 12577 - Department of Defense (DoD) Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries; Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense (DoD) Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries... that the following Federal advisory committee meeting of the DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care... Medicare- Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries meeting or make an oral presentation or submit...

  11. 5 CFR 831.663 - Actuarial reduction in annuity of retirees who make post-retirement elections to provide a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reduction under paragraph (c) of this section. (e) Termination of the reduction. (1) The reduction under... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Actuarial reduction in annuity of... Actuarial reduction in annuity of retirees who make post-retirement elections to provide a current...

  12. Choosing the 'best' plan in a health insurance exchange: actuarial value tells only part of the story.

    PubMed

    Lore, Ryan; Gabel, Jon R; McDevitt, Roland; Slover, Michael

    2012-08-01

    In the health insurance exchanges that will come online in 2014, consumers will be able to compare health plans with respect to actuarial value, or the percentage of health care costs that a plan would pay for a standard population. This analysis illustrates the out-of-pocket costs that might result from plans with various plan designs and actuarial values. We find that average out-of-pocket expense declines as actuarial values rise, but two plans with similar actuarial values can produce very different outcomes for a given person. The overall affordability of a plan also will be influenced by age rating, income-related premium subsidies, and out-of-pocket subsidies. Actuarial value is a useful starting point for selecting a plan, but it does not pinpoint which plan will produce the best overall value for a particular person.

  13. Pretreatment Endorectal Coil Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Predict Biochemical Tumor Control in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Combination Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riaz, Nadeem; Afaq, Asim; Akin, Oguz; Pei Xin; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett; Hricak, Hedvig; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of endorectal coil magenetic resonance imaging (eMRI) in predicting biochemical relapse in prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2008, 279 men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer underwent eMRI of their prostate before receiving brachytherapy and supplemental intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Endorectal coil MRI was performed before treatment and retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists experienced in genitourinary MRI. Image-based variables, including tumor diameter, location, number of sextants involved, and the presence of extracapsular extension (ECE), were incorporated with other established clinical variables to predict biochemical control outcomes. The median follow-up was 49 months (range, 1-13 years). Results: The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival for the cohort was 92%. Clinical findings predicting recurrence on univariate analysis included Gleason score (hazard ratio [HR] 3.6, p = 0.001), PSA (HR 1.04, p = 0.005), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (HR 4.1, p = 0.002). Clinical T stage and the use of androgen deprivation therapy were not correlated with biochemical failure. Imaging findings on univariate analysis associated with relapse included ECE on MRI (HR 3.79, p = 0.003), tumor size (HR 2.58, p = 0.04), and T stage (HR 1.71, p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis incorporating both clinical and imaging findings, only ECE on MRI and Gleason score were independent predictors of recurrence. Conclusions: Pretreatment eMRI findings predict for biochemical recurrence in intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Gleason score and the presence of ECE on MRI were the only significant predictors of biochemical relapse in this group of patients.

  14. Biochemical characterization of protein quality control mechanisms during disease progression in the C22 mouse model of CMT1A

    PubMed Central

    Chittoor, Vinita G.; Sooyeon, Lee; Rangaraju, Sunitha; Nicks, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Jordan T.; Madorsky, Irina; Narvaez, Diana C.; Notterpek, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is a hereditary demyelinating neuropathy linked with duplication of the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Transgenic C22 mice, a model of CMT1A, display many features of the human disease, including slowed nerve conduction velocity and demyelination of peripheral nerves. How overproduction of PMP22 leads to compromised myelin and axonal pathology is not fully understood, but likely involves subcellular alterations in protein homoeostatic mechanisms within affected Schwann cells. The subcellular response to abnormally localized PMP22 includes the recruitment of the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), autophagosomes and heat-shock proteins (HSPs). Here we assessed biochemical markers of these protein homoeostatic pathways in nerves from PMP22-overexpressing neuropathic mice between the ages of 2 and 12 months to ascertain their potential contribution to disease progression. In nerves of 3-week-old mice, using endoglycosidases and Western blotting, we found altered processing of the exogenous human PMP22, an abnormality that becomes more prevalent with age. Along with the ongoing accrual of misfolded PMP22, the activity of the proteasome becomes compromised and proteins required for autophagy induction and lysosome biogenesis are up-regulated. Moreover, cytosolic chaperones are consistently elevated in nerves from neuropathic mice, with the most prominent change in HSP70. The gradual alterations in protein homoeostatic response are accompanied by Schwann cell de-differentiation and macrophage infiltration. Together, these results show that while subcellular protein quality control mechanisms respond appropriately to the presence of the overproduced PMP22, with aging they are unable to prevent the accrual of misfolded proteins. PMID:24175617

  15. Microbiological and biochemical profile of cv. Conservolea naturally black olives during controlled fermentation with selected strains of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Panagou, Efstathios Z; Schillinger, Ulrich; Franz, Charles M A P; Nychas, George-John E

    2008-04-01

    The effect of controlled fermentation processes on the microbial association and biochemical profile of cv. Conservolea naturally black olives processed by the traditional anaerobic method was studied. The different treatments included (a) inoculation with a commercial starter culture of Lactobacillus pentosus, (b) inoculation with a strain of Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from a fermented cassava product and (c) uninoculated spontaneous process. Microbial growth, pH, titratable acidity, organic acids and volatile compounds were monitored throughout the fermentation. The initial microbiota consisted of Gram-negative bacteria, lactic acid bacteria and yeasts. Inhibition of Gram-negative bacteria was evident in all processes. Both starter cultures were effective in establishing an accelerated fermentation process and reduced the survival period of Gram-negative bacteria by 5 days compared with the spontaneous process, minimizing thus the likelihood of spoilage. Higher acidification of the brines was observed in inoculated processes without any significant difference between the two selected starter cultures (113.5 and 117.6mM for L. plantarum and L. pentosus, respectively). L. pentosus was also determined as the major species present during the whole process of spontaneous olive fermentation. It is characteristic that lactic acid fermentation was also initiated rapidly in the spontaneous process, as the conditions of fermentation, mainly the low salt level (6%, w/v) favored the dominance of lactic acid bacteria over yeasts. Lactic, acetic and propionic were the organic acids detected by HPLC in considerable amounts, whereas citric and malic acids were also present at low levels and degraded completely during the processes. Ethanol, methanol, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate were the major volatile compounds identified by GC. Their concentrations varied among the different treatments, reflecting varying degrees of microbial activity in the brines. The results obtained

  16. Academic Attributes of College Freshmen that Lead to Success in Actuarial Studies in a Business College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard Manning; Schumacher, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    The authors studied beginning undergraduate actuarial concentrators in a business college. They identified four variables (math Scholastic Aptitude Test [SAT] score, verbal SAT score, percentile rank in high school graduating class, and percentage score on a college mathematics placement exam) that were available for entering college students that…

  17. Validation of a Systems-Actuarial Computer Process for Multidimensional Classification of Child Psychopathology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Paul A.; Hale, Robert L.

    1982-01-01

    Tested diagnostic classifications of child psychopathology produced by a computerized technique known as multidimensional actuarial classification (MAC), against the criterion of expert psychological opinion. Experts' agreement with MAC was significant for all classification areas, as was MAC's agreement with the experts held as a conjoint…

  18. An Actuarial Model for Selecting Participants for a Special Medical Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker-Bartnick, Leslie; And Others

    An actuarial model applied to the selection process of a special medical school program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine was tested. The 77 students in the study sample were admitted to the university's Fifth Pathway Program, which is designed for U.S. citizens who completed their medical school training, except for internship and…

  19. The effect of framing actuarial risk probabilities on involuntary civil commitment decisions.

    PubMed

    Scurich, Nicholas; John, Richard S

    2011-04-01

    Despite a proliferation of actuarial risk assessment instruments, empirical research on the communication of violence risk is scant and there is virtually no research on the consumption of actuarial risk assessment. Using a 2 × 3 Latin Square factorial design, this experiment tested whether decision-makers are sensitive to varying levels of risk expressed probabilistically and whether the framing of actuarial risk probabilities is consequential for commitment decisions. Consistent with research on attribute framing, in which describing an attribute in terms of its complement leads to different conclusions, this experiment found that the way actuarial risk estimates are framed leads to disparate commitment decisions. For example, risk framed as 26% probability of violence generally led decision-makers to authorize commitment, whereas the same risk framed in the complement, a 74% probability of no violence, generally led decision-makers to release. This result was most pronounced for moderate risk levels. Implications for the risk communication format debate, forensic practice and research are discussed.

  20. From group data to useful probabilities: the relevance of actuarial risk assessment in individual instances.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Douglas

    2015-03-01

    Probability plays a ubiquitous role in decision-making through a process in which we use data from groups of past outcomes to make inferences about new situations. Yet in recent years, many forensic mental health professionals have become persuaded that overly wide confidence intervals render actuarial risk assessment instruments virtually useless in individual assessments. If this were true, the mathematical properties of probabilistic judgments would preclude forensic clinicians from applying group-based findings about risk to individuals. As a consequence, actuarially based risk estimates might be barred from use in legal proceedings. Using a fictional scenario, I seek to show how group data have an obvious application to individual decisions. I also explain how misunderstanding the aims of risk assessment has led to mistakes about how, when, and why group data apply to individual instances. Although actuarially based statements about individuals' risk have many pitfalls, confidence intervals pose no barrier to using actuarial tools derived from group data to improve decision-making about individual instances.

  1. Actuarial senescence in a long-lived orchid challenges our current understanding of ageing.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Johan Petter; Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen R; Øien, Dag-Inge; Moen, Asbjørn; Sletvold, Nina

    2016-11-16

    The dominant evolutionary theory of actuarial senescence-an increase in death rate with advancing age-is based on the concept of a germ cell line that is separated from the somatic cells early in life. However, such a separation is not clear in all organisms. This has been suggested to explain the paucity of evidence for actuarial senescence in plants. We used a 32 year study of Dactylorhiza lapponica that replaces its organs each growing season, to test whether individuals of this tuberous orchid senesce. We performed a Bayesian survival trajectory analysis accounting for reproductive investment, for individuals under two types of land use, in two climatic regions. The mortality trajectory was best approximated by a Weibull model, showing clear actuarial senescence. Rates of senescence in this model declined with advancing age, but were slightly higher in mown plots and in the more benign climatic region. At older ages, senescence was evident only when accounting for a positive effect of reproductive investment on mortality. Our results demonstrate actuarial senescence as well as a survival-reproduction trade-off in plants, and indicate that environmental context may influence senescence rates. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the evolution of demographic senescence and for models of plant population dynamics.

  2. Pattern Analysis of an Actuarial Strategy for Computerized Diagnosis of Childhood Exceptionality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Robert L.; McDermott, Paul A.

    1984-01-01

    The Multidimensional Actuarial Classification system, which consists of routines and decision making procedures applied to weighting of standardized psychometric, observational, and interview data, was used to classify 200 children (6-16 years old) referred for psychological evaluation. Seven distinct patterns emerged, supporting the approach's…

  3. Sexual Reconviction Rates in the United Kingdom and Actuarial Risk Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Leam A.; Browne, Kevin D.; Stringer, Ian; Hogue, Todd E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Assessing the risk of further offending behavior by adult sexual perpetrators of children is highly relevant and important to professionals involved in child protection. Recent progress in assessing risk in sexual offenders has established the validity of actuarial measures, although there continues to be some debate about the…

  4. Dosimetric parameters as predictive factors for biochemical control in patients with higher risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Orio, Peter; Wallner, Kent . E-mail: kent.Wallner@med.va.gov; Merrick, Gregory; Herstein, Andrew; Mitsuyama, Paul; Thornton, Ken; Butler, Wayne; Sutlief, Steven

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the role of dosimetric quality parameters in maximizing cancer eradication in higher risk prostate cancer patients treated with palladium (Pd)-103 and supplemental beam radiation. Methods: One-hundred-seventy-nine patients treated with Pd-103 and supplemental beam radiation, with minimum 2 years follow-up prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and posttreatment computed tomography scans were analyzed. Dosimetric parameters included the V100 (percent of the postimplant volume covered by the prescription dose), the D90 (the minimum dose that covered 90% of the post implant volume), and the treatment margins (the radial distance between the prostatic edge and the prescription isodose). Treatment margins (TMs) were calculated using premarket software. Results: Freedom from biochemical failure was 79% at 3 years, with 92 of the 179 patients (51%) followed beyond 3 years. In comparing patients who did or did not achieve biochemical control, the most striking differences were in biologic factors of pretreatment PSA and Gleason score. The V100, D90, and average TM all showed nonsignificant trends to higher values in patients with biochemical control. In multivariate analysis of each of the three dosimetric parameters against PSA and Gleason score, TM showed the strongest correlation with biochemical control (p = 0.19). Conclusions: For patients with intermediate and high-risk prostate cancer treated with Pd-103 brachytherapy and external beam radiation, biologic factors (PSA and Gleason score) were the most important determinants of cancer eradication. However, there is a trend to better outcomes among patients with higher quality implant parameters, suggesting that attention to implant quality will maximize the likelihood of cure.

  5. Alice in actuarial-land: through the looking glass of changing Static-99 norms.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Shoba; Weinberger, Linda E; Frances, Allen; Cusworth-Walker, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The Static-99, an actuarial rating method, is employed to conduct sexual violence risk assessment in legal contexts. The proponents of the Static-99 dismiss clinical judgment as not empirical. Two elements must be present to apply an actuarial risk model to a specific individual: sample representativeness and uniform measurement of outcome. This review demonstrates that both of these elements are lacking in the normative studies of the Static-99 and its revised version, the Static-99R. Studies conducted since the publication of the Static-99 have not replicated the original norms. Sexual recidivism rates for the same Static-99 score vary widely, from low to high, depending on the sample used. A hypothetical case example is presented to illustrate how the solitary application of the Static-99 or Static-99R recidivism rates to the exclusion of salient clinical factors for identifying sexual dangerousness can have serious consequences for public safety.

  6. Actuarial calculation for PSAK-24 purposes post-employment benefit using market-consistent approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effendie, Adhitya Ronnie

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we use a market-consistent approach to calculate present value of obligation of a companies' post-employment benefit in accordance with PSAK-24 (the Indonesian accounting standard). We set some actuarial assumption such as Indonesian TMI 2011 mortality tables for mortality assumptions, accumulated salary function for wages assumption, a scaled (to mortality) disability assumption and a pre-defined turnover rate for termination assumption. For economic assumption, we use binomial tree method with estimated discount rate as its average movement. In accordance with PSAK-24, the Projected Unit Credit method has been adapted to determine the present value of obligation (actuarial liability), so we use this method with a modification in its discount function.

  7. Prospective actuarial risk assessment: a comparison of five risk assessment instruments in different sexual offender subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rettenberger, Martin; Matthes, Anna; Boer, Douglas P; Eher, Reinhard

    2010-04-01

    This study examines the predictive validity of the most commonly used risk assessment instruments for sexual offenders: Static-99, Rapid Risk Assessment for Sexual Offense Recidivism, Sex Offender Risk Appraisal Guide, Sexual Violence Risk-20, and Psychopathy Checklist-Revised in a prospective research design. Although risk assessment is part of a regime leading to various efforts to reduce risk by treatment and aftercare, all instruments show good predictive validity. However, depending on the instrument, recidivism category, and subgroup, the predictive accuracy varies markedly. Furthermore, the authors fail to demonstrate predictive validity for sexual violent reoffences-for the whole sample and for all subgroups. The results, nevertheless, support the utility and predictive validity of actuarial risk assessment complementary to treatment efforts to reduce risk. On the other hand, forensic practitioners have to be aware of the limitations of actuarial risk assessment methods, in particular as regards to variable predictive accuracy for different sexual offender subgroups and reoffence categories.

  8. Actuarial assessment of violence risk in hospital-based partner assault clinics.

    PubMed

    Hilton, N Zoe; Harris, Grant T; Holder, Norah

    2008-12-01

    Hospital-based partner assault clinics are a relatively recent addition to the community response to partner violence. In this study, 66% of 111 women attending hospital clinics for partner assault were physically injured and 43% reported death threats. Few concurrently used other services (shelters or police) and most relied on female friends and relatives for help. Many participants who currently lived with the perpetrator were contemplating leaving but only a third had made plans to do so. Participants faced an unusually high risk of future assault, according to both victim interview using the ODARA actuarial risk assessment and their own perceptions. Findings imply an important role for partner assault clinics and the feasibility of the victim service sector's using the same actuarial risk assessments as the criminal justice system.

  9. [Survival functions and life tables at the origins of actuarial mathematics].

    PubMed

    Spelta, D

    1997-01-01

    "In the determination of death probabilities of an insured subject one can use either statistical data or a mathematical function. In this paper a survey of the relationship between mortality tables and survival functions from the origins until the first half of the nineteenth century is presented. The author has tried to find the methodological grounds which have induced the actuaries to prefer either of these tools." (EXCERPT)

  10. Long‐Term Post‐CABG Survival: Performance of Clinical Risk Models Versus Actuarial Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brendan M.; Romeiser, Jamie; Ruan, Joyce; Gupta, Sandeep; Seifert, Frank C.; Zhu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background/aim Clinical risk models are commonly used to predict short‐term coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) mortality but are less commonly used to predict long‐term mortality. The added value of long‐term mortality clinical risk models over traditional actuarial models has not been evaluated. To address this, the predictive performance of a long‐term clinical risk model was compared with that of an actuarial model to identify the clinical variable(s) most responsible for any differences observed. Methods Long‐term mortality for 1028 CABG patients was estimated using the Hannan New York State clinical risk model and an actuarial model (based on age, gender, and race/ethnicity). Vital status was assessed using the Social Security Death Index. Observed/expected (O/E) ratios were calculated, and the models' predictive performances were compared using a nested c‐index approach. Linear regression analyses identified the subgroup of risk factors driving the differences observed. Results Mortality rates were 3%, 9%, and 17% at one‐, three‐, and five years, respectively (median follow‐up: five years). The clinical risk model provided more accurate predictions. Greater divergence between model estimates occurred with increasing long‐term mortality risk, with baseline renal dysfunction identified as a particularly important driver of these differences. Conclusions Long‐term mortality clinical risk models provide enhanced predictive power compared to actuarial models. Using the Hannan risk model, a patient's long‐term mortality risk can be accurately assessed and subgroups of higher‐risk patients can be identified for enhanced follow‐up care. More research appears warranted to refine long‐term CABG clinical risk models. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12665 (J Card Surg 2016;31:23–30) PMID:26543019

  11. Young Men Have Equivalent Biochemical Outcomes Compared With Older Men After Treatment With Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Burri, Ryan J.; Ho, Alice Y.; Forsythe, Kevin; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the biochemical outcomes of young men treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2005, 1,665 men with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy {+-} hormone therapy (HT) {+-} external beam radiotherapy and underwent {>=}2 years of follow-up. Patients were stratified on the basis of age: {<=}60 (n = 378) and >60 years (n = 1,287). Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/mL. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the association of variables with freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF). Results: Median follow-up was 68 months (range, 24-180) for men {<=}60 years and 66 months (range, 24-200) for men >60. For the entire group, the actuarial 5- and 8-year FFbF rates were 94% and 88%, respectively. Men {<=}60 demonstrated similar 5- and 8-year FFbF (95% and 92%) compared with men >60 (93% and 87%; p = 0.071). A larger percent of young patients presented with low-risk disease; lower clinical stage, Gleason score (GS), and pretreatment PSA values; were treated after 1997; did not receive any HT; and had a high biologic effective dose (BED) of radiation (all ps <0.001). On multivariate analysis, PSA (p = 0.001), GS (p = 0.005), and BED (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with FFbF, but age was not (p = 0.665). Conclusion: Young men achieve excellent 5- and 8-year biochemical control rates that are comparable to those of older men after prostate brachytherapy. Young age should not be a deterrent when considering brachytherapy as a primary treatment option for clinically localized prostate cancer.

  12. Human actuarial aging increases faster when background death rates are lower: a consequence of differential heterogeneity?

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Kristen; Smith, Ken R; Blevins, James K

    2012-01-01

    Many analyses of human populations have found that age-specific mortality rates increase faster across most of adulthood when overall mortality levels decline. This contradicts the relationship often expected from Williams' classic hypothesis about the effects of natural selection on the evolution of senescence. More likely, much of the within-species difference in actuarial aging is not due to variation in senescence, but to the strength of filters on the heterogeneity of frailty in older survivors. A challenge to this differential frailty hypothesis was recently posed by an analysis of life tables from historical European populations and traditional societies that reported variation in actuarial aging consistent with Williams' hypothesis after all. To investigate the challenge, we reconsidered those cases and aging measures. Here we show that the discrepancy depends on Ricklefs' aging rate measure, ω, which decreases as mortality levels drop because it is an index of mortality level itself, not the rate of increase in mortality with age. We also show unappreciated correspondence among the parameters of Gompertz-Makeham and Weibull survival models. Finally, we compare the relationships among mortality parameters of the traditional societies and the historical series, providing further suggestive evidence that differential heterogeneity has strong effects on actuarial aging.

  13. Valuing structured professional judgment: predictive validity, decision-making, and the clinical-actuarial conflict.

    PubMed

    Falzer, Paul R

    2013-01-01

    Structured professional judgment (SPJ) has received considerable attention as an alternative to unstructured clinical judgment and actuarial assessment, and as a means of resolving their ongoing conflict. However, predictive validity studies have typically relied on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, the same technique commonly used to validate actuarial assessment tools. This paper presents SPJ as distinct from both unstructured clinical judgment and actuarial assessment. A key distinguishing feature of SPJ is the contribution of modifiable factors, either dynamic or protective, to summary risk ratings. With modifiable factors, the summary rating scheme serves as a prognostic model rather than a classification procedure. However, prognostic models require more extensive and thorough predictive validity testing than can be provided by ROC analysis. It is proposed that validation should include calibration and reclassification techniques, as well as additional measures of discrimination. Several techniques and measures are described and illustrated. The paper concludes by tracing the limitations of ROC analysis to its philosophical foundation and its origin as a statistical theory of decision-making. This foundation inhibits the performance of crucial tasks, such as determining the sufficiency of a risk assessment and examining the evidentiary value of statistical findings. The paper closes by noting a current effort to establish a viable and complementary relationship between SPJ and decision-making theory.

  14. Current obstacles in replicating risk assessment findings: a systematic review of commonly used actuarial instruments.

    PubMed

    Rossegger, Astrid; Gerth, Juliane; Seewald, Katharina; Urbaniok, Frank; Singh, Jay P; Endrass, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    An actuarial risk assessment instrument can be considered valid if independent investigations using novel samples can replicate the findings of the instrument's development study. In order for a study to qualify as a replication, it has to adhere to the methodological protocol of the development study with respect to key design characteristics, as well as ensuring that manual-recommended guidelines of test administration have been followed. A systematic search was conducted to identify predictive validity studies (N = 84) on three commonly used actuarial instruments: the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG), the Sex Offender Risk Appraisal Guide (SORAG), and the Static-99. Sample (sex, age, criminal history) and design (follow-up, attrition, recidivism) characteristics, as well as markers of assessment integrity (scoring reliability, item omissions, prorating procedure), were extracted from 84 studies comprising 108 samples. None of the replications matched the development study of the instrument they were attempting to cross-validate with respect to key sample and design characteristics. Furthermore none of the replications strictly followed the manual-recommended guidelines for the instruments' administration. Additional replication studies that follow the methodological protocols outlined in actuarial instruments' development studies are needed before claims of generalizability can be made.

  15. Variations in relative stomatal and biochemical limitations to photosynthesis in a young blackbutt (Eucalyptus pilularis) plantation subjected to different weed control regimes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiqun; Xu, Zhihong; Blumfield, Timothy J; Bubb, Ken

    2008-07-01

    Foliar gas exchange and carbon (delta(13)C) and oxygen (delta(18)O) isotope ratios were measured in a young blackbutt (Eucalyptus pilularis Sm.) plantation subjected to four weed control treatments defined by the width of the weed-free strip maintained for the first 12 months after planting. Treatments were: 2-m-wide weed-free strip (50% of plot area, 2.0MWC), 1.5-m-wide weed-free strip (37.5% of plot area, 1.5MWC), 1-m-wide weed-free strip (25% of plot area, 1.0MWC) and no weed control (NWC). Our objectives were to determine (1) if decreasing the width of the weed control strip (decreasing herbicide use) affected growth and leaf photosynthesis of the plantation, and (2) the effects of the weed control regimes on variations in relative stomatal and biochemical limitations to photosynthesis. Trees in the 1.0MWC treatment had lower foliar light-saturated photosynthetic rate (A(sat)) than trees in the 2.0MWC treatment. An increase in metabolic limitation was responsible for the decrease in A(sat) in the 1.0MWC trees, which was also partly confirmed by the isotopic data. Compared with trees in the 1.0MWC, 1.5MWC and 2.0MWC treatments, A(sat) of NWC trees was significantly lower, a difference that was attributable mainly to stomatal limitation and to a lesser extent to biochemical limitation. The results support the conclusion that different weed control regimes cause differences in relative stomatal and biochemical limitations to plantation photosynthesis. This report contributes to a growing body of literature on competition for soil resources between trees and weeds. Our results highlight the usefulness of the stable isotopic method in supporting analysis of the response of net photosynthesis to varying intercellular CO(2) concentration for determining the relative stomatal and non-stomatal limitations to photosynthesis under experimental conditions in the field.

  16. A Dose–Response Analysis of Biochemical Control Outcomes After {sup 125}I Monotherapy for Patients With Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Yorozu, Atsunori; Ohashi, Toshio; Toya, Kazuhito; Saito, Shiro; Nishiyama, Toru; Yagi, Yasuto; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To define the optimal dose for {sup 125}I prostate implants by correlating postimplantation dosimetry findings with biochemical failure and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2009, 683 patients with prostate cancer were treated with {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy without supplemental external beam radiation therapy and were followed up for a median time of 80 months. Implant dose was defined as the D90 (the minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate) on postoperative day 1 and 1 month after implantation. Therefore, 2 dosimetric variables (day 1 D90 and day 30 D90) were analyzed for each patient. We investigated the dose effects on biochemical control and toxicity. Results: The 7-year biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) rate for the group overall was 96.4% according to the Phoenix definition. A multivariate analysis found day 1 D90 and day 30 D90 to be the most significant factors affecting BFFS. The cutoff points for day 1 D90 and day 30 D90, calculated from ROC curves, were 163 Gy and 175 Gy, respectively. By use of univariate analysis, various dosimetric cutoff points for day 30 D90 were tested. We found that day 30 D90 cutoff points from 130 to 180 Gy appeared to be good for the entire cohort. Greater D90s were associated with an increase in late genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity ≥ grade 2, but the increase was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Improvements in BFFS rates were seen with increasing D90 levels. Day 30 D90 doses of 130 to 180 Gy were found to serve as cutoff levels. For low-risk and low-tier intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients, high prostate D90s, even with doses exceeding 180 Gy, achieve better treatment results and are feasible.

  17. An actuarial analysis shows that offering lung cancer screening as an insurance benefit would save lives at relatively low cost.

    PubMed

    Pyenson, Bruce S; Sander, Marcia S; Jiang, Yiding; Kahn, Howard; Mulshine, James L

    2012-04-01

    Lung cancer screening is not established as a public health practice, yet the results of a recent large randomized controlled trial showed that screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography reduces lung cancer mortality. Using actuarial models, this study estimated the costs and benefits of annual lung cancer screening offered as a commercial insurance benefit in the high-risk US population ages 50-64. Assuming current commercial reimbursement rates for treatment, we found that screening would cost about $1 per insured member per month in 2012 dollars. The cost per life-year saved would be below $19,000, an amount that compares favorably with screening for cervical, breast, and colorectal cancers. Our results suggest that commercial insurers should consider lung cancer screening of high-risk individuals to be high-value coverage and provide it as a benefit to people who are at least fifty years old and have a smoking history of thirty pack-years or more. We also believe that payers and patients should demand screening from high-quality, low-cost providers, thus helping set an example of efficient system innovation.

  18. Biochemical Characterization of Arabidopsis Complexes Containing CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 and SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA Proteins in Light Control of Plant Development[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Danmeng; Maier, Alexander; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Laubinger, Sascha; Saijo, Yusuke; Wang, Haiyang; Qu, Li-Jia; Hoecker, Ute; Deng, Xing Wang

    2008-01-01

    COP1 (for CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1) and the four partially redundant SPA (for SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA) proteins work in concert to repress photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana by targeting key transcription factors and phytochrome A for degradation via the 26S proteasome. Here, we report a detailed biochemical characterization of the SPA-COP1 complexes. The four endogenous SPA proteins can form stable complexes with COP1 in vivo regardless of light conditions but exhibit distinct expression profiles in different tissues and light conditions. The SPA proteins can self-associate or interact with each other, forming a heterogeneous group of SPA-COP1 complexes in which the exact SPA protein compositions vary depending on the abundance of individual SPA proteins. The four SPA proteins could be divided into two functional groups depending on their interaction affinities, their regulation of ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5 degradation, and their opposite effects on COP1 protein accumulation. Loss-of-function mutations in a predominant SPA protein may cause a significant reduction in the overall SPA-COP1 E3 ligase activity, resulting in a partial constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. This study thus provides an in-depth biochemical view of the SPA-COP1 E3 ligase complexes and offers new insights into the molecular basis for their distinct roles in the light control of plant development. PMID:18812498

  19. Greater Biopsy Core Number Is Associated With Improved Biochemical Control in Patients Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, Nathan; Wallner, Kent E.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Standard prostate biopsy schemes underestimate Gleason score in a significant percentage of cases. Extended biopsy improves diagnostic accuracy and provides more reliable prognostic information. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that greater biopsy core number should result in improved treatment outcome through better tailoring of therapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to May 2006, 1,613 prostate cancer patients were treated with permanent brachytherapy. Patients were divided into five groups stratified by the number of prostate biopsy cores ({<=}6, 7-9, 10-12, 13-20, and >20 cores). Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated as a function of core number. Results: The median patient age was 66 years, and the median preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 6.5 ng/mL. The overall 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS were 95.6%, 98.3%, and 78.6%, respectively. When bPFS was analyzed as a function of core number, the 10-year bPFS for patients with >20, 13-20, 10-12, 7-9 and {<=}6 cores was 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 95.8%, and 93.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. When evaluated by treatment era (1995-2000 vs. 2001-2006), the number of biopsy cores remained a statistically significant predictor of bPFS. On multivariate analysis, the number of biopsy cores was predictive of bPFS but did not predict for CSS or OS. Conclusion: Greater biopsy core number was associated with a statistically significant improvement in bPFS. Comprehensive regional sampling of the prostate may enhance diagnostic accuracy compared to a standard biopsy scheme, resulting in better tailoring of therapy.

  20. Youth Actuarial Risk Assessment Tool (Y-ARAT): The development of an actuarial risk assessment instrument for predicting general offense recidivism on the basis of police records.

    PubMed

    van der Put, Claudia E

    2014-06-01

    Estimating the risk for recidivism is important for many areas of the criminal justice system. In the present study, the Youth Actuarial Risk Assessment Tool (Y-ARAT) was developed for juvenile offenders based solely on police records, with the aim to estimate the risk of general recidivism among large groups of juvenile offenders by police officers without clinical expertise. On the basis of the Y-ARAT, juvenile offenders are classified into five risk groups based on (combinations of) 10 variables including different types of incidents in which the juvenile was a suspect, total number of incidents in which the juvenile was a suspect, total number of other incidents, total number of incidents in which co-occupants at the youth's address were suspects, gender, and age at first incident. The Y-ARAT was developed on a sample of 2,501 juvenile offenders and validated on another sample of 2,499 juvenile offenders, showing moderate predictive accuracy (area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve = .73), with little variation between the construction and validation sample. The predictive accuracy of the Y-ARAT was considered sufficient to justify its use as a screening instrument for the police.

  1. Co-administration of metformin and N-acetylcysteine with dietary control improves the biochemical and histological manifestations in rats with non-alcoholic fatty liver.

    PubMed

    El-Lakkany, Naglaa Mohamed; Seif El-Din, Sayed Hassan; Sabra, Abdel-Nasser Abdel-Aal; Hammam, Olfat Ali; Ebeid, Fatma Abdel-Latif

    2016-10-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a burgeoning health problem that affects 1/3 of the adult population and an increasing number of children in developed countries. Oxidative stress and insulin resistance are the mechanisms that seem to be mostly involved in its pathogenesis. This study was conceived in a NAFLD rat model to evaluate the efficacy of both metformin (MTF) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) with dietary control on biochemical and histologic liver manifestations. Rats were classified into nine groups; normal (I), NAFLD-induced by feeding high-fat diet (HFD; II) for 12 weeks, NAFLD switched to regular diet (RD; III), NAFLD-HFD or -RD treated with MTF in a dose of 150 mg/kg (IV, V), NAC in a dose of 500 mg/kg (VI, VII) or MTF+NAC (VIII, IX) respectively for 8 weeks. After 20 weeks, the rats in group II showed notable steatosis, lobular inflammation, fibrosis accompanied with elevated (P < 0.05) serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma glutamyl transferase (γ-GT), cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, VLDL, leptin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), transforming growth factor (TGF-β1) and hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) compared with group I. Meanwhile, hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione GSH with serum HDL, adiponectin were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). These changes were to a less extent in group III. MTF or NAC individually resulted in improvement of most of these biochemical and histological parameters. These improvements were more pronounced in the combined groups VIII and IX versus each drug alone. NAC supplementation concomitant with MTF could be beneficial for the treatment of NAFLD and prevention of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

  2. A Brief Actuarial Assessment for the Prediction of Wife Assault Recidivism: The Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, N. Zoe; Harris, Grant T.; Rice, Marnie E.; Lang, Carol; Cormier, Catherine A.; Lines, Kathryn J.

    2004-01-01

    An actuarial assessment to predict male-to-female marital violence was constructed from a pool of potential predictors in a sample of 589 offenders identified in police records and followed up for an average of almost 5 years. Archival information in several domains (offender characteristics, domestic violence history, nondomestic criminal…

  3. Has actuarial aging "slowed" over the past 250 years? A comparison of small-scale subsistence populations and European cohorts.

    PubMed

    Gurven, Michael; Fenelon, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    G.C. Williams's 1957 hypothesis famously argues that higher age-independent, or "extrinsic," mortality should select for faster rates of senescence. Long-lived species should therefore show relatively few deaths from extrinsic causes such as predation and starvation. Theoretical explorations and empirical tests of Williams's hypothesis have flourished in the past decade but it has not yet been tested empirically among humans. We test Williams's hypothesis using mortality data from subsistence populations and from historical cohorts from Sweden and England/Wales, and examine whether rates of actuarial aging declined over the past two centuries. We employ three aging measures: mortality rate doubling time (MRDT), Ricklefs's omega, and the slope of mortality hazard from ages 60-70, m'(60-70), and model mortality using both Weibull and Gompertz-Makeham hazard models. We find that (1) actuarial aging in subsistence societies is similar to that of early Europe, (2) actuarial senescence has slowed in later European cohorts, (3) reductions in extrinsic mortality associate with slower actuarial aging in longitudinal samples, and (4) men senesce more rapidly than women, especially in later cohorts. To interpret these results, we attempt to bridge population-based evolutionary analysis with individual-level proximate mechanisms.

  4. Competence in Mathematics and Academic Achievement: An Analysis of Enrollees in the Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Maswere, Dyson W.; Mwanga, Yeko

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the role of prior grounding attained in mathematics in predicting the academic achievement of enrollees in Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science (BSAS). The investigation is based on administrative records of 240 BSAS enrollees at Makerere University, School of Statistics and Planning in the 2007-2009 cohorts. Students'…

  5. Throwing the baby out with the bath water: is it time for clinical judgment to supplement actuarial risk assessment?

    PubMed

    Abbott, Brian R

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of the potential for sexual violence is one of three prongs that must be met to satisfy the requirements for civil confinement of dangerous sex offenders in the 21 U.S. jurisdictions that have these laws. In a recent issue of The Journal, Sreenivasan et al. argued that, because of a host of methodological problems, actuarial risk assessment methods in general and the Static-99 and its progeny in particular are insufficient for accurate assessment of risk for dangerous sex offenders. They propose using a combination of clinical judgment with actuarial science as a solution. This analysis and review of Sreenivasan et al. reveals and corrects flaws in the arguments they employed to support their position and shows how the combination of actuarial science with clinical judgment is more error prone than the actuarial approach only, and cannot be forensically defended in court. Recommendations on reporting Static-99R data in expert testimony are provided, taking into account the limitations of the instrument.

  6. 75 FR 6360 - Federal Advisory Committee; DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of... that the DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries will meet on August 18, 2010... used in the valuation of benefits under DoD retiree health care programs for...

  7. 78 FR 9890 - DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries; Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... of the Secretary DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries; Notice of Federal... that the following Federal Advisory Committee meeting of the DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care... in the valuation of benefits under DoD retiree health care programs for...

  8. If You Build It, Will They Come? Tales of Developing a New Degree Program in Actuarial Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marano, Lisa E.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the B.S. in Applied Mathematics program consisting of five concentrations, including Actuarial Science, began at West Chester University of Pennsylvania, and we graduated our first class (of one) that December. We describe our program, some ideas to consider when planning your own program, and share some of the successes of our program…

  9. Resistin is not an appropriate biochemical marker to predict severity of acute pancreatitis: A case-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maramhy, Hamdi; Abdelrahman, Abdelrahman I; Sawalhi, Samer

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess levels of serum resistin upon hospital admission as a predictor of acute pancreatitis (AP) severity. METHODS: AP is both a common and serious disease, with severe cases resulting in a high mortality rate. Several predictive inflammatory markers have been used clinically to assess severity. This prospective study collected data from 102 patients who were diagnosed with an initial acute biliary pancreatitis between March 2010 and February 2013. Measurements of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were obtained and serum resistin levels were analyzed at the time of hospital admission using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additionally, resistin levels were measured from a control group after matching gender, BMI and age. RESULTS: A total of 102 patients (60 females and 42 males) were diagnosed with acute gallstone-induced pancreatitis. The mean age was 45 years, and mean BMI value was 30.5 kg/m2 (Obese, class I). Twenty-two patients (21.6%) had severe AP, while eighty-eight patients had mild pancreatitis (78.4%). Our results showed that BMI significantly correlated with pancreatitis severity (P = 0.007). Serum resistin did not correlate with BMI, weight or WC. Furthermore, serum resistin was significantly higher in patients with AP compared to control subjects (P < 0.0001). The mean resistin values upon admission were 17.5 ng/mL in the severe acute biliary pancreatitis group and 16.82 ng/mL in the mild AP group (P = 0.188), indicating that resistin is not an appropriate predictive marker of clinical severity. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate that obesity is a risk factor for developing severe AP. Further, although there is a correlation between serum resistin levels and AP at the time of hospital admission, resistin does not adequately serve as a predictive marker of clinical severity. PMID:25386084

  10. Reproductive effort accelerates actuarial senescence in wild birds: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Boonekamp, Jelle J; Salomons, Martijn; Bouwhuis, Sandra; Dijkstra, Cor; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Optimality theories of ageing predict that the balance between reproductive effort and somatic maintenance determines the rate of ageing. Laboratory studies find that increased reproductive effort shortens lifespan, but through increased short-term mortality rather than ageing. In contrast, high fecundity in early life is associated with accelerated senescence in free-living vertebrates, but these studies are non-experimental. We performed lifelong brood size manipulation in free-living jackdaws. Actuarial senescence--the increase in mortality rate with age--was threefold higher in birds rearing enlarged- compared to reduced broods, confirming a key prediction of the optimality theory of ageing. Our findings contrast with the results of single-year brood size manipulation studies carried out in many species, in which there was no overall discernible manipulation effect on mortality. We suggest that our and previous findings are in agreement with predictions based on the reliability theory of ageing and propose further tests of this proposition.

  11. An actuarial approach to comparing early stage and late stage lung cancer mortality and survival.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sara W; Mulshine, James L; Hagstrom, Dale; Pyenson, Bruce S

    2010-02-01

    Comparing the mortality characteristics of different cohorts is an essential process in the life insurance industry. Pseudodisease, lead-time bias, and length bias, which are critical to determining the value of cancer screening, have close analogues in life insurance company management, including the temporal impact of underwriting. Ratios of all-cause mortality rates for cancer cohorts relative to standard population mortality rates can provide insights into early stage and late stage mortality differences, differences by age, sex, race, and histology, and allow modeling of biases associated with early stage detection or screening protocols. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data set has characteristics that allow efficient application of actuarial techniques. We show the mortality burden associated with treated early stage lung cancer and that identifying all lung cancers at early stage could reduce US lung cancer deaths by over 70,000 per year.

  12. Risk of violence by psychiatric patients: beyond the "actuarial versus clinical" assessment debate.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Alec

    2008-02-01

    Recently adopted statistical approaches improve researchers' ability to describe what is, and what is not, possible in the prediction of violence by psychiatric patients. At the base rates of violence routinely encountered in outpatient settings, current assessment methods would require hospital admission of large numbers of patients who are potential offenders in order to prevent the actual offending of a few. Suggestions that substantially greater accuracy is possible for short-term predictions, for particular symptom clusters, and for particular offenses have yet to be tested and confirmed. Further research may improve this state of affairs, for instance, by concentrating on particular patient groups. There are reasons to suspect that any improvement will be limited. Clinical practice, however, is likely to continue to require the assessment of a patient's potential for acting violently. Future research should aid such assessments by clarifying the mechanisms by which risk factors correlate with violence and by establishing the clinical usefulness of actuarial scales.

  13. The factor structure of static actuarial items: its relation to prediction.

    PubMed

    Barbaree, Howard E; Langton, Calvin M; Peacock, Edward J

    2006-04-01

    Principal components analysis was conducted on items contained in actuarial instruments used with adult sex offenders, including: the Rapid Assessment of Sex Offender Risk for Recidivism (RASORR), the Static-99, the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG), the Sex Offender Risk Appraisal Guide (SORAG), and the Minnesota Sex Offender Screening Tool-Revised (MnSOST-R). In a data set that included child molesters and rapists (N = 311), six interpretable components were identified: Antisocial Behavior, Child Sexual Abuse, Persistence, Detached Predatory Behavior, Young and Single, and Male Victim(s). The RRASOR was highly correlated with Persistence, and the VRAG and SORAG were highly correlated with Antisocial Behavior. Antisocial Behavior was a significant predictor of violent recidivism, while Persistence and Child Sexual Abuse were significant predictors of sexual recidivism.

  14. ANTEROCOD: actuarial survival curves applied to medical coding support for chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lecornu, L; Le Guillou, C; Le Saux, F; Hubert, M; Puentes, J; Cauvin, J M

    2010-01-01

    For the practitioner, choosing diagnosis codes is a non-intuitive operation. Mistakes are frequent, causing severe consequences on healthcare performance evaluation and funding. French physicians have to assign a code to all their activities and are frequently prone to these errors. Given that most of the time and particularly for chronic diseases indexed information is already available, we propose a tool named AnterOcod, in order to support the medical coding task. It suggests the list of most relevant plausible codes, predicted from the patient's earlier hospital stays, according to a set of previously utilized diagnosis codes. Our method applies the estimation of code reappearance rates, based on an equivalent approach to actuarial survival curves. Around 33% of the expected correct diagnosis codes were retrieved in this manner, after evaluating 998 discharge abstracts, significantly improving the coding task.

  15. An indepth actuarial assessment for wife assault recidivism: the Domestic Violence Risk Appraisal Guide.

    PubMed

    Hilton, N Zoe; Harris, Grant T; Rice, Marnie E; Houghton, Ruth E; Eke, Angela W

    2008-04-01

    An actuarial tool, the Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment (ODARA), predicts recidivism using only variables readily obtained by frontline police officers. Correctional settings permit more comprehensive assessments. In a subset of ODARA construction and cross-validation cases, 303 men with a police record for wife assault and a correctional system file, the VRAG, SARA, Danger Assessment, and DVSI also predicted recidivism, but the Hare Psychopathy Checklist (PCL-R) best improved prediction of recidivism, occurrence, frequency, severity, injury, and charges. In 346 new cases, ODARA and PCL-R independently predicted recidivism. An algorithm was derived for a combined instrument, the Domestic Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (DVRAG), and an experience table is presented (N=649). Results indicated the importance of antisociality in wife assault.

  16. Actuarial analysis of the risk of undergoing repeat cardiac valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, R; Applebaum, R E; Kim, J B; Engler, M B; Engler, M M

    1984-09-01

    One thousand five hundred ninety-eight patients who underwent cardiac valve replacement were reviewed. One hundred fifty-two patients (10 percent) required a second valve replacement. The indications for repeat valve replacement were prosthetic valve dysfunction in 53 patients (35 percent), development of a new valvular lesion in 46 patients (30 percent), simple closure of a perivalvular leak in 14 patients (9 percent), change of the valve poppet in 13 patients (8 percent), severe hemolysis or emboli in 21 patients (14 percent), and prosthetic valve endocarditis in 5 patients (3 percent). The mean preoperative New York Health Association functional class improved from 3 to 1.5 in the nonreoperated patients and from 2.9 to 1.8 in patients who underwent a second valve replacement. Similarly, the mean cardiac index improved from 2.5 to 2.9 and from 2.5 to 2.8 in nonreoperated and reoperated patients, respectively. The operative mortality rate was 14 percent in the nonreoperated patients and 16 percent at second operation in the reoperated patients. Using actuarial techniques, the risk of repeat valve replacement was 1 to 4 percent per year. Long-term survival was compared between groups. Using actuarial techniques, the estimated survival rates at 1, 5, and 10 years were 89 percent, 69 percent, and 52 percent, respectively in nonreoperated patients and 87 percent, 60 percent, and 37 percent in reoperated patients. This study has documented the excellent improvement in functional and hemodynamic state after second cardiac valve replacement. The operative mortality and long-term survival rates were similar to those of the nonreoperated patients. Patients having repeat cardiac valve replacement can expect good improvement in length and quality of life.

  17. Long-term actuarial survivorship analysis of an interspinous stabilization system.

    PubMed

    Sénégas, Jacques; Vital, Jean-Marc; Pointillart, Vincent; Mangione, Paolo

    2007-08-01

    In 1986, an interspinous dynamic stabilization system (the prototype of the current Wallis implant) was designed to stiffen unstable operated degenerate lumbar segments with a hard interspinous blocker to limit extension and a tension band around the spinous processes to secure the implant and limit flexion. Restoring physiological mechanical conditions to the treated level(s) while preserving some intervertebral mobility was intended to treat low-back pain related to degenerative instability without increasing stress forces in the adjacent segments. The procedure was easily reversible. If low back pain persisted or recurred, the device was removed and stability was achieved using fusion. The intermediate-term results were promising, but the long-term safety and efficacy of this dynamic interspinous stabilization device has not been previously documented. We retrospectively reviewed the hospital files of all the patients (n = 241) who had this dynamic stabilization system implanted between 1987 and 1995, contacting as many as possible to determine the actuarial survivorship of the system. In this manner, 142 of the 241 patients (58.9%) were contacted by telephone. The endpoints used for the survivorship analysis were 'any subsequent lumbar operation' and 'implant removal'. At 14 years follow-up, values of actuarial survivorship with 95% confidence interval were 75.9 +/- 8.3 and 81.3 +/- 6.8% for the endpoints 'any subsequent lumbar operation' and 'implant removal', respectively. There was no difference in survivorship of multiple-level implants with respect to single-level devices. Although the conclusions of the present study must be tempered by the 41% attrition rate, these findings support the long-term safety of this system, and possibly long-term protective action against adjacent-level degeneration by motion preservation. Outcomes at least equivalent to those of fusion were observed without the primary drawbacks of fusion.

  18. Projections of health care expenditures as a share of the GDP: actuarial and macroeconomic approaches.

    PubMed Central

    Warshawsky, M J

    1994-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION. Can the steady increases in health care expenditures as a share of GDP projected by widely cited actuarial models be rationalized by a macroeconomic model with sensible parameters and specification? DATA SOURCES. National Income and Product Accounts, and Social Security and Health Care Financing Administration are the data sources used in parameters estimates. STUDY DESIGN. Health care expenditures as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) are projected using two methodological approaches--actuarial and macroeconomic--and under various assumptions. The general equilibrium macroeconomic approach has the advantage of allowing an investigation of the causes of growth in the health care sector and its consequences for the overall economy. DATA COLLECTION METHODS. Simulations are used. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Both models unanimously project a continued increase in the ratio of health care expenditures to GDP. Under the most conservative assumptions, that is, robust economic growth, improved demographic trends, or a significant moderation in the rate of health care price inflation, the health care sector will consume more than a quarter of national output by 2065. Under other (perhaps more realistic) assumptions, including a continuation of current trends, both approaches predict that health care expenditures will comprise between a third and a half of national output. In the macroeconomic model, the increasing use of capital goods in the health care sector explains the observed rise in relative prices. Moreover, this "capital deepening" implies that a relatively modest fraction of the labor force is employed in health care and that the rest of the economy is increasingly starved for capital, resulting in a declining standard of living. PMID:8063567

  19. Effects of a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program on the biochemical composition and morphology of cartilage in women with mild knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee result in decreased function, loss of working capacity and extensive social and medical costs. There is a need to investigate and develop effective interventions to minimise the impact of and even prevent the progression of osteoarthritis. Aquatic exercise has been shown to be effective at reducing the impact of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale, design and intervention of a study investigating the effect of an aquatic resistance exercise intervention on cartilage in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. Methods A minimum of 80 volunteers who meet the inclusion criteria will be recruited from the local population through newspaper advertisements. Following initial assessment volunteers will be randomised into two groups. The intervention group will participate in a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program of 1-hour duration 3 times a week for four months. The control group will be asked to maintain normal care during this period. Primary outcome measure for this study is the biochemical composition of knee cartilage measured using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging; T2 relaxation time and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition, knee cartilage morphology as regional cartilage thickness will be studied. Secondary outcomes include measures of body composition and bone traits using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography, pain, function using questionnaires and physical performance tests and quality of life. Measurements will be performed at baseline, after the 4-month intervention period and at one year follow up. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program has on the biochemical composition of cartilage in post-menopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. This is the first study to

  20. Immunohistochemical and biochemical indicators of muscle damage in vitro: the stability of control muscle and the effects of dinitrophenol and calcium ionophore.

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, T. R.; Jackson, M. J.; Phoenix, J.; MacLennan, P.; West-Jordan, J.; Edwards, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The biochemical, histological and ultrastructural effects of 2,4-dinitrophenol and the calcium ionophore, A23187, on rat soleus muscle incubated in vitro have been examined to test the hypothesis that immunohistochemical techniques can be used to recognize early structural features of fibre damage. In control muscles, despite mild glycogen depletion and a mild reduction in protein synthetic rate in the central portion of the muscle, fibres throughout the muscle appear to be viable with normal cytoskeletal and contractile protein architecture, normal concentrations of high energy phosphates and no creatine kinase efflux. Dinitrophenol causes rapid creatine kinase efflux, extensive loss of immunolabelling for desmin and dystrophin, and abnormal myosin immunolabelling. Creatine kinase efflux and the changes in desmin and dystrophin are reduced by the exclusion of calcium. A23187 causes more gradual creatine kinase efflux associated with changes in myosin immunolabelling, but loss of desmin and dystrophin immunolabelling is restricted to a few of the most peripheral fibres. The results suggest that immunohistochemical methods can be used to reveal differences in the intracellular mechanisms of muscle damage. Although both dinitrophenol and A23187 may act, in part, through calcium-mediated processes, their effects on cytoskeletal proteins differ. Creatine kinase efflux after A23187 may not be due to gross sarcolemmal damage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:7999634

  1. Biochemical and Psychological Effects of Omega-3/6 Supplements in Male Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Rachel V.; Kelly, Joanna; Murphy, Caroline; Potts, Laura; Sumich, Alexander; Ghebremeskel, Kebreab; Crawford, Michael A.; Taylor, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: An abnormality in long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) levels has been implicated in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Studies evaluating LC-PUFA supplementation for therapeutic efficacy in ADHD have shown mixed and, therefore, inconclusive results. Methods: Seventy-six male adolescents (age 12–16 years, mean = 13.7) with ADHD were assessed for the effects of 12 weeks omega-3 and omega-6 supplements on biochemical and psychological outcomes in a randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial. The primary outcome measure was change in the Conners' Teacher Rating Scales (CTRS) following 12 weeks of supplementation of LC-PUFA or placebo. At baseline, the placebo and treatment groups had comparable levels of LC-PUFA as measured by red blood cell phosphatidylcholine. In the treatment group, supplementation enhanced eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and total omega-3 fatty acid levels. Results: No superiority of LC-PUFAs to placebo was observed on the primary outcome. Further, there were no reliable treatment effects on aggression, impulsivity, depression, and anxiety. Conclusions: Future studies should use larger sample sizes and longer supplementation period to detect small-modest effects for clinical recommendations in ADHD. PMID:26682998

  2. A mathematical proof and example that Bayes's Theorem is fundamental to actuarial estimates of sexual recidivism risk.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Theodore; Wollert, Richard

    2008-06-01

    Expert witnesses in sexually violent predator (SVP) cases often rely on actuarial instruments to make risk determinations. Many questions surround their use, however. Bayes's Theorem holds much promise for addressing these questions. Some experts nonetheless claim that Bayesian analyses are inadmissible in SVP cases because they are not accepted by the relevant scientific community. This position is illogical because Bayes's Theorem is simply a probabilistic restatement of the way that frequency data are combined to arrive at whatever recidivism rates are paired with each test score in an actuarial table. This article presents a mathematical proof and example validating this assertion. The advantages and implications of a logic model that combines Bayes's Theorem and the null hypothesis are also discussed.

  3. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Mow S.; Premuzic, Eugene T.

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

  4. Biochemical transformation of coals

    DOEpatents

    Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

    1999-03-23

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed. 7 figs.

  5. Rapamycin regulates biochemical metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Paola; Porta, Giovanni; Agostini, Massimiliano; Antonov, Alexey; Garabadgiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Melino, Gerry; Willis, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of protein synthesis that couples nutrient sensing to cell growth, and deregulation of this pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. p53, and its less investigated family member p73, have been shown to interact closely with mTOR pathways through the transcriptional regulation of different target genes. To investigate the metabolic changes that occur upon inhibition of the mTOR pathway and the role of p73 in this response primary mouse embryonic fibroblast from control and TAp73−/− were treated with the macrocyclic lactone rapamycin. Extensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis were used to obtain a rapamycin-dependent global metabolome profile from control or TAp73−/− cells. In total 289 metabolites involved in selective pathways were identified; 39 biochemical metabolites were found to be significantly altered, many of which are known to be associated with the cellular stress response. PMID:23839040

  6. Actuarial assessment of sex offender recidivism risk: a cross-validation of the RRASOR and the Static-99 in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, G; Långström, N

    2001-12-01

    We cross-validated two actuarial risk assessment tools, the RRASOR (R. K. Hanson, 1997) and the Static-99 (R. K. Hanson & D. Thornton, 1999), in a retrospective follow-up (mean follow-up time = 3.69 years) of all sex offenders released from Swedish prisons during 1993-1997 (N = 1,400, all men, age > or =18 years). File-based data were collected by a researcher blind to the outcome (registered criminal recidivism), and individual risk factors as well as complete instrument characteristics were explored. Both the RRASOR and the Static-99 showed similar and moderate predictive accuracy for sexual reconvictions whereas the Static-99 exhibited a significantly higher accuracy for the prediction of any violent recidivism as compared to the RRASOR. Although particularly the Static-99 proved moderately robust as an actuarial measure of recidivism risk among sexual offenders in Sweden, both procedures may need further evaluation, for example, with sex offender subpopulations differing ethnically or with respect to offense characteristics. The usefulness of actuarial methods for the assessment of sex offender recidivism risk is discussed in the context of current practice.

  7. A theoretical model of the evolution of actuarial senescence under environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Watson, H.; Cohen, A.A.; Isaksson, C.

    2015-01-01

    Free-living organisms are exposed to a wide range of stressors, all of which can disrupt components of stress-related and detoxification physiology. The subsequent accumulation of somatic damage is widely believed to play a major role in the evolution of senescence. Organisms have evolved sophisticated physiological regulatory mechanisms to maintain homeostasis in response to environmental perturbations, but these systems are likely to be constrained in their ability to optimise robustness to multiple stressors due to functional correlations among related traits. While evolutionary change can accelerate due to human ecological impacts, it remains to be understood how exposure to multiple environmental stressors could affect senescence rates and subsequently population dynamics and fitness. We used a theoretical evolutionary framework to quantify the potential consequences for the evolution of actuarial senescence in response to exposure to simultaneous physiological stressors – one versus multiple and additive versus synergistic – in a hypothetical population of avian “urban adapters”. In a model in which multiple stressors have additive effects on physiology, species may retain greater capacity to recover, or respond adaptively, to environmental challenges. However, in the presence of high synergy, physiological dysregulation suddenly occurs, leading to a rapid increase in age-dependent mortality and subsequent population collapse. Our results suggest that, if the synergistic model is correct, population crashes in environmentally-stressed species could happen quickly and with little warning, as physiological thresholds of stress resistance are overcome. PMID:26335620

  8. Accuracy of actuarial procedures for assessment of sexual offender recidivism risk may vary across ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Långström, Niklas

    2004-04-01

    Little is known about whether the accuracy of tools for assessment of sexual offender recidivism risk holds across ethnic minority offenders. I investigated the predictive validity across ethnicity for the RRASOR and the Static-99 actuarial risk assessment procedures in a national cohort of all adult male sex offenders released from prison in Sweden 1993-1997. Subjects ordered out of Sweden upon release from prison were excluded and remaining subjects (N = 1303) divided into three subgroups based on citizenship. Eighty-three percent of the subjects were of Nordic ethnicity, and non-Nordic citizens were either of non-Nordic European (n = 49, hereafter called European) or African Asian descent (n = 128). The two tools were equally accurate among Nordic and European sexual offenders for the prediction of any sexual and any violent nonsexual recidivism. In contrast, neither measure could differentiate African Asian sexual or violent recidivists from nonrecidivists. Compared to European offenders, AfricanAsian offenders had more often sexually victimized a nonrelative or stranger, had higher Static-99 scores, were younger, more often single, and more often homeless. The results require replication, but suggest that the promising predictive validity seen with some risk assessment tools may not generalize across offender ethnicity or migration status. More speculatively, different risk factors or causal chains might be involved in the development or persistence of offending among minority or immigrant sexual abusers.

  9. The ethical implications of Paul Meehl's work on comparing clinical versus actuarial prediction methods.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Robyn M

    2005-10-01

    Paul E. Meehl's work comparing statistical versus actuarial prediction-and the large body of research that followed by others on the same topic-was mainly theoretical and empirical. Meehl also suggested that this work led to a "practical" conclusion, which was quite strong. The author argues that, in addition, it leads to an ethical conclusion, equally strong. Whether the scientific findings are combined with an overarching ethical principle that the best predictions possible should be made for clients, or whether these findings are framed as delineating what can be done for clients-and that clinicians ought not to attempt to do what they cannot-the conclusion is the same. Whenever statistical prediction rules (SPR's) are available for making a relevant prediction, they should be used in preference to intuition. Any modification of these rules should be systematic and subject to the same type of evaluation originally used to assess the SPR's themselves. It is even possible to develop near-optimal rules in new situations. Providing service that assumes that clinicians "can do better" simply based on self-confidence or plausibility in the absence of evidence that they can actually do so is simply unethical.

  10. Age, actuarial risk, and long-term recidivism in a national sample of sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Nicholaichuk, Terry P; Olver, Mark E; Gu, Deqiang; Wong, Stephen C P

    2014-10-01

    Age at release has become an increasing focus of study with regard to evaluating risk in the sex offender population and has been repeatedly shown to be an important component of the risk assessment equation. This study constitutes an extension of a study of sex offender outcomes prepared for the Evaluation Branch, Correctional Service of Canada. The entire cohort of 2,401 male federally incarcerated sexual offenders who reached their warrant expiry date (WED) within 1997/1998, 1998/1999, and 1999/2000 fiscal years were reviewed for the study. Sexual and violent reconviction information was obtained from CPIC criminal records over an average of 12.0 years (SD = 1.7) follow-up. This study focused upon the cohort of sex offenders who were 50 years or older at time of release (N = 542). They were stratified according to risk using a brief actuarial scale (BARS) comprising six binary variables. For the most part, older offenders showed low base rates of sexual recidivism regardless of the risk band into which they fell. The exception was a small group of elderly offenders (n = 20) who fell into the highest risk band, and who showed high levels of sexual recidivism. The results of this combination of cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of elderly sexual offenders may have important implications for offender management, particularly in light of the increasing numbers of offenders in Canada who fall into the over 50 age cohort.

  11. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species.

  12. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  13. Sex offender treatment outcome, actuarial risk, and the aging sex offender in Canadian corrections: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Olver, Mark E; Nicholaichuk, Terry P; Gu, Deqiang; Wong, Stephen C P

    2013-08-01

    The present study is an examination of sex offender treatment outcome in a large national cohort of Canadian Federally incarcerated sex offenders followed up an average of 11.7 years postrelease. A brief actuarial risk scale (BARS), which predicted sexual and violent recidivism, was created for the purposes of the present study to control for risk-related differences between treated and untreated offenders. In total, 732 offenders were identified as having completed (n = 625) or not attended (n = 107) a sex offender treatment program and for whom sufficient information was available to complete the scale. Controlling for risk and individual differences in follow-up time using Cox regression survival analyses and an 8-year fixed follow-up period, treated sex offenders demonstrated significantly lower rates of violent, but not sexual, recidivism. When the treated and untreated groups were stratified by risk level, significant differences were observed only among moderate or high risk offenders. Some significant group differences also emerged on indicators of recidivism severity, with treated offenders demonstrating slower times to sexual reoffense and lower scores on a quantified metric of sexual and violent recidivism severity after controlling for risk. Differences in recidivism base rates between treated and untreated offenders were also larger in magnitude for younger offenders (i.e., under age 50 at release), than for older offenders; however, interactions between age and treatment were not found. The findings are consistent with the risk principle and have possible implications regarding the dynamic nature of sexual violence risk.

  14. PSA nadir as a predictive factor for biochemical disease-free survival and overall survival following whole-gland salvage HIFU following radiotherapy failure

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Taimur; Peters, Max; Kanthabalan, Abi; McCartan, Neil; Fatola, Yomi; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem; van Vulpen, Marco; Freeman, Alex; Moore, Caroline M.; Arya, Manit; Emberton, Mark; Ahmed, Hashim U.

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment options for radio-recurrent prostate cancer are either androgen deprivation therapy or salvage prostatectomy. Whole-gland HIFU might have a role in this setting. Methods An independent HIFU registry collated consecutive cases of HIFU. Between 2005 and 2012 we identified 50 men who underwent whole-gland HIFU following histological confirmation of localized disease following prior external beam radiotherapy (2005-2012). No upper threshold was applied for risk category, Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), or Gleason grade either at presentation or at time of failure. Progression was defined as a composite with either biochemical failure (Phoenix criteria [PSA>nadir+2ng/mL]), start of systemic therapies or metastases. Results Median age (IQR), pre-treatment PSA (IQR), and Gleason score (range), were 68years (64-72), 5.9ng/mL (2.2-11.3), and 7 (6-9), respectively. Median follow-up was 64months (49-84). 24/50 (48%) avoided androgen deprivation therapies. 28/50 (56%) achieved a PSA-nadir <0.5ng/ml. 15/50 (30%) had a nadir ≥0.5ng/ml. 7/50 (14%) did not nadir (PSA non-responders). Actuarial 1, 3 and 5-year PFS was 72%, 40% and 31%, respectively. Actuarial 1, 3, and 5-year OS was 100%, 94% and 87%, respectively. When comparing patients with PSA nadir <0.5ng/ml, nadir ≥0.5 and non-responders a statistically significant difference in PFS was seen (p<0.0001). 3-year PFS in each group was 57%, 20% and 0%, respectively. 5-year overall survival was 96%, 100% and 38%, respectively. Early in the learning curve, between 2005-2007, 3/50 (6%) developed a fistula. Intervention for bladder outlet obstruction was needed in 27/50 (54%). Patient-reported outcome measures questionnaires showed incontinence (any pad-use) as 8/26 (31%). Conclusions In our series of high-risk patients, in whom 30-50% may have micro-metastases, disease control rates were promising in PSA-responders, however with significant morbidity. Additionally, post-HIFU PSA-nadir appears to be an

  15. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; standards related to essential health benefits, actuarial value and accreditation. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-02-25

    This final rule sets forth standards for health insurance issuers consistent with title I of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, referred to collectively as the Affordable Care Act. Specifically, this final rule outlines Exchange and issuer standards related to coverage of essential health benefits and actuarial value. This rule also finalizes a timeline for qualified health plans to be accredited in Federally-facilitated Exchanges and amends regulations providing an application process for the recognition of additional accrediting entities for purposes of certification of qualified health plans.

  16. Recent research (N = 9,305) underscores the importance of using age-stratified actuarial tables in sex offender risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Wollert, Richard; Cramer, Elliot; Waggoner, Jacqueline; Skelton, Alex; Vess, James

    2010-12-01

    A useful understanding of the relationship between age, actuarial scores, and sexual recidivism can be obtained by comparing the entries in equivalent cells from "age-stratified" actuarial tables. This article reports the compilation of the first multisample age-stratified table of sexual recidivism rates, referred to as the "multisample age-stratified table of sexual recidivism rates (MATS-1)," from recent research on Static-99 and another actuarial known as the Automated Sexual Recidivism Scale. The MATS-1 validates the "age invariance effect" that the risk of sexual recidivism declines with advancing age and shows that age-restricted tables underestimate risk for younger offenders and overestimate risk for older offenders. Based on data from more than 9,000 sex offenders, our conclusion is that evaluators should report recidivism estimates from age-stratified tables when they are assessing sexual recidivism risk, particularly when evaluating the aging sex offender.

  17. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

  18. Biochemical upgrading of oils

    DOEpatents

    Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow S.

    1999-01-12

    A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

  19. Biochemical Education in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, F.

    1988-01-01

    Described are discussions held concerning the problems of biochemical education in Brazil at a meeting of the Sociedade Brazileira de Bioquimica in April 1988. Also discussed are other visits that were made to universities in Brazil. Three major recommendations to improve the state of biochemistry education in Brazil are presented. (CW)

  20. Measures of Biochemical Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

  1. Nanoparticles as biochemical sensors

    PubMed Central

    El-Ansary, Afaf; Faddah, Layla M

    2010-01-01

    There is little doubt that nanoparticles offer real and new opportunities in many fields, such as biomedicine and materials science. Such particles are small enough to enter almost all areas of the body, including cells and organelles, potentially leading to new approaches in nanomedicine. Sensors for small molecules of biochemical interest are of critical importance. This review is an attempt to trace the use of nanomaterials in biochemical sensor design. The possibility of using nanoparticles functionalized with antibodies as markers for proteins will be elucidated. Moreover, capabilities and applications for nanoparticles based on gold, silver, magnetic, and semiconductor materials (quantum dots), used in optical (absorbance, luminescence, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance), electrochemical, and mass-sensitive sensors will be highlighted. The unique ability of nanosensors to improve the analysis of biochemical fluids is discussed either through considering the use of nanoparticles for in vitro molecular diagnosis, or in the biological/biochemical analysis for in vivo interaction with the human body. PMID:24198472

  2. Substance Abuse among High-Risk Sexual Offenders: Do Measures of Lifetime History of Substance Abuse Add to the Prediction of Recidivism over Actuarial Risk Assessment Instruments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looman, Jan; Abracen, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    There has been relatively little research on the degree to which measures of lifetime history of substance abuse add to the prediction of risk based on actuarial measures alone among sexual offenders. This issue is of relevance in that a history of substance abuse is related to relapse to substance using behavior. Furthermore, substance use has…

  3. Biochemical aspects of Huntington's chorea.

    PubMed Central

    Caraceni, T; Calderini, G; Consolazione, A; Riva, E; Algeri, S; Girotti, F; Spreafico, R; Branciforti, A; Dall'olio, A; Morselli, P L

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen patients affected by Huntington's chorea were divided into two groups, 'slow' and 'fast', according to IQ scores on the Wechsler-Bellevue scale, and scores on some motor performance tests. A possible correlation was looked for between some biochemical data (cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5HIAA) levels, plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH), dopamine (DA) uptake by platelets), and clinical data (duration of illness, severity of symptoms, age of patients, IQ scores, 'slow' and 'fast' groups). The CSF, HVA, and 5HIAA levels were found to be significantly lowered in comparison with normal controls. DBH activity and DA uptake by platelets did not differ significantly from normal subjects. Treatment with haloperidol in all patients and with dipropylacetic acid in three patients did not appear to modify the CSF, HVA, and 5HIAA concentrations, the plasma DBH activity, or the DA uptake. There were no significant differences in the CSF, HVA, and 5HIAA contents between the two groups of patients, and there was no correlation between biochemical data and clinical features. PMID:143508

  4. A Course in Biochemical Engineering Fundamentals (Revisited).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, J. E.; Ollis, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    Provides: (1) a glossary of terms used in biochemical engineering; (2) a list of key developments in the field; and (3) emphases placed in 15 topic areas in a course restructured on the basis of these developments. Topic areas include enzyme kinetics/applications, genetics and microbial control, transport phenomena, and others. (JN)

  5. A brief actuarial assessment for the prediction of wife assault recidivism: the Ontario domestic assault risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Hilton, N Zoe; Harris, Grant T; Rice, Marnie E; Lang, Carol; Cormier, Catherine A; Lines, Kathryn J

    2004-09-01

    An actuarial assessment to predict male-to-female marital violence was constructed from a pool of potential predictors in a sample of 589 offenders identified in police records and followed up for an average of almost 5 years. Archival information in several domains (offender characteristics, domestic violence history, nondomestic criminal history, relationship characteristics, victim characteristics, index offense) and recidivism were subjected to setwise and stepwise logistic regression. The resulting 13-item scale, the Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment (ODARA), showed a large effect size in predicting new assaults against legal or common-law wives or ex-wives (Cohen's d = 1.1, relative operating characteristic area =.77) and was associated with number and severity of new assaults and time until recidivism. Cross-validation and comparisons with other instruments are also reported.

  6. Hydrogen isotope systematics in C3 and C4 saltmarsh plants: the importance of biochemical processes in controlling interspecies variation in n-alkane 2H/1H composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eley, Y.; Pedentchouk, N.

    2013-12-01

    Palaeohydrological studies have increasingly utilised the 2H/1H composition of leaf wax n-alkyl lipids to extract information from the geological record. Interpretation of the sedimentary biomarker δ2H signal, however, requires detailed understanding of the mechanisms controlling hydrogen isotope fractionation between source water and n-alkyl lipids (ɛl/w). The existence of large ranges in published n-alkyl δ2H and ɛl/w among modern plant species growing at a single location suggests that the lipid signal incorporated into the sedimentary record could be sensitive to relatively small-scale changes in vegetation assemblages. The mechanisms responsible for these interspecies differences are currently poorly constrained. Previous research has had limited success explaining n-alkyl δ2H by reference to physical processes controlling the movement of water inside/outside and within the leaf, while the relative importance of biochemical processes remains largely unexplored. This project aims to identify the mechanisms controlling interspecies variation in n-alkane 2H/1H among a range of C3 and C4 plants from a Norfolk saltmarsh in the UK. To distinguish between environmental, physical and biochemical controls, we conducted 2H/1H analysis of soil, xylem, and leaf waters and n-alkanes (i) across multiple sampling sites within the marsh, (ii) throughout the 2012 growth season, and (iii) at different times of the day. We also measured the 2H/1H of chloroplast phytol in 7 samples collected at the end of 2012. Leaf wax n-alkane δ2H varied among the sampled species by over 100‰ throughout the 2012 growth season. Environmental processes that could influence control source water 2H/1H did not fully account for this interspecies variation - soil water 2H/1H varied by only 35‰ with marsh sub-environment and exhibited site-specific seasonal shifts by no more than 31‰. Maximum interspecies variation in xylem water was 38‰, while leaf waters differed by only 29‰. We

  7. Biochemical Removal of HAP Precursors From Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.; Tucker, L.; Richards, J.

    1997-07-01

    This project addresses DOE`s interest in advanced concepts for controlling emissions of air toxics from coal-fired utility boilers. We are determining the feasibility of developing a biochemical process for the precombustion removal of substantial percentages of 13 inorganic hazardous air pollutant (HAP) precursors from coal. These HAP precursors are Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cl, Co, F, Pb, Hg, Mn, Ni, and Se. Although rapid physical coal cleaning is done routinely in preparation plants, biochemical processes for removal of HAP precursors from coal potentially offer advantages of deeper cleaning, more specificity, and less coal loss. Compared to chemical processes for coal cleaning, biochemical processes potentially offer lower costs and milder process conditions. Pyrite oxidizing bacteria, most notably Thiobacillusferrooxidans, are being evaluated in this project for their ability to remove HAP precursors from U.S. coals.

  8. Misleading biochemical laboratory test results

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Amin A.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews the general and specific factors that interfere with the performance of common biochemical laboratory tests and the interpretation of their results. The clinical status of the patient, drug interactions, and in-vivo and in-vitro biochemical interactions and changes may alter the results obtained from biochemical analysis of blood constituents. Failure to recognize invalid laboratory test results may lead to injudicious and dangerous management of patients. PMID:6375845

  9. Biochemical Reversal of Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-03-01

    We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

  10. 29 CFR 4010.15 - OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false OMB control number. 4010.15 Section 4010.15 Labor... DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.15 OMB control number... Management and Budget under OMB control number 1212-0049....

  11. Unguided clinical and actuarial assessment of re-offending risk: a direct comparison with sex offenders in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, Susanne; Långström, Niklas

    2007-06-01

    Meta-analyses suggest that actuarial risk assessments outperform unguided clinical judgment for prediction of recidivism in criminal offenders. However, there is a lack of direct comparisons of the predictive accuracy of clinical judgment and actuarial risk scales for sexual offenders. We followed up 121 male sex offenders (> or =18 years) subjected to pre-trial forensic psychiatric assessment in Denmark in 1978-1992 (mean post-detainment time = 16.4 years) to compare the predictive validity of unstructured clinical judgment of recidivism risk with that of the well-established Static-99 (Hanson and Thornton, Law and Human Behavior 24:119-136, 2000) and an extension of the Static-99, the Static-2002 (Hanson and Thornton, Notes on the development of Static-2002 (Rep. No. 2003-01), Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, Ottawa, Canada, 2003). The predictive accuracy of unguided judgment did not exceed chance for any sexual, severe sexual or any violent (sexual or non-sexual) reconviction (AUCs of the ROC curve = 0.52, 95%CI = 0.41-0.63; 0.50, 95%CI = 0.34-0.67; and 0.57, 95%CI = 0.40-0.73, respectively). In contrast, all three outcomes were predicted significantly better than chance by the Static-99 (AUC = 0.62, 95%CI = 0.52-0.72; 0.72, 95%CI = 0.59-0.84; and 0.71, 95%CI = 0.56-0.86) and the Static-2002 (AUC = 0.67, 95%CI = 0.57-0.77; 0.69, 95%CI = 0.56-0.83; and 0.70, 95%CI = 0.55-0.86). Static-99 outperformed clinical judgment for sexual recidivision (chi(2) = 5.11, df = 1, p < .05). The Static-2002 was significantly more accurate for the prediction of any sexual recidivism as compared to unguided clinical judgment but its advantage fell just short of statistical significance for severe sexual recidivism (chi(2) = 3.56, df = 1, p = 0.06). When tested for recidivism within 2 years, none of the three prediction methods yielded results significantly better than chance for any outcome. This direct trial of the unguided clinical method argues against its

  12. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

  13. The economic value of fatal and non-fatal occupational risks in Mexico City using actuarial- and perceived-risk estimates.

    PubMed

    Hammitt, James K; Ibarrarán, María Eugenia

    2006-12-01

    Compensating wage differentials are used to estimate marginal rates of substitution between income and both fatal and non-fatal occupational-injury risks in the Mexico City metropolitan area. Data are obtained by in-person survey of almost 600 workers and include workers' perceived risks of fatal and non-fatal occupational injury supplemented by actuarial-risk estimates from government statistics. Results using both actuarial- and perceived-risk estimates are reasonably consistent. Estimates of the value per statistical life are between 235,000 US dollars and 325,000 US dollars and estimates of the value per statistical non-fatal injury are between 3500 US dollars and 11,000 US dollars (2002 US dollars). These values are much smaller than corresponding estimates for higher-income countries but are compatible with the small number of prior estimates for lower-income countries.

  14. Substance abuse among high-risk sexual offenders: do measures of lifetime history of substance abuse add to the prediction of recidivism over actuarial risk assessment instruments?

    PubMed

    Looman, Jan; Abracen, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    There has been relatively little research on the degree to which measures of lifetime history of substance abuse add to the prediction of risk based on actuarial measures alone among sexual offenders. This issue is of relevance in that a history of substance abuse is related to relapse to substance using behavior. Furthermore, substance use has been found to be related to recidivism among sexual offenders. To investigate whether lifetime history of substance abuse adds to prediction over and above actuarial instruments alone, several measures of substance abuse were administered in conjunction with the Sex Offender Risk Appraisal Guide (SORAG). The SORAG was found to be the most accurate actuarial instrument for the prediction of serious recidivism (i.e., sexual or violent) among the sample included in the present investigation. Complete information, including follow-up data, were available for 250 offenders who attended the Regional Treatment Centre Sex Offender Treatment Program (RTCSOTP). The Michigan Alcohol Screening Test (MAST) and the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST) were used to assess lifetime history of substance abuse. The results of logistic regression procedures indicated that both the SORAG and the MAST independently added to the prediction of serious recidivism. The DAST did not add to prediction over the use of the SORAG alone. Implications for both the assessment and treatment of sexual offenders are discussed.

  15. Actuarial models for assessing prison violence risk: revisions and extensions of the Risk Assessment Scale for Prison (RASP).

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mark D; Sorensen, Jon R

    2006-09-01

    An investigation and extension of the Risk Assessment Scale for Prison (RASP-Potosi), an actuarially derived scale for the assessment of prison violence, was undertaken through a retrospective review of the disciplinary records of the first 12 months of confinement of a cohort of inmates entering the Florida Department of Corrections in 2002 and remaining throughout 2003 (N=14,088). A near replication of the RASP-Potosi and additional analyses based on other weighted logistic regression models were performed on an inmate subsample for whom all information categories were available (n=13,341). Younger age and shorter sentences were associated with increased violent misconduct. Older age, drug conviction, and higher educational attainment were associated with reduced violent misconduct. Regardless of whether the original RASP-Potosi or its progeny were utilized, or the custody level of the inmate sample, the models were modestly successful in predicting prison violence, with the area under the curve (AUC) ranging from .645 to .707.

  16. Another look at the (im-)precision of individual risk estimates made using actuarial risk assessment instruments.

    PubMed

    Hart, Stephen D; Cooke, David J

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the precision of individual risk estimates made using actuarial risk assessment instruments (ARAIs) by discussing some major conceptual issues and then illustrating them by analyzing new data. We used a standard multivariate statistical procedure, logistic regression, to create a new ARAI based on data from a follow-up study of 90 adult male sex offenders. We indexed predictive precision at the group level using confidence intervals for group mean probability estimates, and at the individual level using prediction intervals for individual probability estimates. Consistent with past research, ARAI scores were moderately and significantly predictive of failure in the aggregate, but group probability estimates had substantial margins of error and individual probability estimates had very large margins of error. We conclude that, without major advances in our understanding of the causes of violence, ARAIs cannot be used to estimate the specific probability or absolute likelihood of future violence with any reasonable degree of precision or certainty. The implications for conducting violence risk assessments in forensic mental health are discussed.

  17. The Development and Validation of an Actuarial Risk Assessment Tool for the Prediction of First-Time Offending.

    PubMed

    Assink, Mark; van der Put, Claudia E; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2016-05-01

    For prevention purposes, it is important that police officers can estimate the risk for delinquency among juveniles who were involved in a criminal offense, but not in the role of a suspect. In the present study, the Youth Actuarial Risk Assessment Tool for First-Time Offending (Y-ARAT-FO) was developed based solely on police records with the aim to enable Dutch police officers to predict the risk for first-time offending. For the construction of this initial screening instrument, an Exhaustive Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector (Exhaustive CHAID) analysis was performed on a data set that was retrieved from the Dutch police system. The Y-ARAT-FO was developed on a sample of 1,368 juveniles and validated on a different sample of 886 juveniles showing moderate predictive accuracy in the validation sample (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = .728). The predictive accuracy of the Y-ARAT-FO was considered sufficient to justify its use as an initial screening instrument by the Dutch police.

  18. Treatment referral for sex offenders based on clinical judgment versus actuarial risk assessment: match and analysis of mismatch.

    PubMed

    Smid, Wineke J; Kamphuis, Jan Henk; Wever, Edwin C; Van Beek, Daan

    2013-07-01

    The Risk Need Responsivity (RNR) principles (Andrews & Bonta, 2010) dictate that higher risk sex offenders should receive more intensive treatment. The present study investigates how clinically based treatment assignment relates to risk level in a sex offender sample from The Netherlands. Correlational analyses served to identify sources of mismatches: that is, variables differing significantly in their relation between treatment selection and risk level. Our study sample consisted of 194 convicted rapists and 214 convicted child molesters. All participants' criminal files were retrospectively coded in terms of the items of the STATIC-99R, PCL: SV, and SVR-20. A low to moderate correlation was observed between clinical treatment selection and actuarial risk levels. A substantial part of the sex offenders, especially child molesters, received overly intensive treatment and another substantial part, especially rapists, received treatment of lesser intensity than indicated by their risk levels. General violent and antisocial risk factors seemed to be underemphasized in the clinical evaluation of sex offenders, especially rapists. A negative attitude toward intervention was negatively associated with clinical treatment selection. It is concluded that clinical treatment selection leads to an insufficient match between risk level and treatment level and systematic use of validated structured risk assessment instruments is necessary to ensure optimal adherence to the risk principle.

  19. Preliminary safety evaluation and biochemical efficacy of a Carum carvi extract: results from a randomized, triple-blind, and placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kazemipoor, Mahnaz; Radzi, Che Wan Jasimah Bt Wan Mohamed; Hajifaraji, Majid; Cordell, Geoffrey A

    2014-10-01

    Carum carvi L. (Apiaceae) is known as caraway, and its derivatives find wide medicinal use for health purposes, including for gastrointestinal problems and obesity. Since there is inconsistency among the reports on the safety of this plant in humans, this research was aimed at assessing the safety of a characterized caraway aqueous extract (CAE) in a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled study. Seventy, overweight and obese, healthy women were randomly assigned into placebo (n = 35) and plant extract (n = 35) groups. Participants received either 30 ml/day of CAE or placebo. Subjects were examined at baseline and after 12 weeks for changes in heart rate, blood pressure, urine test, 25-item blood chemistries, and general health status. No significant changes of blood pressure, heart rate, urine specific gravity, and serum blood tests were observed between the two groups before and after treatment. However, in the complete blood count test, red blood cell levels were significantly (p < 0.01) increased, and platelet distribution width was significantly decreased after the dietary CAE treatment, as compared with placebo. No negative changes were observed in the general health status of the two groups. This preliminary study suggests that the oral intake of CAE appears to be without any adverse effects at a dosage of 30 ml daily for a period of 12 weeks.

  20. 42 CFR 440.340 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Using a standardized population that is representative of the population involved. (5) Applying the same... taking into account any differences in coverage based on the method of delivery or means of cost control... population to be used in paragraphs (b)(3) and (b)(4) of this section. (d) The State must provide...

  1. 42 CFR 440.340 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Using a standardized population that is representative of the population involved. (5) Applying the same... taking into account any differences in coverage based on the method of delivery or means of cost control... population to be used in paragraphs (b)(3) and (b)(4) of this section. (d) The State must provide...

  2. Neurological impairment among heterozygote women for X-linked Adrenoleukodystrophy: a case control study on a clinical, neurophysiological and biochemical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurologic impairments in female heterozygotes for X-linked Adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) are poorly understood. Our aims were to describe the neurological and neurophysiological manifestations of a cohort of X-ALD heterozygotes, and to correlate them with age, disease duration, mutations, X-inactivation and serum concentrations of a marker of neuronal damage, neuron-specific enolase (NSE). Methods All 45 heterozygotes identified in our region, with previous VLCFA and molecular diagnosis, were invited to be evaluated through myelopathy scales JOA and SSPROM, nerve conduction studies and somatosensory evoked responses. X inactivation pattern was tested by HUMARA methylation assay. Serum NSE was measured by eletrochemiluminescense. Results Thirty three heterozygote women were recruited: 29 (87%) were symptomatic. Symptomatic and asymptomatic women presented different m ± sd ages (43.9 ± 10.2 versus 24.3 ± 4.6), JOA (14.5 ± 1.7 versus 16.6 ± 0.2) and SSPROM (86.6 ± 7.9 versus 98.4 ± 1.1) scores (p < 0.05). Both JOA (r = −0.68) and SSPROM (r = −0.65) correlated with age, irrespectively of the disease status (p = 0.0001, Spearman). Delayed latencies in the central ascending conduction studies on the lower limbs were present in 72% of all heterozygotes, and correlated with SSPROM (r = −0.47, p = 0.018, Spearman). NSE values were higher in heterozygote than in control women (12.9 ± 7 and 7.2 ± 7 ng/ml, p = 0.012, Mann-Whitney U). Mutation severity and inactivation patterns were not associated with neurologic status. Conclusion Neurologic manifestations, clearly related to age, were quite common in the present cohort. JOA and SSPROM scales were able to discriminate the asymptomatic from the symptomatic heterozygotes. Both scales might be useful tools to follow disease progression, in future studies. PMID:24410807

  3. Sex offender modus operandi stability and relationship with actuarial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Lasher, Michael P; McGrath, Robert J; Cumming, Georgia F

    2015-03-01

    Three studies conducted in Vermont yielded data on 82 sexual recidivists' index offenses (Time 1) and sexual reoffenses (Time 2) across 16 modus operandi (MO) characteristics. The current study examines the stability of these 16 characteristics between Time 1 and Time 2 offenses. Probabilities of Time 1-Time 2 characteristic combinations are reported, including when controlling for static risk as measured by the Static-99R and Vermont Assessment of Sex Offender Risk-2 (VASOR-2). Overall, considerable stability of offenders' MO was evident between Time 1 and Time 2 offenses. Victim characteristics and offense behaviors were the most stable MO characteristics, and degree of force used and victim injury were less stable and trended toward less forceful and less injurious reoffenses. Controlling for static risk had little impact on the patterns of MO stability.

  4. Biochemical Engineering and Industrial Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moo-Young, Murray

    1986-01-01

    Describes the biochemical engineering and industrial biotechnology programs of the University of Waterloo (Ontario, Canada). Provides descriptions of graduate courses, along with a sample of current research activities. Includes a discussion of the programs' mechanisms for technology transfer. (TW)

  5. A Course in... Biochemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Terry K-L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a chemical engineering course for senior undergraduates and first year graduate students in biochemical engineering. Discusses five experiments used in the course: aseptic techniques, dissolved oxygen measurement, oxygen uptake by yeast, continuous sterilization, and cultivation of microorganisms. (MVL)

  6. Construction and analysis of biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binns, Michael; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

    2012-09-01

    Bioprocesses are being implemented for a range of different applications including the production of fuels, chemicals and drugs. Hence, it is becoming increasingly important to understand and model how they function and how they can be modified or designed to give the optimal performance. Here we discuss the construction and analysis of biochemical networks which are the first logical steps towards this goal. The construction of a reaction network is possible through reconstruction: extracting information from literature and from databases. This can be supplemented by reaction prediction methods which can identify steps which are missing from the current knowledge base. Analysis of biochemical systems generally requires some experimental input but can be used to identify important reactions and targets for enhancing the performance of the organism involved. Metabolic flux, pathway and metabolic control analysis can be used to determine the limits, capabilities and potential targets for enhancement respectively.

  7. Coherence and health care cost--RCA actuarial study: a cost-effectiveness cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Woody; Kaszkin-Bettag, Marietta

    2010-01-01

    Chronic stress is among the most costly health problems in terms of direct health costs, absenteeism, disability, and performance standards. The Reformed Church in America (RCA) identified stress among its clergy as a major cause of higher-than-average health claims and implemented HeartMath (HM) to help its participants manage stress and increase physiological resilience. The 6-week HM program Revitalize You! was selected for the intervention including the emWave Personal Stress Reliever technology. From 2006 to 2007, completion of a health risk assessment (HRA) provided eligible clergy with the opportunity to participate in the HM program or a lifestyle management program (LSM). Outcomes for that year were assessed with the Stress and Well-being Survey. Of 313 participants who completed the survey, 149 completed the Revitalize You! Program, and 164 completed the LSM. Well-being, stress management, resilience, and emotional vitality were significantly improved in the HM group as compared to the LSM group. In an analysis of the claims costs data for 2007 and 2008, 144 pastors who had participated in the HM program were compared to 343 non-participants (control group). Adjusted medical costs were reduced by 3.8% for HM participants in comparison with an increase of 9.0% for the control group. For the adjusted pharmacy costs, an increase of 7.9% was found compared with an increase of 13.3% for the control group. Total 2008 savings as a result of the HM program are estimated at $585 per participant, yielding a return on investment of 1.95:1. These findings show that HM stress-reduction and coherence-building techniques can reduce health care costs.

  8. Equivalent Biochemical Control and Improved Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir After Permanent Prostate Seed Implant Brachytherapy Versus High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and High-Dose Conformal Proton Beam Radiotherapy Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Weinberg, Vivian K.; Shinohara, Katsuto; Speight, Joycelyn L.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Hsu, I.-C.; Pickett, Barby; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Sandler, Howard M.; Roach, Mack

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB) trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir <=0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or

  9. Survival Analysis and Actuarial Parameters of Sternechus subsignatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Adults.

    PubMed

    Guillermina Socías, María; Van Nieuwenhove, Guido; Murúa, María Gabriela; Willink, Eduardo; Liljesthröm, Gerardo Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    The soybean stalk weevil, Sternechus subsignatus Boheman 1836 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a very serious soybean pest in the Neotropical region. Both adults and larvae feed on soybean, causing significant yield losses. Adult survival was evaluated during three soybean growing seasons under controlled environmental conditions. A survival analysis was performed using a parametric survival fit approach in order to generate survival curves and obtain information that could help optimize integrated management strategies for this weevil pest. Sex of the weevils, crop season, fortnight in which weevils emerged, and their interaction were studied regarding their effect on adult survival. The results showed that females lived longer than males, but both genders were actually long-lived, reaching 224 and 176 d, respectively. Mean lifetime (l50) was 121.88±4.56 d for females and 89.58±2.72 d for males. Although variations were observed in adult longevities among emergence fortnights and soybean seasons, only in December and January fortnights of the 2007–2008 season and December fortnights of 2009–2010 did the statistically longest and shortest longevities occur, respectively. Survivorship data (lx) of adult females and males were fitted to the Weibull frequency distribution model. The survival curve was type I for both sexes, which indicated that mortality corresponded mostly to old individuals.

  10. Hydrogel-based piezoresistive biochemical microsensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Margarita; Schulz, Volker; Gerlach, Gerald; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Solzbacher, Florian; Magda, Jules J.; Tathireddy, Prashant; Lin, Genyao; Orthner, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This work is motivated by a demand for inexpensive, robust and reliable biochemical sensors with high signal reproducibility and long-term-stable sensitivity, especially for medical applications. Micro-fabricated sensors can provide continuous monitoring and on-line control of analyte concentrations in ambient aqueous solutions. The piezoresistive biochemical sensor containing a special biocompatible polymer (hydrogel) with a sharp volume phase transition in the neutral physiological pH range near 7.4 can detect a specific analyte, for example glucose. Thereby the hydrogel-based biochemical sensors are useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. The response of the glucosesensitive hydrogel was studied at different regimes of the glucose concentration change and of the solution supply. Sensor response time and accuracy with which a sensor can track gradual changes in glucose was estimated. Additionally, the influence of various recommended sterilization methods on the gel swelling properties and on the mechano-electrical transducer of the pH-sensors has been evaluated in order to choose the most optimal sterilization method for the implantable sensors. It has been shown that there is no negative effect of gamma irradiation with a dose of 25.7 kGy on the hydrogel sensitivity. In order to achieve an optimum between sensor signal amplitude and sensor response time, corresponding calibration and measurement procedures have been proposed and evaluated for the chemical sensors.

  11. Offering Lung Cancer Screening to High-Risk Medicare Beneficiaries Saves Lives and Is Cost-Effective: An Actuarial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pyenson, Bruce S.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Yip, Rowena; Dec, Ellynne

    2014-01-01

    Background By a wide margin, lung cancer is the most significant cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The incidence of lung cancer increases with age, and Medicare beneficiaries are often at increased risk. Because of its demonstrated effectiveness in reducing mortality, lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) imaging will be covered without cost-sharing starting January 1, 2015, by nongrandfathered commercial plans. Medicare is considering coverage for lung cancer screening. Objective To estimate the cost and cost-effectiveness (ie, cost per life-year saved) of LDCT lung cancer screening of the Medicare population at high risk for lung cancer. Methods Medicare costs, enrollment, and demographics were used for this study; they were derived from the 2012 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) beneficiary files and were forecast to 2014 based on CMS and US Census Bureau projections. Standard life and health actuarial techniques were used to calculate the cost and cost-effectiveness of lung cancer screening. The cost, incidence rates, mortality rates, and other parameters chosen by the authors were taken from actual Medicare data, and the modeled screenings are consistent with Medicare processes and procedures. Results Approximately 4.9 million high-risk Medicare beneficiaries would meet criteria for lung cancer screening in 2014. Without screening, Medicare patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer have an average life expectancy of approximately 3 years. Based on our analysis, the average annual cost of LDCT lung cancer screening in Medicare is estimated to be $241 per person screened. LDCT screening for lung cancer in Medicare beneficiaries aged 55 to 80 years with a history of ≥30 pack-years of smoking and who had smoked within 15 years is low cost, at approximately $1 per member per month. This assumes that 50% of these patients were screened. Such screening is also highly cost-effective, at <$19,000 per life

  12. Can violent (re)offense be predicted? Review of the role of the clinician and use of actuarial tests in light of new data.

    PubMed

    Zagar, Robert John; Busch, Kenneth G; Grove, William M; Hughes, John Russell

    2009-02-01

    This article is an evaluation of established actuarial probation-parole tests in light of new data on violent and homicidal behavior. Probation-parole tests originally were developed by observing risks related with recidivism or return to court after release (i.e., the "danger" of releasing an individual) by following offenders in court records for up to 10 years. Commonly used probation-parole tests together comprise 82 distinct items related to characteristics of the offender: home, school, peers, job, family, individual-medical, community, and court contacts. The risks for violence and homicide found by Zagar, et al. were compared with prior meta-analyses of risks with the criterion of violent delinquency. Bootstrapped logistic regressions in Zagar and colleagues' new data yielded highly accurate predictions of violence, showing that improved methods and sampling can lead to still higher accuracy than had been achieved by established probation-parole tests. A general discussion of the usefulness of actuarial tests and answers to challenges of their validity for decision making are provided.

  13. Interferometric biochemical and chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauglitz, Guenter; Brecht, Andreas; Kraus, Gerolf

    1995-09-01

    Interferometric principles have gained wide acceptance in the field of chemical and biochemical sensing. Reflectometric interference spectrometry sensors using white light multiple reflections at thin layers, structures of polymers, or monolayers of biochemicals are discussed in a survey. These are compared to other techniques, especially methods using surface plasmon resonance and grating couplers. Applications in the area of environmental monitoring in public safety are given, demonstrating the results for halogenated hydrocarbons in air and water as well as pesticides in ground water. Calibration curves, limits of decision, of detection, and of determination are specified and discussed with respect to EU limits. The application of multivariate data analysis is considered including artificial neuronal networks for multisensor systems and referencing in the case of gas sensors.

  14. Biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Jonathon H; Paganini, Adam W

    2015-06-01

    The change in oceanic carbonate chemistry due to increased atmospheric PCO2  has caused pH to decline in marine surface waters, a phenomenon known as ocean acidification (OA). The effects of OA on organisms have been shown to be widespread among diverse taxa from a wide range of habitats. The majority of studies of organismal response to OA are in short-term exposures to future levels of PCO2 . From such studies, much information has been gathered on plastic responses organisms may make in the future that are beneficial or harmful to fitness. Relatively few studies have examined whether organisms can adapt to negative-fitness consequences of plastic responses to OA. We outline major approaches that have been used to study the adaptive potential for organisms to OA, which include comparative studies and experimental evolution. Organisms that inhabit a range of pH environments (e.g. pH gradients at volcanic CO2 seeps or in upwelling zones) have great potential for studies that identify adaptive shifts that have occurred through evolution. Comparative studies have advanced our understanding of adaptation to OA by linking whole-organism responses with cellular mechanisms. Such optimization of function provides a link between genetic variation and adaptive evolution in tuning optimal function of rate-limiting cellular processes in different pH conditions. For example, in experimental evolution studies of organisms with short generation times (e.g. phytoplankton), hundreds of generations of growth under future conditions has resulted in fixed differences in gene expression related to acid-base regulation. However, biochemical mechanisms for adaptive responses to OA have yet to be fully characterized, and are likely to be more complex than simply changes in gene expression or protein modification. Finally, we present a hypothesis regarding an unexplored area for biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification. In this hypothesis, proteins and membranes exposed to the

  15. Biochemical responses of the Skylab crewman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.

    1974-01-01

    The biochemical investigations of the Skylab crewmen were designed to study the physiological changes that were observed on flight crews returning from previous space flight missions as well as to study those changes expected to result from prolonged weightless exposure. These studies can be divided into two broad categories. One category included routine blood studies similar to those used in clinical medical practice. The second included research-type endocrine analyses used to investigate more thoroughly the metabolic/endocrine responses to the space flight environment. The premission control values indicated that all Skylab crewmen were healthy and were free from biochemical abnormalities. The routine results during and after flight showed slight but significant changes in electrolytes, glucose, total protein, osmolality, uric acid, cholesterol, and creatinine. Plasma hormal changes included adrenocorticotrophic hormone, cortisol, angiotensin I, aldosterone, insulin, and thyroxine. The 24-hour urine analyses results revealed increased excretion of cortisol, catecholamines, antidiuretic hormone, and aldosterone as well as excretion of significant electrolyte and uric acid during the Skylab flights.

  16. [Biochemical principles of early saturnism recognition].

    PubMed

    Tsimakuridze, M P; Mansuradze, E A; Zurashvili, D G; Tsimakuridze, M P

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the work is to determine the major sensitive criteria of biochemical indicators that allow timely discovery of negative influence of lead on organism and assist in early diagnosis of primary stages of saturnism. The workers of Georgian typographies, performing technological processes of letterpress printing were observed. Professional groups having contact with lead aerosols (main group of 66 people) and the workers of the same typography not being in touch with the poison (control group of 24 people) were studied. It was distinguished that, protracted professional contact with lead causes moderate increase of lead, coproporphyrin and DALA in daily urine in most cases; it is more clearly evidenced in the professional groups of lead smelters and lino operators and less clearly among typesetter and printers. Upon the checkup of people, having a direct contact with lead, biochemical analysis of urine should be given a preference, especially the determination of quantitative content of lead and coproporphyrin in urine with the aim of revealing the lead carrier, which is one of the first signals for occupational lookout and medical monitoring of the similar contingent.

  17. Physiologic and biochemical aspects of skeletal muscle denervation and reinnervation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Mayer, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the physiologic and biochemical changes that occur in mammalian skeletal muscle following denervation and reinnervation are considered and some comparisons are made with changes observed following altered motor function. The nature of the trophic influence by which nerves control muscle properties are discussed, including the effects of choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase and the role of the acetylcholine receptor.

  18. Radiation, hormonotherapy, survival and local control in prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cellini, N; Luzi, S; Morganti, A G; Smaniotto, D; Niespolo, R M; Valentini, V

    1998-01-01

    The combination of concomitant external beam radiotherapy (ERT) and neoadjuvant hormonotherapy was shown to be able to significantly improve local control and disease-free survival in locally advanced prostatic carcinoma. (RTOG study 8610). Aim of this analysis was to assess the clinical results observed in a population of patients undergoing this combined treatment and, more particularly, to examine the prognostic impact of local control. 84 patients (T2: 47%, T3: 49.4%, T4: 3.6%) underwent concomitant ERT (dose to pelvic volume: 45 Gy; mean dose to prostatic volume: 65 Gy) and neoadjuvant hormonotherapy (flutamide: 250 mg three times/daily for 30 days; LH-RH analogue: 1 oral dose every 28 days starting 2 months prior to radiotherapy and for its whole duration). With a median follow-up of 36 months, 3.6% of patients were deceased; hematogenous metastases and local disease progression were recorded in 16.7% and 4.8% of patients, respectively. Local disease progression was shown to be significantly correlated with the incidence of metastases. In fact, the actuarial incidence of metastases at 5 years was 100% and 27% in patients with and without local recurrence (p = 0.0043) respectively. Overall, metastases-free local and biochemical recurrence-free survival was 89.2%, 66.5%, 85.0% and 41.9% respectively. At univariate analysis (logrank) the clinical stage (T) was shown to be significantly correlated with the incidence of metastases (p = .0004) and local progression (p < .0001). In conclusion, this study has confirmed the low rate of local progression with the combination of hormonotherapy and radiotherapy and the significant correlation of local control with the incidence of hematogenous metastases.

  19. Biochemical structure of Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Korakhashvili, A; Kacharava, T; Kiknavelidze, N

    2007-01-01

    Calendula officinalis is a well known medicinal herb. It is common knowledge that its medicinal properties are conditioned on biologically active complex substances of Carotin (Provitamin A), Stearin, Triterpiniod, Plavonoid, Kumarin, macro and micro compound elements. Because of constant need in raw material of Calendula officinalis, features of its ontogenetic development agro-biological qualities in various eco regions of Georgia were investigated. The data of biologically active compounds, biochemical structure and the maintenance both in flowers and in others parts of plant is presented; the pharmacological activity and importance in medicine was reviewed.

  20. Hyponatraemia: biochemical and clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gill, G; Leese, G

    1998-09-01

    Hyponatraemia is a common bio-chemical abnormality, occurring in about 15% of hospital inpatients. It is often associated with severe illness and relatively poor outcome. Pathophysiologically, hyponatraemia may be spurious, dilutional, depletional or redistributional. Particularly difficult causes and concepts of hyponatraemia are the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis and the sick cell syndrome, which are discussed here in detail. Therapy should always be targeted at the underlying disease process. 'Hyponatraemic symptoms' are of doubtful importance, and may be more related to water overload and/or the causative disease, than to hyponatraemia per se. Artificial elevation of plasma sodium by saline infusion carries the risk of induction of osmotic demyelination (central pontine myelinolysis).

  1. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  2. Thermodynamic constraints for biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A; Babson, Eric; Curtis, Edward; Qian, Hong

    2004-06-07

    The constraint-based approach to analysis of biochemical systems has emerged as a useful tool for rational metabolic engineering. Flux balance analysis (FBA) is based on the constraint of mass conservation; energy balance analysis (EBA) is based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The power of these approaches lies in the fact that the constraints are based on physical laws, and do not make use of unknown parameters. Here, we show that the network structure (i.e. the stoichiometric matrix) alone provides a system of constraints on the fluxes in a biochemical network which are feasible according to both mass balance and the laws of thermodynamics. A realistic example shows that these constraints can be sufficient for deriving unambiguous, biologically meaningful results. The thermodynamic constraints are obtained by comparing of the sign pattern of the flux vector to the sign patterns of the cycles of the internal cycle space via connection between stoichiometric network theory (SNT) and the mathematical theory of oriented matroids.

  3. Mode of inheritance for biochemical traits in genetically engineered cotton under water stress

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Muhammad Ali; Malik, Waqas; Yasmeen, Azra; Qayyum, Abdul; Zhang, Rui; Liang, Chengzhen; Guo, Sandui; Ashraf, Javaria

    2016-01-01

    Drought is an abiotic environmental stress that can significantly reduce crop productivity. We examined the mode of inheritance for different biochemical traits including total soluble proteins, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll, carotenoids, total phenolic contents and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase), and their relationship with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin under control and drought conditions. Eight genetically diverse cotton genotypes were selfed for two generations to ensure homozygosity. Fifteen F1 hybrids were developed by crossing five non-Bt female lines with three Bt male testers. The F1 hybrids and eight parents were finally evaluated under control (100 % field capacity (FC)) and drought (50 % FC) conditions in 2013. The biochemical traits appeared to be controlled by non-additive gene action with low narrow sense heritability estimates. The estimates of general combining ability and specific combining ability for all biochemical traits were significant under control and drought conditions. The genotype-by-trait biplot analysis showed the better performance of Bt cotton hybrids when compared with their parental genotypes for various biochemical traits under control and drought conditions. The biplot and path coefficient analyses revealed the prevalence of different relationships between Cry1Ac toxin and biochemical traits in the control and drought conditions. In conclusion, biochemical traits could serve as potential biochemical markers for breeding Bt cotton genotypes without compromising the optimal level of Bt toxin. PMID:26839284

  4. Mode of inheritance for biochemical traits in genetically engineered cotton under water stress.

    PubMed

    Abid, Muhammad Ali; Malik, Waqas; Yasmeen, Azra; Qayyum, Abdul; Zhang, Rui; Liang, Chengzhen; Guo, Sandui; Ashraf, Javaria

    2016-02-02

    Drought is an abiotic environmental stress that can significantly reduce crop productivity. We examined the mode of inheritance for different biochemical traits including total soluble proteins, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll, carotenoids, total phenolic contents and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase), and their relationship with Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin under control and drought conditions. Eight genetically diverse cotton genotypes were selfed for two generations to ensure homozygosity. Fifteen F1 hybrids were developed by crossing five non-Bt female lines with three Bt male testers. The F1 hybrids and eight parents were finally evaluated under control (100 % field capacity (FC)) and drought (50 % FC) conditions in 2013. The biochemical traits appeared to be controlled by non-additive gene action with low narrow sense heritability estimates. The estimates of general combining ability and specific combining ability for all biochemical traits were significant under control and drought conditions. The genotype-by-trait biplot analysis showed the better performance of Bt cotton hybrids when compared with their parental genotypes for various biochemical traits under control and drought conditions. The biplot and path coefficient analyses revealed the prevalence of different relationships between Cry1Ac toxin and biochemical traits in the control and drought conditions. In conclusion, biochemical traits could serve as potential biochemical markers for breeding Bt cotton genotypes without compromising the optimal level of Bt toxin.

  5. Effect of Different Psychoactive Substances on Serum Biochemical Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sanli, Dilek Beker; Bilici, Rabia; Suner, Ozgur; Citak, Serhat; Kartkaya, Kazim; Mutlu, Fezan Sahin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Psychoactive substances affect mainly central nervous system and brain function causing changes in behavior. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different psychoactive substances on serum biochemical parameters. Patients and Methods: The study included 324 drug dependents, and 69 controls. The patient group was determined according to DSM-IV (The diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition) criteria. All patients and control subjects were tested for routine biochemical parameters and urine toxicology parameters for psychoactive substance use. Cases and controls with accompanying diseases like diabetes, cancer, metabolic disorders etc. are excluded from the study. Moreover, an association between urine toxicology results and changes in biochemical parameters was evaluated for statistical significance. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT), uric acid, creatinine, urea, albumin, Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) medians between the dependent and control groups (P < 0.05). We found a statistically significant difference in sodium and albumin levels between the opium-dependent and control groups (P < 0.05). In the benzodiazepin dependent group, we found a significant difference in GGT, urea, glucose, sodium, T protein, and AST levels (P < 0.05). Moreover, a statistically significant difference was observed in triglyceride and GGT levels between the ethyl glucuronide and control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In psychoactive substance dependents, serum routine biochemistry parameters can be used to predict the need for intensive monitoring and treatment programs. PMID:26405680

  6. Diagnosis of hyperandrogenism: biochemical criteria.

    PubMed

    Stanczyk, Frank Z

    2006-06-01

    Biochemical derangements in ovarian, adrenal, and peripheral androgen production and metabolism play an important role in underlying causes of hyperandrogenism. Specific diagnostic serum markers such as testosterone (total) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), respectively, may be helpful in the diagnosis of ovarian and adrenal hyperandrogenism, respectively. Validated immunoassays or mass spectrometry assays should be used to quantify testosterone, DHEAS and other principal androgens. Free testosterone measurements, determined by equilibrium dialysis or the calculated method, are advocated for routine evaluation of more subtle forms of hyperandrogenism. The skin, with its pilosebaceous units (PSUs), is an important site of active androgen production. A key regulator in PSUs is 5alpha-reductase, which transforms testosterone or androstenedione to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT in blood is not effective in indicating the presence of hyperandrogenism. However, distal metabolites of DHT have been shown to be good markers of clinical manifestations of hirsutism, acne and alopecia. Assays for these peripheral markers need improvement for routine clinical testing.

  7. Biochemical nature of Russell Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Francesca Mossuto, Maria; Ami, Diletta; Anelli, Tiziana; Fagioli, Claudio; Maria Doglia, Silvia; Sitia, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Professional secretory cells produce and release abundant proteins. Particularly in case of mutations and/or insufficient chaperoning, these can aggregate and become toxic within or amongst cells. Immunoglobulins (Ig) are no exception. In the extracellular space, certain Ig-L chains form fibrils causing systemic amyloidosis. On the other hand, Ig variants lacking the first constant domain condense in dilated cisternae of the early secretory compartment, called Russell Bodies (RB), frequently observed in plasma cell dyscrasias, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. RB biogenesis can be recapitulated in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells by expressing mutant Ig-μ, providing powerful models to investigate the pathophysiology of endoplasmic reticulum storage disorders. Here we analyze the aggregation propensity and the biochemical features of the intra- and extra-cellular Ig deposits in human cells, revealing β-aggregated features for RB. PMID:26223695

  8. Biochemical nature of Russell Bodies.

    PubMed

    Mossuto, Maria Francesca; Ami, Diletta; Anelli, Tiziana; Fagioli, Claudio; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Sitia, Roberto

    2015-07-30

    Professional secretory cells produce and release abundant proteins. Particularly in case of mutations and/or insufficient chaperoning, these can aggregate and become toxic within or amongst cells. Immunoglobulins (Ig) are no exception. In the extracellular space, certain Ig-L chains form fibrils causing systemic amyloidosis. On the other hand, Ig variants lacking the first constant domain condense in dilated cisternae of the early secretory compartment, called Russell Bodies (RB), frequently observed in plasma cell dyscrasias, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. RB biogenesis can be recapitulated in lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells by expressing mutant Ig-μ, providing powerful models to investigate the pathophysiology of endoplasmic reticulum storage disorders. Here we analyze the aggregation propensity and the biochemical features of the intra- and extra-cellular Ig deposits in human cells, revealing β-aggregated features for RB.

  9. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  10. Pattern Selection by Dynamical Biochemical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Palau-Ortin, David; Formosa-Jordan, Pau; Sancho, José M.; Ibañes, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms involves cells to decide their fate upon the action of biochemical signals. This decision is often spatiotemporally coordinated such that a spatial pattern arises. The dynamics that drive pattern formation usually involve genetic nonlinear interactions and positive feedback loops. These complex dynamics may enable multiple stable patterns for the same conditions. Under these circumstances, pattern formation in a developing tissue involves a selection process: why is a certain pattern formed and not another stable one? Herein we computationally address this issue in the context of the Notch signaling pathway. We characterize a dynamical mechanism for developmental selection of a specific pattern through spatiotemporal changes of the control parameters of the dynamics, in contrast to commonly studied situations in which initial conditions and noise determine which pattern is selected among multiple stable ones. This mechanism can be understood as a path along the parameter space driven by a sequence of biochemical signals. We characterize the selection process for three different scenarios of this dynamical mechanism that can take place during development: the signal either 1) acts in all the cells at the same time, 2) acts only within a cluster of cells, or 3) propagates along the tissue. We found that key elements for pattern selection are the destabilization of the initial pattern, the subsequent exploration of other patterns determined by the spatiotemporal symmetry of the parameter changes, and the speeds of the path compared to the timescales of the pattern formation process itself. Each scenario enables the selection of different types of patterns and creates these elements in distinct ways, resulting in different features. Our approach extends the concept of selection involved in cellular decision-making, usually applied to cell-autonomous decisions, to systems that collectively make decisions through cell

  11. Biochemical transformation of solid carbonaceous material

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Mow S.; Premuzic, Eugene T.

    2001-09-25

    A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

  12. Associative learning in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Nikhil; Ashkenasy, Gonen; Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2007-11-07

    It has been recently suggested that there are likely generic features characterizing the emergence of systems constructed from the self-organization of self-replicating agents acting under one or more selection pressures. Therefore, structures and behaviors at one length scale may be used to infer analogous structures and behaviors at other length scales. Motivated by this suggestion, we seek to characterize various "animate" behaviors in biochemical networks, and the influence that these behaviors have on genomic evolution. Specifically, in this paper, we develop a simple, chemostat-based model illustrating how a process analogous to associative learning can occur in a biochemical network. Associative learning is a form of learning whereby a system "learns" to associate two stimuli with one another. Associative learning, also known as conditioning, is believed to be a powerful learning process at work in the brain (associative learning is essentially "learning by analogy"). In our model, two types of replicating molecules, denoted as A and B, are present in some initial concentration in the chemostat. Molecules A and B are stimulated to replicate by some growth factors, denoted as G(A) and G(B), respectively. It is also assumed that A and B can covalently link, and that the conjugated molecule can be stimulated by either the G(A) or G(B) growth factors (and can be degraded). We show that, if the chemostat is stimulated by both growth factors for a certain time, followed by a time gap during which the chemostat is not stimulated at all, and if the chemostat is then stimulated again by only one of the growth factors, then there will be a transient increase in the number of molecules activated by the other growth factor. Therefore, the chemostat bears the imprint of earlier, simultaneous stimulation with both growth factors, which is indicative of associative learning. It is interesting to note that the dynamics of our model is consistent with certain aspects of

  13. Biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Diming; Liu, Qingjun

    2016-01-15

    Smartphone has been widely integrated with sensors, such as test strips, sensor chips, and hand-held detectors, for biochemical detections due to its portability and ubiquitous availability. Utilizing built-in function modules, smartphone is often employed as controller, analyzer, and displayer for rapid, real-time, and point-of-care monitoring, which can significantly simplify design and reduce cost of the detecting systems. This paper presents a review of biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone for portable biochemical detections. The biosensors and bioelectronics based on smartphone can mainly be classified into biosensors using optics, surface plasmon resonance, electrochemistry, and near-field communication. The developments of these biosensors and bioelectronics on smartphone are reviewed along with typical biochemical detecting cases. Sensor strategies, detector attachments, and coupling methods are highlighted to show designs of the compact, lightweight, and low-cost sensor systems. The performances and advantages of these designs are introduced with their applications in healthcare diagnosis, environment monitoring, and food evaluation. With advances in micro-manufacture, sensor technology, and miniaturized electronics, biosensor and bioelectronic devices on smartphone can be used to perform biochemical detections as common and convenient as electronic tag readout in foreseeable future.

  14. Development of a new first-aid biochemical detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jingfei; Liao, Haiyang; Su, Shilin; Ding, Hao; Liu, Suquan

    2016-10-01

    The traditional biochemical detector exhibits poor adaptability, inconvenient carrying and slow detection, which can't meet the needs of first-aid under field condition like natural or man-made disasters etc. Therefore a scheme of first-aid biochemical detector based on MOMES Micro Spectrometer, UV LED and Photodiode was proposed. An optical detection structure combined continuous spectrum sweep with fixed wavelength measurement was designed, which adopted mobile detection optical path consisting of Micro Spectrometer and Halogen Lamp to detect Chloride (Cl-), Creatinine (Cre), Glucose (Glu), Hemoglobin (Hb). The UV LED and Photodiode were designed to detect Potassium (K-), Carbon dioxide (CO2), Sodium (Na+). According to the field diagnosis and treatment requirements, we designed the embedded control hardware circuit and software system, the prototype of first-aid biochemical detector was developed and the clinical trials were conducted. Experimental results show that the sample's absorbance repeatability is less than 2%, the max coefficient of variation (CV) in the batch repeatability test of all 7 biochemical parameters in blood samples is 4.68%, less than the clinical requirements 10%, the correlation coefficient (R2) in the clinical contrast test with AU5800 is almost greater than 0.97. To sum up, the prototype meets the requirements of clinical application.

  15. Biochemical correlates in an animal model of depression

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    A valid animal model of depression was used to explore specific adrenergic receptor differences between rats exhibiting aberrant behavior and control groups. Preliminary experiments revealed a distinct upregulation of hippocampal beta-receptors (as compared to other brain regions) in those animals acquiring a response deficit as a result of exposure to inescapable footshock. Concurrent studies using standard receptor binding techniques showed no large changes in the density of alpha-adrenergic, serotonergic, or dopaminergic receptor densities. This led to the hypothesis that the hippocampal beta-receptor in responses deficient animals could be correlated with the behavioral changes seen after exposure to the aversive stimulus. Normalization of the behavior through the administration of antidepressants could be expected to reverse the biochemical changes if these are related to the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. This study makes three important points: (1) there is a relevant biochemical change in the hippocampus of response deficient rats which occurs in parallel to a well-defined behavior, (2) the biochemical and behavioral changes are normalized by antidepressant treatments exhibiting both serotonergic and adrenergic mechanisms of action, and (3) the mode of action of antidepressants in this model is probably a combination of serotonergic and adrenergic influences modulating the hippocampal beta-receptor. These results are discussed in relation to anatomical and biochemical aspects of antidepressant action.

  16. [Cystinuria update: clinical, biochemical and genetic aspects].

    PubMed

    Orts Costa, J A; Zúñiga Cabrera, A; Martínez de la Cára y Salmerón, J

    2003-06-01

    Cystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder with an estimated incidence of 1 case in 7000 live births, that results in elevated urinary excretion of cystine and dibasic aminoacids: ornithine, lysine and arginine. Discussed by Sir Archibald Edward Garrod, in 1908, as one of the four first known inborn errors of metabolism, it is characterized by a defect in transport of cystine and dibasic aminoacids, that affects their reabsortion in both renal tubule and gastrointestinal tract. To date, according to the recent molecular findings, two genes have been identified as responsible for this disease: SLC3A1 and SLC7A9. A more accurate pheno/genotyping identification of cystinuric patients will allow to improve prophilaxis and therapy for this illness. Cystinuria only causes recurrent urolithiasis (about 1-2 / of renal calculi in adults) and its associated complications as clinical feature because of poor cystine solubility at low pH. An accurate control over prohylaxis (based on high water intake and potassium citrate treatment, on first line, and tiol-derivatives treatment, on second line) must be taken in patients -like homozygous type I- with high lithiasis risk. However, approximately one half of patients under prophylaxis control will develop recurrent lithiasis; in this case, only urology or surgical approaches would be possible. 474 Updated knowledge about biochemical, genetic, clinical, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and prognosis aspects of this, relatively unusual, disease has been reviewed in this article.

  17. Biochemical genetic markers in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Glaszmann, J C; Fautret, A; Noyer, J L; Feldmann, P; Lanaud, C

    1989-10-01

    Isozyme variation was used to identify biochemical markers of potential utility in sugarcane genetics and breeding. Electrophoretic polymorphism was surveyed for nine enzymes among 39 wild and noble sugarcane clones, belonging to the species most closely related to modern varieties. Up to 114 distinct bands showing presence versus absence type of variation were revealed and used for qualitative characterization of the materials. Multivariate analysis of the data isolated the Erianthus clone sampled and separated the Saccharum spontaneum clones from the S. robustum and S. officinarum clones; the latter two were not differentiated from one another. The analysis of self-progenies of a 2n=112 S. spontaneum and of a commercial variety showed examples of mono- and polyfactorial segregations. Within the progeny of the variety, co-segregation of two isozymes frequent in S. spontaneum led to them being assigned to a single chromosome initially contributed by a S. spontaneum donor. This illustrates how combined survey of ancestral species and segregation analysis in modern breeding materials should permit using the lack of interspecific cross-over to establish linkage groups in a sugarcane genome.

  18. Physiological, biochemical and transcriptional analysis of onion bulbs during storage

    PubMed Central

    Chope, Gemma A.; Cools, Katherine; Hammond, John P.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Terry, Leon A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims During the transition from endo-dormancy to eco-dormancy and subsequent growth, the onion bulb undergoes the transition from sink organ to source, to sustain cell division in the meristematic tissue. The mechanisms controlling these processes are not fully understood. Here, a detailed analysis of whole onion bulb physiological, biochemical and transcriptional changes in response to sprouting is reported, enabling a better knowledge of the mechanisms regulating post-harvest onion sprout development. Methods Biochemical and physiological analyses were conducted on different cultivars (‘Wellington’, ‘Sherpa’ and ‘Red Baron’) grown at different sites over 3 years, cured at different temperatures (20, 24 and 28 °C) and stored under different regimes (1, 3, 6 and 6 → 1 °C). In addition, the first onion oligonucleotide microarray was developed to determine differential gene expression in onion during curing and storage, so that transcriptional changes could support biochemical and physiological analyses. Key Results There were greater transcriptional differences between samples at harvest and before sprouting than between the samples taken before and after sprouting, with some significant changes occurring during the relatively short curing period. These changes are likely to represent the transition from endo-dormancy to sprout suppression, and suggest that endo-dormancy is a relatively short period ending just after curing. Principal component analysis of biochemical and physiological data identified the ratio of monosaccharides (fructose and glucose) to disaccharide (sucrose), along with the concentration of zeatin riboside, as important factors in discriminating between sprouting and pre-sprouting bulbs. Conclusions These detailed analyses provide novel insights into key regulatory triggers for sprout dormancy release in onion bulbs and provide the potential for the development of biochemical or transcriptional markers for sprout

  19. The role of thermodynamics in biochemical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Stockar, Urs

    2013-09-01

    This article is an adapted version of the introductory chapter of a book whose publication is imminent. It bears the title "Biothermodynamics - The role of thermodynamics in biochemical engineering." The aim of the paper is to give a very short overview of the state of biothermodynamics in an engineering context as reflected in this book. Seen from this perspective, biothermodynamics may be subdivided according to the scale used to formalize the description of the biological system into three large areas: (i) biomolecular thermodynamics (most fundamental scale), (ii) thermodynamics of metabolism (intermediary scale), and (iii) whole-cell thermodynamics ("black-box" description of living entities). In each of these subareas, the main available theoretical approaches and the current and the potential applications are discussed. Biomolecular thermodynamics (i) is especially well developed and is obviously highly pertinent for the development of downstream processing. Its use ought to be encouraged as much as possible. The subarea of thermodynamics of live cells (iii), although scarcely applied in practice, is also expected to enhance bioprocess research and development, particularly in predicting culture performances, for understanding the driving forces for cellular growth, and in developing, monitoring, and controlling cellular cultures. Finally, there is no question that thermodynamic analysis of cellular metabolism (ii) is a promising tool for systems biology and for many other applications, but quite a large research effort is still needed before it may be put to practical use.

  20. Biochemical Lab Activity Supports Evolution Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyman, Daniel J.

    1974-01-01

    Described is thin-layer chromatography (TLC), a technique that can be conveniently used in the laboratory to generate evidence supporting the principle that degrees of biochemical similarity reflect degrees of evolutionary relatedness among organisms. (Author/PEB)

  1. Raman spectroscopic biochemical mapping of tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Nicholas; Hart Prieto, Maria C.; Kendall, Catherine A.; Shetty, Geeta; Barr, Hugh

    2006-02-01

    Advances in technologies have brought us closer to routine spectroscopic diagnosis of early malignant disease. However, there is still a poor understanding of the carcinogenesis process. For example it is not known whether many cancers follow a logical sequence from dysplasia, to carcinoma in situ, to invasion. Biochemical tissue changes, triggered by genetic mutations, precede morphological and structural changes. These can be probed using Raman or FTIR microspectroscopy and the spectra analysed for biochemical constituents. Local microscopic distribution of various constituents can then be visualised. Raman mapping has been performed on a number of tissues including oesophagus, breast, bladder and prostate. The biochemical constituents have been calculated at each point using basis spectra and least squares analysis. The residual of the least squares fit indicates any unfit spectral components. The biochemical distribution will be compared with the defined histopathological boundaries. The distribution of nucleic acids, glycogen, actin, collagen I, III, IV, lipids and others appear to follow expected patterns.

  2. A Program on Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San, Ka-Yiu; McIntire, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an introduction to the Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering program at Rice University. Describes the development of the academic and enhancement programs, including organizational structure and research project titles. (YP)

  3. Biochemical-Pathway Diversity in Archaebacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-30

    characteristic of much or all of the Gram-positive lineage of eubacteria . We have extended the enzymological base of information to include organisms...to compare the biochemical diversitv within the archaebacteria to the biochemical diversity already known or now emerging within the eubacteria . RAI...INALL: In eubacteria aromatic-pathway character states are exceedingly diverse. A given feature will cluster at a hierarchical level ot phylogeny that

  4. [Biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication].

    PubMed

    Papyshev, I P; Astashkina, O G; Tuchik, E S; Nikolaev, B S; Cherniaev, A L

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication remains a topical problem in forensic medical science and practice. We investigated materials obtained in the course of forensic medical expertise of the cases of fatal opium intoxication. The study revealed significant differences between myoglobin levels in blood, urine, myocardium, and skeletal muscles. The proposed approach to biochemical diagnostics of fatal opium intoxication enhances the accuracy and the level of evidence of expert conclusions.

  5. Functional and biochemical modifications in skeletal muscles from malarial mice.

    PubMed

    Brotto, Marco A P; Marrelli, Mauro T; Brotto, Leticia S; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Nosek, Thomas M

    2005-05-01

    Although it is well established that patients suffering from malaria experience skeletal muscle problems (contracture, aches, fatigue, weakness), detailed studies have not been performed to investigate changes in the contractile function and biochemical properties of intact and skinned skeletal muscles of mammals infected with malaria. To this end, we investigated such features in the extensor digitorium longus (EDL, fast-twitch, glyocolytic) and in the soleus (SOL, slow-twitch, oxidative) muscles from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. We first studied maximal tetanic force (T(max)) produced by intact control and malaria-infected muscles before, during and after fatigue. Triton-skinned muscle fibres were isolated from these muscles and used to determine isometric contractile features as well as a basic biochemical profile as analysed by silver-enhanced SDS-PAGE. We found that the T(max) of intact muscles and the maximal Ca2+-activated force (F(max)) of Triton-skinned muscle fibres were reduced by approximately 50% in malarial muscles. In addition, the contractile proteins of Triton-skinned muscle fibres from malarial muscles were significantly less sensitive to Ca2+. Biochemical analysis revealed that there was a significant loss of essential contractile proteins (e.g. troponins and myosin) in Triton-skinned muscle fibres from malarial muscles as compared to controls. The biochemical alterations (i.e., reduction of essential contractile proteins) seem to explain well the functional modifications resolved in both intact muscles and Triton-skinned muscle fibres and may provide a suitable paradigm for the aetiology of muscle symptoms associated with malaria.

  6. [Biochemical genetics in St. Petersburg university: from the gene-enzyme model to medical biotechnology].

    PubMed

    Padkina, M V; Sambuk, E V

    2007-10-01

    The history of biochemical genetic research in St. Petersburg (Leningrad) State University is described. The main research projects and achievements of the Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics in studies on the mechanisms of gene expression control, coordinated regulation of metabolism, and the relationship of the physiological state of yeast cells with the maintenance of genetic stability are discussed. The fundamental importance of studies on the acid phosphatase model for the formation and development of medical biotechnology in St. Petersburg University is demonstrated.

  7. Is Ramadan fasting safe in type 2 diabetic patients in view of the lack of significant effect of fasting on clinical and biochemical parameters, blood pressure, and glycemic control?

    PubMed

    M'guil, M; Ragala, M A; El Guessabi, L; Fellat, S; Chraibi, A; Chabraoui, L; Chebraoui, L; Israili, Z H; Lyoussi, B

    2008-07-01

    The study objective was to determine if Ramadan fasting was safe in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), based upon a determination of the effect of fasting on a broad range of physiological and clinical parameters, including markers of glycemic control and blood pressure. The study was carried out in Ramadan 1422 (December 2001-January 2002) at the Diabetology Services, Hopital Ibn Sina, Rabat, Morocco. One hundred and twenty T2D Moroccan patients (62 women, 58 men), aged 48-60 yrs with well-controlled diabetes through diet and/or oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHD), received dietary instructions and readjustment of the timing of the dose of OHD (gliclazide modified release) according to the fasting/eating periods. Anthropometric indices and physiological parameters (blood pressure, lipid, hematological, and serum electrolyte profiles, as well as markers of glycemic control, nutrition, renal and hepatic function) were measured on the day before Ramadan and then on the 15(th) and 29(th) day of fasting and thereafter 15 days later. Statistical analysis was done by standard methods. Ramadan fasting had no major effect on energy intake, body weight, body mass index, blood pressure, and liver enzymes. Fasting and post-prandial glucose levels decreased, while insulin levels increased. Diabetes was well controlled, as indicated by HbA1c, fructosamine, C-peptide, HOMA-IR, and IGF-1 values. There were fluctuations in some lipid and hematological parameters, creatinine, urea, uric acid, total protein, bilirubin, and electrolytes; however, all values stayed within the proper physiological range. In conclusion, diabetes was well-controlled in patients with dietary/medical management, without serious complications. With a regimen adjustment of OHD, diet control, and physical activity, most patients with T2D whose diabetes was well-controlled before Ramadan can safely observe Ramadan fasting.

  8. How special is the biochemical function of native proteins?

    PubMed

    Skolnick, Jeffrey; Gao, Mu; Zhou, Hongyi

    2016-01-01

    Native proteins perform an amazing variety of biochemical functions, including enzymatic catalysis, and can engage in protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that are essential for life. A key question is how special are these functional properties of proteins. Are they extremely rare, or are they an intrinsic feature? Comparison to the properties of compact conformations of artificially generated compact protein structures selected for thermodynamic stability but not any type of function, the artificial (ART) protein library, demonstrates that a remarkable number of the properties of native-like proteins are recapitulated. These include the complete set of small molecule ligand-binding pockets and most protein-protein interfaces. ART structures are predicted to be capable of weakly binding metabolites and cover a significant fraction of metabolic pathways, with the most enriched pathways including ancient ones such as glycolysis. Native-like active sites are also found in ART proteins. A small fraction of ART proteins are predicted to have strong protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Overall, it appears that biochemical function is an intrinsic feature of proteins which nature has significantly optimized during evolution. These studies raise questions as to the relative roles of specificity and promiscuity in the biochemical function and control of cells that need investigation.

  9. Biochemical and biomedical applications of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Hung; Juang, Ruey-Shin

    2011-10-01

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for future medical diagnosis and therapy. Various types of nanoparticles have been extensively studied for numerous biochemical and biomedical applications. Magnetic nanoparticles are well-established nanomaterials that offer controlled size, ability to be manipulated by an external magnetic field, and enhancement of contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. As a result, these nanoparticles could have many applications including bacterial detection, protein purification, enzyme immobilization, contamination decorporation, drug delivery, hyperthermia, etc. All these biochemical and biomedical applications require that these nanoparticles should satisfy some prerequisites including high magnetization, good stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Because of the potential benefits of multimodal functionality in biomedical applications, in this account highlights some general strategies to generate magnetic nanoparticle-based multifunctional nanostructures. After these magnetic nanoparticles are conjugated with proper ligands (e.g., nitrilotriacetate), polymers (e.g., polyacrylic acid, chitosan, temperature- and pH-sensitive polymers), antibodies, enzymes, and inorganic metals (e.g., gold), such biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles exhibit many advantages in biomedical applications. In addition, the multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles have been widely applied in biochemical fields including enzyme immobilization and protein purification.

  10. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs...

  11. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs...

  12. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs...

  13. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs...

  14. 40 CFR 158.2000 - Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Biochemical pesticides definition and...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2000 Biochemical pesticides definition and applicability. This subpart applies to all biochemical pesticides as defined in paragraphs...

  15. Medical treatment for biochemical relapse after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Quero, L; Hennequin, C

    2014-10-01

    This article's purpose was to review the medical data justifying the use of a medical treatment for biochemical relapse after external beam radiotherapy. The MEDLINE database was searched to identify relevant information with the following medical subject headings: "prostate cancer", "radiotherapy" and "biochemical relapse". Prognostic factors affecting the overall survival of patients with a biochemical relapse after external beam radiotherapy have been identified: short prostate specific antigen (PSA)-doubling time (< 12 months), high PSA value (> 10 ng/mL) and short interval between treatment and biochemical relapse (< 18 months). If a second local treatment is not feasible, timing to initiate a salvage medical treatment is not defined. Particularly, randomized trials did not demonstrate a significant benefit of an early initiation of androgen deprivation treatment. Some retrospective studies suggest that an early androgen deprivation is justified if poor prognostic factors are found. However, if an androgen deprivation treatment is prescribed, intermittent schedule is non-inferior to a continuous administration and seems to offer a better quality of life. Many non-hormonal treatments have also been evaluated in this setting: only 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors could be proposed in some specific situations. In conclusion, the judicious use of a medical treatment for biochemical relapse is still debated. Given the natural history of this clinical situation, a simple surveillance is justified in many cases.

  16. Nonlinear biochemical signal processing via noise propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Hyuk; Qian, Hong; Sauro, Herbert M.

    2013-10-01

    Single-cell studies often show significant phenotypic variability due to the stochastic nature of intra-cellular biochemical reactions. When the numbers of molecules, e.g., transcription factors and regulatory enzymes, are in low abundance, fluctuations in biochemical activities become significant and such "noise" can propagate through regulatory cascades in terms of biochemical reaction networks. Here we develop an intuitive, yet fully quantitative method for analyzing how noise affects cellular phenotypes based on identifying a system's nonlinearities and noise propagations. We observe that such noise can simultaneously enhance sensitivities in one behavioral region while reducing sensitivities in another. Employing this novel phenomenon we designed three biochemical signal processing modules: (a) A gene regulatory network that acts as a concentration detector with both enhanced amplitude and sensitivity. (b) A non-cooperative positive feedback system, with a graded dose-response in the deterministic case, that serves as a bistable switch due to noise-induced ultra-sensitivity. (c) A noise-induced linear amplifier for gene regulation that requires no feedback. The methods developed in the present work allow one to understand and engineer nonlinear biochemical signal processors based on fluctuation-induced phenotypes.

  17. Effects of feeding calves genetically modified corn bt11: a clinico-biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Nobuaki; Murata, Hideo; Mikami, Osamu; Yoshioka, Miyako; Guruge, Keerthi S; Yamanaka, Noriko; Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Miyazaki, Shigeru

    2006-10-01

    Genetically modified corn Bt11 is insect-resistant and expresses Cry1Ab toxin, an insecticidal protein, in kernels. Although Bt11 corn is considered safe based on animal performance, there are no reports available on the clinico-biochemical effects of feeding it to cattle. In this study, we evaluated the effects of feeding Bt11 to calves, using blood and ruminal clinico-biochemical parameters. Our three-month-long feeding experiment demonstrated that calves (n=6), fed with a ration containing 43.3% of Bt11 corn kernels as dry matter, did not develop any discernible clinical, hematological, biochemical, or ruminal abnormalities as compared with control calves (n=6) fed non-Bt11 corn. The results suggest that the transgenic Bt11 has no negative clinico-biochemical effects on calves.

  18. eQuilibrator--the biochemical thermodynamics calculator.

    PubMed

    Flamholz, Avi; Noor, Elad; Bar-Even, Arren; Milo, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The laws of thermodynamics constrain the action of biochemical systems. However, thermodynamic data on biochemical compounds can be difficult to find and is cumbersome to perform calculations with manually. Even simple thermodynamic questions like 'how much Gibbs energy is released by ATP hydrolysis at pH 5?' are complicated excessively by the search for accurate data. To address this problem, eQuilibrator couples a comprehensive and accurate database of thermodynamic properties of biochemical compounds and reactions with a simple and powerful online search and calculation interface. The web interface to eQuilibrator (http://equilibrator.weizmann.ac.il) enables easy calculation of Gibbs energies of compounds and reactions given arbitrary pH, ionic strength and metabolite concentrations. The eQuilibrator code is open-source and all thermodynamic source data are freely downloadable in standard formats. Here we describe the database characteristics and implementation and demonstrate its use.

  19. Biochemical observations in Blount's disease (infantile tibia vara).

    PubMed Central

    Giwa, Olubunmi G.; Anetor, John I.; Alonge, Temitope O.; Agbedana, Emmanuel O.

    2004-01-01

    Blount's disease or congenital tibia vara is a clinical entity characterized by tibia bowing, tibia torsion, and beaking of the medial tibia metaphysis on plain radiograph. In our environment, burnt-out rickets patients with biochemical and radiological diagnosis of rickets who after treatment still have residual bone changes despite normal bone biochemistry) can also present with similar clinical and radiological features as Blount's disease. However, certain biochemical variations, including antioxidants, may serve as a basis for differentiation between these two disorders. The serum levels of calcium, inorganic phosphate, zinc, copper, and alkaline phosphatase in 15 patients (10 females and five males) aged between two- and five years (mean 3.8 +/- 1.1 (SD)) with clinical and radiological features of Blount's disease were determined. The mean weight of the patients with Blount's disease was 14.0 +/- 2.4 kg (range: 11.5-16.3 kg). Fifteen subjects (nine females and six males) matched for age and sex without clinical features of any metabolic bone and/or nutritional diseases who were attending the surgical outpatient clinic served as control subjects. The serum concentrations of inorganic phosphate and calcium, though lower in patients with Blount's disease compared with controls, did not reach statistical significance. Alkaline phosphatase activity was increased in the serum of all patients with Blount's disease. In addition, there was an observed significant reduction in serum concentration of zinc (P < 0.03) compared to the control subjects. As for calcium level, the concentration of serum copper in Blount's patients was reduced, but this was not statistically significant. These biochemical observations, especially those of the antioxidant micronuent zinc, may serve as a basis for the differentiaion of the sometimes clinically inseparable disorders of Blount's and rckets and may aid in early differential diagnosis, appropriate treatment as well as prevention of

  20. Clinico-hemato-biochemical profile of dogs with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Elhiblu, M. A.; Dua, K.; Mohindroo, J.; Mahajan, S. K.; Sood, N. K.; Dhaliwal, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the relevant tools in the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis in dogs. Material and Methods: A total of 140 dogs presented at Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Ludhiana, showing clinical signs of hepatic insufficiency were subjected to clinico-hemato biochemical, urological, ultrasonographic (USG), and USG guided fine-needle biopsy examinations by standard methods. On the basis of these results, 6 dogs out of 140 dogs were found to be suffering from liver cirrhosis. Six clinically healthy dogs constituted the control group. Results: The dogs suffering from liver cirrhosis manifested inappetence, halitosis, abdominal distension, weight loss, melena, icterus, anemia, and neutrophilic leukocytosis with the left shift. Levels of hemoglobin, lymphocytes, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular Hb (MCH), and platelet count were significantly lower in liver cirrhosis group than control group while total leukocyte count, neutrophils, and MCH concentration were significantly higher. Glucose, total protein, albumin, A/G ratio, and fibrinogen were significantly lower, and creatinine, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, prothrombin time, and APTT were significantly higher than the control values. Ultrasound revealed diffuse increase in echogenicity with rounded and irregular liver margins. Cytological examination of the ascitic fluid and fine-needle aspiration biopsy of liver was not fruitful in the diagnosis of liver cirrhosis. Conclusions: Liver cirrhosis causes clinical and hemo-biochemical alterations, which require special consideration when treating diseased animals. USG, diffuse increase in echogenicity of liver, rounding and irregularity of liver margins and microhepatica were the consistent findings. It is suggested that USG along with hemo-biochemical alterations may be used as a diagnostic tool for liver cirrhosis

  1. Advances in Biochemical Indices of Zooplankton Production.

    PubMed

    Yebra, L; Kobari, T; Sastri, A R; Gusmão, F; Hernández-León, S

    2017-01-01

    Several new approaches for measuring zooplankton growth and production rates have been developed since the publication of the ICES (International Council for the Exploration of the Sea) Zooplankton Methodology Manual (Harris et al., 2000). In this review, we summarize the advances in biochemical methods made in recent years. Our approach explores the rationale behind each method, the design of calibration experiments, the advantages and limitations of each method and their suitability as proxies for in situ rates of zooplankton community growth and production. We also provide detailed protocols for the existing methods and information relevant to scientists wanting to apply, calibrate or develop these biochemical indices for zooplankton production.

  2. Biochemical mechanisms for translational regulation in synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Klann, Eric; Dever, Thomas E

    2004-12-01

    Changes in gene expression are required for long-lasting synaptic plasticity and long-term memory in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Regulation of local protein synthesis allows synapses to control synaptic strength independently of messenger RNA synthesis in the cell body. Recent reports indicate that several biochemical signalling cascades couple neurotransmitter and neurotrophin receptors to translational regulatory factors in protein synthesis-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity and memory. In this review, we highlight these translational regulatory mechanisms and the signalling pathways that govern the expression of synaptic plasticity in response to specific types of neuronal stimulation.

  3. The human sunburn reaction: histologic and biochemical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchrest, B.A.; Soter, N.A.; Stoff, J.S.; Mihm, M.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet-induced erythema reaction was investigated histologically and biochemically in four subjects, utilizing suction blister aspirates, analyzed for histamine and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and Epon-embedded 1-mu skin biopsy sections from control skin and from irradiated skin at intervals for 72 hours after exposure to a Hanovia lamp. Major histologic alterations in the epidermis included dyskeratotic and vacuolated keratinocytes (sunburn cells), and disappearance of Langerhans cells. In the dermis the major changes were vascular, involving both the superficial and deep venular plexuses. Endothelial cell enlargement was first apparent within 30 minutes of irradiation, peaked at 24 hours, and persisted throughout the 72-hour study period. Mast cell degranulation and associated perivenular edema were first apparent at 1 hour and striking at the onset of erythema, 3 to 4 hours postirradiation; edema was absent and mast cells were again normal in number and granule content at 24 hours. Histamine levels rose approximately fourfold above control values immediately after the onset of erythema and returned to baseline within 24 hours. PGE2 levels were statistically elevated even before the onset of erythema and reached approximately 150% of the control value at 24 hours. These data provide the first evidence that histamine may mediate the early phase of the human sunburn reaction and increase our understanding of its complex histologic and biochemical sequelae.

  4. Biochemical characterization of a pedigree with mitochondrially inherited deafness.

    PubMed

    Prezant, R T; Shohat, M; Jaber, L; Pressman, S; Fischel-Ghodsian, N

    1992-11-01

    A large kindred with a predicted 2-locus inheritance of sensorineural deafness, caused by the combination of a mitochondrial and an autosomal recessive mutation, was examined at the biochemical level. Because of the mitochondrial inheritance of this disease, we looked for defects in the oxidative phosphorylation Complexes I, III, IV, and V, the 4 enzymes that include all of the 13 mitochondrially encoded polypeptides. Biosynthetic labelling of lymphoblastoid cells from deaf patients, unaffected siblings, and an unrelated control showed no difference in size, abundance, rate of synthesis, or chloramphenicol-sensitivity of the mitochondrially encoded subunits. Since overall mitochondrial protein synthesis appears normal, these results suggest that the mitochondrial mutation is unlikely to be in a tRNA or rRNA gene. No change in enzymatic levels was seen in lymphoblastoid mitochondria of the deaf patients, compared to unaffected sibs and controls, for Complexes I and IV. Both affected and unaffected family members showed an increase in Complex III activity compared to controls, which may reflect the mitochondrial DNA shared by maternal relatives, or be due to other genetic differences. Complex V activity was increased in deaf individuals compared to their unaffected sibs. Since the family members share the presumptive mitochondrial mutation, differences between deaf and unaffected individuals likely reflect the nuclear background and suggest that the autosomal recessive mutation may be related to the increase in Complex V activity. These biochemical studies provide a guide for sequence analysis of the patients' mitochondrial DNA and for linkage studies in this kindred.

  5. Biochemical pharmacology of paradoxical sleep

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, J. -M.

    1983-01-01

    1 The role of noradrenergic cells in the regulation of paradoxical sleep is still controversial, and experimental data have given rise to contradictory interpretations. 2 Early investigations focused primarily on chemical neurotransmissions. However, the process of information transmission between cells involves many other factors, and the cell surface is an important site for transduction of messages into modifications of the activity of postsynaptic cells. 3 α-adrenoceptors are believed to play an important role in the control of wakefulness and paradoxical sleep. Experimental evidence suggests that physiological modulation of receptor sensitivity, possibly by specific neuro-modulators, may be a key mechanism in synaptic transmission. 4 In the investigation of the mechanisms involved in paradoxical sleep regulation, lesions of the locus coeruleus have given equivocal results. Collateral inhibition, probably mediated by α2-adrenoceptors, appears to be a powerful mechanism. The exact temporal relationship between noradrenergic cell activation and paradoxical sleep production is not established, but 5-HT appears to be involved. Differences between paradoxical sleep and waking may be related to a physiological modulation of α2-adrenoceptor sensitivity. PMID:6140943

  6. Actuarial considerations on genetic testing.

    PubMed Central

    Le Grys, D J

    1997-01-01

    In the UK the majority of life insurers employ relatively liberal underwriting standards so that people can easily gain access to life assurance cover. Up to 95% of applicants are accepted at standard terms. If genetic testing becomes widespread then the buying habits of the public may change. Proportionately more people with a predisposition to major types of disease may take life assurance cover while people with no predisposition may take proportionately less. A model is used to show the possible effect. However, the time-scales are long and the mortality of assured people is steadily improving. The change in buying habits may result in the rate of improvement slowing down. In the whole population, the improvement in mortality is likely to continue and could improve faster if widespread genetic testing results in earlier diagnosis and treatment. Life insurers would not call for genetic tests and need not see the results of previous tests except for very large sums assured. In the UK, life insurers are unlikely to change their underwriting standards, and are extremely unlikely to bring in basic premium rating systems that give discounts on the premium or penalty points according to peoples genetic profile. The implications of widespread genetic testing on medical insurance and some health insurance covers may be more extreme. PMID:9304671

  7. Biochemical changes in the injured brain.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Seelora; Nag, Deb Sanjay; Swain, Amlan; Samaddar, Devi Prasad

    2017-02-26

    Brain metabolism is an energy intensive phenomenon involving a wide spectrum of chemical intermediaries. Various injury states have a detrimental effect on the biochemical processes involved in the homeostatic and electrophysiological properties of the brain. The biochemical markers of brain injury are a recent addition in the armamentarium of neuro-clinicians and are being increasingly used in the routine management of neuro-pathological entities such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage and intracranial space occupying lesions. These markers are increasingly being used in assessing severity as well as in predicting the prognostic course of neuro-pathological lesions. S-100 protein, neuron specific enolase, creatinine phosphokinase isoenzyme BB and myelin basic protein are some of the biochemical markers which have been proven to have prognostic and clinical value in the brain injury. While S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein and ubiquitin C terminal hydrolase are early biomarkers of neuronal injury and have the potential to aid in clinical decision-making in the initial management of patients presenting with an acute neuronal crisis, the other biomarkers are of value in predicting long-term complications and prognosis in such patients. In recent times cerebral microdialysis has established itself as a novel way of monitoring brain tissue biochemical metabolites such as glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate and glycerol while small non-coding RNAs have presented themselves as potential markers of brain injury for future.

  8. The Biochemical Basis of Minimal Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaywitz, Sally E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Available from: C. V. Mosby Company 11830 Westline Industrial Drive St. Louis, Missouri 63141 The research review examines evidence suggesting a biochemical basis for minimal brain dysfunction (MBD), which includes both a relationship between MBD and metabolic abnormalities and a significant genetic influence on the disorder in children. (IM)

  9. 2009 Biochemical Conversion Platform Review Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, John

    2009-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Biochemical Conversion platform review meeting, held on April 14-16, 2009, at the Sheraton Denver Downtown, Denver, Colorado.

  10. Biochemical Approaches to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legumes has emerged again as an important topic on the world scene due to the energy crisis and lack of access to nitrogen fertilizer in developing countries. We have taken a biochemical genomics approach to improving symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legumes. L...

  11. Survey of Biochemical Education in Japanese Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagawa, Yasuo

    1995-01-01

    Reports findings of questionnaires sent to faculty in charge of biochemical education in medical schools and other programs from dentistry to agriculture. Total class hours have declined since 1984. New trends include bioethics and computer-assisted learning. Tables show trends in lecture hours, lecture content, laboratory hours, core subject…

  12. Biochemical changes in the injured brain

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Seelora; Nag, Deb Sanjay; Swain, Amlan; Samaddar, Devi Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Brain metabolism is an energy intensive phenomenon involving a wide spectrum of chemical intermediaries. Various injury states have a detrimental effect on the biochemical processes involved in the homeostatic and electrophysiological properties of the brain. The biochemical markers of brain injury are a recent addition in the armamentarium of neuro-clinicians and are being increasingly used in the routine management of neuro-pathological entities such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, subarachnoid haemorrhage and intracranial space occupying lesions. These markers are increasingly being used in assessing severity as well as in predicting the prognostic course of neuro-pathological lesions. S-100 protein, neuron specific enolase, creatinine phosphokinase isoenzyme BB and myelin basic protein are some of the biochemical markers which have been proven to have prognostic and clinical value in the brain injury. While S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein and ubiquitin C terminal hydrolase are early biomarkers of neuronal injury and have the potential to aid in clinical decision-making in the initial management of patients presenting with an acute neuronal crisis, the other biomarkers are of value in predicting long-term complications and prognosis in such patients. In recent times cerebral microdialysis has established itself as a novel way of monitoring brain tissue biochemical metabolites such as glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate and glycerol while small non-coding RNAs have presented themselves as potential markers of brain injury for future. PMID:28289516

  13. Biochemical Applications in the Analytical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Cynthia; Ruttencutter, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An HPLC and a UV-visible spectrophotometer are identified as instruments that helps to incorporate more biologically-relevant experiments into the course, in order to increase the students understanding of selected biochemistry topics and enhances their ability to apply an analytical approach to biochemical problems. The experiment teaches…

  14. Biochemical Thermodynamics under near Physiological Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The recommendations for nomenclature and tables in Biochemical Thermodynamics approved by IUBMB and IUPAC in 1994 can be easily introduced after the chemical thermodynamic formalism. Substitution of the usual standard thermodynamic properties by the transformed ones in the thermodynamic equations, and the use of appropriate thermodynamic tables…

  15. The biochemical basis for thermoregulation in heat-producing flowers

    PubMed Central

    Umekawa, Yui; Seymour, Roger S.; Ito, Kikukatsu

    2016-01-01

    Thermoregulation (homeothermy) in animals involves a complex mechanism involving thermal receptors throughout the body and integration in the hypothalamus that controls shivering and non-shivering thermogenesis. The flowers of some ancient families of seed plants show a similar degree of physiological thermoregulation, but by a different mechanism. Here, we show that respiratory control in homeothermic spadices of skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus renifolius) is achieved by rate-determining biochemical reactions in which the overall thermodynamic activation energy exhibits a negative value. Moreover, NADPH production, catalyzed by mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase in a chemically endothermic reaction, plays a role in the pre-equilibrium reaction. We propose that a law of chemical equilibrium known as Le Châtelier’s principle governs the homeothermic control in skunk cabbage. PMID:27095582

  16. The biochemical basis for thermoregulation in heat-producing flowers.

    PubMed

    Umekawa, Yui; Seymour, Roger S; Ito, Kikukatsu

    2016-04-20

    Thermoregulation (homeothermy) in animals involves a complex mechanism involving thermal receptors throughout the body and integration in the hypothalamus that controls shivering and non-shivering thermogenesis. The flowers of some ancient families of seed plants show a similar degree of physiological thermoregulation, but by a different mechanism. Here, we show that respiratory control in homeothermic spadices of skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus renifolius) is achieved by rate-determining biochemical reactions in which the overall thermodynamic activation energy exhibits a negative value. Moreover, NADPH production, catalyzed by mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase in a chemically endothermic reaction, plays a role in the pre-equilibrium reaction. We propose that a law of chemical equilibrium known as Le Châtelier's principle governs the homeothermic control in skunk cabbage.

  17. Megavoltage external beam irradiation of craniopharyngiomas: Analysis of tumor control and morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Singer, J.; Cano, E.R.; Deutsch, M. )

    1990-07-01

    From 1971 to 1985, 21 patients received megavoltage external beam radiation therapy at the University of Pittsburgh for control of craniopharyngioma. Minimum tumor doses prescribed to the 95% isodose volume ranged between 51.3 to 70.0 Gy. Median total dose was 60.00 Gy and median dose per fraction was 1.83 Gy. Three deaths occurred from intercurrent disease and no deaths from tumor progression. Actuarial overall survival was 89% and 82% at 5 and 10 years. Actuarial local control was 95% at 5 and 10 years. Radiation related complications included one patient with optic neuropathy, one with brain necrosis, and one that developed optic neuropathy followed by brain necrosis. The high dose group of patients who received a NSD or Neuret equivalent of greater than 60 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction had a significantly greater risk of radiation complications (p = .024). The actuarial risk at 5 years for optic neuropathy was 30% and brain necrosis was 12.5% in the high dose group. Tumor control in the high dose group was not shown to be significantly better. Any possible benefit in tumor control in treating patients with craniopharyngioma with doses above 60 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction appears to be offset by the increased risk of radiation injury.

  18. Kombucha tea fermentation: Microbial and biochemical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Somnath; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Chakraborty, Writachit; Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-03-02

    Kombucha tea, a non-alcoholic beverage, is acquiring significant interest due to its claimed beneficial properties. The microbial community of Kombucha tea consists of bacteria and yeast which thrive in two mutually non-exclusive compartments: the soup or the beverage and the biofilm floating on it. The microbial community and the biochemical properties of the beverage have so far mostly been described in separate studies. This, however, may prevent understanding the causal links between the microbial communities and the beneficial properties of Kombucha tea. Moreover, an extensive study into the microbial and biochemical dynamics has also been missing. In this study, we thus explored the structure and dynamics of the microbial community along with the biochemical properties of Kombucha tea at different time points up to 21 days of fermentation. We hypothesized that several biochemical properties will change during the course of fermentation along with the shifts in the yeast and bacterial communities. The yeast community of the biofilm did not show much variation over time and was dominated by Candida sp. (73.5-83%). The soup however, showed a significant shift in dominance from Candida sp. to Lachancea sp. on the 7th day of fermentation. This is the first report showing Candida as the most dominating yeast genus during Kombucha fermentation. Komagateibacter was identified as the single largest bacterial genus present in both the biofilm and the soup (~50%). The bacterial diversity was higher in the soup than in the biofilm with a peak on the seventh day of fermentation. The biochemical properties changed with the progression of the fermentation, i.e., beneficial properties of the beverage such as the radical scavenging ability increased significantly with a maximum increase at day 7. We further observed a significantly higher D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone content and caffeine degradation property compared to previously described Kombucha tea fermentations. Our

  19. Pitfalls in the interpretation of common biochemical tests

    PubMed Central

    Ayling, R.

    2000-01-01

    This review considers some of the more common problems in the interpretation of the results of biochemical tests and, where possible, highlights ways in which errors can be identified or avoided.


Keywords: biochemical tests PMID:10684320

  20. Biochemical studies of patients with Cuban epidemic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernandez, M; Hirano, M; Naini, A; Santiestéban, R

    2001-01-01

    In 1992-1994, a disorder known as the epidemic neuropathy afflicted more than 50,000 Cubans. Three different forms of the illness were identified: epidemic optic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy and mixed optic and peripheral neuropathy. The causes are still unknown. Skeletal muscle biopsy samples were analyzed by standard histological techniques and by biochemical assays. Elevated activities of citrate synthase, a non-respiratory-chain mitochondrial matrix enzyme, suggested possible mitochondrial proliferation in 7 of the 8 patients. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) levels were higher in the patients than in the controls (p = 0.04). Levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and the reduced compounds NADH and NADPH were comparable in patients and controls. Elevations of succinate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase activities and high NADP(+) levels suggest that alterations of mitochondrial functions may be associated with this disorder.

  1. Biochemical correlates of neurosensory changes in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Reschke, Millard F.

    1989-01-01

    The possible existence of a relationship between space motion sickness and chemical and biochemical variables measured in body fluids is studied. Clinical chemistry and endocrine measurements from blood and urine samples taken before and after Space Shuttle flights were analyzed along with the occurrence of SMS during flight and provocative testing before flight. Significant positive correlations were observed with serum chloride and significant negative correlations with serum phosphate, serum uric acid, and plasma thyroid stimulating hormone.

  2. Biochemical assessment of acute myocardial ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cárceles, M D; Osuna, E; Vieira, D N; Martínez, A; Luna, A

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the efficacy of biochemical parameters in different fluids in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction of different causes, analysed after death. METHODS--The myoglobin concentration and total creatine kinase (CK) and creatine kinase MB isoenzyme (CK-MB) activities were measured in serum, pericardial fluid, and vitreous humour from seven diagnostic groups of cadavers classified according to the severity of myocardial ischaemia and cause of death. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and myosin were measured only in serum and pericardial fluid, and cathepsin D only in pericardial fluid. Routine haematoxylin and eosin and acridine orange staining were used for microscopy studies of heart tissue. RESULTS--In pericardial fluid there were substantial differences between the different groups with respect to CK, CK-MB, and LDH activities and myosin concentrations. The highest values were found in cases with morphological evidence of myocardial ischaemia. CONCLUSIONS--Biochemical parameters, which reach the pericardial fluid via passive diffusion and ultrafiltration due to a pressure gradient, were thus detectable in this fluid earlier than in serum in cases with myocardial ischaemia. These biochemical parameters may be of use for ruling out myocardial ischaemia in those controversial cases in which reliable morphological findings are lacking. PMID:7745110

  3. Cytokines as biochemical markers for knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mabey, Thomas; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating degenerative joint disease particularly affecting weightbearing joints within the body, principally the hips and knees. Current radiographic techniques are insufficient to show biochemical changes within joint tissue which can occur many years before symptoms become apparent. The need for better diagnostic and prognostic tools is heightened with the prevalence of OA set to increase in aging and obese populations. As inflammation is increasingly being considered an important part of OAs pathophysiology, cytokines are being assessed as possible candidates for biochemical markers. Cytokines, both pro- and anti-inflammatory, as well as angiogenic and chemotactic, have in recent years been studied for relevant characteristics. Biochemical markers show promise in determination of the severity of disease in addition to monitoring of the efficacy and safety of disease-modifying OA drugs, with the potential to act as diagnostic and prognostic tools. Currently, the diagnostic power of interleukin (IL)-6 and the relationship to disease burden of IL-1β, IL-15, tumor necrosis factor-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor make these the best candidates for assessment. Grouping appropriate cytokine markers together and assessing them collectively alongside other bone and cartilage degradation products will yield a more statistically powerful tool in research and clinical applications, and additionally aid in distinguishing between OA and a number of other diseases in which cytokines are known to have an involvement. Further large scale studies are needed to assess the validity and efficacy of current biomarkers, and to discover other potential biomarker candidates. PMID:25621214

  4. [Basic biochemical processes in glaucoma progression].

    PubMed

    von Thun und Hohenstein-Blaul, N; Kunst, S; Pfeiffer, N; Grus, F H

    2015-05-01

    The term glaucoma summarizes a group of eye diseases that are accompanied by impairments of the optic nerve and related visual field deficits. An early diagnosis of glaucoma is currently not possible due to a lack of diagnostic tests; therefore, in most cases the disease is diagnosed many years after onset, which prevents an early therapy. The known risk factors for the development and progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy comprise elevated intraocular pressure and a broad range of pressure fluctuations as well as lipometabolic disorders, genetic factor and diabetes. The consequences include the induction of anti-inflammatory proteins, elevated levels of oxidative stress and the destruction of retinal ganglion cells. Changes in the autoantibody repertoire have also been observed in the course of the disease. Basic ophthalmological research therefore focuses on the investigation of basic biochemical processes in the course of the disease. A better understanding of physiological and biochemical events is sought in order to develop new and more sensitive diagnostic options and to allow more targeted therapeutic measures. The understanding of biochemical processes allows a better insight into glaucoma progression to be gained, which will lead to improvements in diagnosis and therapy.

  5. Explorations into Chemical Reactions and Biochemical Pathways.

    PubMed

    Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-12-01

    A brief overview of the work in the research group of the present author on extracting knowledge from chemical reaction data is presented. Methods have been developed to calculate physicochemical effects at the reaction site. It is shown that these physicochemical effects can quite favourably be used to derive equations for the calculation of data on gas phase reactions and on reactions in solution such as aqueous acidity of alcohols or carboxylic acids or the hydrolysis of amides. Furthermore, it is shown that these physicochemical effects are quite effective for assigning reactions into reaction classes that correspond to chemical knowledge. Biochemical reactions constitute a particularly interesting and challenging task for increasing our understanding of living species. The BioPath.Database is a rich source of information on biochemical reactions and has been used for a variety of applications of chemical, biological, or medicinal interests. Thus, it was shown that biochemical reactions can be assigned by the physicochemical effects into classes that correspond to the classification of enzymes by the EC numbers. Furthermore, 3D models of reaction intermediates can be used for searching for novel enzyme inhibitors. It was shown in a combined application of chemoinformatics and bioinformatics that essential pathways of diseases can be uncovered. Furthermore, a study showed that bacterial flavor-forming pathways can be discovered.

  6. Stoichiometric network theory for nonequilibrium biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Beard, Daniel A; Liang, Shou-dan

    2003-02-01

    We introduce the basic concepts and develop a theory for nonequilibrium steady-state biochemical systems applicable to analyzing large-scale complex isothermal reaction networks. In terms of the stoichiometric matrix, we demonstrate both Kirchhoff's flux law sigma(l)J(l)=0 over a biochemical species, and potential law sigma(l) mu(l)=0 over a reaction loop. They reflect mass and energy conservation, respectively. For each reaction, its steady-state flux J can be decomposed into forward and backward one-way fluxes J = J+ - J-, with chemical potential difference deltamu = RT ln(J-/J+). The product -Jdeltamu gives the isothermal heat dissipation rate, which is necessarily non-negative according to the second law of thermodynamics. The stoichiometric network theory (SNT) embodies all of the relevant fundamental physics. Knowing J and deltamu of a biochemical reaction, a conductance can be computed which directly reflects the level of gene expression for the particular enzyme. For sufficiently small flux a linear relationship between J and deltamu can be established as the linear flux-force relation in irreversible thermodynamics, analogous to Ohm's law in electrical circuits.

  7. Genetic and Biochemical Biomarkers in Canine Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Graham, K L; McCowan, C; White, A

    2017-03-01

    In many health-related fields, there is great interest in the identification of biomarkers that distinguish diseased from healthy individuals. In addition to identifying the diseased state, biomarkers have potential use in predicting disease risk, monitoring disease progression, evaluating treatment efficacy, and informing pathogenesis. This review details the genetic and biochemical markers associated with canine primary glaucoma. While there are numerous molecular markers (biochemical and genetic) associated with glaucoma in dogs, there is no ideal biomarker that allows early diagnosis and/or identification of disease progression. Genetic mutations associated with canine glaucoma include those affecting ADAMTS10, ADAMTS17, Myocilin, Nebulin, COL1A2, RAB22A, and SRBD1. With the exception of Myocilin, there is very limited crossover in genetic biomarkers identified between human and canine glaucomas. Mutations associated with canine glaucoma vary between and within canine breeds, and gene discoveries therefore have limited overall effects as a screening tool in the general canine population. Biochemical markers of glaucoma include indicators of inflammation, oxidative stress, serum autoantibodies, matrix metalloproteinases, tumor necrosis factor-α, and transforming growth factor-β. These markers include those that indicate an adaptive or protective response, as well as those that reflect the damage arising from oxidative stress.

  8. The Use of Item Analysis for Improvement of Biochemical Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagata, Ryoichi

    2004-01-01

    Item analysis was used to find out which biochemical explanations need to be improved in biochemical teaching, not which items are to be discarded, improved, or reusable in biochemical examinations. The analysis revealed the basic facts of which less able students had more misunderstanding than able students. Identifying these basic facts helps…

  9. Dual Biochemical Oscillators May Control Cellular Reversals in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Eckhert, Erik; Rangamani, Padmini; Davis, Annie E.; Oster, George; Berleman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative, soil-dwelling bacterium that glides on surfaces, reversing direction approximately once every 6 min. Motility in M. xanthus is governed by the Che-like Frz pathway and the Ras-like Mgl pathway, which together cause the cell to oscillate back and forth. Previously, Igoshin et al. (2004) suggested that the cellular oscillations are caused by cyclic changes in concentration of active Frz proteins that govern motility. In this study, we present a computational model that integrates both the Frz and Mgl pathways, and whose downstream components can be read as motor activity governing cellular reversals. This model faithfully reproduces wildtype and mutant behaviors by simulating individual protein knockouts. In addition, the model can be used to examine the impact of contact stimuli on cellular reversals. The basic model construction relies on the presence of two nested feedback circuits, which prompted us to reexamine the behavior of M. xanthus cells. We performed experiments to test the model, and this cell analysis challenges previous assumptions of 30 to 60 min reversal periods in frzCD, frzF, frzE, and frzZ mutants. We demonstrate that this average reversal period is an artifact of the method employed to record reversal data, and that in the absence of signal from the Frz pathway, Mgl components can occasionally reverse the cell near wildtype periodicity, but frz- cells are otherwise in a long nonoscillating state. PMID:25468349

  10. Biochemical Mechanisms controlling Bioreactivity of Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-17

    conditioning in the laboratory rat . B. Examination of the morphological changes that accompany changes in bioreactivity of the rat adrenal medulla: When... Laboratory Rat . Proc. Western Pharmacol. Soc. 29: 315-318, 1986. Campbell, D. C., Hardie, D. G. and Vulliet, P. R. Identification of four Phosphorylation...Robert Lennox (New York, Plenum Press, 1987) pp 367-374. Vulliet, P. R., Loskutoff, N. and Kraemer, D. A Technique of Embryo Transfer in the

  11. Dual biochemical oscillators may control cellular reversals in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Eckhert, Erik; Rangamani, Padmini; Davis, Annie E; Oster, George; Berleman, James E

    2014-12-02

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative, soil-dwelling bacterium that glides on surfaces, reversing direction approximately once every 6 min. Motility in M. xanthus is governed by the Che-like Frz pathway and the Ras-like Mgl pathway, which together cause the cell to oscillate back and forth. Previously, Igoshin et al. (2004) suggested that the cellular oscillations are caused by cyclic changes in concentration of active Frz proteins that govern motility. In this study, we present a computational model that integrates both the Frz and Mgl pathways, and whose downstream components can be read as motor activity governing cellular reversals. This model faithfully reproduces wildtype and mutant behaviors by simulating individual protein knockouts. In addition, the model can be used to examine the impact of contact stimuli on cellular reversals. The basic model construction relies on the presence of two nested feedback circuits, which prompted us to reexamine the behavior of M. xanthus cells. We performed experiments to test the model, and this cell analysis challenges previous assumptions of 30 to 60 min reversal periods in frzCD, frzF, frzE, and frzZ mutants. We demonstrate that this average reversal period is an artifact of the method employed to record reversal data, and that in the absence of signal from the Frz pathway, Mgl components can occasionally reverse the cell near wildtype periodicity, but frz- cells are otherwise in a long nonoscillating state.

  12. Optimal Signal Processing in Small Stochastic Biochemical Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ziv, Etay; Nemenman, Ilya; Wiggins, Chris H.

    2007-01-01

    We quantify the influence of the topology of a transcriptional regulatory network on its ability to process environmental signals. By posing the problem in terms of information theory, we do this without specifying the function performed by the network. Specifically, we study the maximum mutual information between the input (chemical) signal and the output (genetic) response attainable by the network in the context of an analytic model of particle number fluctuations. We perform this analysis for all biochemical circuits, including various feedback loops, that can be built out of 3 chemical species, each under the control of one regulator. We find that a generic network, constrained to low molecule numbers and reasonable response times, can transduce more information than a simple binary switch and, in fact, manages to achieve close to the optimal information transmission fidelity. These high-information solutions are robust to tenfold changes in most of the networks' biochemical parameters; moreover they are easier to achieve in networks containing cycles with an odd number of negative regulators (overall negative feedback) due to their decreased molecular noise (a result which we derive analytically). Finally, we demonstrate that a single circuit can support multiple high-information solutions. These findings suggest a potential resolution of the “cross-talk” phenomenon as well as the previously unexplained observation that transcription factors that undergo proteolysis are more likely to be auto-repressive. PMID:17957259

  13. DNA damaging and biochemical effects of potassium tetraborate

    PubMed Central

    Çelikezen, Fatih Çaglar; Turkez, Hasan; Togar, Basak; Izgi, Mehmet Sait

    2014-01-01

    Potassium tetraborate (PTB) is a product resulting from the controlled reaction of potassium hydroxide, water and boric acid (BA). It is used in many areas of industry such as disinfectant, detergent and treatment of contact lenses. PTB is one of the boron compounds which is most commonly used in many areas of industry although very limited information is available concerning its toxicity. Therefore, in this study, it is aimed to determine genetic and biochemical effects of PTB in human blood cell cultures (n=4). PTB was added into culture tubes at various concentrations (0-1280 µg/ml). Micronucleus (MN) and chromosomal aberration (CA) tests were performed for genotoxic damage influences estimation. In addition, biochemical parameters (total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidative status (TOS) were examined to determine oxidative effects. The results indicated that all tested concentrations of PTB were found to be non-genotoxic. In addition, low concentrations (1.25, 2.5 and 5 µg/ml) of PTB caused increases of TAC levels. Furthermore, all concentrations of PTB were not changed the TOS levels in cultured human blood cells. Based on these results, in this study it has been reported for the first time that PTB is not genotoxic and it increases the antioxidant capacity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. PMID:26417271

  14. [INVITED] Tilted fiber grating mechanical and biochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tuan; Liu, Fu; Guan, Bai-Ou; Albert, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    The tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) is a new kind of fiber-optic sensor that possesses all the advantages of well-established Bragg grating technology in addition to being able to excite cladding modes resonantly. This device opens up a multitude of opportunities for single-point sensing in hard-to-reach spaces with very controllable cross-sensitivities, absolute and relative measurements of various parameters, and an extreme sensitivity to materials external to the fiber without requiring the fiber to be etched or tapered. Over the past five years, our research group has been developing multimodal fiber-optic sensors based on TFBG in various shapes and forms, always keeping the device itself simple to fabricate and compatible with low-cost manufacturing. This paper presents a brief review of the principle, fabrication, characterization, and implementation of TFBGs, followed by our progress in TFBG sensors for mechanical and biochemical applications, including one-dimensional TFBG vibroscopes, accelerometers and micro-displacement sensors; two-dimensional TFBG vector vibroscopes and vector rotation sensors; reflective TFBG refractometers with in-fiber and fiber-to-fiber configurations; polarimetric and plasmonic TFBG biochemical sensors for in-situ detection of cell, protein and glucose.

  15. Biochemical characterization of exercise-trained porcine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, M H; Hale, C C; Novela, L; Gute, D; Hamilton, N; Ianuzzo, C D

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether cardiac biochemical adaptations are induced by chronic exercise training (ET) of miniature swine. Female Yucatan miniature swine were trained on a treadmill or were cage confined (C) for 16-22 wk. After training, the ET pigs had increased exercise tolerance, lower heart rates during exercise at submaximal intensities, moderate cardiac hypertrophy, increased coronary blood flow capacity, and increased oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle. Myosin from both the C and ET hearts was 100% of the V3 isozyme, and there were no differences between the myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) or myofibrillar ATPase activities of C and ET hearts. Also, the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange activity of sarcolemmal vesicles were the same in cardiac muscle of C and ET hearts. Finally, the glycolytic and oxidative capacity of ET cardiac muscle was not different from control, since phosphofructokinase, citrate synthase, and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activities were the same in cardiac tissue from ET and C pigs. We conclude that endurance exercise training does not provide sufficient stress on the heart of a large mammal to induce changes in any of the three major cardiac biochemical systems of the porcine myocardium: the contractile system, the Ca2+ regulatory systems, or the metabolic system.

  16. Effects of Mad Honey on Some Biochemical Parameters in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Huseyin; Yildiz, Oktay; Kolayli, Sevgi

    2016-10-01

    The aims of this study were to determine grayanotoxin (GTX-III) toxin level in mad honey using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and examine the dynamic changes of certain biochemical parameters in blood serum of rats that consumed mad honey. For the experimental animal study, 20 Sprague-Dawley female rats were divided into 5 groups of 4 rats each, with one group being the control group (Group 1) and the others being the experimental groups (Groups 2-5). Groups 2, 3, 4, and 5 were, respectively, given mad honey extract at doses of 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mg/g body weight/day via oral gavage for 8 days. According to results, the quantity of GTX-III found in the honey sample as 39.949 ± 0.020 μg GTX-III/g honey, and the biochemical analysis of the tested parameters (aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, creatine kinase, and creatine kinase muscle and brain) showed a significant elevation with increasing concentration of honey. In conclusion, the use of increasing concentrations of Rhododendron honey was seen as a source of enzymatic symptoms.

  17. Surface Modification of Gold Nanoparticles with Small Molecules for Biochemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2017-02-21

    As one of the major tools for and by chemical science, biochemical analysis is becoming increasingly important in fields like clinical diagnosis, food safety, environmental monitoring, and the development of chemistry and biochemistry. The advancement of nanotechnology boosts the development of analytical chemistry, particularly the nanoparticle (NP)-based approaches for biochemical assays. Functional NPs can greatly improve the performance of biochemical analysis because they can accelerate signal transduction, enhance the signal intensity, and enable convenient signal readout due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Surface chemistry is a widely used tool to functionalize NPs, and the strategy for surface modification is of great significance to the application of NP-mediated biochemical assays. Surface chemistry not only affects the quality of NPs (stability, monodispersity, and biocompatibility) but also provides functional groups (-COO(-), -NH3(+), -CHO, and so on) or charges that can be exploited for bioconjugation or ligand exchange. Surface chemistry also dictates the sensitivity and specificity of the NP-mediated biochemical assays, since it is vital to the orientation, accessibility, and bioactivity of the functionalized ligands on the NPs. In this Account, we will focus on surface chemistry for functionalization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with small organic molecules for biochemical analysis. Compared to other NPs, AuNPs have many merits including controllable synthesis, easy surface modification and high molar absorption coefficient, making them ideal probes for biochemical assays. Small-molecule functionalized AuNPs are widely employed to develop sensors for biochemical analysis, considering that small molecules, such as amino acids and sulfhydryl compounds, are more easily and controllably bioconjugated to the surface of AuNPs than biomacromolecules due to their less complex structure and steric hindrance. The orientation and

  18. Spaceflight effects on biomechanical and biochemical properties of rat vertebrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernicke, R. F.; Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Kaplansky, A.; Salem, G. J.; Martinez, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The biomechanical and biochemical responses of lumbar vertebral bodies during a 12.5-day spaceflight (Cosmos 1887 biosatellite) were determined for rapidly growing rats (90-day-old, Czechoslovakian-Wistar). By use of age-matched vivarium controls (normal cage environment) and synchronous controls (simulated flight conditions), as well as a basal control group (killed before lift-off on the 1st day of flight), the combined influences of growth and space-flight could be examined. Centra of the sixth lumbar vertebrae (L6) were compressed to 50% strain at a fast strain rate while immersed in physiological buffer (37 degrees C). The body masses of vivarium and synchronous controls were significantly heavier than either the flight or basal controls. The flight group had an L6 vertebral body compressional stiffness that was 39% less than the vivarium controls, 47% less than the synchronous control, and 16% less than the basal controls. In addition, the average initial maximum load of the flight L6 was 22% less than vivarium controls and 18% less than the synchronous controls, whereas the linear compressional load of the flight group averaged 34% less than the vivarium and 25% less than the synchronous groups. The structural properties of the vertebrae from the 12.5-day-younger basal group closely resembled the flight vertebrae. Calcium, phosphorous, and hydroxyproline concentrations were not significantly different among the groups. Nevertheless, the lack of strength and stiffness development in spaceflight, coupled with a smaller proportion of mature hydroxypyridinoline cross-links, suggested that the 12.5 days of spaceflight slowed the maturation of trabecular bone in the vertebral bodies of rapidly growing rats.

  19. Influence of low-frequency vibration on changes of biochemical parameters of living rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzak, Cezary; Damijan, Zbigniew; Panuszka, Ryszard

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate how some selected biochemical parameters of living rats depend on exposure of low-frequency vibrations. Experiments were run on 30 Wistar rats randomly segregated into three groups: (I) 20 days old (before puberty), (II) 70th day after; (III) control group. The exposure was repeated seven times, for 3 h, at the same time of day. Vibrations applied during the first tests of the experiment had acceleration 1.22 m/s2 and frequency 20 Hz. At the 135th day the rats' bones were a subject of morphometric/biochemical examination. The results of biochemical tests proved decrease in LDL and HDL cholesterol levels for exposed rats as well as the Ca contents in blood plasma. There was evident increasing of Ca in blood plasma in exposed rats for frequency of exposition.

  20. Biochemical filter with sigmoidal response: increasing the complexity of biomolecular logic.

    PubMed

    Privman, Vladimir; Halámek, Jan; Arugula, Mary A; Melnikov, Dmitriy; Bocharova, Vera; Katz, Evgeny

    2010-11-11

    The first realization of a designed, rather than natural, biochemical filter process is reported and analyzed as a promising network component for increasing the complexity of biomolecular logic systems. Key challenge in biochemical logic research has been achieving scalability for complex network designs. Various logic gates have been realized, but a "toolbox" of analog elements for interconnectivity and signal processing has remained elusive. Filters are important as network elements that allow control of noise in signal transmission and conversion. We report a versatile biochemical filtering mechanism designed to have sigmoidal response in combination with signal-conversion process. Horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of chromogenic electron donor by H(2)O(2) was altered by adding ascorbate, allowing to selectively suppress the output signal, modifying the response from convex to sigmoidal. A kinetic model was developed for evaluation of the quality of filtering. The results offer improved capabilities for design of scalable biomolecular information processing systems.

  1. Uterine infarction in a patient with uterine adenomyosis following biochemical pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Yeon; Won, Kyu-Hee; Lee, Da-Yong; Jeon, Hye-Won; Moon, Min-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Adenomyosis is a common gynecological disorder characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma deep within the myometrium associated with myometrial hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Focal uterine infarction after IVF-ET in a patient with adenomyosis following biochemical pregnancy has not been previously reported, although it occurs after uterine artery embolization in order to control symptoms caused by fibroids or adenomyosis. We report a case of a nulliparous woman who had uterine adenomyosis presenting with fever, pelvic pain and biochemical abortion after undergoing an IVF-ET procedure and the detection of a slightly elevated serum hCG. Focal uterine infarction was suspected after a pelvic magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated preserved myometrium between the endometrial cavity and inner margin of the necrotic myometrium. This case demonstrates that focal uterine infarction should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding and infectious signs in women experiencing biochemical abortion after an IVF-ET procedure. PMID:25599041

  2. Improved delay-leaping simulation algorithm for biochemical reaction systems with delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Na; Zhuang, Gang; Da, Liang; Wang, Yifei

    2012-04-01

    In biochemical reaction systems dominated by delays, the simulation speed of the stochastic simulation algorithm depends on the size of the wait queue. As a result, it is important to control the size of the wait queue to improve the efficiency of the simulation. An improved accelerated delay stochastic simulation algorithm for biochemical reaction systems with delays, termed the improved delay-leaping algorithm, is proposed in this paper. The update method for the wait queue is effective in reducing the size of the queue as well as shortening the storage and access time, thereby accelerating the simulation speed. Numerical simulation on two examples indicates that this method not only obtains a more significant efficiency compared with the existing methods, but also can be widely applied in biochemical reaction systems with delays.

  3. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    SciTech Connect

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G.

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  4. The influence of multiple liver biopsies on hematologic and serum biochemical values of sheep.

    PubMed

    Harvey, R B; Lovering, S L; Bailey, E M; Norman, J O

    1984-10-01

    A rapid, simple liver biopsy technique for sheep was developed to obtain in situ liver samples for evaluation of histological tissue, enzyme assay, and ultrastructural changes that might occur during toxicological testing. The study was designed because repeated biopsies in the same individual could induce bias in hematologic, histological or serum biochemical parameters caused by the trauma of the biopsy procedure. In Experiment I, sheep were divided into a biopsied group (B), sham-operated group (SO), and a nonsurgical, untreated control group (C). Three liver biopsy samples per week were removed from each subject in Group B for five weeks. Biweekly blood samples were drawn for evaluation of hematologic and serum biochemical parameters. In Experiment II, Groups B and SO were dosed with CCl4 in order to validate the applicability of the biopsy procedure. Weekly biopsies were continued in Group B. Biweekly blood samples were evaluated for any hematologic or serum biochemical variations. Significant elevations of enzyme activities confirmed CCl4 hepatotoxicity in treated groups (B and SO) versus C group. Histological lesions in biopsy samples correlated closely with serum biochemical data in treated groups. It was concluded that the serial liver biopsy procedure causes negligible alterations in the hematologic, histological or serum biochemical parameters measured; is simple and rapid to perform, and provides a method for possible early detection of liver disease.

  5. Biochemical markers of ongoing joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis - current and future applications, limitations and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease associated with potentially debilitating joint inflammation, as well as altered skeletal bone metabolism and co-morbid conditions. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment to control disease activity offers the highest likelihood of preserving function and preventing disability. Joint inflammation is characterized by synovitis, osteitis, and/or peri-articular osteopenia, often accompanied by development of subchondral bone erosions, as well as progressive joint space narrowing. Biochemical markers of joint cartilage and bone degradation may enable timely detection and assessment of ongoing joint damage, and their use in facilitating treatment strategies is under investigation. Early detection of joint damage may be assisted by the characterization of biochemical markers that identify patients whose joint damage is progressing rapidly and who are thus most in need of aggressive treatment, and that, alone or in combination, identify those individuals who are likely to respond best to a potential treatment, both in terms of limiting joint damage and relieving symptoms. The aims of this review are to describe currently available biochemical markers of joint metabolism in relation to the pathobiology of joint damage and systemic bone loss in RA; to assess the limitations of, and need for additional, novel biochemical markers in RA and other rheumatic diseases, and the strategies used for assay development; and to examine the feasibility of advancement of personalized health care using biochemical markers to select therapeutic agents to which a patient is most likely to respond. PMID:21539724

  6. Mechanisms of Ovarian Cancer Metastasis: Biochemical Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Kentaro; Nakayama, Naomi; Katagiri, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Despite advances in chemotherapy, the five-year survival rate of advanced ovarian cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis remains around 30%. The most significant prognostic factor is stage, and most patients present at an advanced stage with peritoneal dissemination. There is often no clearly identifiable precursor lesion; therefore, the events leading to metastatic disease are poorly understood. This article reviews metastatic suppressor genes, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and the tumor microenvironment as they relate to ovarian cancer metastasis. Additionally, novel chemotherapeutic agents targeting the metastasis-related biochemical pathways are discussed. PMID:23109879

  7. Sampling rare switching events in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Allen, Rosalind J; Warren, Patrick B; Ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2005-01-14

    Bistable biochemical switches are widely found in gene regulatory networks and signal transduction pathways. Their switching dynamics are difficult to study, however, because switching events are rare, and the systems are out of equilibrium. We present a simulation method for predicting the rate and mechanism of the flipping of these switches. We apply it to a genetic switch and find that it is highly efficient. The path ensembles for the forward and reverse processes do not coincide. The method is widely applicable to rare events and nonequilibrium processes.

  8. [Chronic fatigue syndrome: biochemical examination of blood].

    PubMed

    Hakariya, Yukiko; Kuratsune, Hirohiko

    2007-06-01

    Though patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have lots of complaints, abnormal findings cannot be detected by biochemical screening tests. However, some specialized blood tests have revealed neuroendocrine immune axis abnormalities, which is closely associated with each other. Recent studies indicate that CFS can be understood as a special condition based on abnormality of the psycho-neuro-endocrino-immunological system, with the distinguishing feature of CFS seeming to be the secondary brain dysfunction caused by several cytokines and/or autoantibodies. In this paper, we summarize these abnormalities found in CFS and show the neuro-molecular mechanism leading to chronic fatigue.

  9. Azoospermia: clinical, hormonal, and biochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Papadimas, J; Papadopoulou, F; Ioannidis, S; Spanos, E; Tarlatzis, B; Bontis, J; Mantalenakis, S

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, hormonal and biochemical characteristics of infertile men with azoospermia. A total of 187 azoospermic out of 2610 infertile men (7.2%) were studied. Mean testicular volume and basal plasma levels of FSH were the most useful parameters concerning the evaluation of azoospermia. Basal plasma levels of LH and T were useful only in azoospermic men with hypogonadism, whereas plasma PRL levels, semen volume, and seminal plasma fructose levels were not found to be of common use except in selected cases.

  10. Biochemical Disincentives to Fertilizing Cellulosic Ethanol Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Snapp, S.; McSwiney, C.; Baldock, J.

    2010-12-01

    Corn grain biofuel crops produce the highest yields when the cropping ecosystem is not nitrogen (N)-limited, achieved by application of fertilizer. There are environmental consequences for excessive fertilizer application to crops, including greenhouse gas emissions, hypoxic “dead zones,” and health problems from N runoff into groundwater. The increase in corn acreage in response to demand for alternative fuels (i.e. ethanol) could exacerbate these problems, and divert food supplies to fuel production. A potential substitute for grain ethanol that could reduce some of these impacts is cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol feedstocks include grasses (switchgrass), hardwoods, and crop residues (e.g. corn stover, wheat straw). It has been assumed that these feedstocks will require similar N fertilization rates to grain biofuel crops to maximize yields, but carbohydrate yield versus N application has not previously been monitored. We report the biochemical stocks (carbohydrate, protein, and lignin in Mg ha-1) of a corn ecosystem grown under varying N levels. We measured biochemical yield in Mg ha-1 within the grain, leaf and stem, and reproductive parts of corn plants grown at seven N fertilization rates (0-202 kg N ha-1), to evaluate the quantity and quality of these feedstocks across a N fertilization gradient. The N fertilization rate study was performed at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. Biochemical stocks were measured using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), combined with a molecular mixing model (Baldock et al. 2004). Carbohydrate and lignin are the main biochemicals of interest in ethanol production since carbohydrate is the ethanol feedstock, and lignin hinders the carbohydrate to ethanol conversion process. We show that corn residue carbohydrate yields respond only weakly to N fertilization compared to grain. Grain carbohydrate yields plateau in response to fertilization at

  11. Physiological and biochemical changes with Vamana procedure

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bharti; Mahapatra, Sushil C.; Makhija, Renu; Kumar, Adarsh; Jirankalgikar, Nikhil M.; Padhi, Madan M.; Devalla, Ramesh Babu

    2012-01-01

    Vamana Karma (therapeutic emesis) primarily a Samshodhana Karma (purification procedure) is one of the five Pradhana Karmas (chief procedures) of Panchakarma. It is mentioned in Ayurvedic texts that a person after Samyak Vamana (proper Vamana) experiences lightness of the body, Hrit (precordium), Kantha (throat/voice), and Shirah (head) and weakness. This procedure is effectively used in healthy and ailing persons for purification of body and extraction of Doshas (especially Kapha) in Ayurvedic system. It has been found worth to observe the physiological and biochemical changes during Vamana and after the procedure to understand the effect/safety margins of the procedure in healthy volunteers. PMID:23723640

  12. [Optical detection system for micro biochemical analyses].

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wu, Yi-hui; Zhao, Hua-bing; Ju, Hui

    2005-04-01

    For the need of biochemical chip, which consumes fewer specimens and is easy to integrate with micro-fluid chip, two kinds of spectrophotometric analysis methods are described in the present paper. Both the direct detection method and evanescent wave detection method are used in the experiments with visible light (460-800 nm). The experimental results proved that the direct detection is simple and evident; on the other hand the evanescent wave detection method consumes much less reagent and is easy to integrate with microchips.

  13. Effects of mefenoxam fungicide on soil biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Isidoro; García-Martínez, Ana María; Osta, Paloma; Parrado, Juan; Tejada, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    We studied the effect of mefenoxam on soil biochemical properties. Soil was mixed with three rates of mefenoxam (0.5, 1 and 2 L ha(-1)) and incubated for 83 days. Fungicide was applied to the soil four times during the experiment, according to the manufacturer's instructions. Soil ergosterol, dehydrogenase, urease, β-glucosidase, and phosphatase activities were measured during the experiment. Compared to controls, soils with the highest doses of mefenoxam demonstrated decreased ergosterol and dehydrogenase activities by 81 and 27 %, respectively; whereas, urease, β-glucosidase, and phosphatase activities increased. These results suggest that mefenoxam may possibly have consequences for agronomic crop production due to the negative effect on soil fungal populations and stimulation of the growth of soil bacterial activity.

  14. Overview of the biochemical and genetic processes in malignant mesothelioma*

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Leonardo Vinícius Monteiro; Isoldi, Mauro César

    2014-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly aggressive form of cancer, has a long latency period, and is resistant to chemotherapy. It is extremely fatal, with a mean survival of less than one year. The development of MM is strongly correlated with exposure to asbestos and erionite, as well as to simian virus 40. Although various countries have banned the use of asbestos, MM has proven to be difficult to control and there appears to be a trend toward an increase in its incidence in the years to come. In Brazil, MM has not been widely studied from a genetic or biochemical standpoint. In addition, there have been few epidemiological studies of the disease, and the profile of its incidence has yet to be well established in the Brazilian population. The objective of this study was to review the literature regarding the processes of malignant transformation, as well as the respective mechanisms of tumorigenesis, in MM. PMID:25210967

  15. Microfabricated devices for performing chemical and biochemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J.M.; Jacobson, S.C.; Foote, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    There is growing interest in microfabricated devices that perform chemical and biochemical analysis. The general goal is to use microfabrication tools to construct miniature devices that can perform a complete analysis starting with an unprocessed sample. Such devices have been referred to as lab-on-a-chip devices. Initial efforts on microfluidic laboratory-on-a-chip devices focused on chemical separations. There are many potential applications of these fluidic microchip devices. Some applications such as chemical process control or environmental monitoring would require that a chip be used over an extended period of time or for many analyses. Other applications such as forensics, clinical diagnostics, and genetic diagnostics would employ the chip devices as single use disposable devices.

  16. Pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma: Biochemical and genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cano Megías, Marta; Rodriguez Puyol, Diego; Fernández Rodríguez, Loreto; Sención Martinez, Gloria Lisette; Martínez Miguel, Patricia

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are tumours derived from neural crest cells, which can be diagnosed by biochemical measurement of metanephrine and methoxytyramine. Advances in genetic research have identified many genes involved in the pathogenesis of these tumours, suggesting that up to 35-45% may have an underlying germline mutation. These genes have a singular transcriptional signature and can be grouped into 2 clusters (or groups): cluster 1 (VHL and SHDx), involved in angiogenesis and hypoxia pathways; and cluster 2 (MEN2 and NF1), linked to the kinase signalling pathway. In turn, these genes are associated with a characteristic biochemical phenotype (noradrenergic and adrenergic), and clinical features (location, biological behaviour, age of presentation, etc.) in a large number of cases. Early diagnosis of these tumours, accompanied by a correct genetic diagnosis, should eventually become a priority to enable better treatment, early detection of complications, proper screening of family members and related tumours, as well as an improvement in the overall prognosis of these patients.

  17. Biochemical effects of oral sodium phosphate.

    PubMed

    DiPalma, J A; Buckley, S E; Warner, B A; Culpepper, R M

    1996-04-01

    Our objective was to monitor serum and urine biochemical changes after oral sodium phosphate cleansing in a prospectively designed study. The study subjects were seven healthy, asymptomatic adults. Sodium phosphate 45 ml diluted in 45 ml water was given orally at baseline and 12 hr later. Calcium, ionized calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, creatinine, and PTH were analyzed at 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, 14, 16, 18, 21 and 24 hr after the first challenge. Urinary calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and cyclic AMP were analyzed at baseline and every 2 hr after oral sodium phosphate. Blood pressure, pulse, and respiratory rate were recorded every 2 hr and symptom questionnaires using visual analog scales were completed. A marked rise in phosphorus (peak range 3.6-12.4 mg/dl, P < 0.001) and falls in calcium (P < 0.001) and ionized calcium (P < 0.001) were seen. Rises seen in PTH and urinary cAMP confirmed the physiologic significance of the biochemical effect. There were no significant changes in other serum and urine laboratory or clinical assessments. Reported significant symptoms included bloating, cramps, abdominal pain, and nausea. Significant hypocalcemia and hyperphosphatemia after oral sodium phosphate raises concern about its use in normal individuals. Oral sodium phosphate should not be administered in patients with cardiopulmonary, renal, or hepatic disease.

  18. Biochemical basis for the biological clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James; Chueh, Pin-Ju; Pletcher, Jake; Tang, Xiaoyu; Wu, Lian-Ying; Morre, Dorothy M.

    2002-01-01

    NADH oxidases at the external surface of plant and animal cells (ECTO-NOX proteins) exhibit stable and recurring patterns of oscillations with potentially clock-related, entrainable, and temperature-compensated period lengths of 24 min. To determine if ECTO-NOX proteins might represent the ultradian time keepers (pacemakers) of the biological clock, COS cells were transfected with cDNAs encoding tNOX proteins having a period length of 22 min or with C575A or C558A cysteine to alanine replacements having period lengths of 36 or 42 min. Here we demonstrate that such transfectants exhibited 22, 36, or 40 to 42 h circadian patterns in the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a common clock-regulated protein, in addition to the endogenous 24 h circadian period length. The fact that the expression of a single oscillatory ECTO-NOX protein determines the period length of a circadian biochemical marker (60 X the ECTO-NOX period length) provides compelling evidence that ECTO-NOX proteins are the biochemical ultradian drivers of the cellular biological clock.

  19. A Model Incorporating Some of the Mechanical and Biochemical Factors Underlying Clot Formation and Dissolution in Flowing Blood

    DOE PAGES

    Anand, M.; Rajagopal, K.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple interacting mechanisms control the formation and dissolution of clots to maintain blood in a state of delicate balance. In addition to a myriad of biochemical reactions, rheological factors also play a crucial role in modulating the response of blood to external stimuli. To date, a comprehensive model for clot formation and dissolution, that takes into account the biochemical, medical and rheological factors, has not been put into place, the existing models emphasizing either one or the other of the factors. In this paper, after discussing the various biochemical, physiologic and rheological factors at some length, we develop a modelmore » for clot formation and dissolution that incorporates many of the relevant crucial factors that have a bearing on the problem. The model, though just a first step towards understanding a complex phenomenon, goes further than previous models in integrating the biochemical, physiologic and rheological factors that come into play.« less

  20. Effects of biophysical and biochemical cues on human corneal epithelial cell behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tocce, Elizabeth J.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in the design of biomaterials aim at mimicking the natural biophysical and biochemical components found in a tissue's extracellular environment (ECM). Of particular interest in this work is mimicking the specialized ECM of the human corneal epithelium called the basement membrane (BM) and understanding how corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) respond to biophysical and biochemical cues. To this end, well defined topographic features with dimension of the BM (20 to 200 nm) were fabricated to support controlled cell interactions with biochemical motifs (e.g., adhesive peptide ligands) found in the BM. Here, features of 30 to 70 nm that represent the smallest features found in the BM were used to demonstrate that the smallest features that HCECs can recognize are 30 and 45 nm, depending on the soluble environment. In addition, HCECs demonstrate contact guidance on the smallest BM features (30 to 70 nm) and on the largest BM features (200 nm), but differs from contact guidance on micron-scale features, suggesting that BM scale topography scale is an influential factor in regulating HCEC behavior. To study the simultaneous presentation of biophysical and biochemical cues, topographic features are coated with thin films using a layer-by-layer deposition of covalently reacting polymers, poly(ethylene imine) and poly(2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone (PEI/PVDMA). The films are functionalized with the bioactive peptide argenine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) to control cell-substrate interactions. We demonstrate that PEI/PVDMA films can be functionalized with monotonically increasing densities of ROD to control HCEC attachment and proliferation. In addition PEI/PVDMA films functionalized with RGD were used to demonstrate that HCEC response to topographic cues is dependent on the scale of the topography, the surface chemical composition and the soluble environment. Results from these studies will advance the understanding of how BM-relevant biophysical and biochemical

  1. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase: biochemical characterization and medical significance.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Elizabeth E

    2013-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the reduction of 5,10-methylenetetrahydofolate (CH2-H4folate) to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (CH3-H4folate). The enzyme employs a noncovalently-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which accepts reducing equivalents from NAD(P)H and transfers them to CH2-H4folate. The reaction provides the sole source of CH3-H4folate, which is utilized by methionine synthase in the synthesis of methionine from homocysteine. MTHFR plays a key role in folate metabolism and in the homeostasis of homocysteine; mutations in the enzyme lead to hyperhomocyst(e)inemia. A common C677T polymorphism in MTHFR has been associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and depression in adults, and of neural tube defects in the fetus. The mutation also confers protection for certain types of cancers. This review presents the current knowledge of the enzyme, its biochemical characterization, and medical significance.

  2. Optofluidics in bio-chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yunbo; Fan, Xudong

    2012-01-01

    Optofluidics organically integrates microfluidics and photonics and is an emerging technology in biological and chemical analysis. In this paper, we overview the recent studies in bio-chemical sensing applications of optofluidics. Particularly, we report the research progress in our lab in developing diverse optofluidic devices using two unique configurations: thin-walled capillary based optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) and multi-hole capillary based optofluidic platforms. The first one has been developed to be OFRR-based label-free biosensor, microfluidic laser based intra-cavity sensors, and on-column optical detectors for micro-gas chromatography (μGC), while the second one has been developed to be optofluidic Fabry-Pérot based label-free biosensor and optofluidic Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) biosensor. All of these devices take advantage of superior fluidic handling capability and high sensitivity, and have been used in detecting various biological and chemical analytes in either liquid or vapor phase.

  3. Droplet microfluidics in (bio)chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Basova, Evgenia Yu; Foret, Frantisek

    2015-01-07

    Droplet microfluidics may soon change the paradigm of performing chemical analyses and related instrumentation. It can improve not only the analysis scale, possibility for sensitivity improvement, and reduced consumption of chemical and biological reagents, but also the speed of performing a variety of unit operations. At present, microfluidic platforms can reproducibly generate monodisperse droplet populations at kHz or higher rates with droplet sizes suitable for high-throughput experiments, single-cell detection or even single molecule analysis. In addition to being used as microreactors with volume in the micro- to femtoliter range, droplet based systems have also been used to directly synthesize particles and encapsulate biological entities for biomedicine and biotechnology applications. This minireview summarizes various droplet microfluidics operations and applications for (bio)chemical assays described in the literature during the past few years.

  4. Highly valuable microalgae: biochemical and topological aspects.

    PubMed

    Pignolet, Olivier; Jubeau, Sébastien; Vaca-Garcia, Carlos; Michaud, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    The past decade has seen a surge in the interest in microalgae culture for biodiesel production and other applications as renewable biofuels as an alternative to petroleum transport fuels. The development of new technologies for the culture of these photosynthetic microorganisms and improved knowledge of their biochemical composition has spurred innovation in the field of high-value biomolecules. These developments are only economically viable if all the microalgae fractions are valorized in a biorefinery strategy. Achieving this objective requires an understanding of microalgae content and the cellular localization of the main biomolecular families in order to develop efficient harvest and sequential recovery technologies. This review summarizes the state of the art in microalgae compositions and topologies using some examples of the main industrially farmed microalgae.

  5. Thin membrane sensor with biochemical switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, George D. (Inventor); Worley, III, Jennings F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A modular biosensor system for chemical or biological agent detection utilizes electrochemical measurement of an ion current across a gate membrane triggered by the reaction of the target agent with a recognition protein conjugated to a channel blocker. The sensor system includes a bioresponse simulator or biochemical switch module which contains the recognition protein-channel blocker conjugate, and in which the detection reactions occur, and a transducer module which contains a gate membrane and a measuring electrode, and in which the presence of agent is sensed electrically. In the poised state, ion channels in the gate membrane are blocked by the recognition protein-channel blocker conjugate. Detection reactions remove the recognition protein-channel blocker conjugate from the ion channels, thus eliciting an ion current surge in the gate membrane which subsequently triggers an output alarm. Sufficiently large currents are generated that simple direct current electronics are adequate for the measurements. The biosensor has applications for environmental, medical, and industrial use.

  6. The biochemical basis of hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Bouteldja, Nadia; Timson, David J

    2010-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare, but potentially lethal, inherited disorder of fructose metabolism, caused by mutation of the aldolase B gene. Treatment currently relies solely on dietary restriction of problematic sugars. Biochemical study of defective aldolase B enzymes is key to revealing the molecular basis of the disease and providing a stronger basis for improved treatment and diagnosis. Such studies have revealed changes in enzyme activity, stability and oligomerisation. However, linking these changes to disease phenotypes has not always been straightforward. This review gives a general overview of the features of hereditary fructose intolerance, then concentrates on the biochemistry of the AP variant (Ala149Pro variant of aldolase B) and molecular pathological consequences of mutation of the aldolase B gene.

  7. Hydrophobic hydrophilic phenomena in biochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of concepts developed in the study of the hydrophobic affect is surveyed, within the more general context of solvent-induced effects. A systematic analysis of the solvent-induced contribution to the driving force for the process of protein folding has led to two important modifications in our understanding of these effects. First, the conventional concepts of hydrophobic solvation and hydrophobic interactions had to be replaced by their respective conditional effects. Second, each of the hydrophobic effects has also a corresponding hydrophilic counterpart. Some of the latter effects could contribute significantly to the total driving force for the process of protein folding, and perhaps even dominate the driving force for biochemical processes.

  8. Psychological and Biochemical Effects of a Stress Management Program,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    risk factors for cardiovascular disease . We wanted to sample emotional, behavioral, physical and biochemical measures which might be sensitive to the changes of an effective stress management program.

  9. Soil biochemical responses to nitrogen addition in a bamboo forest.

    PubMed

    Tu, Li-hua; Chen, Gang; Peng, Yong; Hu, Hong-ling; Hu, Ting-xing; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xian-wei; Liu, Li; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many vital ecosystem processes take place in the soils and are greatly affected by the increasing active nitrogen (N) deposition observed globally. Nitrogen deposition generally affects ecosystem processes through the changes in soil biochemical properties such as soil nutrient availability, microbial properties and enzyme activities. In order to evaluate the soil biochemical responses to elevated atmospheric N deposition in bamboo forest ecosystems, a two-year field N addition experiment in a hybrid bamboo (Bambusa pervariabilis × Dendrocalamopsis daii) plantation was conducted. Four levels of N treatment were applied: (1) control (CK, without N added), (2) low-nitrogen (LN, 50 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)), (3) medium-nitrogen (MN, 150 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)), and (4) high-nitrogen (HN, 300 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)). Results indicated that N addition significantly increased the concentrations of NH4(+), NO3(-), microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass N, the rates of nitrification and denitrification; significantly decreased soil pH and the concentration of available phosphorus, and had no effect on the total organic carbon and total N concentration in the 0-20 cm soil depth. Nitrogen addition significantly stimulated activities of hydrolytic enzyme that acquiring N (urease) and phosphorus (acid phosphatase) and depressed the oxidative enzymes (phenol oxidase, peroxidase and catalase) activities. Results suggest that (1) this bamboo forest ecosystem is moving towards being limited by P or co-limited by P under elevated N deposition, (2) the expected progressive increases in N deposition may have a potential important effect on forest litter decomposition due to the interaction of inorganic N and oxidative enzyme activities, in such bamboo forests under high levels of ambient N deposition.

  10. Changes in Serum Biochemical Factors Associated with Opium Addiction after Addiction Desertion

    PubMed Central

    Afarinesh, Mohammad Reza; Haghpanah, Tahereh; Divsalar, Kouros; Dehyadegary, Elham; Shaikh-Aleslami, Azar; Mahmoodi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background The long time use of opium has some effects on serums biochemical factors, the determination of this variation is a new approach in understanding off addiction and relive of drug abuser health. Hence in this study, these indicators in person who were withdrawing of opium have been studied. Methods In this cross-sectional study bloods biochemical factors such as fasting blood sugar (FBS), sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), uric acid (UA), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, cholesterol, total protein, and fibrinogen in three groups serum were studied: (1) Who had been permanent opium users more than 2 years (case). (2) Dependent person who has taken one month addiction withdrawal course (control). (3) A healthy group that had been demographically similar to the other groups. Findings According to these study findings, FBS serum level in the case group is lower than control group. Serum level of Na, creatinine, and blood triglyceride (TG) in case study are higher than group control. Concentration of potassium, Ca, UA, BUN, cholesterol, total serum protein, fibrinogen, and thrombin time in case study and group control showed no significant difference. Also, in withdrawing case serum level of Na, Ca, UA, BUN, creatinine, and TG significantly increase and thrombin time decrease. Conclusion According to this study not only the longtime use of opium but also opium with drawerin opium dependent people can change their serum biochemical factors. So recognition, treatment, and prevention of this change could be a new step in improving of health and condition of patients. PMID:25984281

  11. Relationship between two year PSA nadir and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer patients treated with iodine-125 brachytherap*

    PubMed Central

    Franca, Carlos Antônio da Silva; Vieira, Sérgio Lannes; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Bernabe, Antonio Jose Serrano; Penna, Antonio Belmiro Rodrigues Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationship between two year PSA nadir (PSAn) after brachytherapy and biochemical recurrence rates in prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods In the period from January 1998 to August 2007, 120 patients were treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy alone. The results analysis was based on the definition of biochemical recurrence according to the Phoenix Consensus. Results Biochemical control was observed in 86 patients (71.7%), and biochemical recurrence, in 34 (28.3%). Mean PSAn was 0.53 ng/ml. The mean follow-up was 98 months. The patients were divided into two groups: group 1, with two year PSAn < 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (74 patients; 61.7%), and group 2, with two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy (46 patients; 38.3%). Group 1 presented biochemical recurrence in 15 patients (20.3%), and group 2, in 19 patients (43.2%) (p < 0.02). The analysis of biochemical disease-free survival at seven years, stratified by the two groups, showed values of 80% and 64% (p < 0.02), respectively. Conclusion Levels of two year PSAn ≥ 0.5 ng/ml after brachytherapy are strongly correlated with a poor prognosis. This fact may help to identify patients at risk for disease recurrence. PMID:25741055

  12. A Biochemical Approach to the Problem of Dyslexia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sidney McDonald

    1985-01-01

    The paper presents the case of a sixth-grade boy, labeled dyslexic, who responded positively to a biochemical approach. Remedy of iron, zinc, and Vitamin B-6 deficiencies as well as an imbalance of fatty acids resulted in improvements in hair and skin and also in reading. A biochemical approach to behavior problems is proposed. (Author/CL)

  13. Biochemical Education in Thailand: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svasti, Jisnuson; Surarit, Rudee

    1991-01-01

    Traces the history of Thailand's biochemical education from its initial evolution from medicine to modern day. Discusses the following aspects of Thailand's modern biochemical education: biochemistry teaching at Thai schools, university departments and biochemistry courses, textbooks, degree programs, interplay between research and teaching, and…

  14. Editorial: ESBES - European Society of Biochemical Engineering Sciences.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Guilherme; Jungbauer, Alois

    2013-06-01

    The latest ESBES special issue on "Biochemical Engineering Sciences" is edited by Prof. Guilherme Ferreira (Chairman, ESBES) and Prof. Alois Jungbauer (co-Editor-in-Chief, Biotechnology Journal). This special issue comprises the latest research in biochemical engineering science presented at the 9(th) ESBES Conference held in Istanbul, Turkey in 2012.

  15. Model-Based Design of Biochemical Microreactors

    PubMed Central

    Elbinger, Tobias; Gahn, Markus; Neuss-Radu, Maria; Hante, Falk M.; Voll, Lars M.; Leugering, Günter; Knabner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of biochemical pathways is an important resource in Synthetic Biology, as the predictive power of simulating synthetic pathways represents an important step in the design of synthetic metabolons. In this paper, we are concerned with the mathematical modeling, simulation, and optimization of metabolic processes in biochemical microreactors able to carry out enzymatic reactions and to exchange metabolites with their surrounding medium. The results of the reported modeling approach are incorporated in the design of the first microreactor prototypes that are under construction. These microreactors consist of compartments separated by membranes carrying specific transporters for the input of substrates and export of products. Inside the compartments of the reactor multienzyme complexes assembled on nano-beads by peptide adapters are used to carry out metabolic reactions. The spatially resolved mathematical model describing the ongoing processes consists of a system of diffusion equations together with boundary and initial conditions. The boundary conditions model the exchange of metabolites with the neighboring compartments and the reactions at the surface of the nano-beads carrying the multienzyme complexes. Efficient and accurate approaches for numerical simulation of the mathematical model and for optimal design of the microreactor are developed. As a proof-of-concept scenario, a synthetic pathway for the conversion of sucrose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) was chosen. In this context, the mathematical model is employed to compute the spatio-temporal distributions of the metabolite concentrations, as well as application relevant quantities like the outflow rate of G6P. These computations are performed for different scenarios, where the number of beads as well as their loading capacity are varied. The computed metabolite distributions show spatial patterns, which differ for different experimental arrangements. Furthermore, the total output of G6P

  16. Model-Based Design of Biochemical Microreactors.

    PubMed

    Elbinger, Tobias; Gahn, Markus; Neuss-Radu, Maria; Hante, Falk M; Voll, Lars M; Leugering, Günter; Knabner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of biochemical pathways is an important resource in Synthetic Biology, as the predictive power of simulating synthetic pathways represents an important step in the design of synthetic metabolons. In this paper, we are concerned with the mathematical modeling, simulation, and optimization of metabolic processes in biochemical microreactors able to carry out enzymatic reactions and to exchange metabolites with their surrounding medium. The results of the reported modeling approach are incorporated in the design of the first microreactor prototypes that are under construction. These microreactors consist of compartments separated by membranes carrying specific transporters for the input of substrates and export of products. Inside the compartments of the reactor multienzyme complexes assembled on nano-beads by peptide adapters are used to carry out metabolic reactions. The spatially resolved mathematical model describing the ongoing processes consists of a system of diffusion equations together with boundary and initial conditions. The boundary conditions model the exchange of metabolites with the neighboring compartments and the reactions at the surface of the nano-beads carrying the multienzyme complexes. Efficient and accurate approaches for numerical simulation of the mathematical model and for optimal design of the microreactor are developed. As a proof-of-concept scenario, a synthetic pathway for the conversion of sucrose to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) was chosen. In this context, the mathematical model is employed to compute the spatio-temporal distributions of the metabolite concentrations, as well as application relevant quantities like the outflow rate of G6P. These computations are performed for different scenarios, where the number of beads as well as their loading capacity are varied. The computed metabolite distributions show spatial patterns, which differ for different experimental arrangements. Furthermore, the total output of G6P

  17. A Pilot Comparative Study of 26 Biochemical Markers in Seminal Plasma and Serum in Infertile Men

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Rui-Xiang; Lu, Jin-Chun; Zhang, Hong-Ye; Lü, Nian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The relationships of the biochemical components in seminal plasma and serum, and their origins and physiological effects in male reproductive system have been poorly understood. Methods. Based on the calibration and quality control measures, 26 biochemical markers, in seminal plasma and serum samples from 36 male infertility patients with nonazoospermia were detected and compared. Results. Only PA was undetectable in all seminal plasma samples. There were significant differences of all other 24 biochemical markers in seminal plasma and serum (P < 0.05) except for UA (P = 0.214). There were rich proteins in seminal plasma, and globulin accounted for about 90%. There were also abundant enzymes in seminal plasma, and the activities of ALT, AST, AKP, GGT, LDH, CK, and αHBDH in seminal plasma were significantly higher than those in serum while ADA was inversely lower. There were relatively low levels of Glu, TG, TC, and hsCRP in seminal plasma, but Glu was undetectable in 8 of 36 cases. Conclusions. The differences of the levels of biochemical markers in seminal plasma and serum might be associated with the selective secretion of testis, epididymis and male accessory glands, and the specific environment needed for sperm metabolism and function maintenance. PMID:26539526

  18. The Toxicology and Biochemical Characterization of Cantharidin on Cydia pomonella.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng-Wei; Yang, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Cantharidin, a natural toxin produced by beetles in the families Meloidae and Oedemeridae, reported to be toxic to some pests, is being developed as a biopesticide in China. This study evaluates the toxicity and biochemical characterization of cantharidin on the codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), an economically important fruit pest, under both laboratory and field conditions. Laboratory dose response bioassays showed that the LC50 value of cantharidin against neonate larvae was 0.057 mg ml(-1). Exposure of the larvae to 0.024 and 0.057 mg ml(-1) of cantharidin resulted in significant reduction in larval body weight. Neonate larvae exposed to LC10 of cantharidin showed increased glutathione S-transferase activity and significantly reduced the carboxylesterase and cytochrome P450-dependent mixed-function oxidase activities. Results also showed 16 and 25% ovicidal activity at concentrations of 0.057 and 0.14 mg ml(-1) of cantharidin, respectively. Field trials demonstrated cantharidin has a significant effect on both the first and second generations of C. pomonella larvae, but it exhibits a lower control efficiency than the chemical reference emamectin benzoate. Cantharidin may be considered a valuable tool for the control of codling moth.

  19. Biochemical and nutritional characterization of three prickly pear species with different ripening behavior.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, Talia; Carrillo-López, Armando; Guevara-Lara, Fidel; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; Paredes-López, Octavio

    2005-12-01

    Biochemical and nutritional changes were studied during the ripening process of three Opuntia morphospecies with different ripening behavior: Naranjona (O. ficus-indica), Blanca Cristalina (Opuntia sp.), and Esmeralda (Opuntia sp.) of early, early-intermediate, and intermediate-late ripening, respectively. In loss of fresh weight, Naranjona showed the highest values, while in Blanca Cristalina and Esmeralda, a discrete weight loss was found. No significant differences were found among morphospecies in soluble solids, total titratable acidity and pH during the postharvest days. Blanca Cristalina and Esmeralda showed an increase in the content of carotenoids, while these diminished in Naranjona. The cell wall enzymes evaluated showed particular behaviors during the ripening of each morphospecies suggesting a fine biochemical control and not a clear relationship between fruit softening and enzyme activity. This study provides basic information on prickly pear ripening, in order to understand this process for its control and for improving shelf life.

  20. [Biochemical tests for identifying Pasteurella multocida].

    PubMed

    Karaivanov, L

    1984-01-01

    Studied was the biochemical activity of a total of 168 strains of Pasteurella--73 isolated from birds (48 from cases of acute fowl cholera, and 25--of chronic cholera), and 95 isolated from mammals (3 from lambs, 24 from pigs, 36 from cattle, and 32 from rabbits) with regard to the tests determining the hemolytic activity, production of indol, reduction of nitrates, breakdown of urea, beta galactosidase activity, production of hydrogen sulfide, ornitin-, arginine-, lysine-decarboxylase-, and phosphatase activity, and the fermentation of substrates such as manite, glucose, galactose, saccharose, manose, levulose, dulcite, lactose, maltose, rafinose, trechalose, salicin, melobiose, icelobiose, arabinose, xylose, and sorbite. To differentiate Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from mamals from those isolated from birds the phosphatase activity test on solid media with sodium phenolphtalein diphosphate had to be employed Pasteurella organisms isolated from mammals showed positive phosphatase activity, while those isolated from birds exhibited a negative one. Arabinose and xylose fermentation tests could simultaneously be used. Pasteurellae isolated in cases of acute fowl cholera showed positive reaction for arabinose and a negative one for xylose, while the strains isolated from mammals showed the reverse activity. The strains isolated in cases of chronic fowl cholera were shown to belong to this group.

  1. Biochemical indicators of hepatotoxic effects of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Dahamna, S; Sekfali, N; Walker, C H

    2004-01-01

    Pesticides can cause damage to man and beneficial organisms. Some sub-lethal effects of pesticides were studied in birds with a view to identifying characteristic biochemical responses that may be useful for the monitoring of exposure to sub-lethal levels in the field. Pesticides were used: demeton-S-methyl, (DSM), chlorpyriphos, chlorfenviphos, triazophos, pirimicarb, methiocarb and permethrin. Blood was collected before dosing, and 2, 6, 24, 48 and 72 hours after the treatment from the brachial vein of birds. Enzyme activities were assayed in the plasma or serum samples obtained. The assays used were GOT, MDH, GDH, SDH, GAMMA GT and ChE. The results showed an increase in plasma and serum GOT and gamma-GT levels were found in all animals treated with the previous pesticides. The level of ChE increased in birds after treatment with permethrin. It was concluded that the pesticides cause structural and functional changes in the liver and also, the measurement of the previous parameter activities may be useful for assessing exposure and sub-lethal effects of pesticides on the wildlife.

  2. Reaction networks and kinetics of biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Arceo, Carlene Perpetua P; Jose, Editha C; Lao, Angelyn R; Mendoza, Eduardo R

    2017-01-01

    This paper further develops the connection between Chemical Reaction Network Theory (CRNT) and Biochemical Systems Theory (BST) that we recently introduced [1]. We first use algebraic properties of kinetic sets to study the set of complex factorizable kinetics CFK(N) on a CRN, which shares many characteristics with its subset of mass action kinetics. In particular, we extend the Theorem of Feinberg-Horn [9] on the coincidence of the kinetic and stoichiometric subsets of a mass action system to CF kinetics, using the concept of span surjectivity. We also introduce the branching type of a network, which determines the availability of kinetics on it and allows us to characterize the networks for which all kinetics are complex factorizable: A "Kinetics Landscape" provides an overview of kinetics sets, their algebraic properties and containment relationships. We then apply our results and those (of other CRNT researchers) reviewed in [1] to fifteen BST models of complex biological systems and discover novel network and kinetic properties that so far have not been widely studied in CRNT. In our view, these findings show an important benefit of connecting CRNT and BST modeling efforts.

  3. Biochemical studies of the tracheobronchial epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Mass, M.J.; Kaufman, D.G.

    1984-06-01

    Tracheobronchial epithelium has been a focus of intense investigation in the field of chemical carcinogenesis. We have reviewed some biochemical investigations that have evolved through linkage with carcinogenesis research. These areas of investigation have included kinetics of carcinogen metabolism, identification of carcinogen metabolites, levels of carcinogen binding to DNA, and analysis of carcinogen-DNA adducts. Such studies appear to have provided a reasonable explanation for the susceptibilities of the respiratory tracts of rats and hamsters to carcinogenesis by benzo(a)pyrene. Coinciding with the attempts to understand the initiation of carcinogenesis in the respiratory tract has also been a major thrust aimed at effecting its prevention both in humans and in animal models for human bronchogenic carcinoma. These studies have concerned the effects of derivatives of vitamin A (retinoids) and their influence on normal cell biology and biochemistry of this tissue. Recent investigations have included the effects of retinoid deficiency on the synthesis of RNA and the identification of RNA species associated with this biological state, and also have included the effects of retinoids on the synthesis of mucus-related glycoproteins. Tracheal organ cultures from retinoid-deficient hamsters have been used successfully to indicate the potency of synthetic retinoids by monitoring the reversal of squamous metaplasia. Techniques applied to this tissue have also served to elucidate features of the metabolism of retinoic acid using high pressure liquid chromatography. 94 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Applied spectrophotometry: analysis of a biochemical mixture.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Toni A; Schultz, Emeric; Borland, Michael G; Pugh, Michael Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Spectrophotometric analysis is essential for determining biomolecule concentration of a solution and is employed ubiquitously in biochemistry and molecular biology. The application of the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer Lawis routinely used to determine the concentration of DNA, RNA or protein. There is however a significant difference in determining the concentration of a given species (RNA, DNA, protein) in isolation (a contrived circumstance) as opposed to determining that concentration in the presence of other species (a more realistic situation). To present the student with a more realistic laboratory experience and also to fill a hole that we believe exists in student experience prior to reaching a biochemistry course, we have devised a three week laboratory experience designed so that students learn to: connect laboratory practice with theory, apply the Beer-Lambert-Bougert Law to biochemical analyses, demonstrate the utility and limitations of example quantitative colorimetric assays, demonstrate the utility and limitations of UV analyses for biomolecules, develop strategies for analysis of a solution of unknown biomolecular composition, use digital micropipettors to make accurate and precise measurements, and apply graphing software.

  5. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  6. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  7. Robustness analysis of stochastic biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Ceska, Milan; Safránek, David; Dražan, Sven; Brim, Luboš

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new framework for rigorous robustness analysis of stochastic biochemical systems that is based on probabilistic model checking techniques. We adapt the general definition of robustness introduced by Kitano to the class of stochastic systems modelled as continuous time Markov Chains in order to extensively analyse and compare robustness of biological models with uncertain parameters. The framework utilises novel computational methods that enable to effectively evaluate the robustness of models with respect to quantitative temporal properties and parameters such as reaction rate constants and initial conditions. We have applied the framework to gene regulation as an example of a central biological mechanism where intrinsic and extrinsic stochasticity plays crucial role due to low numbers of DNA and RNA molecules. Using our methods we have obtained a comprehensive and precise analysis of stochastic dynamics under parameter uncertainty. Furthermore, we apply our framework to compare several variants of two-component signalling networks from the perspective of robustness with respect to intrinsic noise caused by low populations of signalling components. We have successfully extended previous studies performed on deterministic models (ODE) and showed that stochasticity may significantly affect obtained predictions. Our case studies demonstrate that the framework can provide deeper insight into the role of key parameters in maintaining the system functionality and thus it significantly contributes to formal methods in computational systems biology.

  8. A biochemically structured model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lei, F; Rotbøll, M; Jørgensen, S B

    2001-07-12

    A biochemically structured model for the aerobic growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on glucose and ethanol is presented. The model focuses on the pyruvate and acetaldehyde branch points where overflow metabolism occurs when the growth changes from oxidative to oxido-reductive. The model is designed to describe the onset of aerobic alcoholic fermentation during steady-state as well as under dynamical conditions, by triggering an increase in the glycolytic flux using a key signalling component which is assumed to be closely related to acetaldehyde. An investigation of the modelled process dynamics in a continuous cultivation revealed multiple steady states in a region of dilution rates around the transition between oxidative and oxido-reductive growth. A bifurcation analysis using the two external variables, the dilution rate, D, and the inlet concentration of glucose, S(f), as parameters, showed that a fold bifurcation occurs close to the critical dilution rate resulting in multiple steady-states. The region of dilution rates within which multiple steady states may occur depends strongly on the substrate feed concentration. Consequently a single steady state may prevail at low feed concentrations, whereas multiple steady states may occur over a relatively wide range of dilution rates at higher feed concentrations.

  9. Induced biochemical interactions in crude oils

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1996-08-01

    In the evolution of oil from sedimentary to reservoir conditions, the hydrogen to carbon ratios decrease while the oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur to carbon ratios increase. During this process, the oils become heavier and richer in asphaltenes. In terms of chemical composition, the oils become enriched in resins, asphaltenes, and polar compounds containing the heteroatoms and metals. Over the geological periods of time, the chemical and physical changes have been brought about by chemical, biological (biochemical) and physical (temperature and pressure) means as well as by the catalytic effects of the sedimentary matrices, migration, flooding, and other physical processes. Therefore, different types of oils are the end products of a given set of such interactions which were brought about by multiple and simultaneous physicochemical processes involving electron transfer, free radical, and chemical reactions. A biocatalyst introduced into a reaction mixture of the type produced by such reactions will seek available chemical reaction sites and react at the most favorable ones. The rates and the chemical pathways by which the biocatalytic reactions will proceed will depend on the oil type and the biocatalyst(s). Some of the possible reaction pathways that may occur in such complex mixtures are discussed.

  10. Adverse Effects of Pesticides Residues on Biochemical Markers in Pakistani Tobacco Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Dilshad A; Bhatti, Mahwish M; Khan, Farooq A; Naqvi, Syed T; Karam, A

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco is an important cash crop of Pakistan and tremendous amount of irrational pesticides are being used to control insect growth. The frequency of plasma pesticide residues above acceptable daily intake (ADI) and its correlation with biochemical markers for assessment of adverse health effects in the tobacco farmers at district Sawabi, Pakistan was determined. Total 109 adult males consisting of 55 tobacco farmers exposed to pesticides and 54 controls were included. Pesticides residues in blood were analyzed on HPLC and GC-NPD. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) was analyzed by Ellman's method. Biochemical markers including serum calcium, phosphorus, urea, creatinine, bilirubin and liver enzymes were measured on Selectra-E auto analyzer. The tobacco farmers had multiple pesticides residues above ADI in their blood consisting of 35 (63%) methomyl; 31 (56%) thiodicarb; 34(62%) cypermethrin; 27 (49%) Imidacloprid; 18 (32%) Methamidophos and 15 (27%) endosulfan. BChE activity was significantly decreased in the pesticides exposed farmers as compared to controls (P<0.001). Plasma biochemical markers including ALT, AST, CK, LDH and phosphate were significantly raised in the pesticides exposed farmers as compared to control group (P<0.001). Total pesticides residues revealed a significant positive correlation with AST (r=0.42), LDH(r= 0.47), ALT (r=0.20) and phosphorus (r=0.51). Excessive exposure to pesticide caused cytotoxic changes in the hepatic and renal biochemical markers which were positively correlated with pesticide residue. Hence these biomarkers might be used in addition to BChE activity for monitoring of adverse effects of pesticides on the health of farm workers. PMID:19079663

  11. The effects of copper sulfate on liver histology and biochemical parameters of term Ross broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Emin Oguzhan; Yuksel, Hayati; Enli, Yasar; Tufan, A Cevik; Turgut, Gunfer

    2010-03-01

    Copper is an essential trace element that is extremely toxic to organisms and organs at high doses. We have investigated the histological and biochemical effects of a toxic dose of copper sulfate on the liver of term Ross broiler chicks. Fertilized eggs were divided into three groups: experimental, injected with 50 mcg/0.1 ml copper sulfate in the air chambers on day 1; sham, injected with 0.1 ml saline; and control, no injection. Term chicks were killed and their livers investigated histologically, with hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections examined under light microscopy, and biochemically, for malondialdehyde and glutathione levels. Histological examinations showed copper-treated samples with granular degeneration and necrosis of hepatocytes and impairment to the cell lining of the remark cords. The samples had a congestive appearance, with blood in the vena centralis and sinusoids, slight connective tissue increase, and lymphocyte infiltration. Control and sham group sections had normal appearances. As oxidative damage parameters, in the copper-treated group, malondialdehyde levels were increased and glutathione levels decreased. In the sham and control groups, there were no significant differences. At this toxic dose, copper sulfate shows oxidative damage according to the histology of term chick liver that are confirmed biochemically by the changes in malondialdehyde and glutathione levels.

  12. Sustained kidney biochemical derangement in treated experimental diabetes: a clue to metabolic memory

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Antonio Anax F.; de Oliveira, Tiago F.; Bobadilla, Larissa L.; Garcia, Camila C. M.; Berra, Carolina Maria; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Medeiros, Marisa H. G.; Di Mascio, Paolo; Zatz, Roberto; de M. Loureiro, Ana Paula

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of biochemical alterations that last for a long period of time in diabetic individuals even after adequate handling of glycemia is an intriguing phenomenon named metabolic memory. In this study, we show that a kidney pathway is gradually altered during the course of diabetes and remains persistently changed after late glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. This pathway comprises an early decline of uric acid clearance and pAMPK expression followed by fumarate accumulation, increased TGF-β expression, reduced PGC-1α expression, and downregulation of methylation and hydroxymethylation of mitochondrial DNA. The sustained decrease of uric acid clearance in treated diabetes may support the prolonged kidney biochemical alterations observed after tight glycemic control, and this regulation is likely mediated by the sustained decrease of AMPK activity and the induction of inflammation. This manuscript proposes the first consideration of the possible role of hyperuricemia and the underlying biochemical changes as part of metabolic memory in diabetic nephropathy development after glycemic control. PMID:28079150

  13. Pellagra and alcoholism: a biochemical perspective.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2014-01-01

    Historical and clinical aspects of pellagra and its relationship to alcoholism are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. Pellagra is caused by deficiency of niacin (nicotinic acid) and/or its tryptophan (Trp) precursor and is compounded by B vitamin deficiencies. Existence on maize or sorghum diets and loss of or failure to isolate niacin from them led to pellagra incidence in India, South Africa, Southern Europe in the 18th century and the USA following the civil war. Pellagra is also induced by drugs inhibiting the conversion of Trp to niacin and by conditions of gastrointestinal dysfunction. Skin photosensitivity in pellagra may be due to decreased synthesis of the Trp metabolite picolinic acid → zinc deficiency → decreased skin levels of the histidine metabolite urocanic acid and possibly also increased levels of the haem precursor 5-aminolaevulinic acid (5-ALA) and photo-reactive porphyrins. Depression in pellagra may be due to a serotonin deficiency caused by decreased Trp availability to the brain. Anxiety and other neurological disturbances may be caused by 5-ALA and the Trp metabolite kynurenic acid. Pellagra symptoms are resolved by niacin, but aggravated mainly by vitamin B6. Alcohol dependence can induce or aggravate pellagra by inducing malnutrition, gastrointestinal disturbances and B vitamin deficiencies, inhibiting the conversion of Trp to niacin and promoting the accumulation of 5-ALA and porphyrins. Alcoholic pellagra encephalopathy should be managed with niacin, other B vitamins and adequate protein nutrition. Future studies should explore the potential role of 5-ALA and also KA in the skin and neurological disturbances in pellagra.

  14. The effect of mariculture facilities on biochemical features of suspended organic matter (southern Tyrrhenian, Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modica, A.; Scilipoti, D.; La Torre, R.; Manganaro, A.; Sarà, G.

    2006-01-01

    A comparison of a Mediterranean aquaculture impacted area and control areas was made to assess the effect of fish farm waste discharge on the biochemical features of the water column. Trophic variables commonly used in marine ecology such as total suspended matter, suspended chlorophyll- a, biochemical features of particulate organic matter (proteins, lipids and carbohydrates) and biopolymeric carbon were chosen as the best descriptors of trophic conditions. An initial analysis of data from the impact area was carried out in order to test the effect of farm waste using a gradient of distances downstream from the fish farm cages (50 m, 300 m, 1000 m). The results were then compared with a control site 750 m upstream. Subsequently, the cage data set was asymmetrically compared with data from five controls collected some years before, when no aquaculture activity was present in the Gulf. The analysis revealed differences in chlorophyll- a, carbohydrates and some trophic ratios between the farm impact area and the controls taken upstream. A clear pattern of trophic enrichment of the water column around the fish farm was evidenced since concentrations in the sites increased along with their distance from the cages. The downstream sites overall were significantly different, trophically speaking, from the five control areas, while the trophic variables of the upstream control were not different from the external controls. Results showed that fish farm facilities provided an organic enrichment of the water column up to at least 1000 m downstream from the cages, producing a deviation of trophodynamics from normal ambient conditions.

  15. Placental sulfatase deficiency: clinical and biochemical study of 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Bedin, M; Alsat, E; Tanguy, G; Cedard, L

    1980-01-01

    Clinical and biochemical data of 16 typical cases of placental sulfatase deficiency have been observed. In vivo loading tests with DHA-S allowed us to make a prenatal diagnosis. In vitro experiments gave confirmation, showing zero or virtually zero placental sulfatase activity towards delta 5P or DHA sulfates Aromatase activities, when tested, were normal or more often less than standard values, the latter showing themselves rather large individual variations. All pregnancies were associated with the delivery of male neonates in good health but 3. The 15 living babies have been developing normally since then. These results, together with those reported in the literature, suggest that placental sulfatase deficiency is under control of an X-linked recessive character, this being supported by the recent observation of such a disorder in two sisters simultaneously pregnant. As to the high frequency problem of cesarian section, pointed out by several authors, we cannot conclude, from our own observations, that the defect has an obvious influence on the good outcome of labor, as 10 out of the 16 women delivered vaginally near term.

  16. Biochemical and functional abnormalities in hypercholesterolemic rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, K.B.; Ebbe, S.; Mazoyer, E.; Carpenter, D.; Yee, T. )

    1990-02-01

    This study was designed to elucidate changes in rabbit platelet lipids induced by a cholesterol rich diet and to explore the possible correlation of these lipid changes with platelet abnormalities. Pronounced biochemical alterations were observed when serum cholesterol levels of 700-1000 mg% were reached. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) platelets contained 37% more neutral lipids and 16% less phospholipids than the controls. Lysolecithin, cholesterol esters and phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels were increased in HC platelets, and the levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC) were decreased. The cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of lipidemic platelets increased from 0.55 +/- 0.011 to 0.89 +/- 0.016 (P less than 0.01) in eight weeks. HC platelets had 90% more arachidonic acid (AA) in the PI than normal platelets. No significant changes in AA of PC were observed. Platelet function was monitored by the uptake and release of (14C)serotonin in platelet rich plasma (PRP), using varying concentrations of collagen as an aggregating agent. The uptake of (14C)serotonin in HC and normal platelets ranged from 78-94%. The percent of (14C)serotonin released from normal and HC platelets was proportional to the concentration of collagen. However, lipidemic platelets were hyperreactive to low concentrations of collagen. Incorporation of 50 microM acetylsalicylic acid into the aggregating medium suppressed the release of (14C)serotonin in normal PRP by more than 90%, but had only a partial effect on lipidemic PRP.

  17. Insecticides induced biochemical changes in freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Muthukannan Satheesh; Kabra, Akhil N; Min, Booki; El-Dalatony, Marwa M; Xiong, Jiuqiang; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Lee, Dae Sung; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The effect of insecticides (acephate and imidacloprid) on a freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas mexicana was investigated with respect to photosynthetic pigments, carbohydrate and protein contents, fatty acids composition and induction of stress indicators including proline, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). C. mexicana was cultivated with 1, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg L(-1) of acephate and imidacloprid. The microalga growth increased with increasing concentrations of both insecticides up to 15 mg L(-1), beyond which the growth declined compared to control condition (without insecticides). C. mexicana cultivated with 15 mg L(-1) of both insecticides for 12 days was used for further analysis. The accumulation of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll and carotenoids), carbohydrates and protein was decreased in the presence of both insecticides. Acephate and imidacloprid induced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and increased the concentration of proline in the microalga, which play a defensive role against various environmental stresses. Fatty acid analysis revealed that the fraction of polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased on exposure to both insecticides. C. mexicana also promoted 25 and 21% removal of acephate and imidacloprid, respectively. The biochemical changes in C. mexicana on exposure to acephate and imidacloprid indicate that the microalga undergoes an adaptive change in response to the insecticide-induced oxidative stress.

  18. Biochemical and Clinical Assessments of Segmental Maxillary Posterior Tooth Intrusion

    PubMed Central

    Tasanapanont, Jintana; Wattanachai, Tanapan; Apisariyakul, Janya; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Midtbø, Marit

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To compare chondroitin sulphate (CS) levels around maxillary second premolars, first molars, and second molars between the unloaded and the loaded periods and to measure the rates of intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth during segmental posterior tooth intrusion. Materials and Methods. In this prospective clinical study, 105 teeth (from 15 patients exhibiting anterior open bite and requiring maxillary posterior tooth intrusion) were studied. Competitive ELISA was used to detect CS levels. Dental casts (during the unloaded and loaded periods) were scanned, and posterior tooth intrusion distances were measured. Results. During the unloaded period, the median CS levels around maxillary second premolars, first molars, second molars (experimental teeth), and mandibular first molars (negative control) were 0.006, 0.055, 0.056, and 0.012 and during the loaded period were 2.592, 5.738, 4.727, and 0.163 ng/μg of total protein, respectively. The median CS levels around experimental teeth were significantly elevated during the loaded period. The mean rates of maxillary second premolar and first and second molar intrusion were 0.72, 0.58, and 0.40 mm/12 weeks, respectively. Conclusions. Biochemical and clinical assessments suggested that the segmental posterior tooth intrusion treatment modality with 50 g of vertical force per side was sufficient. Trial Registration. The study is registered as TCTR20170206006. PMID:28321256

  19. Red edge shift and biochemical content in grass canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutanga, Onisimo; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    The concentration of foliar nitrogen in tropical grass is one of the factors that explain the distribution of wildlife. Therefore, the remote sensing of foliar nitrogen contributes to a better understanding of wildlife feeding patterns. This study evaluated changes in the red edge position of the 680 nm continuum removed chlorophyll feature in the reflectance spectra of samples of Cenchus ciliaris grass grown in a greenhouse under three levels of nitrogen supply. Canopy spectral measurements from each treatment were recorded under controlled laboratory conditions over a four-week period using a GER 3700 spectroradiometer. Results indicate that the mean wavelength positions of the three fertilization treatments were statistically different. An increase in nitrogen supply yielded a shift in the red edge position to longer wavelengths. The red edge position, amplitude, slope at 713 nm and slope at 725 nm were significantly correlated to measured nitrogen concentration (bootstrapped r = 0.89, - 0.28, 0.63 and 0.75, respectively) even at canopy level. Based on these results, the red edge position is strongly correlated with biochemical concentration in plants compared to the other methods tested. The study provides conclusive evidence that confirms the strength of a red edge-nitrogen relationship that remains underused in remote sensing. This method is promising for estimating nutrient content in grasslands.

  20. Plant nanobionics approach to augment photosynthesis and biochemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldo, Juan Pablo; Landry, Markita P.; Faltermeier, Sean M.; McNicholas, Thomas P.; Iverson, Nicole M.; Boghossian, Ardemis A.; Reuel, Nigel F.; Hilmer, Andrew J.; Sen, Fatih; Brew, Jacqueline A.; Strano, Michael S.

    2014-04-01

    The interface between plant organelles and non-biological nanostructures has the potential to impart organelles with new and enhanced functions. Here, we show that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) passively transport and irreversibly localize within the lipid envelope of extracted plant chloroplasts, promote over three times higher photosynthetic activity than that of controls, and enhance maximum electron transport rates. The SWNT-chloroplast assemblies also enable higher rates of leaf electron transport in vivo through a mechanism consistent with augmented photoabsorption. Concentrations of reactive oxygen species inside extracted chloroplasts are significantly suppressed by delivering poly(acrylic acid)-nanoceria or SWNT-nanoceria complexes. Moreover, we show that SWNTs enable near-infrared fluorescence monitoring of nitric oxide both ex vivo and in vivo, thus demonstrating that a plant can be augmented to function as a photonic chemical sensor. Nanobionics engineering of plant function may contribute to the development of biomimetic materials for light-harvesting and biochemical detection with regenerative properties and enhanced efficiency.

  1. Multiple sulfatase deficiency: clinical, neuropathological, ultrastructural and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Guerra, W F; Verity, M A; Fluharty, A L; Nguyen, H T; Philippart, M

    1990-07-01

    We describe the clinical, pathological, ultrastructural and biochemical features in the case of a 15-year-old boy with multiple sulfatase deficiency. Clinical abnormalities included hypotonia, retarded psychomotor development, hepatosplenomegaly, pigmentary degeneration of the retina, myoclonic seizures, aortic insufficiency and quadriplegia. Urinalysis revealed increased heparan sulfate. At necropsy, aortic and mitral valves revealed nodular thickening and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive, metachromatic granules in renal proximal tubules. The brain weighed 400 g and demonstrated cerebral and cerebellar atrophy with a retrocerebellar meningeal cyst. Cortical neurons contained periodic acid-Schiff-positive and cresyl violet-reactive granules. White matter demonstrated brown metachromasia and intense fibrillary gliosis. Conjunctival fibroblasts contained amorphous vacuoles with dense osmiophilic nucleoid cores. Pleomorphic extracellular, intraneural and intraglial inclusions were noted in the brain. Activities of arylsulfatase A, B and C were diminished markedly in autopsied tissue from brain, liver, and kidney (0, 0 and less than 10% of control activities, respectively). Partial deficiencies of iduronate sulfatase and heparan sulfatase were noted in different tissues. Variable decreased enzyme activities were expressed in leukocytes: arylsulfatase A, less than 33%; B, 40%; and C, 90%; heparan sulfatase, 2%; and iduronate sulfatase was not detectable. Near normal activities were found in cultured fibroblasts.

  2. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  3. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  4. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  5. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  6. 40 CFR 158.2080 - Experimental use permit data requirements-biochemical pesticides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements-biochemical pesticides. 158.2080 Section 158.2080 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2080 Experimental use permit data requirements—biochemical pesticides. (a) Sections...

  7. Discerning the biochemical stability of pyrogenic C in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Rosa, José M.; Paneque, Marina; Contreras-Bernal, Lidia; Miller, Ana Z.; Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    The soil organic matter (SOM) constitutes approximately 2/3 of the global terrestrial C pool, which corresponds to estimated 4000 Pg to a depth of 3 m [1] and therefore, the dynamics of organic carbon (OC) in soils control a large part of the terrestrial C cycle. The term Pyrogenic Carbon (PyC) comprises the whole range of pyrogenic organic materials, from partly charred material through charcoal to soot produced during fire, as well as technical chars (biochars) produced by pyrolysis of biomass. The previously common assumption of PyC being inert has long been proven wrong [2]. In theory, the pyrogenic process confers these materials a longer mean residence time in the soils than their precursors, thus the application of PyC in general and particularly biochar to soil is proposed as a valid approach to establish a significant, long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide in terrestrial ecosystems [3]. Nevertheless, the knowledge concerning the biochemical recalcitrance of PyOM in soils is still limited. This study combines the analysis by 13C solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (13C NMR), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) and CO2 emissions in incubated pots of burned and unburned soils as well as in biochar amended and un-amended soils. By using this integrated approach we achieved a more complete understanding of the stability of different forms of PyC in the soil and the chemical changes occurring during aging. Significant differences are found between the stability of PyC. They depend on the nature of the source material, surficial properties of PyC, the pyrolysis process and the soil conditions during aging. Acknowledgements: The Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions (PCIG12-GA-2012-333784-Biocharisma project and PIEF-GA-2012-328689-DECAVE project), and the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (MINECO) (project PCGL2012-37041) are thanked for the financial support of the present study

  8. The effect of metal ions on Staphylococcus aureus revealed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analyses.

    PubMed

    Chudobova, Dagmar; Dostalova, Simona; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Guran, Roman; Rodrigo, Miguel Angel Merlos; Tmejova, Katerina; Krizkova, Sona; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we focused on the effect of heavy metal ions in resistant strains of gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus using biochemical methods and mass spectrometry. Five nitrate solutions of heavy metals (Ag(+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and Pb(2+)) were used to create S. aureus resistant strains. Biochemical changes of resistant strains in comparison with the non-resistant control strain of S. aureus were observed by microbiological (measuring - growth curves and inhibition zones) and spectrophotometric methods (antioxidant activity and alaninaminotransferase, aspartateaminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyltransferase activities). Mass spectrometry was employed for the qualitative analysis of the samples (changes in S. aureus protein composition) and for the identification of the strains database MALDI Biotyper was employed. Alterations, in terms of biochemical properties and protein composition, were observed in resistant strains compared to non-resistant control strain. Our results describe the possible option for the analysis of S. aureus resistant strains and may thus serve as a support for monitoring of changes in genetic information caused by the forming of resistance to heavy metals.

  9. Biochemical investigation of cypermethrin toxicity in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Dahamna, S; Harzallah, D; Guemache, A; Sekfali, N

    2009-01-01

    cypermethrin on the erythropoiesis. An increase of plasma enzyme activities in GOT, GPT and CPK were recorded, explain a high energy-generating product. An increase, in the plasma enzyme activity in Alkaline phosphatase, related to their role in the cell permeability. The histopathological results showed lesions and morphological changes of hepato-cellular, fibrosis and appearance of inflammatory infiltrate, confirmed disturbances of the biochemical parameters. These changes were much underlines during the animal toxicity.

  10. Reduction, integration and emergence in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Jacques

    2004-12-01

    Most studies of molecular cell biology are based upon a process of decomposition of complex biological systems into their components, followed by the study of these components. The aim of the present paper is to discuss, on a physical basis, the internal logic of this process of reduction. The analysis is performed on simple biological systems, namely protein and metabolic networks. A multi-sited protein that binds two ligands x and y can be considered the simplest possible biochemical network. The organization of this network can be described through a comparison of three systems, i.e. XY, X and Y. X and Y are component sub-systems that collect states x(i) and y(j), respectively, i.e. protein states that have bound either i molecules of x (whether or not these states have also bound y), or j molecules of y (whether or not these states have bound x). XY is a system made up of the specific association of X and Y that collects states x(i)y(j). One can define mean self-informations per node of the network, , and . Reduction of the system XY into its components is possible if, and only if, ,is equal to the sum of and . If is smaller than the sum of and , the system is integrated, for it has less self-information than the set of its components X and Y. It can also occur that , be larger than the sum of and . Hence, the system XY displays negative integration and emergence of self-information relative to its components X and Y. Such a system is defined as complex. Positive or negative integration of the system implies it cannot be reduced to its components. The degree of integration can be measured by a function , called mutual information of integration. In the case of enzyme networks, emergence of self-information is associated with emergence of catalytic activity. Moreover, if the enzyme reaction is part of a metabolic sequence, its mutual information of integration can be

  11. [Signal transduction in plant development: Chemical and biochemical approaches to receptor identification]. Progress report, [May 15, 1993--May 14, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Progress is reported on studies concerning NAD(P)H-2,6-DMBQ oxidoreductase of Striga asiatica aimed at elucidating basic biochemical parameters of Striga. Reported studies include characterization of the enzyme, development of Striga molecular genetics, and development of a redox model for germination control.

  12. Biochemical observation during 28 days of space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Kambaut, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    With the completion of the 28-day flight of Skylab 2, the sum of biochemical data on human reaction to the weightless environment was significantly extended both quantitatively and qualitatively. The biochemical studies were divided into two broad categories. One group included the more routine blood studies similar to those used in everyday medical practice. The second category encompassed those analyses used to investigate more thoroughly the endocrinological and fluid changes first seen in the crewmembers following the Gemini, Apollo, and Soviet missions. Significant biochemical changes were observed that varied in magnitude and direction, but all disappeared shortly after return to earth. Most of changes indicate successful adaptation by the body to the combined stresses of weightlessness. Results of the biochemical observation are presented in the form of data tables and graphs.

  13. Aquatic ecological biochemical investigations in the Lake Baikal region

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeeva, S.S.; Kozhova, O.M.

    1986-07-01

    The authors maintain that at the current level of investigations a constructive solution of the problem of protecting aquatic ecosystems is possible only on the basis of a thorough study of biochemical mechanisms of the interaction of biota and pollutants. They believe that in the program of investigations in the Baikal region, with consideration of the easy vulnerability of the aquatic ecosystems, ecological biochemical investigations should occupy one of the leading places. The authors suggest a method for the screening of xenobiotics, consisting of xenobiotics; chemical investigations; biochemical investigations of the properties of xenobiotics, and toxicological investigations of xenobiotics. The differences in the elimination of xenobiotics are considerable due to the species and biochemical characteristics of hydrophytes and chemical structure of the investigated toxicants. The results obtained in experiments with cyanide compounds are of considerable interest, since cyanides, the strongest poisons of animals, prove to be little toxic for higher aquatic plants and algae.

  14. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Biochemical Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzullo, Leslie

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Biochemical Conversion Platform Review meeting.

  15. A view of the history of biochemical engineering.

    PubMed

    Katzen, R; Tsao, G T

    2000-01-01

    The authors present a view of biochemical engineering by describing their personal interests and experience over the years involving mostly conversion of lignocellulosics into fuels and chemicals and the associated engineering subjects.

  16. Optical chemical and biochemical sensors: new trends (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, F.; Giannetti, A.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical and biochemical sensing is under the extensive research all over the world and many chemical and biochemical sensors are finding increasing number of applications in industry, environmental monitoring, medicine, biomedicine and chemical analysis. This is evidenced by each-year-growing number of international scientific conferences, in which advances in the field of the sensors are reported. One of the main reason why only a few sensors reach the international market, notwithstanding the high number of laboratory prototype described in many peer reviewed papers, lies in the fact that a biochemical sensor is a highly interdisciplinary "object" the realization of which requires the team work of scientists coming from different areas such as chemistry, physics, optoelectronics, engineering, biochemistry, and medicine. And this peculiarity is not easily found in the research teams. In the present paper, the fundamental bases of chemical and biochemical optical sensing are summarised and the new trends are described.

  17. Physiological and biochemical response to high temperature stress in Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L. Moench)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamanesh, Shahnoosh; Keitel, Claudia; Ahmad, Nabil; Trethowan, Richard

    2016-04-01

    High temperature has been shown to lower the growth and yield of Okra, an important summer vegetable crop grown in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Australia. We aimed to characterise the physiological and biochemical response of Okra to heat stress. 150 genotypes from Pakistan and the AVRDC (The World Vegetable Centre) were screened for their physiological response (fluorescence, electrolyte leakage and yield) to heat in a greenhouse. Four genotypes (including heat tolerant and sensitive) were selected and subsequently grown in control and hot greenhouses. Daytime temperatures were on average 10°C warmer in the hot greenhouse, whereas nighttime temperatures were similar between the two temperature treatments. During a 12 week period, the physiological (assimilation rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, fluorescence, electrolyte leakage, water potential) and biochemical (carbohydrates, sugar alcohols, C content) response of the four genotypes to heat stress was assessed. The effect of heat stress on the C allocation patterns and yield in Okra will be discussed.

  18. Laetrile: A Study of Its Physicochemical and Biochemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Leo; French, W. N.; Bickis, I. J.; Henderson, I. W. D.

    1965-01-01

    A study was made of the composition and biochemical behaviour of the drug, Laetrile, distributed for clinical trial in the United States and Canada. It was established that the Canadian and the American product are different pharmaceutical formulations, displaying different physicochemical and biochemical properties. The investigation demonstrated, furthermore, that neither preparation can be considered as a palliative in cancer therapy on the basis of the biological rationale advanced by their manufacturers. ImagesFig. 3 PMID:14281087

  19. Silymarin improves the behavioural, biochemical and histoarchitecture alterations in focal ischemic rats: a comparative evaluation with piracetam and protocatachuic acid.

    PubMed

    Muley, Milind M; Thakare, Vishnu N; Patil, Rajesh R; Kshirsagar, Ajay D; Naik, Suresh R

    2012-08-01

    Comparative neuroprotective potential of silymarin, piracetam and protocatechuic acid ethyl ester (PCA) was evaluated in focal ischemic rats. Various pharmacological, biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, catalase, nitrite content, brain water content) and behavioural (memory impairment, motor control, neurological score) including infarct size and histopathological alterations were evaluated. Silymarin (200mg/kg) and PCA treatment significantly improved behavioural, biochemical and histopathological changes, and reduced water content and infarct size. However, piracetam only improved behavioural and histopathological changes, reduced water content and infarct size. The findings indicate that silymarin exhibits neuroprotective activity better than PCA and piracetam in focal ischemia/reperfusion reflected by its better restoration of behavioural and antioxidant profile.

  20. Physiological and biochemical changes after boldenone injection in adult rabbits.

    PubMed

    Tousson, Ehab; El-Moghazy, Mostafa; Massoud, Ahmed; El-Atrash, Afaf; Sweef, Osama; Akel, Amani

    2016-01-01

    Boldenone (BOL) is an androgenic steroid that improves the growth and food conversion in food-producing animals. In most countries worldwide, this anabolic steroid is forbidden for human uses and meat production as it was developed for veterinary use. Recently, BOL is used by bodybuilders in both off season and pre-contest, where it is well known for increasing vascularity while preparing for a bodybuilding contest. The present study was designed to investigate the physiological and biochemical changes in rabbits after injection with the growth promoter BOL. A total of 32 adult New Zealand rabbits were divided into four groups, where the control group includes animals that were injected intramuscularly with olive oil and dissected after 3 weeks. The remaining three experimental groups included animals that received one, two and three intramuscular injections of 5 mg/kg body weight BOL, respectively, and were dissected after 3, 6 and 9 weeks, respectively. The animals from practice appeared healthy and did not show clinical signs of disease and none of the rabbits died during the experimental period. Serum total protein, globulin, alanine aminotransferase, asparate aminotransferase, urea, creatinine, testosterone, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone levels were significantly increased while serum direct bilirubin, albumin and albumin/globulin ratio were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) after one, two and three intramuscular injections of BOL as compared to their relative values in the control group. These findings explain the common phenomena in athletes and bodybuilders who suffer from infertility, renal and hepatic alterations following injection with some drugs as steroids (BOL) to build muscles.

  1. Energy-based analysis of biochemical cycles using bond graphs.

    PubMed

    Gawthrop, Peter J; Crampin, Edmund J

    2014-11-08

    Thermodynamic aspects of chemical reactions have a long history in the physical chemistry literature. In particular, biochemical cycles require a source of energy to function. However, although fundamental, the role of chemical potential and Gibb's free energy in the analysis of biochemical systems is often overlooked leading to models which are physically impossible. The bond graph approach was developed for modelling engineering systems, where energy generation, storage and transmission are fundamental. The method focuses on how power flows between components and how energy is stored, transmitted or dissipated within components. Based on the early ideas of network thermodynamics, we have applied this approach to biochemical systems to generate models which automatically obey the laws of thermodynamics. We illustrate the method with examples of biochemical cycles. We have found that thermodynamically compliant models of simple biochemical cycles can easily be developed using this approach. In particular, both stoichiometric information and simulation models can be developed directly from the bond graph. Furthermore, model reduction and approximation while retaining structural and thermodynamic properties is facilitated. Because the bond graph approach is also modular and scaleable, we believe that it provides a secure foundation for building thermodynamically compliant models of large biochemical networks.

  2. Energy-based analysis of biochemical cycles using bond graphs

    PubMed Central

    Gawthrop, Peter J.; Crampin, Edmund J.

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic aspects of chemical reactions have a long history in the physical chemistry literature. In particular, biochemical cycles require a source of energy to function. However, although fundamental, the role of chemical potential and Gibb's free energy in the analysis of biochemical systems is often overlooked leading to models which are physically impossible. The bond graph approach was developed for modelling engineering systems, where energy generation, storage and transmission are fundamental. The method focuses on how power flows between components and how energy is stored, transmitted or dissipated within components. Based on the early ideas of network thermodynamics, we have applied this approach to biochemical systems to generate models which automatically obey the laws of thermodynamics. We illustrate the method with examples of biochemical cycles. We have found that thermodynamically compliant models of simple biochemical cycles can easily be developed using this approach. In particular, both stoichiometric information and simulation models can be developed directly from the bond graph. Furthermore, model reduction and approximation while retaining structural and thermodynamic properties is facilitated. Because the bond graph approach is also modular and scaleable, we believe that it provides a secure foundation for building thermodynamically compliant models of large biochemical networks. PMID:25383030

  3. [Fifty years of cooperation--FEBS and Polish Biochemical Society].

    PubMed

    Barańska, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    This year, the Federation of European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) celebrates its 50th anniversary. The Polish Biochemical Society, represented by the Society's President, Kazimierz Zakrzewski, was a founding member of the organization. The text presents a history of collaboration between FEBS and Polish Biochemical Society, the participation of Polish Biochemical Society members in different FEBS activities, as well as the role they played in running the Federation. Author describes FEBS Congresses which taken place in Warsaw, the first 3rd FEBS Meeting in 1966 and then 29th Congress in 2004. The profiles of Jakub Karol Parnas, the founding father of the Polish biochemistry and some crucial Presidents of the Society, are also presented. The text describes Parnas Conferences, organized jointly by Polish and Ukrainian Biochemical Societies from 1996, and growing from 2011 into three-nation event with participation of Ukrainian, Israeli and Polish scientists, largely due to significant help from FEBS. Summarizing the last few years, author judge the cooperation between the Federation and the Polish Biochemical Society as optimal.

  4. Effect of fire smoke on some biochemical parameters in firefighters of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Rezq, Ameen M; Al-Saedy, Mohamed H

    2008-01-01

    Background Firefighters who are facing fires, are frequently exposed to hazardous materials including carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen chloride, benzene, sulphur dioxide, etc. This study aimed to evaluate some relevant serum biochemical and blood hematological changes in activity involved firefighters in comparison to normal subjects. Subjects and Methods Two groups of male firefighters volunteered to participate in the study. The first included 28 firefighters from Jeddah, while the second included 21 firefighters from Yanbu, with overall age ranged 20–48 years. An additional group of 23 male non-firefighters volunteered from both cities as normal control subjects, of age range 20–43 years. Blood samples were collected from all volunteer subjects and investigated for some relevant serum biochemical and blood hematological changes. Results The results obtained showed that, there were statistically significant differences in liver function, kidney function, serum lipid profile, cortisol, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, iron and its biologically active derivatives, and blood picture in firefighters as compared with the normal control group. These results indicate that, fire smoke mainly affects serum biochemical and blood hematological parameters. Such results might point out to the need for more health protective and prophylactic measures to avoid such hazardous health effects that might endanger firefighters under their highly drastic working conditions. Conclusion Besides using of personal protective equipments for firefighters to protect them against exposure to toxic materials of fire smoke, it is recommended that, firefighters must be under continuous medical follow up through a standard timetabled medical laboratory investigations to allow for early detection of any serum biochemical or blood hematological changes that might happen during their active service life and to allow for early treatment whenever necessary. PMID:19077241

  5. Functional Motifs in Biochemical Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Novák, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The signal-response characteristics of a living cell are determined by complex networks of interacting genes, proteins, and metabolites. Understanding how cells respond to specific challenges, how these responses are contravened in diseased cells, and how to intervene pharmacologically in the decision-making processes of cells requires an accurate theory of the information-processing capabilities of macromolecular regulatory networks. Adopting an engineer’s approach to control systems, we ask whether realistic cellular control networks can be decomposed into simple regulatory motifs that carry out specific functions in a cell. We show that such functional motifs exist and review the experimental evidence that they control cellular responses as expected. PMID:20055671

  6. Biochemical evidence of anxiety in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, H D; Roscoe, B; Vickers, M D

    1972-10-07

    Urinary metabolites before dental treatment were compared in a group of patients with dental phobia and in a matched control group. Plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, and free fatty acids were estimated before treatment, immediately after sedation with diazapam 0.2 mg/kg body weight in the phobic patients, during induction of oral anaesthesia, and during and after surgery. Patients with dental phobia had significantly higher levels of adrenaline, which were only temporarily lowered by sedation, and which during treatment remained consistently higher than those of control patients.

  7. Biochemical Evidence of Anxiety in Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, H. D.; Roscoe, B.; Vickers, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    Urinary metabolites before dental treatment were compared in a group of patients with dental phobia and in a matched control group. Plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, and free fatty acids were estimated before treatment, immediately after sedation with diazapam 0·2 mg/kg body weight in the phobic patients, during induction of oral anaesthesia, and during and after surgery. Patients with dental phobia had significantly higher levels of adrenaline, which were only temporarily lowered by sedation, and which during treatment remained consistently higher than those of control patients. PMID:5078436

  8. Youth Offender Care Needs Assessment Tool (YO-CNAT): an actuarial risk assessment tool for predicting problematic child-rearing situations in juvenile offenders on the basis of police records.

    PubMed

    van der Put, Claudia E; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2013-12-01

    In the juvenile justice system, much attention is paid to estimating the risk for recidivism among juvenile offenders. However, it is also important to estimate the risk for problematic child-rearing situations (care needs) in juvenile offenders, because these problems are not always related to recidivism. In the present study, an actuarial care needs assessment tool for juvenile offenders, the Youth Offender Care Needs Assessment Tool (YO-CNAT), was developed to predict the probability of (a) a future supervision order imposed by the child welfare agency, (b) a future entitlement to care indicated by the youth care agency, and (c) future incidents involving child abuse, domestic violence, and/or sexual norm trespassing behavior at the juvenile's address. The YO-CNAT has been developed for use by the police and is based solely on information available in police registration systems. It is designed to assist a police officer without clinical expertise in making a quick assessment of the risk for problematic child-rearing situations. The YO-CNAT was developed on a sample of 1,955 juvenile offenders and was validated on another sample of 2,045 juvenile offenders. The predictive validity (area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve) scores ranged between .70 (for predicting future entitlement to care) and .75 (for predicting future worrisome incidents at the juvenile's address); therefore, the predictive accuracy of the test scores of the YO-CNAT was sufficient to justify its use as a screening instrument for the police in deciding to refer a juvenile offender to the youth care agency for further assessment into care needs.

  9. Effects of Salvadora persica Extract on the Hematological and Biochemical Alterations against Immobilization-Induced Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Kholoud S.; Alshamrani, Salha A.

    2015-01-01

    A total of 24 rats were divided into 4 groups: control, stress, extract alone, and stress + extract (n = 6 each), for total 21 days of treatment. The immobilization stress was induced in rats by putting them in 20 cm × 7 cm plastic tubes for 2 h/day for 21 days. Rats were postorally treated with Salvadora persica at a dose of 900 mg/kg body weight via intragastric intubations. At the end of the test period, hematological and biochemical parameters were determined in blood and serum samples with determination of vital organs weights. The vital organ weights were not significantly affected in stressed rats as compared to control rats. Compared to the control group, the stress treated group showed significances in several hematological parameters, including decreases in WBC, RBC, and PLT counts. Furthermore, in comparison to the control group, the stress group showed significantly increased blood glucose, serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triacylglycerols levels and decreased HDL-cholesterol level. The hematological and biochemical parameters in the stress + extract treated group were approximately similar to control group. The SP extract restored the changes observed following stress treatment. PMID:26221565

  10. Biochemical alterations induced by oral subchronic exposure to fipronil, fluoride and their combination in buffalo calves.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kamalpreet Kaur; Dumka, Vinod Kumar

    2013-11-01

    The effects of various pesticides and minerals on biochemical parameters have been explored in different species, but hardly any data exist regarding the combined toxicological effect of pesticides and minerals on these parameters in animals. The present study investigated the effects of fipronil and fluoride co-exposure on biochemical parameters in buffalo calves. Twenty-four healthy male buffalo calves divided into four groups were treated for 98 consecutive days. Group I, receiving no treatment served as the control. Animals of groups II and III were orally administered with fipronil @ 0.5mg/kg/day and sodium fluoride (NaF) @ 6.67 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 98 days. An additional group IV was co-administered fipronil and NaF at the same dosages as groups II and III. Administration of fipronil alone produced mild toxic signs, significant elevation in plasma proteins, blood glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and significant decline in the plasma cholesterol levels. NaF exposure produced toxic signs specifically of muscle weakness and brown and black discoloration of teeth. Significant elevation was seen in whole blood cholinesterase, BUN and creatinine levels. However, it produced significant decline in blood glucose, cholesterol and plasma protein levels. Combined exposure to fipronil and sodium fluoride produced toxic signs with greater intensity while biochemical alterations produced were similar to those that were produced by their individual exposures.

  11. Biochemical and histopathological responses of the Swiss albino mice treated with uranyl nitrate and its recovery.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha Vijayan, P; Rekha, P D; Dinesh, U; Arun, A B

    2016-06-01

    Uranium is a radioactive heavy metal ubiquitous in the natural environment. In its chemical form, it is known to induce nephrotoxicity both in human and in animals. Its toxicity is dose and time dependent, also varies with form of uranium. In the present study, we assessed the nephrotoxicity induced by a single dose of uranyl nitrate (UN) in mice at different time intervals and recovery from its toxicity. Two doses of 2 and 4 mg/kg body weight of uranyl nitrate was injected intraperitoneally and animals were sacrificed after 1, 3, 5, 14, and 28 d of administration. Histopathological and biochemical alterations of post-UN dosing in comparison to control were evaluated. Tubular damage to about 75% was observed after 3 d (4 mg/kg) and the biochemical parameters such as serum creatinine, urea, and blood urea nitrogen levels were also significantly increased. Progression of tubular damage was not found after 5 d. Dose-dependent recovery of uranyl nitrate-treated animals was observed after 14 and 28 d of dosing. The concentration of uranium retained in kidney correlates with biochemical and histopathological analysis.

  12. Tomato lycopene attenuates myocardial infarction induced by isoproterenol: Electrocardiographic, biochemical and anti-apoptotic study

    PubMed Central

    Aman, Upaganlawar; Vaibhav, Patel; Balaraman, R

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the protective effects of lycopene on electrocardiographic, hemodynamic, biochemical and apoptotic changes in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction. Methods Myocardial infarction was induced in rats by subcutaneous injection of isoproterenol (200 mg/kg) for two consecutive days at an interval of 24 h. Rats were treated with lycopene (10 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for a period of 30 days and isoproterenol (ISO) was injected on the 29th and 30th day. At the end of experiment i.e. on the 31st day electrocardiographic, hemodynamic, biochemical and apoptotic changes were monitored from control and experimental groups. Results ISO injected rats showed a significant alteration in electrocardiograph pattern and hemodynamic changes (i.e. systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure). It also showed significant increase in C-reactive protein, myeloperoxidase, nitrite levels and Caspase-3 protease activity. In addition, it also exhibited alteration in the levels of electrolytes (Na+, K+ and Ca2+), vitamin E, uric acid and serum protein. Gel electrophoresis of ISO injected rats showed increase in DNA fragmentation. Triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining of the heart section shows increase area of infarction in ISO injected rats. Pre-co-treatment with lycopene significantly prevented the ISO induced alteration in ECG, haemodynamic, biochemical and apoptotic changes. Conclusions The present result shows that treatment of lycopene in ISO injected rats significantly attenuates induced myocardial infarction. PMID:23569928

  13. Recent Advances on the Use of Biochemical Extracts as Filaricidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abd, Nazeh M.; Nor, Zurainee Mohamed; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H.; Suhaimi, Anwar; Sivanandam, S.

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a parasitic infection that causes a devastating public health and socioeconomic burden with an estimated infection of over 120 million individuals worldwide. The infection is caused by three closely related nematode parasites, namely, Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and B. timori, which are transmitted to human through mosquitoes of Anopheles, Culex, and Aedes genera. The species have many ecological variants and are diversified in terms of their genetic fingerprint. The rapid spread of the disease and the genetic diversification cause the lymphatic filarial parasites to respond differently to diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. This in turn prompts the current challenge encountered in its management. Furthermore, most of the chemical medications used are characterized by adverse side effects. These complications urgently warrant intense prospecting on bio-chemicals that have potent efficacy against either the filarial worms or thier vector. In lieu of this, we presented a review on recent literature that reported the efficacy of filaricidal biochemicals and those employed as vector control agents. In addition, methods used for biochemical extraction, screening procedures, and structure of the bioactive compounds were also presented. PMID:24298292

  14. The significance of routine biochemical markers in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Peng, You-Fan; Xiang, Yang; Wei, Ye-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study is to examine the levels of routine biochemical markers in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and combine multiple biochemical parameters to assess the discriminative power for patients with MDD. We used the Hamilton Depression (HAMD) score to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms in 228 patients with MDD. The phase of depression severity was between moderate and severe in MDD patients. There were significant differences between MDD patients and healthy controls in alanine transaminase (ALT), urea nitrogen (UN), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), uric acid (UA), total protein (TP), total bile acid (TBA), creatinine (Cr), total bilirubin (Tbil), direct bilirubin (Dbil) and indirect bilirubin (Ibil), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), fasting blood-glucose (FBG) and fructosamine (SF). Multivariate analysis showed that UN, FBG, HDL-C, SF, TP, Cr and Tbil remained independently association with MDD. Further, a logit equation was established to identify patients with MDD. The composite markers exhibited an area under the curve of 0.810 with cut-off values of 0.410. Our results suggest the associations between UN, FBG, HDL-C, TP, Cr, Tbil, SF and MDD, use of these routine biochemical markers in combination may contribute to improve the complete management for patients with MDD. PMID:27683078

  15. Structural and biochemical characterization of engineered tissue using FTIR spectroscopic imaging: melanoma progression as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, Rohit; Kong, Rong

    2008-02-01

    Engineered tissue represents a convenient path to providing models for imaging and disease progression. The use of these models or phantoms is becoming increasingly prevalent. While structural characterization of these systems is well-documented, a combination of biochemical and structural knowledge is often helpful. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging is a rapidly emerging technique that combines the molecular selectivity of spectroscopy with the spatial specificity of optical microscopy. Here, we report on the application of FTIR spectroscopic for analysis of a melanoma model in engineered skin. We first characterize the biochemical properties, consistency and spectral changes in different layers of growing skin. Results provide simple indices for monitoring tissue consistency and reproducibility as a function of time. Second, we introduce malignant melanocytes to simulate tumor formation and growth. Both cellular changes associated with tumor formation and growth can be observed. FTIR images indicate holistic chemical changes during the tumor growth, allowing for the development of automated pathology protocols. FTIR imaging being non-destructive, further, samples remain entirely compatible with downstream tissue processing or staining. We specifically examined the correlation of structural changes, molecular content and reproducibility of the model systems. The development of analysis, integrating spectroscopy, imaging and computation will allow for quality control and standardization of both the structural and biochemical properties of tissue phantoms.

  16. Hematological and biochemical profiles and histopathological evaluation of experimental intoxication by sodium fluoroacetate in cats.

    PubMed

    Collicchio-Zuanaze, R C; Sakate, M; Langrafe, L; Takahira, R K; Burini, C

    2010-11-01

    Sodium fluoroacetate (SFAC) is a potent rodenticide, largely used for rodent and domestic pest control. The toxic effects of SFAC are caused by fluoroacetate, a toxic metabolite, whose toxic action blocks the Krebs cycle and also induces the accumulation of citrate in the body, which is a serum calcium chelator. The most common clinical signs of this intoxication are the cardiac and neurological effects. However, the hematological, biochemical and histopathological findings occurring in intoxication are still unknown in different species. In the present study, 16 domestic cats were experimentally intoxicated with oral doses of fluoroacetate (0.45 mg/kg). The hematological and biochemical profiles and histopathological findings were made to look for auxiliary diagnosis methods in SFAC intoxications. The hematological profile showed transitory leucopenia and thrombocytopenia; in the biochemical profiles were detected hyperglycemia, increase of creatinequinase enzyme (CK) and creatinequinase cardiac isoenzyme (CK-MB), hypokalemia and hypophosfatemia. In the macroscopic and histopathological findings were observed lesions characteristic of degenerative and ischemic processes in heart, kidneys, liver, brain and lungs. These changes may be auxiliary to the diagnosis of intoxication by SFAC in cats, when associated with clinical signs described for the species. Thus, the complete blood count with platelet count, serum glucose, enzymes CK and CK-MB isoenzyme, as well as the electrolytes potassium and phosphorus, can facilitate the laboratory diagnosis during intoxication by SFAC, associated with the pathological findings in the case of death of the intoxicated animal.

  17. Hormonal and biochemical responses to transcendental meditation.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, R.; Joffe, B. I.; Lamprey, J. M.; Botha, A.; Shires, R.; Baker, S. G.; Seftel, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to assess whether transcendental meditation (TM) could influence various endocrine responses in 10 experienced male meditators. Nine matched subjects, uninformed of the TM procedure, acted as controls. Meditators successfully practised their technique for 40 min in the morning while controls relaxed for this period. No significant differences emerged between these 2 groups with respect to carbohydrate metabolism (plasma glucose, insulin and pancreatic glucagon concentrations), pituitary hormones (growth hormone and prolactin) or the 'stress' hormones, cortisol and total catecholamines-although meditators tended to have higher mean catecholamine levels. Plasma free fatty acids were significantly elevated in meditators 40 min after completing the period of TM. No clear evidence was thus obtained that any of the stress, or stress-related, hormones were suppressed during or after meditation in the particular setting examined. PMID:3895206

  18. The biochemical aftermath of anti-amyloid immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Active and passive immunotherapy in both amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients have resulted in remarkable reductions in amyloid plaque accumulation, although the degree of amyloid regression has been highly variable. Nine individuals with a clinical diagnosis of AD dementia were actively immunized with the Aβ peptide 1-42 (AN-1792) and subjected to detailed postmortem biochemical analyses. These patients were compared to 6 non-immunized AD cases and 5 non-demented control (NDC) cases. Results All patients were assessed for the presence of AD pathology including amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and vascular amyloidosis. This effort revealed that two immunotherapy recipients had dementia as a consequence of diseases other than AD. Direct neuropathological examination consistently demonstrated small to extensive areas in which amyloid plaques apparently were disrupted. Characterization of Aβ species remnants by ELISA suggested that total Aβ levels may have been reduced, although because the amounts of Aβ peptides among treated individuals were extremely variable, those data must be regarded as tentative. Chromatographic analysis and Western blots revealed abundant dimeric Aβ peptides. SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry demonstrated a substantive number of Aβ-related peptides, some of them with elongated C-terminal sequences. Pro-inflammatory TNF-α levels were significantly increased in the gray matter of immunized AD cases compared to the NDC and non-immunized AD groups. Conclusions Immunotherapy responses were characterized by extreme variability. Considering the broad range of biological variation that characterizes aging and complicates the recognition of reliable AD biomarkers, such disparities will make the interpretation of outcomes derived from epidemiologic and therapeutic investigations challenging. Although in some cases the apparent removal of amyloid plaques by AN-1792 was impressive

  19. Conditions for duality between fluxes and concentrations in biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ronan M T; Vlassis, Nikos; Thiele, Ines; Saunders, Michael A

    2016-11-21

    Mathematical and computational modelling of biochemical networks is often done in terms of either the concentrations of molecular species or the fluxes of biochemical reactions. When is mathematical modelling from either perspective equivalent to the other? Mathematical duality translates concepts, theorems or mathematical structures into other concepts, theorems or structures, in a one-to-one manner. We present a novel stoichiometric condition that is necessary and sufficient for duality between unidirectional fluxes and concentrations. Our numerical experiments, with computational models derived from a range of genome-scale biochemical networks, suggest that this flux-concentration duality is a pervasive property of biochemical networks. We also provide a combinatorial characterisation that is sufficient to ensure flux-concentration duality.The condition prescribes that, for every two disjoint sets of molecular species, there is at least one reaction complex that involves species from only one of the two sets. When unidirectional fluxes and molecular species concentrations are dual vectors, this implies that the behaviour of the corresponding biochemical network can be described entirely in terms of either concentrations or unidirectional fluxes.

  20. Biochemical diagnosis in 3040 kidney stone formers in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Spivacow, Francisco Rodolfo; del Valle, Elisa Elena; Negri, Armando Luis; Fradinger, Erich; Abib, Anabella; Rey, Paula

    2015-08-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a frequent condition in urology that has an important recurrence and high impact in health economy. Knowing the biochemical abnormalities implicated in its pathogenesis is mandatory to establish therapeutic aims. Our objectives are to present the results in 3040 kidney stone formers in Argentina. All patients were selected after completing an ambulatory metabolic protocol with diagnostic purposes. There were 1717 men, (56.48%), with a mean age of 45±12 years, and 1323 women, (43.52%), mean age 44±12 years. 2781 patients had biochemical abnormalities, (91.49%), and were arbitrarily divided in two groups: those who had only one (single) biochemical abnormality (n=2156) and those who had associated abnormalities (n=625). No biochemical abnormalities were found in 259 patients (8.51%). The abnormalities present, single and associated, in order of frequency, were idiopathic hypercalciuria, (56.88%), hyperuricosuria (21.08%), unduly acidic urine (10.95%), hypocitraturia (10.55%), hypomagnesuria (7.9%), primary hyperparathyroidism (3.01%), hyperoxaluria (2.6%), and cystinuria (0.32%). We performed in 484 patient's stone composition and found calcium oxalate stones related to idiopathic hypercalciuria predominantly while uric acid stones to unduly acidic urine. In conclusion, the biochemical abnormalities described are similar to those found in a previous series of our own and to those reported in the literature. Its diagnosis is important to therapeutic purposes to avoid eventual recurrence.

  1. Added ingredients affect the microbiota and biochemical characteristics of durum wheat type-I sourdough.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Fabio; Celano, Giuseppe; Lattanzi, Anna; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed at understanding the effect of additional ingredients (baker's yeast, macerated pears, grape must, honey, or water from macerated pears) on the microbiota and biochemical characteristics of durum wheat-based sourdough. One dough prepared using only flour was used as the control (control-dough). Compared to the control-dough, doughs containing additional ingredients showed higher (P < 0.05) cell numbers of lactic acid bacteria after the first fermentation. Constant pH of ca. 4.0 was found after two (macerated pears or water pears-doughs) to seven (control-dough) back-slopping steps. The use of additional ingredients caused lower microbial diversity, after the first fermentation and in mature sourdoughs. Regardless of the type of ingredient used, OTU belonging to the genus Lactobacillus represented more than 95% of the total Firmicutes in mature sourdoughs. Some metabolic capacities of microbial community of the mature sourdoughs were linked to the additional ingredient. Based on culture-dependent method, Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae dominated in all the sourdoughs. However, the sourdoughs showed different strains of these two species. Other lactic acid bacterium species were associated to baker's yeast, grape must and macerated pears. The different microbial composition was correlated (r > 0.7, P < 0.05) with several biochemical characteristics of the sourdoughs (e.g., free amino acids and their derivatives).

  2. Hemato-biochemical responses to packing in donkeys administered ascorbic acid during the harmattan season

    PubMed Central

    OLAIFA, Folashade; AYO, Joseph Olusegun; AMBALI, Suleiman Folorunsho; REKWOT, Peter Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the effect of ascorbic acid (AA) in reducing hemato-biochemical changes in pack donkeys during the cold-dry (harmattan) season. Six experimental donkeys administered orally AA (200 mg/kg) and six control donkeys not administered ascorbic acid were subjected to packing. Blood samples were collected from all donkeys for hematological and biochemical analyses. In the control donkeys, packed cell volume (PCV), erythrocyte count and hemoglobin concentration (Hb) decreased significantly (P<0.05) at the end of packing. In the experimental donkeys, there was no significant difference between the pre- and post-packing values of PCV, erythrocyte count and Hb. In the control donkeys, the neutrophil and neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio increased significantly (P<0.05) post packing, but in the experimental donkeys, the pre- and post-packing values were not significantly different. The eosinophil count increased significantly (P<0.05) in experimental and control donkeys post packing. In conclusion, packing exerted significant adverse effects on the hematological parameters ameliorated by AA administration. AA may modulate neutrophilia and induce a considerable alteration of erythroid markers in donkeys subjected to packing during the harmattan season. PMID:23154452

  3. Hemato-biochemical responses to packing in donkeys administered ascorbic acid during the harmattan season.

    PubMed

    Olaifa, Folashade; Ayo, Joseph Olusegun; Ambali, Suleiman Folorunsho; Rekwot, Peter Ibrahim

    2015-02-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the effect of ascorbic acid (AA) in reducing hemato-biochemical changes in pack donkeys during the cold-dry (harmattan) season. Six experimental donkeys administered orally AA (200 mg/kg) and six control donkeys not administered ascorbic acid were subjected to packing. Blood samples were collected from all donkeys for hematological and biochemical analyses. In the control donkeys, packed cell volume (PCV), erythrocyte count and hemoglobin concentration (Hb) decreased significantly (P<0.05) at the end of packing. In the experimental donkeys, there was no significant difference between the pre- and post-packing values of PCV, erythrocyte count and Hb. In the control donkeys, the neutrophil and neutrophil:lymphocyte ratio increased significantly (P<0.05) post packing, but in the experimental donkeys, the pre- and post-packing values were not significantly different. The eosinophil count increased significantly (P<0.05) in experimental and control donkeys post packing. In conclusion, packing exerted significant adverse effects on the hematological parameters ameliorated by AA administration. AA may modulate neutrophilia and induce a considerable alteration of erythroid markers in donkeys subjected to packing during the harmattan season.

  4. Generalized anxiety disorder: some biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Munjack, D J; Baltazar, P L; DeQuattro, V; Sobin, P; Palmer, R; Zulueta, A; Crocker, B; Usigli, R; Buckwalter, G; Leonard, M

    1990-04-01

    Fifty-one patients who met DSM-III criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, and who were recruited to participate in a drug outcome study, filled out a variety of rating scales and had blood samples drawn for plasma norepinephrine, epinephrine, and free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) after a 20-min rest period. This group was compared to 15 normal controls who also had their blood drawn after a 20-min rest period. While the two groups were initially found to have significantly different levels of plasma free MHPG through the use of t tests, this finding was not confirmed by subsequent discriminant analysis.

  5. Studies on alterations of clinical and hemato-biochemical parameters before and after treatment in calves naturally infected with theileriosis

    PubMed Central

    Kachhawa, J. P.; Kumar, Surender; Sharma, Ankita; Singh, A. P.; Ahuja, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine hemato-biochemical alterations and to determine the better treatment of theileriosis in naturally infected calves. Materials and Methods: A total of 74 Holstein crossbred calves below 6 months of age, of either sex were included for present investigation in Bikaner. Based on the clinical examinations and laboratory results, 20 calves included for hemato-biochemical studies (before and after treatment) and divided into two groups (having 10 calves each). Results: The clinical examination of these calves revealed weakness, ticks infestations, high fever above 104°F, pronounced swelling of prescapular, prefemoral, parotid lymph nodes, loss of elasticity of skin, anemia, lacrimal discharges, pulpy cornea, tachycardia, and dyspnea. There was highly significant decrease (p<0.01) in hemoglobin, total erythrocyte count, packed cell volume and total leukocyte count, serum glucose, total protein, globulin and albumin level and highly significant increase in aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase level as compared to healthy control animals in Group I and II. The animals of Group II treated with buparvaquone along with single blood transfusion shows better recovery then animals of Group I treated with bupavaqone and hematinic. Conclusions: Significant changes were found in hemato-biochemical parameters in theileria affected calves before treatment as compare to healthy control calves. Significant improvement was observed in hemato-biochemical parameters in buparvaquone and single blood transfusion treated calves as compare to another group, so it is concluded that buparvaquone and single blood transfusion is better combination for treatment of theileriosis. PMID:28096609

  6. Modulation of biochemical indices in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) under the influence of toxic cyanobacterial biomass in diet.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Radovan; Palíková, Miroslava; Navrátil, Stanislav; Mareš, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are producers of potent and environmentally abundant microcystins, representing an emerging global health issue. In the present study, we investigated the impact of cyanobacterial biomass on biochemical indices of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L., average weight of 246 ± 73 g) under laboratory conditions. The fish were fed a diet containing cyanobacterial biomass with microcystins in high concentration (0.4 mg/kg of fish weight and day) for 28 days. Statistical evaluation of the influence of the cyanobacterial biomass in food on the biochemical indices of the juvenile carp showed only minor differences. The activity of aspartate aminotransferase value and the urea concentration were significantly reduced compared to control group. The biochemical parameters of fish blood plasma significantly rose during the experiment in the control group as well as in the experimental group. This state was probably influenced by the environmental conditions and the fish diet. A significant rising value was established in calcium creatinine, total protein, phosphorus, lactate, urea and natrium. The present study demonstrates that the oral exposure of toxic cyanobacterial biomass has a minor influence on the biochemical indices of common carp and that the effect of other factors, e.g., nutrition is more visible.

  7. The effect of triazole induced photosynthetic pigments and biochemical constituents of Zea mays L. (Maize) under drought stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekar, Mahalingam; Rabert, Gabriel Amalan; Manivannan, Paramasivam

    2016-06-01

    In this investigation, pot culture experiment was carried out to estimate the ameliorating effect of triazole compounds, namely Triadimefon (TDM), Tebuconazole (TBZ), and Propiconazole (PCZ) on drought stress, photosynthetic pigments, and biochemical constituents of Zea mays L. (Maize). From 30 days after sowing (DAS), the plants were subjected to 4 days interval drought (DID) stress and drought with TDM at 15 mg l-1, TBZ at 10 mg l-1, and PCZ at 15 mg l-1. Irrigation at 1-day interval was kept as control. Irrigation performed on alternative day. The plant samples were collected on 40, 50, and 60 DAS and separated into root, stem, and leaf for estimating the photosynthetic pigments and biochemical constituents. Drought and drought with triazole compounds treatment increased the biochemical glycine betaine content, whereas the protein and the pigments contents chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b, total chlorophyll, carotenoid, and anthocyanin decreased when compared to control. The triazole treatment mitigated the adverse effects of drought stress by increasing the biochemical potentials and paved the way to overcome drought stress in corn plant.

  8. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of hyacinth macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus).

    PubMed

    Kolesnikovas, Cristiane K M; Niemeyer, Claudia; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Nunes, Adauto L V; Rameh-de-Albuquerque, Luciana C; Sant'Anna, Sávio S; Catão-Dias, José L

    2012-09-01

    The hyacinth macaw (Anodorhyncus hyacinthinus), considered the largest psittacine bird species in the world, is an endangered species, with a remaining population of approximately 6500 birds in the wild. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to verify differences related to sex, samples from 29 hyacinth macaws (14 males, 15 females) were obtained from birds apprehended from illegal wildlife trade and subsequently housed at the Sorocaba Zoo, Brazil. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Compared with published reference values, differences were found in mean concentrations of total red blood cell count, corpuscular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin level, total white blood cell count, aspartate aminotransferase level, creatine kinase concentration, alkaline phosphatase concentration, and phosphorus level. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this endangered species in captivity or rehabilitation centers.

  9. Hematologic and plasma biochemical values of Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii).

    PubMed

    Foldenauer, Ulrike; Borjal, Raffy Jim; Deb, Amrita; Arif, Abdi; Taha, Abid Sharif; Watson, Ryan William; Steinmetz, Hanspeter; Bürkle, Marcellus; Hammer, Sven

    2007-12-01

    The Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) is considered the world's most endangered parrot, with the last wild bird disappearing in 2001 and only 74 birds in captivity. To establish hematologic and plasma biochemical reference ranges and to look for differences relative to sex, age, and season, we obtained blood samples from 46 captive Spix's macaws (23 male, 23 female) housed in aviaries at the Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in the State of Qatar. No significant differences in hematologic or plasma biochemical values were found between females and males. Adult and juvenile birds differed in mean concentrations of glucose, total protein, amylase, cholesterol, and phosphorus; in percentages of heterophils and lymphocytes; and in the absolute lymphocyte count. Total protein, cholesterol, and phosphorus concentrations; hematocrit; and heterophil and lymphocyte counts differed significantly by season. Baseline hematologic and plasma biochemical ranges were established, which may be useful as reference values for clinicians working with this highly endangered species.

  10. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications. PMID:27217831

  11. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications.

  12. Overview of the DOE/SERI Biochemical Conversion Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J D

    1986-09-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute manages a program of research and development on the biochemical conversion of renewable lignocellulosic materials to liquid fuels for the Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division. The Biochemical Conversion Program is mission oriented so effort is concentrated on technologies which appear to have the greatest potential for being adopted by the private sector to economically convert lignocellulosic materials into high value liquid transportation fuels such as ethanol. The program is structured to supply the technology for such fuels to compete economically first as an octane booster or fuel additive, and, with additional improvements, as a neat fuel. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. [Biochemical differentiation of proteus strains from various clinical materials].

    PubMed

    Józefowicz-Piatkowska, H; Woch, G

    1993-01-01

    The material consisted of 729 strain of Proteus isolated from clinical samples in three microbiological laboratories of city of Lódź region. Our of these strains, 466 were Proteus mirabilis, and remaining represented: P. penneri-13 strains, P. vulgaris (II biogroup)-56 and 54 strains which were not classifiable on the basis of biochemical properties and scheme elaborated by Hickman et al. for biogroups of P. vulgaris. The authors indicate feasibility of differentiation of P. vulgaris basing on biochemical tests as a supplementary method to other tests of intracellular differentiation of Proteus.

  14. Spatial waves in synthetic biochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Padirac, Adrien; Fujii, Teruo; Estévez-Torres, André; Rondelez, Yannick

    2013-10-02

    We report the experimental observation of traveling concentration waves and spirals in a chemical reaction network built from the bottom up. The mechanism of the network is an oscillator of the predator-prey type, and this is the first time that predator-prey waves have been observed in the laboratory. The molecular encoding of the nonequilibrium behavior relies on small DNA oligonucleotides that enforce the network connectivity and three purified enzymes that control the reactivity. Wave velocities in the range 80-400 μm min(-1) were measured. A reaction-diffusion model in quantitative agreement with the experiments is proposed. Three fundamental parameters are easy to tune in nucleic acid reaction networks: the topology of the network, the rate constants of the individual reactions, and the diffusion coefficients of the individual species. For this reason, we expect such networks to bring unprecedented opportunities for assaying the principles of spatiotemporal order formation in chemistry.

  15. Monotone and near-monotone biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Monotone subsystems have appealing properties as components of larger networks, since they exhibit robust dynamical stability and predictability of responses to perturbations. This suggests that natural biological systems may have evolved to be, if not monotone, at least close to monotone in the sense of being decomposable into a “small” number of monotone components, In addition, recent research has shown that much insight can be attained from decomposing networks into monotone subsystems and the analysis of the resulting interconnections using tools from control theory. This paper provides an expository introduction to monotone systems and their interconnections, describing the basic concepts and some of the main mathematical results in a largely informal fashion. PMID:19003437

  16. Biochemical capacitance of Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Paulo R; Schrott, Germán D; Bonanni, Pablo S; Simison, Silvia N; Busalmen, Juan P

    2015-08-10

    An electrical model able to decouple the electron pathway from microbial cell machinery impedance terms is introduced. In this context, capacitance characteristics of the biofilm are clearly resolved. In other words, the model allows separating, according to the advantage of frequency and spectroscopic response approach, the different terms controlling the performance of the microbial biofilm respiratory process and thus the directly related electricity production process. The model can be accurately fitted to voltammetry measurements obtained under steady-state conditions and also to biofilm discharge amperometric measurements. The implications of biological aspects of the electrochemical or redox capacitance are discussed theoretically in the context of current knowledge with regard to structure and physiological activity of microbial Geobacter biofilms.

  17. Biochemical variability in a tem sports situation.

    PubMed

    Biersner, R J; McHugh, W B; Rahe, R H

    1981-09-01

    Using 13 members of an amateur softball team during the last seven games of the regular season, associations were determined between overall offensive and defensive performance and levels of serum uric acid (SUA) and cholesterol, and urinary adrenaline and noradrenaline. Skilled players were found to have significantly lower cholesterol and noradrenaline levels than less skilled players whether the games were won or lost. Adrenaline and SUA levels did not differ between the two groups nor between losing or winning outcomes. The elevated cholesterol and noradrenaline levels found among the less skilled players may indicate that although they were stressed by the discrepancy between their expectations and their performance, they nonetheless maintained perceived control over performance because of the social support and reinforcement received from the other players and the coach.

  18. Effect of staged preconditioning on biochemical markers in the patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Jafari, Naser; Babapoursaatlou, Behzad; Doustkami, Hossein; Hosseinian, Adallat; Hasanpour, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The present study has investigated the effectiveness of staged-preconditioning, in both remote and target organs. After IP the myocardial release of the biochemical markers including, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), cardiac creatine kinase (CK-MB), cardiac troponin T (cTnT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were evaluated in patients who underwent CABG, with and without staged-preconditioning. Sixty-one patients entered the study; there were 32 patients in the staged-preconditioning group and 29 patients in the control group. All patients underwent on-pump CABG using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) techniques. In the staged-preconditioning group, patients underwent two stages of IP on remote (upper limb) and target organs. Each stage of preconditioning was carried out by 3 cycles of ischemia and then reperfusion. Serum levels of biochemical markers were immediately measured postoperatively at 24, 48 and 72 h. Serum CK-MB, CPK and LDH levels were significantly lower in the staged-preconditioning group than in the control group. The CK-MB release in the staged-preconditioning patients reduced by 51% in comparison with controls over 72 h after CABG. These results suggest that myocardial injury was attenuated by the effect of three rounds of both remote and target organ IP.

  19. Biochemical, mechanical, and spectroscopic analyses of genetically engineered flax fibers producing bioplastic (poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate).

    PubMed

    Wróbel-Kwiatkowska, Magdalena; Skórkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Dymińska, Lucyna; Maczka, Mirosław; Hanuza, Jerzy; Szopa, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The interest in biofibers has grown in recent years due to their expanding range of applications in fields as diverse as biomedical science and the automotive industry. Their low production costs, biodegradability, physical properties, and perceived eco-friendliness allow for their extensive use as composite components, a role in which they could replace petroleum-based synthetic polymers. We performed biochemical, mechanical, and structural analyses of flax stems and fibers derived from field-grown transgenic flax enriched with PHB (poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate). The analyses of the plant stems revealed an increase in the cellulose content and a decrease in the lignin and pectin contents relative to the control plants. However, the contents of the fibers' major components (cellulose, lignin, pectin) remain unchanged. An FT-IR study confirmed the results of the biochemical analyses of the flax fibers. However, the arrangement of the cellulose polymer in the transgenic fibers differed from that in the control, and a significant increase in the number of hydrogen bonds was detected. The mechanical properties of the transgenic flax stems were significantly improved, reflecting the cellulose content increase. However, the mechanical properties of the fibers did not change in comparison with the control, with the exception of the fibers from transgenic line M13. The generated transgenic flax plants, which produce both components of the flax/PHB composites (i.e., fibers and thermoplastic matrix in the same plant organ) are a source of an attractive and ecologically safe material for industry and medicine.

  20. Urolithiasis in adults. Clinical and biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Halim, Rabie E

    2005-05-01

    Urolithiasis is a multifactorial recurrent disease of world-wide distribution in rural, urban, industrial and non-industrial regions. Changes in urinary pH is a risk factor especially with hyperuricosuria, hypercalciuria or hyperoxaluria. With recurrence, hypercalcuria and higher urinary oxalate levels are more frequent. Hypercalciuria and hyperuricosuria showed correlation with family history of stones. The ionic relations between various stone forming salts in urine of patients are opposite to that in controls and are well represented in stone composition. Obesity is a risk factor in both genders. Over eating a diet rich in all nutrients was associated with hyperuricosuria while a diet high only in fat was associated with other urinary disturbances. High protein and fat intake are risk factors. High or low calcium diet was associated with urolithiasis and supplemental calcium is not a risk factor. Potassium and magnesium citrate are potent in inhibiting the growth of stone fragments after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Whether in patients or normal subjects, drinking hard water should be avoided; tap water or low calcium content water is preferable. Seasonal variations in temperature affected urinary volume, pH and relative saturation of uric acid. To prevent recurrence, patients should maintain high fluid intake achieving a urine volume of 2 liters per day.

  1. Chemical and biochemical thermodynamics: Is it time for a reunification?

    PubMed

    Iotti, Stefano; Raff, Lionel; Sabatini, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    The thermodynamics of chemical reactions in which all species are explicitly considered with atoms and charge balanced is compared with the transformed thermodynamics generally used to treat biochemical reactions where atoms and charges are not balanced. The transformed thermodynamic quantities suggested by Alberty are obtained by execution of Legendre transformation of the usual thermodynamic potentials. The present analysis demonstrates that the transformed values for ΔrG'(0) and ΔrH'(0)can be obtained directly without performing Legendre transformations by simply writing the chemical reactions with all the pseudoisomers explicitly included and charges balanced. The appropriate procedures for computing the stoichiometric coefficients for the pseudoisomers are fully explained by means of an example calculation for the biochemical ATP hydrolysis reaction. It is concluded that the analysis has reunited the "two separate worlds" of conventional thermodynamics and transformed thermodynamics. In addition, it is also shown that the value of the conditional Gibbs energy of reaction, ΔrG', for a biochemical reaction is the same of the value of ΔrG for any chemical reaction involving pseudoisomers of the biochemical reagents.

  2. Biochemical and physiological consequences of the Apollo flight diet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hander, E. W.; Leach, C. S.; Fischer, C. L.; Rummel, J.; Rambaut, P.; Johnson, P. C.

    1971-01-01

    Six male subjects subsisting on a typical Apollo flight diet for five consecutive days were evaluated for changes in biochemical and physiological status. Laboratory examinations failed to demonstrate any significant changes of the kind previously attributed to weightlessness, such as in serum electrolytes, endocrine values, body fluid, or hematologic parameters.

  3. MATLAB-Based Teaching Modules in Biochemical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kilho; Comolli, Noelle K.; Kelly, William J.; Huang, Zuyi

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical models play an important role in biochemical engineering. For example, the models developed in the field of systems biology have been used to identify drug targets to treat pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilms. In addition, competitive binding models for chromatography processes have been developed to predict expanded…

  4. Biochemical markers of spontaneous preterm birth in asymptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ronna L

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a delivery that occurs at less than 37 completed weeks of gestation and it is associated with perinatal morbidity and mortality. Spontaneous preterm birth accounts for up to 75% of all preterm births. A number of maternal or fetal characteristics have been associated with preterm birth, but the use of individual or group biochemical markers have advanced some of the understanding on the mechanisms leading to spontaneous preterm birth. This paper provides a summary on the current literature on the use of biochemical markers in predicting spontaneous preterm birth in asymptomatic women. Evidence from the literature suggests fetal fibronectin, cervical interleukin-6, and α-fetoprotein as promising biochemical markers in predicting spontaneous preterm birth in asymptomatic women. The role of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, as well as epigenetics, has the potential to further elucidate and improve understanding of the underlying mechanisms or pathways of spontaneous preterm birth. Refinement in study design and methodology is needed in future research for the development and validation of individual or group biochemical marker(s) for use independently or in conjunction with other potential risk factors such as genetic variants and environmental and behavioral factors in predicting spontaneous preterm birth across diverse populations.

  5. Solving the differential biochemical Jacobian from metabolomics covariance data.

    PubMed

    Nägele, Thomas; Mair, Andrea; Sun, Xiaoliang; Fragner, Lena; Teige, Markus; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput molecular analysis has become an integral part in organismal systems biology. In contrast, due to a missing systematic linkage of the data with functional and predictive theoretical models of the underlying metabolic network the understanding of the resulting complex data sets is lacking far behind. Here, we present a biomathematical method addressing this problem by using metabolomics data for the inverse calculation of a biochemical Jacobian matrix, thereby linking computer-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction and in vivo metabolic dynamics. The incongruity of metabolome coverage by typical metabolite profiling approaches and genome-scale metabolic reconstruction was solved by the design of superpathways to define a metabolic interaction matrix. A differential biochemical Jacobian was calculated using an approach which links this metabolic interaction matrix and the covariance of metabolomics data satisfying a Lyapunov equation. The predictions of the differential Jacobian from real metabolomic data were found to be correct by testing the corresponding enzymatic activities. Moreover it is demonstrated that the predictions of the biochemical Jacobian matrix allow for the design of parameter optimization strategies for ODE-based kinetic models of the system. The presented concept combines dynamic modelling strategies with large-scale steady state profiling approaches without the explicit knowledge of individual kinetic parameters. In summary, the presented strategy allows for the identification of regulatory key processes in the biochemical network directly from metabolomics data and is a fundamental achievement for the functional interpretation of metabolomics data.

  6. Study on color difference estimation method of medicine biochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhong; Zhou, Yue; Zhao, Hongxia; Sun, Jiashi; Zhou, Fengkun

    2006-01-01

    The biochemical analysis in medicine is an important inspection and diagnosis method in hospital clinic. The biochemical analysis of urine is one important item. The Urine test paper shows corresponding color with different detection project or different illness degree. The color difference between the standard threshold and the test paper color of urine can be used to judge the illness degree, so that further analysis and diagnosis to urine is gotten. The color is a three-dimensional physical variable concerning psychology, while reflectance is one-dimensional variable; therefore, the estimation method of color difference in urine test can have better precision and facility than the conventional test method with one-dimensional reflectance, it can make an accurate diagnose. The digital camera is easy to take an image of urine test paper and is used to carry out the urine biochemical analysis conveniently. On the experiment, the color image of urine test paper is taken by popular color digital camera and saved in the computer which installs a simple color space conversion (RGB -> XYZ -> L *a *b *)and the calculation software. Test sample is graded according to intelligent detection of quantitative color. The images taken every time were saved in computer, and the whole illness process will be monitored. This method can also use in other medicine biochemical analyses that have relation with color. Experiment result shows that this test method is quick and accurate; it can be used in hospital, calibrating organization and family, so its application prospect is extensive.

  7. The use of biochemical methods in extraterrestrial life detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Gene

    2006-08-01

    Instrument development for in situ extraterrestrial life detection focuses primarily on the ability to distinguish between biological and non-biological material, mostly through chemical analysis for potential biosignatures (e.g., biogenic minerals, enantiomeric excesses). In constrast, biochemical analysis techniques commonly applied to Earth life focus primarily on the exploration of cellular and molecular processes, not on the classification of a given system as biological or non-biological. This focus has developed because of the relatively large functional gap between life and non-life on Earth today. Life on Earth is very diverse from an environmental and physiological point of view, but is highly conserved from a molecular point of view. Biochemical analysis techniques take advantage of this similarity of all terrestrial life at the molecular level, particularly through the use of biologically-derived reagents (e.g., DNA polymerases, antibodies), to enable analytical methods with enormous sensitivity and selectivity. These capabilities encourage consideration of such reagents and methods for use in extraterrestrial life detection instruments. The utility of this approach depends in large part on the (unknown at this time) degree of molecular compositional differences between extraterrestrial and terrestrial life. The greater these differences, the less useful laboratory biochemical techniques will be without significant modification. Biochemistry and molecular biology methods may need to be "de-focused" in order to produce instruments capable of unambiguously detecting a sufficiently wide range of extraterrestrial biochemical systems. Modern biotechnology tools may make that possible in some cases.

  8. Solving the Differential Biochemical Jacobian from Metabolomics Covariance Data

    PubMed Central

    Nägele, Thomas; Mair, Andrea; Sun, Xiaoliang; Fragner, Lena; Teige, Markus; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput molecular analysis has become an integral part in organismal systems biology. In contrast, due to a missing systematic linkage of the data with functional and predictive theoretical models of the underlying metabolic network the understanding of the resulting complex data sets is lacking far behind. Here, we present a biomathematical method addressing this problem by using metabolomics data for the inverse calculation of a biochemical Jacobian matrix, thereby linking computer-based genome-scale metabolic reconstruction and in vivo metabolic dynamics. The incongruity of metabolome coverage by typical metabolite profiling approaches and genome-scale metabolic reconstruction was solved by the design of superpathways to define a metabolic interaction matrix. A differential biochemical Jacobian was calculated using an approach which links this metabolic interaction matrix and the covariance of metabolomics data satisfying a Lyapunov equation. The predictions of the differential Jacobian from real metabolomic data were found to be correct by testing the corresponding enzymatic activities. Moreover it is demonstrated that the predictions of the biochemical Jacobian matrix allow for the design of parameter optimization strategies for ODE-based kinetic models of the system. The presented concept combines dynamic modelling strategies with large-scale steady state profiling approaches without the explicit knowledge of individual kinetic parameters. In summary, the presented strategy allows for the identification of regulatory key processes in the biochemical network directly from metabolomics data and is a fundamental achievement for the functional interpretation of metabolomics data. PMID:24695071

  9. Metabolic decompensation in methylmalonic aciduria: which biochemical parameters are discriminative?

    PubMed

    Zwickler, Tamaris; Haege, Gisela; Riderer, Alina; Hörster, Friederike; Hoffmann, Georg F; Burgard, Peter; Kölker, Stefan

    2012-09-01

    Recurrent, life-threatening metabolic decompensations often occur in patients with methylmalonic aciduria (MMAuria). Our study evaluated (impending) metabolic decompensations in these patients aiming to identify the most frequent and reliable clinical and biochemical abnormalities that could be helpful for decision-making on when to start an emergency treatment. Seventy-six unscheduled and 179 regular visits of 10 patients with confirmed MMAuria continuously followed by our metabolic centre between 1975 and 2009 were analysed. The most frequent symptom of an impending acute metabolic decompensation was vomiting (90% of episodes), whereas symptoms of intercurrent infectious disease (29%) or other symptoms (such as food refusal and impaired consciousness) were found less often. Thirty-five biochemical parameters were included in the analysis. Among them, pathological changes of acid-base balance reflecting metabolic acidosis with partial respiratory compensation (decreased pH, pCO(2), standard bicarbonate, and base excess) and elevated ammonia were the most reliable biochemical parameters for the identification of a metabolic decompensation and the estimation of its severity. In contrast, analyses of organic acids, acylcarnitines and carnitine status were less discriminative. In conclusion, careful history taking and identification of suspicious symptoms in combination with a small number of rapidly available biochemical parameters are helpful to differentiate compensated metabolic condition and (impending) metabolic crisis and to decide when to start an emergency treatment.

  10. Classic and contemporary approaches to modeling biochemical reactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William W.; Niepel, Mario; Sorger, Peter K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent interest in modeling biochemical networks raises questions about the relationship between often complex mathematical models and familiar arithmetic concepts from classical enzymology, and also about connections between modeling and experimental data. This review addresses both topics by familiarizing readers with key concepts (and terminology) in the construction, validation, and application of deterministic biochemical models, with particular emphasis on a simple enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Networks of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are the natural language for describing enzyme kinetics in a mass action approximation. We illustrate this point by showing how the familiar Briggs-Haldane formulation of Michaelis-Menten kinetics derives from the outer (or quasi-steady-state) solution of a dynamical system of ODEs describing a simple reaction under special conditions. We discuss how parameters in the Michaelis-Menten approximation and in the underlying ODE network can be estimated from experimental data, with a special emphasis on the origins of uncertainty. Finally, we extrapolate from a simple reaction to complex models of multiprotein biochemical networks. The concepts described in this review, hitherto of interest primarily to practitioners, are likely to become important for a much broader community of cellular and molecular biologists attempting to understand the promise and challenges of “systems biology” as applied to biochemical mechanisms. PMID:20810646

  11. The biochemical properties of antibodies and their fragments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are a powerful molecular recognition tools that can be used to identify minute quantities of a given target analyte. Their antigen binding properties define both the sensitivity and selectivity of an immunoassay. Understanding the biochemical properties of this c...

  12. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 1. MODEL FORMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multilayer biochemical dry deposition model has been developed based on the NOAA Multilayer Model (MLM) to study gaseous exchanges between the soil, plants, and the atmosphere. Most of the parameterizations and submodels have been updated or replaced. The numerical integration ...

  13. A MULTILAYER BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL 2. MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multilayer biochemical dry deposition model (MLBC) described in the accompanying paper was tested against half-hourly eddy correlation data from six field sites under a wide range of climate conditions with various plant types. Modeled CO2, O3, SO2<...

  14. Metstoich--Teaching Quantitative Metabolism and Energetics in Biochemical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kelvin W. W.; Barford, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Metstoich, a metabolic calculator developed for teaching, can provide a novel way to teach quantitative metabolism to biochemical engineering students. It can also introduce biochemistry/life science students to the quantitative aspects of life science subjects they have studied. Metstoich links traditional biochemistry-based metabolic approaches…

  15. [Experiments using rats on Kosmos biosatellites: morphologic and biochemical studies].

    PubMed

    Il'in, E A; Kaplanskiĭ, A S; Savina, E A

    1989-01-01

    Results of morphological and biochemical investigations of rats flown on Cosmos biosatellites are discussed. It is emphasized that most changes occurring during exposure to microgravity are directly or indirectly related to lower musculoskeletal loads which in turn produce deconditioning of different physiological systems and organism as a whole. It is concluded that this deconditioning is associated with both metabolic and structural changes.

  16. Biochemical Markers of Brain Injury: Applications to Combat Casualty Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    these failures [6]. Unlike other organ-based diseases where rapid diagnosis employing biomarkers (usually involving blood tests) prove invaluable...implementation of appropriate triage and medical management. Criteria For Biochemical/Surrogate Markers: In the course of research on biomarkers ...our laboratories have developed criteria for biomarker development. As reflected in the present proposal, useful biomarkers should employ readily

  17. Biochemical Parameters of Orienteers Competing in a Long Distance Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikan, Vladimir; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Measured important biochemical parameters in a group of orienteers two hours before beginning and immediately after an orienteering marathon. Found levels of dehydration. Suggests a drinking regimen which is designed for orienteering races. Concludes that no runner having kidney or liver abnormalities or changes in the urine should be allowed to…

  18. Biochemical and Structural Studies of RNA Modification and Repair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Chio Mui

    2009-01-01

    RNA modification, RNA interference, and RNA repair are important events in the cell. This thesis presents three projects related to these three fields. By using both biochemical and structural methods, we characterized enzymatic activities of pseudouridine synthase TruD, solved the structure of "A. aeolicus" GidA, and reconstituted a novel…

  19. The Stereochemistry of Biochemical Molecules: A Subject to Revisit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centelles, Josep J.; Imperial, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Although Fischer's convention for stereoisomers is useful for simple molecules, the stereochemistry of complex biochemical molecules is often poorly indicated in textbooks. This article reports on errors in stereochemistry of complex hydrosoluble vitamin B12 molecule. Twenty-five popular biochemistry textbooks were examined for their treatment of…

  20. BIOCHEMICAL INDICES OF EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS: A SPECIES COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Existence of endocrine active substances in the aquatic environment has been clearly established in several studies. Exposure of organisms to both natural and synthetic xenoestrogens have been found to alter biochemical homeostatis and, in some cases, result in reproductive and d...

  1. Amorphous material of the skin in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a morphologic and biochemical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Nagao, K.; Yamauchi, M.

    1994-01-01

    We performed morphologic studies on skin from seven patients with ALS and seven control subjects. By light microscopy, the wide spaces that separated collagen bundles reacted strongly with colloidal iron and alcian blue in ALS patients. Electron microscopy revealed markedly increased amorphous material that was positive for ruthenium red in the ground substance. These findings were not present in controls. Quantitative amino acid analysis showed that the amount of total amino acids (nmoles per mg dry weight) was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in ALS patients compared with that of controls, and there was a significant negative correlation between skin amino acid content and duration of illness in ALS patients (r = -0.83, p < 0.001). These morphologic findings and biochemical data indicate that the amorphous material, which is markedly increased in ALS skin, includes glycosaminoglycans.

  2. Plasma volume and biochemical changes in athletes during bed rest chronic hyperhydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorbas, Yan G.; Yarullin, Vladimir L.; Denogradov, Sergei D.; Afonin, Victor B.

    Daily fluid and salt supplements (FSS) may be used to reduce plasma biochemical changes during bed rest (BR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a daily intake of FSS on plasma volume (PV) and biochemical changes during BR. Studies were done during a pre BR period of 15 days and during a BR period of 30 days. Thirty male athletes aged 22-26 years were chosen as subjects. They were divided into three groups: unsupplemented ambulatory control subjects (UACS), unsupplemented bed rested subjects (UBRS) and supplemented bed rested subjects (SBRS). The UBRS and SBRS were kept under a rigorous bed rest regime for 30 days. The SBRS took 26 ml water/kg body weight and 0.1 g sodium chloride/kg body weight daily. PV, protein, albumin, sodium (Na), Chloride (Cl), potassium (K), osmolality, creatinine, glucose, and whole blood haematocrit (Hct) and haemoglobin (Hb) concentrations were measured. PV increased significantly ( P≤0.01) while plasma protein, albumin, Na, Cl, K, glucose, creatinine, osmolality, and whole blood Hb and Hct concentration decreased significantly ( P≤0.01) in the SBRS group when compared with the UBRS group. By contrast, PV decreased significantly ( P≤0.01), while plasma protein, albumin, Na, Cl, K, glucose, creatinine, osmolality and whole blood Hct and Hb concentration increased significantly ( P≤0.01) in the UBRS group when compared with the SBRS and UACS groups. The measured parameters did not change significantly in the UACS group when compared with the baseline control values. It was concluded that a daily intake of FSS may be used to attenuate PV losses and biochemical changes in endurance trained athletes during bed rest.

  3. Physiological, biochemical and histological alterations induced by administration of imidacloprid in female albino rats.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Prerna; Khera, Kuldeep Singh; Sangha, Gurinder Kaur

    2014-03-01

    Imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid the newest class of major insecticide has outstanding potency and systemic action for crop protection against piercing and sucking insects pests and also highly effective for control of flea on cats and dogs. The effect of oral administration of two doses of imidacloprid 10 and 20mg/kg/day for 60 days on biochemical parameters, histopathology and protein profile of female albino rat was assessed. Average feed intake was significantly reduced (P<0.01) at 20mg/kg/day. Relative weight of heart and spleen decreased significantly (P<0.05) at higher dose level. Non significant increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity was observed in both the imidacloprid treated groups. There was significant decrease (P<0.01, P<0.05) in acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) activity in plasma and brain of both the imidacloprid treated groups. Microscopically, liver tissue of rats treated with higher dose of imidacloprid showed marked dilation and congestion of central vein and degeneration of hepatocytes. The exposure to imidacloprid produced histopathological changes that could be correlated with changes in the biochemical profile of female albino rats. The blood plasma proteins were examined by SDS PAGE. There was no diagnostic difference in the pattern of plasma protein profile of control and treated rats. Based on the present physiological, biochemical and histological studies it is evident that imidacloprid did not produce any significant effects at 10mg/kg/day dose but induced toxicological effects at 20mg/kg/day to female rats.

  4. A Quasi Actuarial Prospect for Individual Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, William A.

    A conceptual model of individual assessment through the use of biodata responses with minimal input information is outlined. The process is considered especially applicable to industrial psychology. A scored autobiographical data form, which measures the individual's past behavior and experiences, provides for assignment to a specific subgroup…

  5. Alterations of biochemical indicators in hepatopancreas of the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, from paddy fields in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yuh-Wen; Wu, Jui-Pin; Hsieh, Tsung-Chih; Liang, Shih-Hsiung; Chen, Chien-Min; Huang, Da-Ji

    2014-07-01

    The freshwater golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, is one of the world's 100 worst invasive alien species. The snails' wide distribution, high abundance, and sensitivity to environmental pollution make them a potential bioindicator for environmental contamination. In this study, the biochemical status of golden apple snails collected from paddy fields throughout the island of Taiwan was examined. This study found that the biochemical status of apple snails collected from paddy fields differed from that of animals bred and maintained in the laboratory. Furthermore, certain biochemical endpoints of the snails collected from the paddy fields before and after agricultural activities were also different-hemolymphatic vitellogenin protein was induced in male snail after exposure to estrogen-like chemicals, the hepatic monooxygenase (1.97 +/- 0.50 deltaA(650mm) 30 min(-1) mg(-1) protein in control group) and glutathione S transferase (0.02 +/- 0.01 delta A(340mm) 30 min(-1) mg(-1) protein in control group) snails exposed to pesticides, as well as the hepatopancreatic levels of aspartate aminotransferase (450.00 +/- 59.40 U mg(-1) mg(-1) protein in control group) and alanine aminotransferase (233.27 +/- 42.09 U mg(-1) mg(-1) protein in control group) decreased the indicating that xenobiotics destroyed hepatopancreatic. The above findings reveal that apple snail could be used as a practical bioindicator to monitor anthropogenic environmental pollution.

  6. Toxic effects of copper sulfate on the brains of term Hubbard broiler chicks: a stereological and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Oğuz, E O; Enli, Y; Tufan, A C; Turgut, G

    2014-01-01

    Copper sulfate can cause different pathologies in different organ systems during development. We determined the effects of toxic levels of copper sulfate on brain development in term Hubbard broiler chicks using stereological and biochemical analyses. Hubbard broiler chicken eggs were divided into three groups: controls with no treatment, sham-treated animals and an experimental group. On day 1, 0.1 ml saline was injected into the air chambers of the sham and experimental groups. The experimental group received also 50 μg copper sulfate. At term (day 21), all chick brains were removed and their volumes were determined using the Cavalieri volume estimation. Parallel biochemical analyses were carried out for glutathione and malondialdehyde levels in the brain tissues as indicators of oxidative damage. With copper treatment, the mean brain volume (8079 μm(3)) was significantly decreased compared to both the control (10075 μm(3)) and sham (9547 μm(3)) groups. Copper treatment (143.8 nmol/g tissue) showed significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels compared to the control (293.6 nmol/g tissue) and sham groups (268.8 nmol/g tissue). Copper treatment (404.5 nmol/g tissue) showed significantly increased malondialdehyde levels compared to the control (158.6 nmol/g tissue) and sham (142.8 nmol/g tissue) groups. The morphological and biochemical parameters we measured demonstrated that in term Hubbard broiler chicks, toxic levels of copper sulfate cause developmental and oxidative brain damage.

  7. Accurate atom-mapping computation for biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Latendresse, Mario; Malerich, Jeremiah P; Travers, Mike; Karp, Peter D

    2012-11-26

    The complete atom mapping of a chemical reaction is a bijection of the reactant atoms to the product atoms that specifies the terminus of each reactant atom. Atom mapping of biochemical reactions is useful for many applications of systems biology, in particular for metabolic engineering where synthesizing new biochemical pathways has to take into account for the number of carbon atoms from a source compound that are conserved in the synthesis of a target compound. Rapid, accurate computation of the atom mapping(s) of a biochemical reaction remains elusive despite significant work on this topic. In particular, past researchers did not validate the accuracy of mapping algorithms. We introduce a new method for computing atom mappings called the minimum weighted edit-distance (MWED) metric. The metric is based on bond propensity to react and computes biochemically valid atom mappings for a large percentage of biochemical reactions. MWED models can be formulated efficiently as Mixed-Integer Linear Programs (MILPs). We have demonstrated this approach on 7501 reactions of the MetaCyc database for which 87% of the models could be solved in less than 10 s. For 2.1% of the reactions, we found multiple optimal atom mappings. We show that the error rate is 0.9% (22 reactions) by comparing these atom mappings to 2446 atom mappings of the manually curated Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) RPAIR database. To our knowledge, our computational atom-mapping approach is the most accurate and among the fastest published to date. The atom-mapping data will be available in the MetaCyc database later in 2012; the atom-mapping software will be available within the Pathway Tools software later in 2012.

  8. Biochemical traits and proteomic changes in postharvest flowers of medicinal chrysanthemum exposed to enhanced UV-B radiation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaoqin; Chu, Jian-Zhou; Ma, Chun-Hui; Si, Chao; Li, Ji-Gang; Shi, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Chao-Nan

    2015-08-01

    The article studied UV-B effects on biochemical traits and proteomic changes in postharvest flowers of medicinal chrysanthemum. The experiment about UV-B effects on biochemical traits in flowers included six levels of UV-B treatments (0 (UV0), 50 (UV50), 200 (UV200), 400 (UV400), 600 (UV600) and 800 (UV800) μWcm(-2)). UV400, UV600 and UV800 treatments significantly increased the contents of hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde and UV-B absorbing compounds, and the activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase enzyme over the control. The contents of chlorogenic acid and flavone in flowers were significantly increased by UV-B treatments (except for UV50 and UV800). Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was utilized to analyze proteomic changes in flowers with or without UV-B radiation. Results indicated that 43 protein spots (>1.5-fold difference in volume) were detected, including 19 spots with a decreasing trend and 24 spots with an increasing trend, and 19 differentially expressed protein spots were successfully indentified by MALDI-TOF MS. The indentified proteins were classified based on functions, the most of which were involved in photosynthesis, respiration, protein biosynthesis and degradation and defence. An overall assessment using biochemical and differential proteomic data revealed that UV-B radiation could affect biochemical reaction and promote secondary metabolism processes in postharvest flowers.

  9. Biochemical and histopathological effects of administration various levels of Pomposia (Syzygium cumini) fruit juice as natural antioxidant on rat health.

    PubMed

    El-Anany, Ayman M; Ali, Rehab F M

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the effects of administration various levels (400, 800 and 1,200 ppm) of pomposia extracts as natural antioxidant in comparison with BHT as synthetic antioxidant on some biochemical activities and histopathological examination of rats. Some of biochemical tests i.e. Alkaline phosphatase, transaminases]Aspartate transferase (AST) and alanine transferase (ALT) [,bilirubin, urea and uric acid were conducted. Histopathological examinations were carried out on the liver and kidney tissue of rats administrated tested substances. The biochemical results indicated that the administration of polyphenolic compounds present in pomposia juice did not cause any significant (p ≥ 0.05) changes in the biochemical parameters whereas the administration of BHT at 200 ppm caused significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in the activities of enzymes relevant to the functions of liver and kidney. Microscopically examinations of liver and kidney of rat administered various levels of pomposia juice had the same character as that of control rats (this means that the polyphenolic compounds present in pomposia juice did not cause any adverse affect in liver and kidney), in contrast the administration of 200 ppm of BHT caused marked pathological changes in liver and kidney of rats. The results of the current investigation suggest using pomposia juice as safe food grade substance.

  10. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass: biochemical and molecular perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raj; Singh, Sompal; Singh, Om V

    2008-05-01

    In view of rising prices of crude oil due to increasing fuel demands, the need for alternative sources of bioenergy is expected to increase sharply in the coming years. Among potential alternative bioenergy resources, lignocellulosics have been identified as the prime source of biofuels and other value-added products. Lignocelluloses as agricultural, industrial and forest residuals account for the majority of the total biomass present in the world. To initiate the production of industrially important products from cellulosic biomass, bioconversion of the cellulosic components into fermentable sugars is necessary. A variety of microorganisms including bacteria and fungi may have the ability to degrade the cellulosic biomass to glucose monomers. Bacterial cellulases exist as discrete multi-enzyme complexes, called cellulosomes that consist of multiple subunits. Cellulolytic enzyme systems from the filamentous fungi, especially Trichoderma reesei, contain two exoglucanases or cellobiohydrolases (CBH1 and CBH2), at least four endoglucanases (EG1, EG2, EG3, EG5), and one beta-glucosidase. These enzymes act synergistically to catalyse the hydrolysis of cellulose. Different physical parameters such as pH, temperature, adsorption, chemical factors like nitrogen, phosphorus, presence of phenolic compounds and other inhibitors can critically influence the bioconversion of lignocellulose. The production of cellulases by microbial cells is governed by genetic and biochemical controls including induction, catabolite repression, or end product inhibition. Several efforts have been made to increase the production of cellulases through strain improvement by mutagenesis. Various physical and chemical methods have been used to develop bacterial and fungal strains producing higher amounts of cellulase, all with limited success. Cellulosic bioconversion is a complex process and requires the synergistic action of the three enzymatic components consisting of endoglucanases

  11. Students' Ability to Organize Biochemical and Biochemistry-Related Terms Correlates with Their Performance in a Biochemical Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagata, Ryoichi

    2007-01-01

    Organization is believed to be related to understanding and memory. Whether this belief was applicable in biochemical education was examined about two years after students had experienced biochemistry classes in their first year. The ability of organizing information in biochemistry was judged from the number of correct links of 886 biochemical…

  12. Uroncor consensus statement: Management of biochemical recurrence after radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer: From biochemical failure to castration resistance.

    PubMed

    López Torrecilla, José; Hervás, Asunción; Zapatero, Almudena; Gómez Caamaño, Antonio; Macías, Victor; Herruzo, Ismael; Maldonado, Xavier; Gómez Iturriaga, Alfonso; Casas, Francesc; González San Segundo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Management of patients who experience biochemical failure after radical radiotherapy with or without hormonal therapy is highly challenging. The clinician must not only choose the type of treatment, but also the timing and optimal sequence of treatment administration. When biochemical failure occurs, numerous treatment scenarios are possible, thus making it more difficult to select the optimal approach. Moreover, rapid and ongoing advances in treatment options require that physicians make decisions that could impact both survival and quality of life. The aim of the present consensus statement, developed by the Urological Tumour Working Group (URONCOR) of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR), is to provide cancer specialists with the latest, evidence-based information needed to make the best decisions for the patient under all possible treatment scenarios. The structure of this consensus statement follows the typical development of disease progression after biochemical failure, with the most appropriate treatment recommendations given for each stage. The consensus statement is organized into three separate chapters, as follows: biochemical failure with or without local recurrence and/or metastasis; progression after salvage therapy; and treatment of castration-resistant patients.

  13. Uroncor consensus statement: Management of biochemical recurrence after radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer: From biochemical failure to castration resistance

    PubMed Central

    López Torrecilla, José; Hervás, Asunción; Zapatero, Almudena; Gómez Caamaño, Antonio; Macías, Victor; Herruzo, Ismael; Maldonado, Xavier; Gómez Iturriaga, Alfonso; Casas, Francesc; González San Segundo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Management of patients who experience biochemical failure after radical radiotherapy with or without hormonal therapy is highly challenging. The clinician must not only choose the type of treatment, but also the timing and optimal sequence of treatment administration. When biochemical failure occurs, numerous treatment scenarios are possible, thus making it more difficult to select the optimal approach. Moreover, rapid and ongoing advances in treatment options require that physicians make decisions that could impact both survival and quality of life. The aim of the present consensus statement, developed by the Urological Tumour Working Group (URONCOR) of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR), is to provide cancer specialists with the latest, evidence-based information needed to make the best decisions for the patient under all possible treatment scenarios. The structure of this consensus statement follows the typical development of disease progression after biochemical failure, with the most appropriate treatment recommendations given for each stage. The consensus statement is organized into three separate chapters, as follows: biochemical failure with or without local recurrence and/or metastasis; progression after salvage therapy; and treatment of castration-resistant patients. PMID:26109913

  14. Protective efficacy of ellagic acid on glycoproteins, hematological parameters, biochemical changes, and electrolytes in myocardial infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Kannan, M Mari; Quine, S Darlin; Sangeetha, T

    2012-07-01

    The cardioprotective property of ellagic acid in rats has been reported previously. The present study reveals the protective role of ellagic acid in biochemical parameters including serum iron, plasma iron binding capacity, uric acid, glycoprotein, and electrolytes along with hematological parameters. Rats were subcutaneously injected with isoproterenol (ISO) (100 mg/kg) for 2 days to induce myocardial infarction. ISO-induced rats showed a significant increase in their levels of serum iron, serum uric acid, and blood glucose, and a significant decrease in their levels of plasma iron binding capacity, serum total protein, albumin/globulin ratio, and heart glycogen, when compared with normal control rats. The altered hematological parameters were also observed in ISO-induced rats when compared with normal control rats. Pretreatment with ellagic acid at doses of 7.5 and 15 mg/kg produced significant beneficial effect by returning all the above-mentioned biochemical and hematological parameters to near normal levels.

  15. Audiovisual Stimulation Modulates Physical Performance and Biochemical and Hormonal Status of Athletes.

    PubMed

    Golovin, M S; Golovin, M S; Aizman, R I

    2016-09-01

    We studied the effect of audiovisual stimulation training course on physical development, functional state of the cardiovascular system, blood biochemical parameters, and hormonal status of athletes. The training course led to improvement of physical performance and adaptive capacities of the circulatory system, increase in plasma levels of total protein, albumin, and glucose and total antioxidant activity, and decrease in triglyceride, lipase, total bilirubin, calcium, and phosphorus. The concentration of hormones (cortisol, thyrotropin, triiodothyronine, and thyroxine) also decreased under these conditions. In the control group, an increase in the concentration of creatinine and uric acid and a tendency toward elevation of lowdensity lipoproteins and total antioxidant activity were observed in the absence of changes in cardiac function and physical performance; calcium and phosphorus concentrations reduced. The improvement in functional state in athletes was mainly associated with intensification of anabolic processes and suppression of catabolic reactions after audiovisual stimulation (in comparison with the control). Stimulation was followed by an increase in the number of correlations between biochemical and hormonal changes and physical performance of athletes, which attested to better integration of processes at the intersystem level.

  16. Biochemical Effects of Energy Drinks Alone or in Combination with Alcohol in Normal Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the biochemical effects of energy drink alone or in combination with alcohol in normal albino rats. Methods: Twenty male albino rats weighing 160-180g were assigned into groups A-E of four rats per group. Group A and B rats were given low and high doses of ED, respectively, groups C and D were administered low and high doses of EDmA, respectively while group E rats were given distilled water and served as control. The treatment lasted for 30 days after which the animals were killed and their blood collected for laboratory analyses using standard methods. Results: There were no significant differences in body weight, packed cell volume and haemoglobin concentration with either administration of ED or EDmA in comparison to the control. Energy drink alone or EDmA has significant effects on total white blood cell count, plasma potassium, calcium, renal functions, liver enzymes and plasma triglycerides, with EDmA having more effects than ED alone, except for body weight where the energy drink alone has higher effect. Conclusion: Consumption of energy drink alone or in combination with alcohol is associated with significant alterations in some biochemical parameters. Caution should be exercised while consuming either of them. Public health education is urgently needed to correct the wrong impression already formed by the unsuspecting consumers, especially the youths. PMID:24409412

  17. Morphological and biochemical responses of Abelmoschus esculantus (L.) Moench to zinc nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokak, I. B.; Taranath, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing application and use of nanoparticles are directly related to their release in the environment. There has arisen the necessity to study the interactions of nanoparticles with plants and other organisms. The present investigation is an attempt to evaluate the morphological and biochemical responses of Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench to zinc nanoparticles treatment. Seeds were treated with zinc nanoparticles at concentrations of 50 100, 200, 500 ppm. The morphological and biochemical responses recorded include germination percentage, root, shoot length, number of root hairs and number of leaves. Chlorophyll, protein, proline and carbohydrate contents in the leaves of 30-days-old treated plants were estimated. A greater amount of total dissolved solids (TDS) leached out from the seeds soaked in different concentrations of Zn nanoparticles compared to the control. Zinc nanoparticles executed a positive impact on the seed germination. The seed germination percentage increased in all the treatments compared to control. Increase in the chlorophyll and protein content was also observed in the treated plants. The proline content increased in treated plants indicating the stress. The carbohydrate content of leaves decreased drastically in response to the treatment.

  18. [Influence of HIV/AIDS infection on some biochemical indicators of the nutritional status].

    PubMed

    Linares, M E; Bencomo, J F; Pérez, L E; Tórrez, O; Barrera, O

    2002-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze the influence of nutritional state among HIV-1 infected people, according to the different clinical stages referred by the CDC (Control Disease Center of the United States) in 1987, as well as the changes in the concentrations of some biochemical markers linked to nutritional state. A similar study was carried out in a control group with UltramicroELISA non-reagent healthy individuals, anthropometrically classified. Concentrations of total proteins, albumin, cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, uric acid and creatinine were analyzed by sex and clinical group, comparing the levels obtained through a variance study. When comparing HIV-1 asymptomatic infected patients to HIV-1 and HIV-2 non infected people, the results showed a non significant increase in the level of total proteins with a significant decrease of albumin and creatinine, the latter observed only in male patients. In stage IV patients, an important decrease of cholesterol and a significant increase of the triglycerides were found, as well as the lowest albumin levels. Urea and uric acid levels did not experience statistically significant changes. It was concluded that the study of biochemical markers is advisable, since it contributes to the detection by default of malnutrition marginal states in infected individuals.

  19. [Experimental electric and biochemical data on ventricular fibrillation due to ischemia].

    PubMed

    Arnulf, G

    1976-08-01

    The author presents the results of prolonged research into ventricular fibrillation during myocardial ischaemia, both from the electrocardiographic and biochemical standpoints. - He emphasises the successive tonic and atonic features of VF due to ischaemia, and the difference between the fibrillation in an ischaemic area and in a control area. The most original concept is that there is often a difference between the onset of VF in an ischaemic zone and in a control zone. This study has been carried out with both acute and progressive ischaemia. - The biochemical studies were carried out on blood samples taken from the origin of the coronary arteries, the coronary veins, and from the saphenous veins. An important finding was the definite increase in the potassium level of the coronary venous blood in proportion to the degree of ischaemia; the sodium level showed little change, and if anything tended to fall. But the most important and distinctive finding was that at the onset of VF the sodium and potassium concentrations in the coronary venous blood suddenly increase. As the VF continues, there is a progressive increase in lactic acid and a fall in pH, which is maximal at the onset of the VF. These findings are valid under normothermic conditions, and when there is no extracorporeal circulation. - The physiopathological and practical implications of these facts are discussed.

  20. The effects of forced molt treatment on blood biochemicals in hens.

    PubMed

    Gildersleeve, R P; Satterlee, D G; Johnson, W A; Scott, T R

    1983-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of an environmentally induced force molt treatment on concentrations and daily variations of selected serum biochemicals during early molt. Laying hens were placed into two environmental control chambers. In one chamber, control (Con) laying hens were maintained on long photoperiods of 19 hr of light daily to maintain egg production. In the other chamber, early molt (EM) hens were exposed to short photoperiods of 6 hr of light daily to decrease egg production. After 2 weeks in the chambers, feed was withdrawn from EM hens for 2 days to initiate molt. Three days after feed was restored, hens from both groups were blood sampled every 2 hr for 2 days for selected serum biochemical analyses. Serum concentrations of calcium (Ca), inorganic phosphate (P), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), and albumin (Alb) were depressed in EM hens. Serum concentrations of alkaline phosphatase (Alk P), lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glucose (Glu), cholesterol (Chol), and globulin (Glob) were elevated in EM hens. Daily temporal rhythms of Ca, Glu, total protein (TP), and Alb were found in both hen groups. These temporal changes were independent of force molt treatment. Serum GOT was positively correlated with nuclei free liver corticosteroids (LCS) and negatively associated with plasma corticosterone in Con hens. Serum GOT was positively correlated with nuclei free LCS in EM hens.

  1. [Morphofunctional and biochemical properties of erythrocytes in early postnatal ontogenesis in rats in norm and after prenatal stress].

    PubMed

    Golubeva, E K; Nazarov, S B; Tomilova, I K

    2011-07-01

    Morphofunctional and biochemical properties of erythrocyte membrane were investigated in early postnatal ontogenesis in rats in norm and after prenatal immobilization stress. The transient decrease of erythrocyte membranes stability was revealed in the control rats. The ability to erythrocyte transformation and the concentration of lipid peroxidation products are increased. It has been shown by an increase of percentage discocytes and lower lipid peroxidation level that the erythrocyte membrane of the rats after prenatal stress is more stable.

  2. Treatment of osteoarthritis with tiaprofenic acid: biochemical and histological protection against cartilage breakdown in the Pond-Nuki canine model.

    PubMed

    Howell, D S; Pita, J C; Muller, F J; Manicourt, D H; Altman, R D

    1991-02-01

    Experimental and cage matched control animals were sacrificed 12 weeks after production of ligamentous instability in the right knee, and biochemical studies were performed on eroded OA and normal articular cartilage. Significant protection was afforded by tiaprofenic acid administered orally at 15 mg/kg body weight. Chondroprotection was manifested by reduction of fast sedimenting proteoglycan aggregates, as well as retention of hyaluronate content, and favorable proteoglycan aggregate S value levels. This agent showed significant chondroprotective action under the conditions of these studies.

  3. Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury of Adipofascial Tissue: An Experimental Study Evaluating Early Histologic and Biochemical Alterations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kenan Coban, Yusuf; Belge Kurutas, Ergul; Ciralik, Harun

    2005-01-01

    Fat necrosis remains a serious complication in reconstructive flaps. In clinical setting, it is well known that fat tissue is more susceptible to ischemic events. We aimed to evaluate early histological and biochemical changes of adipofascial tissue in an experimantal model. An epigastric flap model in rats was used to evaluate the effect of ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury on adipofascial tissue. Two groups of animals (one with ischemia alone and other ischemia-reperfusion group) were used to evaluate the degree of histological edema, congestion and extravascular bleeding, and early biochemical alterations within the adipofascial flaps. The biochemical parameters included glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In each group, contralateral groin subcutaneous adipose tissue served as control. These evaluations were compared to normal unmanipulated, contralateral abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. The ischemia-reperfused flap group showed histologically significantly much edema congestion and bleeding than the control groups (P < .0001). The control group showed less edema in fat tissue than the ischemia-alone group (P < .05). All of the flaps in the ischemia-only group showed significantly less bleeding and edema than I-R group (P < .001). The ratio of MDA/GSH was 33 in control, 37 in ischemia alone, and 82 in ischemia-reperfusion groups, respectively. This study confirms that significant histologic and biochemical alteration occurs after ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion events in adipose tissue. Marked drop in adipose tissue antioxidant levels after I-R suggested that preemptive measures to this decrease should be undertaken in clinical settings. PMID:16258198

  4. [Morphophysiological and biochemical characteristics of potato plants with various expression rates of the Δ12 acyl-lipid desaturase gene].

    PubMed

    Zagoskina, N V; Priadekhina, E V; Lapshin, P V; Iur'eva, N O; Goldenkova-Pavlova, I V

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on morphophysiological and biochemical characteristics of control and potato plants (Solarium tuberosum L., Skoroplodnyi cultivar) transformed with the Δ12 acyl-lipid desaturase gene (desA) grown long-term in vitro. The transformed plants showed faster growth and faster ontogenesis as compared to controls, which was accompanied with changes in the accumulation of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls a and b, carotenoids) and phenolic compounds, including flavonoids in the leaves. These characteristics were pronounced to a high degree in Line II plants with high expression rates of the desA gene, whereas Line I plants (moderate expression rate) were similar to control plants in many parameters.

  5. Short-term effects of different organic amendments on soil chemical, biochemical and biological indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelli, Donato; Aly, Adel; Yirga Dagnachew, Ababu; Piscitelli, Lea; Dumontet, Stefano; Miano, Teodoro

    2014-05-01

    compared to control soil. Results concerning biochemical indicators revealed that phosphatase and β-glycosidase were significantly reduced, while activities of urease and FDA were improved in all amended plots in comparison to the control, regardless of amendment type. Data demonstrated the efficiency, the high sensitivity and a quick response of the biochemical indicators in assessing soil quality changes. As a conclusion, it is possible to emphasize that alternative and common soil organic amendments behave similarly in enhancing the chemical, biochemical and biological properties. The alternative soil organic amendments could, then, be candidates for substituting some commonly used one which are currently showing shortage in their supply and a lowering in their quality. Keywords: Organic agriculture, Soil quality, Enzymatic activities, Olive mill wastewater, Residues of mushroom cultivation, Coffee chaff.

  6. Biochemical changes in the serum of patients with chronic toxigenic mold exposures: a risk factor for multiple renal dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Anyanwu, Ebere; Campbell, Andrew W; Vojdani, Aristo; Ehiri, John E; Akpan, Akpan I

    2003-11-03

    This paper analyzes and presents the biochemical abnormalities in the sera of patients presenting with chronic mycosis in order to investigate the relationship with the risks of multiple renal disorders. The study population (n = 10) consisted of six females and four males (mean age 36.3 years) exposed by toxic molds in their homes and offices for an average of 2.8 years. The control group comprised ten people, five males and five females (mean age 35.9 years) without any known exposures to toxic molds. Blood samples were obtained from both the patients and the controls and were processed using specific biochemical methods that included enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). There were biochemical abnormal concentrations in creatinine, uric acid, phosphorus, alkaline phosphotase, cholesterol, HDH, SGOT/AST, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, total T3, IgG and IgA immunoglobulins with significant differences between patients and controls. These abnormalities were consistent with multiple renal disorders. The major complaints of the mycosis patients were headaches, pulmonary symptoms, allergic reactions, memory loss, skin rashes, blurred vision symptoms, fatigue, and runny nose. These findings were depictive of a strong association of chronic mycosis with abnormal renal indicators. It was concluded that, although this research was a pilot investigation, based on the overall results, people exposed to chronic indoor environmental toxic molds were at risk of multiple renal complications.

  7. Infrared spectroscopic imaging of the biochemical modifications induced in the cerebellum of the Niemann-Pick type C mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, Linda H.; Colarusso, Pina; Stewart, Sarah A.; Levin, Ira W.; Appel, Nathan M.; Lester, David S.; Pentchev, Peter G.; Lewis, E. N.

    1999-01-01

    WE have applied Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopic imaging to the investigation of the neuropathologic effects of a genetic lipid storage disease, Niemann-Pick type C (NPC). Tissue sections both from the cerebella of a strain of BALB/c mice that demonstrated morphology and pathology of the human disease and from control animals were used. These samples were analyzed by standard histopathological procedures as well as this new IR imaging approach. The IR absorbance images exhibit contrast based on biochemical variations and allow for the identification of the cellular layers within the tissue samples. Furthermore, these images provide a qualitative description of the localized biochemical differences existing between the diseased and control tissue in the absence of histological staining. Statistical analyses of the IR spectra extracted from individual cell layers of the imaging data sets provide concise quantitative descriptions of these biochemical changes. The results indicate that lipid is depleted specifically in the white matter of the NPC mouse in comparison to the control samples. Minor differences were noted for the granular layers, but no significant differences were observed in the molecular layers of the cerebellar tissue. These changes are consistent with significant demyelination within the cerebellum of the NPC mouse.

  8. National Bioenergy Center Biochemical Platform Integration Project: Quarterly Update #26, January - March 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, D.

    2010-04-01

    January-March, 2010 edition of the National Bioenergy Center's Biochemical Platform Integration Project quarterly newsletter. Issue topics: understanding and improving sugar measurements in biomass hydrolysates; expansion of the NREL/DOE Biochemical Pilot Plant.

  9. ESTIMATING GASEOUS EXCHANGES BETWEEN THE ATMOSPHERE AND PLANTS USING A COUPLED BIOCHEMICAL DRY DEPOSITION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To study gaseous exchanges between the soil, biosphere and atmosphere, a biochemical model was coupled with the latest version of Meyers Multi-Layer Deposition Model. The biochemical model describes photosynthesis and respiration and their coupling with stomatal resistance for...

  10. Study on follicular characteristics, hormonal and biochemical profile in norgestomet+PMSG treated acyclic buffaloes

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, A.; Srivastava, S. K.; Sharma, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted to study the follicular dynamics, hormonal, biochemical profile and fertility response in acyclic and norgestomet+PMSG treated acyclic buffaloes in summer. The study animals were divided into two groups: group I [control (n=8): no treatment] and II [treatment group (n=15)]. In group II, seven animals were used for follicular biochemical and hormonal profile and eight animals for fertility studies following Crestar® (Intervet, France) treatment (day 0: Crestar® insertion; day 8: 500 IU PMSG; day 9: Crestar® removal; day 11 AI). Follicular fluid stradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) in acyclic and pre-ovulatory follicle in study groups was significantly (P<0.01) higher than peripheral level. Peripheral E2 concentration, during pre-ovulatory period in group II was higher (P<0.05) than group I. Significant correlation between serum and follicular E2 was deduced (r=0.888; P<0.01) as significant difference in serum cholesterol content was shown between groups. Lower follicular total protein (P<0.05) in acyclic animals and higher follicular glucose (P<0.05) in treated group were concluded. Significant correlation (r=-0.770; P<0.05) was observed between follicular cholesterol and triglycerides. Follicular characteristics, post PMSG administration, differed significantly (0.83 ± 0.20 vs 1.32 ± 0.12; P<0.01) in all buffaloes exhibiting estrus, out of which four conceived. In conclusion, follicular hormonal and biochemical profile exhibits alteration in protein and glucose level between summer acyclic and treated buffaloes. However, peripheral E2 along with fertility response showed significant difference (P<0.01) between the study groups with significant correlation in E2, cholesterol and triglycerides between peripheral and follicular compartment. PMID:28224008

  11. Biochemical Effects of Xylazine, Propofol, and Ketamine in West African Dwarf Goats.

    PubMed

    Celestine Okwudili, Ukwueze; Athanasius Chinedu, Eze; Jonas Anayo, Ona

    2014-01-01

    Anaesthesia was induced in West African Dwarf (WAD) goats using different combinations of propofol (P), xylazine (X), and ketamine (K), and the biochemical effect of the drugs determined. Twenty male (WAD) goats were randomly assigned to five treatment groups viz. Control (C) (2.5 mL IV normal saline); group K + X (5 mg/kg IV ketamine + 0.05 mg/kg IV xylazine), group P + X (5 mg/kg IV propofol + 0.05 mg/kg IV xylazine), group P + K (propofol 5 mg/kg IV + ketamine 5 mg/kg IV), and group P + K + X (propofol 2.5 mg/kg IV + ketamine 2.5 mg/kg IV + xylazine 0.05 mg/kg IV), respectively. There was increase (P < 0.05) in blood glucose in K + X, P + X and P + K + X. The serum cortisol level increased (P < 0.05) in all groups except in P + X. ALT value increased (P < 0.05) in K + X, P + K, and P + K + X. BUN increased (P < 0.05) in K + X but decreased (P < 0.05) in P + K + X. There was no significant variation (P > 0.05) in serum creatinine. These biochemical changes were transient. P + K + X would be the best drug combinations considering the biochemical parameter measured. However, data on blood glucose, ALT, BUN, and cortisol levels in an anaesthsized goat should be interpreted with caution in order to avoid erroneous interpretation in these animals.

  12. Exploring and Understanding the Biochemical Diversity of the Human Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Nitzan; Balskus, Emily P

    2016-01-21

    Recent studies have illuminated a remarkable diversity and abundance of microbes living on and within the human body. While we are beginning to appreciate associations of certain bacteria and genes with particular host physiological states, considerable information is lacking about the relevant functional activities of the human microbiota. The human gut microbiome encodes tremendous potential for the biosynthesis and transformation of compounds that are important for both microbial and host physiology. Implementation of chemical knowledge and techniques will be required to improve our understanding of the biochemical diversity of the human microbiota. Such efforts include the characterization of novel microbial enzymes and pathways, isolation of microbial natural products, and development of tools to modulate biochemical functions of the gut microbiota. Ultimately, a molecular understanding of gut microbial activities will be critical for elucidating and manipulating these organisms' contributions to human health and disease.

  13. Electrolyte-Gated Graphene Ambipolar Frequency Multipliers for Biochemical Sensing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Feng, Lingyan; Mayer, Dirk; Panaitov, Gregory; Kireev, Dmitry; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Krause, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-13

    In this Letter, the ambipolar properties of an electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) have been explored to fabricate frequency-doubling biochemical sensor devices. By biasing the ambipolar GFETs in a common-source configuration, an input sinusoidal voltage at frequency f applied to the electrolyte gate can be rectified to a sinusoidal wave at frequency 2f at the drain electrode. The extraordinary high carrier mobility of graphene and the strong electrolyte gate coupling provide the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler an unprecedented unity gain, as well as a detection limit of ∼4 pM for 11-mer single strand DNA molecules in 1 mM PBS buffer solution. Combined with an improved drift characteristics and an enhanced low-frequency 1/f noise performance by sampling at doubled frequency, this good detection limit suggests the graphene ambipolar frequency doubler a highly promising biochemical sensing platform.

  14. The genetic and biochemical basis of FANCD2 monoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Rajendra, Eeson; Oestergaard, Vibe H; Langevin, Frédéric; Wang, Meng; Dornan, Gillian L; Patel, Ketan J; Passmore, Lori A

    2014-06-05

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by cellular sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinkers. The molecular defect in FA is an impaired DNA repair pathway. The critical event in activating this pathway is monoubiquitination of FANCD2. In vivo, a multisubunit FA core complex catalyzes this step, but its mechanism is unclear. Here, we report purification of a native avian FA core complex and biochemical reconstitution of FANCD2 monoubiquitination. This demonstrates that the catalytic FANCL E3 ligase subunit must be embedded within the complex for maximal activity and site specificity. We genetically and biochemically define a minimal subcomplex comprising just three proteins (FANCB, FANCL, and FAAP100) that functions as the monoubiquitination module. Residual FANCD2 monoubiquitination activity is retained in cells defective for other FA core complex subunits. This work describes the in vitro reconstitution and characterization of this multisubunit monoubiquitin E3 ligase, providing key insight into the conserved FA DNA repair pathway.

  15. Label-free optical resonant sensors for biochemical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, Caterina; Campanella, Clarissa Martina; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Campanella, Carlo Edoardo; Armenise, Mario Nicola

    2013-03-01

    For a number of years, the scientific community has been paying growing attention to the monitoring and enhancement of public health and the quality of life through the detection of all dangerous agents for the human body, including gases, proteins, virus, and bacterial agents. When these agents are detected through label-free biochemical sensors, the molecules are not modified structurally or functionally by adding fluorescent or radioactive dyes. This work focuses on label-free optical ring resonator-based configurations suited for bio-chemical sensing, highlighting their physical aspects and specific applications. Resonant wavelength shift and the modal splitting occurring when the analyte interacts with microresonant structures are the two major physical aspects analyzed in this paper. Competitive optical platforms proposed in the literature are also illustrated together with their properties and performance.

  16. Role and importance of biochemical markers in clinical cardiology.

    PubMed

    Panteghini, Mauro

    2004-07-01

    This paper reviews the current contribution of the biochemical marker determination to clinical cardiology and discusses some important developments in this field. Biochemical markers play a pivotal role in the diagnosis and management of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), as witnessed by the incorporation of cardiac troponins into new international guidelines for patients with ACS and in the re-definition of myocardial infarction. Despite the success of cardiac troponins, there is still a need for the development of early markers that can reliably rule out ACS from the emergency room at presentation and also detect myocardial ischaemia in the absence of irreversible myocyte injury. Under investigation are two classes of indicators: markers of early injury/ischaemia and markers of inflammation and coronary plaque instability and disruption. Finally, with the characterisation of the cardiac natriuretic peptides, Laboratory Medicine is also assuming a role in the assessment of cardiac function.

  17. [Biochemical investigation for clinical diagnosis of drug dependence].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi

    2010-08-01

    Specific biochemical marker is not available for clinical diagnosis of drug dependence at present. However, drug abuse is accompanied by a decrease in serotonin and the derivative in cerebrospinal fluid, suggesting central serotonergic dysfunction, that is associated with cognitive deficits, alterations in sleep architecture and neuroendocrine function, and increased impulsivity as well as an increase in the risk for aggressive behavior toward the self involving suicide. For central stimulant abusers, elevated plasma catecholamine levels are associated with psychotic episodes and cardiovascular complications involving tachycardia and arrhythmias. Biochemical investigation is useful for predicting drug-induced mental disorders, complications and the prognosis, and also for differentiation from other mental disorders, e.g., secondary to metabolic and infectious diseases, or management of acute intoxication.

  18. [Biochemical evaluation of renal lesions produced by electrohydraulic shock waves].

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Vela, L; Abadia Bayona, T; Lazaro Castillo, J; Guallar Labrador, A; Rioja Sanz, C; Rioja Sanz, L A

    1995-01-01

    The authors present a biochemical study of the renal lesions produced during extracorporeal electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The sequential variation (before and after ESWL) of various biochemical parameters of the blood and 24-hour urine was analysed in 50 patients. A significant increase of urinary N-Acetyl-Glucosaminidase (NAG), urinary NAG/urinary creatinine quotient, proteinuria, serum creatinine and potassium was detected during the 24 hours following ESWL. A significant fall in creatinine clearance, urinary osmolarity and uric acid clearance was also detected. A positive correlation was observed between these alterations, the number of shocks and the kilovoltage used. On the 7th and 15th days, no significant difference was observed compared to the baseline values before ESWL. This can be explained by the fact that the lesions caused by shock waves are already in the repair phase.

  19. Hematological and biochemical reference values for the endangered kiso horse.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Masaki; Nagatani, Nana; Tozaki, Teruaki; Kakoi, Hironaga; Maeda, Masami; Murase, Tetsuma; Mukoyama, Harutaka

    2013-01-01

    To establish blood and biochemical references for the endangered Kiso horse, blood samples were collected from 111 adult Kiso horses, 74.5% of the existing breed. The samples were analyzed for 23 hematological and biochemical parameters to determine their means and standard deviations (SD). We compared the mean ± 2SD with the reference values cited in one of the most commonly used veterinary textbooks in Japan. The hematology of Kiso horses is characterized by lower erythrocyte count and hematocrit and hemoglobin levels. In addition, their serum biochemistry showed lower levels of aspartate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, and γ-glutamyl transferase. Whether these propensities are attributed to breed-specific factors or are acquired factors remains unclear. Nevertheless, this study provides useful diagnostic indices for the endangered Kiso horse.

  20. Self-organization in a biochemical-neuron network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Masahiro; Maki, Yukihiro; Sekiguchi, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Satoshi

    Mimicking the switching property of cyclic enzyme systems in metabolic pathways, we have proposed a different type of molecular switching device (post-synaptic neuron) whose mechanism can be represented by a threshold-logic function capable of storing short-term memory. We have named this system “biochemical-neuron” and have already developed the board-leveled analog circuit. In the present study, building the integrated artificial neural network system composed of biochemical-neurons, we have investigated the relationship between network responses and time-variant excited stimuli to the network, especially focusing on the examination of some neurophysiological experiments such as “selective elimination of synapses” and “associative long-term depression”. Furthermore we shall discuss the information processing where the time-variant external analog signals are received and transduced to impulse signals.