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Sample records for actuarial locoregional control

  1. Elective Inguinal Node Irradiation in Early-Stage T2N0 Anal Cancer: Prognostic Impact on Locoregional Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zilli, Thomas; Betz, Michael; Bieri, Sabine; Ris, Frederic; Roche, Bruno; Roth, Arnaud D.; Allal, Abdelkarim S.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of elective inguinal node radiation therapy (INRT) on locoregional control (LRC) in patients with early-stage T2N0 anal cancer treated conservatively with primary RT. Methods and Materials: Between 1976 and 2008, 116 patients with T2 node-negative anal cancer were treated curatively with RT alone (n=48) or by combined chemoradiation therapy (CRT) (n=68) incorporating mitomycin C and 5-fluorouracil. Sixty-four percent of the patients (n=74) received elective INRT. Results: Over a median follow-up of 69 months (range, 4-243 months), 97 (84%) and 95 patients (82%) were locally and locoregionally controlled, respectively. Rates for 5-year actuarial local control, LRC, cancer-specific, and overall survival for the entire population were 81.7% ± 3.8%, 79.2% ± 4.1%, 91.1% ± 3.0%, and 72.1% ± 4.5%, respectively. The overall 5-year inguinal relapse-free survival was 92.3% ± 2.9%. Isolated inguinal recurrence occurred in 2 patients (4.7%) treated without INRT, whereas no groin relapse was observed in those treated with INRT. The 5-year LRC rates for patients treated with and without INRT and with RT alone versus combined CRT were 80.1% ± 5.0% versus 77.8% ± 7.0% (P=.967) and 71.0% ± 7.2% versus 85.4% ± 4.5% (P=.147), respectively. A trend toward a higher rate of grade ≥3 acute toxicity was observed in patients treated with INRT (53% vs 31%, P=.076). Conclusions: In cases of node-negative T2 anal cancer, the inguinal relapse rate remains relatively low with or without INRT. The role of INRT in the treatment of early-stage anal carcinoma needs to be investigated in future prospective trials.

  2. Monitoring Actuarial Present Values of Term Life Insurance By a Statistical Process Control Chart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafidz Omar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Tracking performance of life insurance or similar insurance policy using standard statistical process control chart is complex because of many factors. In this work, we present the difficulty in doing so. However, with some modifications of the SPC charting framework, the difficulty can be manageable to the actuaries. So, we propose monitoring a simpler but natural actuarial quantity that is typically found in recursion formulas of reserves, profit testing, as well as present values. We shared some simulation results for the monitoring process. Additionally, some advantages of doing so is discussed.

  3. Trastuzumab improves locoregional control in HER2-positive breast cancer patients following adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Cai, Gang; Xu, Fei; Yang, Zhao-Zhi; Yu, Xiao-Li; Ma, Jin-Li; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiong; Guo, Xiao-Mao; Chen, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The benefit of adjuvant trastuzumab in disease-free and overall survival for human epidermal receptor 2–positive (HER2+) breast cancer patients is well established. However, the effect of trastuzumab on locoregional control remains unclear, particularly in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we investigated the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab in patients with HER2+ breast cancer after adjuvant RT. Using a single institutional database, we identified 278 patients with stage II/III invasive HER2+ breast tumors receiving adjuvant RT between January 2008 and July 2011. We compared the locoregional outcomes of 134 patients who received trastuzumab to 144 patients without trastuzumab within the same period. Clinical and biological factors that might impact on the locoregional benefit of trastuzumab were also assessed. At the median follow-up of 45 months, trastuzumab significantly lowered the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) with a 3-year LRR rate of 2.4% versus 7.5% for the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.019). Trastuzumab was associated with a more significant locoregional benefit in the hormone receptor–positive (HR+)/HER2+ subgroup, with a 3-year LRR of 0% versus 6.7% in the cohort with and without trastuzumab (P = 0.027). For HR−/HER2+ breast tumor patients, the 3-year LRR rate was still lower for the cohort with trastuzumab (4.7% vs 8.6%). However, statistical significance was not found (P = 0.179). Both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that trastuzumab treatment was the only significant predictive factor for LRR (hazard ratio, 4.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–15.35; P = 0.039). Adjuvant trastuzumab in addition to RT is associated with significant reduced LRR risk in HER2+ breast cancer. PMID:27512838

  4. Actuarial Valuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachers Retirement System of Louisiana, Baton Rouge.

    This report presents the results of the actuarial valuation of assets and liabilities as well as funding requirements for the Teachers Retirement System of Louisiana as of June 30, 1996. Data reported include current funding, actuarial assets and valuation assets. These include the Louisiana State University Agriculture and Extension Service Fund,…

  5. The essentials of locoregional control in the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    den Dulk, M; Verheij, M; Cats, A; Jansen, E P M; Hartgrink, H H; Van de Velde, C J H

    2006-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most frequent cancer in the world. For curative treatment and local control of gastric cancer, surgery is essential. The extent of the lymph node dissection is still under debate. Only one available trial showed significantly increased overall survival, whereas in all other randomised trials no significant difference could be found. As surgery alone often is not sufficient in the curative treatment in gastric cancer, different (neo)adjuvant treatment strategies have extensively been studied. The recently published MAGIC trial showed downstaging, downsizing and an improved overall survival for patients treated with perioperative chemotherapy, compared to surgery alone (difference 13%, p = 0.009). The INT 0116 trial on the other hand, demonstrated the benefit of postoperative chemoradiotherapy compared to surgery alone for patients with a curative resection of gastric cancer. However, the quality of resections in this trial was poor, illustrating the importance of standardisation by quality control. This could be done by the Maruyama index, which quantifies the likelihood of unresected disease. In the Netherlands, the CRITICS trial has recently been launched, which will be a quality controlled trial comparing postoperative chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy on survival and/or locoregional control in patients who receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by a D1+ gastric resection. PMID:17249271

  6. Ten-Year Recurrence Rates in Young Women With Breast Cancer by Locoregional Treatment Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Woodward, Wendy A. Tucker, Susan L.; Outlaw, Elesyia D.; Allen, Pamela K.; Oh, Julia L.; Strom, Eric A.; Perkins, George H.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, T.-K.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Litton, Jennifer K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Young women with breast cancer have higher locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates than older patients. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of locoregional treatment strategy, breast-conserving therapy (BCT), mastectomy alone (M), or mastectomy with adjuvant radiation (MXRT), on LRR for patients 35 years or younger. Methods and Materials: Data for 668 breast cancers in 652 young patients with breast cancer were retrospectively reviewed; 197 patients were treated with BCT, 237 with M, and 234 with MXRT. Results: Median follow-up for all living patients was 114 months. In the entire cohort, 10-year actuarial LRR rates varied by locoregional treatment: 19.8% for BCT, 24.1% for M, and 15.1% for MXRT (p = 0.05). In patients with Stage II disease, 10-year actuarial LRR rates by locoregional treatment strategy were 17.7% for BCT, 22.8% for M, and 5.7% for MXRT (p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, M (hazard ratio, 4.45) and Grade III disease (hazard ratio, 2.24) predicted for increased LRR. In patients with Stage I disease, there was no difference in LRR rates based on locoregional treatment (18.0% for BCT, 19.8% for M; p = 0.56), but chemotherapy use had a statistically significant LRR benefit (13.5% for chemotherapy, 27.9% for none; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Young women have high rates of LRR after breast cancer treatment. For patients with Stage II disease, the best locoregional control rates were achieved with MXRT. For patients with Stage I disease, similar outcomes were achieved with BCT and mastectomy; however, chemotherapy provided a significant benefit to either approach.

  7. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: Improvement in Locoregional Control Using Three-Dimensional Compared With Two-Dimensional Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Masson-Cote, Laurence; Couture, Christian; Fortin, Andre; Dagnault, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether lung cancer patients treated with three-dimensional (3D) postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) have more favorable outcomes than those treated with two-dimensional (2D) PORT. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 153 lung cancer patients who underwent PORT with curative intent at our center between 1995 and 2007. The patients were grouped according to the RT technique; 66 patients were in the 2D group and 87 in the 3D group. The outcomes included locoregional control, survival, and secondary effects. All patients were treated using a linear accelerator at a total dose of approximately 50 Gy and 2 Gy/fraction. A few patients (21%) also received chemotherapy. Most tumors were in the advanced stage, either Stage II (30%) or Stage III (65%). The main clinical indications for PORT were positive resection margins (23%) and Stage pN2 (52%) and pN1 (22%). The patient characteristics were comparable in both groups. Results: Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the 3D technique significantly improved the locoregional control rate at 5 years compared with the 2D technique (81% vs. 56%, p = .007 [Cox]). The 2D technique was associated with a more than twofold increased risk of locoregional recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-5.5; p = .006). The overall survival rate did not differ at 5 years (38% vs. 20%, p = .3 [Cox]). The toxicities were also similar and acceptable in both groups. Conclusion: The 3D technique for conformal PORT for lung cancer improved the locoregional control rates of patients compared with the 2D technique.

  8. External-beam radiotherapy for differentiated thyroid cancer locoregional control: A statement of the American Head and Neck Society

    PubMed Central

    Kiess, Ana P.; Agrawal, Nishant; Brierley, James D.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Ferris, Robert L.; Genden, Eric; Wong, Richard J.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Lee, Nancy Y.; Randolph, Gregory W.

    2016-01-01

    The use of external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is debated because of a lack of prospective clinical data, but recent retrospective studies have reported benefits in selected patients. The Endocrine Surgery Committee of the American Head and Neck Society provides 4 recommendations regarding EBRT for locoregional control in DTC, based on review of literature and expert opinion of the authors. (1) EBRT is recommended for patients with gross residual or unresectable locoregional disease, except for patients <45 years old with limited gross disease that is radioactive iodine (RAI)-avid. (2) EBRT should not be routinely used as adjuvant therapy after complete resection of gross disease. (3) After complete resection, EBRT may be considered in select patients >45 years old with high likelihood of microscopic residual disease and low likelihood of responding to RAI. (4) Cervical lymph node involvement alone should not be an indication for adjuvant EBRT. PMID:26716601

  9. External-beam radiotherapy for differentiated thyroid cancer locoregional control: A statement of the American Head and Neck Society.

    PubMed

    Kiess, Ana P; Agrawal, Nishant; Brierley, James D; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Ferris, Robert L; Genden, Eric; Wong, Richard J; Tuttle, R Michael; Lee, Nancy Y; Randolph, Gregory W

    2016-04-01

    The use of external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is debated because of a lack of prospective clinical data, but recent retrospective studies have reported benefits in selected patients. The Endocrine Surgery Committee of the American Head and Neck Society provides 4 recommendations regarding EBRT for locoregional control in DTC, based on review of literature and expert opinion of the authors. (1) EBRT is recommended for patients with gross residual or unresectable locoregional disease, except for patients <45 years old with limited gross disease that is radioactive iodine (RAI)-avid. (2) EBRT should not be routinely used as adjuvant therapy after complete resection of gross disease. (3) After complete resection, EBRT may be considered in select patients >45 years old with high likelihood of microscopic residual disease and low likelihood of responding to RAI. (4) Cervical lymph node involvement alone should not be an indication for adjuvant EBRT. PMID:26716601

  10. Efficacy of the Additional Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy to Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Patients with Locoregionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: a Bayesian Network Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Guo, Rui; Liu, Na; Liu, Xu; Mao, Yan-Ping; Tang, Ling-Long; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Due to the lack of studies, it remains unclear whether the additional neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is superior to CCRT alone for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The main objective of this Bayesian network meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy of NACT+CCRT as compared with CCRT alone. Methods: We comprehensively searched databases and extracted data from randomized controlled trials involving NPC patients who received NACT+CCRT, CCRT, NACT+radiotherapy (RT), or RT. Overall survival (OS) with hazard ratio (HR), and locoregional recurrence rate (LRR) and distant metastasis rate (DMR) with relative risks (RRs), were concerned. Results: Nine trials involving 1988 patients were analyzed. In the network meta-analysis, there was significant benefit of NACT+CCRT over CCRT for DMR (RR=0.54, 95% credible interval [CrI]=0.27-0.94). However, NACT+CCRT had a tendency to worsen locoregional control significantly as compared with CCRT (RR =1.71, 95%CrI =0.94-2.84), and no significant improvement in OS was found (HR =0.73, 95%CrI=0.40-1.23). Conclusions: NACT+CCRT is associated with reduced distant failure as compared with CCRT alone, and whether the additional NACT can improve survival for locoregionally advanced NPC should be further explored. Optimizing regimens and identifying patients at high risk of metastasis may enhance the efficacy of NACT+CCRT. PMID:26284140

  11. The Casualty Actuarial Society: Helping Universities Train Future Actuaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boa, J. Michael; Gorvett, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) believes that the most effective way to advance the actuarial profession is to work in partnership with universities. The CAS stands ready to assist universities in creating or enhancing courses and curricula associated with property/casualty actuarial science. CAS resources for university actuarial science…

  12. Pretreatment Quality of Life Predicts for Locoregional Control in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Pajak, Thomas F.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Konski, Andre A.; Coyne, James C.; Gwede, Clement K.; Garden, Adam S.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prospectively collected health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data from patients enrolled in two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group randomized Phase III head and neck cancer trials (90-03 and 91-11) to assess their value as an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control (LRC) and/or overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: HRQOL questionnaires, using a validated instrument, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H and N), version 2, were completed by patients before the start of treatment. OS and LRC were the outcome measures analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Baseline FACT-H and N data were available for 1,093 patients and missing for 417 patients. No significant difference in outcome was found between the patients with and without baseline FACT-H and N data (p = 0.58). The median follow-up time was 27.2 months for all patients and 49 months for surviving patients. Multivariate analyses were performed for both OS and LRC. Beyond tumor and nodal stage, Karnofsky performance status, primary site, cigarette use, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and altered fractionation schedules, the FACT-H and N score was independently predictive of LRC (but not OS), with p = 0.0038. The functional well-being component of the FACT-H and N predicted most significantly for LRC (p = 0.0004). Conclusions: This study represents, to our knowledge, the largest analysis of HRQOL as a prognostic factor in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. The results of this study have demonstrated the importance of baseline HRQOL as a significant and independent predictor of LRC in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  13. Solitary Myocardial Metastasis from Locoregionally Controlled Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Roderick; Skarsgard, David

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 62-year-old male originally diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the right retromolar trigone, Stage cT2N2bM0. He was treated radically with a pharyngotomy and segmental mandibular resection, right selective neck nodal dissection, and then reconstruction with a free fibular flap. The pathologic stage was T4aN1. He then received adjuvant chemoradiation therapy with a radiation dose of 6,000 cGy in 30 fractions, along with cisplatin, 100 mg/m2 every three weeks. Good local control was repeatedly documented for two years. He then presented with shortness of breath and new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) with rapid ventricular response. Computed tomography/pulmonary embolus protocol (CT/PE) showed no evidence of pulmonary embolism but did show a small pericardial effusion. His AF was refractory to medical management, and he was later admitted to hospital with congestive heart failure. He was found to have a large mass arising from the free wall of the right ventricle, a biopsy of which confirmed squamous cell carcinoma consistent with his head and neck primary. The patient declined further therapy and passed away within one month of presentation. This case is unusual in that the only known site of metastatic disease seen was to the myocardium of the right ventricle, presenting as cardiac arrhythmia and congestive heart failure. Although post-mortem studies show cardiac metastases to occur in 2 to 20% of cancer patients, it is rarely seen as a sole site of relapse in clinical practice. PMID:27453804

  14. A new surgical strategy for breast conservation in locally advanced breast cancer that achieves a good locoregional control rate: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Moneer, M; Ismael, S; Khaled, H; El-Gantery, M; Zaghloul, M S; El-Didi, M

    2001-06-01

    The scope of breast conserving surgery has recently expanded to include locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients who are downstaged following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). However, the efficacy of this approach in achieving adequate locoregional control of disease is in doubt. Some reports have attributed the failure to the association of NACT-induced tumour downstaging which can leave multifocal in situ and invasive lesions around the main tumour mass. In the present study, in order to eradicate all possible tumour satellites, a very wide local excision that included the whole original tumour-bearing area was performed regardless of the expected wide defect. This defect was then immediately reconstructed by an ipsilateral pedicled latissimus dorsi myocutaneous (LDM) flap. The study included 26 patients with LABC without evidence of primary tumour-multicentricity. Tumours were downstaged following NACT. The early cosmetic outcome was good in the majority of cases. Early complications were minimal. Twenty-two patients had a mean follow up period of 30.2 (range 7-50) months. In those evaluable cases, locoregional control of the disease was excellent (100%) but distant metastases occurred in seven cases (31.8%). PMID:14965588

  15. Prognostic Impact of Erythropoietin Expression and Erythropoietin Receptor Expression on Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients Irradiated for Stage II/III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Setter, Cornelia; Dahl, Olav; Schild, Steven E.; Noack, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Prognostic factors can guide the physician in selecting the optimal treatment for an individual patient. This study investigates the prognostic value of erythropoietin (EPO) and EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression of tumor cells for locoregional control and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Fourteen factors were investigated in 62 patients irradiated for stage II/III NSCLC, as follows: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), histology, grading, TNM/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack years (average number of packages of cigarettes smoked per day multiplied by the number of years smoked), smoking during radiotherapy, hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy, EPO expression, and EPO-R expression. Additionally, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R were compared to those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and to those expressing neither EPO nor EPO-R. Results: On univariate analysis, improved locoregional control was associated with AJCC stage II cancer (p < 0.048), surgery (p < 0.042), no smoking during radiotherapy (p = 0.024), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). A trend was observed for a KPS of >70 (p = 0.08), an N stage of 0 to 1 (p = 0.07), and no EPO-R expression (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, AJCC stage II and no EPO expression remained significant. No smoking during radiotherapy was almost significant. On univariate analysis, improved survival was associated with N stage 0 to 1 (p = 0.009), surgery (p = 0.039), hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d (p = 0.016), and no EPO expression (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, N stage 0 to 1 and no EPO expression maintained significance. Hemoglobin levels of {>=}12 g/d were almost significant. On subgroup analyses, patients with tumors expressing both EPO and EPO-R had worse outcomes than those expressing either EPO or EPO-R and those expressing neither EPO nor RPO-R. Conclusions: EPO expression of tumor cells

  16. Locoregional Control of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Relation to Automated Early Assessment of Tumor Regression on Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Carsten; Bernchou, Uffe; Bertelsen, Anders; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Large interindividual variations in volume regression of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are observable on standard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) during fractionated radiation therapy. Here, a method for automated assessment of tumor volume regression is presented and its potential use in response adapted personalized radiation therapy is evaluated empirically. Methods and Materials: Automated deformable registration with calculation of the Jacobian determinant was applied to serial CBCT scans in a series of 99 patients with NSCLC. Tumor volume at the end of treatment was estimated on the basis of the first one third and two thirds of the scans. The concordance between estimated and actual relative volume at the end of radiation therapy was quantified by Pearson's correlation coefficient. On the basis of the estimated relative volume, the patients were stratified into 2 groups having volume regressions below or above the population median value. Kaplan-Meier plots of locoregional disease-free rate and overall survival in the 2 groups were used to evaluate the predictive value of tumor regression during treatment. Cox proportional hazards model was used to adjust for other clinical characteristics. Results: Automatic measurement of the tumor regression from standard CBCT images was feasible. Pearson's correlation coefficient between manual and automatic measurement was 0.86 in a sample of 9 patients. Most patients experienced tumor volume regression, and this could be quantified early into the treatment course. Interestingly, patients with pronounced volume regression had worse locoregional tumor control and overall survival. This was significant on patient with non-adenocarcinoma histology. Conclusions: Evaluation of routinely acquired CBCT images during radiation therapy provides biological information on the specific tumor. This could potentially form the basis for personalized response adaptive therapy.

  17. Underlying theory of actuarial analyses.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, B

    1985-05-01

    The developments in theory governing the calculation of mortality rates for use in survival measurements working through the initial basic concept of exposure to risk to the later introduction of stochastic elements are reviewed. I have indicated the way in which actuaries and statisticians who work closely with those in the fields of medicine and biology have, by the exchange of methodologic ideas, come to an identity of approach. Recent new actuarial work and likely future developments in actuarial interests are reviewed. PMID:4047154

  18. Dose-Escalated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible and May Improve Locoregional Control and Laryngeal Preservation in Laryngo-Hypopharyngeal Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Miah, Aisha B.; Bhide, Shreerang A.; Guerrero-Urbano, M. Teresa; Clark, Catharine; Bidmead, A. Margaret; St Rose, Suzanne; Barbachano, Yolanda; A'Hern, Roger; Tanay, Mary; Hickey, Jennifer; Nicol, Robyn; Newbold, Kate L.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and outcomes of induction chemotherapy followed by dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concomitant chemotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the larynx and hypopharynx (LA-SCCL/H). Methods and Materials: A sequential cohort Phase I/II trial design was used to evaluate moderate acceleration and dose escalation. Patients with LA-SCCL/H received IMRT at two dose levels (DL): DL1, 63 Gy/28 fractions (Fx) to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and 51.8 Gy/28 Fx to PTV2; DL2, 67.2 Gy/28 Fx and 56 Gy/28 Fx to PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Patients received induction cisplatin/5-fluorouracil and concomitant cisplatin. Acute and late toxicities and tumor control rates were recorded. Results: Between September 2002 and January 2008, 60 patients (29 DL1, 31 DL2) with Stage III (41% DL1, 52% DL2) and Stage IV (52% DL1, 48% DL2) disease were recruited. Median (range) follow-up for DL1 was 51.2 (12.1-77.3) months and for DL2 was 36.2 (4.2-63.3) months. Acute Grade 3 (G3) dysphagia was higher in DL2 (87% DL2 vs. 59% DL1), but other toxicities were equivalent. One patient in DL1 required dilatation of a pharyngeal stricture (G3 dysphagia). In DL2, 2 patients developed benign pharyngeal strictures at 1 year. One underwent a laryngo-pharyngectomy and the other a dilatation. No other G3/G4 toxicities were reported. Overall complete response was 79% (DL1) and 84% (DL2). Two-year locoregional progression-free survival rates were 64.2% (95% confidence interval, 43.5-78.9%) in DL1 and 78.4% (58.1-89.7%) in DL2. Two-year laryngeal preservation rates were 88.7% (68.5-96.3%) in DL1 and 96.4% (77.7-99.5%) in DL2. Conclusions: At a mean follow-up of 36 months, dose-escalated chemotherapy-IMRT at DL2 has so far been safe to deliver. In this study, DL2 delivered high rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and organ preservation and has been selected as the experimental arm in a Cancer Research UK Phase III

  19. Radiotherapy and Concomitant Intra-Arterial Docetaxel Combined With Systemic 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Preliminary Report-Improvement of Locoregional Control of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oikawa, Hirobumi Nakamura, Ryuji; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Kohji; Sato, Hiroaki; Ehara, Shigeru

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To confirm the advantage of chemoradiotherapy using intra-arterial docetaxel with intravenous cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 oropharyngeal cancer patients (1, 2, 2, and 21 patients had Stage I, II, III, and IVa-IVc, respectively) were treated with two sessions of this chemoradiotherapy regimen. External beam radiotherapy was delivered using large portals that included the primary site and the regional lymph nodes initially (range, 40-41.4 Gy) and the metastatic lymph nodes later (60 or 72 Gy). All tumor-supplying branches of the carotid arteries were cannulated, and 40 mg/m{sup 2} docetaxel was individually infused on Day 1. The other systemic chemotherapy agents included 60 mg/m{sup 2} cisplatin on Day 2 and 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil on Days 2-6. Results: The primary response of the tumor was complete in 21 (81%), partial in 4 (15%), and progressive in 1 patient. Grade 4 mucositis, leukopenia, and dermatitis was observed in 3, 2, and 1 patients, respectively. During a median follow-up of 10 months, the disease recurred at the primary site and at a distant organ in 2 (8%) and 3 (12%) patients, respectively. Three patients died because of cancer progression. Two patients (8%) with a partial response were compromised by lethal bleeding from the tumor bed or chemotherapeutic toxicity. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate was 73% and 77%, respectively. Conclusion: This method resulted in an excellent primary tumor response rate (96%) and moderate acute toxicity. Additional follow-up is required to ascertain the usefulness of this modality.

  20. Photochemical Internalization of Bleomycin Before External-Beam Radiotherapy Improves Locoregional Control in a Human Sarcoma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Norum, Ole-Jacob; Bruland, Oyvind Sverre; Gorunova, Ludmila; Berg, Kristian

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the tumor growth response of the combination photochemical internalization and external-beam radiotherapy. Photochemical internalization is a technology to improve the utilization of therapeutic macromolecules in cancer therapy by photochemical release of endocytosed macromolecules into the cytosol. Methods and Materials: A human sarcoma xenograft TAX-1 was inoculated subcutaneously into nude mice. The photosensitizer AlPcS{sub 2a} and bleomycin were intraperitoneally administrated 48 h and 30 min, respectively, before diode laser light exposure at 670 nm (20 J/cm{sup 2}). Thirty minutes or 7 days after photochemical treatment, the animals were subjected to 4 Gy of ionizing radiation. Results: Using photochemical internalization of bleomycin as an adjunct to ionizing radiation increased the time to progression for the tumors from 17 to 33 days as compared with that observed with photodynamic therapy combined with ionizing radiation as well as for radiochemotherapy with bleomycin. The side effects observed when photochemical internalization of bleomycin was given shortly before ionizing radiation were eliminated by separating the treatment modalities in time. Conclusion: Photochemical internalization of bleomycin combined with ionizing radiation increased the time to progression and showed minimal toxicity and may therefore reduce the total radiation dose necessary to obtain local tumor control while avoiding long-term sequelae from radiotherapy.

  1. Locoregional Treatment Outcomes After Multimodality Management of Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bristol, Ian J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Strom, Eric A.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Domain, Delora; Singletary, S. Eva; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Yu, T.-K.; Terrefe, Welela; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine outcomes for patients with inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) treated with multimodality therapy, to identify factors associated with locoregional recurrence, and to determine which patients may benefit from radiation dose escalation. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 256 consecutive patients with nonmetastatic IBC treated at our institution between 1977 and 2004. Results: The 192 patients who were able to complete the planned course of chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation had significantly better outcomes than the 64 patients who did not. The respective 5-year outcome rates were: locoregional control (84% vs. 51%), distant metastasis-free survival (47% vs. 20%), and overall survival (51% vs. 24%) (p < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Univariate factors significantly associated with locoregional control in the patients who completed plan treatment were response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgical margin status, number of involved lymph nodes, and use of taxanes. Increasing the total chest-wall dose of postmastectomy radiation from 60 Gy to 66 Gy significantly improved locoregional control for patients who experienced less than a partial response to chemotherapy, patients with positive, close, or unknown margins, and patients <45 years of age. Conclusions: Patients with IBC who are able to complete treatment with chemotherapy, mastectomy, and postmastectomy radiation have a high probability of locoregional control. Escalation of postmastectomy radiation dose to 66 Gy appears to benefit patients with disease that responds poorly to chemotherapy, those with positive, close, or unknown margin status, and those <45 years of age.

  2. 75 FR 63505 - Renewal of Advisory Committee on Actuarial Examinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Renewal of Advisory Committee on Actuarial Examinations AGENCY: Joint Board for the... of Actuaries announces the renewal of the Advisory Committee on Actuarial Examinations. FOR FURTHER... Committee is to advise the Joint Board on examinations in actuarial mathematics and methodology. The...

  3. Developing an Actuarial Track Utilizing Existing Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Kathy V.; Sarol, Yalçin

    2014-01-01

    Students earning a degree in mathematics often seek information on how to apply their mathematical knowledge. One option is to follow a curriculum with an actuarial emphasis designed to prepare students as an applied mathematician in the actuarial field. By developing only two new courses and utilizing existing courses for Validation by…

  4. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Statement of actuarial opinion. 403.258 Section 403... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... actuarial opinion means a signed declaration in which a qualified actuary states that the assumptions...

  5. 20 CFR 901.2 - Eligibility to perform actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Eligibility to perform actuarial services... GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Definitions and Eligibility To Perform Actuarial Services § 901.2 Eligibility to perform actuarial...

  6. 20 CFR 901.2 - Eligibility to perform actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Eligibility to perform actuarial services... GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Definitions and Eligibility To Perform Actuarial Services § 901.2 Eligibility to perform actuarial...

  7. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statement of actuarial opinion. 403.258 Section 403... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... actuarial opinion means a signed declaration in which a qualified actuary states that the assumptions...

  8. 20 CFR 901.2 - Eligibility to perform actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Eligibility to perform actuarial services... GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Definitions and Eligibility To Perform Actuarial Services § 901.2 Eligibility to perform actuarial...

  9. 20 CFR 901.2 - Eligibility to perform actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Eligibility to perform actuarial services... GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Definitions and Eligibility To Perform Actuarial Services § 901.2 Eligibility to perform actuarial...

  10. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Statement of actuarial opinion. 403.258 Section 403... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... actuarial opinion means a signed declaration in which a qualified actuary states that the assumptions...

  11. 20 CFR 901.2 - Eligibility to perform actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Eligibility to perform actuarial services... GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Definitions and Eligibility To Perform Actuarial Services § 901.2 Eligibility to perform actuarial...

  12. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Statement of actuarial opinion. 403.258 Section 403... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... actuarial opinion means a signed declaration in which a qualified actuary states that the assumptions...

  13. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Statement of actuarial opinion. 403.258 Section 403... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... actuarial opinion means a signed declaration in which a qualified actuary states that the assumptions...

  14. Starting an Actuarial Program with Existing Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Many institutions wish to offer a path for students pursuing actuarial careers but lack the student demand to offer new courses or hire additional faculty. Fortunately, a program training students to enter the profession can often be constructed using existing courses and well-informed advising.

  15. Recruiting and Advising Challenges in Actuarial Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Bettye Anne; Guan, Yuanying Michelle; Paris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Some challenges to increasing actuarial science program size through recruiting broadly among potential students are identified. Possible solutions depend on the structures and culture of the school. Up to three student cohorts may result from partition of potential students by the levels of academic progress before program entry: students…

  16. Actuarial considerations of medical malpractice evaluations in M&As.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C

    2014-11-01

    To best project an actuarial estimate for medical malpractice exposure for a merger and acquisition, a organization's leaders should consider the following factors, among others: How to support an unbiased actuarial estimation. Experience of the actuary. The full picture of the organization's malpractice coverage. The potential for future loss development. Frequency and severity trends. PMID:25647911

  17. 5 CFR 839.1115 - What is an actuarial reduction?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What is an actuarial reduction? 839.1115... COVERAGE CORRECTIONS ACT Effect of Election General Provisions § 839.1115 What is an actuarial reduction? An actuarial reduction allows you to receive benefits without having to pay an amount due in a...

  18. 5 CFR 839.1115 - What is an actuarial reduction?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What is an actuarial reduction? 839.1115... COVERAGE CORRECTIONS ACT Effect of Election General Provisions § 839.1115 What is an actuarial reduction? An actuarial reduction allows you to receive benefits without having to pay an amount due in a...

  19. 5 CFR 839.1115 - What is an actuarial reduction?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What is an actuarial reduction? 839.1115... COVERAGE CORRECTIONS ACT Effect of Election General Provisions § 839.1115 What is an actuarial reduction? An actuarial reduction allows you to receive benefits without having to pay an amount due in a...

  20. 5 CFR 839.1115 - What is an actuarial reduction?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is an actuarial reduction? 839.1115... COVERAGE CORRECTIONS ACT Effect of Election General Provisions § 839.1115 What is an actuarial reduction? An actuarial reduction allows you to receive benefits without having to pay an amount due in a...

  1. 29 CFR 4231.10 - Actuarial calculations and assumptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Actuarial calculations and assumptions. 4231.10 Section... MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4231.10 Actuarial calculations and assumptions. (a) Most recent valuation. All calculations required by this part must be based on the most recent actuarial valuation as of the date...

  2. 29 CFR 4231.10 - Actuarial calculations and assumptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actuarial calculations and assumptions. 4231.10 Section... MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4231.10 Actuarial calculations and assumptions. (a) Most recent valuation. All calculations required by this part must be based on the most recent actuarial valuation as of the date...

  3. 5 CFR 839.1115 - What is an actuarial reduction?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What is an actuarial reduction? 839.1115... COVERAGE CORRECTIONS ACT Effect of Election General Provisions § 839.1115 What is an actuarial reduction? An actuarial reduction allows you to receive benefits without having to pay an amount due in a...

  4. 29 CFR 4231.10 - Actuarial calculations and assumptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actuarial calculations and assumptions. 4231.10 Section... MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4231.10 Actuarial calculations and assumptions. (a) Most recent valuation. All calculations required by this part must be based on the most recent actuarial valuation as of the date...

  5. 29 CFR 4231.10 - Actuarial calculations and assumptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Actuarial calculations and assumptions. 4231.10 Section... MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4231.10 Actuarial calculations and assumptions. (a) Most recent valuation. All calculations required by this part must be based on the most recent actuarial valuation as of the date...

  6. 29 CFR 4231.10 - Actuarial calculations and assumptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actuarial calculations and assumptions. 4231.10 Section... MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS § 4231.10 Actuarial calculations and assumptions. (a) Most recent valuation. All calculations required by this part must be based on the most recent actuarial valuation as of the date...

  7. Combining Locoregional Therapies in the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Mikhail C. S. S.; Soulen, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to promote more durable local control of larger lesions, thermal ablation has been combined with chemical ablative techniques and with vaso-occlusive procedures such as chemoembolization and bland embolization in an effort to mitigate the limitations inherent in the use of any single treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) >3 cm. The heat-sink effect is the underlying principle for combining vaso-occlusive therapies with ablative techniques. Combination therapies do present viable options for abrogating tumor progression and potentially downsizing tumors to facilitate transplant. We discuss the two most commonly used combination locoregional therapies by the interventionalist and the evidence defining the best techniques in practice. PMID:24436520

  8. Locoregional Tumor Progression After Radiation Therapy Influences Overall Survival in Pediatric Patients With Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S.; McGregor, Lisa; Krasin, Matthew J.; Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is renewed attention to primary site irradiation and local control for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). We conducted a retrospective review to identify factors that might predict for locoregional tumor control and its impact on overall survival. Methods and Materials: Between July 2000 through August 2006, a total of 44 pediatric patients with NB received radiation therapy (RT) with curative intent using computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning. The median age was 3.4 years and the median cumulative dose was 23.4 Gy. Overall survival and locoregional tumor control were measured from the start of RT to the date of death or event as determined by CT/magnetic resonance imaging/meta-iodobenzylguanidine. The influence of age at irradiation, gender, race, cumulative radiation dose, International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage, treatment protocol and resection status was determined with respect to locoregional tumor control. Results: With a median follow-up of 34 months +- 21 months, locoregional tumor progression was observed in 11 (25%) and was evenly divided between primary site and adjacent nodal/visceral site failure. The influence of locoregional control reached borderline statistical significance (p = 0.06). Age (p = 0.5), dose (p = 0.6), resection status (p = 0.7), and International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage (p = 0.08) did not influence overall survival. Conclusions: Overall survival in high-risk neuroblastoma is influenced by locoregional tumor control. Despite CT-based planning, progression in adjacent nodal/visceral sites appears to be common; this requires further investigation regarding target volume definitions, dose, and the effects of systemic therapy.

  9. 20 CFR 200.9 - Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory... ADMINISTRATION § 200.9 Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee. (a) Introduction. Under section 15(f... actuaries to serve on an Actuarial Advisory Committee. This section describes how the two actuaries...

  10. 20 CFR 200.9 - Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory... ADMINISTRATION § 200.9 Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee. (a) Introduction. Under section 15(f... actuaries to serve on an Actuarial Advisory Committee. This section describes how the two actuaries...

  11. 20 CFR 200.9 - Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory... ADMINISTRATION § 200.9 Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee. (a) Introduction. Under section 15(f... actuaries to serve on an Actuarial Advisory Committee. This section describes how the two actuaries...

  12. 20 CFR 200.9 - Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory... ADMINISTRATION § 200.9 Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee. (a) Introduction. Under section 15(f... actuaries to serve on an Actuarial Advisory Committee. This section describes how the two actuaries...

  13. 20 CFR 200.9 - Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory... ADMINISTRATION § 200.9 Selection of members of Actuarial Advisory Committee. (a) Introduction. Under section 15(f... actuaries to serve on an Actuarial Advisory Committee. This section describes how the two actuaries...

  14. 29 CFR 4010.8 - Plan actuarial information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the extent the qualification(s) are permitted under 26 CFR 301.6059-1(d). (b) Alternative compliance... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Plan actuarial information. 4010.8 Section 4010.8 Labor... DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.8 Plan...

  15. An Application of Actuarial Methods in Psychiatric Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overall, John E.; Higgins, C. Wayne

    1977-01-01

    This research provides an initial evaluation of an actuarial diagnostic testing program that is being conducted by the Psychometric Laboratory at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. It was hoped that an actuarial program for psychiatric diagnosis would create greater efficiency, lower cost, and superior validity with respect…

  16. 29 CFR 4010.8 - Plan actuarial information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the extent the qualification(s) are permitted under 26 CFR 301.6059-1(d). (b) Alternative compliance... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Plan actuarial information. 4010.8 Section 4010.8 Labor... DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.8 Plan...

  17. Actuarial models of life insurance with stochastic interest rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiang; Hu, Ping

    2009-07-01

    On the basis of general actuarial model of life insurance, this article has carried on research to continuous life insurance actuarial models under the stochastic interest rate separately. And it provide net single premium for life insurance and life annuity due over a period based on that de Moivre law of mortality and Makeham's law of mortality separately.

  18. 29 CFR 4010.8 - Plan actuarial information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the extent the qualification(s) are permitted under 26 CFR 301.6059-1(d). (b) Alternative compliance... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Plan actuarial information. 4010.8 Section 4010.8 Labor... DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.8 Plan...

  19. 29 CFR 4010.8 - Plan actuarial information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the extent the qualification(s) are permitted under 26 CFR 301.6059-1(d). (b) Alternative compliance... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Plan actuarial information. 4010.8 Section 4010.8 Labor... DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.8 Plan...

  20. Potential Utility of Actuarial Methods for Identifying Specific Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Nicholas; Newman, Isadore

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how actuarial methods can supplant discrepancy models and augment problem solving and Response to Intervention (RTI) efforts by guiding the process of identifying specific learning disabilities (SLD). Actuarial methods use routinized selection and execution of formulas derived from empirically established relationships to…

  1. Development of an Actuarial Science Program at Salisbury University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainwright, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of an actuarial science track for the mathematics major at Salisbury University (SU). A timeline from the initial investigation into such a program through the proposal and approval processes is shared for those who might be interested in developing a new actuarial program. It is wise to start small and take…

  2. Involved-Field Radiation Therapy for Locoregionally Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aaron P.; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann H.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of definitive involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) for selected patients with locoregionally-recurrent ovarian cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed records of 102 epithelial ovarian cancer patients treated with definitive IFRT (≥45 Gy). IFRT was directed to localized nodal (49%) and extranodal (51%) recurrences. Results The median time from diagnosis to IFRT was 36 months (range, 1–311), and the median follow-up after IFRT was 37 months (range, 1–123). Patients received a median of three chemotherapy courses before IFRT (range, 0–9). Five-year overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates after IFRT were 40% and 24% respectively; the 5-year in-field disease control rate was 71%. Thirty-five patients (35%) had no evidence of disease at a median of 38 months after IFRT (range, 7–122), including 25 continuously without disease for a median of 61 months (range, 17–122) and 10 with salvage treatment following disease recurrence, disease-free for a median of 39 months after salvage treatment (range, 7–92). Eight clear cell carcinoma patients had higher 5-year OS (88% versus 37%; p=0.05) and PFS (75% versus 20%; p=0.01) rates than other patients. Patients sensitive to initial platinum chemotherapy had a higher 5-year OS rate than platinum-resistant patients (43% versus 27%, p=0.03). Patients who required chemotherapy for recurrence after IFRT often benefitted from longer chemotherapy-free intervals after than before IFRT. Conclusions Definitive IFRT can yield excellent local control, protracted disease-free intervals, and even cures in carefully selected patients. RT should be considered a tool in the curative management of locoregionally-recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:23648467

  3. [Facial locoregional anesthetics: principles and precautions].

    PubMed

    Lefort, H; Lacroix, G; Cordier, A; Bey, E; Duhamel, P

    2009-12-01

    Facial locoregional anesthetics (ALR) with nervous blocks are simple and reliable to perform, need little technical resources with a very low iatrogenic risk. These blocks allow anesthesia without deforming wound banks using the same materials as usual local anesthetic procedures. Three principal nervous blocks, in a straight line along the vertical pupil axis, allow managing - even extensive - facial wounds. Few side effects may occur which can be easily prevented. It is a good alternative to local anesthetic for the treatment of extensive and deep areas which is performed with a lower number of injections and a high rate of success. These techniques are easy to learn and practise. These anesthetic techniques allow a nice treatment of different kinds of facial wounds from simple suture to flaps. PMID:19272691

  4. 20 CFR 901.20 - Standards of performance of actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standards of performance of actuarial... GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Standards of Performance for Enrolled Actuaries § 901.20 Standards of performance of actuarial services....

  5. 42 CFR 440.340 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage... Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.340 Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage. (a... described in § 440.335, must include an actuarial report. The actuarial report must contain an...

  6. 77 FR 63337 - Renewal of Charter of Advisory Committee on Actuarial Examinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES Renewal of Charter of Advisory Committee on Actuarial Examinations AGENCY: Joint... Committee on Actuarial Examinations. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patrick McDonough, 202-622-8225... advise the Joint Board for the Enrollment of Actuaries (Joint Board) on examinations in...

  7. 42 CFR 457.431 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage... GRANTS TO STATES State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.431 Actuarial report for benchmark... § 457.430, the State must submit to CMS an actuarial report that contains an actuarial opinion that...

  8. 42 CFR 457.431 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage... GRANTS TO STATES State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.431 Actuarial report for benchmark... § 457.430, the State must submit to CMS an actuarial report that contains an actuarial opinion that...

  9. 42 CFR 457.431 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage... GRANTS TO STATES State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.431 Actuarial report for benchmark... § 457.430, the State must submit to CMS an actuarial report that contains an actuarial opinion that...

  10. 20 CFR 901.20 - Standards of performance of actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Standards of performance of actuarial... GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Standards of Performance for Enrolled Actuaries § 901.20 Standards of performance of actuarial services....

  11. 42 CFR 457.431 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage... GRANTS TO STATES State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.431 Actuarial report for benchmark... § 457.430, the State must submit to CMS an actuarial report that contains an actuarial opinion that...

  12. 20 CFR 901.20 - Standards of performance of actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Standards of performance of actuarial... GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Standards of Performance for Enrolled Actuaries § 901.20 Standards of performance of actuarial services....

  13. 20 CFR 901.20 - Standards of performance of actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Standards of performance of actuarial... GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Standards of Performance for Enrolled Actuaries § 901.20 Standards of performance of actuarial services....

  14. 20 CFR 901.20 - Standards of performance of actuarial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Standards of performance of actuarial... GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Standards of Performance for Enrolled Actuaries § 901.20 Standards of performance of actuarial services....

  15. 42 CFR 440.340 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage... Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.340 Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage. (a... described in § 440.335, must include an actuarial report. The actuarial report must contain an...

  16. 42 CFR 457.431 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage... GRANTS TO STATES State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.431 Actuarial report for benchmark... § 457.430, the State must submit to CMS an actuarial report that contains an actuarial opinion that...

  17. 42 CFR 440.340 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage... Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.340 Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage. (a... described in § 440.335, must include an actuarial report. The actuarial report must contain an...

  18. 42 CFR 440.340 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage... Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.340 Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage. (a... described in § 440.335, must include an actuarial report. The actuarial report must contain an...

  19. Reconstruction Using Locoregional Flaps for Large Skull Base Defects.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Takaharu; Motomura, Hisashi; Ayabe, Shinobu

    2015-06-01

    We present a modified locoregional flap for the reconstruction of large anterior skull base defects that should be reconstructed with a free flap according to Yano's algorithm. No classification of skull base defects had been proposed for a long time. Yano et al suggested a new classification in 2012. The lb defect of Yano's classification extends horizontally from the cribriform plate to the orbital roof. According to Yano's algorithm for subsequent skull base reconstructive procedures, a lb defect should be reconstructed with a free flap such as an anterolateral thigh free flap or rectus abdominis myocutaneous free flap. However, our modified locoregional flap has also enabled reconstruction of lb defects. In this case series, we used a locoregional flap for lb defects. No major postoperative complications occurred. We present our modified locoregional flap that enables reconstruction of lb defects. PMID:26225296

  20. Impact of actuarial assumptions on pension costs: A simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Shaira; Ibrahim, Rose Irnawaty

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of pension costs to changes in the underlying assumptions of a hypothetical pension plan in order to gain a perspective on the relative importance of the various actuarial assumptions via a simulation analysis. Simulation analyses are used to examine the impact of actuarial assumptions on pension costs. There are two actuarial assumptions will be considered in this study which are mortality rates and interest rates. To calculate pension costs, Accrued Benefit Cost Method, constant amount (CA) modification, constant percentage of salary (CS) modification are used in the study. The mortality assumptions and the implied mortality experience of the plan can potentially have a significant impact on pension costs. While for interest rate assumptions, it is inversely related to the pension costs. Results of the study have important implications for analyst of pension costs.

  1. Actuarial Science at One Four-Year Comprehensive University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlwood, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Building an Actuarial Science program designated as advanced requires dedicated faculty, support from the administration, and a core group of strong students. Washburn University may serve as a model for those wishing to start or enhance such a program at their institution. We face three main ongoing challenges: first, the hiring and retention of…

  2. Starting an Actuarial Science Major at a Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The article provides details of the process of starting an actuarial science major at a small, liberal arts college. Some critique of the major is included, as well as some challenges that may be faced by others wanting to start such a major at their institution.

  3. Predicting Success for Actuarial Students in Undergraduate Mathematics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard Manning; Schumacher, Phyllis A.

    2005-01-01

    A study of undergraduate actuarial graduates found that math SAT scores, verbal SAT scores, percentile rank in high school graduating class, and percentage score on a college mathematics placement exam had some relevance to forecasting the students' grade point averages in their major. For both males and females, percentile rank in high school…

  4. 29 CFR 4010.8 - Plan actuarial information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the extent the qualification(s) are permitted under 26 CFR 301.6059-1(d). (b) Alternative compliance... retirement age assumptions used by the plan for the plan year ending within the information year for purposes... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plan actuarial information. 4010.8 Section 4010.8...

  5. Strategic Curricular Decisions in Butler University's Actuarial Science Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Christopher James

    2014-01-01

    We describe specific curricular decisions employed at Butler University that have resulted in student achievement in the actuarial science major. The paper includes a discussion of how these decisions might be applied in the context of a new actuarial program.

  6. An Overview of the Society of Actuaries and Its Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klugman, Stuart; Long, Gena

    2014-01-01

    The Society of Actuaries (SOA) is the world's largest actuarial organization. This article describes the SOA with particular attention paid to its education and qualification processes and resources available for university and college programs.

  7. 76 FR 81362 - Regulations Governing the Performance of Actuarial Services Under the Employee Retirement Income...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... published in the Federal Register on Thursday, March 31, 2011 (76 FR 17762). DATES: This correction is... ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES 20 CFR Part 901 RIN 1545-BC82 Regulations Governing the Performance of Actuarial...--REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY...

  8. The Role of an Actuarial Director in the Development of an Introductory Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staples, Susan G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the roles and duties of a director in developing an introductory actuarial program. Degree plan design, specialized exam courses, internship classes, coordination of efforts with Economics and Finance Departments, opportunities for creating a minor in actuarial mathematics, actuarial clubs, career advice, and interaction with actuarial…

  9. 29 CFR 2520.104-42 - Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... Reporting and Disclosure Requirements § 2520.104-42 Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... ERISA that the annual report include as part of the actuarial statement (Schedule B) 1 the present...

  10. 26 CFR 301.6692-1 - Failure to file actuarial report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Failure to file actuarial report. 301.6692-1... Assessable Penalties Additions to the Tax and Additional Amounts § 301.6692-1 Failure to file actuarial... the actuarial report described in section 6059 and § 301.6059-1 within the time prescribed, the...

  11. 26 CFR 301.6692-1 - Failure to file actuarial report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Failure to file actuarial report. 301.6692-1... Assessable Penalties Additions to the Tax and Additional Amounts § 301.6692-1 Failure to file actuarial... the actuarial report described in section 6059 and § 301.6059-1 within the time prescribed, the...

  12. 77 FR 24233 - Actuarial Advisory Committee With Respect to the Railroad Retirement Account; Notice of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... Actuarial Advisory Committee With Respect to the Railroad Retirement Account; Notice of Public Meeting Notice is hereby given in accordance with Public Law 92-463 that the Actuarial Advisory Committee will... Retirement Board, 844 North Rush Street, Chicago, Illinois, on the conduct of the 25th Actuarial Valuation...

  13. 26 CFR 301.6692-1 - Failure to file actuarial report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Failure to file actuarial report. 301.6692-1... Assessable Penalties Additions to the Tax and Additional Amounts § 301.6692-1 Failure to file actuarial... the actuarial report described in section 6059 and § 301.6059-1 within the time prescribed, the...

  14. 29 CFR 2520.104-42 - Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... Reporting and Disclosure Requirements § 2520.104-42 Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... ERISA that the annual report include as part of the actuarial statement (Schedule B) 1 the present...

  15. 26 CFR 301.6692-1 - Failure to file actuarial report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Failure to file actuarial report. 301.6692-1... Assessable Penalties Additions to the Tax and Additional Amounts § 301.6692-1 Failure to file actuarial... the actuarial report described in section 6059 and § 301.6059-1 within the time prescribed, the...

  16. 29 CFR 2520.104-42 - Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... Reporting and Disclosure Requirements § 2520.104-42 Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... ERISA that the annual report include as part of the actuarial statement (Schedule B) 1 the present...

  17. The Undergraduate Statistics Major--A Prelude to Actuarial Science Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Michael I.; Williams, Raymond E.

    Recently there has been increased interest related to the Actuarial Science field. An actuary is a business professional who uses mathematical skills to define, analyze, and solve financial and social problems. This paper examines: (1) the interface between Statistical and Actuarial Science training; (2) statistical courses corresponding to…

  18. 75 FR 68790 - Medicare Program; Medicare Part B Monthly Actuarial Rates, Premium Rate, and Annual Deductible...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... Monthly Actuarial Rates, Premium Rate, and Annual Deductible Beginning January 1, 2011 AGENCY: Centers for... actuarial rates for aged (age 65 and over) and disabled (under age 65) beneficiaries enrolled in Part B of... certain threshold amounts. The monthly actuarial rates for 2011 are $230.70 for aged enrollees and...

  19. 26 CFR 301.6692-1 - Failure to file actuarial report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Failure to file actuarial report. 301.6692-1... Assessable Penalties Additions to the Tax and Additional Amounts § 301.6692-1 Failure to file actuarial... the actuarial report described in section 6059 and § 301.6059-1 within the time prescribed, the...

  20. 29 CFR 2520.104-42 - Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... Reporting and Disclosure Requirements § 2520.104-42 Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... ERISA that the annual report include as part of the actuarial statement (Schedule B) 1 the present...

  1. 29 CFR 2520.104-42 - Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... Reporting and Disclosure Requirements § 2520.104-42 Waiver of certain actuarial information in the annual... ERISA that the annual report include as part of the actuarial statement (Schedule B) 1 the present...

  2. Including an Exam P/1 Prep Course in a Growing Actuarial Science Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the actuarial science program at our university and the development of a course to enhance students' problem solving skills while preparing them for Exam P/1 of the Society of Actuaries (SOA) and the Casualty Actuary Society (CAS). The Exam P/1 prep course, formally titled Mathematical Foundations of…

  3. Insights into managed care--operational, legal and actuarial.

    PubMed

    Melek, S P; Johnson, B A; Schryver, D

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the operational, legal and actuarial dimensions of managed care is essential to developing managed care contracts between managed care organizations and individual health care providers or groups such as provider-sponsored organizations or independent practice associations. Operationally, it is important to understand managed care and its trends, emphasizing business issues, knowing your practice and defining acceptable levels of reimbursement and risk. Legally, there are a number of common themes or issues relevant to all managed care contracts, including primary care vs. specialist contracts, services offered, program policies and procedures, utilization review, physician reimbursement and compensation, payment schedule, terms and conditions, term and termination, continuation of care requirements, indemnification, amendment of contract and program policies, and stop-loss insurance. Actuarial issues include membership, geography, age-gender distribution, degree of health care management, local managed care utilization levels, historical utilization levels, health plan benefit design, among others. PMID:10165777

  4. Multivariate analyses of locoregional recurrences and skin complications after postmastectomy radiotherapy using electrons or photons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Chen, H.-C.; Sun, L.-M.; Fang, F.-M.; Hsu, H.-C.; Hsiung, C.-Y.; Huang, Y.-J.; Wang, C.-Y.; Wang, C.-J. . E-mail: cjw1010@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: We retrospectively analyzed factors of locoregional (LR) recurrence and skin complications in patients after postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: From January 1988 to December 1999, a total of 246 women with Stage II and III breast cancer received PMRT. Doses of 46 to 52.2 Gy/23 to 29 fractions were delivered to the chest wall (CW) and peripheral lymphatic drainage with 12 to 15 MeV single-portal electrons or 6MV photons. Of the patients, 84 patients received an additional 6 to 20 Gy boost to the surgical scar using 9 MeV electrons. We used the Cox regression model for multivariate analyses of CW, supraclavicular nodes (SCN), and LR recurrence. Results: N3 stage (positive nodes >9) (p = 0.003) and diabetes (p = 0.004) were independent factors of CW recurrence. Analysis of ipsilateral SCN recurrence showed that N3 stage (p < 0.001) and electrons (p = 0.006) were independent factors. For LR recurrence, N3 (p < 0.001), T3 to T4 (p = 0.033) and electrons (p = 0.003) were significant factors. Analysis of skin telangiectasia revealed that electrons (p < 0.001) and surgical scar boost (p = 0.003) were independent factors. Conclusions: Photons are superior to single-portal electrons in patients receiving postmastectomy radiotherapy because of better locoregional control and less skin telangiectasia. In patients in whom the number of positive axillary nodes is >9, more aggressive treatment may be considered for better locoregional control.

  5. 26 CFR 1.412(c)(2)-1 - Valuation of plan assets; reasonable actuarial valuation methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Valuation of plan assets; reasonable actuarial..., Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.412(c)(2)-1 Valuation of plan assets; reasonable actuarial valuation methods... actuarial valuation method which satisfies the requirements of section 412(c)(2)(A). An actuarial...

  6. 26 CFR 1.412(c)(2)-1 - Valuation of plan assets; reasonable actuarial valuation methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Valuation of plan assets; reasonable actuarial..., Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.412(c)(2)-1 Valuation of plan assets; reasonable actuarial valuation methods... actuarial valuation method which satisfies the requirements of section 412(c)(2)(A). An actuarial...

  7. 26 CFR 1.412(c)(2)-1 - Valuation of plan assets; reasonable actuarial valuation methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Valuation of plan assets; reasonable actuarial..., Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.412(c)(2)-1 Valuation of plan assets; reasonable actuarial valuation methods... actuarial valuation method which satisfies the requirements of section 412(c)(2)(A). An actuarial...

  8. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian; Chen, Lee-May; Littell, Ramey; Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A.; Chan, John K.; Hsu, I-Chow

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  9. Radiation Field Design and Patterns of Locoregional Recurrence Following Definitive Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Susie A.; Schuster, David M.; Mister, Donna; Liu Tian; Godette, Karen; Torres, Mylin A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Locoregional control is associated with breast cancer-specific and overall survival in select women with breast cancer. Although several patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics have been shown to contribute to locoregional recurrence (LRR), studies evaluating factors related to radiotherapy (XRT) technique have been limited. We investigated the relationship between LRR location and XRT fields and dose delivered to the primary breast cancer in women experiencing subsequent locoregional relapse. Methods and Materials: We identified 21 women who were previously treated definitively with surgery and XRT for breast cancer. All patients developed biopsy-result proven LRR and presented to Emory University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 for treatment. Computed tomography (CT) simulation scans with XRT dose files for the initial breast cancer were fused with {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/CT images in DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) format identifying the LRR. Each LRR was categorized as in-field, defined as {>=}95% of the LRR volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed whole-breast dose; marginal, defined as LRR at the field edge and/or not receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose to {>=}95% of the volume; or out-of-field, that is, LRR intentionally not treated with the original XRT plan. Results: Of the 24 identified LRRs (3 patients experienced two LRRs), 3 were in-field, 9 were marginal, and 12 were out-of-field. Two of the 3 in-field LRRs were marginal misses of the additional boost XRT dose. Out-of-field LRRs consisted of six supraclavicular and six internal mammary nodal recurrences. Conclusions: Most LRRs in our study occurred in areas not fully covered by the prescribed XRT dose or were purposely excluded from the original XRT fields. Our data suggest that XRT technique, field design, and dose play a critical role in preventing LRR in women with breast cancer.

  10. Locoregional treatment outcomes for breast cancer patients with ipsilateral supraclavicular metastases at diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Eugene H.; Strom, Eric A.; Valero, Vicente; Fornage, Bruno; Perkins, George H.; Oh, Julia L.; Yu, T.-K.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Sahin, Aysegul A.; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Buchholz, Thomas A. . E-mail: tbuchhol@mdanderson.org

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the locoregional efficacy of multimodality treatment for breast cancer patients who present with ipsilateral supraclavicular (SCV) disease without systemic metastases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 71 patients with ipsilateral SCV involvement at presentation. SCV involvement in 16 patients (23%) was diagnosed by ultrasound examination only, without palpable disease. All patients were treated with curative intent using neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery (BCT), and radiotherapy. Results: The 5-year SCV control, locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 90%, 77%, 30%, and 47%, respectively. Patients with persistent SCV disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy by physical examination had a lower rate of LRC (64% vs. 86%, p = 0.026), as did those with persistent SCV disease by ultrasound examination (66% vs. 96%, p = 0.007). Of those with a complete response of SCV disease by physical examination after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, those with persistently abnormal ultrasound findings had significantly worse disease-free survival (0% vs. 55%, p = 0.03). BCT was not associated with lower rates of LRC (82% for BCT vs. 76% for mastectomy, p = 0.80). Conclusion: Radiotherapy achieved excellent LRC after surgery for patients with ipsilateral SCV metastases who achieved a complete response of the SCV disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For patients who achieved a complete response of the SCV disease by physical examination, ultrasonography of the SCV fossa may help assess the risk of disease recurrence. SCV involvement should not be considered a contraindication for BCT.

  11. Of pacemakers and statistics: the actuarial method extended.

    PubMed

    Dussel, J; Wolbarst, A B; Scott-Millar, R N; Obel, I W

    1980-01-01

    Pacemakers cease functioning because of either natural battery exhaustion (nbe) or component failure (cf). A study of four series of pacemakers shows that a simple extension of the actuarial method, so as to incorporate Normal statistics, makes possible a quantitative differentiation between the two modes of failure. This involves the separation of the overall failure probability density function PDF(t) into constituent parts pdfnbe(t) and pdfcf(t). The approach should allow a meaningful comparison of the characteristics of different pacemaker types. PMID:6160497

  12. Surgical and Locoregional Therapy of HCC: TACE.

    PubMed

    Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Murakami, Takamichi

    2015-09-01

    Transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) is performed worldwide for patients with intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). TACE has produced survival advantages in two randomized controlled trials and a meta-analysis, and is currently the mainstay of treatment for this stage of HCC. However, there are currently no global guidelines regarding the dose, choice or combination of cytotoxic agents for TACE; therefore, it is difficult to compare data from different TACE studies. In Japan, most of the TACE procedures have been based on iodized oil as conventional TACE, utilizing the microembolic and drug-carrying characteristic of iodized oil. Superselective TACE with lipiodol is the primary TACE procedure that has reported satisfactory levels of local control associated with a lower risk of complications. Conversely, TACE performed using drug-eluting beads has been widely used in western countries, and this has shown similar tumor response and median survival compared to conventional TACE. Moreover, the combination of TACE and molecular targeted agents is now ongoing to evaluate the synergistic effect. In this review, the indication, technical issues, and complications of TACE are reviewed. PMID:26675172

  13. Locoregional Outcomes of Inflammatory Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Standard Fractionation Radiation and Daily Skin Bolus in the Taxane Era

    SciTech Connect

    Damast, Shari; Ho, Alice Y.; Montgomery, Leslie; Fornier, Monica N.; Ishill, Nicole; Elkin, Elena; Beal, Kathryn; McCormick, Beryl

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To assess locoregional outcomes of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy (CMT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 107 patients diagnosed with IBC between January 1995 and March 2006 who presented to our department for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT). Results: All patients received chemotherapy (95% anthracycline and 95% taxane), modified radical mastectomy, and RT to the chest wall and regional lymphatics using standard fractionation to 50 Gy and daily skin bolus. The RT to the chest wall was delivered via electrons (55%) or photons (45%) in daily fractions of 180 cGy (73%) or 200 cGy (27%). Scar boost was performed in 11%. A majority (84%) of patients completed the prescribed treatment. Median follow-up was 47 months (range, 10-134 months). Locoregional control (LRC) at 3 years and 5 years was 90% and 87%, respectively. Distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) at 3 years and 5 years was 61% and 47%, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent locoregional control was observed in this population of IBC patients who received standard fractionation radiation with daily skin bolus and taxanes as part of combined-modality therapy. Distant metastases-free survival remains a significant therapeutic challenge.

  14. An actuarial approach to retrofit savings in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Subbarao, Krishnappa; Etingov, Pavel V.; Reddy, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    An actuarial method has been developed for determining energy savings from retrofits from energy use data for a number of buildings. This method should be contrasted with the traditional method of using pre- and post-retrofit data on the same building. This method supports the U.S. Department of Energy Building Performance Database of real building performance data and related tools that enable engineering and financial practitioners to evaluate retrofits. The actuarial approach derives, from the database, probability density functions (PDFs) for energy savings from retrofits by creating peer groups for the user’s pre post buildings. From the energy use distribution of the two groups, the savings PDF is derived. This provides the basis for engineering analysis as well as financial risk analysis leading to investment decisions. Several technical issues are addressed: The savings PDF is obtained from the pre- and post-PDF through a convolution. Smoothing using kernel density estimation is applied to make the PDF more realistic. The low data density problem can be mitigated through a neighborhood methodology. Correlations between pre and post buildings are addressed to improve the savings PDF. Sample size effects are addressed through the Kolmogorov--Smirnov tests and quantile-quantile plots.

  15. Management of locoregional stage esophageal cancer: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Javle, M M; Nwogu, C E; Donohue, K A; Iyer, R V; Brady, W E; Khemka, S V; Smith, J L; Demmy, T L; Yang, G Y; Nava, H R

    2006-01-01

    Therapeutic options for locoregional esophageal cancer (EC) include primary surgery, neoadjuvant or definitive chemoradiation and systemic chemotherapy. The role of surgery in these multimodal strategies has recently been debated and definitive chemoradiation is being offered as an alternative to surgery at many centers. We examined our results with multimodal therapy and surgery in this patient population. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 172 patients with locoregional (AJCC stages I-III) EC treated at RPCI between February 14, 1990 and September 20, 2002. Median age was 65 years (range, 36-95); there were 136 male patients. There were 100 regional (stages IIB-III), 69 local (stages I-IIA) and three in situ cases. Initial therapy was either combined modality (n = 122) or single modality (surgery) (n = 50). There was 0%, 30-day, postoperative mortality. Median survival for all patients was 25.3 months and was better for local stage with surgery alone (75 months) than with neoadjuvant (35.7 months) or definitive chemoradiation (19.1 months, P < 0.001). Survival for patients with regional disease treated with surgery alone, neoadjuvant or definitive chemoradiation was 21.5, 24.4 and 11.8 months, respectively (P = not significant). The associations of prognostic factors with overall survival were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis and 2-sided Wald's chi-square test. On multivariate analysis, carefully selected patients treated with surgery alone had better outcomes compared with those treated with definitive chemoradiation (P < 0.001). Patients with locoregional esophageal cancer who are eligible for surgical resection either alone or as a part of multimodal therapy may have better outcomes than those treated with non-surgical approaches. PMID:16643174

  16. Anastrozole versus tamoxifen for the prevention of locoregional and contralateral breast cancer in postmenopausal women with locally excised ductal carcinoma in situ (IBIS-II DCIS): a double-blind, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, John F; Sestak, Ivana; Howell, Anthony; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bundred, Nigel; Levy, Christelle; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Eiermann, Wolfgang; Neven, Patrick; Stierer, Michael; Holcombe, Chris; Coleman, Robert E; Jones, Louise; Ellis, Ian; Cuzick, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Third-generation aromatase inhibitors are more effective than tamoxifen for preventing recurrence in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive invasive breast cancer. However, it is not known whether anastrozole is more effective than tamoxifen for women with hormone-receptor-positive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Here, we compare the efficacy of anastrozole with that of tamoxifen in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive DCIS. Methods In a double-blind, multicentre, randomised placebo-controlled trial, we recruited women who had been diagnosed with locally excised, hormone-receptor-positive DCIS. Eligible women were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio by central computer allocation to receive 1 mg oral anastrozole or 20 mg oral tamoxifen every day for 5 years. Randomisation was stratified by major centre or hub and was done in blocks (six, eight, or ten). All trial personnel, participants, and clinicians were masked to treatment allocation and only the trial statistician had access to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was all recurrence, including recurrent DCIS and new contralateral tumours. All analyses were done on a modified intention-to-treat basis (in all women who were randomised and did not revoke consent for their data to be included) and proportional hazard models were used to compute hazard ratios and corresponding confidence intervals. This trial is registered at the ISRCTN registry, number ISRCTN37546358. Results Between March 3, 2003, and Feb 8, 2012, we enrolled 2980 postmenopausal women from 236 centres in 14 countries and randomly assigned them to receive anastrozole (1449 analysed) or tamoxifen (1489 analysed). Median follow-up was 7·2 years (IQR 5·6–8·9), and 144 breast cancer recurrences were recorded. We noted no statistically significant difference in overall recurrence (67 recurrences for anastrozole vs 77 for tamoxifen; HR 0·89 [95% CI 0·64–1·23]). The non-inferiority of

  17. 76 FR 17762 - Regulations Governing the Performance of Actuarial Services Under the Employee Retirement Income...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ...This document contains final regulations under section 3042 of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) relating to the enrollment of actuaries. These regulations update the eligibility requirements for performing actuarial services for ERISA-covered employee pension benefit plans, including the continuing professional education requirements, and the standards for performing......

  18. A Comparison of Logistic Regression, Neural Networks, and Classification Trees Predicting Success of Actuarial Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Phyllis; Olinsky, Alan; Quinn, John; Smith, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The authors extended previous research by 2 of the authors who conducted a study designed to predict the successful completion of students enrolled in an actuarial program. They used logistic regression to determine the probability of an actuarial student graduating in the major or dropping out. They compared the results of this study with those…

  19. Actuarial Prediction of Performance in a Six-Year A.B.-M.D. Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Thomas G.; Brown, Donald R.

    1977-01-01

    Four actuarial equations for predicting an academic performance criterion were developed and assessed at the University of Michigan. It was concluded that appropriately done actuarial prediction of an individual criterion is more efficient than the efforts of an admissions committee. (LBH)

  20. Clinical versus Actuarial Predictions of Violence in Patients with Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, William; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Compared accuracy of an actuarial procedure for the prediction of community violence by patients with mental illnesses to accuracy of clinicians' concern ratings of patient violence. Data came from a study of 357 pairs of patients seen in a psychiatric emergency room. Actuarial predictions based only on patients' histories of violence were more…

  1. 75 FR 47650 - Actuarial Advisory Committee With Respect to the Railroad Retirement Account; Notice of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Actuarial Advisory Committee With Respect to the Railroad Retirement Account; Notice of Public Meeting Notice is hereby given in accordance with Public Law 92-463 that the Actuarial Advisory Committee will.... Railroad Retirement Board, 844 North Rush Street, Chicago, Illinois, on the conduct of the 25th...

  2. Risk Assessment in Child Protective Services: Consensus and Actuarial Model Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Christopher; Wagner, Dennis; Healy, Theresa; Johnson, Kristen

    1999-01-01

    Compared reliability of three widely used child protective service risk-assessment models (one actuarial, two consensus based). Found that, although no system approached 100% interrater reliability, raters employing the actuarial model made consistent estimates of risk for a high percentage of cases they assessed. Interrater reliability for the…

  3. 76 FR 81362 - Regulations Governing the Performance of Actuarial Services Under the Employee Retirement Income...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 17762) relating to the enrollment of actuaries. DATES: This correction is effective on..., the publication of the final regulations (TD 9517) which were the subject of FR Doc. 2011-7573 is... ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES 20 CFR Part 901 RIN 1545-BC82 Regulations Governing the Performance of...

  4. An analysis of possible applications of fuzzy set theory to the actuarial credibility theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostaszewski, Krzysztof; Karwowski, Waldemar

    1992-01-01

    In this work, we review the basic concepts of actuarial credibility theory from the point of view of introducing applications of the fuzzy set-theoretic method. We show how the concept of actuarial credibility can be modeled through the fuzzy set membership functions and how fuzzy set methods, especially fuzzy pattern recognition, can provide an alternative tool for estimating credibility.

  5. Criminal Behavior as a Function of Clinical and Actuarial Variables in a Sexual Offender Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Gordon C. Nagayama

    1988-01-01

    Investigated ability of clinical and actuarial variables to predict criminal behavior of 342 sexual offenders previously studied in 1987. Results suggested linear combination of actuarial variables was significantly predictive of sexual reoffenses against adults and of nonsexual reoffending. Clinical judgment was not significantly predictive of…

  6. 76 FR 67774 - Actuarial Advisory Committee With Respect to the Railroad Retirement Account; Notice of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... Actuarial Advisory Committee With Respect to the Railroad Retirement Account; Notice of Public Meeting Notice is hereby given in accordance with Public Law 92-463 that the Actuarial Advisory Committee will.... Railroad Retirement ] Board, 844 North Rush Street, Chicago, Illinois, on the conduct of the 25th...

  7. Is More Better? Combining Actuarial Risk Scales to Predict Recidivism among Adult Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seto, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether combining the results of multiple actuarial risk scales increases accuracy in predicting sex offender recidivism. Multiple methods of combining 4 validated actuarial risk scales--the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide, the Sex Offender Risk Appraisal Guide, the Rapid Risk Assessment for Sexual…

  8. 5 CFR 839.1119 - How is the actuarial reduction for TSP computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How is the actuarial reduction for TSP computed? 839.1119 Section 839.1119 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED... actuarial reduction for TSP computed? (a) The part of your TSP account on the date you retired that...

  9. 5 CFR 839.1119 - How is the actuarial reduction for TSP computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How is the actuarial reduction for TSP computed? 839.1119 Section 839.1119 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED... actuarial reduction for TSP computed? (a) The part of your TSP account on the date you retired that...

  10. 5 CFR 839.1119 - How is the actuarial reduction for TSP computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false How is the actuarial reduction for TSP computed? 839.1119 Section 839.1119 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED... actuarial reduction for TSP computed? (a) The part of your TSP account on the date you retired that...

  11. 5 CFR 839.1119 - How is the actuarial reduction for TSP computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How is the actuarial reduction for TSP computed? 839.1119 Section 839.1119 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED... actuarial reduction for TSP computed? (a) The part of your TSP account on the date you retired that...

  12. 5 CFR 839.1119 - How is the actuarial reduction for TSP computed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How is the actuarial reduction for TSP computed? 839.1119 Section 839.1119 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED... actuarial reduction for TSP computed? (a) The part of your TSP account on the date you retired that...

  13. Assessment of tumor response on MR imaging after locoregional therapy.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Josephina A; Buijs, Manon; Kamel, Ihab R

    2006-09-01

    Assessment of tumor response after locoregional therapies is important in determining treatment success and in guiding future therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in evaluating treatment response to new therapies directed toward hepatic lesion treatment. The traditional and accepted criteria to determine tumor response in oncology, namely the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria, use decrease in tumor size and lesion enhancement as an indicator of successful therapy. A more recent evaluation method is the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) measured by diffusion-weighted MR imaging. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and ADC values map the thermally induced motion of water molecules in tissues and thereby are able to provide insight into tumor microstructure. In this article we discuss the role of MR imaging in assessing treatment response after various locoregional therapies. We describe the role of tumor size and lesion enhancement as well as ADC mapping. We also discuss the magnetic resonance imaging findings after radiofrequency ablation (RFA), transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radioembolization. PMID:17561215

  14. pN0(i+) Breast Cancer: Treatment Patterns, Locoregional Recurrence, and Survival Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, Irene; Lesperance, Maria F.; Berrang, Tanya; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott; Truong, Pauline T.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To examine treatment patterns, recurrence, and survival outcomes in patients with pN0(i+) breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5999 women with AJCC (6th edition) pT1-3, pN0-N1a, M0 breast cancer diagnosed between 2003 and 2006. Of these, 4342 (72%) had pN0, 96 (2%) had pN0(i+), 349 (6%) had pNmic (micrometastases >0.2 mm to ≤2 mm), and 1212 (20%) had pN1a (1-3 positive macroscopic nodes) disease. Treatment characteristics and 5-year Kaplan-Meier local recurrence, regional recurrence (RR), locoregional recurrence (LRR), and overall survival were compared between nodal subgroups. Multivariable analysis was performed using Cox regression modeling. A 1:3 case-match analysis examined outcomes in pN0(i+) cases compared with pN0 controls matched for similar tumor and treatment characteristics. Results: Median follow-up was 4.8 years. Adjuvant systemic therapy use increased with nodal stage: 81%, 92%, 95%, and 94% in pN0, pN0(i+), pNmic, and pN1a disease, respectively (P<.001). Nodal radiation therapy (RT) use also increased with nodal stage: 1.7% in pN0, 27% in pN0(i+), 33% in pNmic, and 63% in pN1a cohorts (P<.001). Five-year Kaplan-Meier outcomes in pN0 versus pN0(i+) cases were as follows: local recurrence 1.7% versus 3.7% (P=.20), RR 0.5% versus 2.2% (P=.02), and LRR 2.1% versus 5.8% (P=.02). There were no RR events in 26 patients with pN0(i+) disease who received nodal RT and 2 RR events in 70 patients who did not receive nodal RT. On multivariable analysis, pN0(i+) was not associated with worse locoregional control or survival. On case-match analysis, LRR and overall survival were similar between pN0(i+) and matched pN0 counterparts. Conclusions: Nodal involvement with isolated tumor cells is not a significant prognostic factor for LRR or survival in this study's multivariable and case-match analyses. These data do not support the routine use of nodal RT in the setting of pN0(i+) disease. Prospective studies are needed to define optimal

  15. The role and indications of aggressive locoregional therapy in metastatic inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi; Tang, Lili; Tong, Wei; Zhou, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    We seek to confirm the effect and explore the indications of aggressive locoregional management in patients with metastatic inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Between 2003 and 2014, we reviewed the records of 156 patients with metastatic IBC from five large centers of Breast Surgery in the region of central south of China. Clinicopathologic data were collected to access overall survival (OS), prognostic factors and the indications for locoregional treatment. 75 (48%) patients underwent aggressive locoregional therapy. Patients in locoregional therapy group had a median OS of 24 months compared with 17 months of those in no locoregional therapy group. 2-year OS rate of these two groups was 52% and 32%, separately. Locoregional therapy (HR = 0.556; 95% CI 0.385-0.803; p = 0.002) was confirmed to be an independent prognostic factor, which could significantly improve OS of patients with metastatic IBC. For locoregional therapy group, statistical differences were observed in all subgroups stratified by the factors that were significant in univariate analysis except in the subgroups of stable disease, Charlson comorbidity index ≥3 and cerebral metastasis. Therefore, systemic therapy efficacy, Charlson comorbidity index and cerebral metastasis status appeared to be important indexes for choice of locoregional therapy in different individuals. PMID:27174789

  16. The role and indications of aggressive locoregional therapy in metastatic inflammatory breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Tang, Lili; Tong, Wei; Zhou, Jingyu

    2016-01-01

    We seek to confirm the effect and explore the indications of aggressive locoregional management in patients with metastatic inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Between 2003 and 2014, we reviewed the records of 156 patients with metastatic IBC from five large centers of Breast Surgery in the region of central south of China. Clinicopathologic data were collected to access overall survival (OS), prognostic factors and the indications for locoregional treatment. 75 (48%) patients underwent aggressive locoregional therapy. Patients in locoregional therapy group had a median OS of 24 months compared with 17 months of those in no locoregional therapy group. 2-year OS rate of these two groups was 52% and 32%, separately. Locoregional therapy (HR = 0.556; 95% CI 0.385–0.803; p = 0.002) was confirmed to be an independent prognostic factor, which could significantly improve OS of patients with metastatic IBC. For locoregional therapy group, statistical differences were observed in all subgroups stratified by the factors that were significant in univariate analysis except in the subgroups of stable disease, Charlson comorbidity index ≥3 and cerebral metastasis. Therefore, systemic therapy efficacy, Charlson comorbidity index and cerebral metastasis status appeared to be important indexes for choice of locoregional therapy in different individuals. PMID:27174789

  17. Immunologic changes after loco-regional radiotherapy and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) in mice

    SciTech Connect

    De Ruysscher, D.; Waer, M.; Vandeputte, M.; van der Schueren, E. )

    1989-12-01

    The immunologic effects of fractionated irradiation to both hind limbs and the tail of adult mice were investigated. A dose of 34 Gy given in 17 fractions of 2 Gy, 1 fraction per day, 5 days per week, was delivered with a 60Co source. A significant decrease of the total splenocyte count and of the PHA(phytohemagglutinin)-induced proliferation of T cells was found immediately after irradiation. Both parameters normalized within 30 days after irradiation. Immediately after irradiation, the MLC (mixed lymphocyte culture) was supranormal, dropped to 45% 1 week later, and normalized within 1 month after radiotherapy. The NK (natural killer) activity was significantly decreased only the first week after loco-regional irradiation, while the LAK (lymphokine activated killer) activity was not altered at all. The percentage of goat-anti-mouse+ cells (mainly B lymphocytes) was not changed immediately after loco-regional irradiation, but rose to supranormal values (175% of control level) 3 months after irradiation. A persistent decrease of the percentage and the absolute numbers of the Lyt2+ cells (= CD8+ cells, suppressor/cytotoxic phenotype) was observed up to 3 months after irradiation, while the percentage of L3T4+ cells (= CD4+ cells, helper phenotype) remained normal for the total follow-up. No differences in allogeneic skin graft survival could be demonstrated between irradiated and control animals. The observed immunological effects could not be explained by the scatter irradiation to the whole body as total body irradiation (TBI) administered in a dose and dose rate similar to the scatter dose did not result in persistent immunologic changes. No dose-rate effect could be demonstrated in a low dose fractionated total body irradiation schedule. A total body irradiation similar to the scatter dose in humans did not result in significant immunologic changes.

  18. Locoregional Recurrence of Breast Cancer in Patients Treated With Breast Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy Following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Sun Young; Lee, Seung Ju; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Park, In Hae; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kang, Han-Sung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Breast conservation surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) have been linked with high locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates and ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) rates. The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical outcomes in patients who exhibited LRR and IBTR after being treated by BCS and RT following NCT. Methods and Materials: In total, 251 breast cancer patients treated with BCS and RT following NCT between 2001 and 2006 were included. All patients had been shown to be clinically node-positive. Clinical stage at diagnosis (2003 AJCC) was II in 68% of patients and III in 32% of patients. Of those, 50%, 35%, and 15% of patients received anthracycline-based, taxane-based, and combined anthracycline-taxane NCT, respectively. All patients received RT. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), 26 (10%) patients had LRR, 19 of these patients had IBTR. Five-year actuarial rates of IBTR-free and LRR-free survival were 91% and 89%, respectively. In multivariate analyses, lack of hormone suppression therapy was found to increase both LRR and IBTR rates. Hazard ratios were 7.99 (p < 0.0001) and 4.22 (p = 0.004), respectively. Additionally, pathology stage N2 to N3 increased LRR rate (hazard ratio, 4.22; p = 0.004), and clinical AJCC stage III IBTR rate (hazard ratio, 9.05; p = 0.034). Achievement of pathological complete response and presence of multifocal tumors did not affect LRR or IBTR. Conclusions: In patients with locally advanced disease, who were clinically node-positive at presentation, BCS after NCT resulted in acceptably low rates of IBTR and LRR. Mastectomy should be considered as an option in patients who present with clinical stage III tumors or who are not treated with adjuvant hormone suppression therapy, because they exhibit high IBTR rates after NCT and BCS.

  19. Locoregional cancer therapy using polymer-based drug depots.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Farshad; van Nostrum, Cornelis F; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E; Kok, Robbert J

    2016-04-01

    Locoregional delivery of anticancer drugs is an attractive approach to minimize adverse effects associated with intravenous chemotherapy. Polymer-based drug depots injected or implanted intratumorally or adjacent to the tumor can provide long-term local drug exposure. This review highlights studies in which drug-eluting depots have been applied locally in the treatment of cancer. In many cases such drug depots are used for prevention of tumor recurrence after surgery to eradicate remaining tumor cells. Clinical success has been reported for the treatment of brain cancer and liver cancer, and preclinical studies showed proof-of-concept for inhaled drug depots in lung cancer and intraperitoneally injected depots for the treatment of abdominal cancer. PMID:26969576

  20. Salvage reirradiation for locoregional failure after radiation therapy for prostate cancer: who, when, where and how?

    PubMed

    Créhange, G; Roach, M; Martin, E; Cormier, L; Peiffert, D; Cochet, A; Chapet, O; Supiot, S; Cosset, J-M; Bolla, M; Chung, H T

    2014-10-01

    Even in the current era of dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer, biochemical recurrence is not uncommon. Furthermore, biochemical failure is not specific to the site of recurrence. One of the major challenges in the management of prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure after radiotherapy is the early discrimination between those with locoregional recurrence only and those with metastatic disease. While the latter are generally considered incurable, patients with locoregional disease may benefit from emerging treatment options. Ultimately, the objective of salvage therapy is to control disease while ensuring minimal collateral damage, thereby optimizing both cancer and toxicity outcomes. Advances in functional imaging, including multiparametric prostate MRI, abdominopelvic lymphangio-MRI, sentinel node SPECT-CT and/or whole-body PET/CT have paved the way for salvage radiotherapy in patients with local recurrence, microscopic nodal disease limited to the pelvis or oligometastatic disease. These patients may be considered for salvage reirradiation using different techniques: prostate low-dose or high-dose rate brachytherapy, pelvic and/or lomboaortic image-guided radiotherapy with elective nodal irradiation, focal nodal or bone stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). An individualized approach is recommended. The decision about which treatment, if any, to use will be based on the initial characteristics of the disease, relapse patterns and the natural history of the rising prostate specific antigen (PSA). Preliminary results suggest that more than 50% of patients who have undergone salvage reirradiation are biochemically relapse-free with very low rates of severe toxicity. Large prospective studies with a longer follow-up are needed to confirm the promising benefit/risk ratio observed with salvage brachytherapy and or salvage nodal radiotherapy and/or bone oligometastatic SBRT when compared with life-long palliative hormones. PMID:25192626

  1. Concurrent Chemotherapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nancy Y. O'Meara, William; Chan, Kelvin; Della-Bianca, Cesar; Mechalakos, James G.; Zhung, Joanne; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Narayana, Ashwatha; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin P.; Pfister, David G.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective review of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal carcinomas treated with concurrent chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and June 2005, 20 laryngeal and 11 hypopharyngeal carcinoma patients underwent IMRT with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy; most patients had Stage IV disease. The prescription of the planning target volume for gross, high-risk, and low-risk subclinical disease was 70, 59.4, and 54 Gy, respectively. Acute/late toxicities were retrospectively scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria scale. The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up of the living patients was 26 months (range, 17-58 months). The 2-year local progression-free, regional progression-free, laryngectomy-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rate was 86%, 94%, 89%, 92%, and 63%, respectively. Grade 2 mucositis or higher occurred in 48% of patients, and all experienced Grade 2 or higher pharyngitis during treatment. Xerostomia continued to decrease over time from the end of RT, with none complaining of Grade 2 toxicity at this analysis. The 2-year post-treatment percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-dependency rate for those with hypopharyngeal and laryngeal tumors was 31% and 15%, respectively. The most severe late complications were laryngeal necrosis, necrotizing fascitis, and a carotid rupture resulting in death 3 weeks after salvage laryngectomy. Conclusion: These preliminary results have shown that IMRT achieved encouraging locoregional control of locoregionally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas. Xerostomia improved over time. Pharyngoesophageal stricture with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy dependency remains a problem, particularly for patients with hypopharyngeal carcinoma and, to a lesser

  2. Mating Reverses Actuarial Aging in Female Queensland Fruit Flies

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Sarsha; Fanson, Benjamin G.; Taylor, Phillip W.

    2015-01-01

    Animals that have a long pre-reproductive adult stage often employ mechanisms that minimize aging over this period in order to preserve reproductive lifespan. In a remarkable exception, one tephritid fruit fly exhibits substantial pre-reproductive aging but then mitigates this aging during a diet-dependent transition to the reproductive stage, after which life expectancy matches that of newly emerged flies. Here, we ascertain the role of nutrients, sexual maturation and mating in mitigation of previous aging in female Queensland fruit flies. Flies were provided one of three diets: ‘sugar’, ‘essential’, or ‘yeast-sugar’. Essential diet contained sugar and micronutrients found in yeast but lacked maturation-enabling protein. At days 20 and 30, a subset of flies on the sugar diet were switched to essential or yeast-sugar diet, and some yeast-sugar fed flies were mated 10 days later. Complete mitigation of actuarial aging was only observed in flies that were switched to a yeast-sugar diet and mated, indicating that mating is key. Identifying the physiological processes associated with mating promise novel insights into repair mechanisms for aging. PMID:26147734

  3. 78 FR 773 - Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc., Commercial/Actuarial/Information Delivery Services (IDS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc., Commercial/Actuarial/ Information Delivery Services (IDS)/Corporate & Financial Reporting Group, Hartford, CT; Notice of...

  4. Lymph Node Ratio as a Risk Factor for Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients with 10 or More Axillary Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong Eon; Im, Young-Hyuck; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We analyzed the association of lymph node ratio (LNR) wth locoregional control (LRC) in breast cancer patients with ≥10 involved axillary lymph nodes who underwent multimodality treatment. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 234 breast cancer patients with ≥10 involved axillary lymph nodes between 2000 and 2011. All patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) after radical surgery. The cutoff value of LNR was obtained using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The majority of patients (87.2%) received chemotherapeutic regimen including taxane. RT consisted of tangential fields to the chest wall or intact breast, delivered at a median dose of 50 Gy, and a single anterior port to the supraclavicular lymph node area, delivered at a median dose of 50 Gy. For patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery, an electron boost with a total dose of 9 to 15 Gy was delivered to the tumor bed. Results Within a median follow-up period of 73.5 months (range, 11-183 months), locoregional recurrence (LRR) occurred in 30 patients (12.8%) and the 5-year LRC rate was 88.8%. After multivariate analysis, LNR ≥0.7 was the only independent factor significantly associated with LRC (hazard ratio, 2.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-4.29; p=0.05). Conclusion An aggressive multimodal treatment approach showed favorable locoregional outcome in patients with ≥10 involved axillary lymph nodes. However, patients with a high LNR ≥0.7 still had an increased risk for LRR, even in the setting of current local treatments. PMID:27382393

  5. Targeting glucose metabolism in cancer: new class of agents for loco-regional and systemic therapy of liver cancer and beyond?

    PubMed Central

    Savic, Lynn Jeanette; Chapiro, Julius; Duwe, Gregor; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most prevalent cancers and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In patients with unresectable disease, loco-regional catheter-based intra-arterial therapies (IAT) can achieve selective tumor control while minimizing systemic toxicity. As molecular features of tumor growth and microenvironment are better understood, new targets arise for selective anticancer therapy. Particularly, antiglycolytic drugs that exploit the hyperglycolytic cancer cell metabolism – also known as the ‘Warburg effect’ – have emerged as promising therapeutic options. Thus, future developments will combine the selective character of loco-regional drug delivery platforms with highly specific molecular targeted antiglycolytic agents. This review will exemplify literature on antiglycolytic approaches and particularly focus on intra-arterial delivery methods. PMID:26989470

  6. Higher Chest Wall Dose Results in Improved Locoregional Outcome in Patients Receiving Postmastectomy Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Panoff, Joseph E.; Takita, Cristiane; Hurley, Judith; Reis, Isildinha M.; Zhao, Wei; Rodgers, Steven E.; Gunaseelan, Vijayalakshmi; Wright, Jean L.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Randomized trials demonstrating decreased locoregional recurrence (LRR) and improved overall survival (OS) in women receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) used up to 50 Gy to the chest wall (CW), but in practice, many centers boost the CW dose to {>=}60 Gy, despite lack of data supporting this approach. We evaluated the relationship between CW dose and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 582 consecutively treated patients who received PMRT between January 1999 and December 2009. We collected data on patient, disease, treatment characteristics, and outcomes of LRR, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS. Results: Median follow-up from the date of diagnosis was 44.7 months. The cumulative 5-year incidence of LRR as first site of failure was 6.2%. CW dose for 7% (43 patients) was {<=}50.4 Gy (range, 41.4-50.4 Gy) and 93% received >50.4 Gy (range, 52.4-74.4 Gy). A CW dose of >50.4 Gy vs. {<=}50.4 Gy was associated with lower incidence of LRR, a 60-month rate of 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-8.2) vs. 12.7% (95% CI, 4.5-25.3; p = 0.054). Multivariate hazard ratio (HR) for LRR controlling for race, receptor status, and stage was 2.62 (95% CI, 1.02-7.13; p = 0.042). All LRR in the low-dose group occurred in patients receiving 50 to 50.4 Gy. Lower CW dose was associated with worse PFS (multivariate HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.64-4.56; p < 0.001) and OS (multivariate HR, 3.88; 95% CI, 2.16-6.99; p < 0.001). Conclusions: The addition of a CW boost above 50.4 Gy resulted in improved locoregional control and survival in this cohort patients treated with PMRT for stage II-III breast cancer. The addition of a CW boost to standard-dose PMRT is likely to benefit selected high-risk patients. The optimal technique, target volume, and patient selection criteria are unknown. The use of a CW boost should be studied prospectively, as has been done in the setting of breast conservation.

  7. Locoregional Treatment for Breast Carcinoma After Hodgkin's Lymphoma: The Breast Conservation Option

    SciTech Connect

    Haberer, Sophie; Belin, Lisa; Le Scodan, Romuald; Kirova, Youlia M.; Savignoni, Alexia; Stevens, Denise; Moisson, Patricia; Decaudin, Didier; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report clinical and pathologic characteristics and outcome of breast cancer (BC) after irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in women treated at the Institut Curie, with a special focus on the breast-conserving option. Methods and Materials: Medical records of 72 women who developed either ductal carcinoma in situ or Stage I-III invasive carcinoma of the breast after HL between 1978 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age at HL diagnosis was 23 years (range, 14-53 years). Median total dose received by the mediastinum was 40 Gy, mostly by a mantle-field technique. Breast cancers occurred after a median interval of 21 years (range, 5-40 years). Ductal invasive carcinoma and ductal carcinoma in situ represented, respectively, 51 cases (71%) and 14 cases (19%). Invasive BCs consisted of 47 cT0-2 tumors (82%), 5 cN1-3 tumors (9%), and 20 Grade 3 tumors (35%). Locoregional treatment for BCs consisted of mastectomy with (3) or without (36) radiotherapy in 39 patients and lumpectomy with (30) or without (2) adjuvant radiotherapy in 32 patients. The isocentric lateral decubitus radiation technique was used in 17 patients after breast-conserving surgery (57%). With a median follow-up of 7 years, 5-year overall survival rate and locoregional control rate were, respectively, 74.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 64-88%) and 82% (95% CI, 72-93%) for invasive carcinoma and 100% (95% CI, 100 -100%) and 92% (95% CI, 79-100%) for in situ carcinoma. In patients with invasive tumors, the 5-year distant disease-free survival rate was 79% (95% CI, 69-91%), and 13 patients died of progressive BC. Contralateral BC was diagnosed in 10 patients (14%). Conclusions: Breast-conserving treatment can be an option for BCs that occur after HL, despite prior thoracic irradiation. It should consist of lumpectomy and adjuvant breast radiotherapy with use of adequate techniques, such as the lateral decubitus isocentric position, to protect the underlying heart and

  8. 5 CFR 839.1121 - What is the Actuarial Reduction for the Basic Employee Death Benefit (BEDB)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

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  9. 5 CFR 839.1121 - What is the Actuarial Reduction for the Basic Employee Death Benefit (BEDB)?

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  10. 5 CFR 831.663 - Actuarial reduction in annuity of retirees who make post-retirement elections to provide a...

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  11. 5 CFR 839.1121 - What is the Actuarial Reduction for the Basic Employee Death Benefit (BEDB)?

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  12. 5 CFR 831.663 - Actuarial reduction in annuity of retirees who make post-retirement elections to provide a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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  13. 5 CFR 839.1121 - What is the Actuarial Reduction for the Basic Employee Death Benefit (BEDB)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

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  14. 5 CFR 831.663 - Actuarial reduction in annuity of retirees who make post-retirement elections to provide a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

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    2011-01-01

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  16. 5 CFR 831.663 - Actuarial reduction in annuity of retirees who make post-retirement elections to provide a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

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  17. 5 CFR 839.1121 - What is the Actuarial Reduction for the Basic Employee Death Benefit (BEDB)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

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  18. Choosing the 'best' plan in a health insurance exchange: actuarial value tells only part of the story.

    PubMed

    Lore, Ryan; Gabel, Jon R; McDevitt, Roland; Slover, Michael

    2012-08-01

    In the health insurance exchanges that will come online in 2014, consumers will be able to compare health plans with respect to actuarial value, or the percentage of health care costs that a plan would pay for a standard population. This analysis illustrates the out-of-pocket costs that might result from plans with various plan designs and actuarial values. We find that average out-of-pocket expense declines as actuarial values rise, but two plans with similar actuarial values can produce very different outcomes for a given person. The overall affordability of a plan also will be influenced by age rating, income-related premium subsidies, and out-of-pocket subsidies. Actuarial value is a useful starting point for selecting a plan, but it does not pinpoint which plan will produce the best overall value for a particular person. PMID:22946140

  19. Applying a Forensic Actuarial Assessment (the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide) to Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Grant T.; Rice, Marnie E.; Camilleri, Joseph A..

    2004-01-01

    The actuarial Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG) was developed for male offenders where it has shown excellent replicability in many new forensic samples using officially recorded outcomes. Clinicians also make decisions, however, about the risk of interpersonal violence posed by nonforensic psychiatric patients of both sexes. Could an actuarial…

  20. Academic Attributes of College Freshmen that Lead to Success in Actuarial Studies in a Business College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard Manning; Schumacher, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    The authors studied beginning undergraduate actuarial concentrators in a business college. They identified four variables (math Scholastic Aptitude Test [SAT] score, verbal SAT score, percentile rank in high school graduating class, and percentage score on a college mathematics placement exam) that were available for entering college students that…

  1. Should Actuarial Risk Assessments Be Used with Sex Offenders Who Are Intellectually Disabled?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Andrew J. R.; Tough, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Background: Objective actuarial assessments are critical for making risk decisions, determining the necessary level of supervision and intensity of treatment ( Andrews & Bonta 2003). This paper reviews the history of organized risk assessment and discusses some issues in current attitudes towards sexual offenders with intellectual disabilities.…

  2. Sexual Reconviction Rates in the United Kingdom and Actuarial Risk Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Leam A.; Browne, Kevin D.; Stringer, Ian; Hogue, Todd E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Assessing the risk of further offending behavior by adult sexual perpetrators of children is highly relevant and important to professionals involved in child protection. Recent progress in assessing risk in sexual offenders has established the validity of actuarial measures, although there continues to be some debate about the…

  3. High VEGF serum values are associated with locoregional spread of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs).

    PubMed

    Cigrovski Berković, Maja; Čačev, Tamara; Catela Ivković, Tina; Marout, Jasminka; Ulamec, Monika; Zjačić-Rotkvić, Vanja; Kapitanović, Sanja

    2016-04-15

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are highly vascularized neoplasms, capable of synthethisizing VEGF-A, a key mediator of angiogenesis. In pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) VEGF expression is higher in benign and low-grade tumors and associated with good prognosis (neuroendocrine paradox) while the VEGF role in gastrointestinal NETs (GI-NETs) is still unclear. In this study, we examined the VEGF-1154A/G polymorphism in 145 GEP-NET patients and 150 controls. Next, we measured VEGF serum levels and VEGF tumor protein expression, comparing it with Ki67 and tumor grade. Patients' VEGF serum levels were compared with VEGF -1145A/G genotypes and metastatic status as well as with chromogranin A (CgA) and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in case of GI-NET patients. In this study GEP-NET patients had elevated VEGF serum values when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.0013). VEGF-1145G allele correlated with higher VEGF serum levels (p = 0.002). Patients with metastatic tumors had higher VEGF serum values when compared to patients without metastases (p = 0.033), and highest levels were observed in case of lymph node metastases (p = 0.008). VEGF-1145G allele was more frequent in non-functional GI-NET patients than in healthy controls (p = 0.041). CgA was superior to VEGF in tumor detection, while VEGF was superior to 5-HIAA. A correlation was observed between VEGF immunohistochemical staining and Ki-67 (p = 0.028). Tumours with weaker VEGF protein expression were more aggressive than tumours with stronger VEGF expression, confirming a "neuroendocrine paradox" in GI-NETs. Our results suggest the role of VEGF in GI-NETs locoregional spread. PMID:26805636

  4. Long-Term Improvement in Treatment Outcome After Radiotherapy and Hyperthermia in Locoregionally Advanced Cervix Cancer: An Update of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Franckena, Martine Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Koper, Peter C.M.; Wiggenraad, Ruud G.J.; Hoogenraad, Wim J.; Dijk, Jan D.P. van; Warlam-Rodenhuis, Carla C.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Rhoon, Gerard C. van; Zee, Jacoba van der

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: The local failure rate in patients with locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is 41-72% after radiotherapy (RT) alone, whereas local control is a prerequisite for cure. The Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial showed that combining RT with hyperthermia (HT) improved 3-year local control rates of 41-61%, as we reported earlier. In this study, we evaluate long-term results of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial after 12 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 1996, a total of 114 women with locoregionally advanced cervical carcinoma were randomly assigned to RT or RT + HT. The RT was applied to a median total dose of 68 Gy. The HT was given once weekly. The primary end point was local control. Secondary end points were overall survival and late toxicity. Results: At the 12-year follow-up, local control remained better in the RT + HT group (37% vs. 56%; p = 0.01). Survival was persistently better after 12 years: 20% (RT) and 37% (RT + HT; p = 0.03). World Health Organization (WHO) performance status was a significant prognostic factor for local control. The WHO performance status, International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, and tumor diameter were significant for survival. The benefit of HT remained significant after correction for these factors. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Grade 3 or higher radiation-induced late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: For locoregionally advanced cervical cancer, the addition of HT to RT resulted in long-term major improvement in local control and survival without increasing late toxicity. This combined treatment should be considered for patients who are unfit to receive chemotherapy. For other patients, the optimal treatment strategy is the subject of ongoing research.

  5. A prognostic index for locoregional recurrence after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Herrero-Vicent, C; Guerrero-Zotano, A; Gavilá-Gregori, J; Hernández-Blanquisett, A; Sandiego-Contreras, S; Samper-Hiraldo, JM; Guillem-Porta, V; Ruiz-Simón, A

    2016-01-01

    Background The appropriate selection criteria for breast-conserving surgery (BCS) or mastectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) are poorly defined. The aim of this study is to analyse the incidence and prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients with breast cancer (BC) treated with NAC to develop a prognostic score to help with clinical decision-making. Materials and methods Using our retrospective maintained BC database, we identified 730 patients treated with NAC (327 patients treated with BCS and 403 patients treated with mastectomy) between 1998 and 2014. To identify variables associated with an increased LRR rate, we performed firstly Kaplan–Meier curves, with comparisons among groups using log-rank test, and then, significant variables were included in a multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards. The prognostic index was developed by assigning score 0 (favourable) or score 1 (unfavourable) for each significant variable of multivariate analysis and was created separately for patients with BCS and mastectomy. Results At a median follow-up of 72 months, the 6-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 7.2% ( ± 3%) for BCS and 7.9% ( ± 3%) for mastectomy. By univariate analysis, variables associated with an increased LRR were for BCS: HER2 positive, grade III, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), No-pCR (ypTis, ypN0), and age < 40 years; and for mastectomy, HER2-positive, DCIS, No-pCR, and LVI. By multivariate analysis, variables associated with an increased LRR were for BCS: HER2 positive (HR: 11.1, p = 0.001), DCIS (HR: 3.1, p = 0.005), and age < 40 years (HR: 2.8, p = 0.02); and for mastectomy: HER2 positive (HR: 9.5, p = 0.03), DCIS (HR: 2.7, p = 0.01), No-pCR (HR: 11.4, p = 0.01), and age < 40 years (HR: 2.8, p = 0.006). The score stratified patients into three subsets with statistically different levels of risk for LRR. For BCS, the six-year LRR rates were 3%, 13%, and 33% for the low (score 0, n = 120), intermediate (score 1

  6. Size-engineered biocompatible polymeric nanophotosensitizer for locoregional photodynamic therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Keunsoo; Park, Solji; Lee, Yong-Deok; Kang, Chi Soo; Kim, Hyun Jun; Park, Hyeonjong; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Jungahn; Park, Chong Rae; Kim, Sehoon

    2016-08-01

    Current approaches in use of water-insoluble photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer often demand a nano-delivery system. Here, we report a photosensitizer-loaded biocompatible nano-delivery formulation (PPaN-20) whose size was engineered to ca. 20nm to offer improved cell/tissue penetration and efficient generation of cytotoxic singlet oxygen. PPaN-20 was fabricated through the physical assembly of all biocompatible constituents: pyropheophorbide-a (PPa, water-insoluble photosensitizer), polycaprolactone (PCL, hydrophobic/biodegradable polymer), and Pluronic F-68 (clinically approved polymeric surfactant). Repeated microemulsification/evaporation method resulted in a fine colloidal dispersion of PPaN-20 in water, where the particulate PCL matrix containing well-dispersed PPa molecules inside was stabilized by the Pluronic corona. Compared to a control sample of large-sized nanoparticles (PPaN-200) prepared by a conventional solvent displacement method, PPaN-20 revealed optimal singlet oxygen generation and efficient cellular uptake by virtue of the suitably engineered size and constitution, leading to high in vitro phototoxicity against cancer cells. Upon administration to tumor-bearing mice by peritumoral route, PPaN-20 showed efficient tumor accumulation by the enhanced cell/tissue penetration evidenced by in vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The in vivo PDT treatment with peritumorally administrated PPaN-20 showed significantly enhanced suppression of tumor growth compared to the control group, demonstrating great potential as a biocompatible photosensitizing agent for locoregional PDT treatment of cancer. PMID:27107384

  7. Evaluation of Acute Locoregional Toxicity in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Combination With Bevacizumab

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Sharad

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Preclinical studies have shown that bevacizumab combined with radiotherapy (RT) induces a radiosensitizing effect. Published reports regarding the safety of combination therapy involving bevacizumab and RT are lacking. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute locoregional toxicity in patients with breast cancer receiving concurrent bevacizumab plus RT. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval was obtained, patients with breast cancer who received bevacizumab were identified; these patients were then cross-referenced with patients receiving RT. Toxicity was scored by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Patients were matched 1:1 with those who did not receive bevacizumab. Statistical analysis was performed to analyze toxicity between the two groups. Results: Fourteen patients were identified to have received bevacizumab plus RT. All patients receivedbevacizumab during RT without delay or treatment breaks; there were no RT treatment breaks in all patients. No patient receiving bevacizumab plus RT experienced {>=}Grade 3 toxicity; 3 matched control patients experienced a Grade 3 skin reaction. There was no difference in fatigue, radiation fibrosis, pneumonitis, or lymphedema between the two groups. Five patients (35%) developed reduction in ejection fraction; 2 with right-sided and 3 with left-sided treatment. Patients with left-sided treatment experienced a persistent reduction in ejection fraction compared with those receiving right-sided treatment. Conclusion: Concurrent bevacizumab and RT did not increase acute locoregional toxicity in comparison with matched control patients who did not receive RT alone. The addition of concurrent RT when treating the intact breast, chest wall, and associated nodal regions in breast cancer seems to be safe and well tolerated.

  8. Experience with combination of nimotuzumab and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Rui-ping; Ying, Hong-mei; Kong, Fang-fang; Du, Cheng-run; Huang, Shuang; Zhou, Jun-jun; Hu, Chao-su

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using nimotuzumab in combination with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the primary treatment of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods Between December 2009 and December 2013, 38 newly diagnosed patients with stage III–IV nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with IMRT and nimotuzumab concomitantly. The distribution of disease was stage III in 20 (52.6%), stage IV A in 9 (23.7%), and stage IV B in 9 (23.7%). All the patients received at least two cycles of cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by nimotuzumab 200 mg/week concurrently with IMRT. Acute and late radiation-related toxicities were graded according to the Acute and Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Results With a median follow-up of 39.7 months (range, 13.3–66.5 months), the estimated 3-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, progression failure-free survival, and overall survival rates were 92.8%, 92.9%, 89.5%, 78.7%, and 87.5%, respectively. The median cycle for nimotuzumab addition was 6 weeks. Grade 3 radiation-induced mucositis accounted for 36.8% of treated people. No skin rash and infusion reaction were observed, distinctly from what is reported in cetuximab-treated patients. Conclusion Nimotuzumab plus IMRT showed promising outcomes in terms of locoregional control and survival, without increasing the incidence of radiation-related toxicities for patients. PMID:26604795

  9. Alice in actuarial-land: through the looking glass of changing Static-99 norms.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Shoba; Weinberger, Linda E; Frances, Allen; Cusworth-Walker, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The Static-99, an actuarial rating method, is employed to conduct sexual violence risk assessment in legal contexts. The proponents of the Static-99 dismiss clinical judgment as not empirical. Two elements must be present to apply an actuarial risk model to a specific individual: sample representativeness and uniform measurement of outcome. This review demonstrates that both of these elements are lacking in the normative studies of the Static-99 and its revised version, the Static-99R. Studies conducted since the publication of the Static-99 have not replicated the original norms. Sexual recidivism rates for the same Static-99 score vary widely, from low to high, depending on the sample used. A hypothetical case example is presented to illustrate how the solitary application of the Static-99 or Static-99R recidivism rates to the exclusion of salient clinical factors for identifying sexual dangerousness can have serious consequences for public safety. PMID:20852227

  10. Actuarial calculation for PSAK-24 purposes post-employment benefit using market-consistent approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effendie, Adhitya Ronnie

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we use a market-consistent approach to calculate present value of obligation of a companies' post-employment benefit in accordance with PSAK-24 (the Indonesian accounting standard). We set some actuarial assumption such as Indonesian TMI 2011 mortality tables for mortality assumptions, accumulated salary function for wages assumption, a scaled (to mortality) disability assumption and a pre-defined turnover rate for termination assumption. For economic assumption, we use binomial tree method with estimated discount rate as its average movement. In accordance with PSAK-24, the Projected Unit Credit method has been adapted to determine the present value of obligation (actuarial liability), so we use this method with a modification in its discount function.

  11. Long‐Term Post‐CABG Survival: Performance of Clinical Risk Models Versus Actuarial Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brendan M.; Romeiser, Jamie; Ruan, Joyce; Gupta, Sandeep; Seifert, Frank C.; Zhu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background/aim Clinical risk models are commonly used to predict short‐term coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) mortality but are less commonly used to predict long‐term mortality. The added value of long‐term mortality clinical risk models over traditional actuarial models has not been evaluated. To address this, the predictive performance of a long‐term clinical risk model was compared with that of an actuarial model to identify the clinical variable(s) most responsible for any differences observed. Methods Long‐term mortality for 1028 CABG patients was estimated using the Hannan New York State clinical risk model and an actuarial model (based on age, gender, and race/ethnicity). Vital status was assessed using the Social Security Death Index. Observed/expected (O/E) ratios were calculated, and the models' predictive performances were compared using a nested c‐index approach. Linear regression analyses identified the subgroup of risk factors driving the differences observed. Results Mortality rates were 3%, 9%, and 17% at one‐, three‐, and five years, respectively (median follow‐up: five years). The clinical risk model provided more accurate predictions. Greater divergence between model estimates occurred with increasing long‐term mortality risk, with baseline renal dysfunction identified as a particularly important driver of these differences. Conclusions Long‐term mortality clinical risk models provide enhanced predictive power compared to actuarial models. Using the Hannan risk model, a patient's long‐term mortality risk can be accurately assessed and subgroups of higher‐risk patients can be identified for enhanced follow‐up care. More research appears warranted to refine long‐term CABG clinical risk models. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12665 (J Card Surg 2016;31:23–30) PMID:26543019

  12. Human actuarial aging increases faster when background death rates are lower: a consequence of differential heterogeneity?

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Kristen; Smith, Ken R; Blevins, James K

    2012-01-01

    Many analyses of human populations have found that age-specific mortality rates increase faster across most of adulthood when overall mortality levels decline. This contradicts the relationship often expected from Williams' classic hypothesis about the effects of natural selection on the evolution of senescence. More likely, much of the within-species difference in actuarial aging is not due to variation in senescence, but to the strength of filters on the heterogeneity of frailty in older survivors. A challenge to this differential frailty hypothesis was recently posed by an analysis of life tables from historical European populations and traditional societies that reported variation in actuarial aging consistent with Williams' hypothesis after all. To investigate the challenge, we reconsidered those cases and aging measures. Here we show that the discrepancy depends on Ricklefs' aging rate measure, ω, which decreases as mortality levels drop because it is an index of mortality level itself, not the rate of increase in mortality with age. We also show unappreciated correspondence among the parameters of Gompertz-Makeham and Weibull survival models. Finally, we compare the relationships among mortality parameters of the traditional societies and the historical series, providing further suggestive evidence that differential heterogeneity has strong effects on actuarial aging. PMID:22220868

  13. High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Using Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: A Clinical Report With 2-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daniel H.; Wang-Chesebro, Alice; Weinberg, Vivian; Pouliot, Jean; Chen, Lee-May; Speight, Joycelyn; Littell, Ramey; Hsu, I.-Chow

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: We present clinical outcomes of image-guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) planned high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 through December 2006, 51 patients were treated at the University of California, San Francisco with HDR brachytherapy boost as part of definitive radiation for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB1 to Stage IVA cervical cancer. Of the patients, 46 received concurrent chemotherapy, 43 with cisplatin alone and 3 with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. All patients had IPSA-planned HDR brachytherapy boost after whole-pelvis external radiation to a total tumor dose of 85 Gy or greater (for alpha/beta = 10). Toxicities are reported according to National Cancer Institute CTCAE v3.0 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0) guidelines. Results: At a median follow-up of 24.3 months, there were no toxicities of Grade 4 or greater and the frequencies of Grade 3 acute and late toxicities were 4% and 2%, respectively. The proportion of patients having Grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal and genitourinary acute toxicities was 48% and 52%, respectively. Low-grade late toxicities included Grade 1 or 2 vaginal, gastrointestinal, and hormonal toxicities in 31%, 18%, and 4% of patients, respectively. During the follow-up period, local recurrence developed in 2 patients, regional recurrence developed in 2, and new distant metastases developed in 15. The rates of locoregional control of disease and overall survival at 24 months were 91% and 86%, respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDR brachytherapy boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease.

  14. Thermal Ablative Therapies and Immune Checkpoint Modulation: Can Locoregional Approaches Effect a Systemic Response?

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Amol; Oklu, Rahmi

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous image-guided ablation is an increasingly common treatment for a multitude of solid organ malignancies. While historically these techniques have been restricted to the management of small, unresectable tumors, there is an expanding appreciation for the systemic effects these locoregional interventions can cause. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of action for the most common thermal ablation modalities and highlight the key advances in knowledge regarding the interactions between thermal ablation and the immune system. PMID:27051417

  15. Hepatocellular carcinoma after locoregional therapy: Magnetic resonance imaging findings in falsely negative exams

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Weidman, David; Civan, Jesse M; Deshmukh, Sandeep P; Roth, Christopher G; Herrine, Steven K; Parker, Laurence; Mitchell, Donald G

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate causes for false negative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams by identifying imaging characteristics that predict viable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in lesions previously treated with locoregional therapy when obvious findings of recurrence are absent. METHODS: This retrospective institutional review board-approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study included patients who underwent liver transplantation at our center between 1/1/2000 and 12/31/2012 after being treated for HCC with locoregional therapy. All selected patients had a contrast-enhanced MRI after locoregional therapy within 90 d of transplant that was prospectively interpreted as without evidence of residual or recurrent tumor. Retrospectively, 2 radiologists, blinded to clinical and pathological data, independently reviewed the pre-transplant MRIs for 7 imaging features. Liver explant histopathology provided the reference standard, with clinically significant tumor defined as viable tumor ≥ 1.0 cm in maximum dimension. Fisher’s exact test was first performed to identify significant imaging features. RESULTS: Inclusion criteria selected for 42 patients with 65 treated lesions. Fourteen of 42 patients (33%) and 16 of 65 treated lesions (25%) had clinically significant viable tumor on explant histology. None of the 7 imaging findings examined could reliably and reproducibly determine which treated lesion had viable tumor when the exam had been prospectively read as without evidence of viable HCC. CONCLUSION: After locoregional therapy some treated lesions that do not demonstrate any MRI evidence of HCC will contain viable tumor. As such even patients with a negative MRI following treatment should receive regular short-term imaging surveillance because some have occult viable tumor. The possibility of occult tumor should be a consideration when contemplating any action which might delay liver transplant. PMID:27326315

  16. Survival after Locoregional Treatments for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Cohort Study in Real-World Patients

    PubMed Central

    Signoriello, Simona; Annunziata, Annalisa; Lama, Nicola; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Chiodini, Paolo; De Sio, Ilario; Daniele, Bruno; Di Costanzo, Giovanni G.; Calise, Fulvio; Olivieri, Graziano; Castaldo, Vincenzo; Lanzetta, Rosario; Piai, Guido; Marone, Giampiero; Visconti, Mario; Fusco, Mario; Di Maio, Massimo; Perrone, Francesco; Gallo, Ciro; Gaeta, Giovanni B.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of relative effectiveness of local treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is scanty. We investigated, in a retrospective cohort study, whether surgical resection, radiofrequency ablation (RFA), percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), and transarterial embolization with (TACE) or without (TAE) chemotherapy resulted in different survival in clinical practice. All patients first diagnosed with HCC and treated with any locoregional therapy from 1998 to 2002 in twelve Italian hospitals were eligible. Overall survival (OS) was the unique endpoint. Three main comparisons were planned: RFA versus PEI, surgical resection versus RFA/PEI (combined), TACE/TAE versus RFA/PEI (combined). Propensity score method was used to minimize bias related to non random treatment assignment. Overall 425 subjects were analyzed, with 385 (91%) deaths after a median followup of 7.7 years. OS did not significantly differ between RFA and PEI (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.79–1.57), between surgery and RFA/PEI (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.64–1.41) and between TACE/TAE and RFA/PEI (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.66–1.17). 5-year OS probabilities were 0.14 for RFA, 0.18 for PEI, 0.27 for surgery, and 0.15 for TACE/TAE. No locoregional treatment for HCC was found to be more effective than the comparator. Adequately powered randomized clinical trials are still needed to definitely assess relative effectiveness of locoregional HCC treatment. PMID:22654628

  17. Chemoradiotherapy in a Case of Malignant Syringocystadenocarcinoma Papilliferum of Vulva with Locoregional Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pamidimukkala Bramhananda; Ghosh, Saptarshi; Mohapatra, Manisha; Philip, N. Pramod; Kumar, P. Ravindra; Manam, Surendra; Karra, Pradeep; Jasti, Vijay Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Syringocystadenocarcinoma papilliferum (SCACP) is an extremely rare malignant adnexal tumor, which arises from syringocystadenoma papilliferum. To date, less than 30 cases of malignant SCACP have been reported, of which locoregional metastases were found in only four cases. Case Report. A 57-year-old female patient who presented to our Oncology Department with a recurrent malignant SCACP of the left labia along with right inguinal lymphadenopathy. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of malignant SCACP with right inguinal lymph node metastases. Due to the fixity of the right inguinal nodes, neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered with Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for four cycles, following which the primary tumor and the contralateral inguinal nodes regressed completely. Then definitive chemoradiation was delivered with five cycles of weekly Cisplatin and external beam pelvic irradiation up to a dose of 59.4 Gy. Patient is disease-free 11 months after treatment. Discussion. We here report the fifth case of malignant SCACP with locoregional metastases. This is the first case of malignant SCACP which has been treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation. Although surgery has been used most commonly, chemoradiation may also have a role in the treatment of malignant SCACP, especially in cases of locoregional metastases. PMID:26697249

  18. CT Appearance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Locoregional Treatments: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Marin, Daniel; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Serra, Nicola; Sica, Assunta; Lassandro, Francesco; D'Angelo, Roberto; La Porta, Michelearcangelo; Fiore, Francesco; Somma, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem worldwide, affecting more than 600,000 new patients per year. Curative treatments are available in a small percentage of patients, while most of them present in stages requiring locoregional treatments such as thermoablation, transarterial chemoembolization, and/or radioembolization. These therapies result in specific imaging features that the general radiologist has to be aware of in order to assess the response to treatment and to correctly manage the follow-up of treated patients. Multiphasic helical computed tomography has become a popular imaging modality for detecting hypervascular tumors and characterizing liver lesions. On this basis, many staging and diagnostic systems have been proposed for evaluating response to all different existing strategies. Radiofrequencies and microwaves generate thermoablation of tumors, and transarterial chemoembolization exploits the double effect of the locoregional administration of drugs and embolizing particles. Eventually radioembolization uses a beta-emitting isotope to induce necrosis. Therefore, the aim of this comprehensive review is to analyze and compare CT imaging appearance of HCC after various locoregional treatments, with regard to specific indications for all possible procedures. PMID:26798332

  19. CT Appearance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Locoregional Treatments: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Daniel; Cappabianca, Salvatore; Serra, Nicola; Sica, Assunta; D'Angelo, Roberto; La Porta, Michelearcangelo; Fiore, Francesco; Somma, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem worldwide, affecting more than 600,000 new patients per year. Curative treatments are available in a small percentage of patients, while most of them present in stages requiring locoregional treatments such as thermoablation, transarterial chemoembolization, and/or radioembolization. These therapies result in specific imaging features that the general radiologist has to be aware of in order to assess the response to treatment and to correctly manage the follow-up of treated patients. Multiphasic helical computed tomography has become a popular imaging modality for detecting hypervascular tumors and characterizing liver lesions. On this basis, many staging and diagnostic systems have been proposed for evaluating response to all different existing strategies. Radiofrequencies and microwaves generate thermoablation of tumors, and transarterial chemoembolization exploits the double effect of the locoregional administration of drugs and embolizing particles. Eventually radioembolization uses a beta-emitting isotope to induce necrosis. Therefore, the aim of this comprehensive review is to analyze and compare CT imaging appearance of HCC after various locoregional treatments, with regard to specific indications for all possible procedures. PMID:26798332

  20. Ethical practice in sex offender assessment: consideration of actuarial and polygraph methods.

    PubMed

    Vess, James

    2011-09-01

    The current generation of community protection laws represents a shift in priorities that may see the individual rights of sex offenders compromised for the goal of public safety. At the center of many judicial decisions under these laws are the risk assessment reports provided by mental health practitioners. The widespread enactment of laws allowing for additional sanctions for sex offenders, and a burgeoning research literature regarding the methods used to assess risk have served to heighten rather than resolve the ethical concerns associated with professional practice in this area. This article examines ethical issues inherent in the use of two assessment methods commonly used with sex offenders in the correctional context, focusing on actuarial measures and polygraph tests. Properly conducted and adequately reported actuarial findings are considered to provide useful information of sufficient accuracy to inform rather than mislead judicial decision makers, although careful consideration must be given to the limitations of current measures in each individual case. Despite its increasing use, polygraph testing is considered controversial, with little consensus regarding its accuracy or appropriate applications. On the basis of the current state of the professional literature regarding the polygraph, its use with sex offenders raises unresolved ethical concerns. PMID:20944058

  1. BRAF inhibition for advanced locoregional BRAF V600E mutant melanoma: a potential neoadjuvant strategy.

    PubMed

    Sloot, Sarah; Zager, Jonathan S; Kudchadkar, Ragini R; Messina, Jane L; Benedict, Jacob J; Gonzalez, Ricardo J; DeConti, Ronald; Turner, Leslie M; McCardle, Timothy; Smalley, Keiran S M; Weber, Jeffrey S; Sondak, Vernon K; Gibney, Geoffrey T

    2016-02-01

    Selective BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) yield objective responses in 50% of patients with metastatic BRAF V600E mutant melanoma. Adding an MEK inhibitor increases this response rate to 70%. Limited data are available on the outcomes of unresectable stage III patients, and it remains unclear whether BRAF-targeted therapy can be utilized as a neoadjuvant strategy. Data on patients with advanced locoregional BRAF V600E mutant melanoma treated with BRAF-targeted therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center were analyzed to determine response rates, subsequent resection rates after tumor downsizing, pathologic responses, and patient survival. Fifteen patients with locoregional disease treated with BRAF-targeted therapy, either BRAFi alone (vemurafenib; 11 patients) or a combination of BRAFi and an MEK inhibitor (dabrafenib plus trametinib or placebo; four patients), were identified. The median age was 50 years; the median follow-up was 25.4 months. The median BRAF-targeted therapy treatment duration was 6.0 months (range 1.2-29.4 months). Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors-based evaluation demonstrated objective response in 11 patients (73.3%). Six patients underwent resection of the remaining disease after therapy. Pathological analysis showed complete pathologic response (n=2), partial pathologic response (n=2), or no pathologic response (n=2). Four of six patients undergoing surgery have been alive for more than 2 years, including three patients currently free from active disease. No complications attributable to BRAF-targeted therapy were observed in the perioperative period. Dose reduction or discontinuation because of toxicities occurred in 10/15 patients. Neoadjuvant BRAF-targeted therapy may be effective in advanced locoregional BRAF V600E mutant melanoma patients in increasing resectability, yielding pathological responses, and achieving prolonged survival. PMID:26731560

  2. Changes in Pulmonary Function Up to 10 Years After Locoregional Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Erven, Katrien; Weltens, Caroline; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Fieuws, Steffen; Decramer, Marc; Lievens, Yolande

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term impact of locoregional breast radiotherapy (RT) on pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods and Materials: This study included 75 women who underwent postoperative locoregional breast RT. PFTs were performed before RT and 3, 6, and 12 months and 8 to 10 years after RT. By use of univariate and multivariate analyses, the impact of treatment- and patient-related factors on late changes in PFTs was evaluated. Results: During the first year after RT, all PFTs significantly worsened at 3 to 6 months after RT (p < 0.05). At 12 months, forced vital capacity (FVC), vital capacity (VC), and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV{sub 1}) recovered almost to baseline values, whereas total lung capacity (TLC) and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO}) recovered only slightly and were still found to be decreased compared with baseline (p < 0.05). At 8 to 10 years after RT, mean reductions in FEV{sub 1} of 4% (p = 0.03) and in VC, DL{sub CO}, and TLC of 5%, 9%, and 11% (all p < 0.0001), respectively, were observed compared with pre-RT values. On multivariate analysis, tamoxifen use negatively affected TLC at 8 to 10 years after RT (p = 0.033), whereas right-sided irradiation was associated with a late reduction in FEV{sub 1} (p = 0.027). For FEV{sub 1} and DL{sub CO}, an early decrease was predictive for a late decrease (p = 0.003 and p = 0.0009, respectively). Conclusions: The time course of PFT changes after locoregional RT for breast cancer follows a biphasic pattern. An early reduction in PFTs at 3 to 6 months with a partial recovery at 12 months after RT is followed by a late, more important PFT reduction up to 8 to 10 years after RT. Tamoxifen use may have an impact on this late decline in PFTs.

  3. The long-term outcomes of alternating chemoradiotherapy for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a multiinstitutional phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kodaira, Takeshi; Daimon, Takashi; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    To examine the long-term outcomes of alternating chemoradiotherapy (ALCRT) for patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and to assess the efficacy of ALCRT for NPC. Patients with stage IIB to IVB, ECOG PS 0–2, 18–70 years-old, and sufficient organ function were eligible for this study. First, chemotherapy, consisting of 5-fluorouracil (800 mg/m2 per 24 h on days 1–5) and cisplatin (100 mg/m2 per 24 h on day 6), was administered, then a wide field of radiotherapy (36 Gy/20 fraction), chemotherapy, a shrinking field of radiotherapy (34 Gy/17 fraction), and chemotherapy were performed alternately. Between December 2003 and March 2006, 90 patients in 25 facilities were enrolled in this study, 87 patients were finally evaluated. A total of 67 patients (76.1%) completed the course of treatment. The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates at 5 years were 78.04% (95% CI: 69.1∼87.0%), and 68.74% (95% CI: 58.8∼78.7%), respectively. The long-term outcomes of ALCRT for NPC were thought to be promising. ALCRT will be considered to be a controlled trial to compare therapeutic results with those of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for NPC. PMID:25991077

  4. Gall bladder carcinoma: Aggressive malignancy with protean loco-regional and distant spread.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Amit Nandan Dhar; Jain, Shivi; Dixit, Ruhi

    2015-03-16

    The most common malignancy of biliary tract is gallbladder cancer (GBC) which is the third most common cancer in gastrointestinal tract. It is a lethal disease for most patients in spite of growing awareness and improved diagnostic techniques. GBC has a very poor prognosis and the 5 year survival rate is < 10%. Although etiology of the carcinoma of the gallbladder is still obscure, various factors have been implicated, cholelithiasis being the most frequent. The incidence of GBC worldwide is based on the gender, geography and ethnicity which suggest that both genetic and environmental factors can cause GBC. The major route of spread of gallbladder cancer (GC) is loco-regional rather than distant. It spreads by lymphatic, vascular, neural, intraperitoneal, and intraductal routes. Sonography is usually the most common imaging test to evaluate symptoms of biliary tract disease including suspected GC. With recent advances in imaging modalities like multi-detector computed tomography (CT) scanners, magnetic resonance imaging-positron emission tomography/CT diagnosis of gallbladder cancer has improved. Studies have also targeted molecular and genetic pathways. Treatment options have included extended and radical surgeries and adjuvant chemotherapy. This review article deals in detail with important aspects of carcinoma gallbladder and its manifestations and challenges. Role of various imaging modalities in characterization and accurate staging has been discussed. The loco-regional spread of this aggressive malignancy is dealt explicitly. PMID:25789296

  5. Gall bladder carcinoma: Aggressive malignancy with protean loco-regional and distant spread

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Amit Nandan Dhar; Jain, Shivi; Dixit, Ruhi

    2015-01-01

    The most common malignancy of biliary tract is gallbladder cancer (GBC) which is the third most common cancer in gastrointestinal tract. It is a lethal disease for most patients in spite of growing awareness and improved diagnostic techniques. GBC has a very poor prognosis and the 5 year survival rate is < 10%. Although etiology of the carcinoma of the gallbladder is still obscure, various factors have been implicated, cholelithiasis being the most frequent. The incidence of GBC worldwide is based on the gender, geography and ethnicity which suggest that both genetic and environmental factors can cause GBC. The major route of spread of gallbladder cancer (GC) is loco-regional rather than distant. It spreads by lymphatic, vascular, neural, intraperitoneal, and intraductal routes. Sonography is usually the most common imaging test to evaluate symptoms of biliary tract disease including suspected GC. With recent advances in imaging modalities like multi-detector computed tomography (CT) scanners, magnetic resonance imaging-positron emission tomography/CT diagnosis of gallbladder cancer has improved. Studies have also targeted molecular and genetic pathways. Treatment options have included extended and radical surgeries and adjuvant chemotherapy. This review article deals in detail with important aspects of carcinoma gallbladder and its manifestations and challenges. Role of various imaging modalities in characterization and accurate staging has been discussed. The loco-regional spread of this aggressive malignancy is dealt explicitly. PMID:25789296

  6. Actuarial aging rate is not constant within the human life span.

    PubMed

    Ekonomov, A L; Rudd, C L; Lomakin, A J

    1989-01-01

    It is often believed that the mortality intensity in the modern human population undergoes an exponential growth after 40 years, i.e. the actuarial aging rate is regarded to be constant after 40 years. To check this assumption we have calculated local aging rate values for 13 age ranges (within the interval of 30-92 years) for the male and female population of 48 states of the US (1969-1971). It was found that generally the male aging rate is not constant but lowers monotonically with time, while for females the aging rate has a pronounced approximately-shaped character with a minimum in the range of 45-60 years and a maximum within the range of 70-80 years. The results obtained are a warning to those who boldly use Gompertz or Gompertz-Makeham formulas when describing human aging on the population level. PMID:2792778

  7. Projections of health care expenditures as a share of the GDP: actuarial and macroeconomic approaches.

    PubMed Central

    Warshawsky, M J

    1994-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION. Can the steady increases in health care expenditures as a share of GDP projected by widely cited actuarial models be rationalized by a macroeconomic model with sensible parameters and specification? DATA SOURCES. National Income and Product Accounts, and Social Security and Health Care Financing Administration are the data sources used in parameters estimates. STUDY DESIGN. Health care expenditures as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) are projected using two methodological approaches--actuarial and macroeconomic--and under various assumptions. The general equilibrium macroeconomic approach has the advantage of allowing an investigation of the causes of growth in the health care sector and its consequences for the overall economy. DATA COLLECTION METHODS. Simulations are used. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Both models unanimously project a continued increase in the ratio of health care expenditures to GDP. Under the most conservative assumptions, that is, robust economic growth, improved demographic trends, or a significant moderation in the rate of health care price inflation, the health care sector will consume more than a quarter of national output by 2065. Under other (perhaps more realistic) assumptions, including a continuation of current trends, both approaches predict that health care expenditures will comprise between a third and a half of national output. In the macroeconomic model, the increasing use of capital goods in the health care sector explains the observed rise in relative prices. Moreover, this "capital deepening" implies that a relatively modest fraction of the labor force is employed in health care and that the rest of the economy is increasingly starved for capital, resulting in a declining standard of living. PMID:8063567

  8. Projections of health care expenditures as a share of the GDP: actuarial and macroeconomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Warshawsky, M J

    1994-08-01

    STUDY QUESTION. Can the steady increases in health care expenditures as a share of GDP projected by widely cited actuarial models be rationalized by a macroeconomic model with sensible parameters and specification? DATA SOURCES. National Income and Product Accounts, and Social Security and Health Care Financing Administration are the data sources used in parameters estimates. STUDY DESIGN. Health care expenditures as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) are projected using two methodological approaches--actuarial and macroeconomic--and under various assumptions. The general equilibrium macroeconomic approach has the advantage of allowing an investigation of the causes of growth in the health care sector and its consequences for the overall economy. DATA COLLECTION METHODS. Simulations are used. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Both models unanimously project a continued increase in the ratio of health care expenditures to GDP. Under the most conservative assumptions, that is, robust economic growth, improved demographic trends, or a significant moderation in the rate of health care price inflation, the health care sector will consume more than a quarter of national output by 2065. Under other (perhaps more realistic) assumptions, including a continuation of current trends, both approaches predict that health care expenditures will comprise between a third and a half of national output. In the macroeconomic model, the increasing use of capital goods in the health care sector explains the observed rise in relative prices. Moreover, this "capital deepening" implies that a relatively modest fraction of the labor force is employed in health care and that the rest of the economy is increasingly starved for capital, resulting in a declining standard of living. PMID:8063567

  9. If You Build It, Will They Come? Tales of Developing a New Degree Program in Actuarial Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marano, Lisa E.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, the B.S. in Applied Mathematics program consisting of five concentrations, including Actuarial Science, began at West Chester University of Pennsylvania, and we graduated our first class (of one) that December. We describe our program, some ideas to consider when planning your own program, and share some of the successes of our program…

  10. Actuarial Models for Assessing Prison Violence Risk: Revisions and Extensions of the Risk Assessment Scale for Prison (RASP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Mark D.; Sorensen, Jon R.

    2006-01-01

    An investigation and extension of the Risk Assessment Scale for Prison (RASP-Potosi), an actuarially derived scale for the assessment of prison violence, was undertaken through a retrospective review of the disciplinary records of the first 12 months of confinement of a cohort of inmates entering the Florida Department of Corrections in 2002 and…

  11. Competence in Mathematics and Academic Achievement: An Analysis of Enrollees in the Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamala, Robert; Maswere, Dyson W.; Mwanga, Yeko

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the role of prior grounding attained in mathematics in predicting the academic achievement of enrollees in Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science (BSAS). The investigation is based on administrative records of 240 BSAS enrollees at Makerere University, School of Statistics and Planning in the 2007-2009 cohorts. Students'…

  12. A Brief Actuarial Assessment for the Prediction of Wife Assault Recidivism: The Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, N. Zoe; Harris, Grant T.; Rice, Marnie E.; Lang, Carol; Cormier, Catherine A.; Lines, Kathryn J.

    2004-01-01

    An actuarial assessment to predict male-to-female marital violence was constructed from a pool of potential predictors in a sample of 589 offenders identified in police records and followed up for an average of almost 5 years. Archival information in several domains (offender characteristics, domestic violence history, nondomestic criminal…

  13. 26 CFR 1.412(c)(2)-1 - Valuation of plan assets; reasonable actuarial valuation methods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of 120 percent of the current fair market value of plan assets as of the applicable asset valuation... assets in the period in which it occurs. (iii) The asset valuation rules contained in paragraph (b...) Asset valuation method requirements—(1) Consistent basis. (i) The actuarial asset valuation method...

  14. 78 FR 9890 - DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries; Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... of the Secretary DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries; Notice of Federal... that the following Federal Advisory Committee meeting of the DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care... in the valuation of benefits under DoD retiree health care programs for...

  15. 75 FR 6360 - Federal Advisory Committee; DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of... that the DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries will meet on August 18, 2010... used in the valuation of benefits under DoD retiree health care programs for...

  16. Has actuarial aging "slowed" over the past 250 years? A comparison of small-scale subsistence populations and European cohorts.

    PubMed

    Gurven, Michael; Fenelon, Andrew

    2009-04-01

    G.C. Williams's 1957 hypothesis famously argues that higher age-independent, or "extrinsic," mortality should select for faster rates of senescence. Long-lived species should therefore show relatively few deaths from extrinsic causes such as predation and starvation. Theoretical explorations and empirical tests of Williams's hypothesis have flourished in the past decade but it has not yet been tested empirically among humans. We test Williams's hypothesis using mortality data from subsistence populations and from historical cohorts from Sweden and England/Wales, and examine whether rates of actuarial aging declined over the past two centuries. We employ three aging measures: mortality rate doubling time (MRDT), Ricklefs's omega, and the slope of mortality hazard from ages 60-70, m'(60-70), and model mortality using both Weibull and Gompertz-Makeham hazard models. We find that (1) actuarial aging in subsistence societies is similar to that of early Europe, (2) actuarial senescence has slowed in later European cohorts, (3) reductions in extrinsic mortality associate with slower actuarial aging in longitudinal samples, and (4) men senesce more rapidly than women, especially in later cohorts. To interpret these results, we attempt to bridge population-based evolutionary analysis with individual-level proximate mechanisms. PMID:19220451

  17. The effect of loco-regional anaesthesia on motor activity induced by direct stimulation of the sciatic nerve in dogs.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, A P; Michou, J N

    2016-03-01

    A prospective, randomised, blinded, case-controlled clinical study was designed using client-owned dogs undergoing unilateral pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery, to determine the effect on induced motor activity by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of local anaesthetic administration. Dogs were administered 0.5% bupivacaine either extradurally or via a femoral and transgluteal sciatic electrolocation-guided nerve block prior to pelvic limb surgery. Motor response to electrical stimulation of branches of the sciatic nerve was tested and the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch was recorded prior to bupivacaine administration. Provided sensory blockade had been deemed successful intraoperatively, testing was repeated postoperatively, with each dog acting as its own control. Paired t-tests were performed to compare pre- and postoperative minimum currents. Eleven dogs administered extradural and 11 dogs administered femoral and sciatic perineural bupivacaine were eligible for post-operative testing. All dogs displayed normal motor response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at both sites tested before and after bupivacaine administration. There was no significant difference in the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch between pre- and post-operative testing (P = 0.31 sciatic site, P = 0.36 peroneal site), nor between the two groups using different loco-regional anaesthetic techniques (minimum P = 0.13). This study shows that stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of bupivacaine administration induces motor activity, despite adequate sensory blockade. This is relevant in surgical cases where mechanical stimulation of the sciatic nerve might be expected and needs to be recognised to avoid postoperative neurapraxia. PMID:26831173

  18. Matched Survival Analysis in Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Resectable Oropharyngeal Carcinoma: Platinum-Based Induction and Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Versus Primary Surgical Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Boscolo-Rizzo, Paolo; Gava, Alessandro; Baggio, Vittorio; Marchiori, Carlo; Stellin, Marco; Fuson, Roberto; Lamon, Stefano; Da Mosto, Maria Cristina

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The outcome of a prospective case series of 47 patients with newly diagnosed resectable locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with platinum-based induction-concurrent chemoradiotherapy (IC/CCRT) was compared with the outcome of 47 matched historical control patients treated with surgery and postoperative RT. Methods and Materials: A total of 47 control patients with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were identified from review of a prospectively compiled comprehensive computerized head-and-neck cancer database and were matched with a prospective case series of patients undergoing IC/CCRT by disease stage, nodal status, gender, and age ({+-}5 years). The IC/CCRT regimen consisted of one cycle of induction chemotherapy followed by conventionally fractionated RT to a total dose of 66-70 Gy concomitantly with two cycles of chemotherapy. Each cycle of chemotherapy consisted of cisplatinum, 100 mg/m{sup 2}, and a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 5 days. The survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimates. Matched-pair survival was compared using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: No significant difference was found in the overall survival or progression-free survival rates between the two groups. The matched analysis of survival did not show a statistically significant greater hazard ratio for overall death (hazard ratio, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-2.80; p = .415) or progression (hazard ratio, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.72-2.87; p = .301) for patients undergoing IC/CCRT. Conclusion: Although the sample size was small and not randomized, this matched-pair comparison between a prospective case series and a historical cohort treated at the same institution showed that the efficacy of IC/CCRT with salvage surgery is as good as primary surgical resection and postoperative RT.

  19. Molecular predictors of locoregional and distant metastases in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is increasing due to fundamental changes in oncogenesis related to effects of the human papilomavirus (HPV). Virally-mediated tumours behave and respond to treatment differently than their classic, carcinogenically-mediated counterparts despite similar stage and grade of disease. This difference in behaviour has lead to investigation of etiologies of OPSCC at the molecular level. Molecular biomarkers offer potential insight into the behaviour of OPSCC. Identifying a subset of patients that are more likely to have recurrence and distant metastasis is valuable for prognostication and treatment planning. There is limited information regarding the profiles of these biomarkers in locoregional and distant metastases in OPSCC. Objective This study was designed to identify biomarker profiles predictive of locoregional and distant metastases and recurrence in OPSCC. Methods Cross-sectional study of a prospectively-collected oropharyngeal tumour database was undertaken. All patients with OPSCC presenting to the University of Alberta Hospital from 2002-2009 were included in the study. Data collection from the Alberta Cancer Registry, including demographics, nodal status, distant metastases, treatment, recurrence, and survival, was undertaken. Tissue micro-arrays (TMAs) were constructed for each tumour specimen using triplicate cores (0.6mm) of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) pre-treatment tumour tissue. TMAs were processed using immunohistochemistry for p16, EGFR, Ki67, p53, and Bcl-XL. Positivity for each biomarker was determined using quantified AQUAnalysis ® scores on histoplots. Multivariate statistics were utilized to assess the relationship between each biomarker and locoregional and distant metastases, as well as recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results High expression of p16 (p=0.000) and Bcl-XL (p=0.039) independently demonstrated a significant association with nodal disease at

  20. The Place of Extensive Surgery in Locoregional Recurrence and Limited Metastatic Disease of Breast Cancer: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Berlière, M.; Duhoux, F. P.; Taburiaux, L.; Lacroix, V.; Galant, C.; Leconte, I.; Fellah, L.; Lecouvet, F.; Bouziane, D.; Piette, Ph.; Lengele, B.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were first to clearly define two different entities: locoregional recurrences and limited metastatic disease and secondly to evaluate the place of extensive surgery in these two types of recurrence. Material and Methods. Twenty-four patients were followed from June 2004 until May 2014. All patients underwent surgery but for 1 patient this surgery was stopped because the tumour was unresectable. Results. The median interval between surgery for the primary tumour and the locoregional recurrence or metastatic evolution was 129 months. Eight patients had pure nodal recurrences, 4 had nodal and muscular recurrences, 5 had muscular + skin recurrences, and 8 had metastatic evolution. Currently, all patients are still alive but 2 have liver metastases. Disease free survival was measured at 2 years and extrapolated at 5 years and was 92% at these two time points. No difference was observed for young or older women; limited metastatic evolution and locoregional recurrence exhibited the same disease free survival. Conclusion. Extensive surgery has a place in locoregional and limited metastatic breast cancer recurrences but this option must absolutely be integrated in the multidisciplinary strategy of therapeutic options and needs to be planned with a curative intent. PMID:25866810

  1. [A case of locoregional recurrence of gastric carcinoma that was treated using pancreaticoduodenectomy].

    PubMed

    Tokoro, Yukinari; Kametaka, Hisashi; Seike, Kazuhiro; Kamiya, Junichirou; Fukada, Takaomi; Makino, Hironobu; Koyama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    A 71-year-old man underwent distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer in November 2011. The corresponding pathological diagnosis was of well differentiated adenocarcinoma, pT4a(SE), N1(2/15), H0, P0,M0, pStage IIIA. TS-1 was administered as an adjuvant therapy for one year from the second month after the operation. During the 16th month after the operation, we found an elevated tumor marker level and locoregional recurrence near the pancreas head and the abdominal wall upon computed tomography. We could not find any other suspected tumor recurrence using positron-emission tomography and computed tomography. We performed a pancreaticoduodenectomy and transverse colon merger resection in June 2013. Although the tumor marker was again found to be elevated during the second month after the metastasectomy, chemotherapy was continued because obstructive jaundice and gastrointestinal obstruction were prevented by the operation. PMID:25731508

  2. Survival impact of locoregional metachronous malignancy in survival of lung cancer patients who received curative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chi-Tsung; Fu, Jui-Ying; Wu, Ching-Feng; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Liu, Yun-Hen; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Background Metachronous malignancy is also found in the lung cancer population and may be identified before or after diagnosis of lung cancer. No prior studies have documented lung cancer patients with metachronous malignancy and its survival impact in this population. The aim of this study was to try to clarify the survival impact of locoregional metachronous malignancy in the lung cancer population with resectable disease from a pathology point of view. Methods From January 2005 to December 2009, 199 lung cancer patients received curative treatment in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, of which 34 were identified as having lung cancer and metachronous malignancy and 165 patients as having lung cancer only. Clinico-pathologic factors were collected from the medical records. Differences in clinical presentations between the two groups and survival impact were further analyzed. Results Of these patients, 165 patients (82.9%) had lung cancer only (lung cancer group), and the remaining 34 patients (17.1%) had lung cancer and metachronous malignancy (metachronous malignancy group). There were no significant differences in clinical characteristics between the two groups. The disease free survival (P=0.3199) and overall survival (P=0.71) between these two groups showed no statistically significant difference. Metachronous malignancy only showed survival impact in lung cancer patients with pathologic stage IIIA (P=0.0389). Conclusions Metachronous malignancy is also seen in the lung cancer population and may be identified before or after diagnosis of lung cancer. Locoregional metachronous malignancy has no survival impact on lung cancer patients who receive curative treatment. Anatomic resection with regional lymph node (LN) dissection is recommended if different tumor cell type and resectable disease are confirmed. PMID:27293830

  3. Patterns of Loco-regional Treatment for Non-Metastatic Breast Cancer by Patient and Health Systems Factors

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Roger T.; Morris, Cyllene; Kimmick, Gretchen; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Camacho, Fabian; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Sabatino, Susan A.; Fleming, Steven T.; Lipscomb, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine local definitive therapy for non-metastatic breast cancer using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Program of Cancer Registries Patterns of Care Breast and Prostate Cancer (POCBP) study. Patients and Methods POCBP medical record data were re-abstracted in seven state/ regional registry systems (GA, NC, KY, LA, WI, MN and CA) to verify data quality and assess treatment patterns in the population. National Comprehensive Cancer Network clinical practice treatment guidelines were aligned with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage at diagnosis to appraise care. Results 6,505 of 9142 patients with registry confirmed breast cancer were coded as primary disease with 0-IIIA stage tumors and were included for study. Approximately 90% received guideline concordant loco-regional treatment; however this outcome varied by age group as 92.9% of women < 65 years and 85.2% ≥ 65 years received standard care (p <0.0001). Characteristics which best discriminated receipt of guideline concordant care in receiver operating curve (ROC) analyses (C-value) were receipt of BCS versus mastectomy (C = 0.70), patient age (C=0.62), greater tumor stage (C= 0.60), public insurance (C= 0.58) and presence of at least mild comorbidity (C = 0.55). RT following BCS was the most omitted treatment component causing non-concordance in the study population. In multivariable regression, effects of treatment facility, DCIS, race, and comorbidity on non-concordant care differed by age group. Conclusion Patterns of underuse of standard therapies for breast cancer vary by age group and BCS use, where omission of RT is at risk. PMID:25369150

  4. Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Dilling, Thomas J.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Garden, Adam S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Kian Ang, K.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

  5. Long-Term Outcomes After Maximal Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Recurrent or Locoregionally Advanced Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallemeier, Christopher L.; Choo, Richard; Davis, Brian J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Leibovich, Bradley C.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of a multimodality therapy combining maximal surgical resection and intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) for patients with locoregionally (LR) recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy or LR advanced primary RCC. Methods and Materials: From 1989 through 2005, a total of 22 patients with LR recurrent (n = 19) or LR advanced primary (n = 3) RCC were treated with this multimodality approach. The median patient age was 63 years (range 46-78). Twenty-one patients (95%) received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 4,500 cGy (range, 4,140-5,500). Surgical resection was R0 (negative margins) in 5 patients (23%) and R1 (residual microscopic disease) in 17 patients (77%). The median IOERT dose delivered was 1,250 cGy (range, 1,000-2,000). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) and relapse patterns were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 9.9 years (range, 3.6-20 years). The OS and DFS at 1, 5, and 10 years were 91%, 40%, and 35% and 64%, 31%, and 31%, respectively. Central recurrence (within the IOERT field), LR relapse (tumor bed or regional lymph nodes), and distant metastases at 5 years were 9%, 27%, and 64%, respectively. Mortality within 30 days of surgery and IOERT was 0%. Five patients (23%) experienced acute or late National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTCAE) Version 4 Grade 3 to 5 toxicities. Conclusions: In patients with LR recurrent or LR advanced primary RCC, a multimodality approach of perioperative EBRT, maximal surgical resection, and IOERT yielded encouraging results. This regimen warrants further investigation.

  6. A theoretical model of the evolution of actuarial senescence under environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Watson, H; Cohen, A A; Isaksson, C

    2015-11-01

    Free-living organisms are exposed to a wide range of stressors, all of which can disrupt components of stress-related and detoxification physiology. The subsequent accumulation of somatic damage is widely believed to play a major role in the evolution of senescence. Organisms have evolved sophisticated physiological regulatory mechanisms to maintain homeostasis in response to environmental perturbations, but these systems are likely to be constrained in their ability to optimise robustness to multiple stressors due to functional correlations among related traits. While evolutionary change can accelerate due to human ecological impacts, it remains to be understood how exposure to multiple environmental stressors could affect senescence rates and subsequently population dynamics and fitness. We used a theoretical evolutionary framework to quantify the potential consequences for the evolution of actuarial senescence in response to exposure to simultaneous physiological stressors--one versus multiple and additive versus synergistic--in a hypothetical population of avian "urban adapters". In a model in which multiple stressors have additive effects on physiology, species may retain greater capacity to recover, or respond adaptively, to environmental challenges. However, in the presence of high synergy, physiological dysregulation suddenly occurs, leading to a rapid increase in age-dependent mortality and subsequent population collapse. Our results suggest that, if the synergistic model is correct, population crashes in environmentally-stressed species could happen quickly and with little warning, as physiological thresholds of stress resistance are overcome. PMID:26335620

  7. Actuarial senescence can increase the risk of extinction of mammal populations.

    PubMed

    Robert, Alexandre; Chantepie, Stéphane; Pavard, Samuel; Sarrazin, François; Teplitsky, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent acknowledgement that senescence can have negative impact on survival and fertility in natural environments across a wide range of animal species, we still do not know if it can reduce the viability of wild endangered populations. Focusing on actuarial senescence (i.e., the decline of survival probabilities at old ages), we use species-specific demographic information to project the extinction risk of wild populations of 58 species of mammals, accounting (or not) for senescence. Our projections reveal potential negative effects of aging on population viability, with an average decrease of 27% of the time to extinction and a potential deterioration of the population-level projected conservation status in 10% of the species. Senescence is associated with particularly strong increases of the extinction risk in species with low mortality rates and long intervals between litters, independently of their place in the phylogeny, indicating that the pace of life history can be used to forecast the detrimental effects of aging on the viability of species. The aim of the various existing systems of classification of threatened species is to set conservation priorities based on assessments of extinction risk. Our results indicate that the quantitative effects of senescence on extinction are highly heterogeneous, which can affect the ranking of species and populations when setting conservation, priorities. In mammals, based on life history traits of a few species, generic patterns of senescence can be incorporated into projection population models to minimize these biases in viability assessments. PMID:26255361

  8. Accuracy of actuarial procedures for assessment of sexual offender recidivism risk may vary across ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Långström, Niklas

    2004-04-01

    Little is known about whether the accuracy of tools for assessment of sexual offender recidivism risk holds across ethnic minority offenders. I investigated the predictive validity across ethnicity for the RRASOR and the Static-99 actuarial risk assessment procedures in a national cohort of all adult male sex offenders released from prison in Sweden 1993-1997. Subjects ordered out of Sweden upon release from prison were excluded and remaining subjects (N = 1303) divided into three subgroups based on citizenship. Eighty-three percent of the subjects were of Nordic ethnicity, and non-Nordic citizens were either of non-Nordic European (n = 49, hereafter called European) or African Asian descent (n = 128). The two tools were equally accurate among Nordic and European sexual offenders for the prediction of any sexual and any violent nonsexual recidivism. In contrast, neither measure could differentiate African Asian sexual or violent recidivists from nonrecidivists. Compared to European offenders, AfricanAsian offenders had more often sexually victimized a nonrelative or stranger, had higher Static-99 scores, were younger, more often single, and more often homeless. The results require replication, but suggest that the promising predictive validity seen with some risk assessment tools may not generalize across offender ethnicity or migration status. More speculatively, different risk factors or causal chains might be involved in the development or persistence of offending among minority or immigrant sexual abusers. PMID:15208896

  9. Age, actuarial risk, and long-term recidivism in a national sample of sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Nicholaichuk, Terry P; Olver, Mark E; Gu, Deqiang; Wong, Stephen C P

    2014-10-01

    Age at release has become an increasing focus of study with regard to evaluating risk in the sex offender population and has been repeatedly shown to be an important component of the risk assessment equation. This study constitutes an extension of a study of sex offender outcomes prepared for the Evaluation Branch, Correctional Service of Canada. The entire cohort of 2,401 male federally incarcerated sexual offenders who reached their warrant expiry date (WED) within 1997/1998, 1998/1999, and 1999/2000 fiscal years were reviewed for the study. Sexual and violent reconviction information was obtained from CPIC criminal records over an average of 12.0 years (SD = 1.7) follow-up. This study focused upon the cohort of sex offenders who were 50 years or older at time of release (N = 542). They were stratified according to risk using a brief actuarial scale (BARS) comprising six binary variables. For the most part, older offenders showed low base rates of sexual recidivism regardless of the risk band into which they fell. The exception was a small group of elderly offenders (n = 20) who fell into the highest risk band, and who showed high levels of sexual recidivism. The results of this combination of cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of elderly sexual offenders may have important implications for offender management, particularly in light of the increasing numbers of offenders in Canada who fall into the over 50 age cohort. PMID:23818657

  10. A theoretical model of the evolution of actuarial senescence under environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Watson, H.; Cohen, A.A.; Isaksson, C.

    2015-01-01

    Free-living organisms are exposed to a wide range of stressors, all of which can disrupt components of stress-related and detoxification physiology. The subsequent accumulation of somatic damage is widely believed to play a major role in the evolution of senescence. Organisms have evolved sophisticated physiological regulatory mechanisms to maintain homeostasis in response to environmental perturbations, but these systems are likely to be constrained in their ability to optimise robustness to multiple stressors due to functional correlations among related traits. While evolutionary change can accelerate due to human ecological impacts, it remains to be understood how exposure to multiple environmental stressors could affect senescence rates and subsequently population dynamics and fitness. We used a theoretical evolutionary framework to quantify the potential consequences for the evolution of actuarial senescence in response to exposure to simultaneous physiological stressors – one versus multiple and additive versus synergistic – in a hypothetical population of avian “urban adapters”. In a model in which multiple stressors have additive effects on physiology, species may retain greater capacity to recover, or respond adaptively, to environmental challenges. However, in the presence of high synergy, physiological dysregulation suddenly occurs, leading to a rapid increase in age-dependent mortality and subsequent population collapse. Our results suggest that, if the synergistic model is correct, population crashes in environmentally-stressed species could happen quickly and with little warning, as physiological thresholds of stress resistance are overcome. PMID:26335620

  11. A mathematical proof and example that Bayes's Theorem is fundamental to actuarial estimates of sexual recidivism risk.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Theodore; Wollert, Richard

    2008-06-01

    Expert witnesses in sexually violent predator (SVP) cases often rely on actuarial instruments to make risk determinations. Many questions surround their use, however. Bayes's Theorem holds much promise for addressing these questions. Some experts nonetheless claim that Bayesian analyses are inadmissible in SVP cases because they are not accepted by the relevant scientific community. This position is illogical because Bayes's Theorem is simply a probabilistic restatement of the way that frequency data are combined to arrive at whatever recidivism rates are paired with each test score in an actuarial table. This article presents a mathematical proof and example validating this assertion. The advantages and implications of a logic model that combines Bayes's Theorem and the null hypothesis are also discussed. PMID:18490482

  12. 77 FR 12577 - Department of Defense (DoD) Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries; Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5 U.S.C., Appendix, as amended), the Government in the Sunshine Act of 1976 (5 U.S.C. 552b, as amended), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the following Federal advisory committee meeting of the DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Board of Actuaries will take...

  13. Human actuarial aging increases faster when back ground death rates are lower: a consequence of differential heterogeneity?

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Kristen; Smith, Ken R.; Blevins, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Many analyses of human populations have found that age-specific mortality rates increase faster across most of adulthood when overall mortality levels decline. This contradicts the relationship often expected from Williams′ classic hypothesis about the effects of natural selection on the evolution of senescence. More likely, much of the within-species difference in actuarial aging is not due to variation in senescence, but to the strength of filters on the heterogeneity of frailty in older survivors. A challenge to this differential frailty hypothesis was recently posed by an analysis of life tables from historical European populations and traditional societies that reported variation in actuarial aging consistent with Williams′ hypothesis after all. To investigate the challenge, we reconsidered those cases and aging measures. Here we show that the discrepancy depends on Ricklefs′ aging rate measure,ω, which decreases as mortality levels drop because it is an index of mortality level itself, not the rate of increase in mortality with age. We also show unappreciated correspondence among the parameters of Gompertz–Makeham and Weibull survival models. Finally, we compare the relationships among mortality parameters of the traditional societies and the historical series, providing further suggestive evidence that differential heterogeneity has strong effects on actuarial aging. PMID:22220868

  14. Clinically Apparent Internal Mammary Nodal Metastasis in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: Incidence and Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujing; Oh, Julia L.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. Results: We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Conclusion: Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment.

  15. Aggressive Locoregional Treatment Improves the Outcome of Liver Metastases from Grade 3 Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Du, Shunda; Ni, Jianjiao; Weng, Linqian; Ma, Fei; Li, Shaohua; Wang, Wenze; Sang, Xinting; Lu, Xin; Zhong, Shouxian; Mao, Yilei

    2015-08-01

    Grade 3 (G3) gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare, and there is no report specifically dealing with patients of liver metastases from G3 GEP NETs.From January 2004 to January 2014, 36 conservative patients with G3 GEP NET liver metastases were retrospectively identified from 3 hepatobiliary centers in China. The clinical features and treatment outcomes were analyzed.Aggressive locoregional treatments (LT, including cytoreductive surgery, radiofrequency ablation, and liver-directed intra-arterial intervention) and systemic therapy (ST) were introduced separately or combined, with 26 (72%) patients receiving resection of primary tumor and/or hepatic metastases, 12 patients receiving non-surgical locoregional interventions (NSLRIs), and 22 patients receiving certain kind of STs. Median overall survival (OS) was 20.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.9-31.1 months) and survival rates were 62.6%, 30.1%, and 19.8%, at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. The median OS was 9.0 months (95%CI: 3.3-14.7 months) for patients receiving only STs (n = 6), 19 months (95%CI: 1.3-36.8 months) for patients receiving LT followed by STs (n = 16), and 101 months (95%CI: 0.0-210.2 months) for patients receiving only LT (n = 12). Moreover, compared with those receiving only ST or best supportive care, patients given certain types of LTs had higher rates of symptom alleviation (3/8 versus 20/23). On univariate analysis, positive prognostic factors of survival were pancreatic primary tumor (P = 0.013), normal total bilirubin level (P = 0.035), receiving surgery (P = 0.034), receiving NSLRI (P = 0.014), and sum of diameters of remnant tumor < 5 cm (P = 0.008). On multivariate analyses, pancreatic primary tumor (P = 0.015), normal total bilirubin level (P = 0.002), and sum of diameters of remnant tumor < 5 cm (P = 0.001) remained to be independent prognostic factors.For patients with G3 GEP NET liver

  16. Sex offender treatment outcome, actuarial risk, and the aging sex offender in Canadian corrections: a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Olver, Mark E; Nicholaichuk, Terry P; Gu, Deqiang; Wong, Stephen C P

    2013-08-01

    The present study is an examination of sex offender treatment outcome in a large national cohort of Canadian Federally incarcerated sex offenders followed up an average of 11.7 years postrelease. A brief actuarial risk scale (BARS), which predicted sexual and violent recidivism, was created for the purposes of the present study to control for risk-related differences between treated and untreated offenders. In total, 732 offenders were identified as having completed (n = 625) or not attended (n = 107) a sex offender treatment program and for whom sufficient information was available to complete the scale. Controlling for risk and individual differences in follow-up time using Cox regression survival analyses and an 8-year fixed follow-up period, treated sex offenders demonstrated significantly lower rates of violent, but not sexual, recidivism. When the treated and untreated groups were stratified by risk level, significant differences were observed only among moderate or high risk offenders. Some significant group differences also emerged on indicators of recidivism severity, with treated offenders demonstrating slower times to sexual reoffense and lower scores on a quantified metric of sexual and violent recidivism severity after controlling for risk. Differences in recidivism base rates between treated and untreated offenders were also larger in magnitude for younger offenders (i.e., under age 50 at release), than for older offenders; however, interactions between age and treatment were not found. The findings are consistent with the risk principle and have possible implications regarding the dynamic nature of sexual violence risk. PMID:23136142

  17. Local cryosurgery and imiquimod: A successful combination for the treatment of locoregional cutaneous metastasis of melanoma: A case series.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Tolosa, Nancy; Ortiz-Brugués, Ariadna; Toledo-Pastrana, Tomás; Baradad, Manel; Traves, Víctor; Soriano, Virtudes; Sanmartín, Verónica; Requena, Celia; Martí, Rosa; Nagore, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    Locoregional cutaneous metastases of melanoma (LCMM) represent a therapeutic challenge. Many treatment options are available with varying results. The combination of cryotherapy and imiquimod, two treatments with a possible synergistic effect, has not yet been described for treating this disease. In this paper, we aimed to show the response of LCMM to cryotherapy combined with topical imiquimod 5%. A retrospective review of 20 patients diagnosed with LCMM and treated with cryotherapy combined with topical imiquimod 5% between November 2000 and May 2014 at three institutions was performed. The locoregional cutaneous response was evaluated. After a mean of five sessions, 13 patients (65%) responded to treatment, eight (40%) of these completely and five (25%) partially. Systemic disease progressed in 16 (80%) patients. Cryotherapy followed by topical imiquimod 5% is simple to apply, has minimal adverse effects and provides response rates similar to other, more complex treatment options. PMID:26660713

  18. Issues Affecting the Loco-regional and Systemic Management of Patients with Invasive Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Carmel; Clemons, Mark; Addison, Christina; Robertson, Susan; Arnaout, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) of the breast is the second most common type of invasive breast carcinoma accounting for 8-14% of all breast cancers. Traditional management of ILC has followed similar paradigms as that for invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). However, ILC represents a pathologically, clinically and biologically unique variant of breast cancer with particular management challenges. These challenges are seen in both the loco-regional management of ILC; where ILC tumors tend to avoid detection and hence present as more clinically advanced and surgically challenging carcinomas, and the systemic management with a unique response pattern to standard systemic therapies. Because of these challenges, the outcome for patients with ILC has likely lagged behind the continued improvements seen in outcome for patients with IDC. Here, we discuss some of the unique challenges ILC presents and discuss possible management strategies to best overcome the difficulties in the loco-regional and systemic management of patients with ILC. PMID:26782951

  19. IMRT With Simultaneous Integrated Boost and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Montejo, Michael E.; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Bentz, Brandon G.; Hunt, Jason P.; Buchman, Luke O.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Hitchcock, Ying J.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy in advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between April 2003 and May 2008, 43 consecutive patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma received accelerated chemoradiation with concurrent cisplatin or cetuximab. The doses for intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost were 67.5, 60.0, and 54 Gy in 30 daily fractions of 2.25, 2.0, and 1.8 Gy to the planning target volumes for gross disease, high-risk nodes, and low-risk nodes, respectively. Results: Of the patients, 90.7% completed chemoradiotherapy as prescribed. The median treatment duration was 43 days (range, 38-55 days). The complete response rate was 74.4%. With median follow-up of 36.7 months (range, 16.8-78.1 months) in living patients, the estimated 1-, 2-, and 5-year locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 82%, 82%, and 82%; 73%, 65%, and 61%; and 73%, 73%, and 70%, respectively. One treatment-related death occurred from renal failure. Grade 3 mucositis and dermatitis occurred in 13 patients (30.2%) and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Grade 2 xerostomia occurred in 12 patients (27.9%). In patients with adequate follow-up, 82% were feeding tube free by 6 months after therapy; 13% remained feeding tube dependent at 1 year. Grade 3 soft-tissue fibrosis, esophageal stricture, osteoradionecrosis, and trismus occurred in 3 patients (6.9%), 5 patients (11.6%), 1 patient (2.3%), and 3 patients (6.9%), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost with concurrent chemotherapy improved local and regional control. Acute and late toxicities were tolerable and acceptable. A prospective trial of this fractionation regimen is necessary for further assessment of its efficacy and toxicity compared with other approaches.

  20. Risk Prediction Models of Locoregional Failure After Radical Cystectomy for Urothelial Carcinoma: External Validation in a Cohort of Korean Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kim, Myong; Jeong, Chang Wook; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictive accuracy and general applicability of the locoregional failure model in a different cohort of patients treated with radical cystectomy. Methods and Materials: A total of 398 patients were included in the analysis. Death and isolated distant metastasis were considered competing events, and patients without any events were censored at the time of last follow-up. The model included the 3 variables pT classification, the number of lymph nodes identified, and margin status, as follows: low risk (≤pT2), intermediate risk (≥pT3 with ≥10 nodes removed and negative margins), and high risk (≥pT3 with <10 nodes removed or positive margins). Results: The bootstrap-corrected concordance index of the model 5 years after radical cystectomy was 66.2%. When the risk stratification was applied to the validation cohort, the 5-year locoregional failure estimates were 8.3%, 21.2%, and 46.3% for the low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups, respectively. The risk of locoregional failure differed significantly between the low-risk and intermediate-risk groups (subhazard ratio [SHR], 2.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35-5.11; P<.001) and between the low-risk and high-risk groups (SHR, 4.28; 95% CI, 2.17-8.45; P<.001). Although decision curves were appropriately affected by the incidence of the competing risk, decisions about the value of the models are not likely to be affected because the model remains of value over a wide range of threshold probabilities. Conclusions: The model is not completely accurate, but it demonstrates a modest level of discrimination, adequate calibration, and meaningful net benefit gain for prediction of locoregional failure after radical cystectomy.

  1. Risk Factors Associated with Loco-Regional Failure after Surgical Resection in Patients with Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Woo Jung; Kang, Chang Moo; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Bang, Seung Min; Song, Si Young; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the risk factors associated with loco-regional failure after surgical resection and to identify the subgroup that can obtain benefits from adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods We identified patients treated with surgical resection for resectable pancreatic cancer at Severance hospital between January 1993 and December 2014. Patients who received any neoadjuvant or adjuvant RT were excluded. A total of 175 patients were included. Adjuvant chemotherapy was performed in 107 patients with either a gemcitabine-based regimen (65.4%) or 5-FU based one (34.9%). Results The median loco-regional failure-free survival (LRFFS) and overall survival (OS) were 23.9 and 33.6 months, respectively. A recurrence developed in 108 of 175 patients (61.7%). The predominant pattern of the first failure was distant (42.4%) and 47 patients (26.9%) developed local failure as the first site of recurrence. Multivariate analysis identified initial CA 19–9 ≥ 200 U/mL, N1 stage, perineural invasion (PNI), and resection margin as significant independent risk factors for LRFFS. Patients were divided into four groups according to the number of risk factors, including initial CA 19–9, N stage, and PNI. Patients exhibiting two risk factors had 3.2-fold higher loco-regional failure (P < 0.001) and patients with all risk factors showed a 6.5-fold increase (P < 0.001) compared with those with no risk factors. In the analysis for OS, patients with more than two risk factors also had 3.3- to 6-fold higher risk of death with statistical significance. Conclusion The results suggest that patients who exhibit more than two risk factors have a higher risk of locoregional failure and death. This subgroup could be benefited by the effective local adjuvant treatment. PMID:27332708

  2. An Eighteen-Gene Classifier Predicts Locoregional Recurrence in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Skye H.; Horng, Chen-Fang; Huang, Tzu-Ting; Huang, Erich S.; Tsou, Mei-Hua; Shi, Li-Sun; Yu, Ben-Long; Chen, Chii-Ming; Huang, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified 34 genes of interest (GOI) in 2006 to aid the oncologists to determine whether post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) is indicated for certain patients with breast cancer. At this time, an independent cohort of 135 patients having DNA microarray study available from the primary tumor tissue samples was chosen. Inclusion criteria were 1) mastectomy as the first treatment, 2) pathology stages I-III, 3) any locoregional recurrence (LRR) and 4) no PMRT. After inter-platform data integration of Affymetrix U95 and U133 Plus 2.0 arrays and quantile normalization, in this paper we used 18 of 34 GOI to divide the mastectomy patients into high and low risk groups. The 5-year rate of freedom from LRR in the high-risk group was 30%. In contrast, in the low-risk group it was 99% (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the 18-gene classifier independently predicts rates of LRR regardless of nodal status or cancer subtype. PMID:27077114

  3. Loco-regional therapies for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation: Selecting an optimal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Thomas J; Rakela, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common, increasingly prevalent malignancy. For all but the smallest lesions, surgical removal of cancer via resection or liver transplantation (LT) is considered the most feasible pathway to cure. Resection - even with favorable survival - is associated with a fairly high rate of recurrence, perhaps since most HCCs occur in the setting of cirrhosis. LT offers the advantage of removing not only the cancer but the diseased liver from which the cancer has arisen, and LT outperforms resection for survival with selected patients. Since time waiting for LT is time during which HCC can progress, loco-regional therapy (LRT) is widely employed by transplant centers. The purpose of LRT is either to bridge patients to LT by preventing progression and waitlist dropout, or to downstage patients who slightly exceed standard eligibility criteria initially but can fall within it after treatment. Transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation have been the most widely utilized LRTs to date, with favorable efficacy and safety as a bridge to LT (and for the former, as a downstaging modality). The list of potentially effective LRTs has expanded in recent years, and includes transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads, radioembolization and novel forms of extracorporal therapy. Herein we appraise the various LRT modalities for HCC, and their potential roles in specific clinical scenarios in patients awaiting LT. PMID:27358775

  4. The effect of locoregional therapies in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Spivack, John H.; Berger, Yaniv; Heskel, Marina; Aycart, Samantha N.; Sweeney, Robert; Edwards, Martin P.; Labow, Daniel M.; Kim, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background & aims It is unknown whether the addition of locoregional therapies (LRTx) to sorafenib improves prognosis over sorafenib alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LRTx in this population. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients with advanced HCC as defined by extrahepatic metastasis, lymphadenopathy >2 cm, or gross vascular invasion. Sorafenib therapy was required for inclusion. Survival of patients who received LRTx after progression to advanced stage was compared to those who did not receive LRTx. Results Using an intention to treat analysis of 312 eligible patients, a propensity weighted proportional hazards model demonstrated LRTx as a predictor of survival (HR = 0.505, 95% CI: 0.407–0.628; P < 0.001). The greatest benefit was seen in patients with the largest tumor burden (HR = 0.305, 95% CI: 0.236–0.393; P < 0.01). Median survival in the sorafenib arm was 143 days (95% CI: 118–161) vs. 247 days (95% CI: 220–289) in the sorafenib plus LRTx arm (P < 0.001). Conclusions These results demonstrate a survival benefit with the addition of LRTx to sorafenib for patients with advanced HCC. These findings should prompt a prospective clinical trial to further assess the role of LRTx in patients with advanced HCC. PMID:27154804

  5. Loco-regional therapies for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation: Selecting an optimal therapy.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Thomas J; Rakela, Jorge

    2016-06-24

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common, increasingly prevalent malignancy. For all but the smallest lesions, surgical removal of cancer via resection or liver transplantation (LT) is considered the most feasible pathway to cure. Resection - even with favorable survival - is associated with a fairly high rate of recurrence, perhaps since most HCCs occur in the setting of cirrhosis. LT offers the advantage of removing not only the cancer but the diseased liver from which the cancer has arisen, and LT outperforms resection for survival with selected patients. Since time waiting for LT is time during which HCC can progress, loco-regional therapy (LRT) is widely employed by transplant centers. The purpose of LRT is either to bridge patients to LT by preventing progression and waitlist dropout, or to downstage patients who slightly exceed standard eligibility criteria initially but can fall within it after treatment. Transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation have been the most widely utilized LRTs to date, with favorable efficacy and safety as a bridge to LT (and for the former, as a downstaging modality). The list of potentially effective LRTs has expanded in recent years, and includes transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads, radioembolization and novel forms of extracorporal therapy. Herein we appraise the various LRT modalities for HCC, and their potential roles in specific clinical scenarios in patients awaiting LT. PMID:27358775

  6. Locoregional use of lateral thoracic artery perforator flap as a propeller flap.

    PubMed

    Baghaki, Semih; Cevirme, Mirza; Diyarbakirli, Murat; Tatar, Cihad; Aydin, Yagmur

    2015-05-01

    Although thoracodorsal system is a fundamental source of various flaps, lateral thoracic region has not been a popular flap donor area. There is limited data on the use of lateral intercostal artery perforator flap and lateral thoracic artery perforator flap. In this case series, lateral thoracic artery perforator flap has been used in locoregional (axilla, pectoral region, and arm) reconstruction as an island or propeller flap.Eighteen patients have been operated on between September 2010 and January 2013. The age of the patients ranged between 16 and 68 years with a median of 38 years. A thorough chart review has been performed with preoperative and postoperative photographs. Duration of hospitalization, complication rate and long term results have been documented.Nine patients had severe burn contracture of axilla, 7 patients had axillary hidradenitis suppurativa, 1 patient had giant neurofibroma of arm, and 1 patient had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of pectoral area. Seventeen flaps survived totally, and in 1 flap, distal superficial slough of skin has been observed. No recurrence in hidradenitis or peripheral nerve sheath tumor has been observed. Donor site scar is well hidden in anatomical position. The range of motion of affected extremities returned to normal after reconstruction.Lateral thoracic area provides a reliable flap option with a wide arc of rotation when lateral thoracic artery perforators are used. PMID:25875722

  7. Prognostic Factors for Distant Metastasis in Patients with Locoregional Recurrence after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yuri; Gong, Gyungyub; Lee, Hee Jin; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Son, Byung Ho; Lee, Jong Won; Choi, Eun Kyung; Lee, Sang-wook; Ahn, Seung Do

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify patients with high risk of distant metastasis (DM) after salvage treatment for postmastectomy locoregional recurrence (LRR). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 142 patients who received salvage radiotherapy with or without wide excision for isolated LRR after mastectomy between January 1999 and December 2012. Distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was estimated from the date of diagnosis of isolated LRR to the date of DM or last follow-up using the Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression analysis was performed to identify prognostic factors for DM. Results The median follow-up period was 54 months. The major failure pattern was DM (56%) and the 5-year DMFS was 43%. In multivariate analysis, initial N (iN) stage, recurrent N (rN) stage, and hormone receptor (HR) status were significant prognostic factors for DM (5-year DMFS: iN0 vs. iN1-3, 73% vs. 25%, p<0.001; rN0 vs. rN1-3, 61% vs. 29%, p<0.001; HR+ vs. HR-, 49% vs. 21%, p<0.001). Conclusion Patients with lymph node involvement and/or HR- specimens seem to experience more DM than patients with chest wall-only recurrence and HR+ specimens. Further studies are needed to investigate the role of chemotherapy in these patients. PMID:26472979

  8. Matrices of a hydrophobically functionalized hyaluronic acid derivative for the locoregional tumour treatment.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Fabio Salvatore; Puleio, Roberto; Fiorica, Calogero; Pitarresi, Giovanna; Loria, Guido Ruggero; Cassata, Giovanni; Giammona, Gaetano

    2015-10-01

    A hyaluronic acid (HA) derivative bearing octadecylamine and acylhydrazine functionalities has been here employed for the production of a paclitaxel delivering matrix for locoregional chemotherapy. Through a strategy consisting in a powder compression and a plasticization with a mixture water/ethanol, a physically assembled biomaterial, stable in solutions with physiologic ionic strengths, has been produced. Two different drug loading strategies have been adopted, by using paclitaxel as chemotherapic agent, and obtained samples have been assayed in terms of release in enhanced solubility conditions and in vitro and in vivo tumoural cytotoxicity. In particular sample with the best releasing characteristics was chosen for an in vivo evaluation against a HCT-116 xenograft on mice. Local tumour establishment and metastatic diffusion was assayed locally at the site of xenograft implantation and at the tributary lymph nodes. Obtained results demonstrated how loading procedure influenced paclitaxel crystallinity into the matrix and consequently drug diffusion and its cytoreductive potential. Chosen paclitaxel loaded matrix was able to drastically inhibit HCT-116 establishment and metastatic diffusion. PMID:26190798

  9. Locoregional Recurrent or Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: Management Strategies and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Wong, Stuart J; Heron, Dwight E; Stenson, Kerstin; Ling, Diane C; Vargo, John A

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of patients with locoregional recurrent or second primary head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) has been guided by well-reasoned principles and informed by carefully tested chemotherapy and radiation regimens. However, clinical decision making for this population is complicated by many factors. Although surgery is generally considered the treatment of choice for patients with HNSCC with recurrent disease or new second primary disease in a previously irradiated field, operability of cases is not always straightforward. Postoperative treatment is frequently warranted but carries significant risk. In addition, the rapid rise in the incidence of HPV-associated HNSCC raises the question of whether established treatment paradigms should be re-examined in this population of patients with a much better prognosis than the non-HPV population. Furthermore, new radiation techniques and new systemic agents show early promising results in recent clinical studies, suggesting potential for practice-changing effects in the future management of this disease. This article examines each of the treatment modalities used in the care of patients with HNSCC with recurrent or new second primary disease and provides a perspective to aid clinicians in the management of this disease. PMID:27249734

  10. Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Treated With Primary Radiotherapy: A Comparison of the Addition of Cetuximab or Chemotherapy and the Impact of Protocol Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Sawrie, Stephen M.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Desmond, Renee A.; Carroll, William R.; Peters, Glenn E.; Nabell, Lisle M.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Bonner, James A.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: The addition of platinum-based chemotherapy (ChRT) or cetuximab (ExRT) to concurrent radiotherapy (RT) has resulted in improved survival in Phase III studies for locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). However the optimal treatment regimen has not been defined. A retrospective study was performed to compare outcomes in patients who were treated definitively with ExRT or ChRT. Methods: Cetuximab with concurrent RT was used to treat 29 patients with LAHNC, all of whom had tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, or larynx. All patients were T2 to T4 and overall American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage III to IVB, with a Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score of 60 or greater. ChRT was used to treat 103 patients with similar characteristics. Patients were evaluated for locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS). Median follow-up for patients alive at last contact was 83 months for those treated with ExRT and 53 months for those treated with ChRT. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent prognostic factors. Results: The LRC, DMFS, and DSS were not significantly different, with 3-year rates of 70.7%, 92.4%, and 78.6% for ExRT and 74.7%, 86.6%, and 76.5% for ChRT, respectively. The OS was significantly different between the two groups (p = 0.02), with 3-year rates of 75.9% for ExRT and 61.3% for ChRT. OS was not significant when patients who were on protocol treatments of ExRT or ChRT were compared. Also, OS was not significant when multivariate analysis was used to control for potential confounding factors. Conclusion: In our single-institution retrospective review of patients treated with ExRT or ChRT, no significant differences were found in LRC, DMFS, DSS, or OS.

  11. Locoregional surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases: expert consensus statements

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Eddie K; Bauer, Todd W; Chun, Yun S; D'Angelica, Michael; Kooby, David A; Jarnagin, William R

    2013-01-01

    Selection of the optimal surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) requires multidisciplinary discussion of treatment strategies early in the trajectory of the individual patient's care. This paper reports on expert consensus on locoregional and interventional therapies for the treatment of advanced CRLM. Resection remains the reference treatment for patients with bilateral CRLM and synchronous presentation of primary and metastatic cancer. Patients with oligonodular bilateral CRLM may be candidates for one-stage multiple segmentectomies; two-stage resection with or without portal vein embolization may allow complete resection in patients with more advanced disease. After downsizing with preoperative systemic and/or regional therapy, curative-intent hepatectomy requires resection of all initial and currently known sites of disease; debulking procedures are not recommended. Many patients with synchronous primary disease and CRLM can safely undergo simultaneous resection of all disease. Staged resections should be considered for patients in whom the volume of the future liver remnant is anticipated to be marginal or inadequate, who have significant medical comorbid condition(s), or in whom extensive resections are required for the primary cancer and/or CRLM. Priority for liver-first or primary-first resection should depend on primary tumour-related symptoms or concern for the progression of marginally resectable CRLM during treatment of the primary disease. Chemotherapy delivered by hepatic arterial infusion represents a valid option in patients with liver-only disease, although it is best delivered in experienced centres. Ablation strategies are not recommended as first-line treatments for resectable CRLM alone or in combination with resection because of high local failure rates and limitations related to tumour size, multiplicity and intrahepatic location. PMID:23297723

  12. DNA Repair Gene Expression and Risk of Locoregional Relapse in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Le Scodan, Romuald; Cizeron-Clairac, Geraldine

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy appears to kill cells mainly by inducing DNA double-strand breaks. We investigated whether the DNA repair gene expression status might influence the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We used a quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR-based approach to measure messenger RNA levels of 20 selected DNA repair genes in tumor samples from 97 breast cancer patients enrolled in a phase III trial (Centre Rene Huguenin cohort). Normalized mRNA levels were tested for an association with LRR-free survival (LRR-FS) and overall survival (OS). The findings were validated in comparison with those of an independent cohort (Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) cohort). Multivariate analysis encompassing known prognostic factors was used to assess the association between DNA repair gene expression and patient outcome. Results: RAD51 was the only gene associated with LRR in both cohorts. With a median follow-up of 126 months in the CRH cohort, the 5-year LRR-FS and OS rates were 100% and 95% in the 61 patients with low RAD51 expression, compared with 70% and 69% in the 36 patients with high RAD51 expression, respectively (p < 0.001). RAD51 overexpression was associated with a higher risk of LRR (hazard ratio [HR], 12.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.6-45.6) and death (HR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.7-9.7). RAD51 overexpression was also significantly associated with shorter LRR-FS and OS in the NKI cohort. Conclusions: Overexpression of RAD51, a key component of the homologous DNA repair pathway, is associated with poor breast cancer outcome. This finding warrants prospective studies of RAD51 as a prognosticator and therapeutic target.

  13. Radiographic Response to Locoregional Therapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Predicts Patient Survival Times

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Khairuddin; Kulik, Laura; Lewandowski, Robert J; Wang, Edward; Riaz, Ahsun; Ryu, Robert K; Sato, Kent T; Marshall, Karen; Gupta, Ramona; Nikolaidis, Paul; Miller, Frank H; Yaghmai, Vahid; Senthilnathan, Seanthan; Baker, Talia; Gates, Vanessa L; Abecassis, Michael; Benson, Al B; Mulcahy, Mary F; Omary, Reed A; Salem, Riad

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims It is not clear whether survival times of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are associated with their response to therapy. We analyzed the association between tumor response and survival times of patients with HCC who were treated with locoregional therapies (LRTs; chemoembolization and radioembolization). Methods Patients received LRTs over a 9-year period (n=463). Patients with metastases, portal venous thrombosis, or who had received transplants were excluded; 159 patients with Child-Pugh≤B7 were analyzed. Response (based on European Association for Study of the Liver [EASL] or World Health Organization [WHO] criteria) was associated with survival times using the landmark, risk-of-death, and Mantel-Byar methodologies. In a subanalysis, survival times of responders were compared to those of patients with stable disease (SD) and progressive disease (PD). Results Based on 6-month data, in landmark analysis, responders survived longer than nonresponders (based on EASL but not WHO criteria: P=0.002 and 0.0694). The risk of death was also lower for responders (based on EASL but not WHO criteria: P=0.0463 and 0.707). Landmark analysis of 12-month data showed that responders survived longer than nonresponders (P=<0.0001 and 0.004, based on EASL and WHO criteria, respectively). The risk of death was lower for responders (P=0.0132 and 0.010, based on EASL and WHO criteria, respectively). By the Mantel-Byar method, responders had longer survival than nonresponders, based on EASL criteria (P<0.0001; P=0.596 with WHO criteria). In the subanalysis, responders lived longer than patients with SD or PD. Conclusion Radiographic response to LRTs predicts survival time. EASL criteria for response more consistently predicted survival times than WHO criteria. The goal of LRT should be to achieve a radiologic response, rather than to stabilize disease. PMID:21664356

  14. Locoregional surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases: expert consensus statements.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Eddie K; Bauer, Todd W; Chun, Yun S; D'Angelica, Michael; Kooby, David A; Jarnagin, William R

    2013-02-01

    Selection of the optimal surgical and interventional therapies for advanced colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) requires multidisciplinary discussion of treatment strategies early in the trajectory of the individual patient's care. This paper reports on expert consensus on locoregional and interventional therapies for the treatment of advanced CRLM. Resection remains the reference treatment for patients with bilateral CRLM and synchronous presentation of primary and metastatic cancer. Patients with oligonodular bilateral CRLM may be candidates for one-stage multiple segmentectomies; two-stage resection with or without portal vein embolization may allow complete resection in patients with more advanced disease. After downsizing with preoperative systemic and/or regional therapy, curative-intent hepatectomy requires resection of all initial and currently known sites of disease; debulking procedures are not recommended. Many patients with synchronous primary disease and CRLM can safely undergo simultaneous resection of all disease. Staged resections should be considered for patients in whom the volume of the future liver remnant is anticipated to be marginal or inadequate, who have significant medical comorbid condition(s), or in whom extensive resections are required for the primary cancer and/or CRLM. Priority for liver-first or primary-first resection should depend on primary tumour-related symptoms or concern for the progression of marginally resectable CRLM during treatment of the primary disease. Chemotherapy delivered by hepatic arterial infusion represents a valid option in patients with liver-only disease, although it is best delivered in experienced centres. Ablation strategies are not recommended as first-line treatments for resectable CRLM alone or in combination with resection because of high local failure rates and limitations related to tumour size, multiplicity and intrahepatic location. PMID:23297723

  15. Survival Benefit of Locoregional Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Advanced Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kitai, Satoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Nishida, Naoshi; Izumi, Namiki; Sakamoto, Michiie; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Ichida, Takafumi; Nakashima, Osamu; Matsui, Osamu; Ku, Yonson; Kokudo, Norihiro; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC) is a life-threatening condition, which is amenable to liver transplantation (LT) as the standard first-line treatment. However, the application of LT can be limited due to a shortage of donor livers. This study aimed to clarify the effect of non-surgical therapy on the survival of patients with HCC and decompensated LC. Methods Of the 58,886 patients with HCC registered in the nationwide survey of the Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan (January 2000-December 2005), we included 1,344 patients with primary HCC and Child-Pugh (C-P) grade C for analysis in this retrospective study. Among the patients analyzed, 108 underwent LT, 273 were treated by local ablation therapy (LAT), 370 were treated by transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and 593 received best supportive care (BSC). The effect of LT, LAT, and TACE on overall survival (OS) was analyzed using multivariate and propensity score analyses. Results Patient characteristics did not differ significantly between each treatment group and the BSC group, after propensity score matching. LAT (hazard ratio [HR]) =0.568; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.80) and TACE (HR=0.691; 95% CI, 0.50-0.96) were identified as significant contributors to OS if the C-P score was less than 11 and tumor conditions met the Milan criteria. Conclusions For patients with HCC within the Milan criteria and with a C-P score of 10 or 11, locoregional treatment can be used as a salvage treatment if LT is not feasible. PMID:27493893

  16. The 21-Gene Recurrence Score and Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jegadeesh, Naresh K.; Kim, Sunjin; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Oprea, Gabriela M.; Yu, David S.; Godette, Karen G.; Zelnak, Amelia B.; Mister, Donna; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Torres, Mylin A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although the 21-gene recurrence score (RS) assay has been validated to assess the risk of distant recurrence in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients, the relationship between RS and the risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if RS is associated with LRR in breast cancer patients and whether this relationship varies based on the type of local treatment [mastectomy or breast-conserving therapy (BCT)]. Methods 163 consecutive estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients at our institution had an RS generated from the primary breast tumor between August 2006 and October 2009. Patients were treated with lumpectomy and radiation (BCT) (n = 110) or mastectomy alone (n = 53). Patients were stratified using a pre-determined RS of 25 and then grouped according to local therapy type. Results Median follow-up was 68.2 months. Patients who developed an LRR had stage I or IIA disease, >2 mm surgical margins, and received chemotherapy as directed by RS. While an RS > 25 did not predict for a higher rate of LRR, an RS > 24 was associated with LRR in our subjects. Among mastectomy patients, the 5-year LRR rate was 27.3 % in patients with an RS > 24 versus 10.7 % (p = 0.04) in those whose RS was ≤24. RS was not associated with LRR in patients who received BCT. Conclusions Breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy for tumors that have an RS > 24 are at high risk of LRR and may benefit from post-mastectomy radiation. PMID:25472643

  17. Outcomes of Locoregional Tumor Therapy for Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunts

    SciTech Connect

    Padia, Siddharth A. Chewning, Rush H. Kogut, Matthew J. Ingraham, Christopher R. Johnson, Guy E.; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Kwan, Sharon W. Monsky, Wayne L. Vaidya, Sandeep; Hippe, Daniel S.; Valji, Karim

    2015-08-15

    PurposeLocoregional therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be challenging in patients with a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). This study compares safety and imaging response of ablation, chemoembolization, radioembolization, and supportive care in patients with both TIPS and HCC.MethodsThis retrospective study included 48 patients who had both a TIPS and a diagnosis of HCC. Twenty-nine of 48 (60 %) underwent treatment for HCC, and 19/48 (40 %) received best supportive care (i.e., symptomatic management only). While etiology of cirrhosis and indication for TIPS were similar between the two groups, treated patients had better baseline liver function (34 vs. 67 % Child-Pugh class C). Tumor characteristics were similar between the two groups. A total of 39 ablations, 17 chemoembolizations, and 10 yttrium-90 radioembolizations were performed on 29 patients.ResultsAblation procedures resulted in low rates of hepatotoxicity and clinical toxicity. Post-embolization/ablation syndrome occurred more frequently in patients undergoing chemoembolization than ablation (47 vs. 15 %). Significant hepatic dysfunction occurred more frequently in the chemoembolization group than the ablation group. Follow-up imaging response showed objective response in 100 % of ablation procedures, 67 % of radioembolization procedures, and 50 % of chemoembolization procedures (p = 0.001). When censored for OLT, patients undergoing treatment survived longer than patients receiving supportive care (2273 v. 439 days, p = 0.001).ConclusionsAblation appears to be safe and efficacious for HCC in patients with TIPS. Catheter-based approaches are associated with potential increased toxicity in this patient population. Chemoembolization appears to be associated with increased toxicity compared to radioembolization.

  18. Gene profiling and circulating tumor cells as biomarker to prognostic of patients with locoregional breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuniyoshi, Renata K; Gehrke, Flávia de Sousa; Alves, Beatriz C A; Vilas-Bôas, Viviane; Coló, Anna E; Sousa, Naiara; Nunes, João; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Del Giglio, Auro

    2015-09-01

    The gene profile of primary tumors, as well as the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), can provide important prognostic and predictive information. In this study, our objective was to perform tumor gene profiling (TGP) in combination with CTC characterization in women with nonmetastatic breast cancer. Biological samples (from peripheral blood and tumors) from 167 patients diagnosed with stage I, II, and III mammary carcinoma, who were also referred for adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy, were assessed for the following parameters: (a) the presence of CTCs identified by the expression of CK-19 and c-erbB-2 in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fraction by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and (b) the TGP, which was determined by analyzing the expression of 21 genes in paraffin-embedded tissue samples by quantitative multiplex RT-PCR with the Plexor® system. We observed a statistically significant correlation between the progression-free interval (PFI) and the clinical stage (p = 0.000701), the TGP score (p = 0.006538), and the presence of hormone receptors in the tumor (p = 0.0432). We observed no correlation between the PFI and the presence or absence of CK-19 or HER2 expression in the PBMC fraction prior to the start of treatment or in the two following readouts. Multivariate analysis revealed that only the TGP score significantly correlated with the PFI (p = 0.029247). The TGP is an important prognostic variable for patients with locoregional breast cancer. The presence of CTCs adds no prognostic value to the information already provided by the TGP. PMID:25976504

  19. Lung dose analysis in loco-regional hypofractionated radiotherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Mohammad A.; Bahadur, Yasir A.; Constantinescu, Camelia T.; Eltaher, Maha M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the ipsilateral lung dosimetry data of breast cancer (BC) patients treated with loco-regional hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT). Methods: Treatment plans of 150 patients treated in the Radiotherapy Unit, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2012 and March 2015 by HFRT for BC were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received 42.4 Gy in 16 fractions by tangential and supra-clavicular fields with 6 MV, 18 MV, or mixed energies. Ipsilateral lung dosimetric data V20Gy and mean lung dose (MLD) were recorded. Correlations between lung dose, patient characteristics, and treatment delivery parameters were assessed by a logistic regression test. Results: The mean ipsilateral lung V20Gy was 24.6% and mean MLD was 11.9 Gy. A weak, but statistically significant correlation was found between lung dose and lung volume (p=0.043). The lung dose was significantly decreasing with patient separation and depth of axillary lymph node (ALN) and supra-claviculary lymph nodes (SCLN) (p<0.0001), and increasing with ALN (p=0.001) and SCLN (p=0.003) dose coverage. Lung dose significantly decreased with beam energy (p<0.0001): mean V20Gy was 27.8%, 25.4% for 6 MV, mixed energy, and 21.2% for 18 MV. The use of a low breast-board angle correlates with low lung dose. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the use of high energy photon beams and low breast-board angulation can reduce the lung dose. PMID:27279508

  20. Impact of Postmastectomy Radiation on Locoregional Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Modern Systemic Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Rehman, Sana; Shukla, Monica E.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Moore, Halle; Budd, G. Thomas; Dietz, Jill; Crowe, Joseph P.; Macklis, Roger

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) remains controversial for patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes (LN+). Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all 369 breast cancer patients with 1-3 LN+ who underwent mastectomy without neoadjuvant systemic therapy between 2000 and 2007 at Cleveland Clinic. Results: We identified 271 patients with 1-3 LN+ who did not receive PMRT and 98 who did receive PMRT. The median follow-up time was 5.2 years, and the median number of LN dissected was 11. Of those not treated with PMRT, 79% received adjuvant chemotherapy (of whom 70% received a taxane), 79% received hormonal therapy, and 5% had no systemic therapy. Of the Her2/neu amplified tumors, 42% received trastuzumab. The 5-year rate of locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 8.9% without PMRT vs 0% with PMRT (P=.004). For patients who did not receive PMRT, univariate analysis showed 6 risk factors significantly (P<.05) correlated with LRR: estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negative (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6), lymphovascular invasion (HR 2.4), 2-3 LN+ (HR 2.6), nodal ratio >25% (HR 2.7), extracapsular extension (ECE) (HR 3.7), and Bloom-Richardson grade III (HR 3.1). The 5-year LRR rate was 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%-6.8%] for patients with 0-1 risk factor vs 14.6% [95% CI, 8.4%-20.9%] for patients with {>=}2 risk factors (P=.0006), respectively. On multivariate analysis, ECE (HR 4.3, P=.0006) and grade III (HR 3.6, P=.004) remained significant risk factors for LRR. The 5-year LRR was 4.1% in patients with neither grade III nor ECE, 8.1% with either grade III or ECE, and 50.4% in patients with both grade III and ECE (P<.0001); the corresponding 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 91.8%, 85.4%, and 59.1% (P=.0004), respectively. Conclusions: PMRT offers excellent control for patients with 1-3 LN+, with no locoregional failures to date. Patients with 1-3 LN+ who have grade III disease and/or ECE should be strongly considered

  1. Risk assessments by female victims of intimate partner violence: predictors of risk perceptions and comparison to an actuarial measure.

    PubMed

    Connor-Smith, Jennifer K; Henning, Kris; Moore, Stephanie; Holdford, Robert

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies support the validity of both structured risk assessment tools and victim perceptions as predictors of risk for repeat intimate partner violence (IPV). Combining structured risk assessments and victim risk assessments leads to better predictions of repeat violence than either alone, suggesting that the two forms of assessment provide unique and complementary information. However, very little is known about elements involved in women's risk assessments. The present study explores predictors of women's risk assessment and differences in factors linked to victim and actuarial risk assessments in a large sample of women (N = 728) shortly after the arrest of their male partner for IPV. In multivariate analyses, women's risk assessments were strongly related to past relationship violence and their partner's substance abuse but weakly related to demographic factors, family constellation, and the partner's criminal history. Women who perceived high risk but had a low risk score on an actuarial measure were more likely to report the presence of dynamic risk factors, such as escalating violence and violence during separations, along with a history of emotional and psychological abuse. Qualitative findings paralleled quantitative findings, with women's stated reasons for expecting high or low risk indicating that women were attending to IPV history and dynamic factors. Implications for risk assessment and safety planning are discussed. PMID:20841332

  2. Ten-Year Locoregional Recurrence Risks in Women With Nodal Micrometastatic Breast Cancer Staged With Axillary Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Lupe, Krystine; Truong, Pauline T.; Alexander, Cheryl; Speers, Caroline; Tyldesley, Scott

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in patients with nodal mirometastases (pNmic) with those in patients with node-negative (pN0) and macroscopic node-positive (pNmac) breast cancer; and to evaluate the LRR rates according to locoregional treatment of pNmic disease. Methods and Materials: The subjects were 9,616 women diagnosed between 1989 and 1999 with Stage pT1-T2, pN0, pNmic, or pNmac, M0 breast cancer. All women had undergone axillary dissection. The Kaplan-Meier local recurrence, regional recurrence, and LRR rates were compared among those with pN0 (n = 7,977), pNmic (n = 490) and pNmac (n = 1,149) and according to locoregional treatment. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the significant factors associated with LRR. Results: The median follow-up was 11 years. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier recurrence rate in the pN0, pNmic, and pNmac cohorts was 6.1%, 6.8%, and 8.7% for local recurrence; 3.1%, 6.2%, and 10.3% for regional recurrence; and 8.0%, 11.6%, and 15.2% for LRR, respectively (all p < .001). In the pNmic patients, the 10-year regional recurrence rate was 6.4% with breast-conserving surgery plus breast radiotherapy (RT), 5.4% with breast-conserving surgery plus locoregional RT, 4.6% with mastectomy alone, 11.1% with mastectomy plus chest wall RT, and 10.7% with mastectomy plus locoregional RT. In patients with pNmic disease and age <45 years, Grade 3 histologic features, lymphovascular invasion, nodal ratio >0.25, and estrogen receptor-negative disease, the 10-year LRR rates were 15-20%. On multivariate analysis of the entire cohort, pNmic was associated with greater LRR than Stage pN0 (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; p = .002). On multivariate analysis of pNmic patients only, age <45 years was associated with significantly greater LRR (HR, 1.9; p = .03), and trends for greater LRR were observed with a nodal ratio >0.25 (HR, 2.0; p = .07) and lymphovascular invasion (HR, 1.7; p = .07). Conclusion: Women with pNmic had a greater

  3. Orofacial Soft Tissue Reconstruction with Locoregional Flaps in a Health Resource-Depleted Environment: Experiences from Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Obiadazie, Athanasius Chukwudi; Fomete, Benjamin; Omeje, Kelvin Uchenna

    2016-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of orofacial soft tissue defects is often challenging due to functional and aesthetic demands. Despite advances in orofacial soft tissue defect reconstruction using free flaps, locoregional flaps still remain an important option, especially in health resource-depleted environments. This retrospective study highlights our experiences in oral and maxillofacial soft tissue reconstruction using locoregional flaps. Methods A twenty-three years retrospective analysis of all patients managed in our department was undertaken. Information was sourced from patients' case notes and operating theater records. Data was analyzed using SPSS ver. 16 (SPSS Inc.) and Microsoft Excel 2007 (Microsoft). Results A total of 77 patients underwent orofacial soft tissue defect reconstruction within the years reviewed. Males accounted for 55 (71.4%) cases and trauma was the main etiological factor in 45 (58.4%) of the patients treated. When sites of defect were considered, the lip, 27 (32.1%), was the most frequent site followed by the nose, 17 (20.2%). Forehead flap, 51 (59.3%), was the most commonly used flap. Complications noted were tumor recurrences at the recipient bed in 3 (3.9%) cases, tumor occurrence at the donor site in 1 (1.3%) case and postoperative infection in 11 (14.3%) cases. Conclusions Locoregional flaps still have an important role in the rehabilitation of patients with orofacial soft tissue defects. They remain a vital tool in the armamentarium of the reconstructive surgeon, especially in health resource-depleted environments where advanced reconstructive techniques may not be feasible. PMID:27218025

  4. Metastatic Lymph Node Ratio of Central Neck Compartment Has Predictive Values for Locoregional Recurrence in Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Yong; Cho, Jae-Keun; Moon, Jeong Hwan; Son, Young-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the significance of metastatic lymph node ratio (the ratio between the metastatic lymph node and the harvested lymph nodes; MLNR) in the central neck for the prediction of locoregional recurrence in patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma. Methods After reviewing medical records of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma patients who received total thyroidectomy with central neck node dissection, 573 consecutive adult patients were enrolled in this study, with a follow-up period of more than 36 months. Regarding the risk of recurrence, multivariate analyses were performed with the following variables; sex, age, multiplicity of the primary tumor, presence of pathological extrathyroidal extension, the level of postoperative stimulated serum thyroglobulin, the number of harvested lymph nodes, the number of lymph node metastasis and MLNR. Results The MLNR showed a predictive significance for the locoregional recurrence (P<0.05). Most recurrences were occurred in the lateral neck (n=12, 80%) with a median interval of 20 months. The lowest cutoff value of the MLNR for a meaningful separation of disease recurrence was 0.44 (hazard ratio, 8.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.49 to 52.58; P=0.001). Conclusion When the MLNR is higher than 0.44, there is an increased risk of locoregional recurrence mostly in the lateral neck. Therefore, MLNR of the central neck in a permanent or frozen biopsy may be helpful in decision making in the extent of thyroidectomy and/or the need for contralateral central neck lymph nodes dissection. PMID:26976031

  5. Recent research (N = 9,305) underscores the importance of using age-stratified actuarial tables in sex offender risk assessments.

    PubMed

    Wollert, Richard; Cramer, Elliot; Waggoner, Jacqueline; Skelton, Alex; Vess, James

    2010-12-01

    A useful understanding of the relationship between age, actuarial scores, and sexual recidivism can be obtained by comparing the entries in equivalent cells from "age-stratified" actuarial tables. This article reports the compilation of the first multisample age-stratified table of sexual recidivism rates, referred to as the "multisample age-stratified table of sexual recidivism rates (MATS-1)," from recent research on Static-99 and another actuarial known as the Automated Sexual Recidivism Scale. The MATS-1 validates the "age invariance effect" that the risk of sexual recidivism declines with advancing age and shows that age-restricted tables underestimate risk for younger offenders and overestimate risk for older offenders. Based on data from more than 9,000 sex offenders, our conclusion is that evaluators should report recidivism estimates from age-stratified tables when they are assessing sexual recidivism risk, particularly when evaluating the aging sex offender. PMID:21098823

  6. Can Locoregional Treatment of the Primary Tumor Improve Outcomes for Women With Stage IV Breast Cancer at Diagnosis?

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, David H.A.; Truong, Pauline T.; Alexander, Cheryl; Walter, Caroline V.; Hayashi, Emily; Christie, Jennifer; Lesperance, Mary

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of locoregional treatment (LRT) of the primary tumor on survival in patients with Stage IV breast cancer at diagnosis. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 733 women referred to the British Columbia Cancer Agency between 1996 and 2005 with newly diagnosed clinical or pathologic M1 breast cancer. Tumor and treatment characteristics, overall survival (OS), and locoregional progression-free survival were compared between patients treated with (n = 378) and without (n = 355) LRT of the primary disease. Multivariable analysis was performed with Cox regression modeling. Results: The median follow-up time was 1.9 years. LRT consisted of surgery alone in 67% of patients, radiotherapy alone in 22%, and both in 11%. LRT was used more commonly in women with age <50 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status 0-1, Stage T1-2 tumors, N0-1 disease, limited M1 burden, and asymptomatic M1 disease (all p < 0.05). Systemic therapy was used in 92% of patients who underwent LRT and 85% of patients who did not. In patients treated with LRT compared with those without LRT, the 5-year OS rates were 21% vs. 14% (p < 0.001), and the rates of locoregional progression-free survival were 72% vs. 46% (p < 0.001). Among 378 patients treated with LRT, the rates of 5-year OS were higher in patients with age <50, ECOG performance status 0-1, estrogen receptor-positive disease, clear surgical margins, single subsite, bone-only metastasis, and one to four metastatic lesions (all p < 0.003). On multivariable analysis, LRT was associated with improved OS (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.94, p = 0.009). Conclusion: Locoregional treatment of the primary disease is associated with improved survival in some women with Stage IV breast cancer at diagnosis. Among those treated with LRT, the most favorable rates of survival were observed in subsets with young age, good performance status, estrogen receptor-positive disease

  7. Potential surrogate endpoints for overall survival in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: an analysis of a phase III randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Wen-Na; Liang, Shao-Bo; Zong, Jing-Feng; Chen, Lei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Tang, Ling-Long; Li, Wen-Fei; Liu, Xu; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Liu, Meng-Zhong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The gold standard endpoint in trials of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is overall survival (OS). Using data from a phase III randomized trial, we evaluated whether progression-free survival (PFS), failure-free survival (FFS), distant failure-free survival (D-FFS) or locoregional failure-free survival (LR-FFS) could be reliable surrogate endpoints for OS. Between July 2002 and September 2005, 316 eligible patients with stage III-IVB NPC were randomly assigned to receive either radiotherapy alone or chemoradiotherapy. 2- and 3-year PFS, FFS, D-FFS, and LR-FFS were tested as surrogate endpoints for 5-year OS using Prentice’s four criteria. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the strength of the associations. After a median follow-up time of 5.8 years, 2- and 3-year D-FFS and LR-FFS were not significantly different between treatment arms, in rejection of Prentice’s second criterion. Being consistent with all Prentice’s criteria, 2- and 3-year PFS and FFS were valid surrogate endpoints for 5-year OS; the rank correlation coefficient was highest (0.84) between 3-year PFS and 5-year OS. In conclusion, PFS and FFS at 2 and 3 years may be candidate surrogate endpoints for OS at 5 years; 3-year PFS may be more appropriate for early assessment of long-term survival. PMID:26219568

  8. Prognostic significance of p16 in locoregionally advanced head and neck cancer treated with concurrent 5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea, cetuximab and intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Charles C L; Lau, K H Vincent; Rivera, Michael; Cannan, David; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Sikora, Andrew G; Gupta, Vishal; Forsythe, Kevin; Ko, Eric C; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof; Gurudutt, Vivek; Teng, Marita S; Packer, Stuart H; Genden, Eric M; Kao, Johnny

    2012-05-01

    A phase II trial was conducted to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of incorporating cetuximab and simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) into a well-described 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and hydroxyurea (HU)-based chemoradiation regimen. Patients with stage IVa-IVb or high-risk stage III squamous cell carcinomas were enrolled. Prior organ-conserving surgery or induction chemotherapy was allowed. IMRT was administered in 1.5 Gy fractions twice daily on days 1-5 of weeks 1, 3, 5, 7±9 for a total dose of 60-73.5 Gy. Concurrent systemic therapy consisted of 5-FU (600 mg/m2), HU (500 mg BID) and cetuximab (250 mg/m2). p16INK4A expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. From January 2007 to January 2010, 65 patients (61 with stage IV disease; 31 with oropharyngeal primaries) were enrolled. At a median follow-up of 28 months, 2-year locoregional control, distant control, progression-free survival, event-free survival and overall survival were 79, 83, 72, 63 and 80%, respectively. In 48 patients with available pre-treatment tissue, p16 overexpression was associated with significantly increased distant control (p=0.03), progression-free survival (p=0.02), event-free survival (p=0.007) and overall survival (p=0.03). The most common grade 3-4 toxicities were mucositis (46%), leukopenia (18%), anemia (18%) and dermatitis (17%). Concurrent 5-FU, HU, cetuximab and SIB-IMRT is a highly active regimen, particularly in patients with p16-positive disease. PMID:22322320

  9. Substance Abuse among High-Risk Sexual Offenders: Do Measures of Lifetime History of Substance Abuse Add to the Prediction of Recidivism over Actuarial Risk Assessment Instruments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looman, Jan; Abracen, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    There has been relatively little research on the degree to which measures of lifetime history of substance abuse add to the prediction of risk based on actuarial measures alone among sexual offenders. This issue is of relevance in that a history of substance abuse is related to relapse to substance using behavior. Furthermore, substance use has…

  10. Has actuarial aging “slowed” over the past 250 years? A comparison of small-scale subsistence populations and European cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Gurven, Michael; Fenelon, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    G.C. Williams’ 1957 hypothesis famously argues that higher age-independent, or “extrinsic”, mortality should select for faster rates of senescence. Long-lived species should therefore show relatively few deaths from extrinsic causes such as predation and starvation. Theoretical explorations and empirical tests of Williams’ hypothesis have flourished in the past decade but it has not yet been tested empirically among humans. We test Williams’ hypothesis using mortality data from subsistence populations and from historical cohorts from Sweden and England/Wales, and examine whether rates of actuarial aging declined over the past two centuries. We employ three aging measures: mortality rate doubling time (MRDT), Ricklef’s ω, and the slope of mortality hazard from ages sixty to seventy, m’60–70, and model mortality using both Weibull and Gompertz-Makeham hazard models. We find that (1) actuarial aging in subsistence societies is similar to that of early Europe, (2) actuarial senescence has slowed in later European cohorts, (3) reductions in extrinsic mortality associate with slower actuarial aging in longitudinal samples, and (4) men senesce more rapidly than women, especially in later cohorts. To interpret these results, we attempt to bridge population-based evolutionary analysis with individual-level proximate mechanisms. PMID:19220451

  11. Feasibility and efficacy of chemoradiotherapy for elderly patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: results from a matched cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To clarify the feasibility and efficacy of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in elderly (age≥65 years) patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods From January 2000 to December 2006, 101 newly diagnosed elderly non-metastatic NPC patients (age≥65 years) who received cisplatin 3-weekly or weekly concurrent CRT with/without sequential chemotherapy were recruited. Each patient from the CRT group was matched to another patient treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone based on age, gender, pathological type, performance status, overall stage, stage method, Adult Comorbidity Evaluation-27 (ACE-27) score and RT technique, from the same institute and time period. We also recruited 101 young patients (age<65 years) as the referent group, which had been matched to the CRT group based on patient characteristics and treatment parameters. Treatment tolerability and toxicity were clarified, and treatment outcomes were calculated and compared among groups. Results CRT was feasible in elderly NPC patients, while a concurrent regimen of weekly cisplatin was more tolerable. Grade≥3 acute toxicity in CRT group was similar with referent group, although it was significantly higher than the RT alone group (65.3% vs. 43.6%, P=0.002). Furthermore, patients with ACE-27 score≥2 in the CRT group had significantly higher severe acute toxicity and dose reduction. Survival was poorer in elderly patients than the referent group. Compared to RT alone, CRT significantly improved the 5-year overall survival (OS: 54.6% vs. 39.3%, P=0.009), cancer-specific survival (CSS: 56.6% vs. 42.7%, P=0.022), disease-free survival (DFS: 51.6% vs. 30.2%, P=0.028) and locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS: 78.4% vs. 52.2%, P=0.003), but not distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS: 69.6% vs. 63.6%, P=0.669). However, CRT did not significantly improve 5-year OS (43.6% vs. 27.3%, P=0.893) or CSS (43.6% vs. 34.1%, P=0.971) in elderly NPC patients with ACE-27 score≥2

  12. Influence of Lymphatic Invasion on Locoregional Recurrence Following Mastectomy: Indication for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer Patients With One to Three Positive Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunuma, Ryoichi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Fujikane, Tomoko; Matsuura, Masaaki; Sakai, Takehiko; Kimura, Kiyomi; Morizono, Hidetomo; Iijima, Kotaro; Izumori, Ayumi; Miyagi, Yumi; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Makita, Masujiro; Gomi, Naoya; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Iwase, Takuji

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The indication for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with one to three positive lymph nodes has been in discussion. The purpose of this study was to identify patient groups for whom PMRT may be indicated, focusing on varied locoregional recurrence rates depending on lymphatic invasion (ly) status. Methods and Materials: Retrospective analysis of 1,994 node-positive patients who had undergone mastectomy without postoperative radiotherapy between January 1990 and December 2000 at our hospital was performed. Patient groups for whom PMRT should be indicated were assessed using statistical tests based on the relationship between locoregional recurrence rate and ly status. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that the ly status affected the locoregional recurrence rate to as great a degree as the number of positive lymph nodes (p < 0.001). Especially for patients with one to three positive nodes, extensive ly was a more significant factor than stage T3 in the TNM staging system for locoregional recurrence (p < 0.001 vs. p = 0.295). Conclusion: Among postmastectomy patients with one to three positive lymph nodes, patients with extensive ly seem to require local therapy regimens similar to those used for patients with four or more positive nodes and also seem to require consideration of the use of PMRT.

  13. Locoregional treatment of early breast cancer with isolated tumor cells or micrometastases on sentinel lymph node biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Tallet, Agnès; Lambaudie, Eric; Cohen, Monique; Minsat, Mathieu; Bannier, Marie; Resbeut, Michel; Houvenaeghel, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    The advent of sentinel lymph-node technique has led to a shift in lymph-node staging, due to the emergence of new entities namely micrometastases (pN1mi) and isolated tumor cells [pN0(i+)]. The prognostic significance of this low positivity in axillary lymph nodes is currently debated, as is, therefore its management. This article provides updates evidence-based medicine data to take into account for treatment decision-making in this setting, discussing the locoregional treatment in pN0(i+) and pN1mi patients (completion axillary dissection, axillary irradiation with or without regional nodes irradiation, or observation), according to systemic treatment, with the goal to help physicians in their daily practice. PMID:27081647

  14. Impact of Treatment Modalities on Survival of Patients With Locoregional Esophageal Squamous-Cell Carcinoma in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Shan; Hung, Wei-Heng; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Hsu, Po-Kuei; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Wu, Shiao-Chi; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The optimal treatment modality for locoregional esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) is still undetermined. This study investigated the treatment modalities affecting survival of patients with ESCC in Taiwan.Data on 6202 patients who underwent treatment for locoregional esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma during 2008 to 2012 in Taiwan were collected from the Taiwan Cancer Registry. Patients were stratified by clinical stage. The major treatment approaches included definitive chemoradiotherapy, preoperative chemoradiation followed by esophagectomy, esophagectomy followed by adjuvant therapy, and esophagectomy alone. The impact of different treatment modalities on overall survival was analyzed.The majority of patients had stage III disease (n = 4091; 65.96%), followed by stage II (n = 1582, 25.51%) and stage I cancer (n = 529, 8.53%). The 3-year overall survival rates were 60.65% for patients with stage I disease, 36.21% for those with stage II cancer, and 21.39% for patients with stage III carcinoma. Surgery alone was associated with significantly better overall survival than the other treatment modalities for patients with stage I disease (P = 0.029) and was associated with significantly worse overall survival for patients with stage III cancer (P < 0.001). There was no survival risk difference among the different treatment methods for patients with clinical stage II disease.Multimodality treatment is recommended for patients with stage II-III esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma. Patients with clinical stage I disease can be treated with esophagectomy without preoperative therapy. PMID:26962818

  15. Patterns of Care and Locoregional Treatment Outcomes in Older Esophageal Cancer Patients: The SEER-Medicare Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Grace L.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Liao Zhongxing; Jeter, Melenda; Swisher, Stephen G. M.D.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; McAleer, Mary F.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Optimal management of elderly patients with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer is unclear. Outcomes data after locoregional treatment are lacking for this group. Methods: We assessed outcomes associated with standard locoregional treatments in 2,626 patients (age > 65 years) from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort diagnosed with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer from 1992 to 2002. In patients treated with radiotherapy alone (RT), surgery alone (S), chemoradiotherapy (CRT), or preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery (CRT + S), overall and disease-free survival were compared using proportional hazards regression. Postoperative complications were compared using logistic regression. Results: Mean age was 76 {+-} 6 years. Seven percent underwent CRT + S, 39% CRT, 30% S, and 24% RT. One-year survival was 68% (CRT + S), 52% (CRT), 53% (S), and 16% (RT), respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who underwent CRT + S demonstrated improved overall survival compared with S alone (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.98; p = 0.03) and RT (HR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.35-0.55; p < 0.0001); and comparable survival to CRT (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67-1.01; p = 0.06). Patients who underwent CRT + S also had comparable postoperative mortality (HR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.87-1.07; p = 0.45) and complications (OR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.70-1.14; p = 0.36) compared with S alone. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy may be an acceptable treatment option in appropriately selected older esophageal cancer patients. This treatment modality did not appear to increase surgical complications and offered potential therapeutic benefit, particularly compared with surgery alone.

  16. Phase II Study of the Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Chemoradiation for Loco-regionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Trial 0615

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy Y.; Zhang, Ed; Pfister, David. G.; Kim, John; Garden, Adam. S.; Mechalakos, James; Hu, Kenneth; Le, Quynh T.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Ang, K. Kian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to improve the outcomes for loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by testing the feasibility/safety of adding bevacizumab to chemoradiation. Patients/Methods Eligible patients with ≥T2b and/or positive node(s) were prescribed 3 cycles of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) and cisplatin (100 mg/m2) both given on days 1, 22, and 43 of radiation (70 Gy) using IMRT delivered over 33 days on a daily basis, Monday through Friday. This is followed by 3 cycles of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg), cisplatin (80 mg/m2) both were given on days 64, 85, and 106 and fluorouracil (1000 mg/m2/d) on days 64–67, 85–88, 106–109 after radiation. The primary endpoint was to evaluate the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to chemoradiation, specifically looking at treatment-related Grade 4 hemorrhage and/or any Grade 5 adverse event in the first year. Toxicity during and after treatment were collected along with tumor control endpoints. The analysis was done per protocol. This protocol has completed its target accrual. Results There were a total of 46 patients enrolled in this study of whom 44 patients were eligible for analysis. No grade 3–4 hemorrhage or grade 5 adverse events were observed; 9 patients (20.5%) experienced grade 1–2 hemorrhage. Grade 4 adverse events were experienced by the following numbers of patients: leukopenia NOS – 6; lymphopenia – 5; neutrophil count – 5; pharyngolaryngeal pain – 2; hemoglobin – 1; infection with grade 3–4 neutrophils (blood) – 1; infection with grade 3–4 neutrophils [skin (cellulitis)] – 1; tinnitus – 1; thrombosis – 1; radiation mucositis – 1. The most common grade 3 adverse events were radiation mucositis – 33; dysphagia – 25; and mucositis/stomatitis (clinical exam) (pharynx) – 15. Two patients experienced late grade 3 xerostomia. Other late grade 3 adverse events were: dysphagia – 5; hearing impaired – 3; neuralgia NOS – 2; constitutional symptoms (other) – 1; dehydration

  17. Sex offender modus operandi stability and relationship with actuarial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Lasher, Michael P; McGrath, Robert J; Cumming, Georgia F

    2015-03-01

    Three studies conducted in Vermont yielded data on 82 sexual recidivists' index offenses (Time 1) and sexual reoffenses (Time 2) across 16 modus operandi (MO) characteristics. The current study examines the stability of these 16 characteristics between Time 1 and Time 2 offenses. Probabilities of Time 1-Time 2 characteristic combinations are reported, including when controlling for static risk as measured by the Static-99R and Vermont Assessment of Sex Offender Risk-2 (VASOR-2). Overall, considerable stability of offenders' MO was evident between Time 1 and Time 2 offenses. Victim characteristics and offense behaviors were the most stable MO characteristics, and degree of force used and victim injury were less stable and trended toward less forceful and less injurious reoffenses. Controlling for static risk had little impact on the patterns of MO stability. PMID:24958134

  18. The Development and Validation of an Actuarial Risk Assessment Tool for the Prediction of First-Time Offending.

    PubMed

    Assink, Mark; van der Put, Claudia E; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2016-05-01

    For prevention purposes, it is important that police officers can estimate the risk for delinquency among juveniles who were involved in a criminal offense, but not in the role of a suspect. In the present study, the Youth Actuarial Risk Assessment Tool for First-Time Offending (Y-ARAT-FO) was developed based solely on police records with the aim to enable Dutch police officers to predict the risk for first-time offending. For the construction of this initial screening instrument, an Exhaustive Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector (Exhaustive CHAID) analysis was performed on a data set that was retrieved from the Dutch police system. The Y-ARAT-FO was developed on a sample of 1,368 juveniles and validated on a different sample of 886 juveniles showing moderate predictive accuracy in the validation sample (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = .728). The predictive accuracy of the Y-ARAT-FO was considered sufficient to justify its use as an initial screening instrument by the Dutch police. PMID:25395478

  19. CEA Level, Radical Surgery, CD56 and CgA Expression Are Prognostic Factors for Patients With Locoregional Gastrin-Independent GNET

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Bi, Xinyu; Zhao, Jianjun; Huang, Zhen; Zhou, Jianguo; Li, Zhiyu; Zhang, Yefan; Li, Muxing; Chen, Xiao; Hu, Xuhui; Chi, Yihebali; Zhao, Dongbing; Zhao, Hong; Cai, Jianqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastrin-independent gastric neuroendocrine tumors (GNETs) are highly malignant. Radical resections and lymphadenectomy are considered to be the only possible curative treatment for these tumors. However, the prognosis of gastrin-independent GNETs is not well defined. In this study, we identified prognostic factors of locoregional gastrin-independent GNETs. All patients diagnosed with locoregional gastrin-independent GNETs between 2000 and 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Clinical characteristics, blood tests, pathological characteristics, treatments, and follow-up data of the patients were collected and analyzed. Of the 66 patients diagnosed with locoregional gastrin-independent GNETs, 57 (86.4%) received radical resections, 7 (10.6%) with palliative resection, 1 (1.5%) with gastrojejunostomy, and 1 (1.5%) with exploration surgeries. The median survival time for these patients was 19.0 months (interquartile range, 11.0–38.0). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 72%, 34%, and 28%, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level (P = 0.04), radical resection (P = 0.04), and positive Cluster of Differentiation 56 (CD56) expression (P = 0.016) were significant prognostic factors on overall survival rate. Further univariate and multivariate analysis of 57 patients who received radical resections found that CgA expression (P = 0.35) and CEA level (P = 0.33) are independent prognostic factors. Gastrin-independent GNETs had poor prognosis. Serum CEA level, radical surgery, CD56 and CgA expression are markers to evaluate the survival of patients with locoregional gastrin-independent GNETs. PMID:27149478

  20. Prognostic Value of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Locoregionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma with Low Pre-treatment Epstein-Barr Virus DNA: a Propensity-matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Li, Wen-Fei; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Li-Zhi; Tian, Li; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic value of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with low pre-treatment Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in the era of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods: Data on 1099 locoregionally advanced NPC patients treated with IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Propensity score matching (PSM) method was adopted to balance influence of covariates. Patient survival between NCT and non-NCT groups were compared. Results: The cut-off value of pre-treatment Epstein-Barr virus DNA (pre-DNA) was 1550 copies/ml for DMFS (area under curve [AUC], 0.655; sensitivity, 0.819; specificity, 0.445). For the 145 pairs selected by PSM, the 3-year distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) rates were 98.6% vs. 93.7% (P = 0.101), 95.8% vs. 94.4% (P = 0.881), 91.7% vs. 87.5% (P = 0.309) and 94.4% vs. 95.0% (P = 0.667), respectively. Multivariate analysis did not identify NCT as an independent prognostic factor (P > 0.05 for all rates), and stratified analysis based on overall stage (III and IV) and N category (N0-1 and N2-3) also got the same results. Conclusion: NCT was not established as an independent prognostic factor, and it should not be used in locoregionally advanced NPC with low pre-DNA. PMID:27471562

  1. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy Improves Disease-Free Survival of High Risk of Locoregional Recurrence Breast Cancer Patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 Positive Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang-Yan; Lin, Qin; Lin, Huan-Xin; Sun, Jia-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The indications for post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) with T1-2 breast cancer and 1-3 positive axillary lymph nodes is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of PMRT in T1-2 breast cancer with 1-3 positive axillary lymph node. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the file records of 79 patients receiving PMRT and not receiving PMRT (618 patients). Results The median follow-up was 65 months. Multivariate analysis showed that PMRT was an independent prognostic factor of locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) (P = 0.010). Subgroup analysis of patients who did not undergo PMRT showed that pT stage, number of positive axillary lymph nodes, and molecular subtype were independent prognostic factors of LRFS. PMRT improved LRFS in the entire group (P = 0.005), but did not affect distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (P = 0.494), disease-free survival (DFS) (P = 0.215), and overall survival (OS) (P = 0.645). For patients without PMRT, the 5-year LRFS of low-risk patients (0–1 risk factor for locoregional recurrence) of 94.5% was significantly higher than that of high-risk patients (2-3 risk factors for locoregional recurrence) (80.9%, P < 0.001). PMRT improved LRFS (P = 0.001) and DFS (P = 0.027) in high-risk patients, but did not improve LRFS, DMFS, DFS, and OS in low-risk patients. Conclusions PMRT is beneficial in patients with high risk of locoregional recurrence breast cancer patients with T1-2 and 1 to 3 positive nodes. PMID:25781605

  2. 29 CFR 4010.15 - OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false OMB control number. 4010.15 Section 4010.15 Labor... DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.15 OMB control number... Management and Budget under OMB control number 1212-0049....

  3. 29 CFR 4010.15 - OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false OMB control number. 4010.15 Section 4010.15 Labor... DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.15 OMB control number... Management and Budget under OMB control number 1212-0049....

  4. 29 CFR 4010.15 - OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false OMB control number. 4010.15 Section 4010.15 Labor... DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.15 OMB control number... Management and Budget under OMB control number 1212-0049....

  5. The Impact of Preradiation Residual Disease Volume on Time to Locoregional Failure in Cutaneous Merkel Cell Carcinoma—A TROG Substudy

    SciTech Connect

    Finnigan, Renee; Hruby, George; Wratten, Chris; Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee; Dickie, Graeme; Rischin, Danny; Poulsen, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the impact of margin status and gross residual disease in patients treated with chemoradiation therapy for high-risk stage I and II Merkel cell cancer (MCC). Methods and Materials: Data were pooled from 3 prospective trials in which patients were treated with 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary lesion and draining lymph nodes and 2 schedules of carboplatin based chemotherapy. Time to locoregional failure was analyzed according to the burden of disease at the time of radiation therapy, comparing patients with negative margins, involved margins, or macroscopic disease. Results: Analysis was performed on 88 patients, of whom 9 had microscopically positive resection margins and 26 had macroscopic residual disease. The majority of gross disease was confined to nodal regions. The 5-year time to locoregional failure, time to distant failure, time to progression, and disease-specific survival rates for the whole group were 73%, 69%, 62%, and 66% respectively. The hazard ratio for macroscopic disease at the primary site or the nodes was 1.25 (95% confidence interval 0.57-2.77), P=.58. Conclusions: No statistically significant differences in time to locoregional failure were identified between patients with negative margins and those with microscopic or gross residual disease. These results must, however, be interpreted with caution because of the limited sample size.

  6. Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation Followed by Locoregional Tumor Treatments for Treating Occluded Biliary Stents in Non-Resectable Malignant Biliary Obstruction: A Single-Institution Experience

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yan-Li; Han, Xin-Wei; Ren, Jian-Zhuang; Li, Teng-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Hao; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the safety and feasibility of intraductal radiofrequency ablation (RFA) followed by locoregional tumor treatments in patients with non-resectable malignant biliary obstruction and stent re-occlusion. Methods Fourteen patients with malignant biliary obstruction and blocked metal stents were studied retrospectively. All had intraductal RFA followed by locoregional tumor treatments and were monitored clinically and radiologically. The practicality, safety, postoperative complications, jaundice remission, stent patency and survival time were analyzed. Results Combination treatment was successful for all patients. There were no severe complications during RFA or local treatments. All patients had stent patency restored, with a decline in serum bilirubin. Three patients had recurrent jaundice by 195, 237 and 357 days; two patients underwent repeat intraductal RFA; and one required an internal-external biliary drain. The average stent patency time was 234 days (range 187-544 days). With a median follow-up of 384 days (range 187-544 days), six patients were alive, while eight had died. There was no mortality at 30 days. The 3, 6, 12 and 18 month survival rates were 100%, 100%, 64.3% and 42.9%, respectively. Conclusion Intraductal RFA followed by locoregional tumor treatments for occluded metal stents is safe and practically feasible and potential increase stent patency and survival times. PMID:26244367

  7. [Electrochemotherapy: mechanism of action and clinical results in the locoregional treatment of patients with skin cancers and superficial metastases].

    PubMed

    Campana, Luca Giovanni; Marconato, Roberto; Sieni, Elisabetta; Valpione, Sara; Corti, Luigi; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo

    2016-08-01

    Electrochemotherapy (ECT) has emerged among European centers as an innovative locoregional treatment for patients with unresectable skin cancers or superficial metastases from any histotype. The combined administration of a cytotoxic agent (bleomycin or cisplatin) with properly tuned electric pulses results in locally-enhanced drug delivery (reversible electroporation) into malignant cells and sustained tumor response. Reversible electroporation represents the basis of ECT and allows the potentiation of two low permeant cytotoxic agents such as bleomycin (~8000 fold) and cisplatin (~80 fold). The procedure was standardized in 2006 - thanks to a European project - and shortly after introduced in the clinical practice. In recent years, experience with ECT has accumulated mainly in melanoma and breast cancer patients with cutaneous metastases, in whom complete response rates of 20-50% and 40-75% have been reported, respectively, depending on tumor size. Currently, this therapy is being investigated in deep-seated (i.e. bone, soft tissue) metastases and visceral malignancies (i.e. locally advanced pancreatic cancer), with encouraging results. PMID:27571558

  8. Positron Emission Tomography for Neck Evaluation Following Definitive Treatment with Chemoradiotherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ad, Voichita; Mishra, Mark; Ohri, Nitin; Intenzo, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the current review was to assess published data on the role of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for evaluation of nodal residual disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods Studies were identified by searching PubMed electronic databases. Only studies using a post-chemoradiotherapy PET for nodal residual disease evaluation were included in the present review. Both prospective and retrospective studies were included. Information regarding sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of PET for detecting nodal residual disease after definitive chemoradiotherapy for HNSCC was extracted and analyzed. Results Twenty published studies were included in the present review. Existing data suggest that a negative post-chemoradiotherapy PET scan is associated with a negative predictive value up to 100%. The sensitivity of PET in detecting nodal residual disease is greater for scans performed ≥ 10 weeks after definitive treatment with chemoradiotherapy for HNSCC. Conclusions Further studies are needed to quantify the reliability of PET in detecting nodal residual disease after chemoradiotherapy for locoregionally advanced HNSCC. The optimal timing of PET imaging after chemoradiotherapy remains to be defined. PMID:21864252

  9. Do Recent Advances in Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures Negate the Benefit of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy in N1 Patients With a Low Risk of Locoregional Recurrence?

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jee Suk; Lee, Jeongshim; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Sohn, Joo Hyuk; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Byeong-Woo; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Keum, Ki Chang; Suh, Chang-Ok; Kim, Yong Bae

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in breast cancer management might make the use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) redundant in the treatment of pT1/T2N1 patients. We investigated the impact of PMRT on disease-free survival (DFS) in these patients who have a low risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) after contemporary multidisciplinary management. Between 1998 and 2011, 1123 patients underwent upfront surgery for pathologically diagnosed pT1/T2N1 breast cancer, at a single institution. A retrospective review was performed on 692 patients who had a mastectomy with axillary lymph node (LN) clearance. Most patients received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy and/or endocrine therapy. PMRT was administered to 17.8% of the patients. The median follow-up time was 98 months. The entire cohort was divided into 2 groups, the early-era (1998–2003) and late-era (2004–2011) cohorts. Grouping was based on the use of modern therapies since 2004 including sentinel LN (SLN) biopsy, anthracycline/taxane-based chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Late-era patients had a significantly lower 5-year LRR compared with early-era patients (3.2% vs 10.3%, respectively; P < 0.001). In late-era patients, although PMRT did not significantly reduce the 5-year LRR rate (1% vs 3.8%, respectively), it did improve the 5-year DFS rate (96.1% vs 87.5%, respectively). After controlling for all clinicopathological variables, PMRT was independently associated with improved DFS. In subgroup analysis, depending on the presence of micro- or macrometastasis in the axillary nodes, the benefit of PMRT was most apparent in patients with macrometastasis (hazard ratio, 0.19). In the late-era cohort with no PMRT, the 3-year distant metastasis risk increased according to LN tumor burden (0%, 5.2%, and 9.8% in micrometastasis, SLN macrometastasis, and non-SLN macrometastasis, respectively). Advanced surgical and systemic therapies might not negate the benefit of PMRT in recently diagnosed pN1 patients who have a

  10. Nomogram for Predicting the Risk of Locoregional Recurrence in Patients Treated With Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wobb, Jessica L.; Chen, Peter Y.; Shah, Chirag; Moran, Meena S.; Shaitelman, Simona F.; Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To develop a nomogram taking into account clinicopathologic features to predict locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients treated with accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 2000 breasts (1990 women) were treated with APBI at William Beaumont Hospital (n=551) or on the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Registry Trial (n=1449). Techniques included multiplanar interstitial catheters (n=98), balloon-based brachytherapy (n=1689), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (n=213). Clinicopathologic variables were gathered prospectively. A nomogram was formulated utilizing the Cox proportional hazards regression model to predict for LRR. This was validated by generating a bias-corrected index and cross-validated with a concordance index. Results: Median follow-up was 5.5 years (range, 0.9-18.3 years). Of the 2000 cases, 435 were excluded because of missing data. Univariate analysis found that age <50 years, pre-/perimenopausal status, close/positive margins, estrogen receptor negativity, and high grade were associated with a higher frequency of LRR. These 5 independent covariates were used to create adjusted estimates, weighting each on a scale of 0-100. The total score is identified on a points scale to obtain the probability of an LRR over the study period. The model demonstrated good concordance for predicting LRR, with a concordance index of 0.641. Conclusions: The formulation of a practical, easy-to-use nomogram for calculating the risk of LRR in patients undergoing APBI will help guide the appropriate selection of patients for off-protocol utilization of APBI.

  11. Endoluminal loco-regional resection by TEM after R1 endoscopic removal or recurrence of rectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Quaresima, Silvia; Balla, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Giancarlo; Bruzzone, Paolo; Ursi, Pietro; Lezoche, Emanuele; Paganini, Alessandro M

    2016-06-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endoluminal loco-regional resection (ELRR) by transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) after R1 endoscopic resection or local recurrence of early rectal cancer after operative endoscopy. Material and methods Twenty patients with early rectal cancer were enrolled, including patients with incomplete endoscopic resection, or complete endoscopic resection of a tumor with unfavorable prognostic factors (group A, ten patients), and local recurrence after endoscopic removal (group B, ten patients). At admission, histology after endoscopic polypectomy was: TisR1(4), T1R0G3(1), T1R1(5) in group A, and TisR0(8), T1R0(2) in group B. All patients underwent ELRR by TEM with nucleotide-guided mesorectal excision (NGME). Results Mean operative time was 150 minutes. Complications occurred in two patients (10%). Definitive histology was: moderate dysplasia(4), pT0N0(3), pTisN0(5), pT1N0(6), pT2N0(2). Mean number of lymph-nodes was 3.1. Mean follow-up was 79.5 months. All patients are alive and disease-free. Conclusions ELRR by TEM after R1 endoscopic resection of early rectal cancer or for local recurrence after operative endoscopy is safe and effective. It may be considered as a diagnostic procedure, as well as a curative treatment option, instead of a more invasive TME. PMID:26882538

  12. 29 CFR 4010.15 - OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false OMB control number. 4010.15 Section 4010.15 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION CERTAIN REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.15 OMB control...

  13. 29 CFR 4010.15 - OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false OMB control number. 4010.15 Section 4010.15 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION CERTAIN REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.15 OMB control...

  14. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Late Radiation-Associated Tissue Necroses: Is It Safe in Patients With Locoregionally Recurrent and Then Successfully Salvaged Head-and-Neck Cancers?

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H.-Y.; Ku, C.-H.; Liu, D.-W.; Chao, H.-L.; Lin, C.-S.; Jen, Y.-M.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To test, in a retrospective matched-pair study, whether necrosis-rescuing hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) increases the risk of cancer re-recurrence in patients with locoregionally recurrent and then successfully salvaged head-and-neck cancers. Methods and materials: Between January 1995 and July 2004, we retrospectively identified 22 patients with locoregionally recurrent and then successfully salvaged head-and-neck cancers. We defined two groups: the HBOT group, 11 patients with HBOT for rescuing late radiation-associated tissue necroses; and the non-HBOT group, the other 11 matched-pair patients without HBOT. Between the two groups, the following four factors were matched for case pairing: primary cancer subsite, initial cancer stage, age, and gender. Results: Three findings indicate that HBOT increases the risk of cancer re-recurrence. First, we observed more cancer re-recurrences in the HBOT group than in the non-HBOT group: 9 of 11 vs. 4 of 11, with 5-year disease-free survival rates after salvage of 32.7% vs. 70.0% (hazard ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.03-10.7; p = 0.048). Second, re-recurrences developed rapidly after HBOT in 6 patients. Third, 3 patients had unusual cancer re-recurrences after HBOT. Remarkably, of 9 patients with cancer re-recurrences in the HBOT group, 4 patients had cancer disease-free intervals of 9 months or less before HBOT. Conclusions: Necrosis-rescuing HBOT should be given with caution in patients with locoregionally recurrent and then successfully salvaged head-and-neck cancers; if it cannot be omitted entirely, deferring HBOT 9 months or longer after cancer re-treatment may be prudent.

  15. Factors determining long-term outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma within the Milan criteria: liver transplantation versus locoregional therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hee; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Choi, Gyu-Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Ki Yeon; Kim, Kyunga; Paik, Yong-Han; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) satisfying the Milan criteria are candidates for liver transplantation (LT), but locoregional therapies could be another options for them. A total of 1859 treatment-naïve HCC patients fulfilling the Milan criteria were analyzed. Survival tree analysis was performed to generate survival nodes with similar survival risks in 1729 non-LT group, and compared with the survival of 130 patients who received LT. Among patients who did not receive LT, survival tree analysis classified patients into 6 nodes according to Child-Pugh (CP) score, serum alphafetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, and age, with different mortality risks (5-year survival rate of 87.3%, 77.5%, 65.8%, 64.7%, 44.0%, and 28.7% for nodes 1–6, respectively; P < 0.001). The overall survival of patients in nodes 1 (CP score 5 with AFP levels <5 ng/mL) and 2 (CP score 5 with maximal tumor size <2.5 cm) were comparable with that of patients who received LT (both P > 0.05), but the survival rates of patients in nodes 3 to 6 were worse than that of LT (P < 0.05 for all). In each survival node, survival differed slightly according to initial treatment modality for patients who did not receive LT. For patients who received LT, tumor stage at the time of LT was associated with long-term outcome. Certain groups of non-LT patients showed survival rates that were similar to the survival rates of LT patients. CP score, AFP levels, tumor size, and age were baseline factors that can help estimate the long-term outcomes of non-LT treatment. In addition, tumor stage at the time of LT and specific initial treatment modality in non-LT patients affected the long-term outcomes. These factors can help estimate the long-term outcomes of HCC patients diagnosed within the Milan criteria. PMID:27583916

  16. Predictive Value of Molecular Subtyping for Locoregional Recurrence in Early-Stage Breast Cancer with N1 without Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ge; Zhang, Jin-Shan; Zhu, Yu-Jia; Huang, Xiao-Bo; Guan, Xun-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to investigate the relationship between molecular subtype and locoregional recurrence (LRR) in patients with early-stage breast cancer with 1–3 positive axillary lymph nodes (ALNs) and improve the individualized indications for postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Methods The records of 701 patients with pT1-2N1M0 breast cancer who did not undergo PMRT were retrospectively analyzed. Tumors were subclassified as follows: luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-enriched, and basal-like subtypes. Multivariate Cox analysis was used to determine the risk of LRR associated with the different subtypes and to adjust for clinicopathologic factors. Results Luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, and basal-like subtypes accounted for 51.2%, 28.0%, 8.1%, and 12.7% of cases, respectively. The median follow-up duration was 67 months (range, 9–156 months). Univariate analysis revealed that, compared with the luminal A subtype, the HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes were associated with significantly higher 5-year LRR rates (5.6% vs. 21.6% and vs.15.7% respectively; p=0.002 each), lower 5-year LRR-free survival (LRFS) rates (90.6% vs. 73.8% and 78.5%, respectively; p=0.001 each), and poorer 5-year breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) rates (93.7% vs. 82.2% [p=0.002] and 84.9% [p=0.001], respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that the HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes, age ≤35 years, a medial tumor, and pT2 stage were poor prognostic factors for LRR and LRFS; furthermore, 2 to 3 positive ALNs represented an independent prognostic factor affecting LRR. The 10-year LRR rates of patients with 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 risk factors were 1.0%, 6.9%, 14.3%, 30.4%, and 54.3%, respectively (p<0.001); the 10-year BCSS rates were 86.6%, 88.5%, 84.4%, 79.7%, and 38.8%, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusion Molecular subtyping allows for individualized evaluation of LRR risk in patients with pT1-2N1M0 breast cancer. PMRT

  17. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) in Locoregional Therapy Outcome Prediction and Response Assessment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): The New Era of Functional Imaging Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Johannes M; Camacho, Juan C; Kokabi, Nima; Xing, Minzhi; Kim, Hyun S

    2015-01-01

    Reliable response criteria are critical for the evaluation of therapeutic response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current response assessment is mainly based on: (1) changes in size, which is at times unreliable and lag behind the result of therapy; and (2) contrast enhancement, which can be difficult to quantify in the presence of benign post-procedural changes and in tumors presenting with a heterogeneous pattern of enhancement. Given these challenges, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been recently investigated, aiding specificity to locoregional therapy response assessment and outcome prediction. Briefly, DWI quantifies diffusion of water occurring naturally at a cellular level (Brownian movement), which is restricted in multiple neoplasms because of high cellularity. Disruption of cellular integrity secondary to therapy results in increased water diffusion across the injured membranes. This review will provide an overview of the current literature on DWI therapy response assessment and outcome prediction in HCC following treatment with locoregional therapies. PMID:26854170

  18. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) in Locoregional Therapy Outcome Prediction and Response Assessment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): The New Era of Functional Imaging Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Johannes M.; Camacho, Juan C.; Kokabi, Nima; Xing, Minzhi; Kim, Hyun S.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable response criteria are critical for the evaluation of therapeutic response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Current response assessment is mainly based on: (1) changes in size, which is at times unreliable and lag behind the result of therapy; and (2) contrast enhancement, which can be difficult to quantify in the presence of benign post-procedural changes and in tumors presenting with a heterogeneous pattern of enhancement. Given these challenges, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been recently investigated, aiding specificity to locoregional therapy response assessment and outcome prediction. Briefly, DWI quantifies diffusion of water occurring naturally at a cellular level (Brownian movement), which is restricted in multiple neoplasms because of high cellularity. Disruption of cellular integrity secondary to therapy results in increased water diffusion across the injured membranes. This review will provide an overview of the current literature on DWI therapy response assessment and outcome prediction in HCC following treatment with locoregional therapies. PMID:26854170

  19. Triple-Negative or HER2-Positive Status Predicts Higher Rates of Locoregional Recurrence in Node-Positive Breast Cancer Patients After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Li Yexiong; Song Yongwen; Wang Weihu; Jin Jing; Liu Yueping; Liu Xinfan; Yu Zihao

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of determining estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) expression in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy. Methods and Materials: The records of 835 node-positive breast cancer patients who had undergone mastectomy between January 2000 and December 2004 were analyzed retrospectively. Of these, 764 patients (91.5%) received chemotherapy; 68 of 398 patients (20.9%) with T1-2N1 disease and 352 of 437 patients (80.5%) with T3-4 or N2-3 disease received postoperative radiotherapy. Patients were classified into four subgroups according to hormone receptor (Rec+ or Rec-) and HER2 expression profiles: Rec-/HER2- (triple negative; n = 141), Rec-/HER2+ (n = 99), Rec+/HER2+ (n = 157), and Rec+/HER2- (n = 438). The endpoints were the duration of locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. Results: Patients with triple-negative, Rec-/HER2+, and Rec+/HER2+ expression profiles had a significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival than those with Rec+/HER2- profiles (86.5% vs. 93.6%, p = 0.002). Compared with those with Rec+/HER2+ and Rec+/HER2- profiles, patients with Rec-/HER2- and Rec-/HER2+ profiles had significantly lower 5-year distant metastasis-free survival (69.1% vs. 78.5%, p = 0.000), lower disease-free survival (66.6% vs. 75.6%, p = 0.000), and lower overall survival (71.4% vs. 84.2%, p = 0.000). Triple-negative or Rec-/HER2+ breast cancers had an increased likelihood of relapse and death within the first 3 years after treatment. Conclusions: Triple-negative and HER2-positive profiles are useful markers of prognosis for locoregional recurrence and survival in node-positive breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy.

  20. Extrahepatic metastases occur in a minority of hepatocellular carcinoma patients treated by locoregional therapies: Analyzing patterns of progression in 285 patients

    PubMed Central

    Senthilnathan, Seanthan; Memon, Khairuddin; Lewandowski, Robert J; Kulik, Laura; Mulcahy, Mary F; Riaz, Ahsun; Miller, Frank H; Yaghmai, Vahid; Nikolaidis, Paul; Wang, Edward; Baker, Talia; Abecassis, Michael; Benson, Al B; Omary, Reed A; Salem, Riad

    2011-01-01

    While most cancers are considered to be predominantly systemic processes, this may not hold true for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The literature regarding patterns of progression of HCC (local versus systemic) has been relatively sparse. Our objectives were to: 1) analyze patterns of progression in HCC patients presenting with intrahepatic disease from initial treatment until death and, 2) identify clinically-relevant risk factors for the development of metastases. Over a 9-year period, 285 patients treated with transarterial locoregional therapies underwent scheduled imaging follow-up from treatment until death and were categorized by pattern of progression: 1) intrahepatic (increased tumor enhancement/size, development/progression of vascular invasion, new hepatic lesions) progression or 2) extrahepatic (adrenal/bone/lung/lymph node) metastases. Uni/multivariate analyses assessing the risk factors for the development of metastases were performed. The median time from last scan to death was 2.4 months (inter-quartile range: 1.3–4.8 months). The time to development of metastases, vascular invasion and/or new lesions was 13.8 months (confidence interval: 11.3–17.7 months). Of the 209 patients followed until death, only 50 developed extrahepatic metastases (24%). Multivariate analyses identified age <65 years (p=0.038), AFP >200 ng/ml (p=0.04) and vascular invasion (p=0.017) as significant predictors of metastases development. In conclusion, knowledge of the risk factors associated with the development of metastases may help guide assessment of patient prognosis. Since 76% of patients presenting with local disease treated with locoregional therapies die without developing extrahepatic metastases, the notion of HCC as a systemic disease, as detected by imaging, may be reconsidered. PMID:22109811

  1. SW43-DOX ± loading onto drug-eluting bead, a potential new targeted drug delivery platform for systemic and locoregional cancer treatment – An in vitro evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Johannes M.; Gai, Yongkang; Sun, Lingyi; Xiang, Guangya; Zeng, Dexing; Kim, Hyun S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of unresectable primary cancer and their distant metastases, with the liver representing one of the most frequent location, is still plagued by insufficient treatment success and poor survival rates. The Sigma-2 receptor is preferentially expressed on many tumor cells making it an appealing target for therapy. Thus, we developed a potential targeted drug conjugate consisting of the Sigma-2 receptor ligand SW43 and Doxorubicin (SW43-DOX) for systemic cancer therapy and for locoregional treatment of primary and secondary liver malignancies when loaded onto drug-eluting bead (DEB) which was compared in vitro to the treatment with Doxorubicin alone. SW43-DOX binds specifically to the Sigma-2 receptor expressed on hepatocellular (Hep G2, Hep 3B), pancreatic (Panc-1) and colorectal (HT-29) carcinoma cell lines with high affinity and subsequent early specific internalization. Free SW43-DOX showed superior concentration and time depended cancer toxicity than treatment with Doxorubicin alone. Action mechanisms analysis revealed an apoptotic cell death with increased caspase 3/7 activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Only ROS scavenging with α-Tocopherol, but not the caspase inhibition (Z-VAD-FMK), partly reverted the effect. SW43-DOX could successfully be loaded onto DEB and showed prolonged eluting kinetics compared to Doxorubicin. SW43-DOX loaded DEB vs. Doxorubicin loaded DEB showed a significantly greater time dependent toxicity in all cell lines. In conclusion, the novel conjugate SW43-DOX ± loading onto DEB is a promising drug delivery platform for targeted systemic and locoregional cancer therapy. PMID:27262893

  2. A PHASE II STUDY OF A PACLITAXEL-BASED CHEMORADIATION REGIMEN WITH SELECTIVE SURGICAL SALVAGE FOR RESECTABLE LOCOREGIONALLY ADVANCED ESOPHAGEAL CANCER: INITIAL REPORTING OF RTOG 0246

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Stephen G.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Wu, Tsung T.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Konski, Andre A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The strategy of definitive chemoradiation with selective surgical salvage in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer was evaluated in a Phase II trial in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-affiliated sites. Methods and Materials The study was designed to detect an improvement in 1-year survival from 60% to 77.5% (α= 0.05; power = 80%). Definitive chemoradiation involved induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (650 mg/mg2/day), cisplatin (15 mg/mg2/day), and paclitaxel (200 mg/mg2/day) for two cycles, followed by concurrent chemoradiation with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and daily 5-FU (300 mg/mg2/day) with cisplatin (15 mg/mg2/day) over the first 5 days. Salvage surgical resection was considered for patients with residual or recurrent esophageal cancer who did not have systemic disease. Results Forty-three patients with nonmetastatic resectable esophageal cancer were entered from Sept 2003 to March 2006. Forty-one patients were eligible for analysis. Clinical stage was ≥T3 in 31 patients (76%) and N1 in 29 patients (71%), with adenocarcinoma histology in 30 patients (73%). Thirty-seven patients (90%) completed induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation. Twenty-eight patients (68%) experienced Grade 3+ nonhematologic toxicity. Four treatment-related deaths were noted. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery following definitive chemoradiation because of residual (17 patients) or recurrent (3 patients) esophageal cancer,and 1 patient because of choice. Median follow-up of live patients was 22 months, with an estimated 1-year survival of 71%. Conclusions In this Phase II trial (RTOG 0246) evaluating selective surgical salvage after definitive chemoradiation in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer, the hypothesized 1-year RTOG survival rate (77.5%) was not achieved (1 year, 71%; 95% confidence interval< 54%–82%). PMID:21507583

  3. Guidelines for locoregional therapy in primary breast cancer in developing countries: The results of an expert panel at the 8th Annual Women's Cancer Initiative – Tata Memorial Hospital (WCI-TMH) Conference

    PubMed Central

    Munshi, Anusheel; Gupta, Sudeep; Anderson, Benjamin; Yarnold, John; Parmar, Vani; Jalali, Rakesh; Sharma, Suresh Chander; Desai, Sangeeta; Thakur, Meenakshi; Baijal, Gunjan; Sarin, Rajiv; Mittra, Indraneel; Ghosh, Jaya; Badwe, Rajendra

    2012-01-01

    Background: Limited guidelines exist for breast cancer management in developing countries. In this context, the Women's Cancer Initiative - Tata Memorial Hospital (WCI-TMH) organised its 8th Annual Conference to update guidelines in breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Appropriately formulated guideline questions on each topic and subtopic in the surgical, radiation and systemic management of primary breast cancer were developed by the scientific committee and shared with the guest faculty of the Conference. Majority of the questions had multiple choice answers. The opinion of the audience, comprising academic and community oncologists, was electronically cumulated, followed by focussed presentations by eminent national and international experts on each topic. The guidelines were finally developed through an expert panel that voted on each guideline question after all talks had been delivered and audience opinion elicited. Separate panels were constituted for locoregional and systemic therapy in primary breast cancer. Results: Based on the voting results of the expert panel, guidelines for locoregional therapy of breast cancer have been formulated. Voting patterns for each question are reported. Conclusions: The updated guidelines on locoregional management of primary breast cancer in the context of developing countries are presented in this article. These recommendations have been designed to allow centers in the developing world to improve the quality of care for breast cancer patients. PMID:22988354

  4. Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive Tumors and Residual Nodal Disease following Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Mastectomy without Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kandula, Shravan; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Harari, Saul; Fasola, Carolina; Mister, Donna; Yu, David S.; Zelnak, Amelia B.; Torres, Mylin A.

    2015-01-01

    Among breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and mastectomy, locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates are unclear in women with ER+ tumors treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy without postmastectomy radiation (PMRT). To determine if PMRT is needed in these patients, we compared LRR rates of patients with ER+ tumors (treated with adjuvant endocrine therapy) with women who have non-ER+ tumors. 85 consecutive breast cancer patients (87 breast tumors) treated with NAC and mastectomy without PMRT were reviewed. Patients were divided by residual nodal disease (ypN) status (ypN+ versus ypN0) and then stratified by receptor subtype. Among ypN+ patients (n = 35), five-year LRR risk in patients with ER+, Her2+, and triple negative tumors was 5%, 33%, and 37%, respectively (p = 0.02). Among ypN+/ER+ patients, lymphovascular invasion and grade three disease increased the five-year LRR risk to 13% and 11%, respectively. Among ypN0 patients (n = 52), five-year LRR risk in patients with ER+, Her2+, and triple negative tumors was 7%, 22%, and 6%, respectively (p = 0.71). In women with ER+ tumors and residual nodal disease, endocrine therapy may be sufficient adjuvant treatment, except in patients with lymphovascular invasion or grade three tumors where PMRT may still be indicated. PMID:26266050

  5. Image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy – a valuable salvage treatment approach for loco-regional recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ning; Zhao, Hongfu; Han, Dongmei; Zhao, Zhipeng; Ge, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the treatment effect of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for refractory recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Case report This 66-year-old female presented with recurrence 5 years after thyroidectomy for PTC. Despite external irradiation and radioactive 131I, the lesion expanded as 3.7 × 3.0 × 2.3 cm3 and 2.0 × 1.5 × 1.5 cm3. The locoregional recurrent tumor was treated with image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The total dose of 30 Gy in 6 fractions were delivered on the whole recurrent tumor. Results Removal of the recurrent tumor was securely achieved by HDR interstitial brachytherapy guided with ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. The refractory tumor in the patients healed uneventfully after HDR interstitial brachytherapy without recurrence during the 14 months of follow-up. Conclusions The image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy may be a valuable salvage treatment approach for refractory recurrence of PTC. PMID:27257420

  6. Preliminary Experience with Locoregional Intraarterial Chemotherapy of Uterine Cervical or Endometrial Cancer Using the Peripheral Implantable Port System (PIPS{sup TM}): A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Heber, Ralf; Boos, Irene; Goettmann, Dieter; Heinrich, Dirk

    2003-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the suitability of a percutaneously implantable catheter port system (PIPS)for repeated intraarterial locoregional chemotherapy (ILC) for cervical and endometrial carcinoma. In 30 patients with advanced, recurrent, or high-risk cervical (n 23) or endometrial(n = 7) carcinoma, PIPS for ILC was implanted via a femoral access, the catheter localized in the infrarenal abdominal aorta. Chemotherapy was performed adjuvantly after surgery(n = 14) or neo-adjuvantly to enable surgery, or for palliation (n = 16). Port implantation, catheter placement, and repeated port puncture was uneventful in all patients.Complications included catheter dislocation (n = 1),catheter thrombosis (n = 2), subcutaneous infection(n = 1), port-bed skin atrophy (n = 1),requiring port explantation in 3 patients. At 2 years follow-up,complete remission was observed in 7/14 patients with adjuvant chemotherapy, partial remission in 3/14. Successful down-staging could be achieved in 4/8 patients with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. The PIPS is suitable for repeated ILC which may be a valuable method for pre- and post-surgical therapy of advanced or high-risk cervical and endometrial cancer, for adjuvant chemotherapy as well as neo-adjuvantly for down-staging, or for palliation.

  7. Better Overall Survival for Breast Cancer Patients by Adding Breast Ultrasound to Follow-Up Examinations for Early Detection of Locoregional Recurrence-A Survival Impact Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wan-Chen; Wei, Hung-Kuang; Hung, Chen-Fang; Kwang-Jane Lin, Christopher; Hung-Chun Cheng, Skye; Chen, Chii-Ming; Wang, Yong Alison

    2016-09-01

    We retrospectively reviewed patient records to evaluate the effectiveness of our 15 y of ultrasound (US) surveillance of recurrent breast disease in comparison with mammography (MM) and clinical examination. From 4796 stage 0-III breast cancer patients who had received surgical treatment, we identified locoregional recurrence (LRR) in 161 patients. The mean age of the 161 patients was 48 y (27-82 y), and the mean follow-up interval was 77.2 mo (11-167 mo). The methods of LRR detection, sites of LRR and overall survival (OS) were examined. Multivariate Cox survival analysis showed significantly better survival in groups detected by US (hazard ratio = 0.6, p = 0.042). The 10-y LRR OS by detection types for US (n = 69), clinical examination (n = 78) and MM (n = 8) were 58.5%, 33.1% and 100%, respectively (p = 0.0004). US was seen with better OS associated with the effective early detection of non-palpable LRR breast cancer, which is mostly not detectable on MM. PMID:27184247

  8. Definitive Reirradiation for Locoregionally Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Proton Beam Therapy or Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Predictors of High-Grade Toxicity and Survival Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    McAvoy, Sarah; Ciura, Katherine; Wei, Caimiao; Rineer, Justin; Liao, Zhongxing; Chang, Joe Y.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel R.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Intrathoracic recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after initial treatment remains a dominant cause of death. We report our experience using proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy for reirradiation in such cases, focusing on patterns of failure, criteria for patient selection, and predictors of toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients underwent reirradiation for intrathoracic recurrent NSCLC at a single institution. All doses were recalculated to an equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2). All patients had received radiation therapy for NSCLC (median initial dose of 70 EQD2 Gy), with median interval to reirradiation of 17 months and median reirradiation dose of 60.48 EQD2 Gy. Median follow-up time was 6.5 months (range, 0-72 months). Results: Ninety-nine patients (97%) completed reirradiation. Median local failure-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and overall survival times were 11.43 months (range, 8.6-22.66 months), 11.43 months (range, 6.83-23.84 months), and 14.71 (range, 10.34-20.56 months), respectively. Toxicity was acceptable, with rates of grade ≥3 esophageal toxicity of 7% and grade ≥3 pulmonary toxicity of 10%. Of the patients who developed local failure after reirradiation, 88% had failure in either the original or the reirradiation field. Poor local control was associated with T4 disease, squamous histology, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score >1. Concurrent chemotherapy improved DMFS, but T4 disease was associated with poor DMFS. Higher T status, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥1, squamous histology, and larger reirradiation target volumes led to worse overall survival; receipt of concurrent chemotherapy and higher EQD2 were associated with improved OS. Conclusions: Intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton beam therapy are options for treating recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. However, rates of

  9. Comparison of the short-term efficacy between docetaxel plus carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil plus carboplatin in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xing; Xia, Wei-Xiong; Ke, Liang-Ru; Yang, Jing; Qiu, Wen-Zhe; Yu, Ya-Hui; Liang, Hu; Huang, Xin-Jun; Liu, Guo-Yin; Zeng, Qi; Guo, Xiang; Xiang, Yan-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Platinum-based chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy is a standard treatment strategy for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). This study aimed to investigate the long-term efficacy and tolerability of inductive chemotherapy with docetaxel plus carboplatin (TC) or 5-fluorouracil plus carboplatin (FC) followed by concurrent radiation therapy in patients with NPC. Methods Patients (N=88) were randomized to receive TC or FC as inductive therapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy (60–70 Gy) with two cycles of carboplatin (area under the curve =5 mg·h/L). Patients were followed up for 8 years. Primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), toxicity, tumor response, distant metastasis-free survival, and local recurrence-free survival. Results At the end of the follow-up period, 31 patients died, 32 had disease progression, eleven had cancer recurrence, and 25 had distant metastasis. Overall, there was no difference between treatment groups with regard to response or survival. We found that following induction and concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the majority of patients showed a complete response (~96%–98% for induction therapy and 82%–84% for comprehensive therapy) to both therapies. PFS and OS were also similar between groups. The rate of PFS was 63.6% for both FC and TC and that of OS was 65.9% and 63.5%, respectively. The overall incidence of grade 3–4 adverse events in the TC group (20.5%) was higher than in the FC group (10.7%). Neutropenia and leukopenia were the most common grade 3–4 adverse events in the TC group, and mucositis was the most common in the FC group. Conclusion These data indicate that TC and FC therapies have similar efficacy in treating locally advanced NPC and both are well tolerated. PMID:27574453

  10. Patterns and Risk Factors of Locoregional Recurrence in T1-T2 Node Negative Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Mastectomy: Implications for Postmastectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Raad, Rita; Boutrus, Rimoun; Wang Rui; Niemierko, Andrzej; Macdonald, Shannon; Smith, Barbara; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) can reduce locoregional recurrences (LRR) in high-risk patients, but its role in the treatment of lymph node negative (LN-) breast cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to identify a subgroup of T1-T2 breast cancer patients with LN- who might benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 1,136 node-negative T1-T2 breast cancer cases treated with mastectomy without PMRT at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 2004. We estimated cumulative incidence rates for LRR overall and in specific subgroups, and used Cox proportional hazards models to identify potential risk factors. Results: Median follow-up was 9 years. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR was 5.2% (95% CI: 3.9-6.7%). Chest wall was the most common (73%) site of LRR. Tumor size, margin, patient age, systemic therapy, and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) were significantly associated with LRR on multivariate analysis. These five variables were subsequently used as risk factors for stratified analysis. The 10-year cumulative incidence of LRR for patients with no risk factors was 2.0% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2%), whereas the incidence for patients with three or more risk factors was 19.7% (95% CI: 12.2-28.6%). Conclusion: It has been suggested that patients with T1-T2N0 breast cancer who undergo mastectomy represent a favorable group for which PMRT renders little benefit. However, this study suggests that select patients with multiple risk factors including LVI, tumor size {>=}2 cm, close or positive margin, age {<=}50, and no systemic therapy are at higher risk of LRR and may benefit from PMRT.

  11. Estrogen/Progesterone Receptor Negativity and HER2 Positivity Predict Locoregional Recurrence in Patients With T1a,bN0 Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Guray, Merih; Sahin, Aysegul

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Data have suggested that the molecular features of breast cancer are important determinants of outcome; however, few studies have correlated these features with locoregional recurrence (LRR). In the present study, we evaluated estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) as predictors of LRR in patients with lymph node-negative disease and tumors {<=}1 cm, because these patients often do not receive adjuvant chemotherapy or trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: The data from 911 patients with stage T1a,bN0 breast cancer who had received definitive treatment at our institution between 1997 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. We prospectively analyzed ER/PR/HER2 expression from the archival tissue blocks of 756 patients. These 756 patients represented the cohort for the present study. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.0 years, the 5- and 8-year Kaplan-Meier LRR rate was 1.6% and 5.9%, respectively, with no difference noted in those who underwent breast conservation therapy vs. mastectomy (p = .347). The 8-year LRR rates were greater in the patients with ER-negative (10.6% vs. 4.2%, p = .016), PR-negative (9.0% vs. 4.2%, p = .009), or HER2-positive (17.5% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.009) tumors. On multivariate analysis, ER-negative and PR-negative disease (hazard ratio, 2.37; p = .046) and HER2-positive disease (hazard ratio, 3.13, p = .016) independently predicted for LRR. Conclusion: Patients with ER/PR-negative or HER2-positive T1a,bN0 breast cancer had a greater risk of LRR. Therapeutic strategies, such as the use of chemotherapy and/or anti-HER2 therapies, should be considered for future clinical trials for these patients.

  12. Locoregional recurrences after post-operative volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) in oral cavity cancers in a resource constrained setting: experience and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Patil, V M; Babu, S; Muttath, G; Thiagarajan, S K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The conformal nature of dose distribution produced by volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) increases the risk of geographic miss. Data regarding patterns of failure after VMAT in oral cavity cancers in resource-constrained settings are scarce. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the patterns of failure in patients receiving adjuvant VMAT intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer in Malabar Cancer Center, Kerala, India. Methods: Data of patients with oral cavity cancer receiving adjuvant VMAT IMRT between April 2012 and March 2014 were collected. Recurrent volumes were delineated on the treatment planning images and classified as defined by Dawson et al (Dawson LA, Anzai Y, Marsh L, Martel MK, Paulino A, Ship JA, et al. Patterns of local-regional recurrence following parotid-sparing conformal and segmental intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2000; 46: 1117–26). Results: 75 patients with a median follow-up of 24 months were analysed. 41 (55%) patients had oral tongue cancers and 52 (69%) of the patients had Stage IVA cancers. The 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival were 88.9%, 82.1% and 80.5%, respectively. With a median time to failure of 6.5 months, five infield and three outfield failures were identified. Conclusion: A relatively low rate of outfield failure and lack of marginal failure attests to the efficacy of VMAT in such patients. Modifications to our existing target delineation policy have been proposed. Advances in knowledge: The use of standardized target delineation methods allows safe use of VMAT IMRT even in resource-constrained settings. PMID:25645107

  13. Combined heavy smoking and drinking predicts overall but not disease-free survival after curative resection of locoregional esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Chen, Cui; Zhang, Fei; Yang, Hang; Bi, Xi-Wen; An, Xin; Wang, Feng-Hua; Jiang, Wen-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The prognostic impact of smoking and drinking on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) was scarcely discussed. We investigated the prognostic value of smoking and drinking and their relationships with clinicopathological characteristics in a large cohort of patients with locoregional ESCC. Patients and methods We retrospectively analyzed 488 patients who underwent curative treatment at a single institution between January 2007 and December 2008. A chi-square test was used to evaluate the relationships between smoking and drinking and clinicopathological variables, the Kaplan–Meier method was used for 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival, and Cox proportional hazards models were applied for univariate and multivariate analyses of variables with respect to OS and disease-free survival. Results Heavy smokers were more likely to have advanced Tumor-Node-Metastases (TNM) stage and higher neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio at diagnosis (P<0.05). Drinkers were more likely to have advanced TNM stage, to present with a larger tumor, and to undergo multidisciplinary treatment (P<0.05). For patients who used neither heavy tobacco nor alcohol, used either tobacco or alcohol, and used both, the 5-year OS rates and OS times were 57.4%, 46.4%, and 39.1% (P<0.05) and not reached, 55.2 months, and 41.2 months (P<0.05), respectively. On multivariate analysis, patients who both heavily smoked and drank had 1.392 times the risk of dying during follow-up compared with neither-users (95% CI =1.020–1.901, P=0.037). Conclusion We identified that combined heavy smoking and drinking might predict poor prognosis in ESCC patients. PMID:27471400

  14. Outcomes of Bleomycin-based electrochemotherapy in patients with repeated loco-regional recurrences of vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Antonio; Damiani, Gianluca Raffaello; Mangioni, Costantino; Strippoli, Davide; Loverro, Giuseppe; Cappello, Antonio; Turoli Scd, Daniela; Corso, Silvia; Tartagni, Massimo; Pezzotta, Maria Grazia

    2016-05-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety, local tumor efficacy and relief of symptoms of electrochemotherapy (ECT) treatment in patients affected by recurrence of vulvar cancer (VC), unsuitable for standard treatments. Methods Ten patients were recruited with histological diagnosis of recurrence of VC. Intravenous bleomycin was injected, after an accurate mapping of all lesions and ECT was performed. Response to therapy was evaluated and quality of life (QoL) was evaluated via questionnaires. Results Diagnosis stage of primary tumors, according to the FIGO system, was: four patients respectively at stage IB (40%), and at stage II (40%), one patient at stage IIIA (10%), one patient with Paget cancer (10%). Mean age was 76 years (SD ± 7) at time of enrollment. Eight patients (80%) were previously submitted to surgery and/or radio-chemotherapy. Mean treatment time was 20 (range 10-20) min. After a median follow-up of 12 (3-22) months, six patients (60%) were alive. Conclusions Objective responses (ORs) with local control of the tumor were obtained in 80%. After a mean follow-up of 12 (3-22) months six patients (60%) were alive. The favorable outcome of this study, indicates that ECT is a reliable treatment option that may improve their functioning, thus enhancing the care provided in the palliative setting. PMID:26882959

  15. Randomized study of sinusoidal chronomodulated versus flat intermittent induction chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil followed by traditional radiotherapy for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huan-Xin; Hua, Yi-Jun; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Luo, Dong-Hua; Sun, Rui; Qiu, Fang; Mo, Hao-Yuan; Mai, Hai-Qiang; Guo, Xiang; Xian, Li-Jian; Hong, Ming-Huang; Guo, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radiotherapy is the most common treatment regimen for advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Whether chronomodulated infusion of chemotherapy can reduce its toxicity is unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the toxic and therapeutic effects of sinusoidal chronomodulated infusion versus flat intermittent infusion of cisplatin (DDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) followed by radiotherapy in patients with locoregionally advanced NPC. Patients with biopsy-diagnosed untreated stages III and IV NPC (according to the 2002 UICC staging system) were randomized to undergo 2 cycles of sinusoidal chronomodulated infusion (Arm A) or flat intermittent constant rate infusion (Arm B) of DDP and 5-FU followed by radical radiotherapy. Using a “MELODIE” multi-channel programmed pump, the patients were given 12-hour continuous infusions of DDP (20 mg/m2) and 5-FU (750 mg/m2) for 5 days, repeated every 3 weeks for 2 cycles. DDP was administered from 10:00 am to 10:00 pm, and 5-FU was administered from 10:00 pm to 10:00 am each day. Chronomodulated infusion was performed in Arm A, with the peak deliveries of 5-FU at 4:00 am and DDP at 4:00 pm. The patients in Arm B underwent a constant rate of infusion. Radiotherapy was initiated in the fifth week, and both arms were treated with the same radiotherapy techniques and dose fractions. Between June 2004 and June 2006, 125 patients were registered, and 124 were eligible for analysis of response and toxicity. The major toxicity observed during neoadjuvant chemotherapy was neutropenia. The incidence of acute toxicity was similar in both arms. During radiotherapy, the incidence of stomatitis was significantly lower in Arm A than in Arm B (38.1% vs. 59.0%, P = 0.020). No significant differences were observed for other toxicities. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 88.9%, 82.4%, and 74.8% for Arm A and 91.8%, 90.2%, and 82.1% for Arm B. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year progression-free survival rates were 91

  16. Locoregional Recurrence Risk for Patients With T1,2 Breast Cancer With 1-3 Positive Lymph Nodes Treated With Mastectomy and Systemic Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Andrew; Allen, Pamela; Woodward, Wendy; Kim, Michelle; Kuerer, Henry M.; Drinka, Eva Katherine; Sahin, Aysegul; Strom, Eric A.; Buzdar, Aman; Valero, Vicente; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) has been shown to benefit breast cancer patients with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes, but it is unclear how modern changes in management have affected the benefits of PMRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the locoregional recurrence (LRR) rates in 1027 patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with or without PMRT during an early era (1978-1997) and a later era (2000-2007). These eras were selected because they represented periods before and after the routine use of sentinel lymph node surgery, taxane chemotherapy, and aromatase inhibitors. Results: 19% of 505 patients treated in the early era and 25% of the 522 patients in the later era received PMRT. Patients who received PMRT had significantly higher-risk disease features. PMRT reduced the rate of LRR in the early era cohort, with 5-year rates of 9.5% without PMRT and 3.4% with PMRT (log-rank P=.028) and 15-year rates 14.5% versus 6.1%, respectively; (Cox regression analysis: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 0.37, P=.035). However, PMRT did not appear to benefit patients treated in the later cohort, with 5-year LRR rates of 2.8% without PMRT and 4.2% with PMRT (P=.48; Cox analysis: AHR 1.41, P=.48). The most significant factor predictive of LRR for the patients who did not receive PMRT was the era in which the patient was treated (AHR 0.35 for later era, P<.001). Conclusion: The risk of LRR for patients with T1,2 breast cancer with 1 to 3 positive lymph nodes treated with mastectomy and systemic treatment is highly dependent on the era of treatment. Modern treatment advances and the selected use of PMRT for those with high-risk features have allowed for identification of a cohort at very low risk for LRR without PMRT.

  17. Factors determining long-term outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma within the Milan criteria: liver transplantation versus locoregional therapy: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hee; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Choi, Gyu-Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Ki Yeon; Kim, Kyunga; Paik, Yong-Han; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon

    2016-08-01

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) satisfying the Milan criteria are candidates for liver transplantation (LT), but locoregional therapies could be another options for them.A total of 1859 treatment-naïve HCC patients fulfilling the Milan criteria were analyzed. Survival tree analysis was performed to generate survival nodes with similar survival risks in 1729 non-LT group, and compared with the survival of 130 patients who received LT.Among patients who did not receive LT, survival tree analysis classified patients into 6 nodes according to Child-Pugh (CP) score, serum alphafetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, and age, with different mortality risks (5-year survival rate of 87.3%, 77.5%, 65.8%, 64.7%, 44.0%, and 28.7% for nodes 1-6, respectively; P < 0.001). The overall survival of patients in nodes 1 (CP score 5 with AFP levels <5 ng/mL) and 2 (CP score 5 with maximal tumor size <2.5 cm) were comparable with that of patients who received LT (both P > 0.05), but the survival rates of patients in nodes 3 to 6 were worse than that of LT (P < 0.05 for all). In each survival node, survival differed slightly according to initial treatment modality for patients who did not receive LT. For patients who received LT, tumor stage at the time of LT was associated with long-term outcome.Certain groups of non-LT patients showed survival rates that were similar to the survival rates of LT patients. CP score, AFP levels, tumor size, and age were baseline factors that can help estimate the long-term outcomes of non-LT treatment. In addition, tumor stage at the time of LT and specific initial treatment modality in non-LT patients affected the long-term outcomes. These factors can help estimate the long-term outcomes of HCC patients diagnosed within the Milan criteria. PMID:27583916

  18. Is Biological Subtype Prognostic of Locoregional Recurrence Risk in Women With pT1-2N0 Breast Cancer Treated With Mastectomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Pauline T.; Sadek, Betro T.; Lesperance, Maria F.; Alexander, Cheryl S.; Shenouda, Mina; Raad, Rita Abi; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine locoregional and distant recurrence (LRR and DR) in women with pT1-2N0 breast cancer according to approximated subtype and clinicopathologic characteristics. Methods and Materials: Two independent datasets were pooled and analyzed. The study participants were 1994 patients with pT1-2N0M0 breast cancer, treated with mastectomy without radiation therapy. The patients were classified into 1 of 5 subtypes: luminal A (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 1-2, n=1202); luminal B (ER+ or PR+/HER 2−/grade 3, n=294); luminal HER 2 (ER+ or PR+/HER 2+, n=221); HER 2 (ER−/PR−/HER 2+, n=105) and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (ER−/PR−/HER 2−, n=172). Results: The median follow-up time was 4.3 years. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier (KM) LRR were 1.8% in luminal A, 3.1% in luminal B, 1.7% in luminal HER 2, 1.9% in HER 2, and 1.9% in TNBC cohorts (P=.81). The 5-year KM DR was highest among women with TNBC: 1.8% in luminal A, 5.0% in luminal B, 2.4% in luminal HER 2, 1.1% in HER 2, and 9.6% in TNBC cohorts (P<.001). Among 172 women with TNBC, the 5-year KM LRR were 1.3% with clear margins versus 12.5% with close or positive margins (P=.04). On multivariable analysis, factors that conferred higher LRR risk were tumors >2 cm, lobular histology, and close/positive surgical margins. Conclusions: The 5-year risk of LRR in our pT1-2N0 cohort treated with mastectomy was generally low, with no significant differences observed between approximated subtypes. Among the subtypes, TNBC conferred the highest risk of DR and an elevated risk of LRR in the presence of positive or close margins. Our data suggest that although subtype alone cannot be used as the sole criterion to offer postmastectomy radiation therapy, it may reasonably be considered in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors including tumor size, histology, and margin status. Larger cohorts and longer follow-up times are needed to define which women with node-negative disease have high postmastectomy LRR

  19. Diagnostic Performance of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Using Fluorine-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose in Detecting Locoregional Nodal Involvement in Patients with Anal Canal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Annunziata, Salvatore; Treglia, Giorgio; Sadeghi, Ramin; Ayati, Narjes; Giovanella, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in detecting nodal involvement in patients with anal canal cancer (ACC) has been investigated by several studies with conflicting results. The aim of our study is to systematically review and meta-analyze published data about this topic. Methods. A comprehensive computer literature search of PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Embase databases was carried out on July 10 to find relevant articles concerning the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET in detecting locoregional nodal involvement in patients with ACC. No language restriction was used. Pooled diagnostic performance on a lesion-based analysis was calculated. Results. Seven retrospective and five prospective studies have been reviewed. Six studies allowed assessing pooled sensitivity; five studies allowed assessing pooled specificity. Sensitivity and specificity values of FDG-PET/CT on a lesion-based analysis ranged from 31 to 100% and from 53 to 98%, with pooled estimates of 56% (95% CI: 45–67%) and 90% (95% CI: 86–93%), respectively. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis demonstrates that FDG-PET is a specific diagnostic tool in detecting locoregional lymph node involvement in patients with ACC. Low sensitivity is a major concern; however, higher sensitivity could be reached combining FDG-PET with MR scan. PMID:24672298

  20. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion-Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Early Predictor of Treatment Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Locoregionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Youping; Pan, Jianji; Chen, Yunbin; Chen, Ying; He, Zhuangzhen; Zheng, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to prospectively evaluate the clinical value of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in early predicting the treatment response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Forty-eight patients with locoregionally advanced NPC were imaged with IVIM-MRI (14 b-factors, 0 – 1000 s/mm2) on a 3.0-T Magnetic resonance system, at the baseline, and repeatedly at the third and 21st day after NAC started. The IVIM-derived parameters (D, pure diffusion coefficient; f, perfusion fraction; and D∗, pseudodiffusion coefficient) were calculated with the Interactive Data Language version 6.3 software. The baseline parameters and their corresponding changes (Δparameter(day)) during NAC were compared using the Student t test or Mann-Whitney U test. Variation analyses of IVIM-derived parameters were tested with intraclass correlation coefficient. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was conducted to estimate the best diagnostic accuracy. Statistical analyses were performed on the SPSS 18.0 software, with a 2-tailed probability value, P < 0.05 was considered significant. Among recruited patients, 37 cases were categorized as responders and 11 cases as nonresponders after NAC completed. The intra- and interobserver intraclass correlation coefficient of IVIM-derived parameters were excellent, which ranged from 0.858 to 0.971. Compared with the baseline value, at the third and 21st day, the D value was significantly higher and the D∗ value significantly lower (P < 0.05, P < 0.001, respectively). In contrast, f parameter only changed slightly (P > 0.05). Compared with nonresponders, responders presented a notably lower baseline D value and higher ΔD3, ΔD21, ΔD3∗, ΔD21∗, and Δf21 (P < 0.05), but no significant change in Δf3 was observed (P > 0.1). The receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses indicated that the threshold of

  1. Innovative techniques in radiation oncology. Clinical research programs to improve local and regional control in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Fisher, S.A.; Lamm, F.R. )

    1990-02-01

    There is a growing importance in failure analysis in cancer management. In these analyses locoregional failure as the cause of death emerges as a significant problem in many tumor sites, e.g., head and neck cancer, gynecologic cancer, genitourinary cancer. Because of these data, the radiation oncology community has attributed high priority to research efforts to improve locoregional control. These efforts include the following: (1) brachytherapy alone or with external beam radiation therapy or surgery; (2) intraoperative radiation therapy; (3) hyperthermia with radiation therapy; (4) particle irradiation (protons, neutrons, stripped nuclei, and pions); and (5) routes of administration of the treatment, including infusional (intravenous) chemotherapy with radiation therapy, intraarterial monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides, and intraarterial chemotherapy with radiation therapy. Each area of investigation is discussed.

  2. Megavoltage external beam irradiation of craniopharyngiomas: Analysis of tumor control and morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Flickinger, J.C.; Lunsford, L.D.; Singer, J.; Cano, E.R.; Deutsch, M. )

    1990-07-01

    From 1971 to 1985, 21 patients received megavoltage external beam radiation therapy at the University of Pittsburgh for control of craniopharyngioma. Minimum tumor doses prescribed to the 95% isodose volume ranged between 51.3 to 70.0 Gy. Median total dose was 60.00 Gy and median dose per fraction was 1.83 Gy. Three deaths occurred from intercurrent disease and no deaths from tumor progression. Actuarial overall survival was 89% and 82% at 5 and 10 years. Actuarial local control was 95% at 5 and 10 years. Radiation related complications included one patient with optic neuropathy, one with brain necrosis, and one that developed optic neuropathy followed by brain necrosis. The high dose group of patients who received a NSD or Neuret equivalent of greater than 60 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction had a significantly greater risk of radiation complications (p = .024). The actuarial risk at 5 years for optic neuropathy was 30% and brain necrosis was 12.5% in the high dose group. Tumor control in the high dose group was not shown to be significantly better. Any possible benefit in tumor control in treating patients with craniopharyngioma with doses above 60 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction appears to be offset by the increased risk of radiation injury.

  3. Margin on Gross Tumor Volume and Risk of Local Recurrence in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Keene, Kimberley S.; Dobelbower, M. Christian; Bonner, James A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the method or extent of construction of the high-dose clinical target volume (CTV) and high-dose planning target volume (PTV) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer are associated with an increased risk of locoregional failure. Materials and Methods: Patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, oral cavity, hypopharyngeal, or laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas treated definitively with IMRT were included. All patients without local relapse had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Median follow-up for all patients was 24 months. Treatment plans of 85 available patients were reviewed, and the gross tumor volume (GTV) to PTV expansion method was estimated. Results: The GTVs were expanded volumetrically in 71 of 85 patients, by a median of 15 mm (range, 4-25 mm). An anatomic component to the expansion of GTV was used in 14 of 85 patients. Eighteen patients failed locoregionally, for an actuarial locoregional control rate of 77.2% at 2 years. There was no significant difference in locoregional control between patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically vs. those with a component of anatomic expansion. In patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically, no increase in risk of local failure was seen in patients with a total GTV expansion of <=15 mm. Conclusion: In this retrospective study, there was not an increased risk of local failure using smaller margins or expanding GTVs volumetrically when treating head-and-neck cancer patients definitively with IMRT.

  4. Results of radiotherapy in recurrent endometrial carcinoma: A retrospective analysis of 51 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kuten, A.; Grigsby, P.W.; Perez, C.A.; Fineberg, B.; Garcia, D.M.; Simpson, J.R.

    1989-07-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed of 51 patients with locoregional recurrence of endometrial carcinoma, treated by radiotherapy between 1959 and 1986. There were 17 patients (33%) with isolated vaginal recurrence, 12 patients (24%) with vaginal recurrence with pelvic extension, 7 patients (14%) with pelvic recurrence only, and 15 patients (29%) with simultaneous locoregional and distant failure. Eighty percent of the recurrences occurred within 3.5 years from primary treatment; time to relapse was shorter in patients with advanced-stage, high-grade malignancy at original diagnosis. Locoregional control was achieved in 18 patients (35%). Complete tumor regression in the vagina, irrespective of extravaginal pelvic disease status or distant metastasis, occurred in 28 of 34 patients with vaginal involvement (82%). The 5- and 10-year overall actuarial survivals for all patients were 18 and 12.5%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year progression-free survivals of patients with isolated vaginal recurrences were 40% and 29%, respectively; the 5-year progression-free survival of patients with vaginal recurrence with pelvic extension was 20%. There were no survivors beyond 1.5 years among patients with pelvic recurrence (p = 0.02). All patients with simultaneous locoregional and distant failure were dead by 3.5 years. Stage at original diagnosis, time to relapse from primary treatment, histologic pattern, and grade of malignancy were prognosticators of survival. Five patients (10%) developed a total of ten radiation-related sequelae.

  5. Youth Offender Care Needs Assessment Tool (YO-CNAT): an actuarial risk assessment tool for predicting problematic child-rearing situations in juvenile offenders on the basis of police records.

    PubMed

    van der Put, Claudia E; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2013-12-01

    In the juvenile justice system, much attention is paid to estimating the risk for recidivism among juvenile offenders. However, it is also important to estimate the risk for problematic child-rearing situations (care needs) in juvenile offenders, because these problems are not always related to recidivism. In the present study, an actuarial care needs assessment tool for juvenile offenders, the Youth Offender Care Needs Assessment Tool (YO-CNAT), was developed to predict the probability of (a) a future supervision order imposed by the child welfare agency, (b) a future entitlement to care indicated by the youth care agency, and (c) future incidents involving child abuse, domestic violence, and/or sexual norm trespassing behavior at the juvenile's address. The YO-CNAT has been developed for use by the police and is based solely on information available in police registration systems. It is designed to assist a police officer without clinical expertise in making a quick assessment of the risk for problematic child-rearing situations. The YO-CNAT was developed on a sample of 1,955 juvenile offenders and was validated on another sample of 2,045 juvenile offenders. The predictive validity (area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve) scores ranged between .70 (for predicting future entitlement to care) and .75 (for predicting future worrisome incidents at the juvenile's address); therefore, the predictive accuracy of the test scores of the YO-CNAT was sufficient to justify its use as a screening instrument for the police in deciding to refer a juvenile offender to the youth care agency for further assessment into care needs. PMID:23815118

  6. Modified transarterial chemoembolization with locoregional administration of sorafenib for treating hepatocellular carcinoma: feasibility, efficacy, and safety in the VX-2 rabbit liver tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Seidensticker, Max; Streit, Sebastian; Nass, Norbert; Wybranski, Christian; Jürgens, Julian; Brauner, Jan; Schulz, Nadine; Kalinski, Thomas; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Garlipp, Benjamin; Steffen, Ingo; Ricke, Jens; Dudeck, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess the feasibility, efficacy and safety of a local application of sorafenib within a conventional transarterial chemoembolization in the VX-2 tumor-bearing rabbit model. METHODS VX-2 tumors were induced in the left liver lobe of 10 New Zealand White rabbits. After two weeks, growth was verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Five rabbits were treated by transarterial chemoembolization using an emulsion of sorafenib and ethiodized oil (referred to as SORATACE; n=5). Rabbits receiving oral sorafenib for two weeks (n=2) and untreated rabbits (n=3) served as controls. After two weeks, contrast-enhanced CT was performed, followed by animal necropsy. RESULTS The change in tumor diameter between baseline and follow-up was significantly different in the SORATACE group compared with the other groups; tumor shrinkage was observed in the SORATACE group only (P = 0.016). In both control groups, preserved hypervascularity was seen in the follow-up CT in all but one tumor. All tumors in the SORATACE group were devascularized in the follow-up CT. Importantly, substantial parenchymal damage in nontargeted areas of the tumor-bearing liver lobe was seen in rabbits treated with SORATACE. CONCLUSION SORATACE demonstrated high efficacy in the treatment of experimental VX-2 liver tumors but was also associated with substantial liver parenchymal toxicity. PMID:27328720

  7. A Quasi Actuarial Prospect for Individual Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, William A.

    A conceptual model of individual assessment through the use of biodata responses with minimal input information is outlined. The process is considered especially applicable to industrial psychology. A scored autobiographical data form, which measures the individual's past behavior and experiences, provides for assignment to a specific subgroup…

  8. Merkel Cell Carcinoma: 27-Year Experience at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Andrew C.; Stillie, Alison L.; Seel, Matthew; Ainslie, Jill

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the treatment outcome of patients with Merkel cell carcinoma after local and/or regional treatment. Methods and Materials: Patients presenting to our center between January 1980 and July 2006 with Merkel cell carcinoma and without distant metastases were reviewed. The primary endpoint was locoregional control. Secondary endpoints were distant recurrence, survival and treatment toxicity. Results: A total of 176 patients were identified. The median age was 79 years. The median follow-up was 2.2 years for all patients and 3.9 years for those alive at the last follow-up visit. The most common primary site was the head and neck (56%), and 62 patients(35%) had regional disease at presentation. The initial surgery to the primary tumor involved (wide) local excision in 140 patients and biopsy only in 28 patients (8 patients had no identifiable primary tumor); 33 patients underwent nodal surgery. Of the 176 patients, 165 (94%) underwent radiotherapy (RT) and 29 of them also underwent concurrent chemotherapy. The median radiation dose was 50 Gy (range, 18-60). Locoregional recurrence developed in 33 patients(19%), with a median interval to recurrence of 8 months. Distant metastases developed in 43 patients(24%). Age, primary tumor size, and RT (no RT vs. <45 Gy vs. {>=}45 Gy) were predictive of locoregional control on univariate analysis. However, only RT remained significant on multivariate analysis. The estimated 5-year actuarial rate for locoregional control, progression-free survival, and overall survival was 76%, 60%, and 45%, respectively. Conclusion: The locoregional control rate for Merkel cell carcinoma in our study was comparable to those from other series using combined modality treatment with RT an integral part of treatment.

  9. Radiotherapy Can Decrease Locoregional Recurrence and Increase Survival in Mastectomy Patients With T1 to T2 Breast Cancer and One to Three Positive Nodes With Negative Estrogen Receptor and Positive Lymphovascular Invasion Status

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, P.S.; Chen, C.M.; Liu, M.C.; Jian, J.M.; Horng, C.F.; Liu, M.J.; Yu, B.L.; Lee, M.Y.; Chi, C.W.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To define a subgroup of patients at high risk of locoregional recurrence (LRR) who might be benefit from postmastectomy radiotherapy in invasive breast cancer and tumor size <5 cm with one to three involved axillary lymph nodes (T1-2 N1). Methods and Materials: Between April 1991 and December 2005, 544 patients with T1-2 N1 invasive breast cancer were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Of the 544 patients, 383 patients (70.4%) had no radiotherapy, and 161 patients (29.6%) received radiotherapy. We retrospectively compared these two patient groups. Results: With a median follow-up of 40.3 months, LRR occurred in 40 (7.4%) of 544 patients. On univariate analysis, high nuclear grade (p = 0.04), negative estrogen receptor (ER) status (p = 0.001), presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (p = 0.003), and no radiotherapy (p = 0.0015) were associated with a significantly higher rate of LRR. Negative ER status (hazard ratio = 5.1) and presence of LVI (hazard ratio = 2.5) were the risk factors for LRR with statistical significance in the multivariate analysis. Radiotherapy reduced the LRR in patients with the following characteristics: age <40 years, T2 stage, high nuclear grade, negative ER status, and presence of LVI. For 41 patients with negative ER and positive LVI status, radiotherapy can reduce LRR from 10 of 25 (40%) to 2 of 16 (12.5%) and increase the 5-year overall survival from 43.7% to 87.1%. Conclusion: Radiotherapy can reduce LRR and increase survival in T1-2 N1 breast cancer patients with negative ER status and presence of LVI.

  10. Reirradiation With Cetuximab in Locoregional Recurrent and Inoperable Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Feasibility and First Efficacy Results

    SciTech Connect

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Keller, Christian; Hambek, Markus; Wagenblast, Jens; Seitz, Oliver; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with a prospective protocol of external beam reirradiation (Re-RT) combined with cetuximab for patients with inoperable, recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: Between August 2008 and June 2010, 18 patients with inoperable recurrence of SCCHN after adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy (RT) and simultaneous or sequential cisplatin-based chemotherapy for primary SCCHN were enrolled. Acute and late toxicity from the experimental regimen were recorded every week during RT and every 3 months thereafter. Efficacy was assessed with repeated imaging using response evaluation criteria in solid tumors and clinical examinations 8-12 weeks after completion of the treatment and every 3 months thereafter. Results: Median follow-up time for all patients was 9.4 (range: 3.85-31.7) months and for patients alive 30.4 (range: 15.7-31.7) months. Acute toxicity was generally mild or moderate. Five patients developed a grade 3 acneiform rash related to cetuximab. Late toxicity occurred as grade 3 trismus in five and as grade 3 abacterial salivary gland inflammation in one patient, respectively. Overall response rate was 47%. Median overall and progression-free survival for all patients was 8.38 months and 7.33 months, respectively. The overall survival rate was 44% at 1 year, with a 1 year local control rate of 33%. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the limitations of our preliminary data Re-RT combined with cetuximab for recurrent and inoperable SCCHN is feasible and the integration of newer targeted agents seems to be less toxic compared to conventional chemotherapy with encouraging response rates at least for a subset of patients.

  11. Evaluation of Multiple Breathing States Using a Multiple Instance Geometry Approximation (MIGA) in Inverse-Planned Optimization for Locoregional Breast Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Alexander; Moran, Jean M.; Marsh, Robin B.; Balter, James M.; Fraass, Benedick A.; McShan, Daniel L.; Kessler, Marc L.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: Although previous work demonstrated superior dose distributions for left-sided breast cancer patients planned for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at deep inspiration breath hold compared with conventional techniques with free-breathing, such techniques are not always feasible to limit the impact of respiration on treatment delivery. This study assessed whether optimization based on multiple instance geometry approximation (MIGA) could derive an IMRT plan that is less sensitive to known respiratory motions. Methods and Materials: CT scans were acquired with an active breathing control device at multiple breath-hold states. Three inverse optimized plans were generated for eight left-sided breast cancer patients: one static IMRT plan optimized at end exhale, two (MIGA) plans based on a MIGA representation of normal breathing, and a MIGA representation of deep breathing, respectively. Breast and nodal targets were prescribed 52.2 Gy, and a simultaneous tumor bed boost was prescribed 60 Gy. Results: With normal breathing, doses to the targets, heart, and left anterior descending (LAD) artery were equivalent whether optimizing with MIGA or on a static data set. When simulating motion due to deep breathing, optimization with MIGA appears to yield superior tumor-bed coverage, decreased LAD mean dose, and maximum heart and LAD dose compared with optimization on a static representation. Conclusions: For left-sided breast-cancer patients, inverse-based optimization accounting for motion due to normal breathing may be similar to optimization on a static data set. However, some patients may benefit from accounting for deep breathing with MIGA with improvements in tumor-bed coverage and dose to critical structures.

  12. Biochemical Control With Radiotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have an Estimated 10-Year Overall Survival of >90%

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Christopher; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James; Joffres, Michel; Khaira, Mandip; Kwan, Winkle; Moiseenko, Vitali; Pickles, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To identify subgroups of patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radical radiotherapy that have improved overall survival when disease is biochemically controlled. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 1,060 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy was divided into nine subgroups based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk category and estimated 10-year overall survival (eOS 10y) derived from the age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients with and without biochemical control were compared with respect to overall survival. Actuarial estimates of overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 125 months (range, 51-176 months). Only the subgroups with high or intermediate risk disease and an eOS 10y of >90% had a statistically significantly improved overall survival when prostate cancer was biochemically controlled. In all other groups, biochemical control made no significant difference to overall survival. In the subgroup with high-risk disease and eOS 10y >90%, actuarial overall survival was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.5%-94.1%) and 62.1% (95% CI 52.9%-71.3%) for patients with biochemical control and biochemical relapse respectively (p = 0.002). In the intermediate risk group with eOS >90%, actuarial overall survival was 95.3% (95% CI 89.0%-100%) and 79.8% (95% CI 68.0%-91.6%) for biochemically controlled and biochemically relapsed patients (p = 0.033). On multivariate analysis, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = 0.005), biochemical control (p = 0.033) and eOS 10y (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. Conclusion: Biochemical control translates into improved overall survival in patients with high or intermediate risk disease and an estimated 10-year overall survival of >90%.

  13. Patterns of Utilization of Adjuvant Radiotherapy and Outcomes in Black Women After Breast Conservation at a Large Multidisciplinary Cancer Center;Black women; Breast cancer; Radiotherapy; RT; Breast conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards-Bennett, Sophia M.; Jacks, Lindsay M.; McCormick, Beryl; Zhang, Zhigang; Azu, Michelle; Ho, Alice; Powell, Simon; Brown, Carol

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Population-based studies have reported that as many of 35% of black women do not undergo radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservation surgery (BCS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether this trend persisted at a large multidisciplinary cancer center, and to identify the factors that predict for noncompliance with RT and determine the outcomes for this subset of patients. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2007, 83 black women underwent BCS at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and were therefore eligible for the present study. Of the 83 women, 38 (46%) had Stage I, 38 (46%) Stage II, and 7 (8%) Stage III disease. Of the study cohort, 31 (37%) had triple hormone receptor-negative tumors. RT was recommended for 81 (98%) of the 83 patients (median dose, 60 Gy). Results: Of the 81 women, 12 (15%) did not receive the recommended adjuvant breast RT. Nonreceipt of chemotherapy (p = .003) and older age (p = .009) were associated with nonreceipt of RT. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival rate was 99% (actuarial 5-year rate, 97%), 96% (actuarial 5-year rate, 93%), 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 92%), 92% (actuarial 5-year rate, 89%), and 95% (actuarial 5-year rate, 91%), respectively. Conclusion: We found a greater rate of utilization adjuvant breast RT (85%) among black women after BCS than has been reported in recent studies, indicating that excellent outcomes are attainable for black women after BCS when care is administered in a multidisciplinary cancer center.

  14. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clavel, Sebastien; Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard; Despres, Philippe; Khaouam, Nader; Donath, David; Soulieres, Denis; Guertin, Louis; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  15. The influence of limited English proficiency on outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy for head and neck cancer✩

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Romesser, Paul B.; Jalisi, Scharukh; Zaner, Ken S.; Cooley, Timothy P.; Grillone, Gregory; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Truong, Minh Tam

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate how limited English proficiency affects treatment outcome in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with curative intent radiation therapy (RT). Methods From 2004 to 2010, 131 patients with HNC underwent RT. Patient's self-reported primary language and race/ethnicity were obtained at hospital registration. English proficiency was categorized as being English proficient (EP) or limited English proficient (LEP). Race/ethnicity was categorized as white, black and other (Hispanics and Asians). Patients were evaluated for locoregional (LRC), distant control (DC), overall (OS) and disease-free (DFS) survival. Results Fewer LEP patients (60.0%) underwent chemoradiation compared to EP (83.8%), P = 0.028. The three-year actuarial LRC for EP and LEP patients was 82.2% and 58.3%, respectively, P = 0.038. LEP patients had an increased risk of locoregional failure on univariate Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio, HR 2.4, 95% CI, 1.0–5.8). No differences by English proficiency were seen for DC, OS and DFS. Race/ethnicity was not associated LRC, DC, OS and DFS. Conclusion Inferior locoregional control was observed in LEP patients receiving RT for HNC. Potential health disparities as a result of limited English proficiency require further investigation. Practice implications Patient education, use of culturally sensitive interpreter and patient navigation services, and improved patient compliance should be considered in head and neck cancer patients receiving complex multidisciplinary care. PMID:25190640

  16. Influence of intravenous amifostine on xerostomia, tumor control, and survival after radiotherapy for head-and- neck cancer: 2-year follow-up of a prospective, randomized, phase III trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, Todd H. . E-mail: twasserman@bellsouth.net; Brizel, David M.; Henke, Michael; Monnier, Alain; Eschwege, Francois; Sauer, Rolf; Strnad, Vratislav

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate chronic xerostomia and tumor control 18 and 24 months after initial treatment with amifostine in a randomized controlled trial of patients with head-and-neck cancer; at 12 months after radiotherapy (RT), amifostine had been shown to reduce xerostomia without changing tumor control. Methods and Materials: Adults with head-and-neck cancer who underwent once-daily RT for 5-7 weeks (total dose, 50-70 Gy) received either open-label amifostine (200 mg/m{sup 2} i.v.) 15-30 min before each fraction of radiation (n = 150) or RT alone (control; n = 153). Results: Amifostine administration was associated with a reduced incidence of Grade {>=}2 xerostomia over 2 years of follow-up (p = 0.002), an increase in the proportion of patients with meaningful (>0.1 g) unstimulated saliva production at 24 months (p = 0.011), and reduced mouth dryness scores on a patient benefit questionnaire at 24 months (p < 0.001). Locoregional control rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival were not significantly different between the amifostine group and the control group. Conclusions: Amifostine administration during head-and-neck RT reduces the severity and duration of xerostomia 2 years after treatment and does not seem to compromise locoregional control rates, progression-free survival, or overall survival.

  17. Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F.; Tseng, C.-J.; Tseng, C.-C.; Kuo, Y.-C.; Yu, C.-Y.; Chen, W.-C. . E-mail: rto_chen@yahoo.com.tw

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To assess local control and acute and chronic toxicity with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and February 2006, 68 patients at high risk of cervical cancer after hysterectomy were treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for six cycles every week. Thirty-three patients received adjuvant radiotherapy by IMRT. Before the IMRT series was initiated, 35 other patients underwent conventional four-field radiotherapy (Box-RT). The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinicopathologic and treatment factors. Results: IMRT provided compatible local tumor control compared with Box-RT. The actuarial 1-year locoregional control for patients in the IMRT and Box-RT groups was 93% and 94%, respectively. IMRT was well tolerated, with significant reduction in acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities compared with the Box-RT group (GI 36 vs. 80%, p = 0.00012; GU 30 vs. 60%, p = 0.022). Furthermore, the IMRT group had lower rates of chronic GI and GU toxicities than the Box-RT patients (GI 6 vs. 34%, p = 0.002; GU 9 vs. 23%, p = 0.231). Conclusion: Our results suggest that IMRT significantly improved the tolerance to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with compatible locoregional control compared with conventional Box-RT. However, longer follow-up and more patients are needed to confirm the benefits of IMRT.

  18. Extraovarian peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma: a case-control retrospective comparison to papillary adenocarcinoma of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Bloss, J D; Liao, S Y; Buller, R E; Manetta, A; Berman, M L; McMeekin, S; Bloss, L P; DiSaia, P J

    1993-09-01

    Since the establishment of extraovarian peritoneal serous papillary carcinoma (EPSPC) as a clinical entity in 1959, less than 250 cases have been described and its clinicopathologic features remain obscure. The present series is a retrospective, case-controlled study comparing the response and survival to cytoreductive surgery followed by cisplatin-based multiagent chemotherapy of 33 women with confirmed EPSPC versus 33 cases with papillary serous ovarian cancer (PSOC). Each EPSPC case was matched to a PSOC control for extent and distribution of disease prior to and following cytoreductive surgery, tumor grade, patient age, and treatment. Additionally, the new Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the diagnosis for EPSPC are discussed. There were no significant differences in tumor response to therapy, disease-free interval, and actuarial survival between cases and controls. These data suggest that EPSPC is clinically similar to PSOC and support the need for a prospective clinical trial to compare these two entities further. PMID:8406199

  19. Changing the patterns of failure for high-risk prostate cancer patients by optimizing local control

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, Richard G. . E-mail: richard.stock@msnyuhealth.org; Ho, Alice; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Stone, Nelson N.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Standard therapies for high-risk prostate cancer have resulted in suboptimal outcomes with both local and distant failures. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and distant metastases rates as well as biopsy outcomes are reported after a regimen of trimodality therapy with hormonal, radioactive seed, and external beam radiation therapy to demonstrate how patterns of failure are changed when local control is optimized. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 2003, a total of 360 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with trimodality therapy. Patients were defined as being at high risk if they possessed at least one of the following high-risk features: Gleason score 8 to 10, PSA >20, clinical stage t2c to t3, or two or more intermediate risk features: Gleason score 7, PSA >10 to 20, or stage t2b. Patients were followed for a median of 4.25 years (range, 2 to 10 years). Results: The actuarial 7-year freedom from PSA failure and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM) rates were 83% and 89% respectively. Patients (n = 51) developing PSA failure exhibited aggressive disease behavior with short PSA doubling times (median, 5 months) and a 7-year freedom from distant metastases rate of 48%. Local control was high. The last posttreatment biopsy results were negative in 97% of cases (68 of 70 patients). In multivariate analysis, only PSA >20 predicted biochemical failure (p = 0.04), and only seminal vesicle status predicted developing distant failure (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Trimodality therapy results in excellent local control that alters patterns of failure, resulting in similar actuarial biochemical and distant failure rates. Most failures appear to be distant and exhibit biologically aggressive behavior.

  20. Treatment of Locally Advanced Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Trachea With Neutron Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, Nathan; Koh, W.-J.; Laramore, George E.; Patel, Shilpen; Mulligan, Michael S.; Douglas, James G.

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy of fast neutron radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the trachea and to compare outcomes with and without high-dose-rate (HDR) endobronchial brachytherapy boost. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2005, a total of 20 patients with ACC of the trachea were treated with fast neutron radiotherapy at University of Washington. Of these 20 patients, 19 were treated with curative intent. Neutron doses ranged from 10.7 to 19.95 Gy (median, 19.2 Gy). Six of these patients received an endobronchial brachytherapy boost using an HDR {sup 192}Ir source (3.5 Gy x 2 fractions). Median duration of follow-up was 46 months (range, 10-121 months). Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival rate and median overall survival for the entire cohort were 89.4%, and 97 months, respectively. Overall survival was not statistically different among those patients receiving an endobronchial boost compared with those receiving neutron radiotherapy alone (100% vs. 68%, p = 0.36). The 5-year actuarial locoregional control rate for the entire cohort was 54.1%. The locoregional control rate was not statistically different among patients who received an endobronchial boost compared with those who received neutron radiotherapy alone (40% vs. 58%, p 0.94). There were no cases of Grade {>=}3 acute toxicity. There were 2 cases of Grade 3/4 chronic toxicity. Conclusions: Fast neutron radiotherapy is an effective treatment for locally advanced adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea, with acceptable treatment-related toxicity.

  1. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannomas: evaluation of tumor control and its predictors in a large patient cohort in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Klijn, Stijn; Verheul, Jeroen B; Beute, Guus N; Leenstra, Sieger; Mulder, Jef J S; Kunst, Henricus P M; Hanssens, Patrick E J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The authors of this study sought to assess tumor control and complication rates in a large cohort of patients who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) and to identify predictors of tumor control. METHODS The records of 420 patients treated with GKRS for VS with a median marginal dose of 11 Gy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 or who had undergone treatment for VS previously were excluded. The authors assessed tumor control and complication rates with chart review and used the Cox proportional hazards model to identify predictors of tumor control. Preservation of serviceable hearing, defined as Gardner-Robertson Class I-II, was evaluated in a subgroup of 71 patients with serviceable hearing at baseline and with available follow-up audiograms. RESULTS The median VS tumor volume was 1.4 cm(3), and the median length of follow-up was 5.1 years. Actuarial 5-and 10-year tumor control rates were 91.3% and 84.8%, respectively. Only tumor volume was a statistically significant predictor of tumor control rate. The tumor control rate decreased from 94.1% for tumors smaller than 0.5 cm(3) to 80.7% for tumors larger than 6 cm(3). Thirteen patients (3.1%) had new or increased permanent trigeminal nerve neuropathy, 4 (1.0%) had new or increased permanent facial weakness, and 5 (1.2%) exhibited new or increased hydrocephalus requiring a shunting procedure. Actuarial 3-year and 5-year hearing preservation rates were 65% and 42%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The 5-year actuarial tumor control rate of 91.3% in this cohort of patients with VS compared slightly unfavorably with the rates reported in other large studies, but the complication and hearing preservation rates in this study were similar to those reported previously. Various factors may contribute to the observed differences in reported outcomes. These factors include variations in treatment indication and in the definition of treatment failure, as

  2. Efficacy and Toxicity of Chemoradiotherapy Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Unknown Primary of Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Balboni, Tracy A.; Haddad, Robert I.; Norris, Charles M.; Posner, Marshall R.; Wirth, Lori J.; Goguen, Laura A.; Annino, Donald; Tishler, Roy B.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: No single standard treatment paradigm is available for head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma of an unknown primary (HNCUP). Bilateral neck radiotherapy with mucosal axis irradiation is widely used, with or without chemotherapy and/or surgical resection. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a highly conformal method for delivering radiation that is becoming the standard of care and might reduce the long-term treatment-related sequelae. We report the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute experience with IMRT-based treatment for HNCUP. Patients and Materials: A retrospective study of all patients treated at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for HNCUP with IMRT between August 2004 and January 2009. The primary endpoint was overall survival; the secondary endpoints were locoregional and distant control, and acute and chronic toxicity. Results: A total of 24 patients with HNCUP were included. Of these patients, 22 had Stage N2 disease or greater. All patients underwent neck computed tomography, positron emission tomography-computed tomography, and examination under anesthesia with directed biopsies. Of the 24 patients, 22 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 7 (29%) also underwent induction chemotherapy. The median involved nodal dose was 70 Gy, and the median mucosal dose was 60 Gy. With a median follow-up of 2.1 years, the 2-year actuarial overall survival and locoregional control rate was 92% and 100%, respectively. Only 25% of the patients had Grade 2 xerostomia, although 11 patients (46%) required esophageal dilation for stricture. Conclusion: In a single-institution series, IMRT-based chemoradiotherapy for HNCUP was associated with superb overall survival and locoregional control. The xerostomia rates were promising, but the aggressive therapy was associated with significant rates of esophageal stenosis.

  3. The Evolution of an Undergraduate Actuarial Mathematics Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Kristin; Schumacher, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    Bryant University was originally a school for business majors and offered only a few mathematics courses. After becoming accredited by the New England Association of Colleges and Universities in the 1960s, the college was required to upgrade its offerings in the area of mathematics. In the 1970s, the department offerings were increased to include…

  4. Quants at the Gate: The Unique Education of Actuaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfond, Jay A.; Horwitz, Lois K.

    2012-01-01

    An academic discipline and a profession eventually converge through the relationship, division of labor and trust between universities and professional associations--and their mutual respect for the authority and the respective roles of one another. Sometimes, professional associations evaluate academic programs or even provide an examination at…

  5. The Actuarial Turn in the Science of Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danforth, Scot

    2011-01-01

    In the mid-1970s, Donald Hammill and his colleagues authored three scathing critiques of the two most trusted scientific traditions of learning disability treatment--movement education and psycholinguistic training (Hammill, 1972; Hammill & Larsen, 1974; Hammill, Goodman, & Wiederholt, 1974). These critical reviews of research rejected the older…

  6. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David; Lagerwaard, Frank; Rodrigues, George; Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh

    2012-03-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  7. Adaptive and innovative Radiation Treatment FOR improving Cancer treatment outcomE (ARTFORCE); a randomized controlled phase II trial for individualized treatment of head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Failure of locoregional control is the main cause of recurrence in advanced head and neck cancer. This multi-center trial aims to improve outcome in two ways. Firstly, by redistribution of the radiation dose to the metabolically most FDG-PET avid part of the tumour. Hereby, a biologically more effective dose distribution might be achieved while simultaneously sparing normal tissues. Secondly, by improving patient selection. Both cisplatin and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) antibodies like Cetuximab in combination with Radiotherapy (RT) are effective in enhancing tumour response. However, it is unknown which patients will benefit from either agent in combination with irradiation. We will analyze the predictive value of biological markers and 89Zr-Cetuximab uptake for treatment outcome of chemoradiation with Cetuximab or cisplatin to improve patient selection. Methods ARTFORCE is a randomized phase II trial for 268 patients with a factorial 2 by 2 design: cisplatin versus Cetuximab and standard RT versus redistributed RT. Cisplatin is dosed weekly 40 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Cetuximab is dosed 250mg/m2 weekly (loading dose 400 mg/m2) for 6 weeks. The standard RT regimen consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks. Redistributed adaptive RT consists of elective RT up to 54.25 Gy with a SIB between 64-80 Gy in 35 fractions in 6 weeks with redistributed dose to the gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV), and adaptation of treatment for anatomical changes in the third week of treatment. Patients with locally advanced, biopsy confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, oral cavity or hypopharynx are eligible. Primary endpoints are: locoregional recurrence free survival at 2 years, correlation of the median 89Zr-cetuximab uptake and biological markers with treatment specific outcome, and toxicity. Secondary endpoints are quality of life, swallowing function

  8. Irradiation for locoregionally recurrent, never-irradiated oral cavity cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Benjamin H.; Chin, Christine; Riaz, Nadeem; Ho, Felix; Hu, Man; Hong, Julian C.; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Sherman, Eric; Wong, Richard J.; Morris, Luc G.; Ganly, Ian; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Rao, Shyam S.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to report the clinical outcomes and related prognostic factors of patients who underwent radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of recurrent, never-irradiated oral cavity cancer (recurrent OCC). Methods The records of consecutive patients with nonmetastatic recurrent OCC who presented to and were treated with RT at our institution between 1989 and 2011 were reviewed. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate overall survival (OS). The cumulative incidences of disease-specific death, local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis were calculated with death as a competing risk. Results One hundred twenty-three patients were identified. Median follow-up for living patients was 54 months and 16 months for all patients. Ninety-one patients had salvage surgery followed by adjuvant RT. Definitive RT was utilized in the remaining 32 patients. The 5-year OS was 40%. The 5-year cumulative incidence of disease-specific death, local failure, regional failure, and distant metastasis was 55%, 34%, 22%, and 20%, respectively. Recurrent T classification and lack of salvage surgery were independently associated with worse disease-specific death and decreased OS, respectively. Subset analysis of patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated that age, recurrent T classification, and perineural invasion (PNI) were independently associated with decreased OS; recurrent T classification and thicker tumors were independently associated with worse disease-specific death; and positive/close margins and primary T classification were independently associated with increased local failure. Conclusion In this group of patients with recurrent OCC, clinical outcomes were similar or improved when compared with other recurrent OCC-specific reports. In the salvage surgery subset, tumor thickness and PNI are recurrent pathologic features associated with outcomes that were only previously demonstrated in studies of primary disease. Because of the relatively worse outcomes in patients receiving definitive or adjuvant RT for recurrent OCC, we advocate for the appropriate use of postoperative RT in the initial management of oral cavity cancers. PMID:24954094

  9. Locoregional intra-arterial therapies for unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kelvin; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H

    2010-04-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a rare hepatic malignancy that for patients with unresectable disease is uniformly fatal. Only approximately 30% of patients are eligible for resection because of the advanced nature of the disease at the time of diagnosis. Systemic chemotherapy has been disappointing in regard to its efficacy, with most regimens resulting in a median survival of 6 to12 months. There has been great interest in other modalities of treatment, particularly intra-arterial therapies, which consist of a catheter-based group of treatments where therapeutic and/or embolic agents are intra-arterially injected to target the liver tumors. In this report, we attempt to employ an evidence-based approach to critically review and comprehend the current role and future potential of intra-arterial therapies for ICC. PMID:20494703

  10. Locoregional and free flap reconstruction of the lateral skull base.

    PubMed

    Richmon, Jeremy D; Yarlagadda, Bharat B; Wax, Mark K; Patel, Urjeet; Diaz, Jason; Lin, Derrick T

    2015-09-01

    Lateral temporal bone reconstruction after ablative surgery for malignancy, chronic infection, osteoradionecrosis, or trauma presents a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. This complexity is due to the 3D nature of the region, potential dural exposure, and the possible need for external surface repair. Successful reconstruction therefore requires achieving separation of the dura, obliteration of volume defect, and external cutaneous repair. There is significant institutional bias on the best method of reconstruction of these defects. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of reconstructive options will be discussed as well as the potential pitfalls and complications. PMID:24797502

  11. Accelerated versus conventional fractionated postoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer: Results of a multicenter Phase III study

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe . E-mail: gisangui@utmb.edu; Richetti, Antonella; Bignardi, Mario; Corvo, Renzo; Gabriele, Pietro; Sormani, Maria Pia; Antognoni, Paolo

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether, in the postoperative setting, accelerated fractionation (AF) radiotherapy (RT) yields a superior locoregional control rate compared with conventional fractionation (CF) RT in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx. Methods and materials: Patients from four institutions with one or more high-risk features (pT4, positive resection margins, pN >1, perineural/lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension, subglottic extension) after surgery were randomly assigned to either RT with one daily session of 2 Gy up to 60 Gy in 6 weeks or AF. Accelerated fractionation consisted of a 'biphasic concomitant boost' schedule, with the boost delivered during the first and last weeks of treatment, to deliver 64 Gy in 5 weeks. Informed consent was obtained. The primary endpoint of the study was locoregional control. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Results: From March 1994 to August 2000, 226 patients were randomized. At a median follow-up of 30.6 months (range, 0-110 months), 2-year locoregional control estimates were 80% {+-} 4% for CF and 78% {+-} 5% for AF (p = 0.52), and 2-year overall survival estimates were 67% {+-} 5% for CF and 64% {+-} 5% for AF (p = 0.84). The lack of difference in outcome between the two treatment arms was confirmed by multivariate analysis. However, interaction analysis with median values as cut-offs showed a trend for improved locoregional control for those patients who had a delay in starting RT and who were treated with AF compared with those with a similar delay but who were treated with CF (hazard ratio = 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.1). Fifty percent of patients treated with AF developed confluent mucositis, compared with only 27% of those treated with CF (p = 0.006). However, mucositis duration was not different between arms. Although preliminary, actuarial Grade 3+ late toxicity estimates at 2 years were 18% {+-} 4% and 27% {+-} 6% for CF

  12. Retrospective Analysis of Local Control and Cosmetic Outcome of 147 Periorificial Carcinomas of the Face Treated With Low-Dose Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ducassou, Anne; David, Isabelle; Filleron, Thomas; Rives, Michel; Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in white populations. We evaluated the local cure rate and cosmetic outcome of patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) or squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the face treated with low-dose rate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between February 1990 and May 2000, 147 facial carcinomas in 132 patients were treated by {sup 192}Ir wire implantation. Side effects of brachytherapy were noted. Follow-up was 2 years or more. Locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and overall survival were recorded. Group A included patients treated by primary brachytherapy, and Group B included those treated after recurrence. Results: A total of 121 carcinomas were BCCs (82.3%) and 26 were SCCs (17.7%); the median tumor size was 10 mm. Of the tumors, 86 (58.5%) were in men and 61 (41.5%) were in women; the median age was 71 years. Group A comprised 116 lesions (78.9%), and Group B, 31 (21.1%). There were 17 relapses (11.6%) after a median follow-up of 72 months: 12 local, 4 nodal, and 1 local and nodal. Locoregional-free survival was 96.6% at 2 years and 87.3% at 5 years. Five-year LRFS was 82.6% in men and 93.3% in women (p = 0.027). After adjustment for gender, LRFS was better after primary treatment than after recurrence (hasard ratio HR, 2.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-8.03; p = 0.039). Five-year LRFS was 90.4% for BCC and 70.8% for SCC (p = 0.03). There were no Grade 3 complications. Conclusions: Low-dose rate brachytherapy offers good local control and cosmetic outcome in patients with periorificial skin carcinomas, with no Grade 3 complications. Brchytherapy is more efficient when used as primary treatment.

  13. Connectivity and control in the year 2000 and beyond.

    PubMed

    Nolan, R L; Brennan, J; Coyne, K P; Spong, S; Spar, J; Strauss, N; Milan, T; Speight, D; Tedlow, R S; Gillotti, D; Yardeni, E; Block, D J; Radin, S A; Sheinheit, S; Robbins, B

    1998-01-01

    By now, most executives are familiar with the famous Year 2000 problem--and many believe that their companies have the situation well in hand. After all, it seems to be such a trivial problem--computer software that interprets "oo" to be the year 1900 instead of the year 2000. And yet armies of computer professionals have been working on it--updating code in payroll systems, distribution systems, actuarial systems, sales-tracking systems, and the like. The problem is pervasive. Not only is it in your systems, it's in your suppliers' systems, your bankers' systems, and your customers' systems. It's embedded in chips that control elevators, automated teller machines, process-control equipment, and power grids. Already, a dried-food manufacturer destroyed millions of dollars of perfectly good product when a computer counted inventory marked with an expiration date of "oo" as nearly a hundred years old. And when managers of a sewage-control plant turned the clock to January I, 2000 on a computer system they thought had been fixed, raw sewage pumped directly into the harbor. It has become apparent that there will not be enough time to find and fix all of the problems by January I, 2000. And what good will it do if your computers work but they're connected with systems that don't? That is one of the questions Harvard Business School professor Richard Nolan asks in his introduction to HBR's Perspectives on the Year 2000 issue. How will you prepare your organization to respond when things start to go wrong? Fourteen commentators offer their ideas on how senior managers should think about connectivity and control in the year 2000 and beyond. PMID:10181588

  14. Pain Management for Elective Foot and Ankle Surgery: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Liu, George T; Mayo, Helen G; Joshi, Girish P

    2015-01-01

    Pain after foot and ankle surgery can significantly affect the postoperative outcomes. We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials assessing postoperative pain after foot and ankle surgery, because the surgery will lead to moderate-to-severe postoperative pain, but the optimal pain therapy has been controversial. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials in English reporting on pain after foot and ankle surgery in adults published from January 1946 to February 2013 was performed. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative pain scores. The secondary outcome measures included supplemental analgesic requirements and other recovery outcomes. With 953 studies identified, 45 met the inclusion criteria. The approaches improving pain relief (reduced pain scores or opioid requirements) included peripheral nerve blocks, wound infiltration, intravenous dexamethasone, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors, and opioids. Wound instillation, intra-articular injection, and intravenous regional analgesia had variable analgesia. The lack of homogeneous study design precluded quantitative analyses. Optimal pain management strategies included locoregional analgesic techniques plus acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors, with opioids used for "rescue," and 1 intraoperative dose of parenteral dexamethasone. Popliteal sciatic nerve blocks would be appropriate when expecting severe postoperative pain (extensive surgical procedure), and ankle blocks and surgical incision infiltration would be appropriate when expecting moderate postoperative pain (less extensive and minimally invasive surgical procedures). Additional studies are needed to assess multimodal analgesia techniques. PMID:24954920

  15. Local Control, Toxicity, and Cosmesis in Women >70 Years Enrolled in the American Society of Breast Surgeons Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Registry Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Atif J.; Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter; Goyal, Sharad; Kuerer, Henry M.; Keisch, Martin; Quiet, Coral; Zannis, Victor; Keleher, Angela; Snyder, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard; Lyden, Maureen; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The American Society of Breast Surgeons enrolled women in a registry trial to prospectively study patients treated with the MammoSite Radiation Therapy System breast brachytherapy device. The present report examined the outcomes in women aged >70 years enrolled in the trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,449 primary early stage breast cancers were treated in 1,440 women. Of these, 537 occurred in women >70 years old. Fisher's exact test was performed to correlate age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) with toxicity and with cosmesis. The association of age with local recurrence (LR) failure times was investigated by fitting a parametric model. Results: Older women were less likely to develop telangiectasias than younger women (7.9% vs. 12.4%, p = 0.0083). The incidence of other toxicities was similar. Cosmesis was good or excellent in 92% of the women >70 years old. No significant difference was found in LR as a function of age. The 5-year actuarial LR rate with invasive disease for the older vs. younger population was 2.79% and 2.92%, respectively (p = 0.5780). In women >70 years with hormone-sensitive tumors {<=}2 cm who received hormonal therapy (n = 195), the 5-year actuarial rate of LR, overall survival, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival was 2.06%, 89.3%, 87%, and 97.5%, respectively. These outcomes were similar in women who did not receive hormonal therapy. Women with small, estrogen receptor-negative disease had worse LR, overall survival, and disease-free survival compared with receptor-positive patients. Conclusions: Accelerated partial breast irradiation with the MammoSite radiation therapy system resulted in low toxicity and produced similar cosmesis and local control at 5 years in women >70 years compared with younger women. This treatment should be considered as an alternative to omitting adjuvant radiotherapy for older women with small-volume, early-stage breast cancer.

  16. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Squamous Cell Anal Cancer With Para-aortic Nodal Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, Joseph C.; Das, Prajnan; Eng, Cathy; Reish, Andrew G.; Beddar, A. Sam; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the rates of toxicity, locoregional control, distant control, and survival in anal cancer patients with para-aortic nodal involvement, treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Between 2001 and 2007, 6 patients with squamous cell anal cancer and para-aortic nodal involvement were treated with IMRT and concurrent infusional 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. The primary tumor was treated with a median dose of 57.5 Gy (range, 54-60 Gy), involved para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes were treated with a median dose of 55 Gy (range, 50.5-55 Gy), and noninvolved nodal regions were treated with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 43.5-45 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 25 months, none of the patients had a recurrence at the primary tumor, pelvic/inguinal nodes, or para-aortic nodes, whereas 2 patients developed distant metastases to the liver. Four of the 6 patients are alive. The 3-year actuarial locoregional control, distant control, and overall survival rates were 100%, 56%, and 63%, respectively. Four of the 6 patients developed Grade 3 acute gastrointestinal toxicity during chemoradiation. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy could potentially serve as definitive therapy in anal cancer patients with para-aortic nodal involvement. Adjuvant chemotherapy may be indicated in these patients, as demonstrated by the distant failure rates. These patients need to be followed carefully because of the potential for treatment-related toxicities.

  17. Dream controller

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L; Wang, Qiang; Chow, Andrew J

    2013-11-26

    A method and apparatus for intelligently controlling continuous process variables. A Dream Controller comprises an Intelligent Engine mechanism and a number of Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controllers, each of which is suitable to control a process with specific behaviors. The Intelligent Engine can automatically select the appropriate MFA controller and its parameters so that the Dream Controller can be easily used by people with limited control experience and those who do not have the time to commission, tune, and maintain automatic controllers.

  18. Prognostic value of pretherapy platelet elevation in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Shoultz-Henley, Sara; Garden, Adam S; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Sheu, Tommy; Kroll, Michael H; Rosenthal, David I; Gunn, G Brandon; Hayes, Amos J; French, Chloe; Eichelberger, Hillary; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Smith, Blaine D; Phan, Jack; Ayoub, Zeina; Lai, Stephen Y; Pham, Brian; Kies, Merrill; Gold, Kathryn A; Sturgis, Erich; Fuller, Clifton D

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential associations between increased platelets and oncologic outcomes in oropharyngeal cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation. A total of 433 oropharyngeal cancer patients (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy between 2002 and 2012 were included under an approved IRB protocol. Complete blood count (CBC) data were extracted. Platelet and hemoglobin from the last phlebotomy (PLTpre-chemoRT, Hgbpre-chemoRT ) before start of treatment were identified. Patients were risk-stratified using Dahlstrom-Sturgis criteria and were tested for association with survival and disease-control outcomes. Locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis (FDM) and overall survival (OS) were decreased (p < 0.03, p < 0.04 and p < 0.0001, respectively) for patients with PLTpre-chemoRT value of ≥350 × 10(9) /L. Actuarial 5-year locoregional control (LRC) and FDM were 83 and 85% for non-thrombocythemic patients while patient with high platelets had 5-year LRC and FDM of 73 and 74%, respectively. Likewise, 5-year OS was better for patients with normal platelet counts by comparison (76 vs. 57%; p < 0.0001). Comparison of univariate parametric models demonstrated that PLTpre-chemoRT was better among tested models. Multivariate assessment demonstrated improved performance of models which included pretherapy platelet indices. On Bayesian information criteria analysis, the optimal prognostic model was then used to develop nomograms predicting 3-, 5- and 10-year OS. In conclusion, pretreatment platelet elevation is a promising predictor of prognosis, and further work should be done to elucidate the utility of antiplatelets in modifying risk in OPC patients. PMID:26414107

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Node Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastases From Unknown Head-and-Neck Primary Site: M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Petsuksiri, Janjira; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Weber, Randal S.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Garden, Adam S.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional therapy for cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from an unknown primary can cause considerable toxicity owing to the volume of tissues to be irradiated. In the present study, hypothesizing that using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) would provide effective treatment with minimal toxicity, we reviewed the outcomes and patterns of failure for head-and-neck unknown primary cancer at a single tertiary cancer center. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 52 patients who had undergone IMRT for an unknown primary at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1998 and 2005. The patient and treatment characteristics were extracted and the survival rates calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Of the 52 patients, 5 presented with Stage N1, 11 with Stage N2a, 23 with Stage N2b, 6 with Stage N2c, 4 with Stage N3, and 3 with Stage Nx disease. A total of 26 patients had undergone neck dissection, 13 before and 13 after IMRT; 14 patients had undergone excisional biopsy and presented for IMRT without evidence of disease. Finally, 14 patients had received systemic chemotherapy. All patients underwent IMRT to targets on both sides of the neck and pharyngeal axis. The median follow-up time for the surviving patients was 3.7 years. The 5-year actuarial rate of primary mucosal tumor control and regional control was 98% and 94%, respectively. Only 3 patients developed distant metastasis with locoregional control. The 5-year actuarial disease-free and overall survival rate was 88% and 89%, respectively. The most severe toxicity was Grade 3 dysphagia/esophageal stricture, experienced by 2 patients. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that IMRT can produce excellent outcomes for patients who present with cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from an unknown head-and-neck primary tumor. Severe late complications were uncommon.

  20. Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    Birth control, also known as contraception, is designed to prevent pregnancy. Birth control methods may work in a number of different ... eggs that could be fertilized. Types include birth control pills, patches, shots, vaginal rings, and emergency contraceptive ...

  1. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher),more » devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.« less

  2. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher), devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.

  3. Early Clinical Outcome With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Extended-Field, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beriwal, Sushil . E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu; Gan, Gregory N.; Heron, Dwight E.; Selvaraj, Raj N.; Kim, Hayeon; Lalonde, Ron; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the early clinical outcomes with concurrent cisplatin and extended-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) for carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with Stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with EF-IMRT were evaluated. The pelvic lymph nodes were involved in 19 patients, and of these 19 patients, 10 also had para-aortic nodal disease. The treatment volume included the cervix, uterus, parametria, presacral space, upper vagina, and pelvic, common iliac, and para-aortic nodes to the superior border of L1. Patients were assessed for acute toxicities according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. All late toxicities were scored with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late toxicity score. Results: All patients completed the prescribed course of EF-IMRT. All but 2 patients received brachytherapy. Median length of treatment was 53 days. The median follow-up was 18 months. Acute Grade {>=}3 gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and myelotoxicity were seen in 1, 1, and 10 patients, respectively. Thirty-four patients had complete response to treatment. Of these 34 patients, 11 developed recurrences. The first site of recurrence was in-field in 2 patients (pelvis in 1, pelvis and para-aortic in 1) and distant in 9 patients. The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, disease-free survival, overall survival, and Grade {>=}3 toxicity rates for the entire cohort were 80%, 51%, 65%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusion: Extended-field IMRT with concurrent chemotherapy was tolerated well, with acceptable acute and early late toxicities. The locoregional control rate was good, with distant metastases being the predominant mode of failure. We are continuing to accrue a larger number of patients and longer follow-up data to further extend our initial observations with this approach.

  4. Modeling Local Control After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report From the Elekta Collaborative Lung Research Group

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Grills, Inga S.; Belderbos, Jose; Hope, Andrew; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Guckenberger, Matthias; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Xiao, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment option for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using data collected by the Elekta Lung Research Group, we generated a tumor control probability (TCP) model that predicts 2-year local control after SBRT as a function of biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor size. Methods and Materials: We formulated our TCP model as follows: TCP = e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k} Division-Sign (1 + e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k}), where BED10 is the biologically effective SBRT dose, c is a constant, L is the maximal tumor diameter, and TCD50 and k are parameters that define the shape of the TCP curve. Least-squares optimization with a bootstrap resampling approach was used to identify the values of c, TCD50, and k that provided the best fit with observed actuarial 2-year local control rates. Results: Data from 504 NSCLC tumors treated with a variety of SBRT schedules were available. The mean follow-up time was 18.4 months, and 26 local recurrences were observed. The optimal values for c, TCD50, and k were 10 Gy/cm, 0 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively. Thus, size-adjusted BED (sBED) may be defined as BED minus 10 times the tumor diameter (in centimeters). Our TCP model indicates that sBED values of 44 Gy, 69 Gy, and 93 Gy provide 80%, 90%, and 95% chances of tumor control at 2 years, respectively. When patients were grouped by sBED, the model accurately characterized the relationship between sBED and actuarial 2-year local control (r=0.847, P=.008). Conclusion: We have developed a TCP model that predicts 2-year local control rate after hypofractionated SBRT for early-stage NSCLC as a function of biologically effective dose and tumor diameter. Further testing of this model with additional datasets is warranted.

  5. Excellent Local Control Rates and Distinctive Patterns of Failure in Myxoid Liposarcoma Treated With Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Zagars, Gunar K.; Ballo, Matthew T.; Patel, Shreyaskumar R.; Lewis, Valerae O.; Benjamin, Robert S.; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rates and patterns of metastatic relapse in patients with localized myxoid liposarcoma treated with conservation surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Patients and Methods: Between 1960 and 2003, 127 patients with non-metastatic myxoid liposarcoma were treated with conservation surgery and RT at our institution. The median patient age was 39 years (range, 14-79 years). Of the 127 patients, 46% underwent preoperative RT (median dose, 50 Gy) and 54% underwent postoperative RT (median dose, 60 Gy). Also, 28% received doxorubicin-based chemotherapy as a part of their treatment. Results: The median follow-up was 9.1 years. The overall survival rate at 5 and 10 years was 87% and 79%, respectively. The corresponding disease-free survival rates were 81% and 73%. The local control rate at {>=}5 years was 97%. The actuarial rate of distant metastases at 5 and 10 years was 15% and 24%, respectively. Of the 27 patients who developed distant metastases, 48% did so in the retroperitoneum, 22% in other extrapulmonary soft tissues, 22% in the lung, 15% in bone, and 4% in the liver. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that RT and conservation surgery for localized myxoid liposarcoma provide excellent local control. Distant metastatic relapse tended to occur in the retroperitoneum and other nonpulmonary soft tissues. Therefore, staging and surveillance imaging should include the abdomen and pelvis, as well as the thorax, for patients with localized myxoid liposarcoma.

  6. A Prospective and Controlled Clinical Trial on Stromal Vascular Fraction Enriched Fat Grafts in Secondary Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tissiani, L. A. L.; Alonso, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fat grafting is a tremendous tool in secondary breast reconstruction. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) enriched fat grafts have been presenting promising results regarding volume maintenance. Methods. We developed a method that produces a superior SVF enrichment rate (2 : 1) in the operating theatre. This prospective and controlled trial analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively fat grafts with (stem cells group, SG) and without (control group, CG) SVF enrichment in secondary breast reconstruction, through MRI-based volumetry, immunophenotyping, and cell counting. Also, patient satisfaction, aesthetic outcomes, and complications were analyzed. Results. Volumetric persistence in the SG was 78,9% and 51,4% in the CG; however it did not reach statistical significant difference. CD90 was the only marker highly expressed in the SG and showed a positive correlation with volumetric persistence (r = 0.651, p = 0.03). Fat necrosis occurred in 4 patients in the SG and in none in the CG. Patients in the CG showed a trend to be more satisfied. Considering aesthetics, both groups presented improvements. No locoregional recurrences were observed. Conclusions. Results are encouraging despite the fact that SVF enrichment in a higher supplementation rate did not improve, with statistical significance, fat graft volumetric persistence. Enriched fat grafts have proven to be safe in a 3-year follow-up. PMID:26962306

  7. A Prospective and Controlled Clinical Trial on Stromal Vascular Fraction Enriched Fat Grafts in Secondary Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tissiani, L A L; Alonso, N

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fat grafting is a tremendous tool in secondary breast reconstruction. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) enriched fat grafts have been presenting promising results regarding volume maintenance. Methods. We developed a method that produces a superior SVF enrichment rate (2 : 1) in the operating theatre. This prospective and controlled trial analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively fat grafts with (stem cells group, SG) and without (control group, CG) SVF enrichment in secondary breast reconstruction, through MRI-based volumetry, immunophenotyping, and cell counting. Also, patient satisfaction, aesthetic outcomes, and complications were analyzed. Results. Volumetric persistence in the SG was 78,9% and 51,4% in the CG; however it did not reach statistical significant difference. CD90 was the only marker highly expressed in the SG and showed a positive correlation with volumetric persistence (r = 0.651, p = 0.03). Fat necrosis occurred in 4 patients in the SG and in none in the CG. Patients in the CG showed a trend to be more satisfied. Considering aesthetics, both groups presented improvements. No locoregional recurrences were observed. Conclusions. Results are encouraging despite the fact that SVF enrichment in a higher supplementation rate did not improve, with statistical significance, fat graft volumetric persistence. Enriched fat grafts have proven to be safe in a 3-year follow-up. PMID:26962306

  8. A Single-Institutional Experience of 15 Years of Treating T3 Laryngeal Cancer With Primary Radiotherapy, With or Without Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Tans, Lisa; Rooij, Peter van; Levendag, Peter C.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcomes, toxicity, quality of life, and voice quality of patients with T3 laryngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy and to identify subgroups of patients in whom the addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy is necessary. Methods and Materials: Between March 1996 and November 2009, 170 consecutive patients with T3 tumor were treated with (chemo)radiotherapy. Endpoints of the study were local control (LC), locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), late toxicity, quality of life, and voice handicap index. Results: After a median follow-up time of 32 months (range, 7-172), the 3-year actuarial rates of LC, LRC, DFS, and OS were 73%, 70%, 64%, and 61%, respectively, and the 5-year figures were 68%, 65%, 60%, and 49%, respectively. At last follow-up, 84 patients (49.5%) were still alive, 65 of them (77.3%) without local progression. Laryngectomy was performed in 16 patients, leaving 49 patients with anatomic organ preservation, corresponding to an actuarial laryngectomy-free survival of 58.3% at 3 years. The figures for patients treated with chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone were 76.8% and 53.5%, respectively (p = 0.001). Chemoradiotherapy was the only significant predictor for LC on multivariate analysis. The overall 5-year cumulative incidence of late Grade {>=}2 toxicity was 28.2%. Chemoradiotherapy, compared with radiotherapy alone, resulted in slight increase in late toxicity and slight deterioration of quality of life and voice-handicap-index scores. However, the differences were statistically not significant. Conclusion: The addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy in T3 laryngeal cancer significantly improved LC and laryngectomy-free survival without statistically significant increases in late toxicity or deterioration of quality of life or voice handicap index.

  9. Rodent Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for rodent control in crop fields, threshing yards, and rural residential areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for rodent control at the national level. Training personnel in rodent control procedures and procedures for educating the public in the necessity for control are covered. (EC)

  10. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma of the stomach: results of a controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Nambo, María Jesús; Neri, Natividad; Talavera, Alejandra; Cleto, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of patients with early stage gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) remains undefined. We began a controlled clinical trial to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of the most common therapies. Two hundred and forty-one patients with gastric low-grade MALT lymphoma in early stage (IE and IIE) were randomized to surgery (80 cases), radiotherapy (78 cases), and chemotherapy (83 cases). With a median follow-up of 7.5 yr, actuarial curves at 10 yr showed that event-free survival was 52% in patients treated with surgery, 52% in radiotherapy arm, and 87% in the chemotherapy group (p < 0.01). However, overall survival did not showed any statistical differences: 80%, 75% and 87%, respectively (p = 0.4). Acute and late toxicities were mild. No death-related treatments were observed. No clear differences were observed between the most common therapies in patients with primary gastric MALT lymphoma in early stages, probably because this type of lymphoma has an high response rate to salvage treatment after failure to local treatment (surgery and radiotherapy). Thus considered, chemotherapy alone is an effective and safe therapeutic approach in this setting of patients. Surgery or radiotherapy will be reserved to patients that are not candidates for chemotherapy. PMID:15750197

  11. Local tumor control after {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy of choroidal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Damato, Bertil . E-mail: Bertil@damato.co.uk; Patel, Imran; Campbell, Ian R.; Mayles, Helen M.; Errington, R. Douglas

    2005-10-01

    Purpose To report on local tumor control after {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy for choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials A total of 458 patients with choroidal melanoma were treated at a single institution between January 1993 and December 2001. The tumors had a median longest basal dimension of 10.6 mm and a median height of 3.2 mm. The brachytherapy was administered using a 15- or 20-mm plaque. For posterior tumors, the plaque was positioned eccentrically with its posterior edge aligned with the posterior tumor margin to reduce the radiation dose to the optic disk and fovea. A minimal scleral dose sufficient to cause visible choroidal atrophy provided a permanent ophthalmoscopic record of the distribution of choroidal irradiation. If radiotherapy to the posterior tumor was uncertain, adjunctive transpupillary thermotherapy was administered 6 months postoperatively. Results The actuarial rates of tumor recurrence were 1%, 2%, and 3% at 2, 5, and 7 years, respectively. Local tumor recurrence correlated with the longest basal tumor dimension (Cox univariate analysis, p = 0.02, risk ratio 1.41, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.88). Seven of the nine eyes with recurrent tumor were salvaged with additional conservative therapy. Conclusion The low rate of local tumor recurrence suggests that ruthenium plaque radiotherapy is effective with good case selection and if special measures are taken to ensure that the plaque is positioned correctly.

  12. Observation of a Dose-Control Relationship for Lung and Liver Tumors After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    McCammon, Robert Schefter, Tracey E.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Zaemisch, Rebekah; Gravdahl, Daniel; Kavanagh, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine prognostic factors for local control of primary or metastatic tumors within the lung or liver treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) within a single institution. Methods and Materials: The records of 141 consecutive patients with 246 lesions treated with three-fraction SBRT from Oct 1999 through Aug 2005 were reviewed. Local control was assessed radiographically. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate the influence of the following factors on local control: total dose, expressed as either nominal prescription dose or equivalent uniform dose (EUD); gross tumor volume; primary site; treatment site (lung vs. other); histologic characteristics (adenocarcinoma vs. other); gender; age; and primary vs. metastatic tumor. Results: On univariate analysis, increased dose (either nominal or EUD) and smaller gross tumor volume were significant predictors of higher local control. Lesions treated to a nominal dose of 54 Gy or greater had a 3-year actuarial local control rate of 89.3% compared with 59.0% and 8.1% for those treated to 36-53.9 Gy and less than 36 Gy. On multivariate analysis, only increased nominal dose and EUD retained statistical significance. Treatment was well tolerated; 5.7% of patients experienced Grade 3 or higher toxicity. Conclusions: This large single-institution series suggests a dose-control relationship within the range of SBRT doses applied. Excellent local control rates are achieved with a nominal dose of 54 Gy or greater, corresponding to an EUD greater than 65.3 Gy. These results support the use of aggressive SBRT regimens when durable tumor control is the primary objective.

  13. Definitive chemoradiation for primary oral cavity carcinoma: A single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Eli D.; Romesser, Paul B.; Chen, Christine; Ho, Felix; Wuu, Yen; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Wong, Richard J.; McBride, Sean; Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives While surgery with or without adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is the standard of care for oral cavity cancer (OCC), a select group requires nonsurgical treatment. We provide a single-institution experience using definitive chemotherapy and RT for primary OCC. Materials and methods We examined 73 patients with previously untreated, non-metastatic primary OCC treated definitively from 1990 to 2011. There were 39 male and 34 female, with a median age of 63 years (range, 35–89). The disease distribution was Stage I and II (7% each), Stage III (14%), and Stage IV (73%). Oral tongue was the most common (48%), followed by floor of mouth (19%), retromolar trigone (13.7%), and others (8.2%). Median tumor dose was 70 Gy. Sixty-two percent of patients (n = 45) were treated with concurrent chemotherapy, predominantly platinum-based. Results Median follow-up among surviving patients was 73.1 months (interquartile range 14.2– 81.4 months). Actuarial 5-year overall survival was 15%. Incidences of locoregional and distant failures were 41.1% and 20.5%, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year rates of locoregional control and freedom from distant metastasis were 37% and 70%, respectively. Mucositis was the most common ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity (49%). Incidences of Grade 3 late dysphagia and trismus were 15% and 13%, respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrates over 20 years of experience using definitive chemoradiation for OCC at our institution. Our results illustrate the challenges in treating patients with advanced disease who are not surgical candidates, and the need for adequate and early treatment to prevent distant disease and improve survival outcomes. PMID:25958830

  14. Propulsion controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkney, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Increased system requirements and functional integration with the aircraft have placed an increased demand on control system capability and reliability. To provide these at an affordable cost and weight and because of the rapid advances in electronic technology, hydromechanical systems are being phased out in favor of digital electronic systems. The transition is expected to be orderly from electronic trimming of hydromechanical controls to full authority digital electronic control. Future propulsion system controls will be highly reliable full authority digital electronic with selected component and circuit redundancy to provide the required safety and reliability. Redundancy may include a complete backup control of a different technology for single engine applications. The propulsion control will be required to communicate rapidly with the various flight and fire control avionics as part of an integrated control concept.

  15. Weight Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... obese. Achieving a healthy weight can help you control your cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. It ... use more calories than you eat. A weight-control strategy might include Choosing low-fat, low-calorie ...

  16. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    SciTech Connect

    Ruetten, Heidi; Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J.; Takes, Robert P.; Knuijt, Simone; Berg, Manon van den; Merkx, Matthias A.; Herpen, Carla M.L. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  17. Restructurable Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, R. J. (Compiler); Howell, W. E. (Compiler); Bundick, W. T. (Compiler); Ostroff, A. J. (Compiler); Hueschen, R. M. (Compiler); Belcastro, C. M. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Restructurable control system theory, robust reconfiguration for high reliability and survivability for advanced aircraft, restructurable controls problem definition and research, experimentation, system identification methods applied to aircraft, a self-repairing digital flight control system, and state-of-the-art theory application are addressed.

  18. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  19. Controlling Fertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnay, France

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in fertility control are presented in relation to the global demographic situation. Discussion focuses on changes in scientific knowledge and concepts that have shifted the focus from birth control to planned parenthood to the notion of controlled fertility. The place of family planning programs, including their socioeconomic…

  20. Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have sex makes sense Talking to your parents about sex Deciding about sex Birth control Types of birth control Could I get pregnant ... not planned. Some young people are afraid their parents will find out they’re having sex. If you get birth control from a doctor, ask about keeping the information ...

  1. Weed control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uncontrolled weeds in pepper can result in the total loss of the crop, or make harvest not economically feasible. Weed control is a major challenge in conventional and organic production systems. Agricultural weed control costs the U.S. economy more than the cost of insect and disease control comb...

  2. Prospective Study of Local Control and Late Radiation Toxicity After Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, David W.; Marvelde, Luc te; Chua, Boon H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the local recurrence rate and late toxicity of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) boost to the tumor bed using the Intrabeam System followed by external-beam whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in women with early-stage breast cancer in a prospective single-institution study. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer ≤3 cm were recruited between February 2003 and May 2005. After breast-conserving surgery, a single dose of 5 Gy IORT boost was delivered using 50-kV x-rays to a depth of 10 mm from the applicator surface. This was followed by WBI to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients were reviewed at regular, predefined intervals. Late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring systems. Results: Fifty-five patients completed both IORT boost and external-beam WBI. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (range, 1.4-4.1 years). There was no reported locoregional recurrence or death. One patient developed distant metastases. Grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis was detected in 29 (53%) and 8 patients (15%), respectively. Conclusions: The use of IORT as a tumor bed boost using kV x-rays in breast-conserving therapy was associated with good local control but a clinically significant rate of grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis.

  3. Intravenous amifostine during chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: A randomized placebo-controlled phase III study

    SciTech Connect

    Buentzel, Jens . E-mail: jens.buentzel@shk-ndh.de; Micke, Oliver; Adamietz, Irenaus A.; Monnier, Alain; Glatzel, Michael; Vries, Alexander de

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials demonstrated the efficacy and safety of intravenous (i.v.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine for reducing xerostomia and mucositis after radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III study evaluated the efficacy and safety of i.v. amifostine during radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients from European and American study centers received i.v. amifostine 300 mg/m{sup 2} (n = 67) or placebo (n = 65) before carboplatin 70 mg/m{sup 2} and radiotherapy on Days 1 to 5 and 21 to 25, and i.v. amifostine 200 mg/m{sup 2} or placebo before radiotherapy on other days. Results: Toxicity incidences were (amifostine, placebo, p value): Grade 2 or higher acute xerostomia (39%, 34%, 0.715), Grade 3 or higher acute mucositis (39%, 22%, 0.055), Grade 2 or higher late xerostomia (37%, 24%, 0.235), and Grade 3 or higher treatment-related adverse events (42%, 20%, 0.008). One-year rates of locoregional failure, progression-free survival, and overall survival were not significantly different between treatments. Conclusions: The used amifostine doses were not able to reduce the toxicity of simultaneous radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. The safety of amifostine and the lack of tumor protection were consistent with previous studies.

  4. Voltage Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Power Efficiency Corporation, specifically formed to manufacture and develop products from NASA technology, has a license to a three-phase power factor controller originally developed by Frank Nola, an engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center. Power Efficiency and two major distributors, Performance Control and Edison Power Technologies, use the electronic control boards to assemble three different motor controllers: Power Commander, Performance Controller, and Energy Master. The company Power Factor Controller reduces excessive energy waste in AC induction motors. It is used in industries and applications where motors operate under variable loads, including elevators and escalators, machine tools, intake and exhaust fans, oil wells, conveyors, pumps, die casting, and compressors. Customer lists include companies such as May Department Stores, Caesars Atlantic City, Ford Motors, and American Axle.

  5. Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Real-Time Innovations, Inc. (RTI) collaborated with Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Stanford University to leverage NASA research to produce ControlShell software. RTI is the first "graduate" of Ames Research Center's Technology Commercialization Center. The ControlShell system was used extensively on a cooperative project to enhance the capabilities of a Russian-built Marsokhod rover being evaluated for eventual flight to Mars. RTI's ControlShell is complex, real-time command and control software, capable of processing information and controlling mechanical devices. One ControlShell tool is StethoScope. As a real-time data collection and display tool, StethoScope allows a user to see how a program is running without changing its execution. RTI has successfully applied its software savvy in other arenas, such as telecommunications, networking, video editing, semiconductor manufacturing, automobile systems, and medical imaging.

  6. Combined postoperative radiotherapy and weekly cisplatin infusion for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: Preliminary report of a randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bachaud, J.M.; David, J.M.; Boussin, G.; Daly, N. )

    1991-02-01

    A prospective clinical trial was designed to evaluate efficacy, toxicity, and patient compliance of concomitant postoperative radiotherapy and Cisplatin infusion in patients with Stage III or IV S.C.C. of the head and neck and histological evidence of extra-capsular spread of tumor in lymph node metastase(s). Cisplatin 50 mg IV with forced hydration was given or not every week (i.e., 7 to 9 cycles) concurrently with radiotherapy. Between 1984 and 1988, 83 patients were randomized: 44 were treated by irradiation without chemotherapy (RT group) and 39 by the combined modality (CM group). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of patient characteristics, primary sites, tumor differentiation, T.N. stages, or postoperative prognostic factors. All patients completed the planned radiotherapy. There were seven severe toxicities (greater than grade 3) in the RT group. In the CM group, 30 severe toxicities occurred in 16/39 (41%) patients but none was life-threatening. Seven of 39 (18%) patients received less than two-thirds of the scheduled Cisplatin courses because of intolerance, mainly nausea and vomiting. Preliminary results show a better disease-free survival for the CM group (65% at 24 months) than for the RT group (41% at 24 months). This significant difference is largely due to increased loco-regional control in the CM group (79% vs 59%), the actuarial distant metastasis rates in patients controlled above the clavicles not being statistically different in the two groups.

  7. Attitude Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to ITHACO, Inc. satisfied a Goddard Space Flight Center demand for a low cost altitude control system for small spacecraft. The SBIR-sponsored work resulted in the T-Wheel, built specifically for altitude control of small and medium-sized spacecraft. Another product, the T-SCANWHEEL, reduces overall system cost, minimizes mass and power and enhances reliability with a mixture of altitude control and control capacity. Additionally, the Type E Wheel is built for use on medium to large spacecraft. Through July 1996, ITHACO had delivered or was under contract for 95 T-Wheel, T-SCANWHEEL, and Type E Wheel units.

  8. Multiple levels paravertebral block versus morphine patient-controlled analgesia for postoperative analgesia following breast cancer surgery with unilateral lumpectomy, and axillary lymph nodes dissection

    PubMed Central

    Fallatah, Summayah; Mousa, WF

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain after breast cancer surgery is not uncommon. Narcotic based analgesia is commonly used for postoperative pain management. However, the side-effects and complications of systemic narcotics is a significant disadvantage. Different locoregional anesthetic techniques have been tried including, single and multiple levels paravertebral block (PVB), which seems to have a significant reduction in immediate postoperative pain with fewer side-effects. The aim of this study was to compare unilateral multiple level PVB versus morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for pain relief after breast cancer surgery with unilateral lumpectomy and axillary lymph nodes dissection. Materials and Methods: Forty patients scheduled for breast cancer surgery were randomized to receive either preoperative unilateral multiple injections PVB at five thoracic dermatomes (group P, 20 patients) or postoperative intravenous PCA with morphine (group M, 20 patients) for postoperative pain control. Numerical pain scale, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, Time to first analgesic demand, 24-h morphine consumption side-effects and length of hospital stay were recorded. Results: PVB resulted in a significantly more postoperative analgesia, maintained hemodynamic, more significant reduction in nausea and vomiting, and shorter hospital stay compared with PCA patients. Conclusion: Multiple levels PVB is an effective regional anesthetic technique for postoperative pain management, it provides superior analgesia with less narcotics consumption, and fewer side-effects compared with PCA morphine for patients with breast cancer who undergo unilateral lumpectomy, with axillary lymph nodes dissection. PMID:26955304

  9. Short-Term Displacement and Reproducibility of the Breast and Nodal Targets Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Jean M. . E-mail: jmmoran@med.umich.edu; Balter, James M.; Ben-David, Merav A.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Herk, Marcel van; Pierce, Lori J.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The short-term displacement and reproducibility of the breast or chest wall, and the internal mammary (IM), infraclavicular (ICV), and supraclavicular (SCV) nodal regions have been assessed as a function of breath-hold state using an active breathing control (ABC) device for patients receiving loco-regional breast radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients underwent computed tomographic scanning using an ABC device at breath-hold states of end-exhale and 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% of vital capacity (VC). Patients underwent scanning before treatment and at one third and two thirds of the way through treatment. A regional registration was performed for each target using a rigid-body transformation with mutual information as a metric. Results: Between exhale and 40% of VC, the mean displacement was 0.27/0.34, 0.24/0.31, 0.22/0.19, and 0.13/0.19 cm anterior/superior for the breast or chest wall, and IM, ICV, and SCV nodes, respectively. At 80% of VC, the mean displacement from exhale was 0.84/.88, 0.76/.79, 0.70/0.79, and 0.54/0.56 cm anterior/superior for the breast or chest wall, and IM, ICV, and SCV nodes, respectively. The short-term reproducibility (standard deviation) was <0.3 and {<=}0.4 cm for 40% and 80% of VC, respectively. Displacements up to 1.9 cm were observed for individual patients. Conclusions: The short-term reproducibility of target position is {<=}0.4 cm using ABC for all structures for all breath-hold states. This information can be used to guide treatment planning optimization studies that consider the effect of motion on target and normal tissue doses with and without active breathing control.

  10. Oncologic Safety of Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Invasive Breast Cancer Patients: A Matched Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hoo; Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Han-Byoel; Jin, Ung Sik; Chang, Hak; Minn, Kyung Won; Noh, Dong-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) between patients undergoing mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) and those undergoing mastectomy alone. Methods A retrospective review of patients who underwent mastectomy and immediate breast reconstruction for resectable invasive breast cancer between 2002 and 2010 at a single center was conducted. These cases were matched to patients who underwent mastectomy alone in the same time period, performed by 1:2 matching. Matching control variables included age, tumor size, axillary lymph node metastasis, and estrogen receptor status. Overall, 189 patients were identified in the IBR group, and 362 patients were matched to this group. Results In the IBR group, 75 patients (39.7%) underwent conventional total mastectomy, 78 (41.3%) underwent skin-sparing mastectomy (SSM), and 36 (19.0%) underwent nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM). The IBR group was significantly younger than the control group (41.9 and 45.1 years, respectively) (p=0.032), in spite of matching between three age groups. The DFS rates were similar between the IBR group and mastectomy alone group, at 92.0% and 89.9%, respectively, at 5-year follow-up (log-rank test, p=0.496). The 5-year LRFS was 96.2% in the IBR group and 96.4% in the mastectomy alone group (log-rank test, p=0.704), similar to data from previous reports. Subgroup analyses for SSM or NSM patients showed no differences in LRFS and DFS between the two groups. Additionally, in stage III patients, IBR did not cause an increase in recurrence. Conclusion IBR after mastectomy, including both SSM and NSM, had no negative impact on recurrence or patient survival, even in patients with advanced disease. PMID:27064557

  11. Environmental Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneiderman, Helen, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental control units, or ECUs, are devices or systems which allow for alternate access to electronic or electrical devices and those objects, like draperies and doors, which may be adapted for use with electricity. Such devices offer the person with a mobility limitation the opportunity to control his or her environment, thus enhancing the…

  12. Control Charts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Michael; Gluschke, Michael

    Control Charts may be the most powerful tool to demonstrate and to assure quality in chemical measurements. Therefore they are widely used in all kinds of laboratories and it is hard to imagine quality management systems in laboratories without control charts.

  13. Control Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toso, Robert B.

    2000-01-01

    Inspired by William Glasser's Reality Therapy ideas, Control Theory (CT) is a disciplinary approach that stresses people's ability to control only their own behavior, based on internal motivations to satisfy five basic needs. At one North Dakota high school, CT-trained teachers are the program's best recruiters. (MLH)

  14. Power Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The power factor controller (PFC) senses shifts in the relationship between voltage and current, and matches them with a motor's need. This prevents waste as motors do not need a high voltage when they are not operating at full load conditions. PFC is manufactured by Nordic Controls Company, among others, and has proved extremely cost effective.

  15. Pressure Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    EPIC is Electronic Pressure Indicating Controller produced by North American Manufacturing Company. It is a high-sensitivity device for improving combustion efficiency in industrial furnaces that interprets a signal from a pressure transducer on a furnace and regulates furnace pressure accordingly. A controller can provide savings of from five to 25 percent of an industrial user's annual furnace fuel bill.

  16. Contamination control

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, L.C.

    1983-11-01

    An evaluation showed that fluoropolymer plastic squeeze bottles can replace polyethylene bottles when used for in-process cleaning. Fluoropolymer plastic squeeze bottles do not contaminate solvents stored in the bottles as polyethylene bottles do. In addition, a limited survey of industrial practices regarding aerosol spray container control showed containers are being controlled without inconveniencing production.

  17. Controller for thermostatically controlled loads

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Du, Pengwei; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2016-06-07

    A system and method of controlling aggregated thermostatically controlled appliances (TCAs) for demand response is disclosed. A targeted load profile is formulated and a forecasted load profile is generated. The TCAs within an "on" or "off" control group are prioritized based on their operating temperatures. The "on" or "off" status of the TCAs is determined. Command signals are sent to turn on or turn off the TCAs.

  18. Controlling chimeras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bick, Christian; Martens, Erik A.

    2015-03-01

    Coupled phase oscillators model a variety of dynamical phenomena in nature and technological applications. Non-local coupling gives rise to chimera states which are characterized by a distinct part of phase-synchronized oscillators while the remaining ones move incoherently. Here, we apply the idea of control to chimera states: using gradient dynamics to exploit drift of a chimera, it will attain any desired target position. Through control, chimera states become functionally relevant; for example, the controlled position of localized synchrony may encode information and perform computations. Since functional aspects are crucial in (neuro-)biology and technology, the localized synchronization of a chimera state becomes accessible to develop novel applications. Based on gradient dynamics, our control strategy applies to any suitable observable and can be generalized to arbitrary dimensions. Thus, the applicability of chimera control goes beyond chimera states in non-locally coupled systems.

  19. Under Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Rich

    2001-01-01

    Offers advice on how school administrators can properly plan and monitor school construction projects to contain costs. Cost control tips discussed include project scope definition, contract bidding and awarding practice, and project management techniques. (GR)

  20. CONTROL ROD

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.; Ross, H.V.

    1958-11-18

    A control rod is described for a nuclear reactor. In certaln reactor designs it becomes desirable to use a control rod having great width but relatively llttle thickness. This patent is addressed to such a need. The neutron absorbing material is inserted in a triangular tube, leaving volds between the circular insert and the corners of the triangular tube. The material is positioned within the tube by the use of dummy spacers to achleve the desired absorption pattern, then the ends of the tubes are sealed with suitable plugs. The tubes may be welded or soldered together to form two flat surfaces of any desired width, and covered with sheetmetal to protect the tubes from damage. This design provides a control member that will not distort under the action of outside forces or be ruptured by gases generated within the jacketed control member.

  1. Infection Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... lost because of the spread of infections in hospitals. Health care workers can take steps to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. These steps are part of infection control. Proper hand washing is the most effective way ...

  2. Drug Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  3. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  4. Fuel control

    SciTech Connect

    Charrier, M.G.

    1986-08-19

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine control which responds to a compressor discharge pressure (CDP) and a compressor bleed pressure (CBP). The improvement described here consists of: (a) sensing means for sensing whether the aircraft is on the ground and (b) means coupled to the sensing means for artificially increasing the ratio of CBP/CDP which is sensed by the control, during engine startup, while the aircraft is on the ground.

  5. Postmastectomy radiotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meattini, Icro; Cecchini, Sara; Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Saieva, Calogero; Francolini, Giulio; Scotti, Vieri; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mangoni, Monica; Greto, Daniela; Nori, Jacopo; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato; Simoncini, Roberta; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC) treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6%) underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4%) did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (range 2-16) for the whole cohort, median time to locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 3.3 years (range 0.7-12.4). The 5-year and 10-year actuarial LRR rate were 14.5% and 15.9%, respectively. At the multivariate analysis the factors that significantly correlated with survival outcome were ≥ 4 positive nodes (HR 5.0, 1.51-16.52; P = 0.035), extracapsular extension (HR 2.18, 1.37-3.46; P = 0.009), and estrogen receptor positive disease (HR 0.57, 0.36-0.90; P = 0.003). Concerning LRR according to use of radiation, PMRT reduced LRR for patient with clinical T3 staged disease (P = 0.015). Our experience confirmed the impact of pathological nodal involvement on survival outcome. PMRT was found to improve local control in patients presenting with clinical T3 tumors, regardless of the response to chemotherapy. PMID:25045694

  6. Clinical outcome in patients treated with simultaneous integrated boost - intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) with and without concurrent chemotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    PubMed

    Tomasoa, Nathalie B; Meulendijks, Didier; Nijkamp, Jasper; Cats, Annemieke; Dewit, Luc

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose To retrospectively evaluate locoregional control (LRC), survival and toxicity in anal cancer patients treated with simultaneous integrated boost - intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) ± concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and materials Patients with squamous cell anal carcinoma stage T1(≥1 cm)-4, N0-3, M0-1 were included. All patients were treated with SIB-IMRT to a total dose of 59.4 Gy delivered to the primary tumor and macroscopically involved lymph nodes and 49.5 Gy to elective lymph node areas. If macroscopic residual tumor was still present in the fifth week of irradiation, a sequential boost of 5.4 Gy was given. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered in locally advanced cases. Acute and late toxicity were scored. Results One hundred and six patients treated consecutively between April 2006 and December 2012 were included. Eighty-seven (82.1%) patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 47 months (range 2-104 months). Ninety-eight patients reached a clinical complete response (92.5%). Four-year actuarial LRC rate, overall survival and colostomy-free survival were 79%, 77% and 77%, respectively. Acute grade ≥3 toxicity occurred in 67.9% of the patients. Late grade 3 toxicity was seen in 16 patients (15.1%). Conclusions SIB-IMRT ± concurrent chemotherapy for anal cancer was effective with acceptable toxicity. PMID:26878244

  7. Treatment outcome of postoperative radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jin; Kwon, Tae-Won; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Song-Cheol; Han, Duck-Jong; Kim, Choung-Soo; Ahn, Hanjong; Chang, Heung Moon; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Jwa, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; Shin, Seong Soo; Ahn, Seung Do

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the treatment outcome and prognostic factor after postoperative radiotherapy in retroperitoneal sarcoma. Materials and Methods Forty patients were treated with surgical resection and postoperative radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcoma from August 1990 to August 2008. Treatment volume was judged by the location of initial tumor and surgical field, and 45-50 Gy of radiation was basically delivered and additional dose was considered to the high-risk area. Results The median follow-up period was 41.4 months (range, 3.9 to 140.6 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) was 51.8% and disease free survival was 31.5%. The 5-year locoregional recurrence free survival was 61.9% and distant metastasis free survival was 50.6%. In univariate analysis, histologic type (p = 0.006) was the strongest prognostic factor for the OS and histologic grade (p = 0.044) or resection margin (p = 0.032) had also effect on the OS. Histologic type (p = 0.004) was unique significant prognostic factor for the actuarial local control. Conclusion Retroperitoneal sarcoma still remains as a poor prognostic disease despite the combined modality treatment including surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Selective dose-escalation of radiotherapy or combination of effective chemotherapeutic agent must be considered to improve the treatment result especially for the histopathologic type showing poor prognosis. PMID:22984679

  8. Whole pelvic helical tomotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: technical implementation of IMRT with helical tomothearapy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background To review the experience and to evaluate the treatment plan of using helical tomotherapy (HT) for the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods Between November 1st, 2006 and May 31, 2009, 10 cervical cancer patients histologically confirmed were enrolled. All of the patients received definitive concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) with whole pelvic HT (WPHT) followed by brachytherapy. During WPHT, all patients were treated with cisplatin, 40 mg/m2 intravenously weekly. Toxicity of treatment was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 (CTCAE v3.0). Results The mean survival was 25 months (range, 3 to 27 months). The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control and distant metastasis-free rates at 2 years were 67%, 77%, 90% and 88%, respectively. The average of uniformity index and conformal index was 1.06 and 1.19, respectively. One grade 3 of acute toxicity for diarrhea, thrombocytopenia and three grade 3 leucopenia were noted during CCRT. Only one grade 3 of subacute toxicity for thrombocytopenia was noted. There were no grade 3 or 4 subacute toxicities of anemia, leucopenia, genitourinary or gastrointestinal effects. Compared with conventional whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT), WPHT decreases the mean dose to rectum, bladder and intestines successfully. Conclusion HT provides feasible clinical outcomes in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. Long-term follow-up and enroll more locally advanced cervical carcinoma patients by limiting bone marrow radiation dose with WPHT technique is warranted. PMID:20003321

  9. Preliminary Experience in Treatment of Papillary and Macular Retinoblastoma: Evaluation of Local Control and Local Complications After Treatment With Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiotherapy With Micromultileaf Collimator as Second-Line or Salvage Treatment After Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pica, Alessia; Moeckli, Raphael; Balmer, Aubin; Beck-Popovic, Maja; Chollet-Rivier, Madeleine; Do, Huu-Phuoc; Weber, Damien C.; Munier, Francis L.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the local control and complication rates for children with papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma progressing after chemotherapy and undergoing stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with a micromultileaf collimator. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2008, 11 children (15 eyes) with macular and/or papillary retinoblastoma were treated with SRT. The mean age was 19 months (range, 2-111). Of the 15 eyes, 7, 6, and 2 were classified as International Classification of Intraocular Retinoblastoma Group B, C, and E, respectively. The delivered dose of SRT was 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions using a dedicated micromultileaf collimator linear accelerator. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months (range, 13-39). Local control was achieved in 13 eyes (87%). The actuarial 1- and 2-year local control rates were both 82%. SRT was well tolerated. Late adverse events were reported in 4 patients. Of the 4 patients, 2 had developed focal microangiopathy 20 months after SRT; 1 had developed a transient recurrence of retinal detachment; and 1 had developed bilateral cataracts. No optic neuropathy was observed. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SRT for papillary and/or macular retinoblastoma in children resulted in excellent tumor control rates with acceptable toxicity. Additional research regarding SRT and its intrinsic organ-at-risk sparing capability is justified in the framework of prospective trials.

  10. Radiation Therapy for Control of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas Resected With Positive Margins

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaney, Thomas F. . E-mail: tdelaney@partners.org; Kepka, Lucyna; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Gebhardt, Mark C.; Yoon, Sam S.; Springfield, Dempsey S.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Harmon, David C.; Kirsch, David G.; Mankin, Henry J.; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Nielsen, G. Petur; Suit, Herman D.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Positive margins (PM) remain after surgery in some soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients. We investigated the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) in STS patients with PM. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was performed on 154 patients with STS at various anatomic sites with PM, defined as tumor on ink, who underwent RT with curative intent between 1970 and 2001. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were evaluated by univariate (log-rank) and multivariate analysis of prognostic and treatment factors. Results: At 5 years, actuarial LC, DFS, and OS rates were: 76%, 46.7%, and 65.2%, respectively. LC was highest with extremity lesions (p < 0.01), radiation dose >64 Gy (p < 0.05), microscopically (vs. grossly visible) positive margin (p = 0.03), and superficial lesions (p = 0.05). Patients receiving >64 Gy had higher 5-year LC, DFS, and OS rates of 85%, 52.1%, and 67.8% vs. 66.1%, 41.8%, and 62.9% if {<=}64 Gy, p < 0.04. OS was worse in patients with G2/G3 tumors with local failure (LF), p < 0.001. Other known prognostic factors, including grade, stage, size, and age (>50), also significantly influenced OS. By multivariate analysis, the best predictors of LC were site (extremity vs. other), p < 0.01 and dose (>64 vs. {<=}64 Gy), p < 0.05; the best predictors for OS were size, p < 0.001, gross vs. microscopic PM, p < 0.05, and LF, p < 0.01. Conclusion: Local control is achieved in most PM STS patients undergoing RT. Doses >64 Gy, superficial location, and extremity site are associated with improved LC. OS is worse in patients with tumors with lesions >5 cm, grossly positive margins, and after local failure.

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Patterns of Failure and Predictors of Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Kozak, Margaret M.; Maxim, Peter G.; Murphy, James D.; Hsu, Annie; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Few studies have evaluated the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity (OC). We report clinical outcomes and failure patterns for these patients. Methods and Materials: Between October 2002 and June 2009, 37 patients with newly diagnosed SCC of the OC underwent postoperative (30) or definitive (7) IMRT. Twenty-five patients (66%) received systemic therapy. The median follow-up was 38 months (range, 10-87 months). The median interval from surgery to RT was 5.9 weeks (range, 2.1-10.7 weeks). Results: Thirteen patients experienced local-regional failure at a median of 8.1 months (range, 2.4-31.9 months), and 2 additional patients experienced local recurrence between surgery and RT. Seven local failures occurred in-field (one with simultaneous nodal and distant disease) and two at the margin. Four regional failures occurred, two in-field and two out-of-field, one with synchronous metastases. Six patients experienced distant failure. The 3-year actuarial estimates of local control, local-regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival were 67%, 53%, 81%, and 60% among postoperative patients, respectively, and 60%, 60%, 71%, and 57% among definitive patients. Four patients developed Grade {>=}2 chronic toxicity. Increased surgery to RT interval predicted for decreased LRC (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Local-regional control for SCC of the OC treated with IMRT with or without surgery remains unsatisfactory. Definitive and postoperative IMRT have favorable toxicity profiles. A surgery-to-RT interval of <6 weeks improves local-regional control. The predominant failure pattern was local, suggesting that both improvements in target delineation and radiosensitization and/or dose escalation are needed.

  12. Controlled release of nitric oxide chemotherapy using a nano-sized biodegradable multi-arm polymer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shaofeng; Cai, Shuang; Yang, Qiuhong; Forrest, M. Laird

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a cell signaling molecule that can be a potent inducer of cell death in cancers at elevated concentrations. Nitric oxide molecules are short-lived in vivo; therefore, NO-donating prodrugs have been developed that can deliver NO to tissues at micromolar concentrations. However, NO is also toxic to normal tissues and chronic exposure at low levels can induce tumor growth. We have designed a polymeric carrier system to deliver nitric oxide locoregionally to tumorigenic tissues. A highly water solubility and biodegradable 4-arm polymer nanocarrier, sugar poly-(6-O-methacryloyl-D-galactose), was synthesized using MADIX/RAFT polymerization, and utilized to deliver high concentrations of nitric oxide to xenografts of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The in vitro release of the newly synthesized nitric oxide donor, O2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[4-(2-hydroxy)ethyl]-3-methylpiperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate and its corresponding multi-arm polymer-based nanoconjugate demonstrated a 1- and 2.3-fold increase in half-life, respectively, compared to the release half-life of the nitric oxide -donor prodrug JS-K. When administered to tumor-bearing nude mice, the subcutaneously injected multi-arm polymer nitric oxide nanoparticles resulted in 50% tumor inhibition and a 7-week extension of the average survival time, compared to intravenous JS-K therapy (nitric oxide nanoparticles: CR=25%, PR=37.5%, PD=37.5%; JS-K: PD=100%). In summary, we have developed an effective nitric oxide anti-cancer chemotherapy that could be administered regionally to provide the local disease control, improving prognosis for head and neck cancers. PMID:22281420

  13. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  14. COPD - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  15. Controlling Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelehear, Zach

    2004-01-01

    Stress occurs among all groups in a school community and can affect morale, performance, and leadership ability. This article discusses how educators must deal with and control stress. Principals must address their own stress to create a healthy school culture. Moreover, the author presents two survival strategies that can provide support and…

  16. Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... your health, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners and desire to have children in the future. Your health care provider can help you select the best form of birth control for you. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  17. Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Kollmorgen Corporation's Mermaid II two person submersible is propeller-driven by a system of five DC brushless motors with new electronic controllers that originated in work performed in a NASA/DOE project managed by Lewis Research Center. A key feature of the system is electric commutation rather than mechanical commutation for converting AC current to DC.

  18. Controlling chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, E.; Spano, M.

    1996-06-01

    The orbital complexity and exponential sensitivity of chaotic systems has the consequence that such systems offer the possibility of being feedback controlled by use of only small perturbations. The potential consequences of this recent realization are being investigated in a broad range of applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Controlling turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  20. High-dose radiation improved local tumor control and overall survival in patients with inoperable/unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer: Long-term results of a radiation dose escalation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, F.-M. . E-mail: Fengkong@med.umich.edu; Haken, Randall K. ten; Schipper, Matthew J.; Sullivan, Molly A.; Chen, Ming; Lopez, Carlos; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Hayman, James A.

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To determine whether high-dose radiation leads to improved outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: This analysis included 106 patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent Stages I-III NSCLC, treated with 63-103 Gy in 2.1-Gy fractions, using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) per a dose escalation trial. Targets included the primary tumor and any lymph nodes {>=}1 cm, without intentionally including negative nodal regions. Nineteen percent of patients (20/106) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Patient, tumor, and treatment factors were evaluated for association with outcomes. Estimated median follow-up was 8.5 years. Results: Median survival was 19 months, and 5-year overall survival (OS) was 13%. Multivariate analysis revealed weight loss (p = 0.011) and radiation dose (p = 0.0006) were significant predictors for OS. The 5-year OS was 4%, 22%, and 28% for patients receiving 63-69, 74-84, and 92-103 Gy, respectively. Although presence of nodal disease was negatively associated with locoregional control under univariate analysis, radiation dose was the only significant predictor when multiple variables were included (p = 0.015). The 5-year control rate was 12%, 35%, and 49% for 63-69, 74-84, and 92-103 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Higher dose radiation is associated with improved outcomes in patients with NSCLC treated in the range of 63-103 Gy.

  1. Autonomous control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    KSC has been developing the Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE), which is a tool for performing automated monitoring, diagnosis, and control of electromechanical devices. KATE employs artificial intelligence computing techniques to perform these functions. The KATE system consists of a generic shell and a knowledge base. The KATE shell is the portion of the system which performs the monitoring, diagnosis, and control functions. It is generic in the sense that it is application independent. This means that the monitoring activity, for instance, will be performed with the same algorithms regardless of the particular physical device being used. The knowledge base is the portion of the system which contains specific functional and behavorial information about the physical device KATE is working with. Work is nearing completion on a project at KSC to interface a Texas Instruments Explorer running a LISP version of KATE with a Generic Checkout System (GCS) test-bed to control a physical simulation of a shuttle tanking system (humorously called the Red Wagon because of its color and mobility). The Autonomous Control System (ACS) project supplements and extends the KATE/GCS project by adding three other major activities. The activities include: porting KATE from the Texas Instruments Explorer machine to an Intel 80386-based UNIX workstation in the LISP language; rewriting KATE as necessary to run on the same 80386 workstation but in the Ada language; and investigating software and techniques to translate ANSI Standard Common LISP to Mil Standard Ada. Primary goals of this task are as follows: (1) establish the advantages of using expert systems to provide intelligent autonomous software for Space Station Freedom applications; (2) determine the feasibility of using Ada as the run-time environment for model-based expert systems; (3) provide insight into the advantages and disadvantagesof using LISP or Ada in the run-time environment for expert systems; and (4

  2. Predictors of Local Control After Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, Carlo; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Lovelock, Michael; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Zatcky, Joan; Kim, Balem; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To report tumor local control after treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) to extracranial metastatic sites. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 metastases in 103 patients were treated with SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18-24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) between 2004 and 2007. Results: The overall actuarial local relapse-free survival (LRFS) rate was 64% at a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 2-45 months). The median time to failure was 9.6 months (range, 1-23 months). On univariate analysis, LRFS was significantly correlated with prescription dose (p = 0.029). Stratification by dose into high (23 to 24 Gy), intermediate (21 to 22 Gy), and low (18 to 20 Gy) dose levels revealed highly significant differences in LRFS between high (82%) and low doses (25%) (p < 0.0001). Overall, histology had no significant effect on LRFS (p = 0.16). Renal cell histology displayed a profound dose-response effect, with 80% LRFS at the high dose level (23 to 24 Gy) vs. 37% with low doses ({<=}22 Gy) (p = 0.04). However, for patients who received the high dose level, histology was not a statistically significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.90). Target organ (bone vs. lymph node vs. soft tissues) (p = 0.5) and planning target volume size (p = 0.55) were not found to be associated with long-term LRFS probability. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed prescription dose to be a significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: High-dose SD-IGRT is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control. Single-dose IGRT may be effectively used to locally control metastatic deposits regardless of histology and target organ, provided sufficiently high doses (> 22 Gy) of radiation are delivered.

  3. Glucose control.

    PubMed

    Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Stress-related hyperglycemia is a common finding in acutely ill patients, and is related to the severity and outcome of the critical illness. The pathophysiology of stress hyperglycemia includes hormonal and neural signals, leading to increased production of glucose by the liver and peripheral insulin resistance mediated by the translocation of transmembrane glucose transporters. In one pioneering study, tight glycemic control by intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients was associated with improved survival. However, this major finding was not confirmed in several other prospective randomized controlled trials. The reasons underlying the discrepancy between the first and the subsequent studies could include nutritional strategy (amount of calories provided, use of parenteral nutrition), case-mix, potential differences in the optimal blood glucose level (BG) in different types of patients, hypoglycemia and its correction, and the magnitude of glucose variability. Therefore, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of glycemic regulation during acute illness is needed. Safe and effective glucose control will need improvement in the definition of optimal BG and in the measurement techniques, perhaps including continuous monitoring of insulin algorithms and closed-loop systems. PMID:23075589

  4. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Ruano, W.J.

    1957-12-10

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

  5. Tumor Control Outcomes After Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report tumor local progression-free outcomes after treatment with single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2010, 105 lesions from renal cell carcinoma were treated with either single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a prescription dose of 18-24 Gy (median, 24) or hypofractionation (three or five fractions) with a prescription dose of 20-30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1-48). Results: The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year local progression-free survival for those who received a high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), a low single-dose (<24 Gy; n = 14), or hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) was 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose vs. low single dose, p = .001; high single dose vs. hypofractionation, p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables were significant predictors of improved local progression-free survival: 24 Gy dose compared with a lower dose (p = .009) and a single dose vs. hypofractionation (p = .008). Conclusion: High single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancer generally considered radioresistant according to the classic radiobiologic ranking.

  6. Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    M.H. Marks Enterprises' Power Factor Controller (PFC) matches voltage with motor's actual need. Plugged into a motor, PFC continuously determines motor load by sensing shifts between voltage and current flow. When it senses a light load, it cuts voltage to the minimum needed. It offers potential energy savings ranging from eight percent up to 65 percent depending on the application. Myles Marks started out with the notion of writing an article for Popular Electronics magazine at the same time offering to furnish kits to readers interested in assembling PFC's. Within two weeks from publication he had orders for 500 kits and orders are still coming three years later.

  7. Signature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyati, Vittal P.

    The reduction of vehicle radar signature is accomplished by means of vehicle shaping, the use of microwave frequencies-absorbent materials, and either passive or active cancellation techniques; such techniques are also useful in the reduction of propulsion system-associated IR emissions. In some anticipated scenarios, the objective is not signature-reduction but signature control, for deception, via decoy vehicles that mimic the signature characteristics of actual weapons systems. As the stealthiness of airframes and missiles increases, their propulsion systems' exhaust plumes assume a more important role in detection by an adversary.

  8. Light Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Artificial lighting is designed to provide the light intensity necessary if there were no other source of illumination. But many rooms, particularly those in large-windowed office buildings, get a substantial amount of sunlight during the day. An automatic system which considers available sunlight and adjusts the artificial lighting level accordingly can trim energy costs appreciably. Such a system was developed by NASA's Kennedy Space Center. International Technology Corporation, Satellite Beach, Florida, obtained a NASA patent license for the technology, refined the design, and is now producing commercially an improved version known as the Automatic Lighting Controller.

  9. Actuarial risk of isolated CNS involvement in Ewing's sarcoma following prophylactic cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Trigg, M.E.; Makuch, R.; Glaubiger, D.

    1985-04-01

    Records of 154 patients with Ewing's sarcoma treated at the National Cancer Institute were reviewed to assess the incidence and risk of developing isolated central nervous system (CNS) Ewing's sarcoma. Sixty-two of the 154 patients had received CNS irradiation and intrathecal (i.t.) methotrexate as part of their initial therapy to prevent the occurrence of isolated CNS Ewing's sarcoma. The risk of developing isolate CNS Ewing's sarcoma was greatest within the first two years after diagnosis and was approximately 10%. The overall risk of CNS recurrence in the group of patients receiving DNS treatment was similar to the group receiving no therapy directed to the CNS. The occurrence of isolated CNS involvement was not prevented by the use of CNS irradiation and i.t. methotrexate. Because of a lack of efficacy to the CNS irradiation regimen, current treatment regimens do not include therapy directed to CNS.

  10. An Actuarial Model for Assessment of Prison Violence Risk Among Maximum Security Inmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Mark D.; Sorensen, Jon R.; Reidy, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental scale for the assessment of prison violence risk among maximum security inmates was developed from a logistic regression analysis involving inmates serving parole-eligible terms of varying length (n = 1,503), life-without-parole inmates (n = 960), and death-sentenced inmates who were mainstreamed into the general prison population…

  11. Actuarial Assessment of Wechsler Verbal-Performance Scale Differences as Signs of Lateralized Cerebral Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leli, Dano A.; Filskov, Susan B.

    1981-01-01

    The long-standing clinical lore which holds that a discrepancy between Wechsler-Bellevue Verbal-Performance Scale weighted scores is a more sensitive sign of lateralized brain damage than a discrepancy between Verbal-Performance Scale IQ is investigated. The results do not support the clinical lore. (Author/AL)

  12. Actuarial assessment of future loss scenarios in the German insurance sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubik, A.; Boehm, U.; Born, K.; Broecker, U.; Buechner, M.; Burghoff, O.; Donat, M.; Gerstengarbe, F. W.; Hattermann, F. F.; Held, H.; Kuecken, M.; Leckebusch, G. C.; Ludwig, P.; Nocke, T.; Oesterle, H.; Pardowitz, T.; Pinto, J. G.; Prahl, B. F.; Ulbrich, U.; Werner, P. C.

    2012-04-01

    The German Insurance Association (GDV) analyzed the impacts of climate change for the German insurance market. The work was conducted in cooperation with Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Freie Universität Berlin and University of Cologne. Different approaches and data sets were used to analyze the impacts of winter storm, hail and floods. High-resolution loss records to residential buildings in Germany were provided. These daily records are available on a fine spatial level of administrative districts from 1997-2007. For the period of 1984-2008 daily losses to residential buildings were derived from motor vehicle own damage insurance, which shows a surprisingly high correlation between building losses and motor vehicle losses caused by natural hazards. Loss functions from GDVs own flood risk model were made available to estimate flood losses. As climate change will progress the mean annual losses in the private residential building insurance might increase. Until 2100 losses due to winter storm could rise by more than 50%. The increase is mainly attributable to the intensification of individual exceptionally severe storms. Climate change will also result in an increase of flood losses. By the end of the century mean losses are expected to be twice as high - depending on the given scenario they could remain constant or triple. Conversely extreme events with high cumulative losses are expected to become significantly more frequent. Storms with a today's return period of 50 years might occur every 10 years at the end of the century. Floods, now returning every 50 years, could arise every 25 years. For the first time hailstorms have been analyzed. It was noticed, that in particular East Germany might be hit more frequently. Despite these findings, i.e. the cost of insurance against natural hazards might increase, the extent of such an increase in Germany should still remain within limits that can be mastered by the insurance companies. But we have to adapt to climate change. For this purpose stakeholder usually need ascertained numbers. Because our results were achieved using ensemble techniques they display per se a considerable spread. Despite this fact our results are robust over all approaches and climate models. Therefore they can be used for strategic decisions, less for daily routine business. Higher and more frequent losses will require higher venture capital and must be taken into account when implementing the EU directive Solvency II. If we assess our results carefully and act farseeing, we will be able to draw from manifold activities to deal with climate change impacts. Smart portfolio policy can help to reduce risks. Working with limits and franchises can help to insure highly exposed risks. Therefore GDV offers to his member companies wide accepted tools and risk models such as ZÜRS Geo, HQ Kumul and detailed risk statistics. After all, well-directed information policy, increased risk awareness and preventive action can reduce climate change impacts significantly.

  13. 42 CFR 440.340 - Actuarial report for benchmark-equivalent coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Using a standardized population that is representative of the population involved. (5) Applying the same... population to be used in paragraphs (b)(3) and (b)(4) of this section. (d) The State must provide...

  14. Clinical and Actuarial Prediction of Physical Violence in a Forensic Intellectual Disability Hospital: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Dean; Hastings, Richard P.; Coldwell, Jon

    2004-01-01

    Background: There is a high rate of physical violence in populations with intellectual disabilities, and this has been linked to problems for the victim, the assailant, members of staff and services. Despite the clinical significance of this behaviour, few studies have assessed methods of predicting its occurrence. The present study examined…

  15. Sixty-Six Years of Research on the Clinical Versus Actuarial Prediction of Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, N. Zoe; Harris, Grant T.; Rice, Marnie E.

    2006-01-01

    In their meta-analysis of clinical versus statistical prediction models, Aegisdottir et al. (this issue) extended previous findings of statistical-method superiority across such variables as clinicians' experience and familiarity with data. In this reaction, the authors are particularly interested in violence prediction, which yields the greatest…

  16. Risk Assessment: Actuarial Prediction and Clinical Judgement of Offending Incidents and Behaviour for Intellectual Disability Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, William R.; Beail, Nigel

    2004-01-01

    Background: Research on prediction of violent and sexual offending behaviour has developed considerably in the mainstream criminological literature. Apart from one publication [Quinsey (2004) "Offenders with Developmental Disabilities," pp. 131-142] this has not been extended to the field of intellectual disabilities. Methods: Work on actuarial…

  17. Composite Weibull-Inverse Transformed Gamma distribution and its actuarial application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, Mastoureh; Bakar, Shaiful Anuar Abu; Hamzah, Nor Aishah

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces a new composite model, namely, composite Weibull-Inverse Transformed Gamma distribution which assumes Weibull distribution for the head up to a specified threshold and inverse transformed gamma distribution beyond it. The closed form of probability density function (pdf) as well as the estimation of parameters by maximum likelihood method is presented. The model is compared with several benchmark distributions and their performances are measured. A well-known data set, Danish fire loss data, is used for this purpose and it's Value at Risk (VaR) using the new model is computed. In comparison to several standard models, the composite Weibull- Inverse Transformed Gamma model proved to be a competitor candidate.

  18. 78 FR 8596 - Hartford Financial Services Group, Inc., Commercial/Actuarial/ Information Delivery Services (IDS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    .../ Information Delivery Services (IDS)/Corporate & Financial Reporting Group, Hartford, CT; Notice of Negative... was published in the Federal Register on January 4, 2013 (78 FR 773). The Hartford-IDS Group...

  19. Replicated Correlates of MMPI Two-Point Code Types: The Missouri Actuarial System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gynther, M. D.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    This study compared more than 3400 MMPIs obtained from pschiatric in-patients in public mental health facilities with mental status and preadmission descriptor ratings to derive empirical correlates of profiles clustered primarily by two-point high codes. (Author)

  20. Identifying Pedophiles "Eligible" for Community Notification under Megan's Law: A Multivariate Model for Actuarially Anchored Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallone, Nathaniel J.; Hennessy, James J.; Voelbel, Gerald T.

    1998-01-01

    A scientifically sound methodology for identifying offenders about whose presence the community should be notified is demonstrated. A stepwise multiple regression was calculated among incarcerated pedophiles (N=52) including both psychological and legal data; a precision-weighted equation produced 90.4% "true positives." This methodology can be…

  1. General and victim-specific empathy: associations with actuarial risk, treatment outcome, and sexual recidivism.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sarah; Harkins, Leigh; Beech, Anthony R

    2012-10-01

    An empathy-related component has been included in most sex offender treatment programs since the 1980s; however, research linking empathy to sexual offending and/or to treatment outcome has produced mixed findings. This study examined the relationship between victim specific empathy, general empathy, and overall treatment change (determined by responses on a battery of psychometric tests) with static risk (Risk Matrix 2000 [RM 2000]) and sexual offense reconviction data in a sample of 105 offenders who completed treatment while in prison or in the community in England and Wales and followed up for an average period of more than 10 years. Victim-specific empathy improved from pretreatment to posttreatment and related to overall treatment change. A small group of offenders, whose victim empathy scores deteriorated from pretreatment to posttreatment, had higher rates of sexual recidivism compared with the rest of the sample. In contrast, neither were any reliable pretreatment to posttreatment changes noted on general empathy scores, except for an indication on the Interpersonal Reactivity Index Personal Distress Scale, nor was any relationship found to sexual recidivism. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to treatment goals and sexual recidivism. PMID:22179773

  2. Why not private health insurance? 2. Actuarial principles meet provider dreams.

    PubMed

    Deber, R; Gildiner, A; Baranek, P

    1999-09-01

    What do insurers and employers feel about proposals to expand Canadian health care financing through private insurance, in either a parallel stream or a supplementary tier? The authors conducted 10 semistructured, open-ended interviews in the autumn and early winter of 1996 with representatives of the insurance industry and benefits managers working with large employers; respondents were identified using a snowball sampling technique. The respondents felt that proposals for parallel private plans within a competitive market are incompatible with insurance principles, as long as a well-functioning and relatively comprehensive public system continues to exist; the maintenance of a strong public system was both socially and economically desirable. With the exception of serving the niche market for the private management of return-to-work strategies, respondents showed little interest in providing parallel coverage. They were receptive to a larger role for supplementary insurance but cautioned that they are not willing to cover all delisted services. As business executives they stated that they are willing to insure only services and clients that will be profitable. PMID:10497614

  3. 78 FR 64943 - Medicare Program; Medicare Part B Monthly Actuarial Rates, Premium Rate, and Annual Deductible...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... hospital. \\7\\ Includes services furnished in dialysis facilities, rural health clinics, Federally qualified... services furnished in dialysis facilities, rural health clinics, Federally qualified health centers... schedule furnished in the outpatient department of a hospital. \\4\\ Includes services furnished in...

  4. 77 FR 69850 - Medicare Program; Medicare Part B Monthly Actuarial Rates, Premium Rate, and Annual Deductible...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... services furnished in dialysis facilities, rural health clinics, Federally qualified health centers... of a hospital. \\4\\ Includes services furnished in dialysis facilities, rural health clinics... outpatient department of a hospital. \\4\\ Includes services furnished in dialysis facilities, rural...

  5. 76 FR 67572 - Medicare Program; Medicare Part B Monthly Actuarial Rates, Premium Rate, and Annual Deductible...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... department of a hospital. \\7\\ Includes services furnished in dialysis facilities, rural health clinics... schedule furnished in the outpatient department of a hospital. \\4\\ Includes services furnished in dialysis... services furnished in dialysis facilities, rural health clinics, federally qualified health...

  6. Actuarial Risk Assessment and Recidivism in a Sample of UK Intellectually Disabled Sexual Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Dan; Beech, Anthony; Markall, Helena F.; Blacker, Janine

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of three risk assessment instruments: Static-99, Risk Matrix 2000 (RM2000) and the Rapid Risk of Sex Offender Recidivism (RRASOR), in predicting sexual recidivism among 27 intellectually disabled sex offenders. The overall sexual offence reconviction rate was 30%, while non-recidivists remained offence-free…

  7. Heliostat control

    DOEpatents

    Kaehler, James A.

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in a system and method of controlling heliostat in which the heliostat is operable in azimuth and elevation by respective stepper motors and including the respective steps or means for calculating the position for the heliostat to be at a commanded position, determining the number of steps in azimuth and elevation for each respective motor to get to the commanded position and energizing both the azimuth and elevation stepper motors to run in parallel until predetermined number of steps away from the closest commanded position in azimuth and elevation so that the closest position has been achieved, and thereafter energizing only the remaining motor to bring it to its commanded position. In this way, the heliostat can be started from a stowed position in the morning and operated by a computer means to its commanded position and kept correctly oriented throughout the day using only the time of the day without requiring the usual sensors and feedback apparatus. A computer, or microprocessor, can then control a plurality of many heliostats easily and efficiently throughout the day.

  8. Control apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derkacs, Thomas (Inventor); Fetheroff, Charles W. (Inventor); Matay, Istvan M. (Inventor); Toth, Istvan J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Although the method and apparatus of the present invention can be utilized to apply either a uniform or a nonuniform covering of material over many different workpieces, the apparatus (20) is advantageously utilized to apply a thermal barrier covering (64) to an airfoil (22) which is used in a turbine engine. The airfoil is held by a gripper assembly (86) while a spray gun (24) is effective to apply the covering over the airfoil. When a portion of the covering has been applied, a sensor (28) is utilized to detect the thickness of the covering. A control apparatus (32) compares the thickness of the covering of material which has been applied with the desired thickness and is subsequently effective to regulate the operation of the spray gun to adaptively apply a covering of a desired thickness with an accuracy of at least plus or minus 0.0015 inches (1.5 mils) despite unanticipated process variations.

  9. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Medically Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Excellent Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Stephans, Kevin; Reddy, Chandana; Gajdos, Stephen; Kolar, Matthew; Clouser, Edward; Djemil, Toufik

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To validate the use of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beams for medically inoperable Stage I lung cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 to November 2006, a total of 26 patients with 28 lesions received SBRT using a Novalis/BrainLAB system. Immobilization involved a Bodyfix vacuum cushion. A weighted abdominal belt limited respiratory excursion. Computed tomographic simulation images were acquired at rest, full inhalation, and full exhalation and were merged to generate an internal gross tumor volume (ITV). Dose was prescribed to cover the planning target volume (PTV), defined as PTV = ITV + 3-5 mm set-up margin. Heterogeneity corrections were used. Delivery of 50 Gy in five sequential fractions typically used seven nonopposing, noncoplanar beams. Image-guided target verification was provided by BrainLAB-ExacTrac. Results: Among the 26 patients, the mean age was 74 years (range, 49-88 years). Of the patients, 50% were male and 50% female. The median Karnofsky performance status was 70 (range, 40-100). The median follow-up was 30.9 months (range, 10.4-51.4 months). Tissue diagnosis was contraindicated in seven patients (26.9%). There were 22 T1 (78.6%) and six T2 (21.4%) tumors. The median conformality index was 1.38 (range, 1.12-1.8). The median heterogeneity index was 1.08 (range, 1.04-1.2). One patient (3.6%) developed acute Grade 3 dyspnea and one patient developed late Grade 2 chest wall pain. Actuarial local control and overall survival at 3 years were 94.4% and 52%, respectively. Conclusions: Use of IMRT-based delivery of SBRT using restriction of tumor motion in medically inoperable lung cancer demonstrates excellent local control and favorable survival.

  10. Custom controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butell, Bart

    1996-02-01

    Microsoft's Visual Basic (VB) and Borland's Delphi provide an extremely robust programming environment for delivering multimedia solutions for interactive kiosks, games and titles. Their object oriented use of standard and custom controls enable a user to build extremely powerful applications. A multipurpose, database enabled programming environment that can provide an event driven interface functions as a multimedia kernel. This kernel can provide a variety of authoring solutions (e.g. a timeline based model similar to Macromedia Director or a node authoring model similar to Icon Author). At the heart of the kernel is a set of low level multimedia components providing object oriented interfaces for graphics, audio, video and imaging. Data preparation tools (e.g., layout, palette and Sprite Editors) could be built to manage the media database. The flexible interface for VB allows the construction of an infinite number of user models. The proliferation of these models within a popular, easy to use environment will allow the vast developer segment of 'producer' types to bring their ideas to the market. This is the key to building exciting, content rich multimedia solutions. Microsoft's VB and Borland's Delphi environments combined with multimedia components enable these possibilities.

  11. Power Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The device called the Power Factor Controller (PFC) offers exceptional energy conservation potential by virtue of its ability to sense shifts in the relationship between voltage and current flow, and to match them with the motor's need. Originating from the solar heating/cooling program, the PFC senses a light load, it cuts the voltage level to the minimum needed which in turn reduces current flow and heat loss. Laboratory tests showed that the PFC could reduce power used by six to eight percent under normal motor loads, and as much as 65 percent when the motor was idling. Over 150 companies have been granted NASA licenses for commercial use of this technology. One system that utilizes this technology is the Vectrol Energy System, (VES) produced by Vectrol, Inc. a subsidiary of Westinghouse. The VES is being used at Woodward & Lothrop, on their escalators. Energy use is regulated according to how many people are on the escalator at any time. It is estimated that the energy savings are between 30 to 40 percent.

  12. Silent Corticotroph Adenomas After Stereotactic Radiosurgery: A Case–Control Study

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhiyuan; Ellis, Scott; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Starke, Robert M.; Schlesinger, David; Lee Vance, Mary; Lopes, M. Beatriz; Sheehan, Jason

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in patients with a silent corticotroph adenoma (SCA) compared with patients with other subtypes of non–adrenocorticotropic hormone staining nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFA). Methods and Materials: The clinical features and outcomes of 104 NFA patients treated with SRS in our center between September 1994 and August 2012 were evaluated. Among them, 34 consecutive patients with a confirmatory SCA were identified. A control group of 70 patients with other subtypes of NFA were selected for review based on comparable baseline features, including sex, age at the time of SRS, tumor size, margin radiation dose to the tumor, and duration of follow-up. Results: The median follow-up after SRS was 56 months (range, 6-200 months). No patients with an SCA developed Cushing disease during the follow-up. Tumor control was achieved in 21 of 34 patients (62%) in the SCA group, compared with 65 of 70 patients (93%) in the NFA group. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 58 months in the SCA group. The actuarial PFS was 73%, 46%, and 31% in the SCA group and was 94%, 87%, and 87% in the NFA group at 3, 5, and 8 years, respectively. Silent corticotroph adenomas treated with a dose of ≥17 Gy exhibited improved PFS. New-onset loss of pituitary function developed in 10 patients (29%) in the SCA group, whereas it occurred in 18 patients (26%) in the NFA group. Eight patients (24%) in the SCA group experienced worsening of a visual field deficit or visual acuity attributed to the tumor progression, as did 6 patients (9%) in the NFA group. Conclusion: Silent corticotroph adenomas exhibited a more aggressive course with a higher progression rate than other subtypes of NFAs. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an important adjuvant treatment for control of tumor growth. Increased radiation dose may lead to improved tumor control in SCA patients.

  13. IMRT for Sinonasal Tumors Minimizes Severe Late Ocular Toxicity and Preserves Disease Control and Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic; Madani, Indira; Morbee, Lieve; Bonte, Katrien; Deron, Philippe; Domjan, Vilmos; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report late ocular (primary endpoint) and other toxicity, disease control, and survival (secondary endpoints) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2009, 130 patients with nonmetastatic sinonasal tumors were treated with IMRT at Ghent University Hospital. Prescription doses were 70 Gy (n = 117) and 60-66 Gy (n = 13) at 2 Gy per fraction over 6-7 weeks. Most patients had adenocarcinoma (n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (n = 23). One hundred and one (101) patients were treated postoperatively. Of 17 patients with recurrent tumors, 9 were reirradiated. T-stages were T1-2 (n = 39), T3 (n = 21), T4a (n = 38), and T4b (n = 22). Esthesioneuroblastoma was staged as Kadish A, B, and C in 1, 3, and 6 cases, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 52, range 15-121 months. There was no radiation-induced blindness in 86 patients available for late toxicity assessment ({>=}6 month follow-up). We observed late Grade 3 tearing in 10 patients, which reduced to Grade 1-2 in 5 patients and Grade 3 visual impairment because of radiation-induced ipsilateral retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma in 1 patient. There was no severe dry eye syndrome. The worst grade of late ocular toxicity was Grade 3 (n = 11), Grade 2 (n = 31), Grade 1 (n = 33), and Grade 0 (n = 11). Brain necrosis and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6 and 1 patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival were 59% and 52%, respectively. On multivariate analysis local control was negatively affected by cribriform plate and brain invasion (p = 0.044 and 0.029, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.009); overall survival was negatively affected by cribriform plate and orbit invasion (p = 0.04 and <0.001, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT for sinonasal tumors allowed delivering high doses to targets at minimized ocular toxicity, while maintaining disease control and survival

  14. Conformal Locoregional Breast Irradiation with an Oblique Parasternal Photon Field Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Erven, Katrien; Petillion, Saskia; Weltens, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Defraene, Gilles; Van Limbergen, Erik; Van den Bogaert, Walter

    2011-04-01

    We evaluated an isocentric technique for conformal irradiation of the breast, internal mammary, and medial supra-clavicular lymph nodes (IM-MS LN) using the oblique parasternal photon (OPP) technique. For 20 breast cancer patients, the OPP technique was compared with a conventional mixed-beam technique (2D) and a conformal partly wide tangential (PWT) technique, using dose-volume histogram analysis and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). The 3D techniques resulted in a better target coverage and homogeneity than did the 2D technique. The homogeneity index for the IM-MS PTV increased from 0.57 for 2D to 0.90 for PWT and 0.91 for OPP (both p < 0.001). The OPP technique was able to reduce the volume of heart receiving more than 30 Gy (V{sub 30}), the cardiac NTCP, and the volume of contralateral breast receiving 5 Gy (V{sub 5}) compared with the PWT plans (all p < 0.05). There is no significant difference in mean lung dose or lung NTCP between both 3D techniques. Compared with the PWT technique, the volume of lung receiving more than 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) was increased with the OPP technique, whereas the volume of lung receiving more than 40 Gy (V{sub 40}) was decreased (both p < 0.05). Compared with the PWT technique, the OPP technique can reduce doses to the contralateral breast and heart at the expense of an increased lung V{sub 20}.

  15. Locoregional treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma: The best is yet to come

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Naveen; Gupta, Pankaj; Chawla, Yogesh; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth-most common type of cancer worldwide. The only definitive treatment modalities capable of achieving a cure are hepatic resection and hepatic transplantation. However, most patients are not candidates for these therapies. Overall, treatment options are driven by the stage of HCC. Early-stage disease is treated with ablative therapies, with radiofrequency ablation the ablative therapy of choice. Microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation are the other upcoming alternatives. Intermediate-stage disease is managed with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), while advanced-stage disease is managed by sorafenib, with TACE and radioembolization as other alternatives. PMID:26516427

  16. Assessment of methylation status of locoregional lymph nodes in lung cancer using EBUS-NA.

    PubMed

    Millares, Laura; Serra, Mireia; Andreo, Felipe; Sanz-Santos, Jose; Montón, Concepción; Grimau, Carles; Gallego, Miguel; Setó, Laia; Combalia, Neus; Llatjos, Mariona; Escoda, Rosa; Castellà, Eva; Monsó, Eduard

    2015-10-01

    Hypermethylation of the promoter region of tumor suppressor genes is associated with carcinogenesis in lung cancer (LC). Endobronchial ultrasound with needle aspiration (EBUS-NA) is a semi-invasive method for obtaining cell blocks from lymph nodes, which can be used for epigenetic analyses. To establish the relationship between methylation status of p16, DAPK, RASSF1a, APC and CDH13 genes in lymph nodes sampled by EBUS-NA, tumor staging and prognosis. Methylation status of DAPK, p16, RASSF1a, APC and CDH13 genes was assessed in EBUS-NA cell blocks from LC patients and related to stage and survival. Eighty-five consecutive patients [mean age 67 (SD 8)] were included. Methylation of ≥1 gene was found in 43 malignant nodes (67 %). A higher prevalence of RASSF1a methylation was observed in small cell lung cancer patients [9/10 (90 %) vs. 15/53 (28 %); p < 0.001 χ(2) test]. Methylation of APC and/or p16 was related to advanced staging in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) [15/29 (52 %) vs. 6/24 (25 %), p = 0.048, χ(2) test]. Patients with NSCLC showing methylation of APC and/or p16 had also lower 6-month survival (p = 0.019, log rank test), which persisted after adjustment for age and subtyping (HR = 6, 95 % CI [1.8-19.5], p = 0.003, Cox regression). Epigenetic analyses are feasible in EBUS-NA cell blocks and may identify methylation patterns associated with worse prognosis. Methylation of p16 and APC genes in NSCLC patients was associated with advanced staging and lower 6-month survival. PMID:26119430

  17. The antitumor effect of locoregional magnetic cobalt ferrite in dog mammary adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şincai, Mariana; Gângǎ, Diana; Bica, Doina; Vékás, Ladislau

    2001-01-01

    The endocytosis of nanosized magnetic particles by tumor cells led to numerous tests to establish the use of this phenomenon in antitumor therapy. The direct antitumor effect of a biocompatible cobalt-ferrite-based magnetic fluid directly inoculated in bitch mammary tumors was studied. A direct correlation between tumor cell lysis and cobalt ferrite was established in tumors. Massive endocytosis of magnetic particles was observed 1 h after the contact of magnetic fluid with tumor cells.

  18. Assessing tumor response after loco-regional liver cancer therapies: the role of 3D MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chapiro, Julius; Lin, MingDe; Duran, Rafael; Schernthaner, Rüdiger E; Geschwind, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the tumor response of liver cancer lesions after intraarterial therapies is of major clinical interest. Over the last two decades, tumor response criteria have come a long way from purely size-based, anatomic methods such as the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors towards more functional, enhancement- and diffusion-based parameters with a strong emphasis on MRI as the ultimate imaging modality. However, the relatively low reproducibility of those one- and 2D techniques (modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and the European Association for the Study of the Liver criteria) provided the rationale for the development of new, 3D quantitative assessment techniques. This review will summarize and compare the existing methodologies used for 3D quantitative tumor analysis and provide an overview of the published clinical evidence for the benefits of 3D quantitative tumor response assessment techniques. PMID:25371052

  19. Transarterial Administration of Oncolytic Viruses for Locoregional Therapy of Orthotopic HCC in Rats.

    PubMed

    Altomonte, Jennifer; Muñoz-Álvarez, Kim A; Shinozaki, Katsunori; Baumgartner, Christine; Kaissis, Georgios; Braren, Rickmer; Ebert, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a disease with limited treatment options and poor prognosis. In recent years, oncolytic virotherapies have proven themselves to be potentially powerful tools to fight malignancy. Due to the unique dual blood supply in the liver, it is possible to apply therapies locally to orthotopic liver tumors, which are predominantly fed by arterial blood flow. We have previously demonstrated that hepatic arterial delivery of oncolytic viruses results in safe and efficient transduction efficiency of multifocal HCC lesions, resulting in significant prolongation of survival in immune competent rats. This procedure closely mimics the application of transarterial embolization in patients, which is the standard palliative care provided to many HCC patients. The ability to administer tumor therapies through the hepatic artery in rats allows for a highly sophisticated preclinical model for evaluating novel viral vectors under development. Here we describe the detailed protocol for microdissection of the hepatic artery for infusion of oncolytic virus vectors to treat orthotopic HCC. PMID:27167921

  20. [Device for intraarterial access for locoregional chemotherapy in hepatic metastasis from colorectal neoplasms (technical note)].

    PubMed

    Piccinini, E E; Ugolini, G; Rosati, G; Conti, A

    1994-01-01

    Metastasis are the most common malignant lesions of the liver. Liver is the most common site of visceral metastasis from colo-rectal carcinoma. Only in few patients are the lesions surgically resectable for cure and standard intravenous chemotherapy produces a low response rate. An intrahepatic arterial device for regional chemotherapy is an effective and safe alternative for unresectable liver metastasis from colorectal carcinoma, with a significant improvement on response rates compared with conventional i.v. chemotherapy; a longer survival is also reported in patients receiving intrahepatic therapy, even if the difference is not statistically significant. The catheter is inserted through the gastro-duodenal artery and the reservoir is placed in a subcutaneous pocket on the anterior thoracic wall. The Authors discuss indications, implantation technique and complications. Intra-arterial chemotherapy is administered in ambulatorial regimen and scintigraphic scanning and/or epatic ultrasonography are performed every three months to evaluate response rate. Median survival is variable from 12 to 17 months in the different series with response rates (disappeared metastases or tumor-mass reduction over 50%) of 48%-62%. The increased tumor responses reported together with a lower systemic toxicity (compared with systemic therapy) suggest that intra-arterial chemotherapy is a reliable and well tolerated treatment. PMID:7887590

  1. Technical and Practical Considerations for Device Selection in Locoregional Ablative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Sean P.; Gaba, Ron C.

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous ablation therapy is an essential component of contemporary interventional oncologic therapy of primary and secondary malignancies. The growing armamentarium of available ablation technologies calls for thorough understanding of the different ablation modalities to optimize device selection in individual clinical settings. The goal of the current article is to provide direction on ablative device selection by reviewing device mechanisms of action, advantages and disadvantages, and practical considerations in real-life case scenarios. PMID:25053866

  2. [Loco-regional complications of pharyngitis: the example of Lemierre's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tschopp, J; Chuard, C

    2015-10-01

    Pharyngitis is a common cause of consultation in ambulatory medicine. Although it is benign in most cases, serious complications may happen and must be recognized quickly. Lemierre's syndrome is one of them. It consists in the association of thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and septic emboli that generally involve the lungs and is classically associated with Fusobacterium necrophorum. It is usually found in young and healthy adults and has an estimated mortality of 5%. Diagnosis relies essentially on the characteristic presentation of the disease. Therapy consists of surgical drainage of purulent collections and necrotic tissues associated with a prolonged course of antibiotics. Some authors also recommend a anticoagulation. PMID:26638515

  3. Locoregional treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma: The best is yet to come.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Naveen; Gupta, Pankaj; Chawla, Yogesh; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2015-10-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth-most common type of cancer worldwide. The only definitive treatment modalities capable of achieving a cure are hepatic resection and hepatic transplantation. However, most patients are not candidates for these therapies. Overall, treatment options are driven by the stage of HCC. Early-stage disease is treated with ablative therapies, with radiofrequency ablation the ablative therapy of choice. Microwave ablation and irreversible electroporation are the other upcoming alternatives. Intermediate-stage disease is managed with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), while advanced-stage disease is managed by sorafenib, with TACE and radioembolization as other alternatives. PMID:26516427

  4. Spontaneous pneumothorax due to bronchopleural fistula following reirradiation for locoregionally recurrent squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ota, Takayo; Suzumura, Tomohiro; Sugiura, Takamune; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Yonesaka, Kimio; Makihara, Masaru; Tsukuda, Hiroshi; Tada, Takuhito; Fukuoka, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax following radiotherapy for pulmonary malignancy is an unusual clinical condition. Here, we report a case of a 78-year-old male suffering from dyspnea during radiotherapy for squamous cell lung cancer of the right main bronchus. Imaging studies and fiberoptic bronchoscopy revealed that pneumothorax was due to a bronchopleural fistula. PMID:27190612

  5. [A 23-year delayed locoregional recurrence of breast carcinoma following mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Ogo, Etsuyo; Etou, Hidehiro; Suzuki, Gen; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Tsuji, Chiyoko; Hattori, Chikayuki; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2008-02-01

    A 77-year-old woman who underwent a right modified radical mastectomy 23 years ago with no further adjuvant treatment presented with a right chest wall mass (3 x 4 x 2 cm) at the scar. She had no symptoms nor metastasis. The laboratory data were normal including tumor marker. The mass was diagnosed as compatible with a local recurrence tumor from the previous breast cancer on the ultrasonography and chest CT. After obtaining her informed consent for the therapy, we performed 60 Gy/30 fr radiotherapy on the recurrent tumor on her right chest wall with concurrent oral chemo-endocrine therapy. The first regimens were tamoxifen 20 mg/day and 5'-DFUR 600 mg/day, followed by toremifene 80 mg/day and 5'-DFUR 600 mg/day, and then the tumor disappeared. But three years later, we found tumor regrowth. We changed the regimen, giving 5'-DFUR 1,200 mg/day and cyclophosphamide 100 mg/day for 2 weeks followed by a 1-week drug-free period, then added 10 Gy/5 fr radiotherapy and hyperthermia twice a week. Final regimens were anastrozole 1 mg/day and capecitabine 900 mg/day. The recurrent tumor decreased and the disease stabilized. After these therapies, she had very good quality of life. We recommend radiation and/or hyperthermia with concurrent oral chemo-endocrine therapy as useful for the delayed recurrence of elderly breast cancer after a modified radical mastectomy. PMID:18281775

  6. Radioembolization as Locoregional Therapy of Hepatic Metastases in Uveal Melanoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klingenstein, A.; Haug, A. R.; Zech, C. J.; Schaller, U. C.

    2013-02-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the overall survival, safety, and efficacy of metastatic uveal melanoma patients after radioembolization as salvage therapy. Thirteen patients were treated with radioembolization of branches of the hepatic artery with resin-based yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y)-labelled microspheres. Twelve patients underwent a single application, and 1 patient underwent 4 interventions. Dosages from 644 to 2,450 MBq (mean activity 1,780) were applied. Treatment response was evaluated by way of liver magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography (CT) as well as whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET)/CT with evaluation of percentage changes in SUV{sub max} before and at 2-3 months after therapy. Kaplan-Meier analysis was calculated to determine overall survival. Partial remission (PR) was observed in 8 (62 %), stable disease (SD) in 2 (15 %), and progressive disease (PD) in 3 (23 %) patients under terms of standard criteria and PR in 3 (23 %), SD in 3 (23 %), and PD in 7 (54 %) patients according to PET criteria. Neither RECIST nor PET criteria showed a significant difference in predicting overall survival (P = 0.12 and 0.11, respectively). Median survival time after radioembolization was 7 months. No acute toxicity with in-hospital morbidity was observed. One patient developed hepatomegaly, and 1 patient developed gastric ulceration. Throughout follow-up, progression of extrahepatic metastases was observed. Radioembolization may be a promising therapy in uveal melanoma patients with predominant hepatic metastases. At first follow-up, we observed PR or SD in 77 % patients under terms of standard criteria with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  7. Immunological Treatment Options for Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mirandola, Leonardo; Bernardini, Giovanni; Cunha, Nicholas D’; Tijani, Lukman; Nguyen, Diane; Cordero, Joehassin; Jenkins, Marjorie R.; Cobos, Everardo; Kast, W. Martin; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) are usually treated by a multimodal approach with surgery and/or radiochemotherapy as the mainstay of local–regional treatment in cases with advanced disease. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy have the disadvantage of causing severe side effects, while the clinical outcome of patients diagnosed with HNSCC has remained essentially unchanged over the last decade. The potential of immunotherapy is still largely unexplored. Here the authors review the current status of the art and discuss the future challenges in HNSCC treatment and prevention. PMID:22251006

  8. Controlling Separation in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Simon; Himmel, Christoph; Power, Bronwyn; Wakelam, Christian; Xu, Liping; Hynes, Tom; Hodson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Four examples of flow control: 1) Passive control of LP turbine blades (Laminar separation control). 2) Aspiration of a conventional axial compressor blade (Turbulent separation control). 3) Compressor blade designed for aspiration (Turbulent separation control). 4.Control of intakes in crosswinds (Turbulent separation control).

  9. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy can Safely and Durably Control Sites of Extra-Central Nervous System Oligoprogressive Disease in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Crizotinib

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Gregory N.; Weickhardt, Andrew J.; Scheier, Benjamin; Doebele, Robert C.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the durability and toxicity of radiotherapeutic local ablative therapy (LAT) applied to extra-central nervous system (eCNS) disease progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib and manifesting ≤4 discrete sites of eCNS progression were classified as having oligoprogressive disease (OPD). If subsequent progression met OPD criteria, additional courses of LAT were considered. Crizotinib was continued until eCNS progression was beyond OPD criteria or otherwise not suitable for further LAT. Results: Of 38 patients, 33 progressed while taking crizotinib. Of these, 14 had eCNS progression meeting OPD criteria suitable for radiotherapeutic LAT. Patients with eCNS OPD received 1-3 courses of LAT with radiation therapy. The 6- and 12-month actuarial local lesion control rates with radiation therapy were 100% and 86%, respectively. The 12-month local lesion control rate with single-fraction equivalent dose >25 Gy versus ≤25 Gy was 100% versus 60% (P=.01). No acute or late grade >2 radiation therapy-related toxicities were observed. Median overall time taking crizotinib among those treated with LAT versus those who progressed but were not suitable for LAT was 28 versus 10.1 months, respectively. Patients continuing to take crizotinib for >12 months versus ≤12 months had a 2-year overall survival rate of 72% versus 12%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: Local ablative therapy safely and durably eradicated sites of individual lesion progression in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive NSCLC patients receiving crizotinib. A dose–response relationship for local lesion control was observed. The suppression of OPD by LAT in patients taking crizotinib allowed an extended duration of exposure to crizotinib, which was associated with longer overall survival.

  10. Local Control and Outcome in Children with Localized Vaginal Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report from the Soft Tissue Sarcoma Committee of the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Walterhouse, David O.; Meza, Jane L.; Breneman, John C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Pappo, Alberto S.; Arndt, Carola; Raney, R. Beverly; Meyer, William H.; Hawkins, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The local control approach for girls with non-resected vaginal rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) enrolled onto Intergroup RMS Study Group (IRSG)/Children’s Oncology Group (COG) studies has differed from that used at other primary sites by delaying or eliminating radiotherapy (RT) based on response achieved with chemotherapy and delayed primary resection. Procedures We reviewed locoregional treatment and outcome for patients with localized RMS of the vagina on the two most recent COG low-risk RMS studies. Results Forty-one patients with localized vaginal RMS were enrolled: 25 onto D9602 and 16 onto Subset 2 of ARST0331. Only four of the 39 with non-resected tumors received RT. The 5-year cumulative incidence of local recurrence was 26% on D9602, and the 2-year cumulative incidence of local recurrence was 43% on ARST0331. Increased local failure rates appeared to correlate with chemotherapy regimens that incorporated lower cumulative doses of cyclophosphamide. Estimated 5-year and 2-year failure free survival rates were 70% (95% CI: 46%, 84%) on D9602 and 42% (95% CI: 11%, 70%) on ARST0331, respectively. Conclusions To prevent local recurrence, we recommend a local control approach for patients with non-resected RMS of the vagina that is similar to that used for other primary sites and includes RT. We recognize that potential long-term effects of RT are sometimes unacceptable, especially for children less than 24 months of age. However, when making the decision to eliminate RT, the risk of local recurrence must be considered especially when using a chemotherapy regimen with a total cumulative cyclophosphamide dose of ≤ 4.8 g/m2. PMID:21298768

  11. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - inhaled corticosteroids; Asthma - long-acting beta-agonists; Asthma - leukotriene modifiers; Asthma - cromolyn; Bronchial asthma-control drugs; Wheezing - control drugs; Reactive airway disease - control drugs

  12. CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES FOR THE VENTILATION SYSTEM AND A PLC SWITCH FOR AUTOMATIC CO (CARBON MONOXIDE) SYSTEM. THE AIR TESTING SYSTEM IS FREE STANDING AND THE FANS ARE COMPUTER-OPERATED. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  13. Hybrid polarization control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, George R.; Ibragimov, Edem; Sluz, Joseph; Sova, Raymond

    2005-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel method of polarization control that combines rotatable waveplates (angle control) and variable retarders (retardance control). Such a "hybrid" polarization controller performs far better than conventional controllers, allowing nearly perfect arbitrary-to-arbitrary polarization transformations. We show theoretically that the two control parameters augment one another because they tend to result in orthogonal movements on the Poincaré sphere.

  14. Incoherent control of locally controllable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Daoyi; Zhang Chenbin; Rabitz, Herschel; Pechen, Alexander; Tarn, T.-J.

    2008-10-21

    An incoherent control scheme for state control of locally controllable quantum systems is proposed. This scheme includes three steps: (1) amplitude amplification of the initial state by a suitable unitary transformation, (2) projective measurement of the amplified state, and (3) final optimization by a unitary controlled transformation. The first step increases the amplitudes of some desired eigenstates and the corresponding probability of observing these eigenstates, the second step projects, with high probability, the amplified state into a desired eigenstate, and the last step steers this eigenstate into the target state. Within this scheme, two control algorithms are presented for two classes of quantum systems. As an example, the incoherent control scheme is applied to the control of a hydrogen atom by an external field. The results support the suggestion that projective measurements can serve as an effective control and local controllability information can be used to design control laws for quantum systems. Thus, this scheme establishes a subtle connection between control design and controllability analysis of quantum systems and provides an effective engineering approach in controlling quantum systems with partial controllability information.

  15. Failure-probability driven dose painting

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelius, Ivan R.; Håkansson, Katrin; Due, Anne K.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Kristensen, Claus A.; Rasmussen, Jacob; Specht, Lena; Berthelsen, Anne K.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a data-driven dose-painting strategy based on the spatial distribution of recurrences in previously treated patients. The result is a quantitative way to define a dose prescription function, optimizing the predicted local control at constant treatment intensity. A dose planning study using the optimized dose prescription in 20 patients is performed.Methods: Patients treated at our center have five tumor subvolumes from the center of the tumor (PET positive volume) and out delineated. The spatial distribution of 48 failures in patients with complete clinical response after (chemo)radiation is used to derive a model for tumor control probability (TCP). The total TCP is fixed to the clinically observed 70% actuarial TCP at five years. Additionally, the authors match the distribution of failures between the five subvolumes to the observed distribution. The steepness of the dose–response is extracted from the literature and the authors assume 30% and 20% risk of subclinical involvement in the elective volumes. The result is a five-compartment dose response model matching the observed distribution of failures. The model is used to optimize the distribution of dose in individual patients, while keeping the treatment intensity constant and the maximum prescribed dose below 85 Gy.Results: The vast majority of failures occur centrally despite the small volumes of the central regions. Thus, optimizing the dose prescription yields higher doses to the central target volumes and lower doses to the elective volumes. The dose planning study shows that the modified prescription is clinically feasible. The optimized TCP is 89% (range: 82%–91%) as compared to the observed TCP of 70%.Conclusions: The observed distribution of locoregional failures was used to derive an objective, data-driven dose prescription function. The optimized dose is predicted to result in a substantial increase in local control without increasing the predicted risk of toxicity.

  16. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Single Brainstem Metastases: The Cleveland Clinic Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Chao, Samuel T.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the imaging and clinical outcomes of patients with single brainstem metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data from patients with single brainstem metastases treated with SRS. Locoregional control and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Between 1997 and 2007, 43 patients with single brainstem metastases were treated with SRS. The median age at treatment was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance status was 80, and the median follow-up was 5.3 months. The median dose was 15 Gy (range, 9.6-24), and the median conformality and heterogeneity index was 1.7 and 1.9, respectively. The median survival was 5.8 months from the procedure date. Of the 33 patient with post-treatment imaging available, a complete radiographic response was achieved in 2 (4.7%), a partial response in 8 (18.6%), and stable disease in 23 (53.5%). The 1-year actuarial rate of local control, distant brain control, and overall survival was 85%, 38.3%, and 31.5%, respectively. Of the 43 patients, 8 (19%) died within 2 months of undergoing SRS, and 15 (36%) died within 3 months. On multivariate analysis, greater performance status (hazard ratio [HR], 0.95, p = .004), score index for radiosurgery (HR, 0.7; p = .004), graded prognostic assessment score (HR, 0.48; p = .003), and smaller tumor volume (HR, 1.23, p = .002) were associated with improved survival. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that SRS is a safe and effective local therapy for patients with brainstem metastases.

  17. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Resected Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, John W.; Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Willett, Christopher G.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Pappas, Theodore N.; Clary, Bryan M.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Bendell, Johanna C.; Morse, Michael A.; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is a rare malignancy. Despite radical resection, survival remains poor, with high rates of local and distant failure. To clarify the role of radiotherapy with chemotherapy, we performed a retrospective analysis of resected patients who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 45 patients (13 with proximal and 32 with distal disease) underwent resection plus radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy). All but 1 patient received concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 30 months for all patients and 40 months for survivors. Results: Of the 45 patients, 33 underwent adjuvant radiotherapy, and 12 were treated neoadjuvantly. The 5-year actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and locoregional control rates were 33%, 37%, 42%, and 78%, respectively. The median survival was 34 months. No patient died perioperatively. Patient age {<=}60 years and perineural involvement adversely affected survival on univariate analysis. Patients undergoing R0 resection had a significantly improved rate of local control but no survival advantage. Despite having more advanced disease at presentation, patients treated neoadjuvantly had a longer survival (5-year survival 53% vs. 23%, p = 0.16) and similar rates of Grade 2-3 surgical morbidity (16% vs. 33%, p = 0.24) compared with those treated in the postoperative setting. Conclusion: These study results suggest a possible local control benefit from chemoradiotherapy combined with surgery in patients with advanced, resected biliary cancer. Furthermore, our results suggest that a treatment strategy that includes preoperative chemoradiotherapy might result in improved tumor resectability with similar surgical morbidity compared with patients treated postoperatively, as well as potentially improved survival outcomes. Distant failure remains a significant failure pattern, suggesting the need for more effective systemic

  18. Post-radiotherapy neck dissection improves control at non-regional disease sites after definitive chemoradiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Ranck, Mark C.; Abundo, Rainier; Jefferson, Gina; Kolokythas, Antonia; Wenig, Barry L.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Spiotto, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Importance After chemoradiation for head and neck cancer, over ninety percent of patients who achieved a complete response by imaging were regionally controlled without post-radiotherapy neck dissections (PRND). Since several groups have reported that lymph node involvement also predicted failure at both primary and distant sites, it remains unclear the extent to which PRND impacts non-regional sites of disease. Objective Here, we evaluated how PRND impacted local and distant control in patients who achieved a clinical complete response. Design We retrospectively reviewed patients treated for stage III/IV disease with definitive chemoradiation between 1990 to 2012. Setting University of Illinois at Chicago. Participants 287 patients were treated with definitive CRT, of whom seventy-four underwent PRND. Median follow up was 25.4 months. Interventions Chemoradiation followed by lymph node dissection or observation. Main Outcomes and Measures Endpoints evaluated included local control (LC), regional control (RC), freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) using first-failure analysis. Results Patients with advanced nodal disease (≥N2b; n=176) had improved PFS (74.6% vs. 39.1%; P<.001) while patients with lesser nodal disease had similar PFS. For patients with advanced nodal disease, PRND improved 2-year LC (85.5 vs. 53.5%; p<.001), locoregional control with PRND (78.9% vs. 45.7%; P<.001), FFDM (79.5% vs. 67.5%%; P=.03) and OS (84.5% vs. 61.7%; P=.004) but not RC (96.9% vs. 90.1%; P=.21) The benefit in LC (87.4% vs. 66.2%; P=.02) and PFS (80.7% vs. 53.4%; P=.01) persisted for those with negative post-treatment imaging who underwent PRND. On univariate analysis, PRND, alcohol use, nodal stage and chemoradiation significantly impacted 2 year LC and/or PFS. On multivariate analysis, PRND remained strongly prognostic for 2 year LC (HR 0.22; P=.0007) and PFS (HR 0.42; P=.002). Conclusions and Relevance PRND improved

  19. NASA propulsion controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teren, F.

    1983-01-01

    Multivariable control theory is applied to the design of multiple input and output engine controls. Highly-accurate, real-time engine simulations are utilized for control development and checkout. Electro-optical control components are developed for use in electronic control systems having fiber optic data links. Integrated controls are developed for VSTOL and Rotorcraft propulsion systems. Post-stall models of engine systems are developed to aid in understanding and control of post-stall engine behavior.

  20. Neural control: Chaos control sets the pace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöll, Eckehard

    2010-03-01

    Even simple creatures, such as cockroaches, are capable of complex responses to changes in their environment. But robots usually require complicated dedicated control circuits to perform just a single action. Chaos control theory could allow simpler control strategies to realize more complex behaviour.

  1. Preoperative [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Standardized Uptake Value of Neck Lymph Nodes Predicts Neck Cancer Control and Survival Rates in Patients With Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Pathologically Positive Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, C.-T.; Chang, J.T.-C.; Wang, H.-M.; Ng, S.-H.; Hsueh, C.; Lee, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.; Chen, I-H.; Huang, S.-F.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) depends heavily on locoregional control. In this prospective study, we sought to investigate whether preoperative maximum standardized uptake value of the neck lymph nodes (SUVnodal-max) may predict prognosis in OSCC patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes were investigated. All subjects underwent a [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scan within 2 weeks before radical surgery and neck dissection. All patients were followed up for at least 24 months after surgery or until death. Postoperative adjuvant therapy was performed in the presence of pathologic risk factors. Optimal cutoff values of SUVnodal-max were chosen based on 5-year disease-free survival (DFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS). Independent prognosticators were identified by Cox regression analysis. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 41 months. The optimal cutoff value for SUVnodal-max was 5.7. Multivariate analyses identified the following independent predictors of poor outcome: SUVnodal-max {>=}5.7 for the 5-year neck cancer control rate, distant metastatic rate, DFS, DSS, and extracapsular spread (ECS) for the 5-year DSS and OS. Among ECS patients, the presence of a SUVnodal-max {>=}5.7 identified patients with the worst prognosis. Conclusion: A SUVnodal-max of 5.7, either alone or in combination with ECS, is an independent prognosticator for 5-year neck cancer control and survival rates in OSCC patients with pathologically positive lymph nodes.

  2. Analysis of Local Control in Patients Receiving IMRT for Resected Pancreatic Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yovino, Susannah; Maidment, Bert W.; Herman, Joseph M.; Pandya, Naimish; Goloubeva, Olga; Wolfgang, Chris; Schulick, Richard; Laheru, Daniel; Hanna, Nader; Alexander, Richard; Regine, William F.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly incorporated into therapy for pancreatic cancer. A concern regarding this technique is the potential for geographic miss and decreased local control. We analyzed patterns of first failure among patients treated with IMRT for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients who underwent resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for pancreas cancer are included in this report. IMRT was used for all to a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-FU-based in 72% of patients and gemcitabine-based in 28%. Results: At median follow-up of 24 months, 49/71 patients (69%) had failed. The predominant failure pattern was distant metastases in 35/71 patients (49%). The most common site of metastases was the liver. Fourteen patients (19%) developed locoregional failure in the tumor bed alone in 5 patients, regional nodes in 4 patients, and concurrently with metastases in 5 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 25 months. On univariate analysis, nodal status, margin status, postoperative CA 19-9 level, and weight loss during treatment were predictive for OS. On multivariate analysis, higher postoperative CA19-9 levels predicted for worse OS on a continuous basis (p < 0.01). A trend to worse OS was seen among patients with more weight loss during therapy (p = 0.06). Patients with positive nodes and positive margins also had significantly worse OS (HR for death 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.5; HR for death 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.2, respectively). Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting was seen in 8% of patients. Late complication of small bowel obstruction occurred in 4 (6%) patients. Conclusions: This is the first comprehensive report of patterns of failure among patients treated with adjuvant IMRT for pancreas cancer. IMRT was not associated with an increase in local recurrences in our cohort. These data support the use of IMRT in the recently activated EORTC/US Intergroup/RTOG 0848 adjuvant pancreas

  3. Analysis of Local Control in Patients Receiving IMRT for Resected Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yovino, Susannah; Maidment, Bert W.; Herman, Joseph M.; Pandya, Naimish; Goloubeva, Olga; Wolfgang, Chris; Schulick, Richard; Laheru, Daniel; Hanna, Nader; Alexander, Richard; Regine, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly incorporated into therapy for pancreatic cancer. A concern regarding this technique is the potential for geographic miss and decreased local control. We analyzed patterns of first failure among patients treated with IMRT for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials Seventy-one patients who underwent resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for pancreas cancer are included in this report. IMRT was used for all to a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-FU–based in 72% of patients and gemcitabine-based in 28%. Results At median follow-up of 24 months, 49/71 patients (69%) had failed. The predominant failure pattern was distant metastases in 35/71 patients (49%). The most common site of metastases was the liver. Fourteen patients (19%) developed locoregional failure in the tumor bed alone in 5 patients, regional nodes in 4 patients, and concurrently with metastases in 5 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 25 months. On univariate analysis, nodal status, margin status, postoperative CA 19-9 level, and weight loss during treatment were predictive for OS. On multivariate analysis, higher postoperative CA19-9 levels predicted for worse OS on a continuous basis (p < 0.01). A trend to worse OS was seen among patients with more weight loss during therapy (p = 0.06). Patients with positive nodes and positive margins also had significantly worse OS (HR for death 2.8, 95% CI 1.1–7.5; HR for death 2.6, 95% CI 1.1–6.2, respectively). Grade 3–4 nausea and vomiting was seen in 8% of patients. Late complication of small bowel obstruction occurred in 4 (6%) patients. Conclusions This is the first comprehensive report of patterns of failure among patients treated with adjuvant IMRT for pancreas cancer. IMRT was not associated with an increase in local recurrences in our cohort. These data support the use of IMRT in the recently activated EORTC/US Intergroup/RTOG 0848 adjuvant pancreas

  4. Substructural controller synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A decentralized design procedure which combines substructural synthesis, model reduction, decentralized controller design, subcontroller synthesis, and controller reduction is proposed for the control design of flexible structures. The structure to be controlled is decomposed into several substructures, which are modeled by component mode synthesis methods. For each substructure, a subcontroller is designed by using the linear quadratic optimal control theory. Then, a controller synthesis scheme called Substructural Controller Synthesis (SCS) is used to assemble the subcontrollers into a system controller, which is to be used to control the whole structure.

  5. GCFR plant control system

    SciTech Connect

    Estrine, E.A.; Greiner, H.G.

    1980-05-01

    A plant control system is being designed for a gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant. Control analysis is being performed as an integral part of the plant design process to ensure that control requirements are satisfied as the plant design evolves. The load control portion of the plant control system provides stable automatic (closed-loop) control of the plant over the 25% to 100% load range. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate load control system performance. The results show that the plant is controllable at full load with the control system structure selected, but gain scheduling is required to achieve desired performance over the load range.

  6. Superconducting fault current controller/current controller

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.

    2004-06-15

    A superconducting fault current controller/current controller employs a superconducting-shielded core reactor (SSCR) with a variable impedance in a secondary circuit to control current in a primary circuit such as an electrical distribution system. In a second embodiment, a variable current source is employed in a secondary circuit of an SSCR to control current in the primary circuit. In a third embodiment, both a variable impedance in one secondary circuit and a variable current source in a second circuit of an SSCR are employed for separate and independent control of current in the primary circuit.

  7. Solid state controller three axes controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The reported flight controller features a handle grip which is mounted on a longitudinally extending control element. The handle grip is pivotally mounted on the control element about a pitch axis which is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis through the control element. The pivotal mounting includes a resilient force mounting mechanism which centers the grip relative to the control element. Rotation of the handle grip produces a direct rotation of a transducer element in a transducer which provides an electrical indication of the rotative movement about three mutually perpendicular axes.

  8. The role of induction and adjuvant chemotherapy in combination with concurrent chemoradiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongliang; Gu, Dayong; He, Xia; Gao, Xianshu; Bian, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    Whether the addition of induction chemotherapy (IC) or adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is superior to CCRT alone for locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer is unknown. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed to investigate the efficacy of CCRT, IC + CCRT, and CCRT + AC on locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer. The overall survival (OS) with hazard ratios (HRs) and locoregional recurrence rates (LRRs) and distant metastasis rates (DMRs) with risk ratios (RRs) were investigated. After a comprehensive database search, eleven studies involving 2,626 assigned patients were included in this network meta-analysis. Compared with CCRT alone, IC + CCRT resulted in no significant improvement in OS or LRR and a marginal improvement in DMR (OS: HR =0.67, 95% credible interval (CrI) 0.32–1.18; LRR: RR =1.79, 95% CrI 0.80–3.51; DMR: RR =1.79, 95% CrI 0.24–1.04) and CCRT + AC exhibited no beneficial effects on any of the endpoints of OS, LRR, or DMR (OS: HR =0.99, 95% CrI 0.64–1.43; LRR: RR =0.78, 95% CrI 0.43–1.32; DMR: RR =0.85, 95% CrI 0.57–1.24). As a conclusion, for locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer, no significant differences in the treatment efficacies of CCRT, IC + CCRT, and CCRT + AC were found, with the exception of a marginally significant improvement in distant control observed following IC + CCRT compared with CCRT alone. PMID:26793000

  9. Suprapubic transvesical single-port technique for control of lower end of ureter during laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for upper tract transitional cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahlawat, Rajesh K.; Gautam, Gagan

    2011-01-01

    Context: Various minimally invasive techniques – laparoscopic, endoscopic or combinations of both - have been described to handle the lower ureter during laparoscopic nephroureterectomy but none has received wide acceptance. Aims: We describe an endoscopic technique for the management of lower end of ureter during laparoscopic nephroureterectomy using a single suprapubic laparoscopic port. Materials and Methods: Transurethral resectoscope is used to make a full thickness incision in the bladder cuff around the ureteric orifice from 1 o’clock to 11 o’clock. A grasper inserted through the transvesical suprapubic port is used to retract the ureter to complete the incision in the bladder cuff overlying the anterior aspect of the ureteric orifice. The lower end of ureter is subsequently sealed with a clip applied through the port. This is followed by a laparoscopic nephrectomy and the specimen is removed by extending the suprapubic port incision. Our technique enables dissection and control of lower end of ureter under direct vision. Moreover, surgical occlusion of the lower end of the ureter prior to dissection of the kidney may decrease cell spillage. The clip also serves as a marker for complete removal of the specimen. Results: Three patients have undergone this procedure with an average follow up of 19 months. Operative time for the management of lower ureter has been 35, 55 and 40 minutes respectively. A single recurrence was detected on the opposite bladder wall after 9 months via a surveillance cystoscopy. There has been no residual disease or any other locoregional recurrence. Conclusions: The described technique for management of lower end of ureter during laparoscopic nephroureterectomy adheres to strict oncologic principles while providing the benefit of a minimally invasive approach. PMID:21814308

  10. Structural Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, M. S.; Hoffman, W. M.

    This manual is designed for those who seek certification as pesticide applicators for industrial, institutional, structural, and health-related pest control. It is divided into six sections covering general pest control, wood-destroying organisms, bird control, fumigation, rodent control, and industrial weed control. The manual gives information…

  11. Malagasy Backward Object Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potsdam, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Backward control is an obligatory interpretational dependency between an overt controller and a nonovert controllee in which the controllee is structurally superior to the controller: "Meg persuaded [Delta]i" ["Roni to give up"]. It contrasts with ordinary forward control, in which the controller is structurally higher: "Meg persuaded Roni"…

  12. Directions in propulsion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed here is research at NASA Lewis in the area of propulsion controls as driven by trends in advanced aircraft. The objective of the Lewis program is to develop the technology for advanced reliable propulsion control systems and to integrate the propulsion control with the flight control for optimal full-system control.

  13. Controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chao; Wang, Xingyuan; Liu, Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this article, the controllability of asynchronous Boolean multiplex control networks (ABMCNs) is studied. First, the model of Boolean multiplex control networks under Harvey' asynchronous update is presented. By means of semi-tensor product approach, the logical dynamics is converted into linear representation, and a generalized formula of control-depending network transition matrices is achieved. Second, a necessary and sufficient condition is proposed to verify that only control-depending fixed points of ABMCNs can be controlled with probability one. Third, using two types of controls, the controllability of system is studied and formulae are given to show: (a) when an initial state is given, the reachable set at time s under a group of specified controls; (b) the reachable set at time s under arbitrary controls; (c) the specific probability values from a given initial state to destination states. Based on the above formulae, an algorithm to calculate overall reachable states from a specified initial state is presented. Moreover, we also discuss an approach to find the particular control sequence which steers the system between two states with maximum probability. Examples are shown to illustrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  14. Local control and survival after external irradiation for adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Rangala, N.; Cox, J.D.; Byhardt, R.W.; Wilson, J.F.; Greenberg, M.; Da Conceicao, A.L.

    1982-11-01

    From 1966 through 1978, 128 patients with biopsy-proven adenocarcinoma of the prostate underwent external irradiation to the entire pelvis followed by additional irradiation with a field that encompassed the entire prostate with generous margins. Local recurrence was diagnosed when palpable regrowth occurred and was confirmed by biopsy. Eighteen patients (14%) had local recurrence. Actuarial (life table) local recurrence rates, however, were 24% for both for Stage B and C patients. Actuarial five year survival was 100% for the 10 Stage A patients, 91% for the 25 Stage B, and 78% for the 93 Stage C patients. Actuarial five year disease-free survival was 59% for Stage B and 69% for Stage C patients. Local recurrence was affected by the total dose to the whole pelvis and the dose at the center of the prostate. Disease-free survival was influenced by differentiation. High dose external irradiation to the prostate and regional lymph nodes offers the greatest probability of long-term disease-free survival for patients with localized disease. Late bowel complications were seen in 14 patients (11%), two of whom required colostomies. Late urinary tract complications were observed in five patients (4%).

  15. Accelerated Radiotherapy, Carbogen, and Nicotinamide (ARCON) in the Treatment of Advanced Bladder Cancer: Mature Results of a Phase II Nonrandomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskin, Peter; Rojas, Ana Ph.D. Saunders, Michele

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that accelerated radiotherapy combined with carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) was an effective approach to use in the radical treatment of patients with advanced bladder carcinoma. Interim analysis from this Phase II study showed that it achieved a high level of locoregional control and overall survival (OS) and an acceptable level of adverse events. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 2000, a total of 105 consecutive patients with high-grade superficial or muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma were given accelerated radiotherapy (50-55 Gy in 4 weeks) with carbogen alone or ARCON. End points of the study were OS, disease-specific, and local regional relapse-free survival, and for late adverse events, urinary (altered urination frequency, incontinence, hematuria, and urgency) and bowel dysfunction (stool frequency and blood loss). Results: At 5 and 10 years, local regional relapse-free survival rates were 44% after ARCON excluding the effect of salvage treatment and 62% after ARCON including the effect of salvage treatment (p = 0.04). Five- and 10-year rates were 35% and 27% for OS and 47% and 46% for disease-specific survival. The highest actuarial rate for Grade 3 or worse late urinary or bowel dysfunction was observed for altered urinary frequency (44% of patients had urinary events every 1 hour or less) and stool frequency of four or more events (26% at 5 years). Conclusions: Historic comparisons with other studies indicate no evidence of an increase in severe or worse adverse events and good permanent control of bladder disease after ARCON radiotherapy.

  16. Chemoradiation for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Potential for Improving Results to Match Those of Current Treatment Modalities for Early-Stage Tumors-Long-Term Results of Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation With Carbogen Breathing and Anemia Correction With Erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, Alfonso Martinez, Jose Carlos; Serdio, Jose Luis de

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To attempt to improve results of chemoradiation for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From March 1996 to April 2007, 98 patients with head and neck cancer (15 Stage III and 83 Stage IV) were treated with a twice-daily hyperfractionated schedule. Eleven patients presented with N0, 11 with N1, 13 with N2A, 17 with N2B, 24 with N2C, and 22 with N3. Each fraction of treatment consisted of 5 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 115 cGy with carbogen breathing. Treatment was given 5 days per week up to total doses of 350 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 8050 cGy in 7 weeks. Anemia was corrected with erythropoietin. Results: Ninety-six patients tolerated the treatment as scheduled. All patients tolerated the planned radiation dose. Local toxicity remained at the level expected with irradiation alone. Chemotherapy toxicity was moderate. Ninety-seven complete responses were achieved. After 11 years of follow-up (median, 81 months), actuarial locoregional control, cause-specific survival, overall survival, and nodal control rates at 5 and 10 years were, respectively, 83% and 83%, 68% and 68%, 57% and 55%, and 100% and 100%. Median follow-up of disease-free survivors was 80 months. No significant differences in survival were observed between the different subsites or between the pretreatment node status groups (N0 vs. N+, N0 vs. N1, N0 vs. N2A, N0 vs. N2B, N0 vs. N2C, and N0 vs. N3). Conclusions: Improving results of chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer up to the level obtained with current treatments for early-stage tumors is a potentially reachable goal.

  17. Birth control pills - combination

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000655.htm Birth control pills - combination To use the sharing features on ... frequency of your menstrual cycles. Types of Combination Birth Control Pills Birth control pills come in packages. You ...

  18. Gross motor control

    MedlinePlus

    Gross motor control is the ability to make large, general movements (such as waving an arm or lifting a ... Gross motor control is a milestone in the development of an infant. Infants develop gross motor control before they ...

  19. Birth control pills - overview

    MedlinePlus

    Contraception - pills - hormonal methods; Hormonal birth control methods; Birth control pills; Contraceptive pills; BCP; OCP ... Birth control pills are also called oral contraceptives or just "the pill." A health care provider must prescribe ...

  20. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a chapter for John Wiley & Son's Mechanical Engineers' Handbook, and covers issues involving air pollution control. Various technologies for controlling sulfur oxides is considered including fuel desulfurization. It also considers control of nitrogen oxides including post...

  1. Essure Permanent Birth Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Implants and Prosthetics Essure Permanent Birth Control Essure Permanent Birth Control Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... evaluation of the Essure System Essure is a permanent birth control method for women (female sterilization). Implantation of Essure ...

  2. Integrated Control Using the SOFFT Control Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim

    1996-01-01

    The need for integrated/constrained control systems has become clearer as advanced aircraft introduced new coupled subsystems such as new propulsion subsystems with thrust vectoring and new aerodynamic designs. In this study, we develop an integrated control design methodology which accomodates constraints among subsystem variables while using the Stochastic Optimal Feedforward/Feedback Control Technique (SOFFT) thus maintaining all the advantages of the SOFFT approach. The Integrated SOFFT Control methodology uses a centralized feedforward control and a constrained feedback control law. The control thus takes advantage of the known coupling among the subsystems while maintaining the identity of subsystems for validation purposes and the simplicity of the feedback law to understand the system response in complicated nonlinear scenarios. The Variable-Gain Output Feedback Control methodology (including constant gain output feedback) is extended to accommodate equality constraints. A gain computation algorithm is developed. The designer can set the cross-gains between two variables or subsystems to zero or another value and optimize the remaining gains subject to the constraint. An integrated control law is designed for a modified F-15 SMTD aircraft model with coupled airframe and propulsion subsystems using the Integrated SOFFT Control methodology to produce a set of desired flying qualities.

  3. Anticipatory Neurofuzzy Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, Claire L.

    1994-01-01

    Technique of feedback control, called "anticipatory neurofuzzy control," developed for use in controlling flexible structures and other dynamic systems for which mathematical models of dynamics poorly known or unknown. Superior ability to act during operation to compensate for, and adapt to, errors in mathematical model of dynamics, changes in dynamics, and noise. Also offers advantage of reduced computing time. Hybrid of two older fuzzy-logic control techniques: standard fuzzy control and predictive fuzzy control.

  4. LSST control technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolivar, A. F.

    1981-01-01

    The necessary controls technology required for precise attitude, shape, and pointing control of large space systems (LSS) is defined. The major controls tasks are summarized with emphasis on: (1) the selection of typical antenna and platform configurations, and the definition of models and performance requirements; (2) evaluating the applicability of state-of-the-art control techniques to the control of large antennas and platforms; and (3) identifying the need for and initiating the development of advanced control concepts required for LSS.

  5. Birth control pill overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Birth control pills, also called oral contraceptives, are prescription medicines used to prevent pregnancy. Birth control pill overdose occurs when someone takes more than the normal or recommended ...

  6. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  7. Predictive fuzzy controller for robotic motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.J.; Hu, C.F.

    1995-12-31

    A system output prediction strategy incorporated with a fuzzy controller is proposed to manipulate the robotic motion control. Usually, the current position and velocity errors are used to operate the fuzzy logic controller for picking out a corresponding rule. When the system has fast planning speed or time varying behavior, the required tracking accuracy is difficult to achieve by adjusting the fuzzy rules. In order to improve the position control accuracy and system robustness for the industrial application, the current position error in the fuzzy rules look-up table is substituted by the predictive position error of the next step by using the grey predictive algorithm. This idea is implemented on a five degrees of freedom robot. The experimental results show that this fuzzy controller has effectively improve the system performance and achieved the facilitation of fuzzy controller implementation.

  8. Unfalsified control based on the ? controller parameterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Peña, R. S.; Colmegna, P.; Bianchi, F.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an implementation of the unfalsified control (UC) method using the Riccati-based parameterisation of ? controllers. The method provides an infinite controller set to (un)falsify the real-time data streams seeking for the best performance. Different sets may be designed to increase the degrees of freedom of the set of controller candidates to perform UC. In general, a set of m central controllers could be designed, each one seeking different objectives and all with their own parameterisation as a function of a stable and bounded transfer matrix. For example, one controller parameterisation could be designed to solve the robust stability of a model set which covers the physical system, therefore guaranteeing feasibility. The implementation requires the online optimisation of either quadratic fractional or quadratic problems, depending on the selection of the cost function. A multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) time-varying model of a permanent magnet synchronous generator illustrates the use of this technique.

  9. Improving Control of Two Motor Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toland, Ronald W.

    2004-01-01

    A computer program controls motors that drive translation stages in a metrology system that consists of a pair of two-axis cathetometers. This program is specific to Compumotor Gemini (or equivalent) motors and the Compumotor 6K-series (or equivalent) motor controller. Relative to the software supplied with the controller, this program affords more capabilities and is easier to use. Written as a Virtual Instrument in the LabVIEW software system, the program presents an imitation control panel that the user can manipulate by use of a keyboard and mouse. There are three modes of operation: command, movement, and joystick. In command mode, single commands are sent to the controller for troubleshooting. In movement mode, distance, speed, and/or acceleration commands are sent to the controller. Position readouts from the motors and from position encoders on the translation stages are displayed in marked fields. At any time, the position readouts can be recorded in a file named by the user. In joystick mode, the program yields control of the motors to a joystick. The program sends commands to, and receives data from, the controller via a serial cable connection, using the serial-communication portion of the software supplied with the controller.

  10. Minimal control power of the controlled teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kabgyun; Kim, Jaewan; Lee, Soojoon

    2016-03-01

    We generalize the control power of a perfect controlled teleportation of an entangled three-qubit pure state, suggested by Li and Ghose [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052305 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.052305], to the control power of a general controlled teleportation of a multiqubit pure state. Thus, we define the minimal control power, and calculate the values of the minimal control power for a class of general three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states and the three-qubit W class whose states have zero three-tangles. Moreover, we show that the standard three-qubit GHZ state and the standard three-qubit W state have the maximal values of the minimal control power for the two classes, respectively. This means that the minimal control power can be interpreted as not only an operational quantity of a three-qubit quantum communication but also a degree of three-qubit entanglement. In addition, we calculate the values of the minimal control power for general n -qubit GHZ states and the n -qubit W -type states.

  11. Aircraft adaptive learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, P. S. T.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    The optimal control theory of stochastic linear systems is discussed in terms of the advantages of distributed-control systems, and the control of randomly-sampled systems. An optimal solution to longitudinal control is derived and applied to the F-8 DFBW aircraft. A randomly-sampled linear process model with additive process and noise is developed.

  12. Manual on Bibliographic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This manual outlines objectives, functions, and methods for establishing national bibliographic control as part of the development of a worldwide system for the control and exchange of bibliographic information. Chapters cover: (1) definitions of bibliographic control and related concepts including Universal Bibliographic Control (UBC) and…

  13. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost Effect on Local Tumor Control in Young Women With Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guinot, Jose-Luis; Baixauli-Perez, Cristobal; Soler, Pablo; Tortajada, Maria Isabel; Moreno, Araceli; Santos, Miguel Angel; Mut, Alejandro; Gozalbo, Francisco; Arribas, Leoncio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local control rate and complications of a single fraction of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) boost in women aged 45 yeas and younger after breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2007, 167 patients between the ages of 26 and 45 years old (72 were 40 years old or younger), with stages T1 to T2 invasive breast cancer with disease-free margin status of at least 5 mm after breast-conserving surgery received 46 to 50 Gy whole-breast irradiation plus a 7-Gy HDR-BT boost (“fast boost”). An axillary dissection was performed in 72.5% of the patients and sentinel lymph node biopsy in 27.5%. A supraclavicular area was irradiated in 19% of the patients. Chemotherapy was used in 86% of the patients and hormone treatment in 77%. Clinical nodes were present in 18% and pathological nodes in 29%. The pathological stage was pT0: 5%, pTis: 3%, pT1: 69% and pT2: 23%. Intraductal component was present in 40% and 28% were G3. Results: At a median follow-up of 92 months, 9 patients relapsed on the margin of the implant, and 1 patient in another quadrant, resulting in a 10-year local relapse rate of 4.3% and a breast relapse rate of 4.9%, with breast preservation in 93.4%; no case of mastectomy due to poor cosmesis arose. Actuarial 5- and 10-year disease-free, cause-specific, and overall survival rates were 87.9% and 85.8%, and 92.1% and 88.4%, and 92.1% and 87.3%, respectively. In a univariate analysis, triple-negative cases and negative hormone receptors did worse, but in a multivariate analysis, only the last factor was significant for local and breast control. Asymptomatic fibrosis G2 was recorded in 3 cases, and there were no other late complications. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 97% of cases. Conclusions: A single dose of 7 Gy using the fast-boost technique is well tolerated, with a low rate of late complications and improved local tumor control in women aged 45 and younger, compared to published data

  14. Chaotic neural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, A.; Ali, M. K.

    2001-04-01

    We consider the problem of stabilizing unstable equilibria by discrete controls (the controls take discrete values at discrete moments of time). We prove that discrete control typically creates a chaotic attractor in the vicinity of an equilibrium. Artificial neural networks with reinforcement learning are known to be able to learn such a control scheme. We consider examples of such systems, discuss some details of implementing the reinforcement learning to controlling unstable equilibria, and show that the arising dynamics is characterized by positive Lyapunov exponents, and hence is chaotic. This chaos can be observed both in the controlled system and in the activity patterns of the controller.

  15. Nuclear reactor control apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sridhar, Bettadapur N.

    1983-11-01

    Nuclear reactor core safety rod release apparatus comprises a control rod having a detent notch in the form of an annular peripheral recess at its upper end, a control rod support tube for raising and lowering the control rod under normal conditions, latches pivotally mounted on the control support tube with free ends thereof normally disposed in the recess in the control rod, and cam means for pivoting the latches out of the recess in the control rod when a scram condition occurs. One embodiment of the invention comprises an additional magnetically-operated latch for releasing the control rod under two different conditions, one involving seismic shock.

  16. AFWAL control technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehne, V. O.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of space oriented control technology programs which are applicable to flexible large space structures is presented. The spacecraft control activity is interdisciplinary with activities in structures, structural dynamics and control brought together. The large flexible structures to be controlled have many physical factors that influence the final controllability of the vehicle. Factors are studied such as rigidity of both structural elements and joints, damping inherent in both material and discrete dampers located throughout the structure, and the bandwidth of both sensors and actuators used to sense motion and control are the physical factors that are interdisciplinary and influence control.

  17. Quantum multiobservable control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Raj; Wu, Rebing; Rabitz, Herschel

    2008-06-01

    We present deterministic algorithms for the simultaneous control of an arbitrary number of quantum observables. Unlike optimal control approaches based on cost function optimization, quantum multiobservable tracking control (MOTC) is capable of tracking predetermined homotopic trajectories to target expectation values in the space of multiobservables. The convergence of these algorithms is facilitated by the favorable critical topology of quantum control landscapes. Fundamental properties of quantum multiobservable control landscapes, including the MOTC Gramian matrix, are introduced. The effects of multiple control objectives on the structure and complexity of optimal fields are examined. With minor modifications, the techniques described herein can be applied to general quantum multiobjective control problems.

  18. HYDRAULIC SERVO CONTROL MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Hussey, R.B.; Gottsche, M.J. Jr.

    1963-09-17

    A hydraulic servo control mechanism of compact construction and low fluid requirements is described. The mechanism consists of a main hydraulic piston, comprising the drive output, which is connected mechanically for feedback purposes to a servo control piston. A control sleeve having control slots for the system encloses the servo piston, which acts to cover or uncover the slots as a means of controlling the operation of the system. This operation permits only a small amount of fluid to regulate the operation of the mechanism, which, as a result, is compact and relatively light. This mechanism is particuiarly adaptable to the drive and control of control rods in nuclear reactors. (auth)

  19. An intelligent traffic controller

    SciTech Connect

    Kagolanu, K.; Fink, R.; Smartt, H.; Powell, R.; Larsen, E.

    1995-12-01

    A controller with advanced control logic can significantly improve traffic flows at intersections. In this vein, this paper explores fuzzy rules and algorithms to improve the intersection operation by rationalizing phase changes and green times. The fuzzy logic for control is enhanced by the exploration of neural networks for families of membership functions and for ideal cost functions. The concepts of fuzzy logic control are carried forth into the controller architecture. Finally, the architecture and the modules are discussed. In essence, the control logic and architecture of an intelligent controller are explored.

  20. Control augmentation for lateral control wheel steering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulkes, R. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Flight control system design for lateral control wheel steering is discussed. Two alternate designs are presented. The first design is a roll-rate command, bank-angle hold system with a wings-level track-hold submode. The second is a curved-track-hold system. Design details and real-time flight simulator results are included.