Science.gov

Sample records for actuated impact device

  1. Pneumatically actuated micropipetting device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szita, Nicolas; Buser, Rudolf A.

    1998-03-01

    We have realized a valveless micropipetting device with an integrated sensor which can aspirate and dispense liquid volumes without any valves, hence without any reflow or dead volume. With an external pneumatic actuation, we have demonstrated aspirating and dispensing from 190nl of 6 (mu) l of water. Measurements showed a standard deviation of down to 1 percent. An integrated capacitive sensor will allow monitoring of the pressure throughout the pipetting process and detect malfunctions, e.g. clotting of the pipetting tip. It is our intention to use this demonstrated precise aspiration mechanism in combination with a micromachined reaction chamber and a miniaturized optical analysis system.

  2. Impact micro-positioning actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuerden, Brian (Inventor); Angel, J. Roger P. (Inventor); Burge, James H. (Inventor); DeRigne, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An impact micro-positioning actuator. In one aspect of the invention, a threaded shaft is threadably received in a nut and the nut is impacted by an impacting device, causing the nut first to rotate relative to the shaft by slipping as a result of shaft inertia and subsequently to stick to the shaft as a result of the frictional force therebetween. The nut is returned to its initial position by a return force provided by a return mechanism after impact. The micro-positioning actuator is further improved by controlling at least one and preferably all of the following: the friction, the impact provided by the impacting device, the return force provided by the return mechanism, and the inertia of the shaft. In another aspect of the invention, a threaded shaft is threadably received in a nut and the shaft is impacted by an impacting device, causing the shaft to rotate relative to the nut.

  3. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  4. Electrostatically actuatable light modulating device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    The electrostatically actuatable light modulator utilizes an opaque substrate plate patterned with an array of aperture cells, the cells comprised of physically positionable dielectric shutters and electrostatic actuators. With incorporation of a light source and a viewing screen, a projection display system is effected. Inclusion of a color filter array aligned with the aperture cells accomplishes a color display. The system is realized in terms of a silicon based manufacturing technology allowing fabrication of a high resolution capability in a physically small device which with the utilization of included magnification optics allows both large and small projection displays.

  5. Elastomeric actuator devices for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Jolesz, Ferenc A. (Inventor); Kacher, Daniel F. (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed to devices and systems used in magnetic imaging environments that include an actuator device having an elastomeric dielectric film with at least two electrodes, and a frame attached to the actuator device. The frame can have a plurality of configurations including, such as, for example, at least two members that can be, but not limited to, curved beams, rods, plates, or parallel beams. These rigid members can be coupled to flexible members such as, for example, links wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. The frame preferably provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The linear actuation force characteristic is defined as .+-.20% and preferably 10% over a displacement range. The actuator further includes a passive element disposed between the flexible members to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. The preferred embodiment actuator includes one or more layers of the elastomeric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of many elastomeric materials such as, for example, but not limited to, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  6. Evolutionary flight and enabling smart actuator devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Justin; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2007-04-01

    Recent interest in morphing vehicles with multiple, optimized configurations has led to renewed research on biological flight. The flying vertebrates - birds, bats, and pterosaurs - all made or make use of various morphing devices to achieve lift to suit rapidly changing flight demands, including maneuvers as complex as perching and hovering. The first part of this paper will discuss these devices, with a focus on the morphing elements and structural strong suits of each creature. Modern flight correlations to these devices will be discussed and analyzed as valid adaptations of these evolutionary traits. The second part of the paper will focus on the use of active joint structures for use in morphing aircraft devices. Initial work on smart actuator devices focused on NASA Langley's Hyper-Elliptical Cambered Span (HECS) wing platform, which led to development of a discretized spanwise curvature effector. This mechanism uses shape memory alloy (SMA) as the sole morphing actuator, allowing fast rotation with lightweight components at the expense of energy inefficiency. Phase two of morphing actuator development will add an element of active rigidity to the morphing structure, in the form of shape memory polymer (SMP). Employing a composite structure of polymer and alloy, this joint will function as part of a biomimetic morphing actuator system in a more energetically efficient manner. The joint is thermally actuated to allow compliance on demand and rigidity in the nominal configuration. Analytical and experimental joint models are presented, and potential applications on a bat-wing aircraft structure are outlined.

  7. Electrolytic actuators: alternative, high-performance, material-based devices.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Colin G; Freund, Michael S

    2002-06-11

    The emerging field of materials-based actuation continues to be the focus of considerable research because of its inherent scalability and its promise to drive micromechanical devices that cannot be realized with conventional mechanical actuator strategies. The electrolytic phase transformation actuator offers a new broad-spectrum solution to the problem of direct conversion of electrical to mechanical energy. Strains of 136,000% and unoptimized work cycle efficiencies near 50% are demonstrated in a prototype device. Conceivably capable of generating stress beyond 200 MPa, this new approach promises performance orders of magnitude beyond other novel actuation strategies.

  8. Electrolytic actuators: Alternative, high-performance, material-based devices

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Colin G.; Freund, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    The emerging field of materials-based actuation continues to be the focus of considerable research because of its inherent scalability and its promise to drive micromechanical devices that cannot be realized with conventional mechanical actuator strategies. The electrolytic phase transformation actuator offers a new broad-spectrum solution to the problem of direct conversion of electrical to mechanical energy. Strains of 136,000% and unoptimized work cycle efficiencies near 50% are demonstrated in a prototype device. Conceivably capable of generating stress beyond 200 MPa, this new approach promises performance orders of magnitude beyond other novel actuation strategies. PMID:12060728

  9. On the development of planar actuators for variable stiffness devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Markus; Gerlach, Gerald

    2013-04-01

    This contribution describes the development, the potential and the limitations of planar actuators for controlling bending devices with variable stiffness. Such structures are supposed to be components of new smart, self-sensing and -controlling composite materials for lightweight constructions. To realize a proper stiffness control, it is necessary to develop reliable actuators with high actuation capabilities based on smart materials. Several actuator designs driven by electroactive polymers (EAPs) are presented and discussed regarding to their applicability in such structures. To investigate the actuators, variable-flexural stiffness devices based on the control of its area moment of inertia were developed. The devices consist of a multi-layer stack of thin, individual plates. Stiffness variation is caused by planar actuators which control the sliding behavior between the layers by form closure structures. Previous investigations have shown that actuators with high actuation potential are needed to ensure reliable connections between the layers. For that reason, two kinds of EAPs Danfoss PolyPower and VHB 4905 by 3M, have been studied as driving unit. These EAP-driven actuators will be compared based on experimental measurements and finite element analyses.

  10. Polymer-based actuators for virtual reality devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzmacher, Christian; Hafez, Moustapha; Benali Khoudja, Mohamed; Bernardoni, Paul; Dubowsky, Steven

    2004-07-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is gaining more importance in our society. For many years, VR has been limited to the entertainment applications. Today, practical applications such as training and prototyping find a promising future in VR. Therefore there is an increasing demand for low-cost, lightweight haptic devices in virtual reality (VR) environment. Electroactive polymers seem to be a potential actuation technology that could satisfy these requirements. Dielectric polymers developed the past few years have shown large displacements (more than 300%). This feature makes them quite interesting for integration in haptic devices due to their muscle-like behaviour. Polymer actuators are flexible and lightweight as compared to traditional actuators. Using stacks with several layers of elatomeric film increase the force without limiting the output displacement. The paper discusses some design methods for a linear dielectric polymer actuator for VR devices. Experimental results of the actuator performance is presented.

  11. Electrically actuatable temporal tristimulus-color device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1992-01-01

    The electrically actuated light filter operates in a cyclical temporal mode to effect a tristimulus-color light analyzer. Construction is based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer comprised of a high-speed movable mirror pair and cyclically powered electrical actuators. When combined with a single vidicon tube or a monochrome solid state image sensor, a temporally operated tristimulus-color video camera is effected. A color-generated is accomplished when constructed with a companion light source and is a flicker-free colored-light source for transmission type display systems. Advantages of low cost and small physical size result from photolithographic batch-processing manufacturability.

  12. Actuator device utilizing a conductive polymer gel

    DOEpatents

    Chinn, Douglas A.; Irvin, David J.

    2004-02-03

    A valve actuator based on a conductive polymer gel is disclosed. A nonconductive housing is provided having two separate chambers separated by a porous frit. The conductive polymer is held in one chamber and an electrolyte solution, used as a source of charged ions, is held in the second chamber. The ends of the housing a sealed with a flexible elastomer. The polymer gel is further provide with electrodes with which to apply an electrical potential across the gel in order to initiate an oxidation reaction which in turn drives anions across the porous frit and into the polymer gel, swelling the volume of the gel and simultaneously contracting the volume of the electrolyte solution. Because the two end chambers are sealed the flexible elastomer expands or contracts with the chamber volume change. By manipulating the potential across the gel the motion of the elastomer can be controlled to act as a "gate" to open or close a fluid channel and thereby control flow through that channel.

  13. Laser-actuated holographic storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, R. A.; Nagle, E. M.; Steinmetz, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Device permits automatic selection of one out of thousands of pages in holographic memory system by using laser beam. In typical operation for 2 to 3 C temperature interval, using dc power supply with no power regulation, holograms were successfully written and erased over 2- by 2-cm area, using 80-mW argon laser beam.

  14. Grasp Assist Device with Shared Tendon Actuator Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bergelin, Bryan J. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A grasp assist device includes a glove with first and second tendon-driven fingers, a tendon, and a sleeve with a shared tendon actuator assembly. Tendon ends are connected to the respective first and second fingers. The actuator assembly includes a drive assembly having a drive axis and a tendon hook. The tendon hook, which defines an arcuate surface slot, is linearly translatable along the drive axis via the drive assembly, e.g., a servo motor thereof. The flexible tendon is routed through the surface slot such that the surface slot divides the flexible tendon into two portions each terminating in a respective one of the first and second ends. The drive assembly may include a ball screw and nut. An end cap of the actuator assembly may define two channels through which the respective tendon portions pass. The servo motor may be positioned off-axis with respect to the drive axis.

  15. Inductively Heated Shape Memory Polymer for the Magnetic Actuation of Medical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, P; Mckinley, G; Wilson, T; Small, W; Benett, W; Bearinger, J; McElfresh, M; Maitland, D

    2005-09-06

    Presently there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation of a safe and effective method of thermally actuating various device geometries in vivo. A novel scheme of actuation by Curie-thermoregulated inductive heating is presented. Prototype medical devices made from SMP loaded with Nickel Zinc ferrite ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was performed on both the particle-loaded and neat SMP materials to assess the impact of the ferrite particles on the mechanical properties of the samples. Calorimetry was used to quantify the rate of heat generation as a function of particle size and volumetric loading of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive heating. Rapid and uniform heating was achieved in complex device geometries and particle loading up to 10% volume content did not interfere with the shape recovery of the SMP.

  16. Stability, Nonlinearity and Reliability of Electrostatically Actuated MEMS Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Meng, Guang; Chen, Di

    2007-01-01

    Electrostatic micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) is a special branch with a wide range of applications in sensing and actuating devices in MEMS. This paper provides a survey and analysis of the electrostatic force of importance in MEMS, its physical model, scaling effect, stability, nonlinearity and reliability in detail. It is necessary to understand the effects of electrostatic forces in MEMS and then many phenomena of practical importance, such as pull-in instability and the effects of effective stiffness, dielectric charging, stress gradient, temperature on the pull-in voltage, nonlinear dynamic effects and reliability due to electrostatic forces occurred in MEMS can be explained scientifically, and consequently the great potential of MEMS technology could be explored effectively and utilized optimally. A simplified parallel-plate capacitor model is proposed to investigate the resonance response, inherent nonlinearity, stiffness softened effect and coupled nonlinear effect of the typical electrostatically actuated MEMS devices. Many failure modes and mechanisms and various methods and techniques, including materials selection, reasonable design and extending the controllable travel range used to analyze and reduce the failures are discussed in the electrostatically actuated MEMS devices. Numerical simulations and discussions indicate that the effects of instability, nonlinear characteristics and reliability subjected to electrostatic forces cannot be ignored and are in need of further investigation.

  17. Flexible Low-Mass Devices and Mechanisms Actuated by Electroactive Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y; Leary, S.; Shahinpoor, M.; Harrison, J. O.; Smith, J.

    1999-01-01

    Miniature, lightweight, miser actuators that operate similar to biological muscles can be used to develop robotic devices with unmatched capabilities to impact many technology areas. Electroactive polymers (EAP) offer the potential to producing such actuators and their main attractive feature is their ability to induce relatively large bending or longitudinal strain. Generally, these materials produce a relatively low force and the applications that can be considered at the current state of the art are relatively limited. This reported study is concentrating on the development of effective EAPs and the resultant enabling mechanisms employing their unique characteristics. Several EAP driven mechanisms, which emulate human hand, were developed including a gripper, manipulator arm and surface wiper. The manipulator arm was made of a composite rod with an EAP actuator consisting of a scrolled rope that is activated longitudinally by an electrostatic field. A gripper was made to serve as an end effector and it consisted of multiple bending EAP fingers for grabbing and holding such objects as rocks. An EAP surface wiper was developed to operate like a human finger and to demonstrate the potential to remove dust from optical and IR windows as well as solar cells. These EAP driven devices are taking advantage of the large actuation displacement of these materials but there is need for a significantly greater actuation force capability.

  18. Applications catalog of pyrotechnically actuated devices/systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeholzer, Thomas L.; Smith, Floyd Z.; Eastwood, Charles W.; Steffes, Paul R.

    1995-01-01

    A compilation of basic information on pyrotechnically actuated devices/systems used in NASA aerospace and aeronautic applications was formatted into a catalog. The intent is to provide (1) a quick reference digest of the types of operational pyro mechanisms and (2) a source of contacts for further details. Data on these items was furnished by the NASA Centers that developed and/or utilized such devices to perform specific functions on spacecraft, launch vehicles, aircraft, and ground support equipment. Information entries include an item title, user center name, commercial contractor/vendor, identifying part number(s), a basic figure, briefly described purpose and operation, previous usage, and operational limits/requirements.

  19. Electrostatic artificial eyelid actuator as an analog micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Scott H.; Dausch, David E.; Solomon, Steven L.; Lamvik, Michael K.

    2005-05-01

    An electrostatic MEMS actuator is described for use as an analog micromirror device (AMD) for high performance, broadband, hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) scene generation. Current state-of-the-art technology is based on resistively heated pixel arrays. As these arrays drive to the higher scene temperatures required by missile defense scenarios, the power required to drive the large format resistive arrays will ultimately become prohibitive. Existing digital micromirrors (DMD) are, in principle, capable of generating the required scene irradiances, but suffer from limited dynamic range, resolution and flicker effects. An AMD would be free of these limitations, and so represents a viable alternative for high performance UV/VIS/IR scene generation. An electrostatic flexible film actuator technology, developed for use as "artificial eyelid" shutters for focal plane sensors to protect against damaging radiation, is suitable as an AMD for analog control of projection irradiance. In shutter applications, the artificial eyelid actuator contained radius of curvature as low as 25um and operated at high voltage (>200V). Recent testing suggests that these devices are capable of analog operation as reflective microcantilever mirrors appropriate for scene projector systems. In this case, the device would possess larger radius and operate at lower voltages (20-50V). Additionally, frame rates have been measured at greater than 5kHz for continuous operation. The paper will describe the artificial eyelid technology, preliminary measurements of analog test pixels, and design aspects related to application for scene projection systems. We believe this technology will enable AMD projectors with at least 5122 spatial resolution, non-temporally-modulated output, and pixel response times of <1.25ms.

  20. A portable air jet actuator device for mechanical system identification.

    PubMed

    Belden, Jesse; Staats, Wayne L; Mazumdar, Anirban; Hunter, Ian W

    2011-03-01

    System identification of limb mechanics can help diagnose ailments and can aid in the optimization of robotic limb control parameters and designs. An interesting fluid phenomenon--the Coandă effect--is utilized in a portable actuator to provide a stochastic binary force disturbance to a limb system. The design of the actuator is approached with the goal of creating a portable device which could be deployed on human or robotic limbs for in situ mechanical system identification. The viability of the device is demonstrated by identifying the parameters of an underdamped elastic beam system with fixed inertia and stiffness and variable damping. The nonparametric compliance impulse response yielded from the system identification is modeled as a second-order system and the resultant parameters are found to be in excellent agreement with those found using more traditional system identification techniques. The current design could be further miniaturized and developed as a portable, wireless, unrestrained mechanical system identification instrument for less intrusive and more widespread use. PMID:21456788

  1. A portable air jet actuator device for mechanical system identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belden, Jesse; Staats, Wayne L.; Mazumdar, Anirban; Hunter, Ian W.

    2011-03-01

    System identification of limb mechanics can help diagnose ailments and can aid in the optimization of robotic limb control parameters and designs. An interesting fluid phenomenon—the Coandă effect—is utilized in a portable actuator to provide a stochastic binary force disturbance to a limb system. The design of the actuator is approached with the goal of creating a portable device which could be deployed on human or robotic limbs for in situ mechanical system identification. The viability of the device is demonstrated by identifying the parameters of an underdamped elastic beam system with fixed inertia and stiffness and variable damping. The nonparametric compliance impulse response yielded from the system identification is modeled as a second-order system and the resultant parameters are found to be in excellent agreement with those found using more traditional system identification techniques. The current design could be further miniaturized and developed as a portable, wireless, unrestrained mechanical system identification instrument for less intrusive and more widespread use.

  2. Dielectric elastomer actuators as self-sensing devices: a new method of superimposing actuating and sensing signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, Maximilian; Zorell, Ulrich; Wetzel, Thomas; Reitelshöfer, Sebastian; Yoo, In Seong; Franke, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) have a lot of advantages such as high energy efficiency, unrivaled power-toweight ratio and soft structure. Furthermore this new kind of actuator is capable of sensing its deformation and status without additional sensing devices. Therefore, DEAs are acknowledged as self-sensing actuators. In this contribution a new self-sensing technique for DEAs is presented, in which the capacitance of DEAs under deformation is measured using high voltage signals. For this purpose, simple signal processing algorithms and a novel method of superimposing actuating and sensing signals are implemented. By connecting the ground potential electrode of the DEA to a sinusoidal sensing signal, the DEA is used as a passive first order high-pass filter. The other electrode of the DEA is connected to the actuation voltage, which is superimposed with the sinusoidal signal. The amplitude of this signal is basically dependent on the capacitance of the actuator. Therefore, the change of the capacitance induced by contraction of the actuator alters the amplitude of the sinusoidal signal. The amplitude change can then be interpreted as capacity change and can be used to estimate the mechanical deformation of the DEA. In comparison to existing methods, this approach is promising for a miniaturized circuit and therefore for later use in mobile systems. In this paper, the new concept of superimposing actuating and sensing signals for self-sensing DEAs is validated with an experimental setup and several known capacities. The first results are presented and discussed in detail.

  3. New Actuators Using ER Fluid and Their Applications to Force Display Devices in Virtual Reality and Medical Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusho, Junji; Sakaguchi, Masamichi

    We developed ER actuators with low inertia. ER actuator is a torque-controllable clutch which uses an electrorheological fluid. It is shown that this actuator has good properties for force display device, physical therapy treatment, etc. We developed new force display devices for virtual reality which use ER actuators.

  4. Nano scale devices: Fabrication, actuation, and related fluidic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Hao

    Using external actuating magnetic fields to manipulate magnetic parts is an efficient method to manipulate mesoscopic actable devices. Extensive researches have explored the potentials of self-assembly techniques based on capillary force, static charge force, drying, surface tension, and even dynamic fields as a low cost method for ordered 2D or 3D super-lattice structures for new materials and devices. But the ability of tunable patterning nano-particles for designed actable devices is still a requirement yet to be met. Utilizing anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes as templates, soft-magnetic nanowires around 200 nm in diameter, 10 microns long have been fabricated. In this thesis, I describe a method to assemble these magnetic nanowires into a two dimension Wigner structure, of which the wire-wire distance is conveniently adjustable during the fabrication procedure. Using geometric tailored magnetic fields, we can plant these self-assembled magnetic nanowires with desired patterns into a thin soft polymer support layer. The final devices may be readily actuated by an external actuating magnetic field (a self-designed magnetic system, 3-dimensional force microscope (3DFM)) with precise patterns and frequencies in a micro-fluidic system. This method offers a general method to fabricate mesoscopic devices from a wide range of materials with magnetic dipoles to desired structures. And the actable devices themselves can find direct usage in low Re number flow mixing and bio-physical fluidic dynamic researches. The beating of cilia and flagella, slender cylinders 250 nanometers in diameter with lengths from 7 to 50 microns, is responsible for many important biological functions such as organism feeding, propulsion, for bacterial clearance in the lungs and for the right-left asymmetry in vertebrates. The hydrodynamics produced by these beating structures, including mixing, shear and extensional flows, is not understood. We developed an experimental model system for

  5. Analytical model of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model magnetic bearing actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical model of an Annular Momentum Control Device (AMCD) laboratory test model magnetic bearing actuator with permanent magnet fluxbiasing is presented. An AMCD consists of a spinning annular rim which is suspended by a noncontacting linear electromagnetic spin motor. The actuator is treated as a lumped-parameter electromechanical system in the development of the model.

  6. Stretchable Materials for Robust Soft Actuators towards Assistive Wearable Devices

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Gunjan; Besuchet, Nicolas; Audergon, Basile; Paik, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Soft actuators made from elastomeric active materials can find widespread potential implementation in a variety of applications ranging from assistive wearable technologies targeted at biomedical rehabilitation or assistance with activities of daily living, bioinspired and biomimetic systems, to gripping and manipulating fragile objects, and adaptable locomotion. In this manuscript, we propose a novel two-component soft actuator design and design tool that produces actuators targeted towards these applications with enhanced mechanical performance and manufacturability. Our numerical models developed using the finite element method can predict the actuator behavior at large mechanical strains to allow efficient design iterations for system optimization. Based on two distinctive actuator prototypes’ (linear and bending actuators) experimental results that include free displacement and blocked-forces, we have validated the efficacy of the numerical models. The presented extensive investigation of mechanical performance for soft actuators with varying geometric parameters demonstrates the practical application of the design tool, and the robustness of the actuator hardware design, towards diverse soft robotic systems for a wide set of assistive wearable technologies, including replicating the motion of several parts of the human body. PMID:27670953

  7. Stretchable Materials for Robust Soft Actuators towards Assistive Wearable Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Gunjan; Besuchet, Nicolas; Audergon, Basile; Paik, Jamie

    2016-09-01

    Soft actuators made from elastomeric active materials can find widespread potential implementation in a variety of applications ranging from assistive wearable technologies targeted at biomedical rehabilitation or assistance with activities of daily living, bioinspired and biomimetic systems, to gripping and manipulating fragile objects, and adaptable locomotion. In this manuscript, we propose a novel two-component soft actuator design and design tool that produces actuators targeted towards these applications with enhanced mechanical performance and manufacturability. Our numerical models developed using the finite element method can predict the actuator behavior at large mechanical strains to allow efficient design iterations for system optimization. Based on two distinctive actuator prototypes’ (linear and bending actuators) experimental results that include free displacement and blocked-forces, we have validated the efficacy of the numerical models. The presented extensive investigation of mechanical performance for soft actuators with varying geometric parameters demonstrates the practical application of the design tool, and the robustness of the actuator hardware design, towards diverse soft robotic systems for a wide set of assistive wearable technologies, including replicating the motion of several parts of the human body.

  8. Focus tunable device actuator based on ionic polymer metal composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-Wei; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2015-09-01

    IPMC (Ionic Polymer Metallic Composite) is a kind of electroactive polymer (EAP) which is used as an actuator because of its low driving voltage and small size. The mechanism of IPMC actuator is due to the ionic diffusion when the voltage gradient is applied. In this paper, the complex IPMC fabrication such as Ag-IPMC be further developed in this paper. The comparison of response time and tip bending displacement of Pt-IPMC and Ag-IPMC will also be presented. We also use the optimized IPMC as the lens actuator integrated with curvilinear microlens array, and use the 3D printer to make a simple module and spring stable system. We also used modeling software, ANSYS Workbench, to confirm the effect of spring system. Finally, we successfully drive the lens system in 200μm stroke under 2.5V driving voltage within 1 seconds, and the resonant frequency is approximately 500 Hz.

  9. Lead-Free Propellant for Propellant Actuated Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, John L.

    2000-01-01

    Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Division's CAD/PAD Department has been working to remove toxic compounds from our products for about a decade. In 1992, we embarked on an effort to develop a lead-free double base propellant to replace that of a foreign sole source. At the time there were availability concerns. In 1995, the department developed a strategic proposal to include a wider range of products. Efforts included such efforts as removing lead sheathing from linear explosives and replacing lead azide and lead styphnate compounds. This paper will discuss efforts specifically related to developing non-leaded double base propellant for use in various Propellant Actuated Devices (PADs) for aircrew escape systems. The propellants can replace their leaded counterparts, mitigating lead handling, processing, or toxic exposure to the environment and personnel. This work eliminates the use of leaded compounds, replacing them with a more environmentally benign metal-organic salt. Historically double-base propellants have held an advantage over other families of energetic materials through their relative insensitivity of the burning rate to changes in temperature and pressure. This desirable ballistic effect has been obtained with the use of a lead-organic salt alone or in a physical mixture with a copper-organic salt, or more recently with a lead-copper complex. These ballistic modifiers are typically added to the double-base 'paste' prior to gelatinization on heated calendars or one type or another. The effect of constant burning rate over a pressure range is called a 'plateau' while an even more beneficial effect of decreasing burning rate with increasing pressure is termed a 'mesa.' The latter effect results in very low temperature sensitivity of the propellant burning rate. Propellants with such effects are ideal tactical rocket motor propellants. The use of lead compounds poses a concern for the environment and personnel safety due to the metal's toxic

  10. Halbach array type focusing actuator for small and thin optical data storage device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Q.; Park, Kang-Ho; Paek, Mun Chul

    2004-09-01

    The small form factor optical data storage devices are developing rapidly nowadays. Since it is designed for portable and compatibility with flesh memory, its components such as disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within 5 mm. The thickness of focusing actuator is within 2 mm and the total working range is +/-100um, with the resolution of less than 1μm. Since the thickness is limited tightly, it is hard to place the yoke that closes the magnetic circuit and hard to make strong flux density without yoke. Therefore, Halbach array is adopted to increase the magnetic flux of one side without yoke. The proposed Halbach array type focusing actuator has the advantage of thin actuation structure with sacrificing less flex density than conventional magnetic array. The optical head unit is moved on the swing arm type tracking actuator. Focusing coil is attached to swing arm, and Halbach magnet array is positioned at the bottom of deck along the tracking line, and focusing actuator exerts force by the Fleming's left hand rule. The dynamics, working range, control resolution of focusing actuator are analyzed and performed.

  11. Assistive acting movement therapy devices with pneumatic rotary-type soft actuators.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, André; Baiden, David; Ivlev, Oleg

    2012-12-01

    Inherent compliance and assistive behavior are assumed to be essential properties for safe human-robot interaction. Rehabilitation robots demand the highest standards in this respect because the machine interacts directly with weak persons who are often sensitive to pain. Using novel soft fluidic actuators with rotary elastic chambers (REC actuators), compact, lightweight, and cost-effective therapeutic devices can be developed. This article describes modular design and control strategies for new assistive acting robotic devices for upper and lower extremities. Due to the inherent compliance and natural back-drivability of pneumatic REC actuators, these movement therapy devices provide gentle treatment, whereby the interaction forces between humans and the therapy device are estimated without the use of expensive force/torque sensors. An active model-based gravity compensation based on separated models of the robot and of the individual patient's extremity provides the basis for effective assistive control. The utilization of pneumatic actuators demands a special safety concept, which is merged with control algorithms to provide a sufficient level of safeness and to catch any possible system errors and/or emergency situations. A self-explanatory user interface allows for easy, intuitive handling. Prototypes are very comfortable for use due to several control routines that work in the background. Assistive devices have been tested extensively with several healthy persons; the knee/hip movement therapy device is now under clinical trials at the Clinic for Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery at the Klinikum Stuttgart.

  12. Assistive acting movement therapy devices with pneumatic rotary-type soft actuators.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, André; Baiden, David; Ivlev, Oleg

    2012-12-01

    Inherent compliance and assistive behavior are assumed to be essential properties for safe human-robot interaction. Rehabilitation robots demand the highest standards in this respect because the machine interacts directly with weak persons who are often sensitive to pain. Using novel soft fluidic actuators with rotary elastic chambers (REC actuators), compact, lightweight, and cost-effective therapeutic devices can be developed. This article describes modular design and control strategies for new assistive acting robotic devices for upper and lower extremities. Due to the inherent compliance and natural back-drivability of pneumatic REC actuators, these movement therapy devices provide gentle treatment, whereby the interaction forces between humans and the therapy device are estimated without the use of expensive force/torque sensors. An active model-based gravity compensation based on separated models of the robot and of the individual patient's extremity provides the basis for effective assistive control. The utilization of pneumatic actuators demands a special safety concept, which is merged with control algorithms to provide a sufficient level of safeness and to catch any possible system errors and/or emergency situations. A self-explanatory user interface allows for easy, intuitive handling. Prototypes are very comfortable for use due to several control routines that work in the background. Assistive devices have been tested extensively with several healthy persons; the knee/hip movement therapy device is now under clinical trials at the Clinic for Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery at the Klinikum Stuttgart. PMID:23241570

  13. Design of a series visco-elastic actuator for multi-purpose rehabilitation haptic device

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Variable structure parallel mechanisms, actuated with low-cost motors with serially added elasticity (series elastic actuator - SEA), has considerable potential in rehabilitation robotics. However, reflected masses of a SEA and variable structure parallel mechanism linked with a compliant actuator result in a potentially unstable coupled mechanical oscillator, which has not been addressed in previous studies. Methods The aim of this paper was to investigate through simulation, experimentation and theoretical analysis the necessary conditions that guarantee stability and passivity of a haptic device (based on a variable structure parallel mechanism driven by SEA actuators) when in contact with a human. We have analyzed an equivalent mechanical system where a dissipative element, a mechanical damper was placed in parallel to a spring in SEA. Results The theoretical analysis yielded necessary conditions relating the damping coefficient, spring stiffness, both reflected masses, controller's gain and desired virtual impedance that needs to be fulfilled in order to obtain stable and passive behavior of the device when in contact with a human. The validity of the derived passivity conditions were confirmed in simulations and experimentally. Conclusions These results show that by properly designing variable structure parallel mechanisms actuated with SEA, versatile and affordable rehabilitation robotic devices can be conceived, which may facilitate their wide spread use in clinical and home environments. PMID:21251299

  14. A Pneumatic Actuated Microfluidic Beads-Trapping Device

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Guocheng; Cai, Ziliang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wanjun; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-08-20

    The development of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic microbeads trapping device is reported in this paper. Besides fluid channels, the proposed device includes a pneumatic control chamber and a beads-trapping chamber with a filter array structure. The pneumatic flow control chamber and the beads-trapping chamber are vertically stacked and separated by a thin membrane. By adjusting the pressure in the pneumatic control chamber, the membrane can either be pushed against the filter array to set the device in trapping mode or be released to set the device in releasing mode. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics simulation was conducted to optimize the geometry design of the filter array structure; the device fabrication was also carried out. The prototype device was tested and the preliminary experimental results showed that it can be used as a beads-trapping unit for various biochemistry and analytical chemistry applications, especially for flow injection analysis systems.

  15. Reactive actuators and sensors integrated in one device: mimicking brain-muscles feedback communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Toribio F.; Martinez, Jose G.

    2013-04-01

    Artificial muscles based on carbon derivative molecular structures are chemical (electro-chemo-mechanical) actuators. The electrochemical reaction drives the film volume variation and the actuation. The applied current controls the movement rate and the charge controls the amplitude of the displacement (Faraday' motors). Any working or surrounding variable influencing the reaction rate will be sensed by the muscle potential, or by the consumed electrical energy, evolution during actuation. Experimental results and full theoretical description of the basic reactive material and of any dual electrochemical sensing-actuator will be presented. During current flow the muscle potential and the consumed electrical energy evolution are influenced by the working variables: temperature, electrolyte concentration, driving current, film volume variation (external pressure, applied strain, hanged masses, obstacles in its way). The working muscle becomes an electrochemical sensor. Only two connecting wires contain actuating (current) and sensing (potential) signals read and controlled, at any time from the computer-generator. One device integrates several sensing and actuating tools working simultaneously mimicking muscles/brain feedback communication.

  16. Impacting device for testing insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, J. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An electro-mechanical impacting device for testing the bonding of foam insulation to metal is descirbed. The device lightly impacts foam insulation attached to metal to determine whether the insulation is properly bonded to the metal and to determine the quality of the bond. A force measuring device, preferably a load cell mounted on the impacting device, measures the force of the impact and the duration of the time the hammer head is actually in contact with the insulation. The impactor is designed in the form of a handgun having a driving spring which can propel a plunger forward to cause a hammer head to impact the insulation. The device utilizes a trigger mechanism which provides precise adjustements, allowing fireproof operation.

  17. Autofocus fluid lens device construction and implementation of modified ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) membrane actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Rudolf; Kiveste, Harti; Punning, Andres; Kesküla, Arko; Lulla, Tõnis; Aabloo, Alvo

    2014-03-01

    The autofocus fluid lens device, as developed by Philips, is based on water/oil interfaces forming a spherical lens where the meniscus of the liquid can be switched by applying a high voltage to change from a convex to a concave divergent lens. In this work we construct a device to evaluate the performance of membrane actuators based on electro active polymers, in a design applicable for autofocus fluid lens applications. The membrane with a hole in the middle separates the oil phase from the electrolyte phase, forming a meniscus in the middle of the membrane between the oil and electrolyte. If the membrane actuator shows a certain force and displacement, the meniscus between oil and electrolyte changes form between concave and convex, applicable as a fluid lens. Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are applied in this work to investigate how the performance of the membrane actuator takes place in Milli-Q, certain electrolytes and in combination with an electrochemically deposited conducting polymer. The goal of this work is to investigate the extent of membrane displacement of IPMC actuators operating at a low voltage (+/-0.7 V), and the back relaxation phenomena of IPMC actuators.

  18. Electropolymerized Conducting Polymer as Actuator and Sensor Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Maria T.; Moreno, Juan C.

    2005-01-01

    A study demonstrates the potential application of conducting polymers to convert electrical energy into mechanical energy at low voltage or current. The performance of the device is explained using electrochemistry and solid-state chemistry.

  19. Near-infrared–actuated devices for remotely controlled drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Timko, Brian P.; Arruebo, Manuel; Shankarappa, Sahadev A.; McAlvin, J. Brian; Okonkwo, Obiajulu S.; Mizrahi, Boaz; Stefanescu, Cristina F.; Gomez, Leyre; Zhu, Jia; Zhu, Angela; Santamaria, Jesus; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    A reservoir that could be remotely triggered to release a drug would enable the patient or physician to achieve on-demand, reproducible, repeated, and tunable dosing. Such a device would allow precise adjustment of dosage to desired effect, with a consequent minimization of toxicity, and could obviate repeated drug administrations or device implantations, enhancing patient compliance. It should exhibit low off-state leakage to minimize basal effects, and tunable on-state release profiles that could be adjusted from pulsatile to sustained in real time. Despite the clear clinical need for a device that meets these criteria, none has been reported to date to our knowledge. To address this deficiency, we developed an implantable reservoir capped by a nanocomposite membrane whose permeability was modulated by irradiation with a near-infrared laser. Irradiated devices could exhibit sustained on-state drug release for at least 3 h, and could reproducibly deliver short pulses over at least 10 cycles, with an on/off ratio of 30. Devices containing aspart, a fast-acting insulin analog, could achieve glycemic control after s.c. implantation in diabetic rats, with reproducible dosing controlled by the intensity and timing of irradiation over a 2-wk period. These devices can be loaded with a wide range of drug types, and therefore represent a platform technology that might be used to address a wide variety of clinical indications. PMID:24474759

  20. Sensor-actuator coupled device for active tracheal tube using solid polymer electrolyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Tadashi; Nakamura, Taro; Mukai, Toshiharu; Asaka, Kinji

    2007-04-01

    A sensor-actuator coupled device was developed using solid polymer electrolyte membrane (SPM) as an active tracheal tube for ventilator. Active tracheal tube is a novel type of tube for ventilator that removes patient's phlegm automatically upon sensing the narrowing of trachea by phlegm. This type of active tube is extremely useful in clinical settings as currently the sole measure to remove phlegm from patient's tube is to do it manually by a nurse every few hours. As SPM works both as a sensor and an actuator, an effective compact device was developed. SPM based sensor-actuator coupled device was fabricated with modified gold plating method. Prepared SPM was fixed as an array on a plastic pipe of diameter 22 mm and was connected to a ventilator circuit and driven by a ventilator with a volume control ventilation (VCV) mode. SPM was connected both to a sensing unit and an actuation unit. Generated voltage developed by the membrane with the setting of the maximum pressure from 5 cmH IIO to 20 cmH IIO was in order of several hundred μV. SPM sensor demonstrated a biphasic response to the ventilator flow. The sensor data showed nearly linearly proportional voltage development to the intra-tracheal pressure. The sensed signal was filtered and digitized with an A/D converting unit on a PC board. A real time operating program was used to detect the sensed signal that indicates the narrowing of trachea. The program then activated a driving signal to control the actuation of the membrane. The signal was sent to a D/A converting unit. The output of the D/A unit was sent to an amplifier and the galvanostat unit which drives the membrane with constant current regardless of the change in the load. It was demonstrated that the sensor-actuator unit detects the narrowing of trachea within several hundreds milli-seconds and responds by actuating the same membrane with the driving voltage of 3-4 V and driving current of several hundred milli-ampere for each membrane. SPM array

  1. Self-sensing miniature electromagnetic actuators for a cardiac assist device application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Ben M.; Walker, Peter G.; Levesley, Martin C.; Watterson, Kevin; Richardson, Robert C.; Yang, Ming

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the application of self-sensing control to a cardiac assist device. We propose to improve the pumping performance of diseased or weakened hearts by applying direct cardiac compression using artificial muscle. This particular application imposes strict limitations on size, weight and system complexity, therefore employing self-sensing could offer advantages over separate sensors and actuators. Many electromagnetic actuators produce a back-e.m.f. proportional to velocity. Using a simple system model, it is possible to separate this back-e.m.f. from the supply voltage, thus the actuator velocity can be self-sensed. Furthermore, using a more detailed model, it also is possible to self-sense the force being applied. Experimental results are presented for linear moving-coil actuators and miniature d.c. motors. Estimation of position has been performed by numerical integration of self-sensed velocity, and shown to compare favourably to data from displacement sensors. Force estimation has also been shown to closely agree with data from a load cell. Combined force and position control has been implemented, without using sensors. Unfortunately, since self-sensed position is derived by integrating velocity, the estimated position can suffer from drifting. An automatic re-calibration scheme is proposed for the cardiac assist application.

  2. A microfabricated magnetic actuation device for mechanical conditioning of arrays of 3D microtissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Zhao, Ruogang; Liu, Alan S; Metz, Tristin; Shi, Yu; Bose, Prasenjit; Reich, Daniel H

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an approach to actuate magnetically arrays of microtissue constructs for long-term mechanical conditioning and subsequent biomechanical measurements. Each construct consists of cell/matrix material self-assembled around a pair of flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) pillars. The deflection of the pillars reports the tissues' contractility. Magnetic stretching of individual microtissues via magnetic microspheres mounted on the cantilevers has been used to elucidate the tissues' elastic modulus and response to varying mechanical boundary conditions. This paper describes the fabrication of arrays of micromagnetic structures that can transduce an externally applied uniform magnetic field to actuate simultaneously multiple microtissues. These structures are fabricated on silicon-nitride coated Si wafers and contain electrodeposited Ni bars. Through-etched holes provide optical and culture media access when the devices are mounted on the PDMS microtissue scaffold devices. Both static and AC forces (up to 20 μN on each microtissue) at physiological frequencies are readily generated in external fields of 40 mT. Operation of the magnetic arrays was demonstrated via measurements of elastic modulus and dynamic stiffening in response to AC actuation of fibroblast populated collagen microtissues.

  3. Detailed design of an SMA-actuated self-locking device for rotary feed structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyu, Qin; Xiaojun, Yan; Xiaoyong, Zhang; Weibing, Wang; Lianghai, Li

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed design of a locking device which is used to lock the rotary feed structure of a space-borne microwave radiometer during the launching stage. This locking device employs two redundant shape memory alloy (SMA) wires as the actuating elements, uses a self-locking structure to achieve the locking function and a step structure to ensure a safety clearance after release. Based on the design concept, preliminary design of the locking/release unit and the clamp unit are performed. Then, a more accurate simulation of the release process and the cyclic property of the device is carried out by using an improved Brinson’s SMA constitutive model and a heat transfer equation. After the design and simulation, four prototypes are fabricated and their performance tests are carried out to evaluate the self-locking property, lifetime and thermal tolerance.

  4. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1990-05-22

    An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  5. Method for Reading Sensors and Controlling Actuators Using Audio Interfaces of Mobile Devices

    PubMed Central

    Aroca, Rafael V.; Burlamaqui, Aquiles F.; Gonçalves, Luiz M. G.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel closed loop control architecture based on audio channels of several types of computing devices, such as mobile phones and tablet computers, but not restricted to them. The communication is based on an audio interface that relies on the exchange of audio tones, allowing sensors to be read and actuators to be controlled. As an application example, the presented technique is used to build a low cost mobile robot, but the system can also be used in a variety of mechatronics applications and sensor networks, where smartphones are the basic building blocks. PMID:22438726

  6. Method for reading sensors and controlling actuators using audio interfaces of mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Aroca, Rafael V; Burlamaqui, Aquiles F; Gonçalves, Luiz M G

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a novel closed loop control architecture based on audio channels of several types of computing devices, such as mobile phones and tablet computers, but not restricted to them. The communication is based on an audio interface that relies on the exchange of audio tones, allowing sensors to be read and actuators to be controlled. As an application example, the presented technique is used to build a low cost mobile robot, but the system can also be used in a variety of mechatronics applications and sensor networks, where smartphones are the basic building blocks.

  7. Potential for micromachined actuation of ultra-wide continuously tunable optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillmer, H.; Daleiden, J.; Prott, C.; Römer, F.; Irmer, S.; Rangelov, V.; Tarraf, A.; Schüler, S.; Strassner, M.

    2002-07-01

    Tailored scaling represents a principle of success that, both in nature and in technology, allows the effectiveness of physical effects to be enhanced. Mutation and selection in nature are imitated in technology, e.g. by model calculation and design. Proper scaling of dimensions in natural photonic crystals and our fabricated artificial 1D photonic crystals (DBRs, distributed Bragg reflectors) enable efficient diffractive interaction in a specific spectral range. For our optical microsystems we illustrate that tailored miniaturization may also increase the mechanical stability and the effectiveness of spectral tuning by thermal and electrostatic actuation, since the relative significance of the fundamental physical forces involved considerably changes with scaling. These basic physical principles are rigorously applied in micromachined 1.55-μm vertical-resonator-based devices. We modeled, implemented and characterized 1.55-μm micromachined optical filters and vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser devices capable of wide, monotonic and kink-free tuning by a single control parameter. Tuning is achieved by mechanical actuation of one or several air-gaps that are part of the vertical resonator including two ultra-highly reflective DBR mirrors of strong refractive index contrast: (i) Δn=2.17 for InP/air-gap DBRs (3.5 periods) using GaInAs sacrificial layers and (ii) Δn=0.5 for Si3N4/SiO2 DBRs (12 periods) with a polymer sacrificial layer to implement the air-cavity. In semiconductor multiple air-gap filters, a continuous tuning of >8% of the absolute wavelength is obtained. Varying the reverse voltage (U=0-5 V) between the membranes (electrostatic actuation), a tuning range of >110 nm was obtained for a large number of devices. The correlation of the wavelength and the applied voltage is accurately reproducible without any hysteresis. In two filters, tuning of 127 and 130 nm was observed for about ΔU=7 V. The extremely wide tuning range and the very small voltage

  8. A Portable, Air-Jet-Actuator-Based Device for System Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staats, Wayne; Belden, Jesse; Mazumdar, Anirban; Hunter, Ian

    2010-11-01

    System identification (ID) of human and robotic limbs could help in diagnosis of ailments and aid in optimization of control parameters and future redesigns. We present a self-contained actuator, which uses the Coanda effect to rapidly switch the direction of a high speed air jet to create a binary stochastic force input to a limb for system ID. The design of the actuator is approached with the goal of creating a portable device, which could deployed on robot or human limbs for in situ identification. The viability of the device is demonstrated by performing stochastic system ID on an underdamped elastic beam system with fixed inertia and stiffness, and variable damping. The non-parametric impulse response yielded from the stochastic system ID is modeled as a second order system, and the resultant parameters are found to be in excellent agreement with those found using more traditional system ID techniques. The current design could be further miniaturized and developed as a portable, wireless, on-site multi-axis system identification system for less intrusive and more widespread use.

  9. Stimulus-active polymer actuators for next-generation microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilber, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic devices have not yet evolved into commercial off-the-shelf products. Although highly integrated microfluidic structures, also known as lab-on-a-chip (LOC) and micrototal-analysis-system (µTAS) devices, have consistently been predicted to revolutionize biomedical assays and chemical synthesis, they have not entered the market as expected. Studies have identified a lack of standardization and integration as the main obstacles to commercial breakthrough. Soft microfluidics, the utilization of a broad spectrum of soft materials (i.e., polymers) for realization of microfluidic components, will make a significant contribution to the proclaimed growth of the LOC market. Recent advances in polymer science developing novel stimulus-active soft-matter materials may further increase the popularity and spreading of soft microfluidics. Stimulus-active polymers and composite materials change shape or exert mechanical force on surrounding fluids in response to electric, magnetic, light, thermal, or water/solvent stimuli. Specifically devised actuators based on these materials may have the potential to facilitate integration significantly and hence increase the operational advantage for the end-user while retaining cost-effectiveness and ease of fabrication. This review gives an overview of available actuation concepts that are based on functional polymers and points out promising concepts and trends that may have the potential to promote the commercial success of microfluidics.

  10. Photoresponsive microvalve for remote actuation and flow control in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Amol D; Yan, Bao; Luo, Rong-Cong; Wei, Li; Zhen, Xu; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Microvalves with different actuation methods offer great integrability and flexibility in operation of lab-on-chip devices. In this work, we demonstrate a hydrogel-based and optically controlled modular microvalve that can be easily integrated within a microfluidic device and actuated by an off-chip laser source. The microvalve is based on in-channel trapping of microgel particles, which are composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polypyrrole nanoparticles. Upon irradiation by a near-infrared (NIR) laser, the microgel undergoes volumetric change and enables precisely localized fluid on/off switching. The response rate and the "open" duration of the microvalve can be simply controlled by adjusting the laser power and exposure time. We showed that the trapped microgel can be triggered to shrink sufficiently to open a channel within as low as ∼1-2 s; while the microgel swells to re-seal the channel within ∼6-8 s. This is so far one of the fastest optically controlled and hydrogel-based microvalves, thus permitting speedy fluidic switching applications. In this study, we successfully employed this technique to control fluidic interface between laminar flow streams within a Y-junction device. The optically triggered microvalve permits flexible and remote fluidic handling, and enables pulsatile in situ chemical treatment to cell culture in an automatic and programmed manner, which is exemplified by studies of chemotherapeutic drug induced cell apoptosis under different drug treatment strategies. We find that cisplatin induced apoptosis is significantly higher in cancer cells treated with a pulsed dose, as compared to continuous flow with a sustained dose. It is expected that our NIR-controlled valving strategy will provide a simple, versatile, and powerful alternative for liquid handling in microfluidic devices. PMID:26180571

  11. Photoresponsive microvalve for remote actuation and flow control in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Amol D; Yan, Bao; Luo, Rong-Cong; Wei, Li; Zhen, Xu; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Microvalves with different actuation methods offer great integrability and flexibility in operation of lab-on-chip devices. In this work, we demonstrate a hydrogel-based and optically controlled modular microvalve that can be easily integrated within a microfluidic device and actuated by an off-chip laser source. The microvalve is based on in-channel trapping of microgel particles, which are composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polypyrrole nanoparticles. Upon irradiation by a near-infrared (NIR) laser, the microgel undergoes volumetric change and enables precisely localized fluid on/off switching. The response rate and the "open" duration of the microvalve can be simply controlled by adjusting the laser power and exposure time. We showed that the trapped microgel can be triggered to shrink sufficiently to open a channel within as low as ∼1-2 s; while the microgel swells to re-seal the channel within ∼6-8 s. This is so far one of the fastest optically controlled and hydrogel-based microvalves, thus permitting speedy fluidic switching applications. In this study, we successfully employed this technique to control fluidic interface between laminar flow streams within a Y-junction device. The optically triggered microvalve permits flexible and remote fluidic handling, and enables pulsatile in situ chemical treatment to cell culture in an automatic and programmed manner, which is exemplified by studies of chemotherapeutic drug induced cell apoptosis under different drug treatment strategies. We find that cisplatin induced apoptosis is significantly higher in cancer cells treated with a pulsed dose, as compared to continuous flow with a sustained dose. It is expected that our NIR-controlled valving strategy will provide a simple, versatile, and powerful alternative for liquid handling in microfluidic devices.

  12. Photoresponsive microvalve for remote actuation and flow control in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Amol D.; Yan, Bao; Luo, Rong-Cong; Wei, Li; Zhen, Xu; Chen, Chia-Hung; Shi, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Microvalves with different actuation methods offer great integrability and flexibility in operation of lab-on-chip devices. In this work, we demonstrate a hydrogel-based and optically controlled modular microvalve that can be easily integrated within a microfluidic device and actuated by an off-chip laser source. The microvalve is based on in-channel trapping of microgel particles, which are composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and polypyrrole nanoparticles. Upon irradiation by a near-infrared (NIR) laser, the microgel undergoes volumetric change and enables precisely localized fluid on/off switching. The response rate and the “open” duration of the microvalve can be simply controlled by adjusting the laser power and exposure time. We showed that the trapped microgel can be triggered to shrink sufficiently to open a channel within as low as ∼1–2 s; while the microgel swells to re-seal the channel within ∼6–8 s. This is so far one of the fastest optically controlled and hydrogel-based microvalves, thus permitting speedy fluidic switching applications. In this study, we successfully employed this technique to control fluidic interface between laminar flow streams within a Y-junction device. The optically triggered microvalve permits flexible and remote fluidic handling, and enables pulsatile in situ chemical treatment to cell culture in an automatic and programmed manner, which is exemplified by studies of chemotherapeutic drug induced cell apoptosis under different drug treatment strategies. We find that cisplatin induced apoptosis is significantly higher in cancer cells treated with a pulsed dose, as compared to continuous flow with a sustained dose. It is expected that our NIR-controlled valving strategy will provide a simple, versatile, and powerful alternative for liquid handling in microfluidic devices. PMID:26180571

  13. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  14. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  15. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui Ren, Luquan; Liang, Yunhong; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-15

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  16. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument. PMID:24985848

  17. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Dewhurst, Katharine H.

    1990-01-01

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  18. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1987-12-10

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  19. A bi-stable buckled energy harvesting device actuated via torque arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Daniel A.; Berfield, Thomas A.

    2014-07-01

    A bi-stable switching energy harvester made from a buckled steel structure mounted with uni-axially poled piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride and 3D printed polylactic acid components is constructed and tested. A data collection system and frequency sweeping program is built to drive the device using a custom compression rig fitted with an accelerometer. The energy harvester is tested with the center beam compressed to different degrees of buckling, as well as in its unloaded state. Root mean square (RMS) accelerations are applied to the device in the range of 0.1-0.9g rms by 0.2 g steps. The device is driven with a frequency between 16 and 40 Hz (by 0.5 Hz) in both forwards and backwards sweeps. Finite element modeling program ANSYS is used to model the device and determine undamped pre-stressed modal frequencies, proof mass displacements to ‘snap-through’, and static buckled profiles for the center beam. As a comparison, a doubly constrained beam (DCB) with the same width and length is constructed and tested in the same manner as the torque arm device. RMS power density for the torque actuated device compressed by 0.13 mm and frequency swept in reverse was 0.246 μW cm-2 (3.13 μW) at 16.5 Hz and 1.5g rms using two 0.19 g proof masses. The DCB RMS power density swept in reverse was 1.287 μW cm-2 (6.18 μW) at 59.5 Hz and 1.5g rms with a 1.38 g proof mass.

  20. Photomechanical actuator device based on disperse red 1 doped poly(methyl methacrylate) optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xianjun

    The photomechanical effect is the phenomenon involving any mechanical property change of a material induced by light exposure. Photomechanical devices can be built with superior performance over traditional devices and offer versatile control tactics. Previous experiments show that disperse red 1 azobenzene (DR1) doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) optical fiber has a fast photomechanical response upon asymmetrical 633nm laser irradiation originating in photoisomerization of the dopants between the cis and trans forms, which causes an elongation of the polymer fiber. In this work, laser light of 355nm wavelength is used to investigate the dynamics of the trans to cis photoisomerization process, which should result in length contraction of the DR1 doped PMMA polymer fiber. A three-point-contact optically-actuated beam controlling tilt mount is made and used as the measurement apparatus to study this process. The photomechanical fiber is observed to elongate upon UV irradiation. Numerical simulations, which take into account the coupled effect between the laser-induced temperature increase and population density change of the dye molecules, show that contraction of the fiber due to direct trans-cis photoisomerization is overwhelmed by elongation due to the photo-thermally-stimulated cis-trans isomerization under high intensity. An ink coated entrance face of the fiber is placed in the measurement tilt mount and is found to exhibit contraction in the fast process under low intensity without sacrificing the good signal to noise ratio enjoyed in the high intensity case.

  1. A low-voltage three-axis electromagnetically actuated micromirror for fine alignment among optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Euisik

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, a new three-axis electromagnetically actuated micromirror structure has been proposed and fabricated. It is electromagnetically actuated at low voltage using an external magnetic field. The main purpose of this work was to obtain a three-axis actuated micromirror in a mechanically robust structure with large static angular and vertical displacement at low actuation voltage for fine alignment among optical components in an active alignment module as well as conventional optical systems. The mirror plate and torsion bars are made of bulk silicon using a SOI wafer, and the actuation coils are made of electroplated Au. The maximum static deflection angles were measured as ±4.2° for x-axis actuation and ±9.2° for y-axis actuation, respectively. The maximum static vertical displacement was measured as ±42 µm for z-axis actuation. The actuation voltages were below 3 V for all actuation. The simulated resonant frequencies are several kHz, and these imply that the fabricated micromirror can be operated in sub-millisecond order. The measured radius of curvature (ROC) of the fabricated micromirror is 7.72 cm, and the surface roughness of the reflector is below 1.29 nm which ensure high optical performance such as high directionality and reflectivity. The fabricated micromirror has demonstrated large actuated displacement at low actuation voltage, and it enables us to compensate a larger misalignment value when it is used in an active alignment module. The robust torsion bar and lifting bar structure formed by bulk silicon allowed the proposed micromirror to have greater operating stability. The additional degree of freedom with z-axis actuation can decrease the difficulty in the assembly of optical components and increase the coupling efficiency between optical components.

  2. Overall life cycle comprehensive assessment of pneumatic and electric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yeming; Cai, Maolin

    2014-05-01

    Pneumatic actuators and electric actuators have almost been applied to all manufacturing industries. The two kinds of actuators can replace each other in most fields, such as the point to point transmission occasion and some rotating occasions. However, there are very few research results about the advantages and disadvantages of two kinds of actuators under the same working conditions so far. In this paper, a novel comprehensive assessment method, named as overall life cycle comprehensive assessment (OLCCA), is proposed for comparison and assessment of pneumatic and electric actuators. OLCCA contains mechanical properties evaluation (MPE), life cycle cost analysis based on users (LCCABOU) and life cycle environmental impact analysis (LCEIA) algorithm in order to solve three difficult problems: mechanical properties assessment, cost analysis and environmental impact assessment about actuators. The mechanical properties evaluation of actuators is a multi-objective optimization problem. The fuzzy data quantification and information entropy methods are combined to establish MPE algorithm of actuators. Two kinds of pneumatic actuators and electric actuators with similar bearing capacity and similar work stroke were taken for example to verify the correctness of MPE algorithm. The case study of MPE algorithm for actuators verified its correctness. LCCABOU for actuators is also set up. Considering cost complex structure of pneumatic actuators, public device cost even method (PDCEM) is firstly presented to solve cost division of public devices such as compressors, aftercooler, receivers, etc. LCCABOU method is also effective and verified by the three groups of pneumatic actuators and electric actuators. Finally, LCEIA model of actuators is established for the environmental impact assessment of actuators. LCEIA data collection method and model establishment procedure for actuators are also put forward. With Simapro 7, LCEIA comparison results of six actuators can be

  3. Application of the nonlinear, double-dynamic Taguchi method to the precision positioning device using combined piezo-VCM actuator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yung-Tien; Fung, Rong-Fong; Wang, Chun-Chao

    2007-02-01

    In this research, the nonlinear, double-dynamic Taguchi method was used as design and analysis methods for a high-precision positioning device using the combined piezo-voice-coil motor (VCM) actuator. An experimental investigation into the effects of two input signals and three control factors were carried out to determine the optimum parametric configuration of the positioning device. The double-dynamic Taguchi method, which permits optimization of several control factors concurrently, is particularly suitable for optimizing the performance of a positioning device with multiple actuators. In this study, matrix experiments were conducted with L9(3(4)) orthogonal arrays (OAs). The two most critical processes for the optimization of positioning device are the identification of the nonlinear ideal function and the combination of the double-dynamic signal factors for the ideal function's response. The driving voltage of the VCM and the waveform amplitude of the PZT actuator are combined into a single quality characteristic to evaluate the positioning response. The application of the double-dynamic Taguchi method, with dynamic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and L9(3(4)) OAs, reduced the number of necessary experiments. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to set the optimum parameters based on the high-precision positioning process.

  4. Static and transient modeling of fast moving ball actuator as a display device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongmo; Yoon, Ho Won; Hong, MunPyo; Jhun, Chul Gyu; Bae, Byung Seong; Han, Seungoh

    2016-04-01

    FMBA(Fast Moving Ball Actuator), developed as novel electronic-paper display, has already proven its operability and functionality. However, optimization issues related with low operating voltage, high refresh rate, fine pixel and higher display resolution, etc. are still remaining to be improved for a successful commercialization. In order to optimize such issues effectively, static and transient model were developed and verified by comparing the calculated results to the measured. The static model is based on the force balancing equation between the driving and the holding forces while the transient model is developed from Newton's 2nd law by adding the inertia as well as the resistive damping forces caused by the surroundings. With the simplified static model, driving voltage of 30.71 V was obtained, which is reasonably matched to the measured voltage of 40 V. Based on the transient model, also, the transient response of the device can be estimated within reasonable margin. Considering the absence of reliable key parameters of surface roughness, static and dynamic frictional coefficient, and refractive indices, the developed static and transient models account well the experimental results and thus they are expected to contribute further improvements in FMBA.

  5. Development of a novel shape memory alloy-actuated resettable locking device for magnetic bearing reaction wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Yan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Shaowei; Nie, Jingxu

    2014-01-01

    The current investigation proposes a shape memory alloy (SMA)-actuated resettable locking device for magnetic bearing reaction wheel. The device employed two SMA wire-based actuators to realize locking and unlocking. Dual-slope mating surfaces were used on one hand to transmit the motion between a moving part and a clamp, and on the other hand to achieve a self-locking linkage in the locking state. Moreover, geometric parameters of the two SMA wires and corresponding bias springs were also designed. Based on the proposed design scheme, four locking devices were manufactured and assembled. Performance and environmental tests were performed to verify the proposed locking device. Test results show that the locking device can protect the magnetic bearing reaction wheel from launch vibration damage, and can withstand the thermal environment in the launch and on-orbit stage. Moreover, the device can be successfully operated for 76 times, and the response time for the locking and unlocking processes under 7 V power supply is 0.9 s and 5.6 s, respectively. Considering the results obtained from these tests, we conclude that the proposed resettable locking device is an attractive alternative technology to conventional motor-driven or pyrotechnics-based technologies, and can be applied reliably in the magnetic bearing reaction wheel.

  6. Development of a novel shape memory alloy-actuated resettable locking device for magnetic bearing reaction wheel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Yan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Shaowei; Nie, Jingxu

    2014-01-01

    The current investigation proposes a shape memory alloy (SMA)-actuated resettable locking device for magnetic bearing reaction wheel. The device employed two SMA wire-based actuators to realize locking and unlocking. Dual-slope mating surfaces were used on one hand to transmit the motion between a moving part and a clamp, and on the other hand to achieve a self-locking linkage in the locking state. Moreover, geometric parameters of the two SMA wires and corresponding bias springs were also designed. Based on the proposed design scheme, four locking devices were manufactured and assembled. Performance and environmental tests were performed to verify the proposed locking device. Test results show that the locking device can protect the magnetic bearing reaction wheel from launch vibration damage, and can withstand the thermal environment in the launch and on-orbit stage. Moreover, the device can be successfully operated for 76 times, and the response time for the locking and unlocking processes under 7 V power supply is 0.9 s and 5.6 s, respectively. Considering the results obtained from these tests, we conclude that the proposed resettable locking device is an attractive alternative technology to conventional motor-driven or pyrotechnics-based technologies, and can be applied reliably in the magnetic bearing reaction wheel.

  7. Parylene-coated ionic liquid-carbon nanotube actuators for user-safe haptic devices.

    PubMed

    Bubak, Grzegorz; Gendron, David; Ceseracciu, Luca; Ansaldo, Alberto; Ricci, Davide

    2015-07-22

    Simple fabrication, high power-to-weight and power-to-volume ratios, and the ability to operate in open air at low voltage make the ionic electroactive polymer actuators highly attractive for haptic applications. Whenever a direct tactile stimulation of the skin is involved, electrical and chemical insulation as well as a long-term stability of the actuator are required. Because of its inherent physicochemical properties such as high dielectric strength, resistance to solvents, and biological inactivity, Parylene C meets the requirements for making biocompatible actuators. We have studied the displacement and the generated force of Parylene-coated carbon nanotube actuators as well as the encapsulation quality. A 2 μm coating creates an effective electrical insulation of the actuators without altering the blocking force at frequencies from 50 mHz to 1 Hz. Moreover, the generated strain is preserved at higher frequencies (from 0.5 to 5 Hz). We employed a simple mechanical model to explain the relation between the key parameters-flexural stiffness, displacement, and force-for uncoated and coated actuators. In addition, we demonstrated that our Parylene-coated actuators are not damaged by rinsing in liquid media such as 2-propanol or water. In conclusion, our results indicate that Parylene C encapsulated actuators are safe to touch and can be used in contact with human skin and in biomedical applications in direct contact with tissues and physiological fluids.

  8. Laplace-Pressure Actuation of Liquid Metal Devices For Reconfigurable Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumby, Brad Lee

    Present day electronics are now taking on small form factors, unexpected uses, adaptability, and other features that only a decade ago were unimaginable even for most engineers. These electronic devices, such as tablets, smart phones, wearable sensors, and others, have further had a profound impact on how society interacts, works, maintains health, etc. To optimize electronics a growing trend has been to both minimize the physical space taken up by the individual electronic components as well as to maximize the number of functionalities in a single electronic device, forming a compact and efficient package. To accomplish this challenge in one step, many groups have used a design that has reconfigurable electromagnetic properties, maximizing the functionality density of the device. This would allow the replacement of multiple individual components into an integrated system that would achieve a similar result as the separate individual devices while taking up less space. For example, could a device have a reconfigurable antenna, allowing it optimal communication in various settings and across multiple communication bands, thus increasing functionality, range, and even reducing total device size. Thus far a majority of such reconfigurable devices involve connecting/disconnecting various physically static layouts to achieve a summation of individual components that give rise to multiple effects. However, this is not an ideal situation due to the fact that the individual components whether connected or not are taking up real-estate as well as electrical interference with adjacent connected components. This dissertation focuses on the reconfigurability of the metallic component of the electronic device, specifically microwave devices. This component used throughout this dissertation is that of an eutectic liquid metal alloy. The liquid metal allows the utilization of both the inherent compact form (spherical shape) of a liquid in the lowest energy state and the fact that

  9. Rapid bonding enhancement by auxiliary ultrasonic actuation for the fabrication of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Tor, S. B.; Loh, N. H.

    2014-11-01

    Thermal compression bonding is a straightforward, inexpensive and widely used method for enclosing open microchannels in thermoplastic microfluidic devices. It is advantageous over adhesive, solvent and grafting bonding methods in retaining material homogeneity. However, the trade-off between high bond strength and low microchannel deformation is always a crucial consideration in thermal compression bonding. In this study, an effective method for improving bond strength while retaining the microchannel integrity with negligible distortion is proposed and analyzed. Longitudinal ultrasonic actuation was applied to the preheated cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) substrates to achieve accelerated and enhanced bonding with an ultrasonic welding system. Intimate contact between the bonding surfaces before the ultrasonic actuation was found to be an important prior condition. With improper contact, several bonding defects would occur, such as voids, localized spot melting and edge melting. Under auxiliary ultrasonic vibration, within 10 s, the bond strength developed at the bonding interface could be dramatically improved compared with those achieved without ultrasonic actuation. The enhanced bond strength obtained at a preheating temperature of 20 °C lower than its Tg could be comparable to the strength for pure thermal compression at 5 °C higher than its Tg. It is believed that the ultrasonic energy introduced could elevate the interfacial temperature and facilitate the interdiffusion of molecular chain segments at the interface, consequently resulting in rapidly enhanced bonding. Also, the microchannel distortion after ultrasonic actuation was found to be satisfactory—another important requirement. From dynamic mechanical analysis, the glass transition temperature of COC was found to increase with increasing frequency, and the temperature of the bulk polymer under ultrasonic actuation was still well under Tg; therefore the deformation is minor under ultrasonic

  10. Application of the moving-actuator type pump as a ventricular assist device: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Rho, Y R; Park, C Y; Hwang, C M; Kim, W G; Sun, K; Choi, M J; Lee, K K; Cheong, J T; Shim, E B; Min, B G

    2002-06-01

    A moving actuator type pump has been developed as a multifunctional Korean artificial heart (AnyHeart). The pump consists of a moving actuator as an energy converter, right and left sacs, polymer (or mechanical) valves, and a rigid polyurethane housing. The actuator containing a brushless DC motor moves back and forth on an epicyclical gear train to produce a pendular motion, which compresses both sacs alternately. Of its versatile functions of ventricular assist device and total artificial heart use, we have evaluated the system performance as a single or biventricular assist device through in vitro and in vivo experiments. Pump performance and anatomical feasibility were tested using various animals of different sizes. In the case of single ventricular assist device (VAD) use, one of the sacs remained empty and a mini-compliance chamber was attached to either an outflow or inflow port of the unused sac. The in vitro and in vivo studies show acceptable performance and pump behavior. Further extensive study is required to proceed to human application.

  11. A SMA-based redundant actuation locking device for rotary feed structure using self-locking principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaoyu; Yan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Hu, Dianyin; Wang, Weibing; Li, Lianghai

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a locking device which achieves in locking the rotary feed structure of a space-borne microwave radiometer during the launch stage. This locking device employs two shape memory alloy (SMA) wires as the actuating elements, and uses a self-locking structure to achieve the locking function. To improve the performance and reliability, a redundant SMA wire and a step structure are employed. To validate the proposed SMA locking device, four prototypes were fabricated and tested. The result shows that the locking device possesses the advantages of remarkable locking performances, wide operation electric current and high survival temperature. Based on the test results, the locking device has a great potential for the application of space rotary structures.

  12. Electrothermal actuation of metal-insulator transition in SmNiO3 thin film devices above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sieu D.; Viswanath, B.; Ramanathan, Shriram

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that a metal-insulator phase transition can be electrothermally actuated in the correlated complex oxide SmNiO3 (SNO) above room temperature from current-voltage measurements on thin film two-terminal devices. We simulate the internal temperature of SmNiO3 as a function of applied dc power by a Joule heating mechanism with substrate/electrode dissipation and find good agreement with experiment and device scaling. The results are relevant towards integrating correlated oxide phase transition functionality into semiconductor electronic/optoelectronic platforms.

  13. Integrating a piezoelectric actuator with mechanical and hydraulic devices to control camless engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercorelli, Paolo; Werner, Nils

    2016-10-01

    The paper deals with some interdisciplinary aspects and problems concerning the actuation control which occur in the integration of a piezoelectric structure in an aggregate actuator consisting of a piezoelectric, a stroke ratio displacement, a mechanical and a hydraulic part. Problems like compensation of the piezo hysteresis effect, scaling force-position to obtain an adequate displacement of the actuator and finally the control of such a complex aggregate system are considered and solved. Even though this work considers a particular application, the solutions proposed in the paper are quite general. In fact, the considered technical aspects occurring in systems which utilize piezoelectric technologies can be used in a variegated gamma of actuators integrating piezoelectric technologies. A cascade controller is proposed to combine a Feedforward action with an internal and an external PI-Controller. The Feedforward Controller is based on the model of the whole actuator, so particular attention is paid to the model structure. The resulting Feedforward action is an adaptive one to compensate hydraulic pressure faults. Real measurements are shown.

  14. Subsea valve actuator for ultra deepwater

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.Z.; Skeels, H.B.; Montemayor, B.K.; Williams, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews the continuing development of gate valve and actuator technology for subsea completions extending into ultra deep water. The basic technical challenges inherent to subsea valve actuators are reviewed, along with the various factors which affect the design and performance of these devices in deepwater applications. The high external ambient pressures which occur in deep water, coupled with high specific gravity hydraulic control fluids, are shown to have a significant impact on the performance of the actuators. This paper presents design and analysis methods and the verification test procedures which are required to develop and qualify new deep water actuator designs. Gate valve actuators of the type described in this paper are currently in use on subsea christmas trees on the world`s deepest subsea wells offshore Brazil (water depths >3,000 feet). New applications of the deepwater actuators are in process for upcoming Gulf of Mexico subsea production systems in water depths approaching 6,000 feet. The actuator/valve development method described in this paper has been confirmed by performance verification testing of full scale valves and actuators using a hyperbaric chamber to simulate ultra deepwater operating conditions. Performance of the test valves and actuators correlated very well with analytical predictions. Test results have confirmed that the new valve actuator designs will satisfy API 17D performance requirements for water depths up to 7,500 feet, well in excess of the upcoming GOM application.

  15. Actuating Fibers: Design and Applications.

    PubMed

    Stoychev, Georgi V; Ionov, Leonid

    2016-09-21

    Actuators are devices capable of moving or controlling objects and systems by applying mechanical force on them. Among all kinds of actuators with different shapes, fibrous ones deserve particular attention. In spite of their apparent simplicity, actuating fibers allow for very complex actuation behavior. This review discusses different approaches for the design of actuating fibers, and their advantages and disadvantages. We also discuss the prospects for the design of fibers with advanced architectures and complex actuation behavior. PMID:27571481

  16. Wireless actuation of bulk acoustic modes in micromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, Farrukh; Brown, Benjamin; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2016-08-01

    We report wireless actuation of a Lamb wave micromechanical resonator from a distance of over 1 m with an efficiency of over 15%. Wireless actuation of conventional micromechanical resonators can have broad impact in a number of applications from wireless communication and implantable biomedical devices to distributed sensor networks.

  17. Comparison of Walking and Traveling-Wave Piezoelectric Motors as Actuators in Kinesthetic Haptic Devices.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Pontus; Nysjo, Fredrik; Carlbom, Ingrid B; Johansson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectric motors offer an attractive alternative to electromagnetic actuators in portable haptic interfaces: they are compact, have a high force-to-volume ratio, and can operate with limited or no gearing. However, the choice of a piezoelectric motor type is not obvious due to differences in performance characteristics. We present our evaluation of two commercial, operationally different, piezoelectric motors acting as actuators in two kinesthetic haptic grippers, a walking quasi-static motor and a traveling wave ultrasonic motor. We evaluate each gripper's ability to display common virtual objects including springs, dampers, and rigid walls, and conclude that the walking quasi-static motor is superior at low velocities. However, for applications where high velocity is required, traveling wave ultrasonic motors are a better option.

  18. Nanorobots: the ultimate wireless self-propelled sensing and actuating devices.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Samuel; Pumera, Martin

    2009-09-01

    Natural motor proteins, "bionanorobots," have inspired researchers to develop artificial nanomachines (nanorobots) able to move autonomously by the conversion of chemical to mechanical energy. Such artificial nanorobots are self-propelled by the electrochemical decomposition of the fuel (up to now, hydrogen peroxide). Several approaches have been developed to provide nanorobots with some functionality, such as for controlling their movement, increasing their power output, or transporting different cargo. In this Focus Review we will discuss the recent advances in nanorobots based on metallic nanowires, which can sense, deliver, and actuate in complex environments, looking towards real applications in the not-too-distant future.

  19. Thermal MEMS actuator operation in aqueous media/seawater: Performance enhancement through atomic layer deposition post processing of PolyMUMPs devices

    SciTech Connect

    Warnat, Stephan Forbrigger, Cameron; Hubbard, Ted; Bertuch, Adam; Sundaram, Ganesh

    2015-01-15

    A method to enhance thermal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuators in aqueous media by using dielectric encapsulation layers is presented. Aqueous media reduces the available mechanical energy of the thermal actuator through an electrical short between actuator structures. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} laminates with various thicknesses were deposited on packaged PolyMUMPs devices to electrically separate the actuator from the aqueous media. Atomic layer deposition was used to form an encapsulation layer around released MEMS structures and the package. The enhancement was assessed by the increase of the elastic energy, which is proportional to the mechanical stiffness of the actuator and the displacement squared. The mechanical stiffness of the encapsulated actuators compared with the noncoated actuators was increased by factors ranging from 1.45 (for 45 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 20 nm TiO{sub 2}) to 1.87 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 40 nm TiO{sub 2}). Displacement measurements were made for all laminate combinations in filtered tap water and seawater by using FFT based displacement measurement technique with a repeatability of ∼10 nm. For all laminate structures, the elastic energy increased and enhanced the actuator performance: In seawater, the mechanical output energy increased by factors ranging from 5 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to 11 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 40 nm TiO{sub 2}). The authors also measured the long-term actuator stability/reliability in seawater. Samples were stored for 29 days in seawater and tested for 17 days in seawater. Laminates with TiO{sub 2} layers allowed constant operation over the entire measurement period.

  20. Electrically actuatable doped polymer flakes and electrically addressable optical devices using suspensions of doped polymer flakes in a fluid host

    DOEpatents

    Trajkovska-Petkoska, Anka; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.

    2010-05-11

    Doped electrically actuatable (electrically addressable or switchable) polymer flakes have enhanced and controllable electric field induced motion by virtue of doping a polymer material that functions as the base flake matrix with either a distribution of insoluble dopant particles or a dopant material that is completely soluble in the base flake matrix. The base flake matrix may be a polymer liquid crystal material, and the dopants generally have higher dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity than the electrically actuatable polymer base flake matrix. The dopant distribution within the base flake matrix may be either homogeneous or non-homogeneous. In the latter case, the non-homogeneous distribution of dopant provides a dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity gradient within the body of the flakes. The dopant can also be a carbon-containing material (either soluble or insoluble in the base flake matrix) that absorbs light so as to reduce the unpolarized scattered light component reflected from the flakes, thereby enhancing the effective intensity of circularly polarized light reflected from the flakes when the flakes are oriented into a light reflecting state. Electro-optic devices contain these doped flakes suspended in a host fluid can be addressed with an applied electric field, thus controlling the orientation of the flakes between a bright reflecting state and a non-reflecting dark state.

  1. Fundamental study on the application of liquid crystals to actuator devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan; Tsuji, Tomohiro; Chono, Shigeomi

    2016-07-01

    In a fundamental study to develop liquid crystal microactuators, we prepared a sandwich cell with a movable upper plate and used backflow induced by applying repetitively a rectangular wave voltage to drive the upper plate in its plane. We used 4-cyano-4'-pentyl biphenyl, a low-molar-mass nematic liquid crystal. The speed of the plate depends significantly on the frequency of the applied voltage. With specific settings of applied voltage, duty ratio, plate gap, and upper plate mass, the speed increases with increasing frequency, attaining a maximum value of 120 μm/s at 175 Hz. Further increases in frequency, however, produce a gradual decrease in plate speed because the molecules of the liquid crystal respond too slowly to the change in voltage at the higher frequencies. In addition, to expand the field of application of liquid crystal actuators, we performed an experiment to control the direction of movement of the upper plate by patterning the electrodes and the alignment layer to govern the orientation of molecules at the walls. The plate changes its direction smoothly with quick responses at each switching, but its speed is reduced compared with the unidirectional actuators over the entire frequency range.

  2. Lock for hydraulic actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Two clamps hold rod in fixed extension from cylinder even when power is off, converting actuator into stiff structural member. Locked actuator is useful as mechanical support or linkage or as fail-safe device in case of loss of hydraulic pressure. Potential applications include manufacturing processes and specialized handling and holding devices.

  3. Hand Held Device for Wireless Powering and Interrogation of Biomems Sensors and Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix Antonio (Inventor); Simons, Rainee N (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A compact, hand-held device for wireless powering, interrogation and data retrieval from at least one implanted sensor. The hand-held device includes an antenna for powering an implanted sensor and for receiving data from the implanted sensor to the hand-held device for at least one of storage, display or analysis. The hand-held device establishes electromagnetic coupling with a low radiating radio frequency power inductor in the implanted sensor at a predefined separation and the antenna geometry allows for the antenna to power, interrogate and retrieve data from the implanted sensor without strapping the hand-held device to a human body housing the implanted sensor The hand-held device optionally allows for activation of the implanted sensor only during interrogation and data retrieval.

  4. Rapid prototyping of pneumatically actuated hydrocarbon gel valves for centrifugal microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Swayne, Laura; Kazarine, Alexei; Templeton, Erin J; Salin, Eric D

    2015-03-01

    A novel, easy to prototype hydrocarbon gel-based active valve was developed for use in centrifugal microfluidic devices. The valve has been demonstrated to restrict flow by an additional 1000 revolutions per minute (RPM) when compared to a passive capillary valve of the same size located at the same radius. Opening of the valve is accomplished in a contactless manner using a stream of focused compressed air. The ease of fabrication, low cost and small dimensions of the gel valve offer the potential for integration of multiple valves of this type into multi-process centrifugal microfluidic systems.

  5. Simulation of a liquid droplet ejection device using multi-actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yoshihiro; Yoshino, Michitaka; Yasuda, Akira; Tanuma, Chiaki

    2016-07-01

    An equivalent circuit model for a liquid droplet ejection device using a multiactuator has been developed. The equivalent circuit was simplified using a gyrator in the synthesis of the outputs of many elements. The simulation was performed for an inkjet head having three piezoelectric elements using MATLAB/Simulink. In this model, the pressure chamber is filled with a Newtonian fluid. For this reason, the model assumed only the resistance component of the pressure chamber and the nozzle as a load. Furthermore, since the resistance component of the inlet is much larger than that of the nozzle, it is not considered in this model. As a result, by providing a time difference between the driving signals of the piezoelectric elements, we found that the pressure of the ink chamber could be arbitrarily controlled. By this model, it becomes possible to control the pressure in the ink chamber of the inkjet head required for the ejection of various inks.

  6. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  7. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  8. Effect of multiple actuations, delayed inhalation and antistatic treatment on the lung bioavailability of salbutamol via a spacer device.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D. J.; Lipworth, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to extend previous in vitro observations regarding the effects of multiple actuations of aerosols into spacer devices, delayed inhalation, and antistatic treatment of spacer devices on the amount of drug delivered for inhalation. An in vivo study of lung bioavailability of salbutamol from a large volume (Volumatic) spacer was conducted. METHODS: Ten healthy volunteers of mean age 20.5 years with a mean forced expiratory volume in one second of 112.1% predicted were studied in a randomised single blind (investigator blind) crossover study. 1200 micrograms of salbutamol was given with mouth rinsing (100 micrograms/puff) on four study days: single puffs via spacer, multiple puffs via spacer (3 x 4 puffs), single puffs with 20 second delay before inhalation via spacer, and single puffs via an antistatic treated spacer. All spacers, including those treated with antistatic, were prewashed prior to each study day. Measurements of lung bioavailability were made at five, 10, and 20 minutes after inhalation to determine peak (Cmax) and average (Cav) plasma salbutamol levels. Systemic beta 2 responses including finger tremor, heart rate, and plasma potassium levels were also evaluated. RESULTS: Single puffs from the spacer produced higher plasma salbutamol levels and greater systemic beta 2 responses than either multiple puffs or single puffs with delayed inhalation for a 1200 micrograms dose. For Cmax this amounted to a 1.93-fold (95% CI 1.68 to 2.19) greater lung bioavailability for single puffs than for multiple puffs and a 1.80-fold (95% CI 1.59 to 2.00) greater lung bioavailability for single puffs than for single puffs with a 20 second delay. Comparison of the normal and antistatic treated spacers (both prewashed) revealed differences for Cmax with levels 1.23-fold (95% CI 1.04 to 1.41) greater for the normal spacer. CONCLUSIONS: Delayed inhalation from a Volumatic spacer and the use of multiple puffs results in a considerable

  9. Applications of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelrine, Ron; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Kornbluh, Roy D.; Heydt, Richard; Kofod, Guggi; Pei, Qibing; Gravesen, Peter

    2001-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators, based on the field-induced deformation of elastomeric polymers with compliant electrodes, can produce a large strain response, combined with a fast response time and high electromechanical efficiency. This unique performance, combined with other factors such as low cost, suggests many potential applications, a wide range of which are under investigation. Applications that effectively exploit the properties of dielectric elastomers include artificial muscle actuators for robots; low-cost, lightweight linear actuators; solid- state optical devices; diaphragm actuators for pumps and smart skins; acoustic actuators; and rotary motors. Issues that may ultimately determine the success or failure of the actuation technology for specific applications include the durability of the actuator, the performance of the actuator under load, operating voltage and power requirements, and electronic driving circuitry, to name a few.

  10. Advanced launch system (ALS) actuation and power systems impact operability and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, G.R. . Lewis Research Center)

    1990-09-01

    To obtain the advanced launch system (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs ($300/lb earth to LEO) and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using electrical actuation integrated with a single vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. This paper reviews the ALS and its associated advanced development program to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the ALS goals (cryogenic fuel valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles and a multitude of commercial applications.

  11. A Gas-Actuated Projectile Launcher for High-Energy Impact Testing of Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Jaunky, Navin; Lawson, Robin E.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Lyle, Karen H.

    1999-01-01

    A gas-act,uated penetration device has been developed for high-energy impact testing of structures. The high-energy impact. t,estiiig is for experimental simulation of uncontained engine failures. The non-linear transient finite element, code LS-DYNA3D has been used in the numerical simula.tions of a titanium rectangular blade with a.n aluminum target, plate. Threshold velocities for different combinations of pitch and yaw angles of the impactor were obtained for the impactor-target, t8est configuration in the numerica.1 simulations. Complet,e penet,ration of the target plate was also simulat,ed numerically. Finally, limited comparison of analytical and experimental results is presented for complete penetration of the target by the impactor.

  12. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  13. Advanced Launch System (ALS) actuation and power systems impact operability and cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of commercial applications.

  14. Note: high frequency vibration rejection using a linear shaft actuator-based image stabilizing device via vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation control method.

    PubMed

    Koh, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-08-01

    In mobile robotics, obtaining stable image of a mounted camera is crucial for operating a mobile system to complete given tasks. This note presents the development of a high-speed image stabilizing device using linear shaft actuator, and a new image stabilization method inspired by human gaze stabilization process known as vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). In the proposed control, the reference is adaptively adjusted by the VOR adaptation control to reject residual vibration of a camera as the VOR gain converges to optimal state. Through experiments on a pneumatic vibrator, it will be shown that the proposed system is capable of stabilizing 10 Hz platform vibration, which shows potential applicability of the device to a high-speed mobile robot.

  15. Note: High frequency vibration rejection using a linear shaft actuator-based image stabilizing device via vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation control method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-08-01

    In mobile robotics, obtaining stable image of a mounted camera is crucial for operating a mobile system to complete given tasks. This note presents the development of a high-speed image stabilizing device using linear shaft actuator, and a new image stabilization method inspired by human gaze stabilization process known as vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). In the proposed control, the reference is adaptively adjusted by the VOR adaptation control to reject residual vibration of a camera as the VOR gain converges to optimal state. Through experiments on a pneumatic vibrator, it will be shown that the proposed system is capable of stabilizing 10 Hz platform vibration, which shows potential applicability of the device to a high-speed mobile robot.

  16. Note: high frequency vibration rejection using a linear shaft actuator-based image stabilizing device via vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation control method.

    PubMed

    Koh, Doo-Yeol; Kim, Young-Kook; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2013-08-01

    In mobile robotics, obtaining stable image of a mounted camera is crucial for operating a mobile system to complete given tasks. This note presents the development of a high-speed image stabilizing device using linear shaft actuator, and a new image stabilization method inspired by human gaze stabilization process known as vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). In the proposed control, the reference is adaptively adjusted by the VOR adaptation control to reject residual vibration of a camera as the VOR gain converges to optimal state. Through experiments on a pneumatic vibrator, it will be shown that the proposed system is capable of stabilizing 10 Hz platform vibration, which shows potential applicability of the device to a high-speed mobile robot. PMID:24007125

  17. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  18. Designing and testing lightweight shoulder prostheses with hybrid actuators for movements involved in typical activities of daily living and impact absorption

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Masashi; Kita, Kahori; Yu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Unlike forearm amputees, transhumeral amputees have residual stumps that are too small to provide a sufficient range of operation for their prosthetic parts to perform usual activities of daily living. Furthermore, it is difficult for small residual stumps to provide sufficient impact absorption for safe manipulation in daily living, as intact arms do. Therefore, substitution of upper limb function in transhumeral amputees requires a sufficient range of motion and sufficient viscoelasticity for shoulder prostheses under critical weight and dimension constraints. We propose the use of two different types of actuators, ie, pneumatic elastic actuators (PEAs) and servo motors. PEAs offer high power-to-weight performance and have intrinsic viscoelasticity in comparison with motors or standard industrial pneumatic cylinder actuators. However, the usefulness of PEAs in large working spaces is limited because of their short strokes. Servo motors, in contrast, can be used to achieve large ranges of motion. In this study, the relationship between the force and stroke of PEAs was investigated. The impact absorption of both types of actuators was measured using a single degree-of-freedom prototype to evaluate actuator compliance for safety purposes. Based on the fundamental properties of the actuators identified, a four degree-of-freedom robotic arm is proposed for prosthetic use. The configuration of the actuators and functional parts was designed to achieve a specified range of motion and torque calculated from the results of a simulation of typical movements performed in usual activities of daily living. Our experimental results showed that the requirements for the shoulder prostheses could be satisfied. PMID:26185472

  19. Hydraulic actuation technology for full- and semi-active railway suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodall, Roger; Freudenthaler, Gerhard; Dixon, Roger

    2014-12-01

    The paper describes a simulation study that provides a comprehensive comparison between full-active and semi-active suspensions for improving the vertical ride quality of railway vehicles. It includes an assessment of the ride quality benefits that can theoretically be achieved with idealised devices, and also examines the impact of real devices based upon hydraulic actuation technology.

  20. Aerosol-Jet-Printing silicone layers and electrodes for stacked dielectric elastomer actuators in one processing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitelshöfer, Sebastian; Göttler, Michael; Schmidt, Philip; Treffer, Philipp; Landgraf, Maximilian; Franke, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution we present recent findings of our efforts to qualify the so called Aerosol-Jet-Printing process as an additive manufacturing approach for stacked dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA). With the presented system we are able to print the two essential structural elements dielectric layer and electrode in one machine. The system is capable of generating RTV-2 silicone layers made of Wacker Elastosil P 7670. Therefore, two aerosol streams of both precursor components A and B are generated in parallel and mixed in one printing nozzle that is attached to a 4-axis kinematic. At maximum speed the printing of one circular Elastosil layer with a calculated thickness of 10 μm and a diameter of 1 cm takes 12 seconds while the process keeps stable for 4.5 hours allowing a quite high overall material output and the generation of numerous silicone layers. By adding a second printing nozzle and the infrastructure to generate a third aerosol, the system is also capable of printing inks with conductive particles in parallel to the silicone. We have printed a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) ink prepared in our lab to generate electrodes on VHB 4905, Elastosil foils and finally on Aerosol-Jet-Printed Elastosil layers. With rGO ink printed on Elastosil foil, layers with a 4-point measured sheet resistance as low as 4 kΩ can be realized leaving room for improving the electrode printing time, which at the moment is not as good as the quite good time-frame for printing the silicone layers. Up to now we have used the system to print a fully functional two-layer stacked DEA to demonstrate the principle of continuously 3D printing actuators.

  1. Reliability studies of electrostrictive actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, U.; Randall, M.; Hock, J.; Ritter, A.

    1994-12-31

    Multilayer electrostrictive actuators have numerous applications. Frequently these applications involve harsh mechanical and electrical loads. Furthermore, it is typically expected that these loads be incurred for >10{sup 8} repetitions (ideally for an infinite number of cycles). This paper describes the electrical and electro-mechanical analyses used at AVX Corporation to assess the performance characteristics of multilayer ceramic actuators, and addresses the effects of electro-mechanical cycling on selected device properties. In this study, lead magnesium niobate based multilayer electrostrictive actuators were subjected to a.c. fields at rated device voltage. Capacitance, dissipation factor, displacement vs. voltage, displacement hysteresis, electro-mechanical quality factor, and resonant frequency were monitored as a function of electro-mechanical cycling. The actuators exhibited highly stable displacements throughout the investigation. Changes observed in other properties indicate a possibility of using them as NDE techniques to assess the actuator reliability.

  2. Microprocessor controlled proof-mass actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, Garnett C.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the microprocessor controlled proof-mass actuator is to develop the capability to mount a small programmable device on laboratory models. This capability will allow research in the active control of flexible structures. The approach in developing the actuator will be to mount all components as a single unit. All sensors, electronic and control devices will be mounted with the actuator. The goal for the force output capability of the actuator will be one pound force. The programmable force actuator developed has approximately a one pound force capability over the usable frequency range, which is above 2 Hz.

  3. Impact of device level faults in a digital avionic processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.; Iyer, R. K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental analysis of the impact of gate and device-level faults in the processor of a flight control system. Via mixed mode simulation faults were injected both at the gate (stuck-at) and at the transistor levels, and their propagation through the chip to the output pins was measured. The results show that there is little correspondence between a stuck-at and a device-level fault model insofar as error activity or detection within a functional unit is concerned. Insofar as error activity outside the injected unit and at the output pins are concerned, the stuck-at and device models track each other, although the stuck-at model overestimates, by over one hundred percent, the probability of fault propagation to the output pins. The stuck-at model significantly underestimates the impact of an internal chip fault on the output pins.

  4. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  5. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Segalman, Daniel J.; Witkowski, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  6. Organisational impact: Definition and assessment methods for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Christophe; Carbonneil, Cédric; Audry, Antoine

    2016-02-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is a rapidly developing area and the value of taking non-clinical fields into consideration is growing. Although the health-economic aspect is commonly recognised, evaluating organisational impact has not been studied nearly as much. The goal of this work was to provide a definition of organisational impact in the sector of medical devices by defining its contours and exploring the evaluation methods specific to this field. Following an analysis of the literature concerning the impact of technologies on organisations as well as the medical literature, and also after reviewing the regulatory texts in this respect, the group of experts identified 12 types of organisational impact. A number of medical devices were carefully screened using the criteria grid, which proved to be operational and to differentiate properly. From the analysis of the practice and of the methods described, the group was then able to derive a few guidelines to successfully evaluate organisational impact. This work shows that taking organisational impact into consideration may be critical alongside of the other criteria currently in favour (clinically and economically). What remains is to confer a role in the decision-making process on this factor and one that meets the economic efficiency principle. PMID:27080633

  7. Organisational impact: Definition and assessment methods for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Christophe; Carbonneil, Cédric; Audry, Antoine

    2016-02-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is a rapidly developing area and the value of taking non-clinical fields into consideration is growing. Although the health-economic aspect is commonly recognised, evaluating organisational impact has not been studied nearly as much. The goal of this work was to provide a definition of organisational impact in the sector of medical devices by defining its contours and exploring the evaluation methods specific to this field. Following an analysis of the literature concerning the impact of technologies on organisations as well as the medical literature, and also after reviewing the regulatory texts in this respect, the group of experts identified 12 types of organisational impact. A number of medical devices were carefully screened using the criteria grid, which proved to be operational and to differentiate properly. From the analysis of the practice and of the methods described, the group was then able to derive a few guidelines to successfully evaluate organisational impact. This work shows that taking organisational impact into consideration may be critical alongside of the other criteria currently in favour (clinically and economically). What remains is to confer a role in the decision-making process on this factor and one that meets the economic efficiency principle.

  8. Torsional Ratcheting Actuating System

    SciTech Connect

    BARNES,STEPHEN MATTHEW; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; RODGERS,M. STEVEN; BITSIE,FERNANDO

    2000-01-24

    A new type of surface micromachined ratcheting actuation system has been developed at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories. The actuator uses a torsional electrostatic comb drive that is coupled to an external ring gear through a ratcheting scheme. The actuator can be operated with a single square wave, has minimal rubbing surfaces, maximizes comb finger density, and can be used for open-loop position control. The prototypes function as intended with a minimum demonstrated operating voltage of 18V. The equations of motion are developed for the torsional electrostatic comb drive. The resonant frequency, voltage vs. displacement and force delivery characteristics are predicted and compared with the fabricated device's performance.

  9. Navigating conjugated polymer actuated neural probes in a brain phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshvar, Eugene D.; Kipke, Daryl; Smela, Elisabeth

    2012-04-01

    Neural probe insertion methods have a direct impact on the longevity of the device in the brain. Initial tissue and vascular damage caused by the probe entering the brain triggers a chronic tissue response that is known to attenuate neural recordings and ultimately encapsulate the probes. Smaller devices have been found to evoke reduced inflammatory response. One way to record from undamaged neural networks may be to position the electrode sites away from the probe. To investigate this approach, we are developing probes with controllably movable electrode projections, which would move outside of the zone that is damaged by the insertion of the larger probe. The objective of this study was to test the capability of conjugated polymer bilayer actuators to actuate neural electrode projections from a probe shank into a transparent brain phantom. Parylene neural probe devices, having five electrode projections with actuating segments and with varying widths (50 - 250 μm) and lengths (200 - 1000 μm) were fabricated. The electroactive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) was used to bend or flatten the projections. The devices were inserted into the brain phantom using an electronic microdrive while simultaneously activating the actuators. Deflections were quantified based on video images. The electrode projections were successfully controlled to either remain flat or to actuate out-of-plane and into the brain phantom during insertion. The projection width had a significant effect on their ability to deflect within the phantom, with thinner probes deflecting but not the wider ones. Thus, small integrated conjugated polymer actuators may enable multiple neuro-experiments and applications not possible before.

  10. Integrated sensing and actuation of muscle-like actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisby, T. A.; Xie, S.; Calius, E. P.; Anderson, I. A.

    2009-03-01

    The excellent overall performance and compliant nature of Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEAs) make them ideal candidates for artificial muscles. Natural muscle however is much more than just an actuator, it provides position feedback to the brain that is essential for the body to maintain balance and correct posture. If DEAs are to truly earn the moniker of "artificial muscles" they need to be able to reproduce, if not improve on, this functionality. Self-sensing DEAs are the ideal solution to this problem. This paper presents a system by which the capacitance of a DEA can be sensed while it is being actuated and used for feedback control. This system has been strongly influenced by the desire for portability i.e. designed for use in a battery operated microcontroller based system. It is capable of controlling multiple independent DEAs using a single high voltage power supply. These features are important developments for artificial muscle devices where accuracy and low mass are important e.g. a prosthetic hand or force-feedback surgical tools. A numerical model of the electrical behaviour of the DEA that incorporates arbitrary leakage currents and the impact of arbitrary variable capacitance has been created to model a DEA system. A robust capacitive self-sensing method that uses a slew-rate controlled Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signal and compensates for the effects of leakage current and variable capacitance is presented. The numerical model is then used to compare the performance of this new method with an earlier method previously published by the authors.

  11. TMD 2D Materials: Defects, Passivation, Functionalization and Device Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Robert

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) such as MoS2 have become popular in ``beyond CMOS'' device concepts and research due to their band structure in two-dimensional layers - viz. a significant band gap. Various device demonstrations have been reported utilizing exfoliated and synthesized single/few layer TMDs for possible electronic and photonic applications. The performance of such devices will also necessarily depend upon the TMD layer quality. The impact of defects and impurities on device transport characteristics is of interest, as well as methods to passivate and minimize their effects. The interaction of the TMDs with component materials, such as dielectrics and contacts, is also an important aspect. This talk will present our recent work using in-situ and ex-situ methods to understand the physics and chemistry of TMDs and their associated interfaces. This work was supported in part by the LEAST Center, one of the six SRC STARnet Centers, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA; the SWAN Center sponsored by the SRC NRI and NIST, and the NSF under Award ECCS-1407765.

  12. PREFABRICATION DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR A LONG-TERM ELECTRICALLY-ACTUATED ABDOMINAL LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE (E-TYPE ALVAD)

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, James T.; Igo, Stephen R.; Poirier, Victor L.; Keiser, John T.; Hibbs, C. Wayne; Fuqua, John M.; Edmonds, Charles H.; Holub, Daniel A.; McGee, Michael G.; Fuhrman, Thomas M.; Joseph, Alexander R.; Norman, John C.

    1978-01-01

    The conceptual design and development of a long-term, low-profile intracorporeal left ventricular assist device is a multifaceted project involving a series of technical, anatomic and physiologic considerations. Patients with severe left ventricular failure refractory to all other forms of therapy could benefit from such a device. Prior to fabrication of such a blood pump, consideration must be given to physiologic parameters of the projected patient population. The pump must be designed to meet physiologic demands and yet conform to the anatomic constraints posed by the patient population. We measured the body surface area (BSA) of a group of patients (n=50) and found the mean BSA for this group to be 1.804 ± 0.161 m2. Using 25 ml/m2 as a stroke volume index indicative of left ventricular failure and a stroke volume index of 45 ml/m2 as normal, distributions of stroke volumes (normal and in left ventricular failure) were plotted for a potential population and demonstrated that 63% of the projected population can be returned to normal by a pump with a stroke volume ≥ 83 ml. Cadaver fitting studies established that 73% of the potential population can accommodate an ALVAD 10.8 cm in diameter. In-vitro tests demonstrated that a pump stroke volume ≥ 83 ml could be achieved by the proposed pump with a 15 mmHg filling pressure at rates up to 125 B/min. A pusher-plate stroke of 0.56 inches would be necessary to provide a stroke volume ≥ 83 ml. The percent of the patient population that could be served was determined by excluding those in whom the pump would not fit or in whom it would provide less than a normal resting stroke volume. Approximately 73% of the projected patient population would accommodate this pump and be returned to normal circulatory dynamics. PMID:15216047

  13. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator

  14. Self-folding miniature elastic electric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Shuhei; Meeker, Laura; Tolley, Michael T.; Wood, Robert J.; Rus, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Printing functional materials represents a considerable impact on the access to manufacturing technology. In this paper we present a methodology and validation of print-and-self-fold miniature electric devices. Polyvinyl chloride laminated sheets based on metalized polyester film show reliable self-folding processes under a heat application, and it configures 3D electric devices. We exemplify this technique by fabricating fundamental electric devices, namely a resistor, capacitor, and inductor. Namely, we show the development of a self-folded stretchable resistor, variable resistor, capacitive strain sensor, and an actuation mechanism consisting of a folded contractible solenoid coil. Because of their pre-defined kinematic design, these devices feature elasticity, making them suitable as sensors and actuators in flexible circuits. Finally, an RLC circuit obtained from the integration of developed devices is demonstrated, in which the coil based actuator is controlled by reading a capacitive strain sensor.

  15. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  16. Actuator mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stange, W. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An actuator mechanism is described, having a frame with a rotatable shaft supported in the frame, a positioning mechanism coupled to the shaft for rotating the shaft in two rotary positions, disposed approximately 180 degrees apart, and a pair of plungers coupled to the shaft. Each plunger is responsive to a control signal for applying bi-directional rotation to the shaft.

  17. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan

    Dielectric polymers are widely used in a plurality of applications, such as electrical insulation, dielectric capacitors, and electromechanical actuators. Dielectric polymers with large strain deformations under an electric field are named dielectric elastomers (DE), because of their relative low modulus, high elongation at break, and outstanding resilience. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are superior to traditional transducers as a muscle-like technology: large strains, high energy densities, high coupling efficiency, quiet operation, and light weight. One focus of this dissertation is on the design of DE materials with high performance and easy processing. UV radiation curing of reactive species is studied as a generic synthesis methodology to provide a platform for material scientists to customize their own DE materials. Oligomers/monomers, crosslinkers, and other additives are mixed and cured at appropriate ratios to control the stress-strain response, suppress electromechanical instability of the resulting polymers, and provide stable actuation strains larger than 100% and energy densities higher than 1 J/g. The processing is largely simplified in the new material system by removal of the prestretching step. Multilayer stack actuators with 11% linear strain are demonstrated in a procedure fully compatible with industrial production. A multifunctional DE derivative material, bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP), is invented enabling repeatable rigid-to-rigid deformation without bulky external structures. Bistable actuation allows the polymer actuator to have two distinct states that can support external load without device failure. Plasticizers are used to lower the glass transition temperature to 45 °C. Interpenetrating polymer network structure is established inside the BSEP to suppress electromechanical instability, providing a breakdown field of 194 MV/m and a stable bistable strain as large as 228% with a 97% strain fixity. The application of BSEP

  18. Impact of Environmental Enrichment Devices on NTP In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Sheba R; Morgan, Daniel L; Kissling, Grace E; Travlos, Gregory S; King-Herbert, Angela P

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether the use of nesting material or polycarbonate shelters as enrichment devices would have an impact on end points commonly measured during the conduct of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) 13-week studies. The study design was consistent with the NTP 13-week toxicity studies. Harlan Sprague-Dawley (HSD) rats and their offspring and B6C3F1/N mice were assigned to control (unenriched) and enriched experimental groups. Body weight, food and water consumption, behavioral observations, fecal content, clinical pathology, gross pathology, organ weights, and histopathology were evaluated. Enriched male mice and male and female rats exhibited decreased feed intake without a subsequent decrease in body weight; this may have been the result of the nesting material reducing the effect of cold stress, thereby allowing for more efficient use of feed. There were statistical differences in some hematological parameters; however, these were not considered physiologically relevant since all values were within the normal range. Gross pathology and histopathological findings were background changes and were not considered enrichment-related. Nesting material and shelters were used frequently and consistently and allowed animals to display species-typical behavior. There was no significant impact on commonly measured end points in HSD rats and B6C3F1/N mice given enrichment devices. PMID:26873679

  19. Impact of Environmental Enrichment Devices on NTP In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Sheba R; Morgan, Daniel L; Kissling, Grace E; Travlos, Gregory S; King-Herbert, Angela P

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether the use of nesting material or polycarbonate shelters as enrichment devices would have an impact on end points commonly measured during the conduct of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) 13-week studies. The study design was consistent with the NTP 13-week toxicity studies. Harlan Sprague-Dawley (HSD) rats and their offspring and B6C3F1/N mice were assigned to control (unenriched) and enriched experimental groups. Body weight, food and water consumption, behavioral observations, fecal content, clinical pathology, gross pathology, organ weights, and histopathology were evaluated. Enriched male mice and male and female rats exhibited decreased feed intake without a subsequent decrease in body weight; this may have been the result of the nesting material reducing the effect of cold stress, thereby allowing for more efficient use of feed. There were statistical differences in some hematological parameters; however, these were not considered physiologically relevant since all values were within the normal range. Gross pathology and histopathological findings were background changes and were not considered enrichment-related. Nesting material and shelters were used frequently and consistently and allowed animals to display species-typical behavior. There was no significant impact on commonly measured end points in HSD rats and B6C3F1/N mice given enrichment devices.

  20. Actuator Placement Via Genetic Algorithm for Aircraft Morphing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, William A.; Cook, Andrea M.

    2001-01-01

    This research continued work that began under the support of NASA Grant NAG1-2119. The focus of this effort was to continue investigations of Genetic Algorithm (GA) approaches that could be used to solve an actuator placement problem by treating this as a discrete optimization problem. In these efforts, the actuators are assumed to be "smart" devices that change the aerodynamic shape of an aircraft wing to alter the flow past the wing, and, as a result, provide aerodynamic moments that could provide flight control. The earlier work investigated issued for the problem statement, developed the appropriate actuator modeling, recognized the importance of symmetry for this problem, modified the aerodynamic analysis routine for more efficient use with the genetic algorithm, and began a problem size study to measure the impact of increasing problem complexity. The research discussed in this final summary further investigated the problem statement to provide a "combined moment" problem statement to simultaneously address roll, pitch and yaw. Investigations of problem size using this new problem statement provided insight into performance of the GA as the number of possible actuator locations increased. Where previous investigations utilized a simple wing model to develop the GA approach for actuator placement, this research culminated with application of the GA approach to a high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle concept to demonstrate that the approach is valid for an aircraft configuration.

  1. Automatic rotary valve actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, W.E.

    1985-03-28

    This report describes the design, construction, and operation of a microcomputer-controlled valve actuator for operating test valves requiring rotary motion of the valve stem. An AIM 65 microcomputer, using a FORTH language program, controls an air motor and air clutch mounted within an oven to accomplish testing at elevated temperatures. The valve actuator closes the test valve until a preset torque is reached and then opens the valve to its initial starting point. The number of cycles and extremes of rotation are tallied and printed as the test progresses. Provisions are made to accept remote signals to stop the test and to indicate to a remote device when the test has been stopped.

  2. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  3. Light-Driven Polymeric Bimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Gregory; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are being developed as alternatives to prior electrically and optically driven actuators in advanced, highly miniaturized devices and systems exemplified by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems (MEOMS), and sensor and actuator arrays in smart structures. These light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are intended to satisfy a need for actuators that (1) in comparison with the prior actuators, are simpler and less power-hungry; (2) can be driven by low-power visible or mid-infrared light delivered through conventional optic fibers; and (3) are suitable for integration with optical sensors and multiple actuators of the same or different type. The immediate predecessors of the present light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are bimorph actuators that exploit a photorestrictive effect in lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics. The disadvantages of the PLZT-based actuators are that (1) it is difficult to shape the PLZT ceramics, which are hard and brittle; (2) for actuation, it is necessary to use ultraviolet light (wavelengths < 380 nm), which must be generated by use of high-power, high-pressure arc lamps or lasers; (3) it is difficult to deliver sufficient ultraviolet light through conventional optical fibers because of significant losses in the fibers; (4) the response times of the PLZT actuators are of the order of several seconds unacceptably long for typical applications; and (5) the maximum mechanical displacements of the PLZT-based actuators are limited to those characterized by low strains beyond which PLZT ceramics disintegrate because of their brittleness. The basic element of a light-driven bimorph actuator of the present developmental type is a cantilever beam comprising two layers, at least one of which is a polymer that exhibits a photomechanical effect (see figure). The dominant mechanism of the photomechanical effect is a photothermal one: absorption of

  4. Dynamic actuation of single-crystal diamond nanobeams

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Young-Ik; Burek, Michael J.; Lončar, Marko; Kara, Vural; Kearns, Ryan

    2015-12-14

    We show the dielectrophoretic actuation of single-crystal diamond nanomechanical devices. Gradient radio-frequency electromagnetic forces are used to achieve actuation of both cantilever and doubly clamped beam structures, with operation frequencies ranging from a few MHz to ∼50 MHz. Frequency tuning and parametric actuation are also studied.

  5. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  8. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  9. 21 CFR 870.1670 - Syringe actuator for an injector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Syringe actuator for an injector. 870.1670 Section... actuator for an injector. (a) Identification. A syringe actuator for an injector is an electrical device that controls the timing of an injection by an angiographic or indicator injector and synchronizes...

  10. Bucky gel actuators optimization towards haptic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubak, Grzegorz; Ansaldo, Alberto; Ceseracciu, Luca; Hata, Kenji; Ricci, Davide

    2014-03-01

    An ideal plastic actuator for haptic applications should generate a relatively large displacement (minimum 0.2-0.6 mm, force (~50 mN/cm2) and a fast actuation response to the applied voltage. Although many different types of flexible, plastic actuators based on electroactive polymers (EAP) are currently under investigation, the ionic EAPs are the only ones that can be operated at low voltage. This property makes them suitable for applications that require inherently safe actuators. Among the ionic EAPs, bucky gel based actuators are very promising. Bucky gel is a physical gel made by grounding imidazolium ionic liquids with carbon nanotubes, which can then be incorporated in a polymeric composite matrix to prepare the active electrode layers of linear and bending actuators. Anyhow, many conflicting factors have to be balanced to obtain required performance. In order to produce high force a large stiffness is preferable but this limits the displacement. Moreover, the bigger the active electrode the larger the force. However the thicker an actuator is, the slower the charging process becomes (it is diffusion limited). In order to increase the charging speed a thin electrolyte would be desirable, but this increases the probability of pinholes and device failure. In this paper we will present how different approaches in electrolyte and electrode preparation influence actuator performance and properties taking particularly into account the device ionic conductivity (which influences the charging speed) and the electrode surface resistance (which influences both the recruitment of the whole actuator length and its speed).

  11. Experimental investigation of resonant MEMS switch with ac actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jitendra; Zhu, Yong; Wang, Boyi; Lu, Junwei; Khan, Fahimullah; Viet Dao, Dzung; Wang, Yifan

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, modeling, analysis, and experimental investigation for a resonant MEMS switch are presented. The resonant switch harnesses its mechanical resonance to lower the required actuation voltage by a substantial factor over the switch with static actuation. With alternating actuation voltage at its mechanical resonance frequency of 6.6 kHz, the average capacitance is tuned by changing the gap between fixed and movable electrodes. Based on the proposed actuation method, the device offers 57.44% lower actuation voltage compared with the switch with static actuation.

  12. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  13. Toward standardization of EAP actuators test procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Diego; Moreno, Luis; Baselga, Juan

    2005-05-01

    Since the field of Electroactive Polymers (EAP) actuators is fairly new there are no standard testing processes for such intelligent materials. This drawback can seriously limit the scope of application of EAP actuators, since the targeted industrial sectors (aerospace, biomedical...) demand high reliability and product assurance. As a first iteration two elements are required to define a test standard for an EAP actuator: a Unit Tester, and a Component Specification. In this paper a EAP Unit Tester architecture is presented along with the required classification of measurements to be included in the EAP actuator Component Specification. The proposed EAP Unit Tester allows on-line monitoring and recording of the following properties of the specimen under test: large deformation, small tip displacement, temperature at the electrodes, weight of the specimen, voltage and current driven into the EAP, load being applied to the actuator, output voltage of the EAP in sensing operation and mode of operation (structure/sensor/actuator/smart). The measurements are taken simultaneously, in real-time. The EAP Unit Tester includes a friendly Graphical User Interface. It uses embedded Excel tools to visualize data. In addition, real-time connectivity with MATLAB allows an easy testing of control algorithms. A novel methodology to measure the properties of EAP specimens versus a variable load is also presented. To this purpose a force signals generator in the range of mN was developed. The device is based on a DC mini-motor. It generates an opposing force to the movement of the EAP actuator. Since the device constantly opposes the EAP actuator movement it has been named Digital Force Generator (DFG). The DFG design allows simultaneous length and velocity measuring versus different load signals. By including such a device in the EAP Unit Tester the most suitable application for the specimen under test can be easily identified (vibration damper, large deformation actuator, large

  14. Carbon nanotube actuators

    PubMed

    Baughman; Cui; Zakhidov; Iqbal; Barisci; Spinks; Wallace; Mazzoldi; De Rossi D; Rinzler; Jaschinski; Roth; Kertesz

    1999-05-21

    Electromechanical actuators based on sheets of single-walled carbon nanotubes were shown to generate higher stresses than natural muscle and higher strains than high-modulus ferroelectrics. Like natural muscles, the macroscopic actuators are assemblies of billions of individual nanoscale actuators. The actuation mechanism (quantum chemical-based expansion due to electrochemical double-layer charging) does not require ion intercalation, which limits the life and rate of faradaic conducting polymer actuators. Unlike conventional ferroelectric actuators, low operating voltages of a few volts generate large actuator strains. Predictions based on measurements suggest that actuators using optimized nanotube sheets may eventually provide substantially higher work densities per cycle than any previously known technology.

  15. Flexure-based nanomagnetic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Daniel James

    Nanometer-scale actuators powered through applied-magnetic fields have been designed, fabricated, and tested. These actuators consist of one or more ferromagnetic elements attached to a mechanical flexure. Two types of flexures were studied including a cantilever beam that is fixed on one end, and free on the other. The free end of the cantilever is attached to a, ferromagnetic element allowing a bending torque to be applied by a magnetic field. The second type of actuator design uses a set of torsion beams that are each anchored on one end, and attached to the magnetic element on the other end. The torsion beams are designed such that the application of a magnetic field will result in a twist along the long axis of the beam with little to no bending. The smallest fabricated and tested device is a cantilever-based ferromagnetic actuator that consists of a single 1.5-mum-long, 338-nm-wide, and 50-nm-thick nickel element, and a 2.2-mum-long, 110-nm-wide, and 30-nm-thick gold cantilever beam. A deflection of over 17° was measured for this actuator, while a similar one with a 10.1-mum long cantilever beam experienced measured deflections up to 57°. Torsion-based ferromagnetic actuators have been fabricated and tested with 110-nm-wide, and 50-rim-thick magnetic elements. Such magnetic elements contain only a single saturated magnetic domain. The ultimate scalability of ferromagnetic actuation is limited by the ability of thermal noise to affect the temporal stability of a nanometer-scale magnet. Theory to describe thermal noise and ultimate scalability of the ferromagnetic actuators has been developed. The size of the ferromagnetic actuators studied in this manuscript are smaller than most plant and animal cells. This enables the possibility of such actuators to manipulate a, living cell on an intracellular level. Other potential applications of such small actuators include MHz, to GHz frequency resonators, and tunable optical filters.

  16. Sensor/Actuator Selection for Gust and Turbulence Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1998-01-01

    From aircraft fuselages and space stations to vacuum cleaners and automobiles, active control of noise and/or vibration has come of age. Determining the number of active control devices (e.g. actuators) to be placed and where they are to be placed is the prototypical location problem. However, unlike typical location problems, where the customer is readily identified and is actively engaged in the assessment of the performance of the chosen locations, the customers that active control devices serve are not so easily identified and their impact on system performance issues may be unclear. For example, consider the problem of where to locate actuators to attenuate cabin noise in a propeller driven aircraft. Clearly, the ultimate customers are the passengers who will travel in these aircraft. But to decide whether one set of actuator locations is better than another it is unlikely we will ask passengers to fly in the aircraft and fill out a questionnaire about noise levels. Instead a set of sensors (pseudo-customers) are placed and the system performance of the actuators, as measured by these sensors, is recorded. Hence, we have yet another location problem. How many sensors should there be and where should they be located? In many instances collocation of sensors and actuators is the answer but in other instances it is not. A variety of approaches have been taken to address these sensor/actuator location problems. With regard to damping vibrations in truss structures (space station prototypes) it was formulated a new noxious location problem and generated high-quality solutions with a combination of LP-relaxations and heuristic search procedures. Other related efforts are summarized the actuator location problem for a single frequency interior noise control problem was examined for an idealized aircraft cabin. A tabu search procedure was shown to generate better locations for the actuators than a modal decomposition approach. The model was extended to include multi

  17. Biomimetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, Vaclav; Boudova, Lea; Haluzikova, Denisa

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the presentation is to propose an alternative model of mammalian skeletal muscle function, which reflects the simplicity of nature and can be applied in engineering. Van der Waals attractive and repulsive electrostatic forces are assumed to control the design of internal structures and functions of contractile units of the muscles - sarcomere. The role of myosin heads is crucial for the higher order formation. The model of the myosin head lattice is the working model for the sarcomere contraction interpretation. The contraction is interpreted as a calcium induced phase transition of the lattice, which results in relative actin-myosin sliding and/or force generation. The model should provide the engineering science with a simple analogy to technical actuators of high performance.

  18. Actuator lifetime predictions for Ni60Ti40 shape memory alloy plate actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Robert; Ottmers, Cade; Hewling, Brett; Lagoudas, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs), due to their ability to repeatedly recover substantial deformations under applied mechanical loading, have the potential to impact the aerospace, automotive, biomedical, and energy industries as weight and volume saving replacements for conventional actuators. While numerous applications of SMA actuators have been flight tested and can be found in industrial applications, these actuators are generally limited to non-critical components, are not widely implemented and frequently one-off designs, and are generally overdesigned due to a lack of understanding of the effect of the loading path on the fatigue life and the lack of an accurate method of predicting actuator lifetimes. Previous efforts have been effective at predicting actuator lifetimes for isobaric dogbone test specimens. This study builds on previous work and investigates the actuation fatigue response of plate actuators with various stress concentrations through the use of digital image correlation and finite element simulations.

  19. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  20. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  1. THEORETICAL DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS AND PHYSIOLOGIC PERFORMANCE CRITERIA FOR AN IMPROVED INTRACORPOREAL (ABDOMINAL) ELECTRICALLY ACTUATED LONG-TERM LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE (“E-TYPE” ALVAD) OR PARTIAL ARTIFICIAL HEART

    PubMed Central

    Igo, Stephen R.; Hibbs, C. Wayne; Fuqua, John M.; Trono, Ruben; Edmonds, Charles H.; Norman, John C.

    1978-01-01

    Our laboratories are engaged in the design of a clinically-oriented electrically actuated long-term intracorporeal (abdominal) left ventricular assist device (“E-type” ALVAD) or partial artificial heart. This infradiaphragmatic blood pump is designed to be powered by implantable electrical to mechanical energy converter systems. The following analyses were undertaken to: [List: see text] The proposed “E-type” ALVAD should be capable of pumping 4-7 liters per minute at heart rates of 75-100 beats per minute during rest, and 10 liters per minute at rates of 120 beats per minute during moderate exercise. These performance levels should be exceeded with a maximum device stroke volume of 85-90 ml and a mean pump inflow (filling) impedance of ≤ 0.072 gm/sec/cm−5. Images PMID:15216070

  2. Microprocessor controlled force actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, D. C.; Inman, D. J.; Horner, G. C.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical design of a prototype force actuator for vibration control of large space structures (LSS) is described. The force actuator is an electromagnetic system that produces a force by reacting against a proof-mass. The actuator has two colocated sensors, a digital microcontroller, and a power amplifier. The total weight of actuator is .998 kg. The actuator has a steady state force output of approximately 2.75 N from approximately 2 Hz to well beyond 1000 Hz.

  3. Out-of-Plane Translational PZT Bimorph Actuator with Archimedes’ Spiral Actuating Tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenye; Liu, Sanwei; Livermore, Carol

    2015-12-01

    The design, finite element analysis (FEA), and experimental characterization of a MEMS out-of-plane (vertical) translational lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) bimorph actuator supported on Archimedes’ spiral tethers are presented. Two types of bimorph actuators with different electrode patterns (with spiral tethers half actuated or fully actuated) are designed and fabricated. Both designs are fabricated by commercial processes and are compatible with integration into more complex MEMS systems. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to analyze and predict the displacements of both types of actuators. The deflections of both fully- actuated and half-actuated devices were measured experimentally to validate the design. At an applied voltage of 110V, the out-of-plane deflections of the actuators with half-actuated and fully-actuated tethers were measured at about 17 μm and 29 μm respectively, in good agreement with FEA predictions of 17.1 μm and 25.8 μm. The corresponding blocking forces are predicted as 10 mN and 17 mN by FEA.

  4. Impact of Electronic Device Use in Class on Pharmacy Students’ Academic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Heather L.; Wrobel, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate and assess the impact of pharmacy students’ electronic device (e-device) use during a lecture-based pharmacotherapeutics sequence. Methods. A validated survey instrument to assess e-device use was e-mailed to 238 second- (P2) and third-year (P3) pharmacy students. Grades were reviewed retrospectively and correlated with e-device use to determine its impact on academic performance. Results. Of 140 responding students (59% response rate), 106 reported using e-devices during class for course-related (91.5%) and non-course-related (81.1%) activities. When P2 and P3 students were combined, e-device use was not associated with academic performance (p = 0.70). Academic performance was not impacted among P3 students (p = 0.86), but P2 students performed better academically if they refrained from using e-devices during class (mean grade = 88.5% vs. 83.3%; p=0.019). Conclusions. The impact of e-device use on overall academic performance was negligible. Use of e-devices by students enrolled in their first pharmacotherapeutics course may negatively impact academics. PMID:23193331

  5. Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Charles D.; Bergum, John W.

    1994-01-01

    An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated.

  6. Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning

    DOEpatents

    Swift, C.D.; Bergum, J.W.

    1994-10-25

    An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated. 3 figs.

  7. Flexible dielectric elastomer actuators for wearable human-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzmacher, Christian; Biggs, James; Srinivasan, Mandayam

    2006-03-01

    Wearable dielectric elastomer actuators have the potential to enable new technologies, such as tactile feedback gloves for virtual reality, and to improve existing devices, such as automatic blood pressure cuffs. They are potentially lighter, quieter, thinner, simpler, and cheaper than pneumatic and hydraulic systems now used to make compliant, actuated interfaces with the human body. Achieving good performance without using a rigid frame to prestrain the actuator is a fundamental challenge in using these actuators on body. To answer this challenge, a new type of fiber-prestrained composite actuator was developed. Equations that facilitate design of the actuator are presented, along with FE analysis, material tests, and experimental results from prototypes. Bending stiffness of the actuator material was found to be comparable to textiles used in clothing, confirming wearability. Two roll-to-roll machines are also presented that permit manufacture of this material in bulk as a modular, compact, prestressed composite that can be cut, stacked, and staggered, in order to build up actuators for a range of desired forces and displacements. The electromechanical properties of single- layered actuators manufactured by this method were measured (N=5). At non-damaging voltages, blocking force ranged from 3,7-5,0 gram per centimeter of actuator width, with linear strains of 20,0-30%. Driving the actuators to breakdown produced maximum force of 8,3-10 gram/cm, and actuation strain in excess 30%. Using this actuator, a prototype tactile display was constructed and demonstrated.

  8. Photothermal Properties of Shape Memory Polymer Micro-Actuators for Treating Stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Maitland, D J; Metzger, M F; Schumann, D; Lee, A; Wilson, T S

    2001-03-05

    Objective--In this paper the photothermal design aspects of novel shape memory polymer (SMP) microactuators for treating stroke are presented. Materials and Methods--A total of three devices will be presented: two interventional ischemic stroke devices (coil and umbrella) and one device for releasing embolic coils (microgripper). The optical properties of SMP, methods for coupling laser light into SMP, heating distributions in the SMP devices and the impact of operating the thermally activated material in a blood vessel are presented. Results--Actuating the devices requires device temperatures in the range of 65 C-85 C. Attaining these temperatures under flow conditions requires critical engineering of the SMP optical properties, optical coupling into the SMP, and device geometries. Conclusion--Laser-activated SMP devices are a unique combination of laser-tissue and biomaterial technologies. Successful deployment of the microactuator requires well-engineered coupling of the light from the diffusing fiber through the blood into the SMP.

  9. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  10. Dielectric elastomer actuators with hydrostatic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2009-03-01

    The rapidly growing adoption of dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators as a high performance EAP technology for many kinds of new applications continuously opens new technical challenges, in order to take always the most from each adopted device and actuating configuration. This paper presents a new type of DE actuators, which show attractive potentialities for specific application needs. The concept here proposed adopts an incompressible fluid to mechanically couple active and passive parts. The active parts work according to the DE actuation principle, while the passive parts represent the end effector, in contact with the load. The fluid is used to transfer actuation hydrostatically from an active to a passive part and, then, to the load. This can provide specific advantages, including improved safety and less stringent design constraints for the architecture of the actuator, especially for soft end effectors. Such a simple concept can be readily implemented according to different shapes and intended functionalities of the resulting actuators. The paper describes the structure and the performance of the first prototype devices developed so far.

  11. Membrane Mirrors With Bimorph Shape Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Deformable mirrors of a proposed type would be equipped with relatively-large-stroke microscopic piezoelectric actuators that would be used to maintain their reflective surfaces in precise shapes. These mirrors would be members of the class of MEMS-DM (for microelectromechanical system deformable mirror) devices, which offer potential for a precise optical control in adaptive-optics applications in such diverse fields as astronomy and vision science. The proposed mirror would be fabricated, in part, by use of a membrane-transfer technique. The actuator design would contain bimorph-type piezoelectric actuators.

  12. Hydraulic Actuator System for Rotor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz; Althaus, Josef

    1991-01-01

    In the last ten years, several different types of actuators were developed and fabricated for active control of rotors. A special hydraulic actuator system capable of generating high forces to rotating shafts via conventional bearings is addressed. The actively controlled hydraulic force actuator features an electrohydraulic servo valve which can produce amplitudes and forces at high frequencies necessary for influencing rotor vibrations. The mathematical description will be given in detail. The experimental results verify the theoretical model. Simulations already indicate the usefulness of this compact device for application to a real rotor system.

  13. Impact of point defects on III-nitride tunnel devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Darshana; Lyons, John; van de Walle, Chris G.

    Heterostructures using GaN and InGaN are being pursued in designs of tunnel field-effect-transistors (TFETs) to enable low-power switching devices. Point defects and impurities in these heterostructures can adversely affect the performance of these devices through Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) and Trap-Assisted-Tunneling (TAT) processes. Using first-principles calculations based on a hybrid functional, we calculate the thermodynamic and charge-state switching levels as well as nonradiative recombination rates of point defects and impurities in GaN and InGaN. Gallium vacancies and their complexes, in particular, are found to be potentially detrimental centers. We then investigate how these defects can contribute to SRH and TAT processes in a nitride TFET device. This work was supported by the Center for Low Energy Systems Technology (LEAST), one of the six SRC STARnet Centers, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  14. Spectroradiometer Intercomparison and Impact on Characterizing Photovoltaic Device Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, E.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-11-01

    Indoor and outdoor testing of photovoltaic (PV) device performance requires the use of solar simulators and natural solar radiation, respectively. This performance characterization requires accurate knowledge of spectral irradiance distribution that is incident on the devices. Spectroradiometers are used to measure the spectral distribution of solar simulators and solar radiation. On September 17, 2013, a global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers was organized by the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This paper presents highlights of the results of this first intercomparison, which will help to decrease systematic inter-laboratory differences in the measurements of the outputs or efficiencies of PV devices and harmonize laboratory experimental procedures.

  15. The MJS-77 magnetometer actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stange, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A two-position (0 deg and 180 deg) actuating mechanism (flipper) driven by alternately-heated wax motors (pellets) used to rotate the low field triaxial fluxgate magnetometer experiment on the 1977 Mariner Jupiter-Saturn spacecraft to its 0 deg and 180 deg positions is described. The magnetic field, power requirements, weight and volume of this device are discussed. The problems encountered in design and development of this mechanism are presented.

  16. The MJS-77 magnetometer actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stange, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A two-position (0 deg and 180 deg) actuating mechanism (flipper) driven by alternately-heated wax motors (pellets) will be used to rotate the low field triaxial fluxgate magnetometer experiment on the 1977 Mariner Jupiter-Saturn spacecraft to its 0 deg and 180 deg positions. The magnetic field, power requirements, weight and volume of this device are very restrictive. The problems encountered in design and development of this mechanism are presented.

  17. Hydraulic actuator motion limiter ensures operator safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, C. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device regulates action of hydraulic linkage to control column to minimize hazard to operator. Primary components of device are flow rate control valve, limiter accumulator, and shutoff valve. Limiter may be incorporated into other hydraulic systems to prevent undue wear on hydraulic actuators and associated components.

  18. The Impact of Digital Mobile Devices in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevillano-García, M.ª Luisa; Vázquez-Cano, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the acceptance, incidence, and use of digital mobile devices (tablets and smartphones) among university students in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The research was contextualized in a sample of 419 students from three Spanish public universities. Through a quantitative methodology, we identified the factors and…

  19. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  20. 75 FR 34459 - Converged Communications and Health Care Devices Impact on Regulation; Public Meeting; Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Converged Communications and Health Care Devices Impact on... significant developments in recent years in medical and health care devices using radio technology to monitor..., caregivers, and patients. These and other products cover a broad range of health care solutions. At one...

  1. The Impact of Discontinuing Contact Precautions for VRE and MRSA on Device-Associated Infections.

    PubMed

    Edmond, Michael B; Masroor, Nadia; Stevens, Michael P; Ober, Janis; Bearman, Gonzalo

    2015-08-01

    The impact of discontinuing contact precautions for patients with MRSA and VRE colonization/infection on device-associated hospital-acquired infection rates at an academic medical center was investigated in this before-and-after study. In the setting of a strong horizontal infection prevention platform, discontinuation of contact precautions had no impact on device-associated hospital-acquired infection rates. PMID:25915205

  2. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  3. Subminiature hydraulic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.

    1978-01-01

    Subminiature, single-vane rotary actuator for wind-tunnel test-model control-surface actuation systems presents severe torque and system band-pass requirements with stringent space and weight limitations. Actuator has very low leakage of fluid from one side to other, permitting use in precision position servo-systems.

  4. AMSD Cryo Actuator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullette, Mark; Matthews, Gary; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The actuator technology required for AMSD and subsequently NGST are critical in the successful development for future cryogenic systems. Kodak has undertaken an extensive test plan to determine the performance of the force actuators developed under the AMSD program. These actuators are currently in testing at MSFC and are expected to finish this test cycle in early June 2002.

  5. Design of an innovative magnetostrictive patch actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinquemani, S.; Giberti, H.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetostrictive actuators can be profitably used to reduce vibration in structures. However, this technology has been exploited only to develop inertial actuators, while patches actuators have not been ever used in practice. Patches actuators consist on a layer of magnetostrictive material, which has to be stuck to the surface of the vibrating structure, and on a coil surrounding the layer itself. However, the presence of the winding severely limits the use of such devices. As a matter of fact, the scientific literature reports only theoretical uses of such actuators, but, in practice it does not seem they were ever used. This paper presents an innovative solution to improve the structure of the actuator patches, allowing their use in several practical applications. The principle of operation of these devices is rather simple. The actuator patch is able to generate a local deformation of the surface of the vibrating structure so as to introduce an equivalent damping that dissipates the kinetic energy associated to the vibration. This deformation is related to the behavior of the magnetostrictive material immersed in a variable magnetic field generated by the a variable current flowing in the winding. Contrary to what suggested in the theoretical literature, the designed device has the advantage of generating the variable magnetic field no longer in close proximity of the material, but in a different area, thus allowing a better coupling. The magnetic field is then conveyed through a suitable ferromagnetic structure to the magnetostrictive material. The device has been designed and simulated through FEA. Results confirm that the new configuration can easily overcome all the limits of traditional devices.

  6. Status of Electrical Actuator Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Taylor, Linda M.; Hansen, Irving G.

    1996-01-01

    An ever increasing number of actuation functions historically performed by hydraulics or pneumatics are being accomplished by electric actuation. If 'end to end' systems are considered, electric actuators (EA's) are potentially lighter and more efficient. In general, system redundancies may be more easily implemented and operationally monitored. Typically, electrical components exhibit longer mean times to failure and projected lifetime costs of EA's are potentially much lower than those of other options. EA's have certain characteristics which must be considered in their application. The actual mechanical loadings must be established, for the more easily controlled EA may be operated much closer to its full capabilities. At higher rates of motion, EA's are operating as constant power devices. Therefore, it may be possible to start a movement that can not be stopped. The incorporation of high power electronics into remote locations introduces new concerns of EMI and thermal control. It is the management of these and other characteristics that forms the engineering design challenges. Work is currently in progress on EA's for aircraft and expendable launch vehicles. These applications span from ten to 40+ horsepower. The systematics and status of these actuators will be reported along with current technical trends in this area.

  7. Impact of optical antennas on active optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Mohseni, Hooman

    2014-10-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the fabrication and characterization of optical antennas that are integrated with optoelectronic devices. Herein, we describe the fundamental reasons for and experimental evidence of the dramatic improvements that can be achieved by enhancing the light-matter interaction via an optical antenna in both photon-emitting and -detecting devices. In addition, integration of optical antennas with optoelectronic devices can lead to the realization of highly compact multifunctional platforms for future integrated photonics, such as low-cost lab-on-chip systems. In this review paper, we further focus on the effect of optical antennas on the detectivity of infrared photodetectors. One particular finding is that the antenna can have a dual effect on the specific detectivity, while it can elevate light absorption efficiency of sub-wavelength detectors, it can potentially increase the noise of the detectors due to the enhanced spontaneous emission rate. In particular, we predict that the detectivity of interband photon detectors can be negatively affected by the presence of optical antennas across a wide wavelength region covering visible to long wavelength infrared bands. In contrast, the detectivity of intersubband detectors could be generally improved with a properly designed optical antenna.

  8. Propellant Flow Actuated Piezoelectric Igniter for Combustion Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollen, Mark A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A propellant flow actuated piezoelectric igniter device using one or more hammer balls retained by one or more magnets, or other retaining method, until sufficient fluid pressure is achieved to release and accelerate the hammer ball, such that it impacts a piezoelectric crystal to produce an ignition spark. Certain preferred embodiments provide a means for repetitively capturing and releasing the hammer ball after it impacts one or more piezoelectric crystals, thereby oscillating and producing multiple, repetitive ignition sparks. Furthermore, an embodiment is presented for which oscillation of the hammer ball and repetitive impact to the piezoelectric crystal is maintained without the need for a magnet or other retaining mechanism to achieve this oscillating impact process.

  9. Flexible and stretchable electrodes for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-02-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) are flexible lightweight actuators that can generate strains of over 100 %. They are used in applications ranging from haptic feedback (mm-sized devices), to cm-scale soft robots, to meter-long blimps. DEAs consist of an electrode-elastomer-electrode stack, placed on a frame. Applying a voltage between the electrodes electrostatically compresses the elastomer, which deforms in-plane or out-of plane depending on design. Since the electrodes are bonded to the elastomer, they must reliably sustain repeated very large deformations while remaining conductive, and without significantly adding to the stiffness of the soft elastomer. The electrodes are required for electrostatic actuation, but also enable resistive and capacitive sensing of the strain, leading to self-sensing actuators. This review compares the different technologies used to make compliant electrodes for DEAs in terms of: impact on DEA device performance (speed, efficiency, maximum strain), manufacturability, miniaturization, the integration of self-sensing and self-switching, and compatibility with low-voltage operation. While graphite and carbon black have been the most widely used technique in research environments, alternative methods are emerging which combine compliance, conduction at over 100 % strain with better conductivity and/or ease of patternability, including microfabrication-based approaches for compliant metal thin-films, metal-polymer nano-composites, nanoparticle implantation, and reel-to-reel production of μm-scale patterned thin films on elastomers. Such electrodes are key to miniaturization, low-voltage operation, and widespread commercialization of DEAs.

  10. Omnidirectional Actuator Handle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed actuator handle comprises two normally concentric rings, cables, and pulleys arranged such that relative displacement of rings from concentricity results in pulling of cable and consequent actuation of associated mechanism. Unlike conventional actuator handles like levers on farm implements, actuated from one or two directions only, proposed handle reached from almost any direction and actuated by pulling or pushing inner ring in any direction with respect to outer ring. Flanges installed on inner ring to cover gap between inner ring and housing to prevent clothing from being caught.

  11. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  12. Hemodynamic impact of cerebral aneurysm endovascular treatment devices: coils and flow diverters.

    PubMed

    Goubergrits, Leonid; Schaller, Jens; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Woelken, Thies; Ringelstein, Moritz; Spuler, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Coils and flow diverters or stents are devices successfully used to treat cerebral aneurysms. Treatment aims to reduce intra-aneurysmal flow, thereby separating the aneurysmal sac from the blood circulation. The focus and this manuscript combining literature review and our original research is an analysis of changes in aneurysmal hemodynamics caused by endovascular treatment devices. Knowledge of post-treatment hemodynamics is a path to successful long-term treatment. Summarizing findings on hemodynamic impact of treatment devices, we conclude: coiling and stenting do not affect post-treatment intra-aneurysmal pressure, but significantly alter aneurysmal hemodynamics through flow reduction and a change in flow structure. The impact of treatment devices on aneurysmal flow depends, however, on a set of parameters including device geometry, course of placement, parent vessel and aneurysm geometry.

  13. Printing 3D dielectric elastomer actuators for soft robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Walters, Peter; Stoimenov, Boyko

    2009-03-01

    We present a new approach to the fabrication of soft dielectric elastomer actuators using a 3D printing process. Complete actuators including active membranes and support structures can be 3D printed in one go, resulting in a great improvement in fabrication speed and increases in accuracy and consistency. We describe the fabrication process and present force and displacement results for a double-membrane antagonistic actuator. In this structure controlled prestrain is applied by the simple process of pressing together two printed actuator halves. The development of 3D printable soft actuators will have a large impact on many application areas including engineering, medicine and the emerging field of soft robotics.

  14. A wireless actuating drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Won-Jun; Baek, Seung-Ki; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2015-04-01

    A wireless actuating drug delivery system was devised. The system is based on induction heating for drug delivery. In this study, thermally generated nitrogen gas produced by induction heating of azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) was utilized for pressure-driven release of the drug. The delivery device consists of an actuator chamber, a drug reservoir, and a microchannel. A semicircular copper disc (5 and 6 mm in diameter and 100 µm thick), and thermal conductive tape were integrated as the heating element in the actuator chamber. The final device was 2.7 mm thick. 28 µl of drug solution were placed in the reservoir and the device released the drug quickly at the rate of 6 µl s-1 by induction heating at 160 µT of magnetic intensity. The entire drug solution was released and dispersed after subcutaneous implantation under identical experimental condition. This study demonstrates that the device was simply prepared and drug delivery could be achieved by wireless actuation of a thin, pressure-driven actuator.

  15. Actuators, biomedicine, and cell-biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jager, Edwin W. H.

    2012-04-01

    Conducting polymers such as polypyrrole are well-known for their volume changing capacity and their use as actuating material. Actuators based on polypyrrole have been demonstrated in dimensions ranging from centimetres down to micrometres as well as in linear strain and bending beam actuation modes. The polypyrrole (micro-)actuators can be operated in salt solutions including cell culture media and blood. In addition, polypyrrole is known to be biocompatible making them a good choice for applications within cell biology and medicine. Applications of polypyrrole actuators within micromechanical devices, such as microrobotics and valves, will be presented. Opportunities and devices for the medical device industry, especially vascular surgery will be shown. This includes a rotating PCTA balloon system, a steerable guide wire, and an implantable drug delivery system. In addition, novel mechanostimulation chips for cell biology will be introduced. Using these devices, we can stretch cells and show the cellular response to this mechanical stimulation. Since the dawn of eukaryotic cells many parallel molecular mechanisms that respond to mechanical stimuli have evolved. This technology allows us to begin the investigation of these mechanisms on a single cell level.

  16. Maximizing strain in miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Araromi, Oluwaseun; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical model to optimise the unidirectional motion of a rigid object bonded to a miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), a configuration found for example in AMI's haptic feedback devices, or in our tuneable RF phase shifter. Recent work has shown that unidirectional motion is maximized when the membrane is both anistropically prestretched and subjected to a dead load in the direction of actuation. However, the use of dead weights for miniaturized devices is clearly highly impractical. Consequently smaller devices use the membrane itself to generate the opposing force. Since the membrane covers the entire frame, one has the same prestretch condition in the active (actuated) and passive zones. Because the passive zone contracts when the active zone expands, it does not provide a constant restoring force, reducing the maximum achievable actuation strain. We have determined the optimal ratio between the size of the electrode (active zone) and the passive zone, as well as the optimal prestretch in both in-plane directions, in order to maximize the absolute displacement of the rigid object placed at the active/passive border. Our model and experiments show that the ideal active ratio is 50%, with a displacement twice smaller than what can be obtained with a dead load. We expand our fabrication process to also show how DEAs can be laser-post-processed to remove carefully chosen regions of the passive elastomer membrane, thereby increasing the actuation strain of the device.

  17. Transparent and flexible haptic array actuator made with cellulose acetate for tactile sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohiuddin, Md; Kim, Hyun-Chan; Kim, Sang-Yeon; Kim, Jaehwan

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports an array type film haptic actuator based on cellulose acetate. Suggested actuator can vibrate with faster response time and various frequencies to give a range of haptic feedbacks to users which can be used in touch screen devices. Fabrication process, performance evaluation and electrostatic behavior of haptic actuator are reported for tactile sensation. Cellulose acetate film is suitable for haptic actuator for its transparency, flexibility and high dielectric constant. An element of haptic actuator is made by using cellulose acetate film with patterned adhesive tape spacer, then haptic actuator elements arrayed to 3 x 3 to embed in haptic devices. Experiment to measure vibration acceleration is carried out on wide range of actuation frequency and voltage for single actuator to evaluate 3x3 array actuator.

  18. Nanobionics: the impact of nanotechnology on implantable medical bionic devices.

    PubMed

    Wallace, G G; Higgins, M J; Moulton, S E; Wang, C

    2012-08-01

    The nexus of any bionic device can be found at the electrode-cellular interface. Overall efficiency is determined by our ability to transfer electronic information across that interface. The nanostructure imparted to electrodes plays a critical role in controlling the cascade of events that determines the composition and structure of that interface. With commonly used conductors: metals, carbon and organic conducting polymers, a number of approaches that promote control over structure in the nanodomain have emerged in recent years with subsequent studies revealing a critical dependency between nanostructure and cellular behaviour. As we continue to develop our understanding of how to create and characterise electromaterials in the nanodomain, this is expected to have a profound effect on the development of next generation bionic devices. In this review, we focus on advances in fabricating nanostructured electrodes that present new opportunities in the field of medical bionics. We also briefly evaluate the interactions of living cells with the nanostructured electromaterials, in addition to highlighting emerging tools used for nanofabrication and nanocharacterisation of the electrode-cellular interface.

  19. Three DOF actuator for optical parts micropositioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitu, Constantin; Comeaga, Constantin D.; Gramescu, Bogdan

    2005-08-01

    The actual growth of high-technologies and future applications in micro- and nano-manufacturing have raised the need for low cost / high performance micro-positioners. Photonic packaging, optical device testing, MEMS positioning/alignment, fiber alignment, micromachining, micro-manipulation, semiconductor handling systems, microsurgery are some examples of applications, from which the most are in the optical field. Very often, micro-positioning systems with micron or submicron resolution m needed to be run open loop, without feedback position sensors. Such devices are achievable with strain actuators like piezoelectric, magnetostrictive or electrostrictive ones. Two kinds of actuators could be used, with continuous motion or with discrete motion. The first could reach all the points from a space but request real time control. The second could reach only a finite number of points in space, but the command is binary, easy to implement. The working space for discrete actuators can be reached using a lot of actuators, series connected. The paper presents a piezoelectric actuator with 3 DOF, that could be used for micro-positioning. The investigated actuator is a scale model, for checking the principle and the models.

  20. Assessment and non-clinical impact of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Dervaux, Benoît; Szwarcensztein, Karine; Josseran, Anne; Barna, Alexandre; Carbonneil, Cédric; Chevrie, Karine; Debroucker, Frédérique; Grumblat, Anne; Grumel, Olivier; Massol, Jacques; Maugendre, Philippe; Méchin, Hubert; Orlikowski, David; Roussel, Christophe; Rumeau-Pichon, Catherine; Sales, Jean-Patrick; Vicaut, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Medical devices (MDs) cover a wide variety of products. They accompany changes in medical practice in step with technology innovations. Innovations in the field of MDs can improve the conditions of use of health technology and/or modify the organisation of care beyond the strict diagnostic or therapeutic benefit for the patients. However, these non purely clinical criteria seem to be only rarely documented or taken into account in the assessment of MDs during reimbursement decisions at national level or for formulary listing by hospitals even though multidimensional models for the assessment of health technologies have been developed that take into account the views of all stakeholders in the healthcare system In this article, after summarising the background concerning the assessment of health technologies in France, a definition of non-clinical criteria for the assessment of MDs is proposed and a decision tree for the assessment of MDs is described. Future lines of approach are proposed as a conclusion.

  1. Impact of iron contamination in multicrystalline silicon solarcells: origins, chemical states, and device impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Buonassisi, Tonio; Heuer, Matthias; Istratov, Andrei A.; Marcus,Matthew A.; Jonczyk, Ralf; Lai, Barry; Cai, Zhonghou; Schindler, Roland; Weber, Eicke R.

    2004-11-08

    Synchrotron-based microprobe techniques have been applied to study the distribution, size, chemical state, and recombination activity of Fe clusters in two types of mc-Si materials: block cast mc-Si, and AstroPower Silicon Film(TM) sheet material. In sheet material, high concentrations of metals were found at recombination-active, micron-sized intragranular clusters consisting of micron and sub-micron sized particles. In addition, Fe nanoparticles were located in densities of {approx}2'107 cm-2 along recombination-active grain boundaries. In cast mc-Si,two types of particles were identified at grain boundaries: (1) micron-sized oxidized Fe particles accompanied by other metals (Cr, Mn, Ca, Ti), and (2) a higher number of sub-micron FeSi2 precipitates that exhibited a preferred orientation along the crystal growth direction. In both materials, it is believed that the larger Fe clusters are inclusions of foreign particles, from which Fe dissolves in the melt to form the smaller FeSi2 nanoprecipitates, which by virtue of their more homogeneous distribution are deemed more dangerous to solar cell device performance. Based on this understanding, strategies proposed to reduce the impact of Fe on mc-Si electrical properties include gettering, passivation, and limiting the dissolution of foreign Fe-rich particles in the melt.

  2. Actuators Based on Liquid Crystalline Elastomer Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongrui; Li, Chensha; Huang, Xuezhen

    2013-01-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) exhibit a number of remarkable physical effects, including the unique, high-stroke reversible mechanical actuation when triggered by external stimuli. This article reviews some recent exciting developments in the field of LCEs materials with an emphasis on their utilization in actuator applications. Such applications include artificial muscles, industrial manufacturing, health and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). With suitable synthetic and preparation pathways and well-controlled actuation stimuli, such as heat, light, electric and magnetic field, excellent physical properties of LCE materials can be realized. By comparing the actuating properties of different systems, general relationships between the structure and the property of LCEs are discussed. How these materials can be turned into usable devices using interdisciplinary techniques is also described. PMID:23648966

  3. Actuators based on liquid crystalline elastomer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongrui; Li, Chensha; Huang, Xuezhen

    2013-05-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) exhibit a number of remarkable physical effects, including the unique, high-stroke reversible mechanical actuation when triggered by external stimuli. This article reviews some recent exciting developments in the field of LCE materials with an emphasis on their utilization in actuator applications. Such applications include artificial muscles, industrial manufacturing, health and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). With suitable synthetic and preparation pathways and well-controlled actuation stimuli, such as heat, light, electric and magnetic fields, excellent physical properties of LCE materials can be realized. By comparing the actuating properties of different systems, general relationships between the structure and the properties of LCEs are discussed. How these materials can be turned into usable devices using interdisciplinary techniques is also described.

  4. Feasibility of transparent flexible ultrasonic haptic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akther, Asma; Kafy, Abdullahil; Kim, Hyun Chan; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic haptics actuator is a device that can create a haptic feedback to user's hand. The modulation of ultrasonic frequency can give different textures to the users. In this study, a feasibility of the ultrasonic haptic actuator made on a flexible piezoelectric substrate is investigated. As the piezoelectric substrate helps to propagate flexural waves, a pair of interdigital transducer (IDT) with reflectors can produce standing waves, which can increase the vibrational displacement of the actuator. A pair of IDT pattern was fabricated on a piezoelectric polymer substrate. A finite element analysis is at first performed to design the actuator. A sinusoidal excitation voltage is applied on IDT electrodes at ultrasonic frequencies and the displacement waveforms are found. The displacement waveforms clearly represent how ultrasonic waves propagate through the piezoelectric substrate.

  5. Development of Microfabricated Magnetic Actuators for Removing Cellular Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Selene A.; Lee, Hyowon; Pinney, James R; Khialeeva, Elvira; Bergsneider, Marvin; Judy, Jack W.

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on the development of torsional magnetic microactuators for displacing biological materials in implantable catheters. Static and dynamic behaviors of the devices were characterized in air and in fluid using optical experimental methods. The devices were capable of achieving large deflections (>60°) and had resonant frequencies that ranged from 70 Hz to 1.5 kHz in fluid. The effect of long-term actuation (>2.5 · 108 cycles) was quantified using resonant shift as the metric (Δf < 2%). Cell-clearing capabilities of the devices were evaluated by examining the effect of actuation on a layer of aggressively growing adherent cells. On average, actuated microdevices removed 37.4% of the adherent cell layer grown over the actuator surface. The effect of actuation time, deflection angle, and beam geometry were evaluated. The experimental results indicate that physical removal of adherent cells at the microscale is feasible using magnetic microactuation. PMID:21886945

  6. Electropneumatic actuator, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, D. P.

    1989-10-01

    The program demonstrated the feasibility of an electropneumatic actuator which can be used in manufacturing applications. The electropneumatic actuator, an alternative to the electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators used in industry, consists of an electrochemical compressor, a power supply, and an actuator. The electrochemical compressor working fluid is hydrogen and a solvent such as water or ammonia. The compressor has no moving parts and runs on low voltage DC. The actuator is a conventional, commercially available unit. Researchers designed, constructed, and tested the electrochemical compressor in conjunction with the actuator, power supply, and computerized control. The one inch actuator can lift a fifty pound weight a distance of ten inches in about 1.5 minutes. The electrochemically powered system is capable of driving its loaded actuator to a prescribed location at a controlled rate. A defined set of design changes will combine the compressor and actuator in the same housing, and will develop two orders of magnitude increased actuator speed at the same or higher force levels.

  7. Miga Aero Actuator and 2D Machined Mechanical Binary Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    actuators. SMA actuators typically perform ideally as latch-release devices, wherein a spring-loaded device is released when the SMA actuator actuates in one direction. But many applications require cycling between two latched states open and closed.

  8. Electrothermally-Actuated Micromirrors with Bimorph Actuators--Bending-Type and Torsion-Type.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Hua; Tsai, Chun-Wei; Chang, Hsu-Tang; Liu, Shih-Hsiang; Tsai, Jui-Che

    2015-01-01

    Three different electrothermally-actuated MEMS micromirrors with Cr/Au-Si bimorph actuators are proposed. The devices are fabricated with the SOIMUMPs process developed by MEMSCAP, Inc. (Durham, NC, USA). A silicon-on-insulator MEMS process has been employed for the fabrication of these micromirrors. Electrothermal actuation has achieved a large angular movement in the micromirrors. Application of an external electric current 0.04 A to the bending-type, restricted-torsion-type, and free-torsion-type mirrors achieved rotation angles of 1.69°, 3.28°, and 3.64°, respectively. PMID:26110409

  9. Manufacturing of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator for Degradation Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, Nicole M.

    The performance and broader application of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are restricted by the manufacturing methods currently employed. In the current work, two methodologies are proposed to build robust plasma actuators for active flow control; a protective silicone oil (PDMS) treatment for hand-cut and laid tape-based actuators and a microfabrication technique for glass-based devices. The microfabrication process, through which thin film electrodes are precisely deposited onto plasma-resistant glass substrates, is presented in detail. The resulting glass-based devices are characterized with respect to electrical properties and output for various operating conditions. The longevity of microfabricated devices is compared against silicone-treated and untreated hand-made devices of comparable geometries over 60 hours of continuous operation. Both tungsten and copper electrodes are considered for microfabricated devices. Human health effects are also considered in an electromagnetic field study of the area surrounding a live plasma actuator for various operating conditions.

  10. Impact of defects on efficiency of nitride devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Walle, Chris

    Nitride semiconductors are the key materials for solid-state lighting and also increasingly for power electronics. In both bulk crystals and epitaxial layers, point defects may act as compensating centers, charge traps, or radiative or nonradiative recombination centers. Unintentional impurities often play an equally important role; for instance, carbon that is unavoidably incorporated during metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) acts as a source of yellow luminescence. Theoretical advances now enable us to calculate the energetics as well as electronic and optical properties of point defects with unprecedented accuracy. In AlN, we have identified the defects that lead to characteristic luminescence and absorption lines. Both point defects and impurities can affect the radiative efficiency of light emitters. We have developed a first-principles methodology to determine nonradiative carrier capture coefficients. Accurate calculations of electron-phonon coupling, combined with results for defect formation energies and charge-state transition levels, enable the calculation of nonradiative capture rates for electrons and holes and the evaluation of Shockley-Read-Hall coefficients. This approach allows us to identify specific defects that play a key role in limiting the efficiency of nitride semiconductor devices. Work performed in collaboration with A. Alkauskas, C. Dreyer, A. Janotti, J. Lyons, D. Wickramaratne, J. Shen, and Q. Yan, and supported by DOE and NSF.

  11. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    DOE PAGES

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kosovic, Branko; Draxl, Caroline; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of thesemore » changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, σu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of σu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while σu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.« less

  12. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    SciTech Connect

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kosovic, Branko; Draxl, Caroline; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of these changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, σu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of σu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while σu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.

  13. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  14. Impact of Alternative Medical Device Approval Processes on Costs and Health

    PubMed Central

    George, Benjamin P.; Venkataraman, Vinayak; Dorsey, E. Ray; Johnston, S. Claiborne

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical devices are often introduced prior to randomized-trial evidence of efficacy and this slows completion of trials. Alternative regulatory approaches include restricting device use outside of trials prior to trial evidence of efficacy (like the drug approval process) or restricting out-of-trial use but permitting coverage within trials such as Medicare’s Coverage with Study Participation (CSP). Methods We compared the financial impact to manufacturers and insurers of three regulatory alternatives: (1) limited regulation (current approach), (2) CSP, and (3) restrictive regulation (like the current drug approval process). Using data for patent foramen ovale closure devices, we modeled key parameters including recruitment time, probability of device efficacy, market adoption, and device cost/price to calculate profits to manufacturers, costs to insurers, and overall societal impact on health. Results For manufacturers, profits were greatest under CSP—driven by faster market adoption of effective devices—followed by restrictive regulation. Societal health benefit in total quality-adjusted life years was greatest under CSP. Insurers’ expenditures for ineffective devices were greatest with limited regulation. Findings were robust over a reasonable range of probabilities of trial success. Conclusions Regulation restricting out-of-trial device use and extending limited insurance coverage to clinical trial participants may balance manufacturer and societal interests. PMID:25185975

  15. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  16. Comprehensive piezoceramic actuator review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chris J.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2002-07-01

    Piezoceramic actuation has become an area of increased interest in the past ten years. Having been used for many years as sensors in such applications as pressure transducers and smoke detectors, piezoceramics are now being used as prime movers in fuel injectors and valve lifters. In an effort to aid the engineering community, this paper will conduct a comprehensive review of several piezoceramic actuators. Classical design parameters will be derived for each actuator such as blocked force and free stroke. In addition, more esoteric entities such as mechanical efficiency and energy density will also be derived. The result will be design metrics of popular piezoceramic actuators containing vital design equations, validated with empirical data. Of the many different configurations of piezoceramic actuators, this paper will investigate the bimorph and unimorph bender. These actuator types are finding increased use in semi-active structural damping, energy harvesting and vibration control. The work in this paper will show experimental verification of various actuator types as well as theoretical derivations. In addition to unimorphs, bimorphs and stack actuators a novel type of unimorph bender, the THUNDER actuator (developed and licensed by NASA) will be included in the review.

  17. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water...

  18. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1103-6 - Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire... Protection § 75.1103-6 Automatic fire sensors; actuation of fire suppression systems. Point-type heat sensors or automatic fire sensor and warning device systems may be used to actuate deluge-type water...

  2. Miniaturized auto-focusing VCM actuator with zero holding current.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Sheng; Lin, Psang Dain

    2009-06-01

    In keeping with consumers' preferences for electronic products of ever smaller size and enhanced functionality, it is necessary to reduce the profile of the auto-focusing actuators used in camera phones without sacrificing their performance. Accordingly, this study modifies the Voice Coil Motor (VCM) actuator proposed by the current group in a previous study (C. S. Liu and P. D. Lin, Opt. Express, 16, 2533-2540, 2008) to accomplish a miniaturized auto-focusing actuator for cell phone camera modules with minimal power consumption. The proposed device comprises a VCM, a closed-loop position control system, a magnetoconductive plate, and a lens support structure to drive the lens to the optimal focusing position. The experimental results show that the actuator has a zero holding current when maintaining the lens in the specified focusing position. Overall, it is shown that compared to existing VCM actuators, the proposed actuator has bo a higher power efficiency and an improved positioning repeatability.

  3. Miniaturized auto-focusing VCM actuator with zero holding current.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Sheng; Lin, Psang Dain

    2009-06-01

    In keeping with consumers' preferences for electronic products of ever smaller size and enhanced functionality, it is necessary to reduce the profile of the auto-focusing actuators used in camera phones without sacrificing their performance. Accordingly, this study modifies the Voice Coil Motor (VCM) actuator proposed by the current group in a previous study (C. S. Liu and P. D. Lin, Opt. Express, 16, 2533-2540, 2008) to accomplish a miniaturized auto-focusing actuator for cell phone camera modules with minimal power consumption. The proposed device comprises a VCM, a closed-loop position control system, a magnetoconductive plate, and a lens support structure to drive the lens to the optimal focusing position. The experimental results show that the actuator has a zero holding current when maintaining the lens in the specified focusing position. Overall, it is shown that compared to existing VCM actuators, the proposed actuator has bo a higher power efficiency and an improved positioning repeatability. PMID:19506625

  4. The Load Capability of Piezoelectric Single Crystal Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2006-01-01

    Piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal is one of the most promising materials for electromechanical device applications due to its high electrical field induced strain and high electromechanical coupling factor. PMN-PT single crystal-based multilayer stack actuators and multilayer stack-based flextensional actuators have exhibited high stroke and high displacement-voltage ratios. The actuation capabilities of these two actuators were evaluated using a newly developed method based upon a laser vibrometer system under various loading conditions. The measured displacements as a function of mechanical loads at different driving voltages indicate that the displacement response of the actuators is approximately constant under broad ranges of mechanical load. The load capabilities of these PMN-PT single crystal-based actuators and the advantages of the capability for applications will be discussed.

  5. The Load Capability of Piezoelectric Single Crystal Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2007-01-01

    Piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal is one of the most promising materials for electromechanical device applications due to its high electrical field induced strain and high electromechanical coupling factor. PMN-PT single crystal-based multilayer stack actuators and multilayer stack-based flextensional actuators have exhibited high stroke and high displacement-voltage ratios. The actuation capabilities of these two actuators were evaluated using a newly developed method based upon a laser vibrometer system under various loading conditions. The measured displacements as a function of mechanical loads at different driving voltages indicate that the displacement response of the actuators is approximately constant under broad ranges of mechanical load. The load capabilities of these PMN-PT single crystal-based actuators and the advantages of the capability for applications will be discussed.

  6. Tubular dielectric elastomer actuator for active fluidic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David; Pei, Qibing

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel low-profile, biomimetic dielectric elastomer tubular actuator capable of actively controlling hydraulic flow. The tubular actuator has been established as a reliable tunable valve, pinching a secondary silicone tube completely shut in the absence of a fluidic pressure bias or voltage, offering a high degree of resistance against fluidic flow, and able to open and completely remove this resistance to flow with an applied low power actuation voltage. The system demonstrates a rise in pressure of ∼3.0 kPa when the dielectric elastomer valve is in the passive, unactuated state, and there is a quadratic fall in this pressure with increasing actuation voltage, until ∼0 kPa is reached at 2.4 kV. The device is reliable for at least 2000 actuation cycles for voltages at or below 2.2 kV. Furthermore, modeling of the actuator and fluidic system yields results consistent with the observed experimental dependence of intrasystem pressure on input flow rate, actuator prestretch, and actuation voltage. To our knowledge, this is the first actuator of its type that can control fluid flow by directly actuating the walls of a tube. Potential applications may include an implantable artificial sphincter, part of a peristaltic pump, or a computerized valve for fluidic or pneumatic control.

  7. Preregulator feedback circuit utilizes Light Actuated Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayser, T. P.

    1966-01-01

    Preregulator feedback circuit employing a Light Actuated Switch /LAS/ provides a simple and efficient feedback device in a power supply preregulator which maintains dc isolation between input and output grounds. The LAS consists of a diode PN junction infrared source close to, but electrically isolated from, a photodetector.

  8. Explosive actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Kenneth G.

    1983-01-01

    1. A device of the character described comprising the combination of a housing having an elongate bore and including a shoulder extending inwardly into said bore, a single elongate movable plunger disposed in said bore including an outwardly extending flange adjacent one end thereof overlying said shoulder, normally open conduit means having an inlet and an outlet perpendicularly piercing said housing intermediate said shoulder and said flange and including an intermediate portion intersecting and normally openly communicating with said bore at said shoulder, normally closed conduit means piercing said housing and intersecting said bore at a location spaced from said normally open conduit means, said elongate plunger including a shearing edge adjacent the other end thereof normally disposed intermediate both of said conduit means and overlying a portion of said normally closed conduit means, a deformable member carried by said plunger intermediate said flange and said shoulder and normally spaced from and overlying the intermediate portion of said normally open conduit means, and means on the housing communicating with the bore to retain an explosive actuator for moving said plunger to force the deformable member against the shoulder and extrude a portion of the deformable member out of said bore into portions of the normally open conduit means for plugging the same and to effect the opening of said normally closed conduit means by the plunger shearing edge substantially concomitantly with the plugging of the normally open conduit means.

  9. Multiple switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Edward T.

    1976-01-06

    The present invention relates to switches and switch actuating devices to be operated for purposes of arming a bomb or other missile as it is dropped or released from an aircraft. The particular bomb or missile in which this invention is applied is one in which there is a plurality of circuits which are to be armed by the closing of switches upon dropping or releasing of the bomb. The operation of the switches to closed position is normally accomplished by means of a pull-out wire; that is, a wire which is withdrawn from the bomb or missile at the time of release of the bomb, one end of the wire being attached to the aircraft. The conditions to be met are that the arming switches must be positively and surely maintained in open position until the bomb is released and the arming action is effected. The action of the pull-out wire in achieving the arming action must be sure and positive with minimum danger of malfunctioning, jamming or binding.

  10. Impact Welding of Aluminum to Copper and Stainless Steel by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: Effect of Heat Treatment Cycles on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, Anupam; Hansen, Steven; Benzing, Jake; He, Mei; Daehn, Glenn

    2015-10-01

    This work studies the mechanical property effect of microstructure on impact welds of aluminum alloy AA6061 with both copper alloy Cu 110 and stainless steel AISI 304. AA6061-T6 and T4 temper aluminum sheets of 1 mm thickness were launched toward copper and stainless steel targets using the vaporizing foil actuator technique. Flyer plate velocities, measured via photonic Doppler velocimetry, were observed to be approximately 800 m/s. The welded aluminum-copper samples were subjected to instrumented peel testing, microhardness testing, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The welded joints exhibited cracks through their continuous intermetallic layers. The cracks were impeded upon encountering a ductile metallic wave. The welds created with T6 temper flyer sheets were found to have smaller intermetallic-free and wavy interface regions as compared to those created with T4 temper flyer sheets. Peel strength tests of the two weld combinations resulted in failure along the interface in the case of the T6 flyer welds, while the failure generally occurred in the parent aluminum for the T4 temper flyer welds. Half of the T4 flyer welds were subjected to aging for 18 h at 433 K (160 °C) to convert the aluminum sheet to the T6 condition. Although the aged flyer material did not attain the hardness of the as-received T6 material, it was found to be significantly stronger than the T4 material. These welds retained their strength after the aging process, and diffusion across the interface was minimal. The welded aluminum-stainless steel samples were analyzed on a more basic level than aluminum-copper samples, but were found to exhibit similar results.

  11. New, electronically enhanced remote actuation system

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Conventional completion techniques are time intensive, require tubing manipulation and multiple well interventions, which make them less than desirable for extended-reach and deepwater applications. The ideal setting method for extended-reach and deepwater applications requires a one-trip system where the packer is run in on the completion string, actuated, and set without any tubing manipulation or well intervention. No single conventional setting method meets these requirements. Electronically enhanced remote actuation allows for reduction, and in some cases total elimination, of common well-intervention operations. A new, mud-pulse-frequency-based communication technique that actuates and manipulates downhole tools equipped with onboard electronics has been developed. The downhole tools are programmed at the surface to recognize 1 of 16 discrete actuation commands from a computer-controlled, portable terminal unit. Once in position, the tools are actuated on receipt of a specific command sent from the portable terminal unit. As many as 16 devices can be activated independently of one another in a single wellbore. Pulse-communication technology can be adapted to many types of downhole completion devices, including packers, sliding sleeves, and temporary plugs.

  12. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  13. Preloaded latching device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor); Nagy, Kornel (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A latching device is disclosed which is lever operated sequentially to actuate a set of collet fingers to provide a radial expansion and to actuate a force mechanism to provide a compressive gripping force for attaching first and second devices to one another. The latching device includes a body member having elongated collet fingers which, in a deactuated condition, is insertable through bores on the first and second devices so that gripping terminal portions on the collet fingers are proximate to the end of the bore of the first device while a spring assembly on the body member is located proximate to the outer surface of a second device. A lever is rotatable through 90 deg to move a latching rod to sequentially actuate and expand collet fingers and to actuate the spring assembly by compressing it. During the first 30 deg of movement of the lever, the collet fingers are actuated by the latching rod to provide a radial expansion and during the last 60 deg of movement of the lever, the spring assembly acts as a force mechanism and is actuated to develop a compressive latching force on the devices. The latching rod and lever are connected by a camming mechanism. The amount of spring force in the spring assembly can be adjusted; the body member can be permanently attached by a telescoping assembly to one of the devices; and the structure can be used as a pulling device for removing annular bearings or the like from blind bores.

  14. Electromagnetic Controlled Cortical Impact Device for Precise, Graded Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    BRODY, DAVID L.; DONALD, CHRISTINE Mac; KESSENS, CHAD C.; YUEDE, CARLA; PARSADANIAN, MAIA; SPINNER, MIKE; KIM, EDDIE; SCHWETYE, KATHERINE E.; HOLTZMAN, DAVID M.; BAYLY, PHILIP V.

    2008-01-01

    Genetically modified mice represent useful tools for traumatic brain injury (TBI) research and attractive preclinical models for the development of novel therapeutics. Experimental methods that minimize the number of mice needed may increase the pace of discovery. With this in mind, we developed and characterized a prototype electromagnetic (EM) controlled cortical impact device along with refined surgical and behavioral testing techniques. By varying the depth of impact between 1.0 and 3.0 mm, we found that the EM device was capable of producing a broad range of injury severities. Histologically, 2.0-mm impact depth injuries produced by the EM device were similar to 1.0-mm impact depth injuries produced by a commercially available pneumatic device. Behaviorally, 2.0-, 2.5-, and 3.0-mm impacts impaired hidden platform and probe trial water maze performance, whereas 1.5-mm impacts did not. Rotorod and visible platform water maze deficits were also found following 2.5- and 3.0-mm impacts. No impairment of conditioned fear performance was detected. No differences were found between sexes of mice. Inter-operator reliability was very good. Behaviorally, we found that we could statistically distinguish between injury depths differing by 0.5 mm using 12 mice per group and between injury depths differing by 1.0 mm with 7-8 mice per group. Thus, the EM impactor and refined surgical and behavioral testing techniques may offer a reliable and convenient framework for preclinical TBI research involving mice. PMID:17439349

  15. Electromagnetic controlled cortical impact device for precise, graded experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Brody, David L; Mac Donald, Christine; Kessens, Chad C; Yuede, Carla; Parsadanian, Maia; Spinner, Mike; Kim, Eddie; Schwetye, Katherine E; Holtzman, David M; Bayly, Philip V

    2007-04-01

    Genetically modified mice represent useful tools for traumatic brain injury (TBI) research and attractive preclinical models for the development of novel therapeutics. Experimental methods that minimize the number of mice needed may increase the pace of discovery. With this in mind, we developed and characterized a prototype electromagnetic (EM) controlled cortical impact device along with refined surgical and behavioral testing techniques. By varying the depth of impact between 1.0 and 3.0 mm, we found that the EM device was capable of producing a broad range of injury severities. Histologically, 2.0-mm impact depth injuries produced by the EM device were similar to 1.0-mm impact depth injuries produced by a commercially available pneumatic device. Behaviorally, 2.0-, 2.5-, and 3.0-mm impacts impaired hidden platform and probe trial water maze performance, whereas 1.5-mm impacts did not. Rotorod and visible platform water maze deficits were also found following 2.5- and 3.0-mm impacts. No impairment of conditioned fear performance was detected. No differences were found between sexes of mice. Inter-operator reliability was very good. Behaviorally, we found that we could statistically distinguish between injury depths differing by 0.5 mm using 12 mice per group and between injury depths differing by 1.0 mm with 7-8 mice per group. Thus, the EM impactor and refined surgical and behavioral testing techniques may offer a reliable and convenient framework for preclinical TBI research involving mice.

  16. Conducting polymers are simultaneous sensing actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdova, Fransisco G.; Ismail, Yahya A.; Martinez, Jose G.; Al Harrasi, Ahmad S.; Otero, Toribio F.

    2013-04-01

    Conducting polymers are soft, wet and reactive gels capable of mimicking biological functions. They are the electrochemomechanical actuators having the ability to sense the surrounding variables simultaneously. The sensing and actuating signals are sent/received back through the same two connecting wires in these materials. The sensing ability is a general property of all conducting polymers arises from the unique electrochemical reaction taking place in them. This sensing ability is verified for two different conducting polymers here - for an electrochemically generated polypyrrole triple layer bending actuator exchanging cations and for a chemically generated polytoluidine linear actuator exchanging anions. The configuration of the polypyrrole actuator device corresponds to polypyrrole-dodecyl benzene sulfonate (pPy-DBS) film/tape/ pPy-DBS film in which the film on one side of the triple layer is acted as anode and the film on the other side acted as cathode simultaneously, and the films interchanged their role when move in the opposite direction. The polytoluidine linear actuator was fabricated using a hydrgel microfiber through in situ chemical polymerization. The sensing characteristics of these two actuators were studied as a function of their working conditions: applied current, electrolyte concentration and temperature in aqueous electrolytes. The chronopotentiometric responses were studied by applying square electrical currents for a specified time. For the pPy actuator it was set to produce angular movement of +/- 45° by the free end of the actuator, consuming constant charges of 60 mC. In both the actuators the evolution of the muscle potential along the electrical current cycle was found to be a function of chemical and physical variables acting on the polymer reaction rates: electrolyte concentration, temperature or driving electrical current. The muscle potential evolved decreases with increasing electrolyte concentrations, increasing temperatures or

  17. Nanophotonic implementation of optoelectrowetting for microdroplet actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Christopher M.; Hill, Kyle A.; DeWachter, Mark A.; Huizing, Alexander M.; Holzman, Jonathan F.

    2015-02-01

    The development and ultimate operation of a nanocomposite high-aspect-ratio photoinjection (HARP) device is presented in this work. The device makes use of a nanocomposite material as the optically active layer and the device achieves a large optical penetration depth with a high aspect ratio which provides a strong actuation force far away from the point of photoinjection. The nanocomposite material can be continuously illuminated and the position of the microdroplets can, therefore, be controlled to diffraction limited resolution. The nanocomposite HARP device shows great potential for future on-chip applications.

  18. Proprioceptive Actuation Design for Dynamic Legged locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangbae; Wensing, Patrick; Biomimetic Robotics Lab Team

    Designing an actuator system for highly-dynamic legged locomotion exhibited by animals has been one of the grand challenges in robotics research. Conventional actuators designed for manufacturing applications have difficulty satisfying challenging requirements for high-speed locomotion, such as the need for high torque density and the ability to manage dynamic physical interactions. It is critical to introduce a new actuator design paradigm and provide guidelines for its incorporation in future mobile robots for research and industry. To this end, we suggest a paradigm called proprioceptive actuation, which enables highly- dynamic operation in legged machines. Proprioceptive actuation uses collocated force control at the joints to effectively control contact interactions at the feet under dynamic conditions. In the realm of legged machines, this paradigm provides a unique combination of high torque density, high-bandwidth force control, and the ability to mitigate impacts through backdrivability. Results show that the proposed design provides an impact mitigation factor that is comparable to other quadruped designs with series springs to handle impact. The paradigm is shown to enable the MIT Cheetah to manage the application of contact forces during dynamic bounding, with results given down to contact times of 85ms and peak forces over 450N. As a result, the MIT Cheetah achieves high-speed 3D running up to 13mph and jumping over an 18-inch high obstacle. The project is sponsored by DARPA M3 program.

  19. Fastening apparatus having shape memory alloy actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnis, Darin N.

    1992-11-01

    A releasable fastening apparatus is presented. The device includes a connecting member and a housing. The housing supports a gripping mechanism that is adapted to engage the connecting member. A triggering member is movable within the housing between a first position in which it constrains the gripping mechanism in locked engagement with the connecting member, and a second position in which the gripping mechanism is disengaged from the connecting member. A shaped memory alloy actuator is employed for translating the triggering member from its first to its second position. The actuator is designed to expand longitudinally when transitioned from a martensitic to an austenitic state.

  20. Dielectric elastomer actuators for active microfluidic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David; Murray, Coleman; Di Carlo, Dino; Pei, Qibing

    2013-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers with low modulus and large actuation strain have been investigated for applications in which they serve as "active" microfluidic channel walls. Anisotropically prestrained acrylic elastomer membranes are bonded to cover open trenches formed on a silicone elastomer substrate. Actuation of the elastomer membranes increases the cross-sectional area of the resulting channels, in turn controlling hydraulic flow rate and pressure. Bias voltage increases the active area of the membranes, allowing intrachannel pressure to alter channel geometry. The channels have also demonstrated the ability to actively clear a blockage. Applications may include adaptive microfilters, micro-peristaltic pumps, and reduced-complexity lab-on-a-chip devices.

  1. Fastening apparatus having shape memory alloy actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnis, Darin N. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A releasable fastening apparatus is presented. The device includes a connecting member and a housing. The housing supports a gripping mechanism that is adapted to engage the connecting member. A triggering member is movable within the housing between a first position in which it constrains the gripping mechanism in locked engagement with the connecting member, and a second position in which the gripping mechanism is disengaged from the connecting member. A shaped memory alloy actuator is employed for translating the triggering member from its first to its second position. The actuator is designed to expand longitudinally when transitioned from a martensitic to an austenitic state.

  2. Surface micromachined sensors and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.

    1995-08-01

    A description of a three-level mechanical polysilicon surface-micromachining technology including a discussion of the advantages of this level of process complexity is presented. This technology is capable of forming mechanical elements ranging from simple cantilevered beams to complex, interconnected, interactive, microactuated micromechanisms. The inclusion of a third deposited layer of mechanical polysilicon greatly extends the degree of complexity available for micromechanism design. Additional features of the Sandia three-level process include the use of Chemical-Mechanical Polishing (CMP) for planarization, and the integration of micromechanics with the Sandia CMOS circuit process. The latter effort includes a CMOS-first, tungsten metallization process to allow the CMOS electronics to withstand high-temperature micromechanical processing. Alternatively, a novel micromechanics-first approach wherein the micromechanical devices are processed first in a well below the surface of the CMOS starting material followed by the standard, aluminum metallization CMOS process is also being pursued. Following the description of the polysilicon surface micromachining are examples of the major sensor and actuator projects based on this technology at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) at Sandia National Laboratories. Efforts at the MDL are concentrated in the technology of surface micromachining due to the availability of and compatibility with standard CMOS processes. The primary sensors discussed are a silicon nitride membrane pressure sensor, hot polysilicon filaments for calorimetric gas sensing, and a smart hydrogen sensor. Examples of actuation mechanisms coupled to external devices are also presented. These actuators utilize the three-level process (plus an additional passive level) and employ either surface tension or electrostatic forces.

  3. The impact of use of an intraoperative margin assessment device on re-excision rates.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Molly; Akbari, Stephanie; Anglin, Beth; Lin, Erin H; Police, Alice M

    2015-01-01

    Historically there has been a high rate of surgical interventions to obtain clear margins for breast cancer patients undergoing breast conserving local therapy. An intraoperative margin assessment tool (MarginProbe) has been approved for use in the US since 2013. This study is the first compilation of data from routine use of the device, to assess the impact of device utilization on re-excision rates. We present a retrospective, observational, review from groups of consecutive patients, before and after the implementation of intraoperative use of the device during lumpectomy procedures. Lesions were localized by standard methods. The intraoperative margin assessment device was used on all circumferential margins of the main specimen, but not on any additional shavings. A positive reading by the device led to an additional shaving of the corresponding cavity location. Specimens were also, when feasible, imaged intra-operatively by X-ray, and additional shavings were taken if needed based on clinical assessment. For each surgeon, historical re-excision rates were established based on a consecutive set of patients from a time period proximal to initiation of use of the device. From March 2013 to April 2014 the device was routinely used by 4 surgeons in 3 centers. In total, 165 cases lumpectomy cases were performed. Positive margins resulted in additional re-excision procedures in 9.7% (16/165) of the cases. The corresponding historical set from 2012 and 2013 consisted of 186 Lumpectomy cases, in which additional re-excision procedures were performed in 25.8% (48/186) of the cases. The reduction in the rate of re-excision procedures was significant 62% (P < 0.0001). Use of an intraoperative margin assessment device contributes to achieving clear margins and reducing re-excision procedures. As in some cases positive margins were found on shavings, future studies of interest may include an analysis of the effect of using the device on the shavings intra

  4. Assistive devices for children with functional impairments: impact on child and caregiver function.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Stacey; Skelton, Heather; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2008-02-01

    Functional impairments can limit a child's ability to participate in the experiences of childhood. This'deprivation'can, in turn, have a negative effect on such children's development, academic performance, and quality of life, as well as on the lives of their caregivers and families. Many adults use assistive devices to overcome functional impairments and enable them to participate in daily activities; however, such devices may be underutilized by children. Each of the 54 studies reviewed in this report identified one or more functional impairments towards which an assistive device was targeted: accessing a computer (n=3 [studies]), activity assistance (n=2), behaviour changes (n=3), communication (n=30), independent feeding (n=1), living skills (n=1), mobility (n=9), modifying the environment (n=1), nutrition (n=4), and postural stability (n=2). The aim of this review was to determine the impact of assistive devices on the components of functioning defined by the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The impact of these devices was found to be overwhelmingly positive. Study outcomes reported were mainly child-focused and could be classified as influencing activity, participation, and personal contextual factors, with relatively little attention paid to caregiver-focused outcomes. Few studies provided either qualitative evidence or experimentally-based quantitative research evidence using controls.

  5. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  6. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  7. Electronic assistive devices: their impact on the quality of life of high level quadriplegic persons.

    PubMed

    Efthimiou, J; Gordon, W A; Sell, G H; Stratford, C

    1981-03-01

    The impact of electronic assistive devices (ie, the environmental control system or ECS) on the day-to-day living of high-level quadriplegics (C3-C5) was studied. Twenty male quadriplegic persons (7 ECS users and 13 nonusers) were interviewed using the following material: Activity Pattern Indicators (APIs), Bell Adjustment Inventory, Locus of Control, Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist and McClelland's adaptation of the Thematic Apperception Test. It was found that ECS impact was most clearly demonstrated in the API results. The ECS users made greater use of a variety of adaptive devices to function relatively more independently and with minimal assistance. The users participated in more activities and spent considerably more time educating themselves than the nonusers, who more frequently participated in quiet activities and spent more time in passive recreational activities in residence. Since the ECS and other adaptive devices have a positive impact on the lives of users, patients should be exposed to them as early as possible in their rehabilitation programs to promote their acceptance. Additionally, home planning and equipment ordering should be done conjointly before discharge so that patients and their families do not become acclimated to a less safe and less efficient way of functioning. An assessment protocol consisting of both intrapsychic and behavioral measures (similar to the one presented in this article) is recommended as a comprehensive and systematic way of evaluating both the short- and long-term effects of using assistive devices. PMID:7235899

  8. Investigation of size effect on film type haptic actuator made with cellulose acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Youn; Kim, Jaehwan; Kim, Ki-Baek

    2014-04-01

    The most important factor in haptic interaction with hand-held devices is to develop a thin film type actuator which can be easily inserted into the devices and create vibrotactile signals with wide frequency bandwidth. This paper reports a film type vibrotactile actuator which is tiny enough to be embedded into small hand-held devices. The vibration mechanism and experiment results for the suggested vibrotactile actuator are explained. The aim of the actuator is to convey a vibrotactile force greater than a human’s vibrotactile threshold with broad frequency bandwidth to users. To achieve the requirement, we fabricate a film type vibrotactile actuator with cellulose acetate. When an AC voltage is applied to the actuator, the cellulose acetate film gets charged and then generates vibration. The suggested vibrotactile actuator is fabricated in two sizes: 50 mm × 25 mm and 25 mm × 25 mm. For each size of actuator, three kinds of actuator are fabricated with different pillar materials to support the cellulose acetate films. An experiment for measuring vibrational amplitude is conducted over a wide frequency range of actuation voltage. It is known that the proposed film type actuator is feasible for haptic application in the small hand-held devices.

  9. NASA pyrotechnically actuated systems program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1993-01-01

    The Office of Safety and Mission Quality initiated a Pyrotechnically Actuated Systems (PAS) Program in FY-92 to address problems experienced with pyrotechnically actuated systems and devices used both on the ground and in flight. The PAS Program will provide the technical basis for NASA's projects to incorporate new technological developments in operational systems. The program will accomplish that objective by developing/testing current and new hardware designs for flight applications and by providing a pyrotechnic data base. This marks the first applied pyrotechnic technology program funded by NASA to address pyrotechnic issues. The PAS Program has been structured to address the results of a survey of pyrotechnic device and system problems with the goal of alleviating or minimizing their risks. Major program initiatives include the development of a Laser Initiated Ordnance System, a pyrotechnic systems data base, NASA Standard Initiator model, a NASA Standard Linear Separation System and a NASA Standard Gas Generator. The PAS Program sponsors annual aerospace pyrotechnic systems workshops.

  10. Electrical Impact of SiC Structural Crystal Defects on High Electric Field Devices (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1999-01-01

    As illustrated by the invited paper at this conference and other works, SiC wafers and epilayers contain a variety of crystallographic imperfections, including micropipes, closed-core screw dislocations, grain boundaries, basal plane dislocations, heteropolytypic inclusions, and surfaces that are often damaged and contain atomically rough features like step bunching and growth pits or hillocks. Present understanding of the operational impact of various crystal imperfections on SiC electrical devices is reviewed, with an emphasis placed on high-field SiC power devices and circuits.

  11. Rotary Actuators Based on Pneumatically Driven Elastomeric Structures.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiangyu; Yang, Ke; Xie, Jingjin; Wang, Yanjun; Kulkarni, Parth; Hobbs, Alexander S; Mazzeo, Aaron D

    2016-09-01

    Unique elastomeric rotary actuators based on pneumatically driven peristaltic motion are demonstrated. Using silicone-based wheels, these motors enable a new class of soft locomotion not found in nature, which is capable of withstanding impact, traversing irregular terrain, and operating in water. For soft robotics, this work marks progress toward providing torque without bending actuators. PMID:27348794

  12. Micromachined sensor and actuator research at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Montague, S.; Rodriguez, J.L.; Smith, B.K.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    An overview of the major sensor and actuator projects using the micromachining capabilities of the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Development efforts are underway for a variety of micromechanical devices and control electronics for those devices. Surface micromachining is the predominant technology under development. Pressure sensors based on silicon nitride diaphragms have been developed. Hot polysilicon filaments for calorimetric gas sensing have been developed. Accelerometers based upon high-aspect ratio surface micromachining are under development. Actuation mechanisms employing either electrostatic or steam power are being combined with a three-level active (plus an additional passive level) polysilicon surface micromachining process to couple these actuators to external devices. Results of efforts toward integration of micromechanics with the driving electronics for actuators or the amplification/signal processing electronics for sensors is also described. This effort includes a tungsten metallization process to allow the CMOS electronics to withstand high-temperature micromechanical processing.

  13. Frequency-dependent electrostatic actuation in microfluidic MEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.

    2003-09-01

    Electrostatic actuators exhibit fast response times and are easily integrated into microsystems because they can be fabricated with standard IC micromachining processes and materials. Although electrostatic actuators have been used extensively in 'dry' MEMS, they have received less attention in microfluidic systems probably because of challenges such as electrolysis, anodization, and electrode polarization. Here we demonstrate that ac drive signals can be used to prevent electrode polarization, and thus enable electrostatic actuation in many liquids, at potentials low enough to avoid electrochemistry. We measure the frequency response of an interdigitated silicon comb-drive actuator in liquids spanning a decade of dielectric permittivities and four decades of conductivity, and present a simple theory that predicts the characteristic actuation frequency. The analysis demonstrates the importance of the native oxide on silicon actuator response, and suggests that the actuation frequency can be shifted by controlling the thickness of the oxide. For native silicon devices, actuation is predicted at frequencies less than 10 MHz, in electrolytes of ionic strength up to 100 mmol/L, and thus electrostatic actuation may be feasible in many bioMEMS and other microfluidic applications.

  14. Low input voltage switching amplifiers for piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Zhu, Huiyu; Song, Chunping; Huang, Weixing; Cheng, Danling

    2002-07-01

    The Inertially Stabilized Rifle is a new stabilized rifle system that can eliminate the disturbances induced by the shooter. Recurve actuator is used in this system to provide the precise movement of the rifle barrel. In such a portable device, only low voltage electrical sources are available yet the piezoelectric actuator needs high voltage to drive the actuator. The actuators consume little real power but a large amount of reactive power. Furthermore, the piezoelectric actuators are present an almost purely capacitive load. In this paper, we describe the development of a low input voltage amplifier for a high voltage piezoelectric actuator. This amplifier is based on switching technology so it efficiently handles the regenerative energy from the piezoelectric actuator. This amplifier consists of two stages. The first stage is a flyback converter which boosts the (low) input voltage to the maximum voltage required by the piezoelectric actuator. The second stage is a half-bridge amplifier which delivers the output voltage to the actuator as commanded by the reference signal. The basic structure of the amplifier is described, and its performance is characterized in terms of bandwidth, distortion, and efficiency.

  15. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of the

  16. Scalability of Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2008-01-01

    Temporal flow control of a jet has been widely studied in the past to enhance jet mixing or reduce jet noise. Most of this research, however, has been done using small diameter low Reynolds number jets that often have little resemblance to the much larger jets common in real world applications because the flow actuators available lacked either the power or bandwidth to sufficiently impact these larger higher energy jets. The Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators (LAFPA), developed at the Ohio State University (OSU), have demonstrated the ability to impact a small high speed jet in experiments conducted at OSU and the power to perturb a larger high Reynolds number jet in experiments conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. However, the response measured in the large-scale experiments was significantly reduced for the same number of actuators compared to the jet response found in the small-scale experiments. A computational study has been initiated to simulate the LAFPA system with additional actuators on a large-scale jet to determine the number of actuators required to achieve the same desired response for a given jet diameter. Central to this computational study is a model for the LAFPA that both accurately represents the physics of the actuator and can be implemented into a computational fluid dynamics solver. One possible model, based on pressure waves created by the rapid localized heating that occurs at the actuator, is investigated using simplified axisymmetric simulations. The results of these simulations will be used to determine the validity of the model before more realistic and time consuming three-dimensional simulations are conducted to ultimately determine the scalability of the LAFPA system.

  17. Electrothermal linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derr, L. J.; Tobias, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Converting electric power into powerful linear thrust without generation of magnetic fields is accomplished with an electrothermal linear actuator. When treated by an energized filament, a stack of bimetallic washers expands and drives the end of the shaft upward.

  18. Rotary series elastic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  19. Rotary Series Elastic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  20. Magnetically Actuated Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinera, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a magnetically actuated seal in which either a single electromagnet, or multiple electromagnets, are used to control the seal's position. This system can either be an open/ close type of system or an actively controlled system.

  1. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  2. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The linear proof mass actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (mass, upper housing, lower housing, and center support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operating testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  3. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, S. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The Linear Proof Mass Actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (Mass, Upper Housing, Lower Housing, and Center Support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operational testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  4. Micro- and nanostructured electro-active polymer actuators as smart muscles for incontinence treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Osmani, Bekim E-mail: tino.toepper@unibas.ch; Töpper, Tino E-mail: tino.toepper@unibas.ch; Weiss, Florian M. E-mail: bert.mueller@unibas.ch; Leung, Vanessa E-mail: bert.mueller@unibas.ch; Müller, Bert E-mail: bert.mueller@unibas.ch

    2015-02-17

    Treatments of severe incontinence are currently based on purely mechanical systems that generally result in revision after three to five years. Our goal is to develop a prototype acting in a natural-analogue manner as artificial muscle, which is based on electro-active polymers. Dielectric actuators have outstanding performances including millisecond response times, mechanical strains of more than 10 % and power to mass densities similar to natural muscles. They basically consist of polymer films sandwiched between two compliant electrodes. The incompressible but elastic polymer film transduces the electrical energy into mechanical work according to the Maxwell pressure. Available polymer films are micrometers thick and voltages as large as kV are necessary to obtain 10 % strain. For medical implants, polymer films should be nanometer thin to realize actuation below 48 V. The metallic electrodes have to be stretchable to follow the strain of 10 % and remain conductive. Recent results on the stress/strain behavior of anisotropic EAP-cantilevers have shown dependencies on metal electrode preparation. We have investigated tunable anisotropic micro- and nanostructures for metallic electrodes. They show a preferred actuation direction with improved stress-strain behavior. The bending of the cantilever has been characterized by the laser beam deflection method. The impact of the electrode on the effective Young's Modulus is measured using an Ultra Nanoindentation Tester with an integrated reference system for soft polymer surfaces. Once ten thousand layers of nanometer-thin EAP actuators are available, devices beyond the envisioned application will flood the market.

  5. Micro- and nanostructured electro-active polymer actuators as smart muscles for incontinence treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmani, Bekim; Töpper, Tino; Deschenaux, Christian; Nohava, Jiri; Weiss, Florian M.; Leung, Vanessa; Müller, Bert

    2015-02-01

    Treatments of severe incontinence are currently based on purely mechanical systems that generally result in revision after three to five years. Our goal is to develop a prototype acting in a natural-analogue manner as artificial muscle, which is based on electro-active polymers. Dielectric actuators have outstanding performances including millisecond response times, mechanical strains of more than 10 % and power to mass densities similar to natural muscles. They basically consist of polymer films sandwiched between two compliant electrodes. The incompressible but elastic polymer film transduces the electrical energy into mechanical work according to the Maxwell pressure. Available polymer films are micrometers thick and voltages as large as kV are necessary to obtain 10 % strain. For medical implants, polymer films should be nanometer thin to realize actuation below 48 V. The metallic electrodes have to be stretchable to follow the strain of 10 % and remain conductive. Recent results on the stress/strain behavior of anisotropic EAP-cantilevers have shown dependencies on metal electrode preparation. We have investigated tunable anisotropic micro- and nanostructures for metallic electrodes. They show a preferred actuation direction with improved stress-strain behavior. The bending of the cantilever has been characterized by the laser beam deflection method. The impact of the electrode on the effective Young's Modulus is measured using an Ultra Nanoindentation Tester with an integrated reference system for soft polymer surfaces. Once ten thousand layers of nanometer-thin EAP actuators are available, devices beyond the envisioned application will flood the market.

  6. Control Software for Piezo Stepping Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel F.

    2013-01-01

    A control system has been developed for the Space Interferometer Mission (SIM) piezo stepping actuator. Piezo stepping actuators are novel because they offer extreme dynamic range (centimeter stroke with nanometer resolution) with power, thermal, mass, and volume advantages over existing motorized actuation technology. These advantages come with the added benefit of greatly reduced complexity in the support electronics. The piezo stepping actuator consists of three fully redundant sets of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs), two sets of brake PZTs, and one set of extension PZTs. These PZTs are used to grasp and move a runner attached to the optic to be moved. By proper cycling of the two brake and extension PZTs, both forward and backward moves of the runner can be achieved. Each brake can be configured for either a power-on or power-off state. For SIM, the brakes and gate of the mechanism are configured in such a manner that, at the end of the step, the actuator is in a parked or power-off state. The control software uses asynchronous sampling of an optical encoder to monitor the position of the runner. These samples are timed to coincide with the end of the previous move, which may consist of a variable number of steps. This sampling technique linearizes the device by avoiding input saturation of the actuator and makes latencies of the plant vanish. The software also estimates, in real time, the scale factor of the device and a disturbance caused by cycling of the brakes. These estimates are used to actively cancel the brake disturbance. The control system also includes feedback and feedforward elements that regulate the position of the runner to a given reference position. Convergence time for smalland medium-sized reference positions (less than 200 microns) to within 10 nanometers can be achieved in under 10 seconds. Convergence times for large moves (greater than 1 millimeter) are limited by the step rate.

  7. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  8. Inertial Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren

    1995-01-01

    Inertial linear actuators developed to suppress residual accelerations of nominally stationary or steadily moving platforms. Function like long-stroke version of voice coil in conventional loudspeaker, with superimposed linear variable-differential transformer. Basic concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations of terrestrial platforms. For example, laboratory table equipped with such actuators plus suitable vibration sensors and control circuits made to vibrate much less in presence of seismic, vehicular, and other environmental vibrational disturbances.

  9. Electrostatic Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.; Curry, Kenneth C.

    1990-01-01

    Electrically charged helices attract or repel each other. Proposed electrostatic linear actuator made with intertwined dual helices, which holds charge-bearing surfaces. Dual-helix configuration provides relatively large unbroken facing charged surfaces (relatively large electrostatic force) within small volume. Inner helix slides axially in outer helix in response to voltages applied to conductors. Spiral form also makes components more rigid. Actuator conceived to have few moving parts and to be operable after long intervals of inactivity.

  10. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  11. Elastomeric contractile actuators for hand rehabilitation splints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Mannini, Andrea; De Rossi, Danilo

    2008-03-01

    The significant electromechanical performances typically shown by dielectric elastomer actuators make this polymer technology particularly attractive for possible active orthoses for rehabilitation. Folded contractile actuators made of dielectric elastomers were recently described as a simple configuration, suitable to easily implement linear contractile devices. This paper describes an application of folded actuators for so-called hand splints: they consist of orthotic systems for hand rehabilitation. The dynamic versions of the state-of-the-art splints typically include elastic bands, which exert a passive elastic resistance to voluntary elongations of one or more fingers. In order to provide such splints with the possibility of electrically modulating the compliance of the resistive elements, the substitution of the passive elastic bands with the contractile actuators is here described. The electrical activation of the actuators is used to vary the compliance of the system; this enables modulations of the force that acts as an antagonist to voluntary finger movements, according to programmable rehabilitation exercises. The paper reports results obtained from the first prototype implementations of such a type of system.

  12. Method of Fabricating NASA-Standard Macro-Fiber Composite Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, James W.; Wilkie, W. Keats

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Macro-Fiber Composite actuator is a flexible piezoelectric composite device designed for controlling vibrations and shape deformations in high performance aerospace structures. A complete method for fabricating the standard NASA Macro-Fiber Composite actuator is presented in this document. When followed precisely, these procedures will yield devices with electromechanical properties identical to the standard actuator manufactured by NASA Langley Research Center.

  13. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alexander S.; Peteu, Serban F.; Ly, James V.; Requicha, Aristides A. G.; Thompson, Mark E.; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-04-01

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 µm, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  14. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alexander S; Peteu, Serban F; Ly, James V; Requicha, Aristides A G; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-04-23

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 µm, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  15. Sensumotor transformation of input devices and the impact on practice and task difficulty.

    PubMed

    Sutter, C

    2007-12-01

    In the present study, the usability of two laptop input devices, touchpad and trackpoint, is evaluated. The focus is set on the impact of sensumotor transformation of input devices on practice and task difficulty. Thirty novices and 14 experts operated either touchpad or trackpoint over a period of 1600 trials of a point-click task. As hypothesized, novices and experts operated the touchpad by 15% faster compared to the trackpoint. For novices, performance rose distinctly and levelled off after 960 trials. This consolidation occurred earlier than reported in literature (1400-1600 trials) and, contrary to the assumption, learning was similar for touchpad and trackpoint. The impact of task difficulty dropped remarkably by practice, which points at a more general than specific task learning. In conclusion, ergonomic guidelines can be derived for the user-specific optimization of the usage of touchpad and trackpoint. Actual and potential applications of this research include the user-specific optimization of laptop input devices. Within the theoretical framework of psychomotor models, a profound knowledge of user behaviour in human-computer interaction is provided. Ergonomic guidelines can be derived for the efficient usage of laptop input devices and an optimized hardware and software design.

  16. An experimental spinal cord injury rat model using customized impact device: A cost-effective approach

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaprakash, K.M.; Sridharan, N.

    2013-01-01

    Till date, NYU MASCIS (New York University, Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study) impactor and Ohio State University electromagnetic spinal cord injury device impactor were under use for simulating an experimental spinal cord injury in rodents; functional recovery being assessed through Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scoring method which is an open field behavior based scoring system. Although, the cited impactors are state-of-art devices, affordability to scientists in developing and under developed countries is questionable. Since the acquisition of these impact devices are expensive, we designed a customized impact device based on the requirement, satisfying all the parameters to withstand a standard animal model for contusion type of spinal cord injury at the thoracic level without compromising the lesion reproducibility. Here, a spinal cord contusion is created using a blunt-force impactor in male Wistar rats. Our method gave consistent lesion effects as evaluated by behavior scoring methods. All the animals showed equal degree of performance in tests like narrow beam, inclined plane and horizontal ladder and in BBB scores (open field locomotor test). The aim of presenting our experience is to reinstate the fact that lack of affordability to get sophisticated instrumentation need not be a hurdle in the pursuit of science. PMID:23960429

  17. An experimental spinal cord injury rat model using customized impact device: A cost-effective approach.

    PubMed

    Vijayaprakash, K M; Sridharan, N

    2013-07-01

    Till date, NYU MASCIS (New York University, Multicenter Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study) impactor and Ohio State University electromagnetic spinal cord injury device impactor were under use for simulating an experimental spinal cord injury in rodents; functional recovery being assessed through Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scoring method which is an open field behavior based scoring system. Although, the cited impactors are state-of-art devices, affordability to scientists in developing and under developed countries is questionable. Since the acquisition of these impact devices are expensive, we designed a customized impact device based on the requirement, satisfying all the parameters to withstand a standard animal model for contusion type of spinal cord injury at the thoracic level without compromising the lesion reproducibility. Here, a spinal cord contusion is created using a blunt-force impactor in male Wistar rats. Our method gave consistent lesion effects as evaluated by behavior scoring methods. All the animals showed equal degree of performance in tests like narrow beam, inclined plane and horizontal ladder and in BBB scores (open field locomotor test). The aim of presenting our experience is to reinstate the fact that lack of affordability to get sophisticated instrumentation need not be a hurdle in the pursuit of science. PMID:23960429

  18. Hybrid electromechanical actuator and actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid electromechanical actuator has two different types of electromechanical elements, one that expands in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto and one that contracts in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto. The two electromechanical elements are (i) disposed in relation to one another such that the transverse directions thereof are parallel to one another, and (ii) mechanically coupled to one another at least at two opposing edges thereof. Electric power is applied simultaneously to the elements.

  19. Integrated design and analysis of smart actuators for hybrid assistive knee bracese-fla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. T.; Liao, W. H.

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop smart actuators for knee braces as assistive devices for helping disabled people to recover their mobility. The actuator functions as motor, clutch, and brake. In the design, magnetorheological (MR) fluids are utilized to generate controllable torque. To decrease the size of the actuator, motor and MR fluids are integrated. MR fluids are filled inside the DC motor based actuator. Additional design factors of smart actuators including influence of permanent magnet on MR fluids and dynamic sealing are also considered. Finite element model of the smart actuator is built and analyzed. A prototype of the smart actuator with two different inner armatures is fabricated and their characteristics are investigated. Torques are compared between simulation and experiments. The results show that the developed smart actuator with multiple functions is promising for assistive knee braces.

  20. Experimental study and modeling of nanotube buckypaper composite actuator for morphing structure applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Szu-Yuan

    amount of actuation compared to long MWNT buckypaper actuators. The maximum strain and blocking force of the long MWNT BP composite actuators were 0.77% and 8.7 mN, respectively. The research indicated two actuation mechanisms of nanotube buckypaper actuators co-exist: (1) carbon-carbon (C-C) bond extensions when an electrical charge applied, as previously reported in the literature, and (2) an ionic current flow effect in the solid electrolytes. The developed structure-stimulation-performance model was able to predict the displacement of nanotube buckypaper actuators based on both mechanisms. Modeling results indicate that ionic current flow effect was the dominant effect in the devices. By conducting parameter studies, we can reveal the influential factors for actuation performance. The modeling results for the SWNT BP/Nafion actuator were in good agreement with experimental data. The resultant actuators are promising for lightweight morphing structure applications.

  1. Electrical Impact of SiC Structural Crystal Defects on High Electric Field Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1999-01-01

    Commercial epilayers are known to contain a variety of crystallographic imperfections. including micropipes, closed core screw dislocations. low-angle boundaries, basal plane dislocations, heteropolytypic inclusions, and non-ideal surface features like step bunching and pits. This paper reviews the limited present understanding of the operational impact of various crystal defects on SiC electrical devices. Aside from micropipes and triangular inclusions whose densities have been shrinking towards manageably small values in recent years, many of these defects appear to have little adverse operational and/or yield impact on SiC-based sensors, high-frequency RF, and signal conditioning electronics. However high-power switching devices used in power management and distribution circuits have historically (in silicon experience) demanded the highest material quality for prolonged safe operation, and are thus more susceptible to operational reliability problems that arise from electrical property nonuniformities likely to occur at extended crystal defects. A particular emphasis is placed on the impact of closed-core screw dislocations on high-power switching devices, because these difficult to observe defects are present in densities of thousands per cm,in commercial SiC epilayers. and their reduction to acceptable levels seems the most problematic at the present time.

  2. Potential resource and toxicity impacts from metals in waste electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seung H; Lee, Dae Sung; Lim, Seong-Rin

    2016-04-01

    As a result of the continuous release of new electronic devices, existing electronic devices are quickly made obsolete and rapidly become electronic waste (e-waste). Because e-waste contains a variety of metals, information about those metals with the potential for substantial environmental impact should be provided to manufacturers, recyclers, and disposers to proactively reduce this impact. This study assesses the resource and toxicity (i.e., cancer, noncancer, and ecotoxicity) potentials of various heavy metals commonly found in e-waste from laptop computers, liquid-crystal display (LCD) monitors, LCD TVs, plasma TVs, color cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs, and cell phones and then evaluates such potentials using life cycle impact-based methods. Resource potentials derive primarily from Cu, Sb, Ag, and Pb. Toxicity potentials derive primarily from Pb, Ni, and Hg for cancer toxicity; from Pb, Hg, Zn, and As for noncancer toxicity; and from Cu, Pb, Hg, and Zn for ecotoxicity. Therefore, managing these heavy metals should be a high priority in the design, recycling, and disposal stages of electronic devices.

  3. Potential resource and toxicity impacts from metals in waste electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seung H; Lee, Dae Sung; Lim, Seong-Rin

    2016-04-01

    As a result of the continuous release of new electronic devices, existing electronic devices are quickly made obsolete and rapidly become electronic waste (e-waste). Because e-waste contains a variety of metals, information about those metals with the potential for substantial environmental impact should be provided to manufacturers, recyclers, and disposers to proactively reduce this impact. This study assesses the resource and toxicity (i.e., cancer, noncancer, and ecotoxicity) potentials of various heavy metals commonly found in e-waste from laptop computers, liquid-crystal display (LCD) monitors, LCD TVs, plasma TVs, color cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs, and cell phones and then evaluates such potentials using life cycle impact-based methods. Resource potentials derive primarily from Cu, Sb, Ag, and Pb. Toxicity potentials derive primarily from Pb, Ni, and Hg for cancer toxicity; from Pb, Hg, Zn, and As for noncancer toxicity; and from Cu, Pb, Hg, and Zn for ecotoxicity. Therefore, managing these heavy metals should be a high priority in the design, recycling, and disposal stages of electronic devices. PMID:27017840

  4. Silicene-based spin-filter device: impact of random vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, C.; Domínguez-Adame, F.; Orellana, P. A.; Rosales, L.; Römer, R. A.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a hybrid spin-filter device based on a silicene nanoribbon. A ferroelectric polymer grown on top of the nanoribbon splits spin-up and spin-down electron bands and gives rise to a spin polarisation of the conductance. In particular, we study the effects of a random distribution of vacancies on the performance of this spin-filter device. Disorder induces Anderson localisation of electrons and we find that the localisation length strongly depends on the electron spin. By adjusting the Fermi level of the source contact, only electrons with one spin orientation can reach the drain contact because their localisation length is larger than the length of the device. Electrons with opposite spin are largely back-reflected. Electric conductance then becomes spin polarised and the device behaves as a quasi-half-metal. We conclude that a moderate concentration of vacancies has little impact on the spin-filter capabilities of the device, opening the possibility to using it as a tuneable source of polarised electrons.

  5. Airborne virus detection by a sensing system using a disposable integrated impaction device.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Kei; Togashi, Shigenori; Miyake, Ryo; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Hide, Michihiro

    2016-01-01

    There are many respiratory infections such as influenza that cause epidemics. These respiratory infection epidemics can be effectively prevented by determining the presence or absence of infections in patients using frequent tests. We think that self-diagnosis may be possible using a system that can collect and detect biological aerosol particles in the patient's breath because breath sampling is easy work requiring no examiner. In this paper, we report a sensing system for biological aerosol particles (SSBAP) with a disposable device. Using the system and the device, someone with no medical knowledge or skills can safely, easily, and rapidly detect infectious biological aerosol particles. The disposable device, which is the core of the SSBAP, can be an impactor for biological aerosol particles, a flow-cell for reagents, and an optical window for the fluorescent detection of collected particles. Furthermore, to detect the fluorescence of very small collected particles, this disposable device is covered with a light-blocking film that lets only fluorescence of particles pass through a fluorescence detector of the SSBAP. The SSBAP using the device can automatically detect biological aerosol particles by the following process: collecting biological aerosol particles from a patient's breath in a sampling bag by the impaction method, labeling the collected biological aerosol particles with fluorescent dyes by the antigen-antibody reaction, removing free fluorescent dyes, and detecting the fluorescence of the biological aerosol particles. The collection efficiency of the device for microspheres aerosolized in the sampling bag was more than 97%, and the SSBAP with the device could detect more than 8.3  ×  10(3) particles l(-1) of aerosolized influenza virus particles within 10 min. PMID:27447200

  6. Ultrathin Alvarez lens system actuated by artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Petsch, S; Grewe, A; Köbele, L; Sinzinger, S; Zappe, H

    2016-04-01

    A key feature of Alvarez lenses is that they may be tuned in focal length using lateral rather than axial translation, thus reducing the overall length of a focus-tunable optical system. Nevertheless the bulk of classical microsystems actuators limits further miniaturization. We present here a new, ultrathin focus-tunable Alvarez lens fabricated using molding techniques and actuated using liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) artificial muscle actuators. The large deformation generated by the LCE actuators permits the integration of the actuators in-plane with the mechanical and optical system and thus reduces the device thickness to only 1.6 mm. Movement of the Alvarez lens pair of 178 μm results in a focal length change of 3.3 mm, based on an initial focal length of 28.4 mm. This design is of considerable interest for realization of ultraflat focus-tunable and zoom systems. PMID:27139677

  7. Shape memory system with integrated actuation using embedded particles

    DOEpatents

    Buckley, Patrick R.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2009-09-22

    A shape memory material with integrated actuation using embedded particles. One embodiment provides a shape memory material apparatus comprising a shape memory material body and magnetic pieces in the shape memory material body. Another embodiment provides a method of actuating a device to perform an activity on a subject comprising the steps of positioning a shape memory material body in a desired position with regard to the subject, the shape memory material body capable of being formed in a specific primary shape, reformed into a secondary stable shape, and controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape; including pieces in the shape memory material body; and actuating the shape memory material body using the pieces causing the shape memory material body to be controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape and perform the activity on the subject.

  8. Shape memory system with integrated actuation using embedded particles

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Patrick R; Maitland, Duncan J

    2014-04-01

    A shape memory material with integrated actuation using embedded particles. One embodiment provides a shape memory material apparatus comprising a shape memory material body and magnetic pieces in the shape memory material body. Another embodiment provides a method of actuating a device to perform an activity on a subject comprising the steps of positioning a shape memory material body in a desired position with regard to the subject, the shape memory material body capable of being formed in a specific primary shape, reformed into a secondary stable shape, and controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape; including pieces in the shape memory material body; and actuating the shape memory material body using the pieces causing the shape memory material body to be controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape and perform the activity on the subject.

  9. Shape memory system with integrated actuation using embedded particles

    DOEpatents

    Buckley, Patrick R.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2012-05-29

    A shape memory material with integrated actuation using embedded particles. One embodiment provides a shape memory material apparatus comprising a shape memory material body and magnetic pieces in the shape memory material body. Another embodiment provides a method of actuating a device to perform an activity on a subject comprising the steps of positioning a shape memory material body in a desired position with regard to the subject, the shape memory material body capable of being formed in a specific primary shape, reformed into a secondary stable shape, and controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape; including pieces in the shape memory material body; and actuating the shape memory material body using the pieces causing the shape memory material body to be controllably actuated to recover the specific primary shape and perform the activity on the subject.

  10. Stabilization of large space structures by linear reluctance actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Saroj K.; Sendaula, Henry M.

    1991-01-01

    Application of magnetic forces are considered for stabilization of vibrations of flexible space structures. Three electromagnetic phenomena are studied, such as: (1) magnetic body force; (2) reluctance torque; and (3) magnetostriction, and their application is analyzed for stabilization of a beam. The magnetic body force actuator uses the force that exists between poles of magnets. The reluctance actuator is configured in such a way that the reluctance of the magnetic circuit will be minimum when the beam is straight. Any bending of the beam increases the reluctance and hence generates a restoring torque that reduces bending. The gain of the actuator is controlled by varying the magnetizing current. Since the energy density of a magnetic device is much higher compared to piezoelectric or thermal actuators, it is expected that the reluctance actuator will be more effective in controlling the structural vibrations.

  11. Reversible switching of hydrogel-actuated nanostructures into complex micropatterns.

    PubMed

    Sidorenko, Alexander; Krupenkin, Tom; Taylor, Ashley; Fratzl, Peter; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2007-01-26

    Responsive behavior, which is intrinsic to natural systems, is becoming a key requirement for advanced artificial materials and devices, presenting a substantial scientific and engineering challenge. We designed dynamic actuation systems by integrating high-aspect-ratio silicon nanocolumns, either free-standing or substrate-attached, with a hydrogel layer. The nanocolumns were put in motion by the "muscle" of the hydrogel, which swells or contracts depending on the humidity level. This actuation resulted in a fast reversible reorientation of the nanocolumns from tilted to perpendicular to the surface. By further controlling the stress field in the hydrogel, the formation of a variety of elaborate reversibly actuated micropatterns was demonstrated. The mechanics of the actuation process have been assessed. Dynamic control over the movement and orientation of surface nanofeatures at the micron and submicron scales may have exciting applications in actuators, microfluidics, or responsive materials.

  12. Piezoelectric Polymer Actuators For Vibration Suppression In Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, N.; Bohannan, G.; Hallenberg, J.; Nelson, C.; Eckberg, J.; Schmidt, V. H.

    1999-05-01

    We have designed and tested a three-dimensional vibration isolation device using poly(vinylidene fluoride), PVDF. The need for a low power, low current vibration damping system comes from space vehicles requiring low acceleration environments for sensitive experiments in microgravity with minimal resource utilization. The system is built around twelve actuators arranged to actuate the isolation box in all six degrees of freedom. Actuators are made from silver-coated piezoelectric PVDF sheets, constructed as a stacked bimorph "bellows" to trade actuator force for actuator displacement. The system incorporates six proportional integration and differentiation controllers for active low frequency damping. After construction, the three-dimensional isolation system was tested on a NASA KC-135 that provided 25-second intervals of a microgravity environment.

  13. Piezoelectric ceramic assembly tubes for torsional actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulho; Glazounov, Alexandre E.; Flippen, Luther D.; Pattnaik, Amitav; Zhang, Qi Ming; Lewis, David, III

    1999-07-01

    The efforts described here are intended to provide a basis for the utilization of novel piezoelectric actuators in smart materials and structures. The actuator design developed in this study is a segmented, piezoelectric tube, with the individual segments driven in a d15 shear mode. The PZT-5A tubes were cut longitudinally in to an even number of equal slender segments. These slender segments were poled individually along their length using a continuous poling technique developed at NRL. The polarization of the poled segments alternates in direction between adjacent segments. The segments were reassembled with a conductive epoxy so that it serves as both joint and electrode. The assembled actuator tubes were evaluated by applying electric field normal to the polarization direction of the segments, demonstrating proof of concept. These solid state prototype devices were driven to precise angular displacement and torque output. Reliability test, including both fatigue and mechanical loading of the device, were conducted. In conjunction with this effort, numerical computation analyses were performed with respect to structural integrity versus segment joint thickness, and the relative effect of cylindrical versus polygonal configurations. These studies facilitated the successful production of prototypes. Projected actuator outputs based on electromechanical test results are also discussed in terms of requirements for noise and vibration control of helicopter rotor blades.

  14. Fabrication and reliable implementation of an ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) biaxial bending actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Yong; Choi, Jung-Oh; Kim, Myeungseon; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2011-10-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are one of the most popular types of electro-active polymer actuator, due to their low electric driving potential, large deformation range, and light weight. IPMCs have been used as actuators or sensors in many areas of biomedical and robotic engineering. In this research, IPMCs were studied as a biaxial bending actuator capable of smart and flexible motion. We designed and fabricated this bending actuator and implemented it to have a reliable actuating motion using a systematic approach. The resulting device was bar shaped with a square cross section and had four insulated electrodes on its surface. By applying different voltages to these four electrodes, a biaxial bending motion can be induced. To construct this actuator, several fabrication processes were considered. We modified the Nafion stacking method, and established a complete sequence of actuator fabrication processes. Using these processes, we were able to fabricate an IPMC biaxial bending actuator with both high actuating force and high flexibility. Several experiments were conducted to investigate and verify the performance of the actuator. The IPMC actuator system was modeled from experimentally measured data, and using this actuator model, a closed-loop proportional integral (PI) controller was designed. Reference position tracking performances of open-loop and closed-loop systems were compared. Finally, circular motion tracking performances of the actuator tip were tested under different rotation frequencies and radii of a reference trajectory circle.

  15. Biomimetic photo-actuation: sensing, control and actuation in sun-tracking plants.

    PubMed

    Dicker, M P M; Rossiter, J M; Bond, I P; Weaver, P M

    2014-09-01

    Although the actuation mechanisms that drive plant movement have been investigated from a biomimetic perspective, few studies have looked at the wider sensing and control systems that regulate this motion. This paper examines photo-actuation-actuation induced by, and controlled with light-through a review of the sun-tracking functions of the Cornish Mallow. The sun-tracking movement of the Cornish Mallow leaf results from an extraordinarily complex-yet extremely elegant-process of signal perception, generation, filtering and control. Inspired by this process, a concept for a simplified biomimetic analogue of this leaf is proposed: a multifunctional structure employing chemical sensing, signal transmission, and control of composite hydrogel actuators. We present this multifunctional structure, and show that the success of the concept will require improved selection of materials and structural design. This device has application in the solar-tracking of photovoltaic panels for increased energy yield. More broadly it is envisaged that the concept of chemical sensing and control can be expanded beyond photo-actuation to many other stimuli, resulting in new classes of robust solid-state devices.

  16. Biomimetic photo-actuation: sensing, control and actuation in sun-tracking plants.

    PubMed

    Dicker, M P M; Rossiter, J M; Bond, I P; Weaver, P M

    2014-09-01

    Although the actuation mechanisms that drive plant movement have been investigated from a biomimetic perspective, few studies have looked at the wider sensing and control systems that regulate this motion. This paper examines photo-actuation-actuation induced by, and controlled with light-through a review of the sun-tracking functions of the Cornish Mallow. The sun-tracking movement of the Cornish Mallow leaf results from an extraordinarily complex-yet extremely elegant-process of signal perception, generation, filtering and control. Inspired by this process, a concept for a simplified biomimetic analogue of this leaf is proposed: a multifunctional structure employing chemical sensing, signal transmission, and control of composite hydrogel actuators. We present this multifunctional structure, and show that the success of the concept will require improved selection of materials and structural design. This device has application in the solar-tracking of photovoltaic panels for increased energy yield. More broadly it is envisaged that the concept of chemical sensing and control can be expanded beyond photo-actuation to many other stimuli, resulting in new classes of robust solid-state devices. PMID:24959885

  17. A novel multi-actuation CMOS RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chiung-I.; Ko, Chih-Hsiang; Huang, Tsun-Che

    2008-12-01

    This paper demonstrates a capacitive shunt type RF MEMS switch, which is actuated by electro-thermal actuator and electrostatic actuator at the same time, and than latching the switching status by electrostatic force only. Since thermal actuators need relative low voltage compare to electrostatic actuators, and electrostatic force needs almost no power to maintain the switching status, the benefits of the mechanism are very low actuation voltage and low power consumption. Moreover, the RF MEMS switch has considered issues for integrated circuit compatible in design phase. So the switch is fabricated by a standard 0.35um 2P4M CMOS process and uses wet etching and dry etching technologies for postprocess. This compatible ability is important because the RF characteristics are not only related to the device itself. If a packaged RF switch and a packaged IC wired together, the parasitic capacitance will cause the problem for optimization. The structure of the switch consists of a set of CPW transmission lines and a suspended membrane. The CPW lines and the membrane are in metal layers of CMOS process. Besides, the electro-thermal actuators are designed by polysilicon layer of the CMOS process. So the RF switch is only CMOS process layers needed for both electro-thermal and electrostatic actuations in switch. The thermal actuator is composed of a three-dimensional membrane and two heaters. The membrane is a stacked step structure including two metal layers in CMOS process, and heat is generated by poly silicon resistors near the anchors of membrane. Measured results show that the actuation voltage of the switch is under 7V for electro-thermal added electrostatic actuation.

  18. Large-Stroke Self-Aligned Vertical Comb Drive Actuators for Adaptive Optics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, E J; Olivier, S S; Solgaard, O

    2005-10-27

    A high-stroke micro-actuator array was designed, modeled, fabricated and tested. Each pixel in the 4x4 array consists of a self-aligned vertical comb drive actuator. This micro-actuator array was designed to become the foundation of a micro-mirror array that will be used as a deformable mirror for adaptive optics applications. Analytical models combined with CoventorWare{reg_sign} simulations were used to design actuators that would move up to 10{micro}m in piston motion with 100V applied. Devices were fabricated according to this design and testing of these devices demonstrated an actuator displacement of 1.4{micro}m with 200V applied. Further investigation revealed that fabrication process inaccuracy led to significantly stiffer mechanical springs in the fabricated devices. The increased stiffness of the springs was shown to account for the reduced displacement of the actuators relative to the design.

  19. Impacts of Ion Irradiation on Hafnium oxide-based Resistive Random Access Memory Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoli

    The impacts of ion irradiation on so-called vacancy-change mechanism (VCM) and electrochemical-metallization mechanism (ECM) ReRAM devices based on HfO2 are investigated using various ion sources: H + (1 MeV), He+ (1 MeV), N+ (1 MeV), Ne+ (1.6 MeV) and Ar+ (2.75 MeV) over a range of total doses (105 -- 1011 rad(Si)) and fluences (1012 -- 1015 cm-2). VCM-ReRAM devices show robust resistive switching function after all irradiation experiments. VCM resistive switching parameters including set voltage (V set), reset voltage (Vreset), on-state resistance (R on) and off-state resistance (Roff) exhibited, in most cases, modest changes after irradiation. Decreases in forming voltage (Vf) and initial resistance (Rfresh) of fresh devices were observed after all irradiation experiments on VCM-ReRAM devices with the exception of Ar+ irradiation at the highest fluence (10 15 cm-2). In that case Rfresh increased by an order of magnitude. For VCM-ReRAM devices it was also observed that irradiation beyond a dose threshold of approximately 5 Grad(Si) could induce off-to-on state transition events. This behavior could lead to errors in a VCM-ReRAM memory system. ECM-ReRAM devices (based on HfO2) were also subjected to ion irradiation. Under proton irradiation ECM-ReRAM devices remained functional, but with relatively large positive variations (20-40%) in Vset, Vreset and Ron and large negative variations (˜ -60%) in Roff. In contrast to VCM HfO2-ReRAMs, ECM-based devices exhibited increased V f after irradiation, and no off-to-on transitions were observed. Interestingly, for ECM-ReRAM devices, high-fluence Ar irradiation resulted in a transition of the electrical conduction mechanism associated with the conductive filament forming process from a Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism (pre-irradiation) to ionic conduction (post-Ar irradiation). ECM-ReRAM devices irradiated with lighter ions did not exhibit this effect. The different ion irradiation responses of the two types of HfO2-Re

  20. Optimization of Actuating Origami Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskohl, Philip; Fuchi, Kazuko; Bazzan, Giorgio; Joo, James; Gregory, Reich; Vaia, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Origami structures morph between 2D and 3D conformations along predetermined fold lines that efficiently program the form, function and mobility of the structure. By leveraging design concepts from action origami, a subset of origami art focused on kinematic mechanisms, reversible folding patterns for applications such as solar array packaging, tunable antennae, and deployable sensing platforms may be designed. However, the enormity of the design space and the need to identify the requisite actuation forces within the structure places a severe limitation on design strategies based on intuition and geometry alone. The present work proposes a topology optimization method, using truss and frame element analysis, to distribute foldline mechanical properties within a reference crease pattern. Known actuating patterns are placed within a reference grid and the optimizer adjusts the fold stiffness of the network to optimally connect them. Design objectives may include a target motion, stress level, or mechanical energy distribution. Results include the validation of known action origami structures and their optimal connectivity within a larger network. This design suite offers an important step toward systematic incorporation of origami design concepts into new, novel and reconfigurable engineering devices. This research is supported under the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funding, LRIR 13RQ02COR.

  1. Unconventional Impacts from Unconventional Hydropower Devices: The Environmental Effects of Noise, Electromagnetic Fields, and other Stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevelhimer, M.; Cada, G. F.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional dam-based hydropower production produces a variety of environmental stressors that have been debated and confronted for decades. In-current hydrokinetic devices present some of the same or analogous stressors (e.g., changes in sediment transport and deposition, interference with animal movements and migrations, and strike by rotor blades) and some potentially new stressors (e.g., noise during operation, emission of electromagnetic fields [EMF], and toxicity of paints, lubricants, and antifouling coatings). The types of hydrokinetic devices being proposed and tested are varied, as are the locations where they could be deployed, i.e., coastal, estuarine, and big rivers. Differences in hydrology, device type, and the affected aquatic community (marine, estuarine, and riverine) will likely result in a different suite of environmental concerns for each project. Studies are underway at the U.S. Department of Energy's national laboratories to characterize the level of exposure to these stressors and to measure environmental response where possible. In this presentation we present results of studies on EMF, noise, and benthic habitat alteration relevant to hydrokinetic device operation in large rivers. In laboratory studies we tested the behavioral response of a variety of fish and invertebrate organisms to exposure to DC and AC EMF. Our findings suggest that lake sturgeon may be susceptible to EMF like that emitted from underwater cables, but most other species tested are not. Based on recordings of various underwater noise sources, we will show how the spectral density of noises created by hydrokinetic devices compares to that from other anthropogenic sources and natural sources. We will also report the results of hydroacoustic surveys that show how sediments are redistributed behind pilings like those that could be used for mounting hydrokinetic devices. The potential effects of these stressors will be discussed in the context of possible fish population

  2. Laser initiated piston actuator X51-8284-1

    SciTech Connect

    Spomer, E.

    1993-04-27

    This contract is a follow on effort in the development of a laser initiated piston actuator. During the previous contract a miniature piston actuator was developed which had two system related problems. First, during operation of the actuator, combustion gases would escape past the piston shank, overheating the surrounding materials. Secondly, the function of the device seemed to be overly brisant. The purpose of this contract was to improve the performance of the laser initiated piston actuator by developing a means of sealing the device, and to reduce the velocity of the piston. Three sealing concepts were tested; a silicone pad placed on the powder side of the piston, a stainless steel cup placed on the powder side of the piston, and copper plating on the shank of the piston. Piston velocity was to be reduced by changing the powder charge to BCTK or reducing the amount of Ti/KClO{sub 4}.

  3. LAM actuated propellant flow control device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Robert H.; Cust, Kevin M.

    1992-02-01

    An advanced design LAM (limited angle motor) positions an integral flow control element for bi-level flow control of storable propellants. The LAM incorporates permanent magnet latching to maintain the flow control element in either the low or high flow position without continuous electrical energization. The LAM stator and rotor are fully sheathed within stainless steel. This construction method permits the LAM to control storable propellants without using dynamic seals to isolate the LAM from the propellants. All welded construction prevents external leakage. The design concept selection rationale and the computer FEA (finite element analysis) methods employed to optimize design characteristics are presented. Correlations of analyses to test results are described.

  4. Cavity optoelectromechanical system combining strong electrical actuation with ultrasensitive transduction

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, Terry G.; Lee, Kwan H.; Harris, Glen I.; Knittel, Joachim; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2010-08-15

    A cavity optoelectromechanical system is reported which combines the ultrasensitive transduction of cavity optomechanical systems with the electrical actuation of nanoelectromechanical systems. Ultrasensitive mechanical transduction is achieved via optomechanical coupling. Electrical gradient forces as large as 0.40 {mu}N are realized, facilitating strong actuation with ultralow dissipation. A scanning probe microscope is implemented, capable of characterizing the mechanical modes. The integration of electrical actuation into optomechanical devices is an enabling step toward the regime of quantum nonlinear dynamics and provides capabilities for quantum control of mechanical motion.

  5. Ferroelectric actuator testing for deformable-mirror applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, Thomas P.; Schell, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Low voltage ferroelectric microdisplacement actuators are excellent candidates for use in zonal correction deformable mirrors (DMs) used in adaptive optical systems. Selection/specification is a critical process, however, since the device's electro-mechanical performance largely determines the mirror performance, and its electrical load characteristics strongly influence the cost of drive electronics. Several commercially available low voltage actuator devices were tested to establish a database for new DM designs. Both quasi-static and dynamic response characteristics were investigated. Test results are presented and conclusions are drawn concerning the merits of each device for typical deformable mirror applications.

  6. Actuating critical care therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Stone, David J; Csete, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Viewing the intensive care unit (ICU) as a control system with inputs (patients) and outputs (outcomes), we focus on actuation (therapies) of the system and how to enhance our understanding of status of patients and their trajectory in the ICU. To incorporate the results of these analytics meaningfully, we feel that a reassessment of predictive scoring systems and of ways to optimally characterize and display the patient's "state space" to clinicians is important. Advances in sensing (diagnostics) and computation have not yet led to significantly better actuation, and so we focus on ways that data can be used to improve actuation in the ICU, in particular by following therapeutic burden along with disease severity. This article is meant to encourage discussion about how the critical care community can best deal with the data they see each day, and prepare for recommendations that will inevitably arise from application of major federal and state initiatives in big data analytics and precision medicine.

  7. Fluid logic control circuit operates nutator actuator motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Fluid logic control circuit operates a pneumatic nutator actuator motor. It has no moving parts and consists of connected fluid interaction devices. The operation of this circuit demonstrates the ability of fluid interaction devices to operate in a complex combination of series and parallel logic sequence.

  8. Active multistable twisting device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Marc R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Two similarly shaped, such as rectangular, shells are attached to one another such that they form a resulting thin airfoil-like structure. The resulting device has at least two stable equilibrium shapes. The device can be transformed from one shape to another with a snap-through action. One or more actuators can be used to effect the snap-through; i.e., transform the device from one stable shape to another. Power to the actuators is needed only to transform the device from one shape to another.

  9. Monitoring the impact of pressure on the assessment of skin perfusion and oxygenation using a novel pressure device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Ho, Thuan; Le, Du; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Nguyen, Thu; Lichy, Alison; Groah, Suzanne

    2013-03-01

    Skin perfusion and oxygenation is easily disrupted by imposed pressure. Fiber optics probes, particularly those spectroscopy or Doppler based, may relay misleading information about tissue microcirculation dynamics depending on external forces on the sensor. Such forces could be caused by something as simple as tape used to secure the fiber probe to the test subject, or as in our studies by the full weight of a patient with spinal cord injury (SCI) sitting on the probe. We are conducting a study on patients with SCI conducting pressure relief maneuvers in their wheelchairs. This study aims to provide experimental evidence of the optimal timing between pressure relief maneuvers. We have devised a wireless pressure-controlling device; a pressure sensor positioned on a compression aluminum plate reads the imposed pressure in real time and sends the information to a feedback system controlling two position actuators. The actuators move accordingly to maintain a preset value of pressure onto the sample. This apparatus was used to monitor the effect of increasing values of pressure on spectroscopic fiber probes built to monitor tissue oxygenation and Doppler probes used to assess tissue perfusion.

  10. The Impact of Using Mobile-Enabled Devices on Patient Engagement in Remote Monitoring Programs

    PubMed Central

    Agboola, Stephen; Havasy, Rob; Myint-U, Khinlei; Kvedar, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Different types of data transmission technologies are used in remote monitoring (RM) programs. This study reports on a retrospective analysis of how participants engage, based on the type of data transfer technology used in a blood pressure (BP) RM program, and its potential impact on RM program design and outcomes. Methods: Thirty patients, aged 23–84 years (62 ± 14 years), who had completed at least 2 months in the program and were not participating in any other clinical trial were identified from the Remote Monitoring Data Repository. Half of these patients used wireless-based data transfer devices [wireless-based device (WBD)] while the other half used telephone modem-based data transfer devices [modem-based device (MBD)]. Participants were matched by practice and age. Engagement indices, which include frequency of BP measurements, frequency of data uploads, time to first BP measurement, and time to first data upload, were compared in both groups using the Wilcoxon–Mann–Whitney two-sample rank-sum test. Help desk call data were analyzed by Chi square test. Results: The frequency of BP measurements and data uploads was significantly higher in the WBD group versus the MBD group [median = 0.66 versus 0.2 measurements/day (p =.01) and 0.46 versus 0.01 uploads/day (p <.001), respectively]. Time to first upload was significantly lower in the WBD group (median = 4 versus 7 days; p =.02), but time to first BP measurement did not differ between the two groups (median = 2 versus 1 day; p =.98). Conclusion: Wireless transmission ensures instantaneous transmission of readings, providing clinicians timely data to intervene on. Our findings suggest that mobile-enabled wireless technologies can positively impact patient engagement, outcomes, and operational workflow in RM programs. PMID:23759394

  11. Low-voltage bending actuators from carbide-derived carbon improved with gold foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torop, Janno; Sugino, Takushi; Asaka, Kinji; Jänes, Alar; Lust, Enn; Arulepp, Mati; Aabloo, Alvo

    2012-04-01

    We report carbide-derived carbon (CDC) based polymeric actuators for the low-voltage applications. The CDC-based actuators have been designed and fabricated in combination with gold foil. The gold-foil-modified actuators exhibited high frequency response and required remarkably low operating voltage (as low as +/-0.25 V). Hot-pressed additional gold layer (thickness 100 nm) ensures better conductivity of polymer supported CDC electrodes, while maintaining the elasticity of actuator. Energy consumption of gold-foil-modified (CDC/gold) actuators increased only at higher frequency values (f > 1 Hz), which is in good correlation with enhanced conductivity and improved charge delivery capabilities. Electrochemical measurements of both actuators performed at small operating frequency values (f < 0.01 Hz) confirmed that there was no difference in consumed charge between conventional CDC and CDC/gold actuators. Due to enhanced conductivity of CDC/gold actuators the accumulated charge increased at higher operating frequency values, while initiating larger dimensional changes. For that reason, the CDC/gold actuators exhibited same deflection rate at much lower potential applied. Electrochemical impedance measurements confirmed that relaxation time constant of gold-foil-modified actuator decreased more than one order of magnitude, thus allowing faster charge/discharge cycles. Gold-foil-modified actuators obtained the strain level of 2.2 % when rectangular voltage +/-2 V was applied with frequency 0.5 Hz. The compact design and similar working principle of multi-layered actuator also provides opportunity to use actuator concurrently as energy storage device. From practical standpoint, this device concept can be easily extended to actuator-capacitor hybrid designs for generation of energy efficient actuation.

  12. Hydraulic involute cam actuator

    DOEpatents

    Love, Lonnie J.; Lind, Randall F.

    2011-11-01

    Mechanical joints are provided in which the angle between a first coupled member and a second coupled member may be varied by mechanical actuators. In some embodiments the angle may be varied around a pivot axis in one plane and in some embodiments the angle may be varied around two pivot axes in two orthogonal planes. The joints typically utilize a cam assembly having two lobes with an involute surface. Actuators are configured to push against the lobes to vary the rotation angle between the first and second coupled member.

  13. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  14. Development of an Actuator for Flow Control Utilizing Detonation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lonneman, Patrick J.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2004-01-01

    Active flow control devices including mass injection systems and zero-net-mass flux actuators (synthetic jets) have been employed to delay flow separation. These devices are capable of interacting with low-speed, subsonic flows, but situations exist where a stronger crossflow interaction is needed. Small actuators that utilize detonation of premixed fuel and oxidizer should be capable of producing supersonic exit jet velocities. An actuator producing exit velocities of this magnitude should provide a more significant interaction with transonic and supersonic crossflows. This concept would be applicable to airfoils on high-speed aircraft as well as inlet and diffuser flow control. The present work consists of the development of a detonation actuator capable of producing a detonation in a single shot (one cycle). Multiple actuator configurations, initial fill pressures, oxidizers, equivalence ratios, ignition energies, and the addition of a turbulence generating device were considered experimentally and computationally. It was found that increased initial fill pressures and the addition of a turbulence generator aided in the detonation process. The actuators successfully produced Chapman-Jouguet detonations and wave speeds on the order of 3000 m/s.

  15. Mitigation of residual oscillations in electrostatically actuated microbeams using a command-shaping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godara, R. K.; Joglekar, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    When electrostatically actuated microbeams are driven by an input-waveform comprising multiple voltage steps, the resulting response inherently contains residual oscillations, which may prove detrimental to the device performance and accuracy. In this article, we report the systematic development of a command shaping technique for mitigating such residual oscillations in electrostatically actuated microbeams and achieving fast switching between the successive equilibrium states. Invoking the force balance at a critical point in an oscillation cycle, the proposed technique relies on bringing the actuator to a stagnation state by applying an additional voltage signal of specific amplitude at a predetermined time. The underlying principle of the technique is enunciated for the lumped parallel-plates model of the microactuator, and further extended to the cases of microbeams. The electromechanical model of the microbeam incorporates the effects of full-order electrostatic nonlinearity, moderately large deflections, viscous energy dissipation, and fringing fields. The modal superposition method is employed to obtain the dynamic response of microbeams. Based on a single-mode assumption, the proposed technique lends itself to a simple multistep waveform, which is attractive from the implementation point of view. The applicability of the proposed technique is demonstrated by considering a wide range of parameters involving variations in the extent of geometric nonlinearity, damping, and equilibrium sequences. The impact of higher modes on the stabilized response is exposited, and a command shaping approach based on the multi-mode response of the actuator is suggested. In particular, such an approach is shown to be effective in controlling the motion of the beam in the vicinity of the static pull-in displacement, which is associated with strong electrostatic nonlinearity. The present investigation can find its potential use in the development of an open-loop controller for

  16. Contractive tension force stack actuator based on soft dielectric EAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Gabor; Düring, Lukas

    2009-03-01

    Among the electronic polymers EAPs especially the dielectric elastomers are functional materials that have promising potential as muscle-like actuators due to their inherent compliancy and good overall performance. The combination of huge active deformations, high energy densities, good efficiencies and fast response is unique to dielectric elastomers. Furthermore, they are lightweight, have a simple structure and can be easily tailored to various applications. Up to now most scientific research work has been focused on the planar expanding actuation mode due to the fact that the commercially available acrylic material VHB 4910 (3M) can easily be processed to planar actuators and has demonstrated very high actuation performance when pre-strained. Many different actuator designs have been developed and tested which expands in plane when voltage is applied and shrinks back as soon as the applied charges are removed from the electrodes. Obviously the contractive operation mode at activation is required for a wide range of application. Due to the principle of operation of soft DE EAP, mainly two directions to performed work against external loads are possible. Beside of the commonly used expanding actuation in planar direction the contractile actuation in thickness direction of the DE film represents a very promising option in the multilayer configuration. First approaches have been presented by the folded actuator design and by the multilayer tactile display device. In this study a novel approach for active structures driven by soft dielectric EAP is presented, which can perform contractive displacements at external tensile load. The device is composed of an array of equal segments, where the dielectric films are arranged in a pile-up configuration. In order to maintain satisfying structural integrity when external tension load is applied special attention was paid to the compliant electrode design which takes a central importance concerning the force transmission

  17. Low-Actuation Voltage MEMS Digital-to-Analog Converter with Parylene Spring Structures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cheng-Wen; Lee, Fu-Wei; Liao, Hsin-Hung; Kuo, Wen-Cheng; Yang, Yao-Joe

    2015-01-01

    We propose an electrostatically-actuated microelectromechanical digital-to-analog converter (M-DAC) device with low actuation voltage. The spring structures of the silicon-based M-DAC device were monolithically fabricated using parylene-C. Because the Young's modulus of parylene-C is considerably lower than that of silicon, the electrostatic microactuators in the proposed device require much lower actuation voltages. The actuation voltage of the proposed M-DAC device is approximately 6 V, which is less than one half of the actuation voltages of a previously reported M-DAC equipped with electrostatic microactuators. The measured total displacement of the proposed three-bit M-DAC is nearly 504 nm, and the motion step is approximately 72 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the M-DAC can be employed as a mirror platform with discrete displacement output for a noncontact surface profiling system.

  18. Low-Actuation Voltage MEMS Digital-to-Analog Converter with Parylene Spring Structures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cheng-Wen; Lee, Fu-Wei; Liao, Hsin-Hung; Kuo, Wen-Cheng; Yang, Yao-Joe

    2015-01-01

    We propose an electrostatically-actuated microelectromechanical digital-to-analog converter (M-DAC) device with low actuation voltage. The spring structures of the silicon-based M-DAC device were monolithically fabricated using parylene-C. Because the Young's modulus of parylene-C is considerably lower than that of silicon, the electrostatic microactuators in the proposed device require much lower actuation voltages. The actuation voltage of the proposed M-DAC device is approximately 6 V, which is less than one half of the actuation voltages of a previously reported M-DAC equipped with electrostatic microactuators. The measured total displacement of the proposed three-bit M-DAC is nearly 504 nm, and the motion step is approximately 72 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the M-DAC can be employed as a mirror platform with discrete displacement output for a noncontact surface profiling system. PMID:26343682

  19. Low-Actuation Voltage MEMS Digital-to-Analog Converter with Parylene Spring Structures

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cheng-Wen; Lee, Fu-Wei; Liao, Hsin-Hung; Kuo, Wen-Cheng; Yang, Yao-Joe

    2015-01-01

    We propose an electrostatically-actuated microelectromechanical digital-to-analog converter (M-DAC) device with low actuation voltage. The spring structures of the silicon-based M-DAC device were monolithically fabricated using parylene-C. Because the Young’s modulus of parylene-C is considerably lower than that of silicon, the electrostatic microactuators in the proposed device require much lower actuation voltages. The actuation voltage of the proposed M-DAC device is approximately 6 V, which is less than one half of the actuation voltages of a previously reported M-DAC equipped with electrostatic microactuators. The measured total displacement of the proposed three-bit M-DAC is nearly 504 nm, and the motion step is approximately 72 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the M-DAC can be employed as a mirror platform with discrete displacement output for a noncontact surface profiling system. PMID:26343682

  20. Determination of the dynamical behaviour of biological materials during impact using a pendulum device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zeebroeck, M.; Tijskens, E.; Van Liedekerke, P.; Deli, V.; De Baerdemaeker, J.; Ramon, H.

    2003-09-01

    A pendulum device has been developed to measure contact force, displacement and displacement rate of an impactor during its impact on the sample. Displacement, classically measured by double integration of an accelerometer, was determined in an alternative way using a more accurate incremental optical encoder. The parameters of the Kuwabara-Kono contact force model for impact of spheres have been estimated using an optimization method, taking the experimentally measured displacement, displacement rate and contact force into account. The accuracy of the method was verified using a rubber ball. Contact force parameters for the Kuwabara-Kono model have been estimated with success for three biological materials, i.e., apples, tomatoes and potatoes. The variability in the parameter estimations for the biological materials was quite high and can be explained by geometric differences (radius of curvature) and by biological variation of mechanical tissue properties.

  1. "Mighty Worm" Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, Robert M.; Wada, Ben K.; Moore, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    "Mighty Worm" piezoelectric actuator used as adjustable-length structural member, active vibrator or vibration suppressor, and acts as simple (fixed-length) structural member when inactive. Load force not applied to piezoelectric element in simple-structural-member mode. Piezoelectric element removed from load path when not in use.

  2. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  3. Piezoelectric actuator renaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    This paper resumes the content of the invited talk of the author, read at the occasion of the International Workshop on Relaxor Ferroelectrics, IWRF 14, held on October 12-16, 2014 in Stirin, Czech Republic. It reviews the recent advances in materials, designing concepts, and new applications of piezoelectric actuators, as well as the future perspectives of this area.

  4. Electromechanical flight control actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using an electromechanical actuator (EMA) as the primary flight control equipment in aerospace flight is examined. The EMA motor design is presented utilizing improved permanent magnet materials. The necessary equipment to complete a single channel EMA using the single channel power electronics breadboard is reported. The design and development of an improved rotor position sensor/tachometer is investigated.

  5. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    1999-01-01

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing.

  6. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing. 49 figs.

  7. Printing low-voltage dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, Alexandre; Rosset, Samuel; Shea, Herbert R.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of fully printed thin dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs), reducing the operation voltage below 300 V while keeping good actuation strain. DEAs are soft actuators capable of strains greater than 100% and response times below 1 ms, but they require driving voltage in the kV range, limiting the possible applications. One way to reduce the driving voltage of DEAs is to decrease the dielectric membrane thickness, which is typically in the 20-100 μm range, as reliable fabrication becomes challenging below this thickness. We report here the use of pad-printing to produce μm thick silicone membranes, on which we pad-print μm thick compliant electrodes to create DEAs. We achieve a lateral actuation strain of 7.5% at only 245 V on a 3 μm thick pad-printed membrane. This corresponds to a ratio of 125%/kV2, by far the highest reported value for DEAs. To quantify the increasing stiffening impact of the electrodes on DEA performance as the membrane thickness decreases, we compare two circular actuators, one with 3 μm- and one with 30 μm-thick membranes. Our experimental measurements show that the strain uniformity of the 3 μm-DEA is indeed affected by the mechanical impact of the electrodes. We developed a simple DEA model that includes realistic electrodes of finite stiffness, rather than assuming zero stiffness electrodes as is commonly done. The simulation results confirm that the stiffening impact of the electrodes is an important parameter that should not be neglected in the design of thin-DEAs. This work presents a practical approach towards low-voltage DEAs, a critical step for the development of real world applications.

  8. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  9. A small-gap electrostatic micro-actuator for large deflections

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Holger; Schenk, Harald; Kaiser, Bert; Langa, Sergiu; Gaudet, Matthieu; Schimmanz, Klaus; Stolz, Michael; Lenz, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Common quasi-static electrostatic micro actuators have significant limitations in deflection due to electrode separation and unstable drive regions. State-of-the-art electrostatic actuators achieve maximum deflections of approximately one third of the electrode separation. Large electrode separation and high driving voltages are normally required to achieve large actuator movements. Here we report on an electrostatic actuator class, fabricated in a CMOS-compatible process, which allows high deflections with small electrode separation. The concept presented makes the huge electrostatic forces within nanometre small electrode separation accessible for large deflections. Electrostatic actuations that are larger than the electrode separation were measured. An analytical theory is compared with measurement and simulation results and enables closer understanding of these actuators. The scaling behaviour discussed indicates significant future improvement on actuator deflection. The presented driving concept enables the investigation and development of novel micro systems with a high potential for improved device and system performance. PMID:26655557

  10. Micromechanism linear actuator with capillary force sealing

    DOEpatents

    Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A class of micromachine linear actuators whose function is based on gas driven pistons in which capillary forces are used to seal the gas behind the piston. The capillary forces also increase the amount of force transmitted from the gas pressure to the piston. In a major subclass of such devices, the gas bubble is produced by thermal vaporization of a working fluid. Because of their dependence on capillary forces for sealing, such devices are only practical on the sub-mm size scale, but in that regime they produce very large force times distance (total work) values.

  11. Impact of SiC Devices on Hybrid Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hui; Tolbert, Leon M; Ozpineci, Burak

    2008-01-01

    The application of SiC devices (as battery interface, motor controller, etc.) in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) will benefit from their high-temperature capability, high-power density, and high efficiency. Moreover, the light weight and small volume will affect the whole power train system in a HEV, and thus performance and cost. In this work, the performance of HEVs is analyzed using PSAT (powertrain system analysis tool, vehicle simulation software). Power loss models of a SiC inverter are incorporated into PSAT powertrain models in order to study the impact of SiC devices on HEVs. Two types of HEVs are considered. One is the 2004 Toyota Prius HEV, the other is a plug-in HEV (PHEV), whose powertrain architecture is the same as that of the 2004 Toyota Prius HEV. The vehicle-level benefits from the introduction of the SiC devices are demonstrated by simulations. Not only the power loss in the motor controller but also those in other components in the vehicle powertrain are reduced. As a result, the system efficiency is improved and the vehicles consume less energy and emit less harmful gases. It also makes it possible to improve the system compactness with simplified thermal management system. For the PHEV, the benefits are more distinct. Especially, the size of battery bank can be reduced for optimum design.

  12. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  13. The impact of companion diagnostic device measurement performance on clinical validation of personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijuan; Yu, Tinghui; Hu, Yun-Fu

    2015-06-30

    A key component of personalized medicine is companion diagnostics that measure biomarkers, for example, protein expression, gene amplification or specific mutations. Most of the recent attention concerning molecular cancer diagnostics has been focused on the biomarkers of response to therapy, such as V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer, epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in metastatic malignant melanoma. The presence or absence of these markers is directly linked to the response rates of particular targeted therapies with small-molecule kinase inhibitors or antibodies. Therefore, testing for these markers has become a critical step in the target therapy of the aforementioned tumors. The core capability of personalized medicine is the companion diagnostic devices' (CDx) ability to accurately and precisely stratify patients by their likelihood of benefit (or harm) from a particular therapy. There is no reference in the literature discussing the impact of device's measurement performance, for example, analytical accuracy and precision on treatment effects, variances, and sample sizes of clinical trial for the personalized medicine. In this paper, using both analytical and estimation method, we assessed the impact of CDx measurement performance as a function of positive and negative predictive values and imprecision (standard deviation) on treatment effects, variances of clinical outcome, and sample sizes for the clinical trials. PMID:25779099

  14. Simulation and experimental verification of flexible cellulose acetate haptic array actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akther, Asma; Mohiuddin, Md; Min, Seung-Ki; Kim, Sang Yeon; Kim, Jaehwan

    2015-04-01

    This paper reports the experiment and finite element (FEM) simulation of an array type film haptic actuator. Haptic actuator was made of cellulose acetate films and adhesive tape separator between two films. For preparing 3×3 array haptic device, nine identical actuators were joined together. The purpose of an actuator is to create vibration feedback resulting from applied potential. Cellulose acetate based film actuator is suitable for transparent haptic devices because of its high dielectric constant, flexibility and transparency. The focus of this paper is to use a finite element model to simulate and analysis haptic actuator and verify that result with experiment. The reason of preferring ANSYS simulation is for the flexibility of modeling, time saving, post processing criteria and result accuracy.

  15. Ionic electroactive polymer actuators as active microfluidic mixers

    SciTech Connect

    Meis, Catherine; Montazami, Reza; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2015-11-06

    On-chip sample processing is integral to the continued development of lab-on-a-chip devices for various applications. An active microfluidic mixer prototype is proposed using ionic electroactive polymer actuators (IEAPAs) as artificial cilia. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed in which the actuators were shown to produce localized flow pattern disruptions in the laminar flow regime. Suggestions for further engineering and optimization of a scaled-down, complete device are provided. Furthermore, the device in its current state of development necessitates further engineering, the use of IEAPAs addresses issues currently associated with the use of electromechanical actuators as active microfluidic mixers and may prove to be a useful alternative to other similar materials.

  16. Ionic electroactive polymer actuators as active microfluidic mixers

    DOE PAGES

    Meis, Catherine; Montazami, Reza; Hashemi, Nastaran

    2015-11-06

    On-chip sample processing is integral to the continued development of lab-on-a-chip devices for various applications. An active microfluidic mixer prototype is proposed using ionic electroactive polymer actuators (IEAPAs) as artificial cilia. A proof-of-concept experiment was performed in which the actuators were shown to produce localized flow pattern disruptions in the laminar flow regime. Suggestions for further engineering and optimization of a scaled-down, complete device are provided. Furthermore, the device in its current state of development necessitates further engineering, the use of IEAPAs addresses issues currently associated with the use of electromechanical actuators as active microfluidic mixers and may prove tomore » be a useful alternative to other similar materials.« less

  17. Dielectric elastomer actuators for octopus inspired suction cups.

    PubMed

    Follador, M; Tramacere, F; Mazzolai, B

    2014-09-25

    Suction cups are often found in nature as attachment strategy in water. Nevertheless, the application of the artificial counterpart is limited by the dimension of the actuators and their usability in wet conditions. A novel design for the development of a suction cup inspired by octopus suckers is presented. The main focus of this research was on the modelling and characterization of the actuation unit, and a first prototype of the suction cup was realized as a proof of concept. The actuation of the suction cup is based on dielectric elastomer actuators. The presented device works in a wet environment, has an integrated actuation system, and is soft. The dimensions of the artificial suction cups are comparable to proximal octopus suckers, and the attachment mechanism is similar to the biological counterpart. The design approach proposed for the actuator allows the definition of the parameters for its development and for obtaining a desired pressure in water. The fabricated actuator is able to produce up to 6 kPa of pressure in water, reaching the maximum pressure in less than 300 ms.

  18. Dielectric elastomer actuators for octopus inspired suction cups.

    PubMed

    Follador, M; Tramacere, F; Mazzolai, B

    2014-01-01

    Suction cups are often found in nature as attachment strategy in water. Nevertheless, the application of the artificial counterpart is limited by the dimension of the actuators and their usability in wet conditions. A novel design for the development of a suction cup inspired by octopus suckers is presented. The main focus of this research was on the modelling and characterization of the actuation unit, and a first prototype of the suction cup was realized as a proof of concept. The actuation of the suction cup is based on dielectric elastomer actuators. The presented device works in a wet environment, has an integrated actuation system, and is soft. The dimensions of the artificial suction cups are comparable to proximal octopus suckers, and the attachment mechanism is similar to the biological counterpart. The design approach proposed for the actuator allows the definition of the parameters for its development and for obtaining a desired pressure in water. The fabricated actuator is able to produce up to 6 kPa of pressure in water, reaching the maximum pressure in less than 300 ms. PMID:25253019

  19. Sequential growth for lifetime extension in biomimetic polypyrrole actuator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazin, J. C.; Mascaro, Stephen A.

    2015-04-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) present prospective use in actuation and manipulation devices due to their low electrical activation requirements, biocompatibility, and mechanical performance. One of the main drawbacks with EAP actuators is a decrease in performance over extended periods of operation caused by over-oxidation of the polymer and general polymer degradation. Synthesis of the EAP material, polypyrrole with an embedded metal helix allows for sequential growth of the polymer during operation. The helical metal electrode acts as a scaffolding to support the polymer, and direct the 3-dimensional change in volume of the polymer along the axis of the helix during oxidative and reductive cycling. The metal helix also provides a working metal electrode through the entire length of the polymer actuator to distribute charge for actuation, as well as for sequential growth steps during the lifetime of operation of the polymer. This work demonstrates the method of sequential growth can be utilized after extended periods of use to partially restore electrical and mechanical performance of polypyrrole actuators. Since the actuation must be temporarily stopped to allow for a sequential growth cycle to be performed and reverse some of the polymer degradation, these actuator systems more closely mimic natural muscle in their analogous maintenance and repair.

  20. Development of Characterization Tools for Reliability Testing of MicroElectroMechanical System Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, James J.; Eaton, William P.; Smith, Norman F.; Tanner, Danelle M.

    1999-07-26

    Characterization tools have been developed to study the performance characteristics and reliability of surface micromachined actuators. These tools include (1) the ability to electrically stimulate or stress the actuator, (2) the capability to visually inspect the devices in operation, (3) a method for capturing operational information, and (4) a method to extract performance characteristics from the operational information. Additionally, a novel test structure has been developed to measure electrostatic forces developed by a comb drive actuator.

  1. Molecular engineering of polymer actuators for biomedical and industrial use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banister, Mark; Eichorst, Rebecca; Gurr, Amy; Schweitzer, Georgette; Geronov, Yordan; Rao, Pavalli; McGrath, Dominic

    2012-04-01

    Five key materials engineering components and how each component impacted the working performance of a polymer actuator material are investigated. In our research we investigated the change of actuation performance that occurred with each change we made to the material. We investigated polymer crosslink density, polymer chain length, polymer gelation, type and density of reactive units, as well as the addition of binders to the polymer matrix. All five play a significant role and need to be addressed at the molecular level to optimize a polymer gel for use as a practical actuator material for biomedical and industrial use.

  2. Hydraulically actuated valve train for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Brisko, F.S.

    1986-09-23

    A hydraulically actuated valve train is described for an internal combustion engine comprising a poppet valve supported for reciprocation for controlling the communication of a port with a chamber of the engine, a fluid actuated piston associated with the poppet valve for operating the poppet valve, and a remotely positioned actuator device for supplying fluid under pressure to the fluid piston. The actuator device comprises a housing defining a fluid chamber and having a bore, means for delivering fluid under pressure to the chamber, the bore communicating with the fluid piston for delivering fluid thereto. A plunger is supported in the bore for pressurizing the fluid in the bore, valve means comprising a sleeve slidably supported on the plunger and within the bore for selectively communicating a chamber formed in the bore above the valve sleeve and the plunger with the fluid chamber and for isolating the bore from the fluid chamber. A means for cyclically and sequentially closing the valve for isolating the bore from the fluid chamber and for moving the plunger in the bore for pressurizing the fluid piston and actuating the poppet valve, comprises a first relatively light spring means interposed between the plunger and the valve sleeve for urging the valve sleeve toward a closed position. A second relatively heavier valve spring means acts on the plunger for urging the plunger into engagement with an actuating member for effecting reciprocation of the plunger and the valve sleeve.

  3. Adhesion testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPeyronnie, Glenn M. (Inventor); Huff, Charles M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a testing apparatus and method for testing the adhesion of a coating to a surface. The invention also includes an improved testing button or dolly for use with the testing apparatus and a self aligning button hook or dolly interface on the testing apparatus. According to preferred forms, the apparatus and method of the present invention are simple, portable, battery operated rugged, and inexpensive to manufacture and use, are readily adaptable to a wide variety of uses, and provide effective and accurate testing results. The device includes a linear actuator driven by an electric motor coupled to the actuator through a gearbox and a rotatable shaft. The electronics for the device are contained in the head section of the device. At the contact end of the device, is positioned a self aligning button hook, attached below the load cell located on the actuator shaft.

  4. A compliant soft-actuator laterotactile display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Espen; Rossiter, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Humans are extremely adept at eliciting useful information through touch, and the tactile domain has huge potential for handheld and wearable electronic devices. Smart materials may be central to exploiting this potential. The skin is highly sensitive to laterotactile stimulation, where tactile elements move laterally against the skin, and this modality is well suited for wearable devices. Wearable devices should be soft and compliant, in order to move with the user and be comfortable. We present and characterize a laterotactile display using soft and compliant dielectric elastomer actuators. We carry out an initial psychophysical study to determine the absolute sensitivity threshold of laterotactile stimulation, and find that at low frequencies sensitivity is higher than for normal tactile stimulation. Our results suggest that the mechanoreceptors close to the skin surface (SA1, FA1) have improved sensitivity to laterotactile stimulation. We believe our results lay the foundation for a range of new soft robotic human interface devices using smart materials.

  5. Development of an acoustic actuator for launch vehicle noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Benjamin K; Lane, Steven A; Gussy, Joel; Griffin, Steve; Farinholt, Kevin M

    2002-01-01

    In many active noise control applications, it is necessary that acoustic actuators be mounted in small enclosures due to volume constraints and in order to remain unobtrusive. However, the air spring of the enclosure is detrimental to the low-frequency performance of the actuator. For launch vehicle noise control applications, mass and volume constraints are very limiting, but the low-frequency performance of the actuator is critical. This work presents a novel approach that uses a nonlinear buckling suspension system and partial evacuation of the air within the enclosure to yield a compact, sealed acoustic driver that exhibits a very low natural frequency. Linear models of the device are presented and numerical simulations are given to illustrate the advantages of this design concept. An experimental prototype was built and measurements indicate that this design can significantly improve the low-frequency response of compact acoustic actuators.

  6. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Actuator for Reconfigurable Patch Antenna Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2001-01-01

    A microstrip patch antenna with two contact actuators along the radiating edges for frequency reconfiguration was demonstrated at K-band frequencies. The layout of the antenna is shown in the following figure. This antenna has the following advantages over conventional semiconductor varactor-diode-tuned patch antennas: 1. By eliminating the semiconductor diode and its nonlinear I-V characteristics, the antenna minimizes intermodulation signal distortion. This is particularly important in digital wireless systems, which are sensitive to intersymbol interference caused by intermodulation products. 2. Because the MEMS actuator is an electrostatic device, it does not draw any current during operation and, hence, requires a negligible amount of power for actuation. This is an important advantage for hand-held, battery-operated, portable wireless systems since the battery does not need to be charged frequently. 3. The MEMS actuator does not require any special epitaxial layers as in the case of diodes and, hence, is cost effective.

  7. Micromachined actuators/sensors for intratubular positioning/steering

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Northrup, M.A.; Trevino, J.C.

    1998-06-30

    Micromachined thin film cantilever actuators having means for individually controlling the deflection of the cantilevers, valve members, and rudders for steering same through blood vessels, or positioning same within a blood vessel, for example. Such cantilever actuators include tactile sensor arrays mounted on a catheter or guide wire tip for navigation and tissues identification, shape-memory alloy film based catheter/guide wire steering mechanisms, and rudder-based steering devices that allow the selective actuation of rudders that use the flowing blood itself to help direct the catheter direction through the blood vessel. While particularly adapted for medical applications, these cantilever actuators can be used for steering through piping and tubing systems. 14 figs.

  8. Micromachined actuators/sensors for intratubular positioning/steering

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Northrup, M. Allen; Trevino, Jimmy C.

    1998-01-01

    Micromachined thin film cantilever actuators having means for individually controlling the deflection of the cantilevers, valve members, and rudders for steering same through blood vessels, or positioning same within a blood vessel, for example. Such cantilever actuators include tactile sensor arrays mounted on a catheter or guide wire tip for navigation and tissues identification, shape-memory alloy film based catheter/guide wire steering mechanisms, and rudder-based steering devices that allow the selective actuation of rudders that use the flowing blood itself to help direct the catheter direction through the blood vessel. While particularly adapted for medical applications, these cantilever actuators can be used for steering through piping and tubing systems.

  9. Differential-damper topologies for actuators in rehabilitation robotics.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Michael R; Gassert, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Differential-damper (DD) elements can provide a high bandwidth means for decoupling a high inertia, high friction, non-backdrivable actuator from its output and can enable high fidelity force control. In this paper, a port-based decomposition is used to analyze the energetic behavior of such actuators in various physical domains. The general concepts are then applied to a prototype DD actuator for illustration and discussion. It is shown that, within physical bounds, the output torque from a DD actuator can be controlled independently from the input speed. This concept holds the potential to be scaled up and integrated in a compact and lightweight package powerful enough for incorporation with a portable lower limb orthotic or prosthetic device. PMID:23366576

  10. Development of the Second Generation Berry Impact Recording Device (BIRD II)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Li, Changying

    2015-01-01

    To quantitatively measure the impacts during blueberry harvesting and post-harvest handling, this study designed the second generation Berry Impact Recording Device (BIRD II) sensor with a size of 21 mm in diameter and a weight of 3.9 g, which reduced the size by 17% and the weight by 50% compared to the previous prototype. The sensor was able to measure accelerations up to 346 g at a maximum frequency of 2 KHz. Universal Serial Bus (USB) was used to directly connect the sensor with the computer, removing the interface box used previously. LabVIEW-based PC software was designed to configure the sensor, download and process the data. The sensor was calibrated using a centrifuge. The accuracy of the sensor was between −1.76 g to 2.17 g, and the precision was between 0.21 g to 0.81 g. Dynamic drop tests showed that BIRD II had smaller variance in measurements than BIRD I. In terms of size and weight, BIRD II is more similar to an average blueberry fruit than BIRD I, which leads to more accurate measurements of the impacts for blueberries. PMID:25664430

  11. Accuracy of the actuator disc-RANS approach for predicting the performance and wake of tidal turbines.

    PubMed

    Batten, W M J; Harrison, M E; Bahaj, A S

    2013-02-28

    The actuator disc-RANS model has widely been used in wind and tidal energy to predict the wake of a horizontal axis turbine. The model is appropriate where large-scale effects of the turbine on a flow are of interest, for example, when considering environmental impacts, or arrays of devices. The accuracy of the model for modelling the wake of tidal stream turbines has not been demonstrated, and flow predictions presented in the literature for similar modelled scenarios vary significantly. This paper compares the results of the actuator disc-RANS model, where the turbine forces have been derived using a blade-element approach, to experimental data measured in the wake of a scaled turbine. It also compares the results with those of a simpler uniform actuator disc model. The comparisons show that the model is accurate and can predict up to 94 per cent of the variation in the experimental velocity data measured on the centreline of the wake, therefore demonstrating that the actuator disc-RANS model is an accurate approach for modelling a turbine wake, and a conservative approach to predict performance and loads. It can therefore be applied to similar scenarios with confidence.

  12. Accuracy of the actuator disc-RANS approach for predicting the performance and wake of tidal turbines.

    PubMed

    Batten, W M J; Harrison, M E; Bahaj, A S

    2013-02-28

    The actuator disc-RANS model has widely been used in wind and tidal energy to predict the wake of a horizontal axis turbine. The model is appropriate where large-scale effects of the turbine on a flow are of interest, for example, when considering environmental impacts, or arrays of devices. The accuracy of the model for modelling the wake of tidal stream turbines has not been demonstrated, and flow predictions presented in the literature for similar modelled scenarios vary significantly. This paper compares the results of the actuator disc-RANS model, where the turbine forces have been derived using a blade-element approach, to experimental data measured in the wake of a scaled turbine. It also compares the results with those of a simpler uniform actuator disc model. The comparisons show that the model is accurate and can predict up to 94 per cent of the variation in the experimental velocity data measured on the centreline of the wake, therefore demonstrating that the actuator disc-RANS model is an accurate approach for modelling a turbine wake, and a conservative approach to predict performance and loads. It can therefore be applied to similar scenarios with confidence. PMID:23319711

  13. Modeling liquid crystal elastomers: actuators, pumps, and robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinger, Robin L. B.; Mbanga, Badel L.; Selinger, Jonathan V.

    2008-02-01

    We model the dynamics of shape evolution of liquid crystal elastomers (LCE) in three dimensions using finite element elastodynamics. The model predicts the macroscopic mechanical response induced by changes in nematic order, e.g. by heating or cooling through the isotropic/nematic transition or, in azo-doped materials, by exposure to light. We model the performance of LCE actuator devices including multicomponent actuators, peristaltic pumps and self-propelled robots. The goal of this work is to build a bridge between basic soft matter theory and practical materials engineering/device design. Supported by NSF-DMR-0605889.

  14. Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Monica (Compiler); Sharkey, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the NASA Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging (ELA-TB) Workshop held in Huntsville, Alabama, September 29-October 1, 1992. The workshop was sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Systems Development and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The workshop addressed key technologies bridging the entire field of electrical actuation including systems methodology, control electronics, power source systems, reliability, maintainability, and vehicle health management with special emphasis on thrust vector control (TVC) applications on NASA launch vehicles. Speakers were drawn primarily from industry with participation from universities and government. In addition, prototype hardware demonstrations were held at the MSFC Propulsion Laboratory each afternoon. Splinter sessions held on the final day afforded the opportunity to discuss key issues and to provide overall recommendations. Presentations are included in this document.

  15. Solar actuated drain system

    SciTech Connect

    Sarver, G. E.; Worstell, B. W.

    1985-04-30

    A temperature actuated drain system is provided that comprises a siphon that has an inlet end for immersing in a pool of water to be drained from a roof surface and a discharge end communicating with a pressure-responsive one-way valve. A solar actuated enclosed chamber that contains a solar heat energy collector is located on the roof surface and is in open communication with the siphon by means of a tubular member that has its inlet end positioned closely adjacent the bottom of the interior of the chamber. The arrangement causes any appreciable amounts of water that accumulate within the chamber to be discharged from the chamber during the pumping action created by the heating and cooling of air within the chamber.

  16. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    1997-07-08

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The ``micro`` size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed. 22 figs.

  17. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, Milton A.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1997-01-01

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The "micro" size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed.

  18. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  19. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  20. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  1. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  2. Linear mass actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III (Inventor); Crossley, Edward A., Jr. (Inventor); Jones, Irby W. (Inventor); Miller, James B. (Inventor); Davis, C. Calvin (Inventor); Behun, Vaughn D. (Inventor); Goodrich, Lewis R., Sr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A linear mass actuator includes an upper housing and a lower housing connectable to each other and having a central passageway passing axially through a mass that is linearly movable in the central passageway. Rollers mounted in the upper and lower housings in frictional engagement with the mass translate the mass linearly in the central passageway and drive motors operatively coupled to the roller means, for rotating the rollers and driving the mass axially in the central passageway.

  3. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  4. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  5. Passively actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  6. Experimental aerodynamics of mesoscale trailing-edge actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovitz, Stephen Adam

    Uninhabited air vehicles (UAVs) are commonly designed with high-aspect ratio wings, which can be susceptible to significant aeroelastic vibrations. These modes can result in a loss of control or structural failure, and new techniques are necessary to alleviate them. A multidisciplinary effort at Stanford developed a distributed flow control method that used small trailing-edge actuators to alter the aerodynamic loads at specific spanwise locations along an airplane wing. This involved design and production of the actuators, computational and experimental study of their characteristics, and application to a flexible wing. This project focused on the experimental response. The actuators were based on a Gurney flap, which is a trailing-edge flap of small size and large deflection, typically about 2% of the chord and 90 degrees, respectively. Because of the large deflection, there is a significant change to the wing camber, increasing the lift. However, due to the small size, the drag does not increase substantially, and the performance is actually improved for high lift conditions. For this project, a 1.5% flap was divided into small span segments (5.2% of the chord), each individually controllable. These devices are termed microflaps or Micro Trailing-edge Effectors (MiTEs). The aerodynamic response was examined to determine the effects of small flap span, the influence of the device structure, and the transient response to relatively rapid MiTE actuation. Measurements included integrated loads, pressure profiles, wake surveys, and near-wake studies using particle image velocimetry. The basic response was similar to a Gurney flap, as full-span actuation of the devices produced a lift increment of about +0.25 when applied towards the pressure surface. For partial actuated spans, the load increment was approximately linear with the actuated span, regardless of configuration. The primary effects occurred within two device spans, indicating that most of the load was

  7. Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.

    2012-07-31

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

  8. Failure modes in surface micromachined microelectromechanical actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.; Rodgers, M.S.; LaVigne, G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Clews, P.; Tanner, D.M.; Peterson, K.A.

    1998-03-01

    In order for the rapidly emerging field of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) to meet its extraordinary expectations regarding commercial impact, issues pertaining to how they fail must be understood. The authors identify failure modes common to a broad range of MEMS actuators, including adhesion (stiction) and friction induced failures caused by improper operational methods, mechanical instabilities, and electrical instabilities. Demonstrated methods to mitigate these failure modes include implementing optimized designs, model based operational methods, and chemical surface treatments.

  9. ToF-SIMS Characterization of Silk Fibroin and Polypyrrole Composite Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Nathan P.; Severt, Sean Y.; Wang, Zhaoying; Fengel, Carly V.; Larson, Jesse D.; Zhu, Zihua; Murphy, Amanda; Leger, Janelle M.

    2015-08-31

    Biocompatible materials capable of controlled actuation under biologically relevant conditions are in high demand for use in a number of biomedical applications. Recently, we demonstrated that a composite material composed of silk biopolymer and the conducting polymer poly(pyrrole) can bend under an applied voltage using a simple bilayer device. Here we present further characterization of these bilayer actuators using time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and provide clarification on the mechanism of actuation and factors affecting device performance and stability. We will discuss the results of this study in the context of strategies for optimization of device performance.

  10. [Impact of fish aggregation devices on tropical tuna's behavioral pattern: a review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Fang; Zhu, Guo-Ping; Sun, Man-Chang; Xu, Liu-Xong

    2012-01-01

    Tuna prefers to aggregate around floating objects. Based on this behavioral characteristic, people developed fish aggregation devices (FADs) to trap tuna, and made the catch and fishing efficiency of tuna purse seine fisheries improved greatly. However, there still exist uncertainties whether the FADs can attract tuna and what's the potential impact of widely applying FADs in tuna purse seine fishery on tuna resources and oceanic pelagic ecosystem. Aiming at these uncertainties, scientists conducted a great deal experiments to study the behavioral biology of tuna around FADs. This paper reviewed the related classic and more credible experiments in the past 30 years, and summed up five behavioral patterns of the tunas around drifting and anchored FADs, i. e., tropism behavior, schooling behavior, association behavior, feeding behavior, and vertical movement pattern. The related main research methods currently in use were introduced, and the issues on this subject needed to be paid great attention to were discussed.

  11. Asymmetric band offsets in silicon heterojunction solar cells: Impact on device performance

    DOE PAGES

    Seif, Johannes Peter; Menda, Deneb; Descoeudres, Antoine; Barraud, Loris; Özdemir, Orhan; Ballif, Christophe; De Wolf, Stefaan

    2016-08-01

    Here, amorphous/crystalline silicon interfaces feature considerably larger valence than conduction band offsets. In this article, we analyze the impact of such band offset asymmetry on the performance of silicon heterojunction solar cells. To this end, we use silicon suboxides as passivation layers -- inserted between substrate and (front or rear) contacts -- since such layers enable intentionally exacerbated band-offset asymmetry. Investigating all topologically possible passivation layer permutations and focussing on light and dark current-voltage characteristics, we confirm that to avoid fill factor losses, wider-bandgap silicon oxide films (of at least several nanometer thin) should be avoided in hole-collecting contacts. Asmore » a consequence, device implementation of such films as window layers -- without degraded carrier collection -- demands electron collection at the front and hole collection at the rear. Furthermore, at elevated operating temperatures, once possible carrier transport barriers are overcome by thermionic (field) emission, the device performance is mainly dictated by the passivation of its surfaces. In this context, compared to the standard amorphous silicon layers, the wide-bandgap oxide layers applied here passivate remarkably better at these temperatures, which may represent an additional benefit under practical operation conditions.« less

  12. Asymmetric band offsets in silicon heterojunction solar cells: Impact on device performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seif, Johannes Peter; Menda, Deneb; Descoeudres, Antoine; Barraud, Loris; Özdemir, Orhan; Ballif, Christophe; De Wolf, Stefaan

    2016-08-01

    Amorphous/crystalline silicon interfaces feature considerably larger valence than conduction band offsets. In this article, we analyze the impact of such band offset asymmetry on the performance of silicon heterojunction solar cells. To this end, we use silicon suboxides as passivation layers—inserted between substrate and (front or rear) contacts—since such layers enable intentionally exacerbated band-offset asymmetry. Investigating all topologically possible passivation layer permutations and focussing on light and dark current-voltage characteristics, we confirm that to avoid fill factor losses, wider-bandgap silicon oxide films (of at least several nanometer thin) should be avoided in hole-collecting contacts. As a consequence, device implementation of such films as window layers—without degraded carrier collection—demands electron collection at the front and hole collection at the rear. Furthermore, at elevated operating temperatures, once possible carrier transport barriers are overcome by thermionic (field) emission, the device performance is mainly dictated by the passivation of its surfaces. In this context, compared to the standard amorphous silicon layers, the wide-bandgap oxide layers applied here passivate remarkably better at these temperatures, which may represent an additional benefit under practical operation conditions.

  13. Use of a composite Biomer-butyl rubber/Biomer material to prevent transdiaphragmatic water permeation during long-term, electrically-actuated left ventricular assist device (LVAD) pumping

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Michael G.; Szycher, Michael; Turner, Stephen A.; Clay, Warren; Trono, Ruben; Fuqua, John M.; Norman, John C.

    1980-01-01

    The pumping diaphragm of the Texas Heart Institute (THI) E-Type ALVAD must perform the dual functions of providing a flexible blood interface and isolating the electrical actuator from adjacent fluids. Thus, protection is required against fluid leakage and moisture diffusion to prevent corrosion and damage to electrical actuator components. Average diffusion rates up to 1 ml per day through currently used elastomeric diaphragm materials have been measured during static in-vitro and in-vivo tests. To circumvent this problem, an improved pumping diaphragm has been recently developed for use with the electrically-actuated THI E-Type ALVAD. This trilaminar diaphragm consists of a composite Biomer and butyl rubber design. A.010 inch layer of butyl rubber (characterized by an extremely low diffusion rate for water, ≃ 0 ml per day) is positioned between two Biomer layers (.020 and .010 inches in thickness). Initial invitro and in-vivo studies, in calves, indicate that this composite diaphragm provides an excellent barrier to water permeation, without sacrificing biocompatibility or structural integrity under conditions of chronic flexure. Images PMID:15216255

  14. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  15. High power thrust vector actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittock, M. J.

    1993-06-01

    Modern missile programs are frequently favoring electro-mechanical (EM) thrust vector actuation (TVA) over hydraulic for a variety of reasons. However, actuation system performance requirements are not relaxed for EM systems. Thus the development of EM systems with greater power output is required. The configuration of EM actuator studied consists of a DC brushless motor driving a spur gear train, which drives a ballscrew that converts rotary motion to rectilinear motion. This design produces an actuator with high levels of performance in a compact mechanical package. Design for manufacturability and assembly (DFMA) was part of the design process, resulting in an actuator that can be assembled easily and will operate reliably. This paper will discuss the mechanical details of the resultant actuator and report test results on a prototype derivative.

  16. Linear Proof-Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III; Crossley, Edward A.; Miller, James B.; Jones, Irby W.; Davis, C. Calvin; Behun, Vaughn D.; Goodrich, Lewis R., Sr.

    1995-01-01

    Linear proof-mass actuator (LPMA) is friction-driven linear mass actuator capable of applying controlled force to structure in outer space to damp out oscillations. Capable of high accelerations and provides smooth, bidirectional travel of mass. Design eliminates gears and belts. LPMA strong enough to be used terrestrially where linear actuators needed to excite or damp out oscillations. High flexibility designed into LPMA by varying size of motors, mass, and length of stroke, and by modifying control software.

  17. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  18. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  19. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  20. Mechanisms and actuators for rotorcraft blade morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocke, Robert D., III

    The idea of improved fight performance through changes in the control surfaces dates back to the advent of aviation with the Wright brothers' pioneering work on "wing warping," but it was not until the recent progress in material and actuator development that such control surfaces seemed practical for modern aircraft. This has opened the door to a new class of aircraft that have the ability to change shape or morph, which are being investigated due to the potential to have a single platform serve multiple mission objectives, as well as improve performance characteristics. While the majority of existing research for morphing aircraft has focused on fixedwing aircraft, rotary-wing aircraft have begun to receive more attention. The purpose of this body of work is to investigate the current state of morphing actuation technology for rotorcraft and improve upon it. Specifically, this work looks at two types of morphing: Pneumatic Artificial Muscle (PAM) actuated trailing edge flaps and conformal variable diameter morphing. First, active camber changes through the use of PAM powered trailing edge flaps were investigated due to the potential for reductions in power requirements and vibration/noise levels. A PAM based antagonistic actuation system was developed utilizing a novel combination of mechanism geometry and PAM bias contraction optimization to overcome the natural extension stiffening characteristics of PAMs. In open-loop bench-top testing against a "worst-case" constant torsional loading, the system demonstrated actuation authority suitable for both primary control and vibration/noise reduction. Additionally, closed-loop test data indicated that the system was capable of tracking complex waveforms consistent with those needed for rotorcraft control. This system demonstrated performance on-par with the state of the art pneumatic trailing edge flap actuators, yet with a much smaller footprint and impact on the rotor-blade. The second morphing system developed in

  1. Actuating the deformable mirror: a multiphysics design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Ciro; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Riccardi, Armando; Spairani, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    The crucial component of an Adaptive Optics unit is the actuation system of the deformable mirror. One possible implementation comprehends a linear force motor and a capacitive sensor providing the feedback measure signal. Due to the extreme accuracy required by the optics, a proper design of the actuator is essential in order to fulfill the specifications. In the device, mechanics, electrostatics, electromagnetism and thermal effects are mutually related, and they have to be properly considered in the design phase. This paper analyzes such a multiphysics behavior of the actuation system, providing an inter-disciplinary approach able to define the optimized device: a capacitive sensor measuring the displacements at the nanometer accuracy and a closed loop linear motor delivering the requested force with the lowest possible power dissipation, in order to minimize the degrading of the optical waves propagation.

  2. Magnetostrictively actuated control flaps for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Millott, T.; Friedmann, P.P.

    1994-12-31

    High vibration levels can impose constraints on helicopter operations and hinder passenger acceptance. Vibration reduction using blade root pitch control introduces a significant power penalty and may adversely affect the airworthiness of the flight control system. Comparable levels of vibration reduction can be achieved using considerably less power through an actively controlled trailing edge flap mounted on the blade. Such a device would have no effect on helicopter airworthiness since it is controlled by a loop separate from the primary flight control system which utilizes the swashplate. Control flap actuation using the magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D is studied in this paper by designing a minimum weight actuator, subject to a set of actuation and stress constraints. The resulting device is capable of producing vibration reduction in excess of 90% at cruise conditions.

  3. A Hybrid Actuation System Demonstrating Significantly Enhanced Electromechanical Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji; Xu, Tian-Bing; Zhang, Shujun; Shrout, Thomas R.; Zhang, Qiming

    2004-01-01

    A hybrid actuation system (HYBAS) utilizing advantages of a combination of electromechanical responses of an electroactive polymer (EAP), an electrostrictive copolymer, and an electroactive ceramic single crystal, PZN-PT single crystal, has been developed. The system employs the contribution of the actuation elements cooperatively and exhibits a significantly enhanced electromechanical performance compared to the performances of the device made of each constituting material, the electroactive polymer or the ceramic single crystal, individually. The theoretical modeling of the performances of the HYBAS is in good agreement with experimental observation. The consistence between the theoretical modeling and experimental test make the design concept an effective route for the development of high performance actuating devices for many applications. The theoretical modeling, fabrication of the HYBAS and the initial experimental results will be presented and discussed.

  4. How Well Does the Latest Anthropomorphic Test Device Mimic Human Impact Responses?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, N.; Somers, J. T.; Caldwell, E.; Gernhardt, M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the goals of the NASA Occupant Protection Group is to understand the human tolerance to dynamic loading. This knowledge has to come through indirect approaches such as existing human response databases, anthropometric test devices (ATD), animal testing, post-mortem human subjects, and models. This study investigated the biofidelity of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's ATD named the THOR (test device for human occupant restraint). If THOR responds comparably to humans, then it could potentially be used as a human surrogate to help validate space vehicle requirements for occupant protection. The THOR responses to frontal and spinal impacts (ranging from 8 to 12 G with rise times of 40, 70, and 100 ms) were measured and compared to human volunteer responses (95 trials in frontal and 58 in spinal) previously collected by the U. S. Air Force on the same horizontal impact accelerator. The impact acceleration profiles tested are within the expected range of multi-purpose crew vehicle (MPCV) landing dynamics. A correlation score was calculated for each THOR to human comparison using CORA (CORrelation and Analysis) software. A two-parameter beta distribution model fit was obtained for each dependent variable using maximum likelihood estimation. For frontal impacts, the THOR head x-acceleration peak response correlated with the human response at 8 and 10-G 100 ms but not 10-G 70 ms. The phase lagged the human response. Head z-acceleration was not correlated. Chest x-acceleration was in phase, had a higher peak response, and was well correlated with lighter subjects (Cora = 0.8 for 46 kg vs. Cora = 0.4 for 126 kg). Head x-displacement had a leading phase. Several subjects responded with the same peak displacement but the mean of the group was lower. The shoulder x-displacement was in phase but had higher peaks than the human response. For spinal impacts, the THOR head x-acceleration was not well correlated. Head and chest z-acceleration was in phase

  5. Modelling and control of double-cone dielectric elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, F.; Francesconi, A.

    2016-09-01

    Among various dielectric elastomer devices, cone actuators are of large interest for their multi-degree-of-freedom design. These objects combine the common advantages of dielectric elastomers (i.e. solid-state actuation, self-sensing capability, high conversion efficiency, light weight and low cost) with the possibility to actuate more than one degree of freedom in a single device. The potential applications of this feature in robotics are huge, making cone actuators very attractive. This work focuses on rotational degrees of freedom to complete existing literature and improve the understanding of such aspect. Simple tools are presented for the performance prediction of the device: finite element method simulations and interpolating relations have been used to assess the actuator steady-state behaviour in terms of torque and rotation as a function of geometric parameters. Results are interpolated by fit relations accounting for all the relevant parameters. The obtained data are validated through comparison with experimental results: steady-state torque and rotation are determined at a given high voltage actuation. In addition, the transient response to step input has been measured and, as a result, the voltage-to-torque and the voltage-to-rotation transfer functions are obtained. Experimental data are collected and used to validate the prediction capability of the transfer function in terms of time response to step input and frequency response. The developed static and dynamic models have been employed to implement a feedback compensator that controls the device motion; the simulated behaviour is compared to experimental data, resulting in a maximum prediction error of 7.5%.

  6. Piezoelectric actuated gimbal

    DOEpatents

    Tschaggeny, Charles W.; Jones, Warren F.; Bamberg, Eberhard

    2011-09-13

    A gimbal is described and which includes a fixed base member defining an axis of rotation; a second member concentrically oriented relative to the axis of rotation; a linear actuator oriented in immediate, adjoining force transmitting relation relative to the base member or to the second member, and which applies force along a linear axis which is tangential to the axis of rotation so as to cause the second member to rotate coaxially relative to the fixed base member; and an object of interest mounted to the second member such that the object of interest is selectively moved relative to the base member about the axis of rotation.

  7. Lead screw linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A linear actuator which can apply high forces is described, which includes a reciprocating rod having a threaded portion engaged by a nut that is directly coupled to the rotor of an electric motor. The nut is connected to the rotor in a manner that minimizes loading on the rotor, by the use of a coupling that transmits torque to the nut but permits it to shift axially and radially with respect to the rotor. The nut has a threaded hydrostatic bearing for engaging the threaded rod portion, with an oilcarrying groove in the nut being interrupted.

  8. Self-sensing ionic electromechanically active actuator with patterned carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruusamäe, Karl; Kaasik, Friedrich; Punning, Andres; Aabloo, Alvo

    2013-04-01

    In comparison to other ionic electromechanically active polymers (ionic EAP), carbon-polymer composite (CPC) actuators are considered especially attractive due to possibility of producing completely metal-free devices. However, mechanical response of ionic EAP-s is, in addition to voltage and frequency, dependent on environmental variables such as humidity and temperature. Therefore, similarly to other EAPs, one of the major challenges lies in achieving controlled actuation of the CPC sample. Due to their size and added complexity, external feedback devices (e.g. laser displacement sensors and video cameras) tend to inhibit the application of micro-scale actuators. Hence, self-sensing EAP actuators - capable for simultaneous actuation and sensing - are often desired. A thin polyvinylidene fluoride-cohexafluoropropylene film with ionic liquid (EMIMBF4) was prepared and masked coincidently on opposite surfaces prior to spray painting carbide-derived carbon electrodes. The purpose of masking was to create different electrically insulated electrodes on the same surface of polymer in order to achieve separate sections for actuator and sensor on one piece of CPC material. Solution of electrode paint consisting of carbide-derived carbon, EMIMBF4 and dimethylacetamide was applied to the polymer film. After removing the masking tape, a completely metal-free CPC actuator with sophisticated electrode geometry was achieved to foster simultaneous sensing and actuation, i.e. self-sensing carbon-polymer actuator was created.

  9. Design and dynamic evaluation for a linear ultrasonic stage using the thin-disc structure actuator.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuhliang; Yen, C-Y

    2007-12-01

    The design of a novel, single-axis ultrasonic actuating stage has been proposed. It consists of a movable plate, an edge-driving ultrasonic actuator as an actuating device, and a magnetic Magi encoder as a position sensor. The stage is impelled using a friction-contact mechanism by the ultrasonic actuator with long distance movement. Very high actuating and braking abilities are obtained. The stable and precise positioning control of the stage was achieved by using a neural-fuzzy controller. This simple and inexpensive structure of the single-axis stage demonstrates that the mechanical design of ultrasonic actuating concept could be done flexibly according to the requirements for various applications. PMID:17692880

  10. Light-driven actuation of fluids at microscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Mandar; Saggere, Laxman

    2004-07-01

    This paper discusses the prospects of light-driven actuation particularly for actuating fluids at micro-scale for potential use in a novel retinal prosthesis and other drug delivery applications. The prosthesis is conceived to be comprised of an array of light-driven microfluidic-dispenser units, devices that eject very small amounts of fluids on the order of 1 picoliter per second in response to incident light energy in the range of 0.1-1 mW/cm2. A light-driven actuator, whose size will ideally be smaller than about 100 micrometers in diameter, independently powers each dispenser unit. Towards this application, various approaches for transducing light energy for actuation of fluids are explored. These approaches encompass both direct transduction of light energy to mechanical actuation of fluid and indirect transduction through an intermediary form of energy, for instance, light energy to thermal or electrical energy followed by mechanical actuation of fluid. Various existing schemes for such transduction are reviewed comprehensively and discussed from the standpoint of the application requirements. Direct transduction schemes exploiting recent developments in optically sensitive materials that exhibit direct strain upon illumination, particularly the photostrictive PLZT (Lanthanum modified Lead Zirconate Titanate), are studied for the current application, and results of some preliminary experiments involving measurement of photovoltage, photocurrent, and photo-induced strain in the meso-scale samples of the PLZT material are presented.

  11. Renewable Interfaces: Surface Topography Actuation for Complex Biological Adhesion Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocivavsek, Luka; Ye, Sangho; Cao, Kathleen; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Velankar, Sachin; Wagner, William

    2015-03-01

    Controlling adhesion at biological interfaces is a complex problem with great biomedical importance. We use dynamic wrinkling, generated with PDMS/UVO chemistry under different macroscopic strains (ɛij ~ 0 . 3), to create a mechanical interfacial term that frustrates particle adhesion. This device actuates surface topography between flat (zero surface confinement χij) and wrinkled surfaces (χij ~(A / λ) 2 , where A and λ are wrinkle amplitude and wavelength, respectively), with a maximum rate of 0.6 Hz. Un-actuated PDMS placed in contact with whole sheep blood shows near total surface coverage with adhered platelets over 90 min. Actuation showed a nearly 100-fold decrease in platelet adhesion. Interestingly, topographic actuation is four times as effective compared to flat surface actuation in controlling platelet adhesion. Our model explores the competition between surface tension terms (Uγ = γɛij) and interfacial elastic terms (Uχ =Eij (t .ɛij2 +t3 . (χij /λ2)) generated because of actuation and wrinkling, where Eij is platelet modulus and t is characteristic platelet length scale. The condition for de-adhesion is Uχ >Uγ .

  12. Integration of piezoceramic actuators in fiber-reinforced structures for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, Johannes K.; Herold-Schmidt, Ursula; Zaglauer, Helmut W.; Arendts, Franz J.

    1998-06-01

    Up to now experimental and theoretical research on active structures for aerospace applications has put the focus mainly on surface bonded actuators. Simultaneously peizoceramics became the major type of actuating device being investigated for smart structures.In this context various techniques of insulating, bonding and operating these actuators have been developed. However, especially with regard to actuators only a few investigations have dealt with embedding of these components into the load bearing structure so far. With increasing shares of fiber- reinforced plastics applied in aerospace products the option of integrating the actuation capability into the components should be reconsidered during the design process. This paper deals with different aspects related to the integration of piezoceramic actuators into fiber reinforced aerospace structures. An outline of the basic possibilities of either bonding an actuator to the structure's surface or embedding it into the composite is given while the emphasis is put on different aspects related to the latter technology. Subsequently recent efforts at Daimler-Benz Aerospace Dornier concerning aircraft components with surface bonded actuators are presented. Design considerations regarding embedded piezoceramic actuators are discussed. Finally some techniques of non-destructive testing applicable to structures with surface bonded as well as embedded piezoelectric actuators are described.

  13. NASA aerospace pyrotechnically actuated systems: Program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Aerospace Pyrotechnically Actuated Systems (PAS) Program, a focused technology program, is being initiated to enhance the reliability, safety, and performance of pyrotechnically actuated systems. In broad terms, this Program Plan presents the approach that helps to resolve concerns raised by the NASA/DOD/DOE Aerospace Pyrotechnic Steering Committee. This Plan reflects key efforts needed in PAS technology. The resources committed to implement the Program will be identified in the Program Implementation Plan (PIP). A top level schedule is included along with major Program milestones and products. Responsibilities are defined in the PIP. The Plan identifies the goals and detailed objectives which define how those goals are to be accomplished. The Program will improve NASA's capabilities to design, develop, manufacture, and test pyrotechnically actuated systems for NASA's programs. Program benefits include the following: advanced pyrotechnic systems technology developed for NASA programs; hands-on pyrotechnic systems expertise; quick response capability to investigate and resolve pyrotechnic problems; enhanced communications and intercenter support among the technical staff; and government-industry PAS technical interchange. The PAS Program produces useful products that are of a broad-based technology nature rather than activities intended to meet specific technology objectives for individual programs. Serious problems have occurred with pyrotechnic devices although near perfect performance is demanded by users. The lack of a program to address those problems in the past is considered a serious omission. The nature of problems experienced as revealed by a survey are discussed and the origin of the program is explained.

  14. Quality impact on diagnostic blood specimen collection using a new device to relieve venipuncture pain.

    PubMed

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2013-07-01

    A new device called Buzzy(®) has been recently presented that combines a cooling ice pack and a vibrating motor in order to relieve the venipuncture pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Buzzy(®) use during diagnostic blood specimen collection by venipuncture for routine immunochemistry tests. Blood was collected from 100 volunteers by a single, expert phlebotomist. A vein was located on the left forearm without applying tourniquet, in order to prevent any interference from venous stasis, and blood samples were collected using a 20-G straight needle directly into 5 mL vacuum tubes with clot activator and gel separator. In sequence, external cold and vibration by Buzzy(®) was applied on the right forearm-5 cm above the chosen puncture site-for 1 min before venipuncture and continued until the end of the same procedure already done in the left forearm. The panel of tests included the following: glucose, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, albumin, c-reactive protein, urea, creatinine, uric acid, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, AST, ALT, g-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, total bilirubin, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, chloride, lipase, cortisol, insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine, free triiodothyronine, total thyroxine, free thyroxine and haemolysis index. Clinically significant differences between samples were found only for: total protein, albumin and transferrin. The Buzzy(®) can be used during diagnostic blood specimens collection by venipuncture for the majority of the routine immunochemistry tests. We only suggest avoiding this device during blood collection when protein, albumin and transferrin determinations should be performed. PMID:24426217

  15. ToF-SIMS Characterization of Biocompatible Silk/Polypyrrole Electromechanical Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Nathan; Severt, Sean; Wang, Zhaoying; Klemke, Carly; Larson, Jesse; Zhu, Zihua; Murphy, Amanda; Leger, Janelle

    2015-03-01

    Materials capable of controlled movements that can also interface with biological environments are highly sought after for biomedical devices such as valves, blood vessel sutures, cochlear implants and controlled drug release devices. Recently we have reported the synthesis of films composed of a conductive interpenetrating network of the biopolymer silk fibroin and poly(pyrrole). These silk-PPy composites function as bilayer electromechanical actuators in a biologically-relevant environment, can be actuated repeatedly, and are able to generate forces comparable with natural muscle (>0.1 MPa), making them an ideal candidate for interfacing with biological tissues. Here, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to investigate the migration of ions in the devices during actuation. These findings will be discussed in the context of the actuation mechanism and opportunities for further improvements in device stability and performance.

  16. Non-explosive actuation for the ORBCOMM (TM) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Anthony; Courtney, Craig; Moran, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Spool-based non-explosive actuator (NEA) devices are used for three important holddown and release functions during the establishment of the ORBCOMM (TM) constellation. Non-explosive separation nuts are used to restrain and release the 26 individual satellites into low earth orbit. Cable release mechanisms based on the same technology are used to release the solar arrays and antenna boom.

  17. Two-position wax-motor rotary actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stange, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Two position rotary actuator rotates shaft by precisely 180 deg and rotates it back on command. Mechanism consumes 11 watts of power and functions over wide range of temperatures under high vacuum for long unattended periods. Light weight device may be used to flip magnetometer for calibration in magnetic field.

  18. Spacecraft Jitter Attenuation Using Embedded Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1995-01-01

    Remote sensing from spacecraft requires precise pointing of measurement devices in order to achieve adequate spatial resolution. Unfortunately, various spacecraft disturbances induce vibrational jitter in the remote sensing instruments. The NASA Langley Research Center has performed analysis, simulations, and ground tests to identify the more promising technologies for minimizing spacecraft pointing jitter. These studies have shown that the use of smart materials to reduce spacecraft jitter is an excellent match between a maturing technology and an operational need. This paper describes the use of embedding piezoelectric actuators for vibration control and payload isolation. In addition, recent advances in modeling, simulation, and testing of spacecraft pointing jitter are discussed.

  19. Fully redundant mechanical release actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, Melvin H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for performing a mechanical release function exhibiting low shock. This system includes two pyrotechnic detents fixed mounted in opposing axial alignment within a cylindrical housing having two mechanical bellows. Two mechanical bellow assemblies, each having one end hermetically bonded to the housing and the other to the respective actuator pin extending from either end of the housing, ensure that all outgassing and contamination from the operation of the pyrotechnic devices will be contained within the housing and bellows. The pin on one end of the assembly is fixed mounted and supported, via a bolt or ball-and-socket joint so that when the charge corresponding to that pin ignites, the entire assembly will exhibit rectilinear movement, including the opposing pin providing the unlatching motion. The release detent pin is supported by a linear bearing and when its corresponding pyrotechnic charge ignites the pin is retracted within the housing producing the same unlatching motion without movement of the entire assembly, thus providing complete mechanical, electrical and pyrotechnic redundancy for the unlatching pin.

  20. Actuator operated microvalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuator operated microvalve and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The microvalve comprises a SiC housing which includes a first lower portion and a second upper portion. The lower portion of the SiC housing includes a passageway therethrough, a microvalve seat, and a moveable SiC diaphragm. The SiC diaphragm includes a centrally located boss and radially extending corrugations which may be sinusoidally shaped. The boss of the SiC diaphragm moves and modulates in a range of positions between a closed position wherein the boss interengages said microvalve seat prohibiting communication of fluid through the passageway and a fully open position when the boss is spaced apart from the seat at its maximum permitting communication of fluid through said passageway. The actuator includes a SiC top plate affixed to the boss of the diaphragm and a first electrode and the second upper portion of the SiC housing further includes a second electrode.

  1. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator for flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opaits, Dmitry Florievich

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) and magnetohydrodynamic phenomena are being widely studied for aerodynamic applications. The major effects of these phenomena are heating of the gas, body force generation, and enthalpy addition or extraction, [1, 2, 3]. In particular, asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are known to be effective EHD device in aerodynamic control, [4, 5]. Experiments have demonstrated their effectiveness in separation control, acoustic noise reduction, and other aeronautic applications. In contrast to conventional DBD actuators driven by sinusoidal voltages, we proposed and used a voltage profile consisting of nanosecond pulses superimposed on dc bias voltage. This produces what is essentially a non-self-sustained discharge: the plasma is generated by repetitive short pulses, and the pushing of the gas occurs primarily due to the bias voltage. The advantage of this non-self-sustained discharge is that the parameters of ionizing pulses and the driving bias voltage can be varied independently, which adds flexibility to control and optimization of the actuators performance. Experimental studies were conducted of a flow induced in a quiescent room air by a single DBD actuator. A new approach for non-intrusive diagnostics of plasma actuator induced flows in quiescent gas was proposed, consisting of three elements coupled together: the Schlieren technique, burst mode of plasma actuator operation, and 2-D numerical fluid modeling. During the experiments, it was found that DBD performance is severely limited by surface charge accumulation on the dielectric. Several ways to mitigate the surface charge were found: using a reversing DC bias potential, three-electrode configuration, slightly conductive dielectrics, and semi conductive coatings. Force balance measurements proved the effectiveness of the suggested configurations and advantages of the new voltage profile (pulses+bias) over the traditional sinusoidal one at relatively low

  2. Evaluation of the Autohaler actuator: the effect of written patient instructions on correct use.

    PubMed

    Kelloway, J S; Kochevar, J W; Sveum, R J; Hahn, M A

    1993-01-01

    The Autohaler actuator is a breath-actuated device designed by 3M Pharmaceuticals. The objective of this study was to measure and improve the effectiveness of the device's package insert instructions (PII). Using only the PII for guidance, 5 of 20 (25%) subjects failed to trigger the device. The PII were revised based on the subject's performance and suggestions. Using the revised PII, only 1 of 20 (5%) different subjects failed to trigger the device. These results indicate that relatively minor modifications to instructions can result in significant improvements in patient use. Eighty-five percent of the participants thought the device was easier to use than a metered-dose inhaler.

  3. A bioinspired soft actuated material.

    PubMed

    Roche, Ellen T; Wohlfarth, Robert; Overvelde, Johannes T B; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Pigula, Frank A; Mooney, David J; Bertoldi, Katia; Walsh, Conor J

    2014-02-26

    A class of soft actuated materials that can achieve lifelike motion is presented. By embedding pneumatic actuators in a soft material inspired by a biological muscle fibril architecture, and developing a simple finite element simulation of the same, tunable biomimetic motion can be achieved with fully soft structures, exemplified here by an active left ventricle simulator.

  4. Smart actuators with piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janocha, Hartmut; Jendritza, Daniel J.; Scheer, Peter

    1996-04-01

    Piezoelectric solid-state actuators continue to gain in technical and economic significance for a great variety of applications such as quick fine-positioning tasks, control of structural stability and active noise and vibration control due to the high driving forces, short reaction times and compact construction of these actuators. Microelectronics and signal processing must be combined intelligently to form `smart actuators' in order to do justice to the growing demand for precision, miniaturization, efficiency and cost. Energy transducers with piezoelectric PZT ceramics (PZT: lead-zirconate-titanate) simultaneously possess actuator and sensor capacities. An important requirement for the construction of smart actuators is fulfilled by separating the sensor information (charge approximately external force) from the actuator control quantities (elongation approximately electric field strength). A closed-loop control structure with digital signal processing and a voltage controlled power amplifier were developed to enable nearly load-independent linearization of the actuator's response characteristic (elongation-voltage curve) even under dynamic operating conditions by making use of the `self-sensing' effect and without using extra force or displacement sensors. The effectiveness of the developed approach for realizing smart actuators was verified and specified with the help of a computerized large-signal measurement set-up using a low-voltage piezoelectric ceramic stack as an example.

  5. Rotary actuator for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andión, J. A.; Burgui, C.; Migliorero, G.

    2005-07-01

    SENER is developing a rotary actuator for space applications. The activity, partially funded under ESA GSTP contract, aims at the design, development and performance testing of an innovative rotary actuator concept for space applications. An engineering model has been manufactured and has been tested to demonstrate the compliance with the requirements specification.

  6. Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Redding, David; Lowman, Andrew; Cohen, David; Ohara, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts the planned Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope (AHMT), which is intended to demonstrate a new approach to the design and construction of wide-aperture spaceborne telescopes for astronomy and Earth science. This technology is also appropriate for Earth-based telescopes. The new approach can be broadly summarized as using advanced lightweight mirrors that can be manufactured rapidly at relatively low cost. More specifically, it is planned to use precise replicated metallic nanolaminate mirrors to obtain the required high-quality optical finishes. Lightweight, dimensionally stable silicon carbide (SiC) structures will support the nanolaminate mirrors in the required surface figures. To enable diffraction- limited telescope performance, errors in surface figures will be corrected by use of mirror-shape-control actuators that will be energized, as needed, by a wave-front-sensing and control system. The concepts of nanolaminate materials and mirrors made from nanolaminate materials were discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Nanolaminates constitute a relatively new class of materials that can approach theoretical limits of stiffness and strength. Nanolaminate mirrors are synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition of metallic alloys and/or compounds on optically precise master surfaces to obtain optical-quality reflector surfaces backed by thin shell structures. As an integral part of the deposition process, a layer of gold that will constitute the reflective surface layer is deposited first, eliminating the need for a subsequent and separate reflective-coating process. The crystallographic textures of the nanolaminate will be controlled to optimize the performance of the mirror. The entire deposition process for making a nanolaminate mirror takes less than 100 hours, regardless of the mirror diameter. Each nanolaminate mirror will be bonded to its lightweight SiC supporting structure. The lightweight nanolaminate mirrors and Si

  7. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Protection for a Laser Diode Ignited Actuator

    SciTech Connect

    SALAS, FREDERICK J.; SANCHEZ, DANIEL H.; WEINLEIN, JOHN HARVEY

    2003-06-01

    The use of laser diodes in devices to ignite pyrotechnics provides unique new capabilities including the elimination of electrostatic discharge (ESD) pulses entering the device. The Faraday cage formed by the construction of these devices removes the concern of inadvertent ignition of the energetic material. However, the laser diode itself can be damaged by ESD pulses, therefore, to enhance reliability, some protection of the laser diode is necessary. The development of the MC4612 Optical Actuator has included a circuit to protect the laser diode from ESD pulses including the ''Fisher'' severe human body ESD model. The MC4612 uses a laser diode and is designed to replace existing hot-wire actuators. Optical energy from a laser diode, instead of electrical energy, is used to ignite the pyrotechnic. The protection circuit is described along with a discussion of how the circuit design addresses and circumvents the historic 1Amp/1Watt requirement that has been applicable to hot-wire devices.

  8. Shape-memory alloy micro-actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, John D. (Inventor); Johnson, Alfred D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of producing an integral piece of thermo-sensitive material, which is responsive to a shift in temperature from below to above a phase transformation temperature range to alter the material's condition to a shape-memory condition and move from one position to another. The method is characterized by depositing a thin film of shape-memory material, such as Nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) onto a substrate by vacuum deposition process such that the alloy exhibits an amorphous non-crystalline structure. The coated substrate is then annealed in a vacuum or in the presence of an inert atmosphere at a selected temperature, time and cool down rate to produce an ordered, partially disordered or fully disordered BCC structure such that the alloy undergoes thermoelastic, martinsetic phase transformation in response to alteration in temperature to pass from a martinsetic phase when at a temperature below a phase transformation range and capable of a high level of recoverable strain to a parent austenitic phase in a memory shape when at a temperature above the phase transformation range. Also disclosed are actuator devices employing shape-memory material actuators that deform from a set shape toward an original shape when subjected to a critical temperature level after having been initially deformed from the original shape into the set shape while at a lower temperature. The actuators are mechanically coupled to one or more movable elements such that the temperature-induce deformation of the actuators exerts a force or generates a motion of the mechanical element(s).

  9. Microwave power for smart material actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.; Golembiewskii, Walter; Chu, Sang-Hyon; King, Glen C.

    2004-02-01

    The concept of microwave-driven smart material actuators was envisioned and developed as the best option to alleviate the complexity and weight associated with a hard-wire-networked power and control system for smart actuator arrays. The patch rectenna array was initially designed for high current output, but has undergone further development for high voltage output devices used in shape control applications. Test results show that more than 200 V of output were obtained from a 6 × 6 array at a far-field exposure (1.8 m away) with an X-band input power of 18 W. The 6 × 6 array patch rectenna was designed to theoretically generate voltages up to 540 V, but practically it has generated voltages in the range between 200 and 300 V. Testing was also performed with a thin layer composite unimorph ferroelectric driver and sensor and electro-active paper as smart actuators attached to the 6 × 6 array. Flexible dipole rectenna arrays built on thin-film-based flexible membranes are most applicable for NASA's various missions, such as microwave-driven shape controls for aircraft morphing and large, ultra-lightweight space structures. An array of dipole rectennas was designed for high voltage output by densely populating Schottky barrier diodes to drive piezoelectric or electrostrictive actuators. The dipole rectenna array will eventually be integrated with a power allocation and distribution logic circuit and microbatteries for storage of excessive power. The roadmap for the development of wireless power drivers based on the rectenna array for shape control requires the development of new membrane materials with proper dielectric constants that are suitable for dipole rectenna arrays.

  10. Development of highly integrated magetically and electrostatically actuated micropumps : LDRD 64709 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sosnowchik, Brian D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Hendrix, Jason R.; Zwolinski, Andrew

    2003-12-01

    The pump and actuator systems designed and built in the SUMMiT{trademark} process, Sandia's surface micromachining polysilicon MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) fabrication technology, on the previous campus executive program LDRD (SAND2002-0704P) with FSU/FAMU (Florida State University/Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University) were characterized in this LDRD. These results demonstrated that the device would pump liquid against the flow resistance of a microfabricated channel, but the devices were determined to be underpowered for reliable pumping. As a result a new set of SUMMiT{trademark} pumps with actuators that generate greater torque will be designed and submitted for fabrication. In this document we will report details of dry actuator/pump assembly testing, wet actuator/pump testing, channel resistance characterization, and new pump/actuator design recommendations.

  11. Actuator-valve interface optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code, Actuator Valve Response (AVR), has been developed to optimize the explosive actuator-valve interface parameters so that the valve plunger velocity is at a maximum when the plunger reaches the valve tubes. The code considers three forces to act on the valve plunger before the plunger reaches the valve tubes. These are the pressure force produced by the actuator, the shear force necessary to shear the seal disks on the actuator and the valve plunger, and the friction force caused by friction between the plunger and the plunger bore. The three forces are modeled by expressions that are explicitly functions of the plunger displacement. A particular actuator-valve combination was analyzed with the computer code AVR with four different combinations of valve plunger seal disk shear strength and initial friction force. (LEW)

  12. Dog-Bone Horns for Piezoelectric Ultrasonic/Sonic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2007-01-01

    A shape reminiscent of a dog bone has been found to be superior to other shapes for mechanical-amplification horns that are components of piezoelectrically driven actuators used in a series of related devices denoted generally as ultrasonic/sonic drill/corers (USDCs). The first of these devices was reported in Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors (NPO-20856), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January 2001), page 38. The dog-bone shape was conceived especially for use in a more recent device in the series, denoted an ultrasonic/ sonic gopher, that was described in Ultrasonic/Sonic Mechanisms for Drilling and Coring (NPO-30291), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 9 (September 2003), page 65. The figure shows an example of a dog-bone-shaped horn and other components of an ultrasonic gopher. Prerequisite to a meaningful description of this development is an unavoidably lengthy recapitulation of the principle of operation of a USDC and, more specifically, of the ultrasonic/sonic gopher as described previously in NASA Tech Briefs. The ultrasonic actuator includes a stack of piezoelectric rings, the horn, a metal backing, and a bolt that connects the aforementioned parts and provides compressive pre-strain to the piezoelectric stack to prevent breakage of the rings during extension. The stack of piezoelectric rings is excited at the resonance frequency of the overall ultrasonic actuator. Through mechanical amplification by the horn, the displacement in the ultrasonic vibration reaches tens of microns at the tip of the horn. The horn hammers an object that is denoted the free mass because it is free to move longitudinally over a limited distance between hard stops: The free mass bounces back and forth between the ultrasonic horn and a tool bit (a drill bit or a corer). Because the longitudinal speed of the free mass is smaller than the longitudinal speed of vibration of the tip of the horn, contact between the free mass and the horn tip usually occurs at a

  13. Experimental approaches to assessing the impact of a cesium chloride radiological dispersal device

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, S.; Gibb, Snyder E.; Barzyk, J.; McGee, J.; Koenig, A.

    2008-01-01

    The US EPA, as a part of the Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI) project team, is currently working to assess the impacts of an urban radiological dispersion device (RDD) and to develop containment and decontamination strategies. Three efforts in this area are currently underway: development of a laboratory-scale cesium chloride deposition method to mimic a RDD; assessment of cesium (Cs) penetration depth and pathways in urban materials using two dimensional (2-D) mapping laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS); and experimental determination of distribution coefficients (kd) for Cs in water-building material systems. It is critical that, when performing laboratory-scale experiments to assess the fate of Cs from an RDD, the Cs particle deposition method mimics the RDD deposition. Once Cs particles are deposited onto urban surfaces, 2-D mapping of Cs concentrations using LA-ICP-MS is a critical tool for determining Cs transport pathways through these materials. Lastly, distribution coefficients are critical for understanding the transport of Cs in urban settings when direct measurements of its penetration depth are unavailable. An assessment of the newly developed deposition method along with preliminary results from the penetration experiments are presented in this paper.

  14. Impact of Vice President Cheney on public interest in left ventricular assist devices and heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ambarish; Abdullah, Kazeen; Drazner, Mark H

    2014-05-01

    Although celebrity illnesses attract a significant amount of media attention in the United States, there are few studies that have looked at how celebrity health conditions impact the awareness of the illness in the general population. Recently, Vice President Cheney underwent left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation and subsequently a cardiac transplant. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was evidence of increased interest in these 2 procedures as assessed by social media. We determined the relative frequency of Google searches for LVAD and heart transplantation from 2004 to 2013 using Google trends. We also counted the number of YouTube videos and Twitter messages posted monthly concerning LVADs over a 7-year time frame. There was a significant spike in the Google search interest for LVAD and heart transplantation in the month when Vice President Cheney underwent the respective procedure. Similarly, there was a large increase in YouTube videos and Twitter messages concerning LVADs shortly after he was implanted. In total, these data support the concept that a public figure's illness can significantly influence the public's interest in that condition and its associated therapies.

  15. Assessment of enhanced autofluorescence and impact on cell microscopy for microfabricated thermoplastic devices.

    PubMed

    Young, Edmond W K; Berthier, Erwin; Beebe, David J

    2013-01-01

    Thermoplastics such as polystyrene (PS) and cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) have become common materials for fabrication of microfluidic cell-based systems because of a number of attractive properties. However, thermoplastics are also known to exhibit autofluorescence levels that may hinder their utility for cell-based and imaging applications. Here, we identify and characterize a phenomenon causing an increase in the autofluorescence of polystyrene after thermal treatment. This effect is of particular importance for plastic microfluidic device fabrication because the ranges of pressures and temperatures causing this effect match the same range as those used for polystyrene bonding. Further, we find that the enhanced autofluorescence has significant impact on the image quality, accuracy, and ability to identify and quantify fluorescently labeled cells. We tested two alternative strategies, solvent bonding of PS or thermal bonding of COP, to alleviate the adverse effects of heterogeneous and enhanced autofluorescence on cell image analysis, and demonstrate that both strategies are viable options to thermal bonding of PS for specific applications where cellular imaging is of primary interest.

  16. The impact of communication materials on public responses to a radiological dispersal device (RDD) attack.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M Brooke; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G James

    2013-03-01

    It is a common assumption that, in the event of a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) attack, a well-prepared and informed public is more likely to follow official recommendations regarding the appropriate safety measures to take. We present findings from a UK study investigating the ability of crisis communication to influence perceptions of risk and behavioral intentions in the general public in response to CBRN terrorism. We conducted a focus group study involving a scenario presented in mock news broadcasts to explore levels of public knowledge, information needs, and intended behavioral reactions to an attack involving an overt radiological dispersal device (RDD), or dirty bomb. We used the findings from these focus groups to design messages for the public that could be presented in a short leaflet. We then tested the effects of the leaflet on reactions to the same scenario in 8 further focus groups. The impact of the new messages on levels of knowledge, information needs, and intended compliance with official recommendations was assessed. The provision of information increased the perceived credibility of official messages and increased reported levels of intended compliance with advice to return to normal/stop sheltering, attend a facility for assessment and treatment, and return to a previously contaminated area after decontamination of the environment has taken place. Should a real attack with an RDD occur, having pretested messages available to address common concerns and information needs should facilitate the public health response to the attack.

  17. The impact of communication materials on public responses to a radiological dispersal device (RDD) attack.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M Brooke; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G James

    2013-03-01

    It is a common assumption that, in the event of a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) attack, a well-prepared and informed public is more likely to follow official recommendations regarding the appropriate safety measures to take. We present findings from a UK study investigating the ability of crisis communication to influence perceptions of risk and behavioral intentions in the general public in response to CBRN terrorism. We conducted a focus group study involving a scenario presented in mock news broadcasts to explore levels of public knowledge, information needs, and intended behavioral reactions to an attack involving an overt radiological dispersal device (RDD), or dirty bomb. We used the findings from these focus groups to design messages for the public that could be presented in a short leaflet. We then tested the effects of the leaflet on reactions to the same scenario in 8 further focus groups. The impact of the new messages on levels of knowledge, information needs, and intended compliance with official recommendations was assessed. The provision of information increased the perceived credibility of official messages and increased reported levels of intended compliance with advice to return to normal/stop sheltering, attend a facility for assessment and treatment, and return to a previously contaminated area after decontamination of the environment has taken place. Should a real attack with an RDD occur, having pretested messages available to address common concerns and information needs should facilitate the public health response to the attack. PMID:23510306

  18. Underground Infrastructure Impacts Due to a Surface Burst Nuclear Device in an Urban Canyon Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Randall J.; Dey, Thomas N.; Runnels, Scott R.

    2012-07-03

    case. Again, as in the above ground case, the basements create significant shielding causing the shock profile to become more square and reducing the potential for damage diagonal to the line of sight streets. The results for a 1KT device is that the heavily damaged zone (complete destruction) will extend out to 50m from the detonation ({approx}100m for 10KT). The heavily to moderately damaged zone will extend out to 100m ({approx}200m for 10KT). Since the destruction will depend on geometric angle from the detonation and also the variability of response for various critical infrastructure, for planning purposes the area out to 100m from the detonation should be assumed to be non-operational. Specifically for subway tunnels, while not operational, they could be human passable for human egress in the moderately damaged area. The results of the simulations presented in this report indicate only the general underground infrastructure impact. Simulations done with the actual basement geometry would be an important improvement. Equally as important or even more so, knowing the actual underground material configurations and material composition would be critical information to refine the calculations. Coupling of the shock data into structural codes would help inform the emergency planning and first response communities on the impact to underground structures and the state of buildings after the detonation.

  19. An Impact Velocity Device Design for Blood Spatter Pattern Generation with Considerations for High-Speed Video Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stotesbury, Theresa; Illes, Mike; Vreugdenhil, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    A mechanical device that uses gravitational and spring compression forces to create spatter patterns of known impact velocities is presented and discussed. The custom-made device uses either two or four springs (k1 = 267.8 N/m, k2 = 535.5 N/m) in parallel to create seventeen reproducible impact velocities between 2.1 and 4.0 m/s. The impactor is held at several known spring extensions using an electromagnet. Trigger inputs to the high-speed video camera allow the user to control the magnet's release while capturing video footage simultaneously. A polycarbonate base is used to allow for simultaneous monitoring of the side and bottom views of the impact event. Twenty-four patterns were created across the impact velocity range and analyzed using HemoSpat. Area of origin estimations fell within an acceptable range (ΔXav = -5.5 ± 1.9 cm, ΔYav = -2.6 ± 2.8 cm, ΔZav = +5.5 ± 3.8 cm), supporting distribution analysis for the use in research or bloodstain pattern training. This work provides a framework for those interested in developing a robust impact device.

  20. An Impact Velocity Device Design for Blood Spatter Pattern Generation with Considerations for High-Speed Video Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stotesbury, Theresa; Illes, Mike; Vreugdenhil, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    A mechanical device that uses gravitational and spring compression forces to create spatter patterns of known impact velocities is presented and discussed. The custom-made device uses either two or four springs (k1 = 267.8 N/m, k2 = 535.5 N/m) in parallel to create seventeen reproducible impact velocities between 2.1 and 4.0 m/s. The impactor is held at several known spring extensions using an electromagnet. Trigger inputs to the high-speed video camera allow the user to control the magnet's release while capturing video footage simultaneously. A polycarbonate base is used to allow for simultaneous monitoring of the side and bottom views of the impact event. Twenty-four patterns were created across the impact velocity range and analyzed using HemoSpat. Area of origin estimations fell within an acceptable range (ΔXav = -5.5 ± 1.9 cm, ΔYav = -2.6 ± 2.8 cm, ΔZav = +5.5 ± 3.8 cm), supporting distribution analysis for the use in research or bloodstain pattern training. This work provides a framework for those interested in developing a robust impact device. PMID:27404625

  1. Bistable electroactive polymer for refreshable Braille display with improved actuation stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan; Brochu, Paul; Stoyanov, Hristiyan; Yun, Sung Ryul; Pei, Qibing

    2012-04-01

    Poly(t-butyl acrylate) is a bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP) capable of rigid-to-rigid actuation. The BSEP combines the large-strain actuation of dielectric elastomers with shape memory property. We have introduced a material approach to overcome pull-in instability in poly(t-butyl acrylate) that significantly improves the actuation lifetime at strains greater than 100%. Refreshable Braille display devices with size of a smartphone screen have been fabricated to manifest a potential application of the BSEP. We will report the testing results of the devices by a Braille user.

  2. Field emission in actuation pads of radio frequency microelectromechanical systems ohmic switches: A potential contamination mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoureli, M.; Reig, B.; Papandreou, E.; Poulain, C.; Souchon, F.; Deborgies, F.; Papaioannou, G.

    2016-01-01

    The field emission current generated across the actuation pads in ohmic MEMS switches during ON state is shown to constitute an additional source of degradation. Switches with Au/Au and Au/Ru contacts have been subjected to 24 h continuous stress. In both cases the switch ohmic contact resistance and field emission current across actuation pads were monitored simultaneously. The experimental results revealed a negligible degradation in Au/Au contact devices while the Au/Ru contact devices show a fast degradation. The experimental results from Au/Au and Ru/Au contact switches have been compared taking into account the plasma generation in the actuation pads.

  3. Long throw and rotary output electro-thermal actuators based on bent-beam suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Chu, L.L.; Siwapornsathain, E.; Oliver, A.D.; Gianchandani, Y.B.

    1999-11-22

    This paper reports on significant advances in electrothermal bent beam actuators. Designs for long throw linear and rotary actuators are described. Silicon p++ devices showed 20--30 {mu}m displacements with 150 {micro}N loads at actuation levels of 6--8 V, and 250--300 mW. An electroplated version provided 15 {mu}m displacements at 0.8 V and 450 mW. Inchworm type devices are reported that had linear displacements of 100 {micro}m with 200 {micro}N loads. Refinements in the modeling to account for non-linear thermal expansion coefficients and buckling are also reported.

  4. Design of an innovative dielectric elastomer actuator for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, Francesco; Sansone, Francesco; Francesconi, Alessandro

    2014-03-01

    The capability of Dielectric Elastomers to show large deformations under high voltage loads has been deeply investigated to develop a number of actuators concepts. From a space systems point of view, the advantages introduced by this class of smart materials are considerable and include high conversion efficiency, distributed actuation, self-sensing capability, light weight and low cost. This paper focuses on the design of a solid-state actuator capable of high positioning resolution. The use of Electroactive Polymers makes this device interesting for space mechanisms applications, such as antenna and sensor pointing, solar array orientation, attitude control, adaptive structures and robotic manipulators. In particular, such actuation suffers neither wear, nor fatigue issues and shows highly damped vibrations, thus requiring no maintenance and transferring low disturbance to the surrounding structures. The main weakness of this actuator is the relatively low force/torque values available. The proposed geometry allows two rotational degrees of freedom, and simulations are performed to measure the expected instant angular deflection at zero load and the stall torque of the actuator under a given high voltage load. Several geometric parameters are varied and their influence on the device behaviour is studied. Simplified relations are extrapolated from the numerical results and represent useful predicting tools for design purposes. Beside the expected static performances, the dynamic behaviour of the device is also assessed and the input/output transfer function is estimated. Finally, a prototype design for laboratory tests is presented; the experimental activity aims to validate the preliminary results obtained by numerical analysis.

  5. A study on the effect of surface topography on the actuation performance of stacked-rolled dielectric electro active polymer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sait, Usha; Muthuswamy, Sreekumar

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric electro active polymer (DEAP) is a suitable actuator material that finds wide applications in the field of robotics and medical areas. This material is highly controllable, flexible, and capable of developing large strain. The influence of geometrical behavior becomes critical when the material is used as miniaturized actuation devices in robotic applications. The present work focuses on the effect of surface topography on the performance of flat (single sheet) and stacked-rolled DEAP actuators. The non-active areas in the form of elliptical spots that affect the performance of the actuator are identified using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dissipated X-ray (EDX) experiments. Performance of DEAP actuation is critically evaluated, compared, and presented with analytical and experimental results.

  6. Simulating MEMS Chevron Actuator for Strain Engineering 2D Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutukuru, Mounika; Christopher, Jason; Bishop, David; Swan, Anna

    2D materials pose an exciting paradigm shift in the world of electronics. These crystalline materials have demonstrated high electric and thermal conductivities and tensile strength, showing great potential as the new building blocks of basic electronic circuits. However, strain engineering 2D materials for novel devices remains a difficult experimental feat. We propose the integration of 2D materials with MEMS devices to investigate the strain dependence on material properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity, refractive index, mechanical elasticity, and band gap. MEMS Chevron actuators, provides the most accessible framework to study strain in 2D materials due to their high output force displacements for low input power. Here, we simulate Chevron actuators on COMSOL to optimize actuator design parameters and accurately capture the behavior of the devices while under the external force of a 2D material. Through stationary state analysis, we analyze the response of the device through IV characteristics, displacement and temperature curves. We conclude that the simulation precisely models the real-world device through experimental confirmation, proving that the integration of 2D materials with MEMS is a viable option for constructing novel strain engineered devices. The authors acknowledge support from NSF DMR1411008.

  7. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off

  8. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  9. Development of a miniature actuator/controller system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, Scott P.

    1995-01-01

    Development of new products is often hampered or prevented by the cost and resource commitments required by a traditional engineering approach. Schaeffer Magnetics, Inc. identified the potential need for a miniature incremental actuator with an integrated controller but did not want the development to be subject to the obstacles inherent in the traditional approach. In response a new approach - the Pathfinder Engineering Program (PEP) - was developed to streamline new product generation and improve product quality. The actuator/controller system resulting from implementation of this new procedure is an exceptionally compact and self-contained device with many applications.

  10. Nuclear Storage Overpack Door Actuator and Alignment Apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Andreyko, Gregory M.

    2005-05-11

    The invention is a door actuator and alignment apparatus for opening and closing the 15,000-pound horizontally sliding door of a storage overpack. The door actuator includes a ball screw mounted horizontally on a rigid frame including a pair of door panel support rails. An electrically powered ball nut moves along the ball screw. The ball nut rotating device is attached to a carriage. The carriage attachment to the sliding door is horizontally pivoting. Additional alignment features include precision cam followers attached to the rails and rail guides attached to the carriage.

  11. Nuclear storage overpack door actuator and alignment apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Andreyko, Gregory M.

    2005-05-10

    The invention is a door actuator and alignment apparatus for opening and closing the 15,000-pound horizontally sliding door of a storage overpack. The door actuator includes a ball screw mounted horizontally on a rigid frame including a pair of door panel support rails. An electrically powered ball nut moves along the ball screw. The ball nut rotating device is attached to a carriage. The carriage attachment to the sliding door is horizontally pivoting. Additional alignment features include precision cam followers attached to the rails and rail guides attached to the carriage.

  12. Complaint liquid metal electrodes for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkenauer, Lauren R.; Majidi, Carmel

    2014-03-01

    This work presents a liquid-phase metal electrode to be used with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) for a dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA). DEAs are favorable for soft-matter applications where high efficiency and response times are desirable. A consistent challenge faced during the fabrication of these devices is the selection and deposition of electrode material. While numerous designs have been demonstrated with a variety of conductive elastomers and greases, these materials have significant and often intrinsic shortcomings, e.g. low conductivity, hysteresis, incapability of large deformations, and complex fabrication requirements. The liquid metal alloy eutectic Gallium-Indium (EGaIn) is a promising alternative to existing compliant electrodes, having both high conductivity and complete soft-matter functionality. The liquid electrode shares almost the same electrical conductivity as conventional metal wiring and provides no mechanical resistance to bending or stretching of the DEA. This research establishes a straightforward and effective method for quickly depositing EGaIn electrodes, which can be adapted for batch fabrication, and demonstrates the successful actuation of sample curved cantilever elastomer actuators using these electrodes. As with the vast majority of electrostatically actuated elastomer devices, the voltage requirements for these curved DEAs are still quite significant, though modifications to the fabrication process show some improved electrical properties. The ease and speed with which this method can be implemented suggests that the development of a more electronically efficient device is realistic and worthwhile.

  13. Solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Solid State Device research program is directed toward developing innovative devices for space remote and in-situ sensing, and for data processing. Innovative devices can result from the standard structures in innovative materials such as low and high temperature superconductors, strained layer superlattices, or diamond films. Innovative devices can also result from innovative structures achieved using electron tunneling or nanolithography in standard materials. A final step is to use both innovative structures and innovative materials. A new area of emphasis is the miniaturization of sensors and instruments molded by using the techniques of electronic device fabrication to micromachine silicon into micromechanical and electromechanical sensors and actuators.

  14. Microelectromechanical systems integrating molecular spin crossover actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique-Juarez, Maria D.; Rat, Sylvain; Mathieu, Fabrice; Saya, Daisuke; Séguy, Isabelle; Leïchlé, Thierry; Nicu, Liviu; Salmon, Lionel; Molnár, Gábor; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2016-08-01

    Silicon MEMS cantilevers coated with a 200 nm thin layer of the molecular spin crossover complex [Fe(H2B(pz)2)2(phen)] (H2B(pz)2 = dihydrobis(pyrazolyl)borate and phen = 1,10-phenantroline) were actuated using an external magnetic field and their resonance frequency was tracked by means of integrated piezoresistive detection. The light-induced spin-state switching of the molecules from the ground low spin to the metastable high spin state at 10 K led to a well-reproducible shift of the cantilever's resonance frequency (Δfr = -0.52 Hz). Control experiments at different temperatures using coated as well as uncoated devices along with simple calculations support the assignment of this effect to the spin transition. This latter translates into changes in mechanical behavior of the cantilever due to the strong spin-state/lattice coupling. A guideline for the optimization of device parameters is proposed so as to efficiently harness molecular scale movements for large-scale mechanical work, thus paving the road for nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) actuators based on molecular materials.

  15. Surface micromachined electrostatically actuated micro peristaltic pump.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Shih, Jason; Lin, Qiao; Yang, Bozhi; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2004-10-01

    An electrostatically actuated micro peristaltic pump is reported. The micro pump is entirely surface micromachined using a multilayer parylene technology. Taking advantage of the multilayer technology, the micro pump design enables the pumped fluid to be isolated from the electric field. Electrostatic actuation of the parylene membrane using both DC and AC voltages was demonstrated and applied to fluid pumping based on a 3-phase peristaltic sequence. A maximum flow rate of 1.7 nL min(-1) and an estimated pumping pressure of 1.6 kPa were achieved at 20 Hz phase frequency. A dynamic analysis was also performed with a lumped-parameter model for the peristaltic pump. The analysis results allow a quantitative understanding of the peristaltic pumping operation, and correctly predict the trends exhibited by the experimental data. The small footprint of the micro pump is well suited for large-scale integration of microfluidics. Moreover, because the same platform technology has also been used to fabricate other devices (e.g. valves, electrospray ionization nozzles, filters and flow sensors), the integration of these different devices can potentially lead to versatile and functional micro total analysis systems (microTAS).

  16. Laser microfluidics: fluid actuation by light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delville, Jean-Pierre; de Saint Vincent, Matthieu Robert; Schroll, Robert D.; Chraïbi, Hamza; Issenmann, Bruno; Wunenburger, Régis; Lasseux, Didier; Zhang, Wendy W.; Brasselet, Etienne

    2009-03-01

    The development of microfluidic devices is still hindered by the lack of robust fundamental building blocks that constitute any fluidic system. An attractive approach is optical actuation because light field interaction is contactless and dynamically reconfigurable, and solutions have been anticipated through the use of optical forces to manipulate microparticles in flows. Following the concept of an 'optical chip' advanced from the optical actuation of suspensions, we propose in this survey new routes to extend this concept to microfluidic two-phase flows. First, we investigate the destabilization of fluid interfaces by the optical radiation pressure and the formation of liquid jets. We analyze the droplet shedding from the jet tip and the continuous transport in laser-sustained liquid channels. In the second part, we investigate a dissipative light-flow interaction mechanism consisting in heating locally two immiscible fluids to produce thermocapillary stresses along their interface. This opto-capillary coupling is implemented in adequate microchannel geometries to manipulate two-phase flows and propose a contactless optical toolbox including valves, droplet sorters and switches, droplet dividers or droplet mergers. Finally, we discuss radiation pressure and opto-capillary effects in the context of the 'optical chip' where flows, channels and operating functions would all be performed optically on the same device.

  17. Gear-Driven Turnbuckle Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Ricky N.

    2010-01-01

    This actuator design allows the extension and contraction of turnbuckle assemblies. It can be operated manually or remotely, and is extremely compact. It is ideal for turnbuckles that are hard to reach by conventional tools. The tool assembly design solves the problem of making accurate adjustments to the variable geometry guide vanes without having to remove and reinstall the actuator system back on the engine. The actuator does this easily by adjusting the length of the turnbuckles while they are still attached to the engine.

  18. The actuated latch pin and its development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawlor, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    An actuated latch pin developed to meet the need for a reusable locking device is described. The unit can function as a pin puller or as a pin pusher latch. Initial prototype testing demonstrated the feasibility of the device with the unit being driven from a 28 V dc supply and using 15 W to drive a 12 mm diameter pin through a stroke of 10 mm with a side load of 100 N in 120 ms. High wear rates with a MOS2 lubrication on the ballscrew and angular contact bearings have necessitated the reduction in the duty cycle from 1000 cycles in air and vacuum to 100 in air and 1000 in vacuum.

  19. Impact of the Volkswagen emissions control defeat device on US public health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven R. H.; Speth, Raymond L.; Eastham, Sebastian D.; Dedoussi, Irene C.; Ashok, Akshay; Malina, Robert; Keith, David W.

    2015-11-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has alleged that Volkswagen Group of America (VW) violated the Clean Air Act (CAA) by developing and installing emissions control system ‘defeat devices’ (software) in model year 2009-2015 vehicles with 2.0 litre diesel engines. VW has admitted the inclusion of defeat devices. On-road emissions testing suggests that in-use NOx emissions for these vehicles are a factor of 10 to 40 above the EPA standard. In this paper we quantify the human health impacts and associated costs of the excess emissions. We propagate uncertainties throughout the analysis. A distribution function for excess emissions is estimated based on available in-use NOx emissions measurements. We then use vehicle sales data and the STEP vehicle fleet model to estimate vehicle distance traveled per year for the fleet. The excess NOx emissions are allocated on a 50 km grid using an EPA estimate of the light duty diesel vehicle NOx emissions distribution. We apply a GEOS-Chem adjoint-based rapid air pollution exposure model to produce estimates of particulate matter and ozone exposure due to the spatially resolved excess NOx emissions. A set of concentration-response functions is applied to estimate mortality and morbidity outcomes. Integrated over the sales period (2008-2015) we estimate that the excess emissions will cause 59 (95% CI: 10 to 150) early deaths in the US. When monetizing premature mortality using EPA-recommended data, we find a social cost of ˜450m over the sales period. For the current fleet, we estimate that a return to compliance for all affected vehicles by the end of 2016 will avert ˜130 early deaths and avoid ˜840m in social costs compared to a counterfactual case without recall.

  20. Design and reliability of a MEMS thermal rotary actuator.

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael Sean; Corwin, Alex David

    2007-09-01

    A new rotary MEMS actuator has been developed and tested at Sandia National Laboratories that utilizes a linear thermal actuator as the drive mechanism. This actuator was designed to be a low-voltage, high-force alternative to the existing electrostatic torsional ratcheting actuator (TRA) [1]. The new actuator, called the Thermal Rotary Actuator (ThRA), is conceptually much simpler than the TRA and consists of a gear on a hub that is turned by a linear thermal actuator [2] positioned outside of the gear. As seen in Figure 1, the gear is turned through a ratcheting pawl, with anti-reverse pawls positioned around the gear for unidirectional motion (see Figure 1). A primary consideration in the design of the ThRA was the device reliability and in particular, the required one-to-one relationship between the ratcheting output motion and the electrical input signal. The electrostatic TRA design has been shown to both over-drive and under-drive relative to the number of input pulses [3]. Two different ThRA designs were cycle tested to measure the skip rate. This was done in an automated test setup by using pattern matching to measure the angle of rotation of the output gear after a defined number of actuation pulses. By measuring this gear angle over time, the number of skips can be determined. Figure 2 shows a picture of the ThRA during testing, with the pattern-matching features highlighted. In the first design tested, it was found that creep in the thermal actuator limited the number of skip-free cycles, as the rest position of the actuator would creep forward enough to prevent the counter-rotation pawls from fully engaging (Figure 3). Even with this limitation, devices were measured with up to 100 million cycles with no skipping. A design modification was made to reduce the operating temperature of the thermal actuator which has been shown in a previous study [2] to reduce the creep rate. In addition, changes were made to the drive ratchet design and actuation

  1. A novel linear elastic actuator for minimally invasive surgery: development of a surgical gripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerboni, G.; Brancadoro, M.; Tortora, G.; Diodato, A.; Cianchetti, M.; Menciassi, A.

    2016-10-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) applications require lightweight actuators that can generate a high force in a limited volume. Among pressure driven actuators, fluid elastic actuators demonstrate high potential for use in the medical field. They are characterized by nearly no friction and wear and they can be made of low-cost biocompatible elastomers. However, when compared to traditional piston-cylinder fluid actuators, fluid elastic actuators often result in smaller output forces as well as weaker return forces. This work is about the design of a linear elastic actuator (LEA) which is able to develop relevant pulling-pushing force in one direction. The LEA is composed of entirely disposable materials and it requires a simple manufacturing process. Thanks to its design, the LEA can be compared to traditional piston-cylinders actuators in terms of output forces (up to 7 N) with the advantage of using relative low working pressures (0, 2 MPa). The actuator has been used for the actuation of a gripper for MIS, as a case study. The whole range of gripping forces developed by the tool actated by the LEA has been evaluated, thus verifying that the gripping device, is able to meet the force requirements for accomplishing typical surgical tasks.

  2. MEMS Actuators for Improved Performance and Durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yearsley, James M.

    Micro-ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) devices take advantage of force-scaling at length scales smaller than a millimeter to sense and interact with directly with phenomena and targets at the microscale. MEMS sensors found in everyday devices like cell-phones and cars include accelerometers, gyros, pressure sensors, and magnetic sensors. MEMS actuators generally serve more application specific roles including micro- and nano-tweezers used for single cell manipulation, optical switching and alignment components, and micro combustion engines for high energy density power generation. MEMS rotary motors are actuators that translate an electric drive signal into rotational motion and can serve as rate calibration inputs for gyros, stages for optical components, mixing devices for micro-fluidics, etc. Existing rotary micromotors suffer from friction and wear issues that affect lifetime and performance. Attempts to alleviate friction effects include surface treatment, magnetic and electrostatic levitation, pressurized gas bearings, and micro-ball bearings. The present work demonstrates a droplet based liquid bearing supporting a rotary micromotor that improves the operating characteristics of MEMS rotary motors. The liquid bearing provides wear-free, low-friction, passive alignment between the rotor and stator. Droplets are positioned relative to the rotor and stator through patterned superhydrophobic and hydrophilic surface coatings. The liquid bearing consists of a central droplet that acts as the motor shaft, providing axial alignment between rotor and stator, and satellite droplets, analogous to ball-bearings, that provide tip and tilt stable operation. The liquid bearing friction performance is characterized through measurement of the rotational drag coefficient and minimum starting torque due to stiction and geometric effects. Bearing operational performance is further characterized by modeling and measuring stiffness, environmental survivability, and high

  3. Muscular MEMS—the engineering of liquid crystal elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsch, S.; Khatri, B.; Schuhladen, S.; Köbele, L.; Rix, R.; Zentel, R.; Zappe, H.

    2016-08-01

    A new class of soft-matter actuator, the liquid crystal elastomer (LCE), shows promise for application in a wide variety of mechanical microsystems. Frequently referred to as an ‘artificial muscle’, this family of materials exhibits large actuation stroke and generates considerable force, in a compact form which may easily be combined with the structures and devices commonly used in microsystems and MEMS. We show here how standard microfabrication techniques may be used to integrate LCEs into mechanical microsystems and present an in-depth analysis of their mechanical and actuation properties. Using an example from micro-optics and optical MEMS, we demonstrate that their performance and flexibility allows realization of entirely new types of tunable optical functionality.

  4. Note: An asymmetric flexure mechanism for comb-drive actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olfatnia, M.; Sood, S.; Awtar, S.

    2012-11-01

    This Note presents a new asymmetric flexure design, the double parallelogram-tilted-beam double parallelogram (DP-TDP) flexure, that enables two times higher stroke in electrostatic comb-drive actuators, compared to the traditional symmetrically paired double parallelogram (DP-DP) flexure, while maintaining the same device footprint. Because of its unique kinematic configuration, the DP-TDP flexure provides an improved stiffness ratio between the bearing and actuation directions, thus delaying the on-set of sideways instability. Experimental testing of micro-fabricated comb-drive actuators with flexure beam length 1 mm and comb gap 5 μm demonstrates a stroke of 149 μm (at 86 V) for the proposed DP-TDP flexure, in comparison to 75 μm (at 45 V) for the traditional DP-DP flexure.

  5. A planar nano-positioner driven by shear piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Li, H.; Du, Z.

    2016-08-01

    A planar nano-positioner driven by the shear piezoelectric actuators is proposed in this paper based on inertial sliding theory. The performance of the nano-positioner actuated by different driving signals is analyzed and discussed, e.g. the resolution and the average velocity which depend on the frequency, the amplitude and the wave form of the driving curves. Based on the proposed design, a prototype system of the nano-positioner is developed by using a capacitive sensor as the measurement device. The experiment results show that the proposed nano-positioner is capable of outputting two-dimensional motions within an area of 10 mm × 10 mm at a maximum speed of 0.25 mm/s. The corresponding resolution can be as small as 21 nm. The methodology outlined in this paper can be employed and extended to shear piezoelectric actuators involved in high precision positioning systems.

  6. Concurrent droplet charging and sorting by electrostatic actuation.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Byungwook; Lee, Kangsun; Louge, Romain; Oh, Kwang W

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a droplet-based microfluidic device for concurrent droplet charging and sorting by electrostatic actuation. Water-in-oil droplets can be charged on generation by synchronized electrostatic actuation. Then, simultaneously, the precharged droplets can be electrostatically steered into any designated laminar streamline, thus they can be sorted into one of multiple sorting channels one by one in a controlled fashion. In this paper, we studied the size dependence of the water droplets under various relative flow rates of water and oil. We demonstrated the concurrent charging and sorting of up to 600 dropletss by synchronized electrostatic actuation. Finally, we investigated optimized voltages for stable droplet charging and sorting. This is an essential enabling technology for fast, robust, and multiplexed sorting of microdroplets, and for the droplet-based microfluidic systems.

  7. Study on Multi-DOF Ultrasonic Actuator for Laparoscopic Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Shinsuk; Takemura, Kenjiro; Maeno, Takashi

    In surgical robots, compact manipulators with multi-degree-of-freedom (DOF) are essential owing to a small work volume in the patient body. Conventional single-DOF actuators such as electromagnetic motors require a multiple number of actuators to generate multi-DOF motion, which in turn results in bulky mechanism combined with transmission device. Our previous work has developed a compact ultrasonic motor capable of generating a multi-DOF rotation of a spherical rotor utilizing three natural vibration modes of a bar-shaped stator. The present study designs and builds a novel multi-DOF master-slave system for laparoscopic surgical procedures, using a single ultrasonic actuator. The system consists of surgical forceps on multi-DOF wrist with joystick controller. Experimental results have confirmed high responsiveness and precise position control of the master-slave system.

  8. Advanced Layered Composite Polylaminate Electroactive Actuator and Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Copeland, Benjamin M., Jr. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to the mounting of pre-stressed electroactive material in such a manner that large displacement actuators or sensors result. The invention comprises mounting the pre-stressed electroactive material to a support layer. This combination of a pre-stressed electroactive material and support layer may in turn be attached to a mounting surface. The pre-stressed electroactive material may be a ferroelectric, pyroelectric, piezoelectric, or magnetostrictive material. The size, stiffness, mass, and material of the support layer is selected to result in the electroactive device having dynamic response properties, environmental capability characteristics, and the required resilience optimized for a given application. The capacity to connect the support layer to a surface expands the arenas in which the prestressed electroactive device may be used. Application for which the invention may be used include actuators, sensors, or as a component in a pumps, switches, relays, pressure transducers and acoustic devices.

  9. Design and Simulation of an Electrothermal Actuator Based Rotational Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, Sterling; Dallas, Tim

    2008-10-01

    As a participant in the Micro and Nano Device Engineering (MANDE) Research Experience for Undergraduates program at Texas Tech University, I learned how MEMS devices operate and the limits of their operation. Using specialized AutoCAD-based design software and the ANSYS simulation program, I learned the MEMS fabrication process used at Sandia National Labs, the design limitations of this process, the abilities and drawbacks of micro devices, and finally, I redesigned a MEMS device called the Chevron Torsional Ratcheting Actuator (CTRA). Motion is achieved through electrothermal actuation. The chevron (bent-beam) actuators cause a ratcheting motion on top of a hub-less gear so that as voltage is applied the CTRA spins. The voltage applied needs to be pulsed and the frequency of the pulses determine the angular frequency of the device. The main objective was to design electromechanical structures capable of transforming the electrical signals into mechanical motion without overheating. The design was optimized using finite element analysis in ANSYS allowing multi-physics simulations of our model system.

  10. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  11. Study on the impact of device parameter variations on performance of III-V homojunction and heterojunction tunnel FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmat, Maedeh; Kamal, Mehdi; Afzali-Kusha, Ali; Pedram, Massoud

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the impact of physical parameter variations on the electrical characteristics of III-V TFETs is investigated. The study is performed on the operations of two optimized ultra-thin 20 nm double-gate transistors. The two device structures are InAs homojunction TFET and InAs-GaAs0.1Sb0.9 heterojunction TFET. The operation parameters are the ON-current, OFF-current, and threshold voltage. The investigation is performed at the device level, using a device simulator and the Monte-Carlo simulation approach is exploited to extract the distribution of electrical parameters in the presence of the process variation. The results reveal that the operation of the transistor is more sensitive to the doping of the source and gate work function compared to other physical parameters. Furthermore, the heterojunction TFETs show less sensitivity to physical parameter variations compared to the homojunction ones.

  12. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A.; Eide, S.A.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  13. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A. ); Eide, S.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  14. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  15. Electro-Active Polymer (EAP) Actuators for Planetary Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Leary, S.; Shahinpoor, M.; Harrison, J. O.; Smith, J.

    1999-01-01

    NASA is seeking to reduce the mass, size, consumed power, and cost of the instrumentation used in its future missions. An important element of many instruments and devices is the actuation mechanism and electroactive polymers (EAP) are offering an effective alternative to current actuators. In this study, two families of EAP materials were investigated, including bending ionomers and longitudinal electrostatically driven elastomers. These materials were demonstrated to effectively actuate manipulation devices and their performance is being enhanced in this on-going study. The recent observations are reported in this paper, include the operation of the bending-EAP at conditions that exceed the harsh environment on Mars, and identify the obstacles that its properties and characteristics are posing to using them as actuators. Analysis of the electrical characteristics of the ionomer EAP showed that it is a current driven material rather than voltage driven and the conductivity distribution on the surface of the material greatly influences the bending performance. An accurate equivalent circuit modeling of the ionomer EAP performance is essential for the design of effective drive electronics. The ionomer main limitations are the fact that it needs to be moist continuously and the process of electrolysis that takes place during activation. An effective coating technique using a sprayed polymer was developed extending its operation in air from a few minutes to about four months. The coating technique effectively forms the equivalent of a skin to protect the moisture content of the ionomer. In parallel to the development of the bending EAP, the development of computer control of actuated longitudinal EAP has been pursued. An EAP driven miniature robotic arm was constructed and it is controlled by a MATLAB code to drop and lift the arm and close and open EAP fingers of a 4-finger gripper. Keywords: Miniature Robotics, Electroactive Polymers, Electroactive Actuators, EAP

  16. A linear actuator for precision positioning of dual objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yuxin; Cao, Jie; Guo, Zhao; Yu, Haoyong

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a linear actuator for precision positioning of dual objects is proposed based on a double friction drive principle using a single piezoelectric element (PZT). The linear actuator consists of an electromagnet and a permanent magnet, which are connected by the PZT. The electromagnet serves as an object 1, and another object (object 2) is attached on the permanent magnet by the magnetic force. For positioning the dual objects independently, two different friction drive modes can be alternated by an on-off control of the electromagnet. When the electromagnet releases from the guide way, it can be driven by impact friction force generated by the PZT. Otherwise, when the electromagnet clamps on the guide way and remains stationary, the object 2 can be driven based on the principle of smooth impact friction drive. A prototype was designed and constructed and experiments were carried out to test the basic performance of the actuator. It has been verified that with a compact size of 31 mm (L) × 12 mm (W) × 8 mm (H), the two objects can achieve long strokes on the order of several millimeters and high resolutions of several tens of nanometers. Since the proposed actuator allows independent movement of two objects by a single PZT, the actuator has the potential to be constructed compactly.

  17. Magnetostrictive Actuators For Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1996-01-01

    Linear-translation motors containing magnetostrictive actuator elements proposed for use in making fine position adjustments on scientific instruments at temperatures from near absolute zero to room temperature. Actuators produce small increments of linear motion and operate in "set-and-forget" mode in sense they automatically lock themselves against motion when power not applied. Do not consume or dissipate power when stationary. Proposed linear-translation motors also made to produce large maximum displacements.

  18. Sensors, actuators, and smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiler-McKinstry, S.; Newnham, R. E.

    1993-04-01

    Electroceramic materials are presently noted to have a wide array of sensing and actuating functions which can be incorporated into smart-material designs. The sensor types extend to temperature, piezoelectricity and piezoresistivity, and the presence of oxygen. Attention is given to the prospects for developing composite smart materials that encompass various sensing and actuating functions; these may ultimately reach a level of complexity and sophistication that may be termed 'biomimetric' in its approximation to the functions of the living tissues of organisms.

  19. Parylene coated carbon nanotube actuators for tactile stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubak, Grzegorz; Ansaldo, Alberto; Gendron, David; Brayda, Luca; Ceseracciu, Luca; Ricci, Davide

    2015-04-01

    Ionic liquid/carbon nanotube based actuators have been constantly improved in recent years owing to their suitability for applications related to human-machine interaction and robotics thanks to their light-weight and low voltage operation. However, while great attention has been paid to the development of better electrodes and electrolytes, no adequate efforts were made to develop actuators to be used in direct contact with the human skin. Herein, we present our approach, based on the use of parylene-C coating. Indeed, owning to its physicochemical properties such as high dielectric strength, resistance to solvents, biological and chemical inactivity/inertness, parylene fulfils the requirements for use in biocompatible actuator fabrication. In this paper, we study the influence of the parylene coating on the actuator performance. To do so, we analyzed its mechanical and electrochemical properties. We looked into the role of parylene as a protection layer that can prevent alteration of the actuator performance likely caused by external conditions. In order to complete our study, we designed a haptic device and investigated the generated force, displacement and energy usage.

  20. Magnetic Actuation of Self-Assembled DNA Hinges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauback, S.; Mattioli, K.; Armstrong, M.; Miller, C.; Pease, C.; Castro, C.; Sooryakumar, R.

    DNA nanotechnology offers a broad range of applications spanning from the creation of nanoscale devices, motors and nanoparticle templates to the development of precise drug delivery systems. Central to advancing this technology is the ability to actuate or reconfigure structures in real time, which is currently achieved primarily by DNA strand displacement yielding slow actuation times (about 1-10min). Here we exploit superparamagnetic beads to magnetically actuate DNA structures which also provides a system to measure forces associated with molecular interactions. DNA nanodevices are folded using DNA origami, whereby a long single-stranded DNA is folded into a precise compact geometry using hundreds of short oligonucleotides. Our DNA nanodevice is a nanohinge from which rod shaped DNA nanostructures are polymerized into micron-scale filaments forming handles for actuation. By functionalizing one arm of the hinge and the filament ends, the hinge can be attached to a surface while still allowing an arm to rotate and the filaments can be labeled with magnetic beads enabling the hinge to be actuated almost instantaneously by external magnetic fields. These results lay the groundwork to establish real-time manipulation and direct force application of DNA constructs.

  1. Characterization of conjugated polymer actuation under cerebral physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Eugene Dariush; Smela, Elisabeth

    2014-07-01

    Conjugated polymer actuators have potential use in implantable neural interface devices for modulating the position of electrode sites within brain tissue or guiding insertion of neural probes along curved trajectories. The actuation of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) is characterized to ascertain whether it can be employed in the cerebral environment. Microfabricated bilayer beams are electrochemically cycled at either 22 or 37 °C in aqueous NaDBS or in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). Nearly all the ions in aCSF are exchanged into the PPy-the cations Na(+) , K(+) , Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , as well as the anion PO4 (3-) ; Cl(-) is not present. Nevertheless, deflections in aCSF are comparable to those in NaDBS and they are monotonic with oxidation level: strain increases upon reduction, with no reversal of motion despite the mixture of ionic charges and valences being exchanged. Actuation depends on temperature. Upon warming, the cyclic voltammograms show additional peaks and an increase of 70% in the consumed charge. Bending is, however, much less affected: strain increases somewhat (6%-13%) but remains monotonic, and deflections shift (up to 20%). These results show how the actuation environment must be taken into account, and demonstrate proof of concept for actuated implantable neural interfaces. PMID:24574101

  2. Characterization of Conjugated Polymer Actuation under Cerebral Physiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvar, Eugene Dariush; Smela, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated polymer actuators have potential use in implantable neural interface devices for modulating the position of electrode sites within brain tissue or guiding insertion of neural probes along curved trajectories. The actuation of polypyrrole (PPy) doped with dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS) was characterized to ascertain whether it could be employed in the cerebral environment. Microfabricated bilayer beams were electrochemically cycled at either 22 or 37 °C in aqueous NaDBS or in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF). Nearly all the ions in aCSF were exchanged into the PPy – the cations Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, as well as the anion PO43−; Cl− was not present. Nevertheless, deflections in aCSF were comparable to those in NaDBS and they were monotonic with oxidation level: strain increased upon reduction, with no reversal of motion despite the mixture of ionic charges and valences being exchanged. Actuation depended on temperature. Upon warming, the cyclic voltammograms showed additional peaks and an increase of 70% in the consumed charge. Bending was, however, much less affected: strain increased somewhat (6-13%) but remained monotonic, and deflections shifted (up to 20%). These results show how the actuation environment must be taken into account, and demonstrate proof of concept for actuated implantable neural interfaces. PMID:24574101

  3. Anisotropic Laminar Piezocomposite Actuator Incorporating Machined PMN-PT Single Crystal Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Inman, Daniel J.; Lloyd, Justin M.; High, James W.

    2006-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a flexible, laminar, anisotropic piezoelectric composite actuator utilizing machined PMN-32%PT single crystal fibers is presented. The device consists of a layer of rectangular single crystal piezoelectric fibers in an epoxy matrix, packaged between interdigitated electrode polyimide films. Quasistatic free-strain measurements of the single crystal device are compared with measurements from geometrically identical specimens incorporating polycrystalline PZT-5A and PZT-5H piezoceramic fibers. Free-strain actuation of the single crystal actuator at low bipolar electric fields (+/- 250 V/mm) is approximately 400% greater than that of the baseline PZT-5A piezoceramic device, and 200% greater than that of the PZT-5H device. Free-strain actuation under high unipolar electric fields (0-4kV/mm) is approximately 200% of the PZT-5A baseline device, and 150% of the PZT-5H alternate piezoceramic device. Performance increases at low field are qualitatively consistent with predicted increases based on scaling the low-field d33 piezoelectric constants of the respective piezoelectric materials. High-field increases are much less than scaled d33 estimates, but appear consistent with high-field freestrain measurements reported for similar bulk single-crystal and piezoceramic compositions. Measurements of single crystal actuator capacitance and coupling coefficient are also provided. These properties were poorly predicted using scaled bulk material dielectric and coupling coefficient data. Rules-of-mixtures calculations of the effective elastic properties of the single crystal device and estimated actuation work energy densities are also presented. Results indicate longitudinal stiffnesses significantly lower (50% less) than either piezoceramic device. This suggests that single-crystal piezocomposite actuators will be best suited to low induced-stress, high strain and deflection applications.

  4. Anisotropic Piezocomposite Actuator Incorporating Machined PMN-PT Single Crystal Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Inman, Daniel J.; Lloyd, Justin M.; High, James W.

    2004-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a flexible, planar, anisotropic piezoelectric composite actuator utilizing machined PMN-32%PT single crystal fibers is presented. The device consists of a layer of rectangular single crystal piezoelectric fibers in an epoxy matrix, packaged between interdigitated electrode polyimide films. Quasistatic free-strain measurements of the single crystal device are compared with measurements from geometrically identical specimens incorporating polycrystalline PZT-5A and PZT-5H piezoceramic fibers. Free-strain actuation of the single crystal actuator at low bipolar electric fields (+/- 250 V/mm) is approximately 400% greater than that of the baseline PZT-5A piezoceramic device, and 200% greater than that of the PZT-5H device. Free-strain actuation under high unipolar electric fields (0-4kV/mm) is approximately 200% of the PZT-5A baseline device, and 150% of the PZT-5H alternate piezoceramic device. Performance increases at low field are qualitatively consistent with predicted increases based on scaling the low-field d(sub 33) piezoelectric constants of the respective piezoelectric materials. High-field increases are much less than scaled d(sub 33) estimates, but appear consistent with high-field freestrain measurements reported for similar bulk single-crystal and piezoceramic compositions. Measurements of single crystal actuator capacitance and coupling coefficient are also provided. These properties were poorly predicted using scaled bulk material dielectric and coupling coefficient data. Rules-of-mixtures calculations of the effective elastic properties of the single crystal device and estimated actuation work energy densities are also presented. Results indicate longitudinal stiffnesses significantly lower (50% less) than either piezoceramic device. This suggests that single-crystal piezocomposite actuators will be best suited to low induced-stress, high strain and deflection applications.

  5. Large Scale Magnetostrictive Valve Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A.; Holleman, Elizabeth; Eddleman, David

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Valves, Actuators and Ducts Design and Development Branch developed a large scale magnetostrictive valve actuator. The potential advantages of this technology are faster, more efficient valve actuators that consume less power and provide precise position control and deliver higher flow rates than conventional solenoid valves. Magnetostrictive materials change dimensions when a magnetic field is applied; this property is referred to as magnetostriction. Magnetostriction is caused by the alignment of the magnetic domains in the material s crystalline structure and the applied magnetic field lines. Typically, the material changes shape by elongating in the axial direction and constricting in the radial direction, resulting in no net change in volume. All hardware and testing is complete. This paper will discuss: the potential applications of the technology; overview of the as built actuator design; discuss problems that were uncovered during the development testing; review test data and evaluate weaknesses of the design; and discuss areas for improvement for future work. This actuator holds promises of a low power, high load, proportionally controlled actuator for valves requiring 440 to 1500 newtons load.

  6. Air Ambient-Operated pNIPAM-Based Flexible Actuators Stimulated by Human Body Temperature and Sunlight.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Kanao, Kenichiro; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2015-05-27

    Harnessing a natural power source such as the human body temperature or sunlight should realize ultimate low-power devices. In particular, macroscale and flexible actuators that do not require an artificial power source have tremendous potential. Here we propose and demonstrate electrically powerless polymer-based actuators operated at ambient conditions using a packaging technique in which the stimulating power source is produced by heat from the human body or sunlight. The actuating angle, force, and reliability are discussed as functions of temperature and exposure to sunlight. Furthermore, a wearable device platform and a smart curtain actuated by the temperature of human skin and sunlight, respectively, are demonstrated as the first proof-of-concepts. These nature-powered actuators should realize a new class of ultimate low-power devices.

  7. LC Circuits for Diagnosing Embedded Piezoelectric Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattin, Richard L.; Fox, Robert Lee; Moses, Robert W.; Shams, Qamar A.

    2005-01-01

    A recently invented method of nonintrusively detecting faults in piezoelectric devices involves measurement of the resonance frequencies of inductor capacitor (LC) resonant circuits. The method is intended especially to enable diagnosis of piezoelectric sensors, actuators, and sensor/actuators that are embedded in structures and/or are components of multilayer composite material structures.

  8. Quick actuating closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, III, Dorsey E. (Inventor); Updike, deceased, Benjamin T. (Inventor); Allred, Johnny W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quick actuating closure for a pressure vessel 80 in which a wedge ring 30 with a conical outer surface 31 is moved forward to force shear blocks 40, with conical inner surfaces 41, radially outward to lock an end closure plug 70 within an opening 81 in the pressure vessel 80. A seal ring 60 and a preload ramp 50 sit between the shear blocks 40 and the end closure plug 70 to provide a backup sealing capability. Conical surfaces 44 and 55 of the preload ramp 50 and the shear blocks 40 interact to force the seal ring 60 into shoulders 73 and 85 in the end closure plug 70 and opening 81 to form a tight seal. The end closure plug 70 is unlocked by moving the wedge ring 30 rearward, which causes T-bars 32 of the wedge ring 30 riding within T -slots 42 of the shear blocks 40 to force them radially inward. The end closure plug 70 is then removed, allowing access to the interior of the pressure vessel 80.

  9. Downhole hydraulic actuated pump

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, G.K.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a downhole hydraulically actuated pump assembly of the type having a main housing within which an engine and pump is enclosed; a connecting rod, an engine piston, a pump plunger, means by which the engine and connecting rod reciprocate the pump plunger and thereby produces fluid; the main housing has a lower end having a formation fluid inlet; and upper end having a power fluid inlet; and, a produced fluid outlet; the plunger divides one marginal end of the housing into upper and lower production chambers; the lower end of the connecting rod is hollow and extends through the plunger into fluid communication with the formation fluid inlet to provide a source of formation fluid for the upper and lower production chambers; a traveling value assembly contained within the plunger and arranged to transfer formation fluid from the hollow rod, through the plunger, and into the upper and lower production chambers, respectively, as the plunger upstrokes and downstrokes; produced fluid valve means by which fluid flows from the upper and lower production chambers and through the produced fluid outlet.

  10. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Mahrholz, T.; Wierach, P.; Sinapius, M.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750-2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs.

  11. Impact of Reflow on the Output Characteristics of Piezoelectric Microelectromechanical System Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Okada, Hironao; Masuda, Takashi; Maeda, Ryutaro; Itoh, Toshihiro

    2012-09-01

    An animal health monitoring system and a wireless sensor node aimed at preventing the spread of animal-transmitted diseases and improving pastoral efficiency which are especially suitable for chickens, were developed. The sensor node uses a piezoelectric microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device and an event-driven system that is activated by the movements of a chicken. The piezoelectric MEMS device has two functions: a) it measures the activity of a chicken and b) switches the micro-control unit (MCU) of the wireless sensor node from the sleep mode. The piezoelectric MEMS device is required to produce high output voltages when the chicken moves. However, after the piezoelectric MEMS device was reflowed to the wireless sensor node, the output voltages of the piezoelectric MEMS device decreased. The main reason for this might be the loss of residual polarization, which is affected by the thermal load during the reflow process. After the reflow process, we were not able to apply a voltage to the piezoelectric MEMS device; thus, the piezoelectric output voltage was not increased by repoling the piezoelectric MEMS device. To address the thermal load of the reflow process, we established a thermal poling treatment, which achieves a higher temperature than the reflow process. We found that on increasing the thermal poling temperature, the piezoelectric output voltages did not decreased low significantly. Thus, we considered that a thermal poling temperature higher than that of the reflow process prevents the piezoelectric output voltage reduction caused by the thermal load.

  12. The actuator design and the experimental tests of a new technology large deformable mirror for visible wavelengths adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Ciro; Agapito, Guido; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Carbonaro, Luca; Marignetti, Fabrizio; De Santis, Enzo; Biliotti, Valdemaro; Riccardi, Armando

    2012-07-01

    Recently, Adaptive Secondary Mirrors showed excellent on-sky results in the Near Infrared wavelengths. They currently provide 30mm inter-actuator spacing and about 1 kHz bandwidth. Pushing these devices to be operated at visible wavelengths is a challenging task. Compared to the current systems, working in the infrared, the more demanding requirements are the higher spatial resolution and the greater correction bandwidth. In fact, the turbulence scale is shorter and the parameter variation is faster. Typically, the former is not larger than 25 mm (projected on the secondary mirror) and the latter is 2 kHz, therefore the actuator has to be more slender and faster than the current ones. With a soft magnetic composite core, a dual-stator and a single-mover, VRALA, the actuator discussed in this paper, attains unprecedented performances with a negligible thermal impact. Pre-shaping the current required to deliver a given stroke greatly simplifies the control system, whose output supplies the current generator. As the inductance depends on the mover position, the electronics of this generator, provided with an inductance measure circuit, works also as a displacement sensor, supplying the control system with an accurate feed-back signal. A preliminary prototype, built according to the several FEA thermo-magnetic analyses, has undergone some preliminary laboratory tests. The results of these checks, matching the design results in terms of power and force, show that the the magnetic design addresses the severe specifications.

  13. The Impact of Grain Boundaries on the Reliability and Performance of Polysilicon-Based Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana, Bhattacharya S.

    Three different polysilicon-based device structures have been studied, each exploiting some property of the grain boundaries in polysilicon: electrical, diffusion or microstructural. In the first sub-task, hot-carrier-induced degradation of polysilicon-on-oxide, LDD P-MOSFET's that find application as load elements in 3-D integrated CMOS SRAM's has been studied. It has been shown that in addition to hot-electron trapping that occurs similar to that reported in bulk P -MOSFET's, polysilicon P-MOSFET's show a new hot-carrier -induced degradation mechanism due to the breaking of Si -H bonds by hot carriers, which increases the grain boundary trap density at the H-passivated grain boundaries in polysilicon. A new model based on Thermionic Field Emission (TFE) via grain boundary traps has been developed to explain the temperature and bias dependence of the leakage current, which is not described by the existing model based on field emission. In the second sub-task, ion-implanted polysilicon is used as a solid diffusion source and a self-aligned emitter contact to form polysilicon emitter bipolar transistors. The impact of ex situ chemical cleans such as a RCA clean and RCA clean followed by a HF dip prior to polysilicon deposition has been studied. It has been shown that the RCA clean by itself is not desirable because of the poor controllability of electrical parameters as well as the high emitter resistance resulting from the thicker interfacial oxide compared to that obtained with the HF-clean. The use of an in situ clean using a cluster tool for polysilicon deposition to incorporate controllable amounts of oxide at the polysilicon/silicon interface has been explored to show for the first time that by having increasing thicknesses of interfacial oxide, and subsequently annealing to partially break up the oxide, one can obtain improved current gains without paying a penalty of higher emitter resistance. Finally, a new double polysilicon-gate-based P -I-N MOSFET

  14. Torque-Limiting Manipulation Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A device for manipulating a workpiece in space includes a fixture, a stanchion assembly, a manipulation mechanism, an actuation mechanism, and a reaction mechanism. The fixture has an end onto which the workpiece affixes. The stanchion assembly has an upper and a lower end. The manipulation mechanism connects the fixture and the upper end of the stanchion assembly. The lower end of the stanchion assembly mounts, via probe and a socket, to a structure. The actuation mechanism operably connects to the manipulation mechanism, and moves the fixture in space. The reaction mechanism provides a point through which force inputs into the actuation mechanism may react.

  15. Design and driving characteristics of a novel ‘pusher’ type piezoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a novel ‘pusher’ type piezoelectric actuator based on clamping blocks, where a solid mover can be driven at a high resolution and with a designed stroke of 4 mm. The working principle of the actuator is presented and the design process of its key component ‘stator’ is described. Via finite element simulation, the rationality of the structure of the device was analyzed. The prototype actuator was manufactured and its main performance was tested. The driving characteristics of the proposed actuator produced the following experimental results. The movement resolution was 31.5 nm, the maximum speed was 248 μm s-1 and the maximum loading capacity was 123.5 N, verifying that it could meet the needs of precise positioning with a high resolution and a large load capacity. The actuator was also found to achieve various step speeds when the driving voltage and working frequency were changed.

  16. Actuation Using Piezoelectric Materials: Application in Augmenters, Energy Harvesters, and Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenoehrl, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Piezoelectric actuators are used in many manipulation, movement, and mobility applications as well as transducers and sensors. When used at the resonance frequencies of the piezoelectric stack, the actuator performs at its maximum actuation capability. In this Space Grant internship, three applications of piezoelectric actuators were investigated including hammering augmenters of rotary drills, energy harvesters, and piezo-motors. The augmenter shows improved drill performance over rotation only. The energy harvesters rely on moving fluid to convert mechanical energy into electrical power. Specific designs allow the harvesters more freedom to move, which creates more power. The motor uses the linear movement of the actuator with a horn applied to the side of a rotor to create rotational motion. Friction inhibits this motion and is to be minimized for best performance. Tests and measurements were made during this internship to determine the requirements for optimal performance of the studied mechanisms and devices.

  17. REACTOR CONTROL DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, H.B.; Weiss, A.A.

    1959-08-18

    A shadow control device for controlling a nuclear reactor is described. The device comprises a series of hollow neutron-absorbing elements arranged in groups, each element having a cavity for substantially housing an adjoining element and a longitudinal member for commonly supporting the groups of elements. Longitudinal actuation of the longitudinal member distributes the elements along its entire length in which position maximum worth is achieved.

  18. Impacts of Co doping on ZnO transparent switching memory device characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanjuntak, Firman Mangasa; Prasad, Om Kumar; Panda, Debashis; Lin, Chun-An; Tsai, Tsung-Ling; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The resistive switching characteristics of indium tin oxide (ITO)/Zn1-xCoxO/ITO transparent resistive memory devices were investigated. An appropriate amount of cobalt dopant in ZnO resistive layer demonstrated sufficient memory window and switching stability. In contrast, pure ZnO devices demonstrated a poor memory window, and using an excessive dopant concentration led to switching instability. To achieve suitable memory performance, relying only on controlling defect concentrations is insufficient; the grain growth orientation of the resistive layer must also be considered. Stable endurance with an ON/OFF ratio of more than one order of magnitude during 5000 cycles confirmed that the Co-doped ZnO device is a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory application. Additionally, fully transparent devices with a high transmittance of up to 90% at wavelength of 550 nm have been fabricated.

  19. Miniature High-Force, Long-Stroke SMA Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummin, Mark A.; Donakowski, William; Cohen, Howard

    2008-01-01

    at greater cycle speeds, and have stronger housings that can withstand greater externally applied forces and impacts. The main novel features of the improved SMA actuators are the following: 1) The ends of the wires are anchored in compact crimps made from short steel tubes. Each wire end is inserted in a tube, the tube is flattened between planar jaws to make the tube grip the wire, the tube is compressed to a slight U-cross-section deformation to strengthen the grip, then the crimp is welded onto one of the actuator stages. The pull strength of a typical crimp is about 125 N -- comparable to the strength of the SMA wire and greater than the typical pull strengths of wire-end anchors in prior SMA actuators. Greater pull strength is one of the keys to achievement of higher actuation force; 2) For greater strength and resistance to impacts, housings are milled from aluminum instead of being made from polymers. Each housing is made from two pieces in a clamshell configuration. The pieces are anodized to reduce sliding friction; 3) Stages are made stronger (to bear greater compression loads without excessive flexing) by making them from steel sheets thicker than those used in prior SMA actuators. The stages contain recessed pockets to accommodate the crimps. Recessing the pockets helps to keep overall dimensions as small as possible; and, 4) UHT SMA wires are used to satisfy the higher-speed/higher-temperature requirement.

  20. IPMC actuator array as a 3D haptic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masanori; Mazzone, Andrea; Piffaretti, Filippo; Gassert, Roger; Nakao, Masayuki; Bleuler, Hannes

    2005-05-01

    Based on the concept of Mazzone et al., we have designed a novel system to be used simultaneously as an input and output device for designing, presenting, or recognizing objects in three-dimensional space. Unlike state of the art stereoscopic display technologies that generate a virtual image of a three-dimensional object, the proposed system, a "digital clay" like device, physically imitates the desired object. The object can not only be touched and explored intuitively but also deform itself physically. In order to succeed in developing such a deformable structure, self-actuating ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) materials are proposed. IPMC is a type of electro active polymer (EAP) and has recently been drawing much attention. It has high force to weight ratio and shape flexibility, making it ideal for robotic applications. This paper introduces the first steps and results in the attempt of developing such a structure. A strip consisting of four actuators arranged in line was fabricated and evaluated, showing promising capabilities in deforming two-dimensionally. A simple model to simulate the deformation of an IPMC actuator using finite element methods (FEM) is also proposed and compared with the experimental results. The model can easily be implemented into computer aided engineering (CAE) software. This will expand the application possibilities of IPMCs. Furthermore, a novel method for creating multiple actuators on one membrane with a laser machining tool is introduced.

  1. A swimming robot actuated by living muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Herr, Hugh; Dennis, Robert G

    2004-10-28

    Biomechatronics is the integration of biological components with artificial devices, in which the biological component confers a significant functional capability to the system, and the artificial component provides specific cellular and tissue interfaces that promote the maintenance and functional adaptation of the biological component. Based upon functional performance, muscle is potentially an excellent mechanical actuator, but the larger challenge of developing muscle-actuated, biomechatronic devices poses many scientific and engineering challenges. As a demonstratory proof of concept, we designed, built, and characterized a swimming robot actuated by two explanted frog semitendinosus muscles and controlled by an embedded microcontroller. Using open loop stimulation protocols, the robot performed basic swimming maneuvers such as starting, stopping, turning (turning radius ~400 mm) and straight-line swimming (max speed >1/3 body lengths/second). A broad spectrum antibiotic/antimycotic ringer solution surrounded the muscle actuators for long term maintenance, ex vivo. The robot swam for a total of 4 hours over a 42 hour lifespan (10% duty cycle) before its velocity degraded below 75% of its maximum. The development of functional biomechatronic prototypes with integrated musculoskeletal tissues is the first critical step toward the long term objective of controllable, adaptive and robust biomechatronic robots and prostheses.

  2. Compliant composite electrodes and large strain bistable actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sungryul; Yu, Zhibin; Niu, Xiaofan; Hu, Weili; Li, Lu; Brochu, Paul; Pei, Qibing

    2012-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) and bistable electroactive polymers (BSEP) both require compliant electrodes with rubbery elasticity and high conductivity at large strains. Stretchable opto-electronic devices additionally require the compliant electrodes to be optically transparent. Many candidate materials have been investigated. We report a new approach to mechanically robust, stretchable compliant electrodes. A facile in-situ composite synthesis and transfer technique is employed, and the resulting composite electrodes retain the high surface conductivity of the original conductive network formed by nanowires or nanotubes, while exhibiting the mechanical flexibility of the matrix polymer. The composite electrodes have high transparency and low surface roughness useful for the fabrication of polymer thinfilm electronic devices. The new electrodes are suitable for high-strain actuation, as a complaint resistive heating element to administer the temperature of shape memory polymers, and as the charge injection electrodes for flexible/stretchable polymer light emitting diodes. Bistable electroactive polymers employing the composite electrodes can be actuated to large strains via heating-actuation-cooling cycles.

  3. Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD) response to head impacts and potential implications for athletic headgear testing.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Adam; Benzel, Edward; Miele, Vincent; Morr, Douglas; Prakash, Vikas

    2012-09-01

    The Hybrid III 50th percentile male anthropomorphic test device (ATD) is the most widely used human impact testing surrogate and has historically been used in automotive or military testing. More recently, this ATD is finding use in applications evaluating athletic helmet protectivity, quantifying head impact dosage and estimating injury risk. But ATD head-neck response has not been quantified in omnidirectional athletic-type head impacts absent axial preload. It is probable that headgear injury reduction that can be quantified in a laboratory, including in American football, boxing, hockey, lacrosse and soccer, is related to a number of interrelated kinetic and kinematic factors, such as head center of gravity linear acceleration, head angular acceleration, head angular velocity, occipito-cervical mechanics and neck stiffness. Therefore, we characterized ATD head-neck dynamic response to direct head impacts in a series of front, oblique front and lateral head impacts. Key findings were: (1) impacts producing highest ATD resultant center of gravity linear acceleration resulted in the lowest resultant occipito-cervical spine bending moment/force. (2) Resultant ATD head angular velocity and angular acceleration did not appear coupled to impact direction at lower impact energy levels; these parameters were coupled at higher energy levels. (3) The ATD had progressively increasing occipito-cervical stiffness in extension, torsion and lateral bending, respectively. Because the ATD neck influenced head and neck impact dosage parameters, testing agencies, manufacturers and researchers should consider using the Hybrid III head form attached to a neck as a means to quantify head and neck injury risks as opposed to systems that do not utilize a neck. This heightened understanding of Hybrid III ATD head-neck response, and consideration of order of stiffest axes in the lateral, oblique and extension directions, respectively, should aid in the development of head and neck injury

  4. Wireless Displacement Sensing of Micromachined Spiral-Coil Actuator Using Resonant Frequency Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; AbuZaiter, Alaa; Schlosser, Colin; Bycraft, Brad; Takahata, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a method that enables real-time displacement monitoring and control of micromachined resonant-type actuators using wireless radiofrequency (RF). The method is applied to an out-of-plane, spiral-coil microactuator based on shape-memory-alloy (SMA). The SMA spiral coil forms an inductor-capacitor resonant circuit that is excited using external RF magnetic fields to thermally actuate the coil. The actuation causes a shift in the circuit's resonance as the coil is displaced vertically, which is wirelessly monitored through an external antenna to track the displacements. Controlled actuation and displacement monitoring using the developed method is demonstrated with the microfabricated device. The device exhibits a frequency sensitivity to displacement of 10 kHz/μm or more for a full out-of-plane travel range of 466 μm and an average actuation velocity of up to 155 μm/s. The method described permits the actuator to have a self-sensing function that is passively operated, thereby eliminating the need for separate sensors and batteries on the device, thus realizing precise control while attaining a high level of miniaturization in the device. PMID:25014100

  5. Development of in-series piezoelectric bimorph bending beam actuators for active flow control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Wilfred K.; Clingman, Dan J.; Amitay, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Piezoelectric materials have long been used for active flow control purposes in aerospace applications to increase the effectiveness of aerodynamic surfaces on aircraft, wind turbines, and more. Piezoelectric actuators are an appropriate choice due to their low mass, small dimensions, simplistic design, and frequency response. This investigation involves the development of piezoceramic-based actuators with two bimorphs placed in series. Here, the main desired characteristic was the achievable displacement amplitude at specific driving voltages and frequencies. A parametric study was performed, in which actuators with varying dimensions were fabricated and tested. These devices were actuated with a sinusoidal waveform, resulting in an oscillating platform on which to mount active flow control devices, such as dynamic vortex generators. The main quantification method consisted of driving these devices with different voltages and frequencies to determine their free displacement, blocking force, and frequency response. It was found that resonance frequency increased with shorter and thicker actuators, while free displacement increased with longer and thinner actuators. Integration of the devices into active flow control test modules is noted. In addition to physical testing, a quasi-static analytical model was developed and compared with experimental data, which showed close correlation for both free displacement and blocking force.

  6. Wireless displacement sensing of micromachined spiral-coil actuator using resonant frequency tracking.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; AbuZaiter, Alaa; Schlosser, Colin; Bycraft, Brad; Takahata, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a method that enables real-time displacement monitoring and control of micromachined resonant-type actuators using wireless radiofrequency (RF). The method is applied to an out-of-plane, spiral-coil microactuator based on shape-memory-alloy (SMA). The SMA spiral coil forms an inductor-capacitor resonant circuit that is excited using external RF magnetic fields to thermally actuate the coil. The actuation causes a shift in the circuit's resonance as the coil is displaced vertically, which is wirelessly monitored through an external antenna to track the displacements. Controlled actuation and displacement monitoring using the developed method is demonstrated with the microfabricated device. The device exhibits a frequency sensitivity to displacement of 10 kHz/µm or more for a full out-of-plane travel range of 466 µm and an average actuation velocity of up to 155 µm/s. The method described permits the actuator to have a self-sensing function that is passively operated, thereby eliminating the need for separate sensors and batteries on the device, thus realizing precise control while attaining a high level of miniaturization in the device.

  7. Biocompatible Silk-Poly(Pyrrole) Composite Trilayer Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengel, Carly; Bradshaw, Nathan; Severt, Sean; Murphy, Amanda; Leger, Janelle

    Biocompatible materials capable of controlled actuation are in high demand for use in biomedical applications such as dynamic tissue scaffolding, valves, and steerable surgical tools. Conducting polymers (CPs) have some desirable traits for use as an actuator, such as the ability to operate in biologically relevant fluids and responsiveness to low voltages. However CPs alone are limited due to their brittle nature and poor solubility. Recently we have shown that a composite material of silk and the CP poly(pyrrole) (PPy) shows promising characteristics as an actuator; it is mechanically robust as well as fully biocompatible. Initial proof-of-concept experiments demonstrated that these composites bend under an applied voltage (or current) using a simple bilayer device. Here we present trilayer devices composed of two silk-PPy composite layers separated by an insulating silk layer. This configuration results in more charge is passed in comparison to the analogous bilayer system, as well as a more sustainable current response through cycling, resulting in a larger angle of deflection per volt applied. In addition, the motion of the trilayer devices is more symmetric than that of the bilayer analogs, resulting in a more repeatable movement. We will discuss the fabrication and characterization of these devices, as well as their performance and future applications of this technology.

  8. Analysis, design, and testing of a low cost, direct force command linear proof mass actuator for structural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Shelley, Stuart; Jacobson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the design, analysis, and test of a low cost, linear proof mass actuator for vibration control is presented. The actuator is based on a linear induction coil from a large computer disk drive. Such disk drives are readily available and provide the linear actuator, current feedback amplifier, and power supply for a highly effective, yet inexpensive, experimental laboratory actuator. The device is implemented as a force command input system, and the performance is virtually the same as other, more sophisticated, linear proof mass systems.

  9. Variable Frequency Diverter Actuation for Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.

    2006-01-01

    The design and development of an actively controlled fluidic actuator for flow control applications is explored. The basic device, with one input and two output channels, takes advantage of the Coanda effect to force a fluid jet to adhere to one of two axi-symmetric surfaces. The resultant flow is bi-stable, producing a constant flow from one output channel, until a disturbance force applied at the control point causes the flow to switch to the alternate output channel. By properly applying active control the output flows can be manipulated to provide a high degree of modulation over a wide and variable range of frequency and duty cycle. In this study the momentary operative force is applied by small, high speed isolation valves of which several different types are examined. The active fluidic diverter actuator is shown to work in several configurations including that in which the operator valves are referenced to atmosphere as well as to a source common with the power stream.

  10. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-17

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis. PMID:26715211

  11. Probing Cell Deformability via Acoustically Actuated Bubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuliang; Nama, Nitesh; Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Huang, Po-Hsun; Zhao, Chenglong; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-17

    An acoustically actuated, bubble-based technique is developed to investigate the deformability of cells suspended in microfluidic devices. A microsized bubble is generated by an optothermal effect near the targeted cells, which are suspended in a microfluidic chamber. Subsequently, acoustic actuation is employed to create localized acoustic streaming. In turn, the streaming flow results in hydrodynamic forces that deform the cells in situ. The deformability of the cells is indicative of their mechanical properties. The method in this study measures mechanical biomarkers from multiple cells in a single experiment, and it can be conveniently integrated with other bioanalysis and drug-screening platforms. Using this technique, the mean deformability of tens of HeLa, HEK, and HUVEC cells is measured to distinguish their mechanical properties. HeLa cells are deformed upon treatment with Cytochalasin. The technique also reveals the deformability of each subpopulation in a mixed, heterogeneous cell sample by the use of both fluorescent markers and mechanical biomarkers. The technique in this study, apart from being relevant to cell biology, will also enable biophysical cellular diagnosis.

  12. Visualization of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: Impact of devices and anatomy.

    PubMed

    Benscoter, Mark A; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2015-11-26

    Endocardial access to the left atrium is commonly achieved to treat patients with atrial fibrillation, using different device delivery systems for cardiac ablation. But the large variation in human anatomy presses the limits of existing medical devices. In this unique study, we directly visualized the device-tissue interface in fresh reanimated human hearts using Visible Heart(®) methodologies. Our goal was to better understand any opportunities to improve therapeutic approaches. The visual images obtained in this study (also featured in this article) allow a more intimate grasp of the key steps required in various ablation procedures, as well as some limitations of current device designs. These images show the potential risks of conducting transseptal punctures and the difficulties of placing catheter tips in certain scenarios (e.g., when creating circumferential lesions); they also demonstrate potential problems that could occur while attempting to place catheter tips on such anatomies like the mitral isthmus. In our analysis of these images, we focus on where enhancements are needed to refine device functionality.

  13. The LDCM actuator for vibration suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Eric N.; Lindner, Douglas K.

    1988-01-01

    A linear dc motor (LDCM) has been proposed as an actuator for the COFS I mast and the COFS program ground test Mini-Mast. The basic principles of operation of the LDCM as an actuator for vibration suppression in large flexible structures are reviewed. Because of force and stroke limitations, control loops are required to stabilize the actuator, which results in a non-standard actuator-plant configuration. A simulation model that includes LDCM actuator control loops and a finite element model of the Mast is described, with simulation results showing the excitation capability of the actuator.

  14. Actuator selection for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Ruan, Mifang

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses the process of selecting the actuator locations and the determination of the required number of actuators for large space structures. The selection is based on the definitions of the degree of controllability, the independence of actuators, and the effectiveness of the individual actuators. An algorithm is developed that can be used for the selection of the essential number of actuators and for finding some defects of the system, such as the insuffiency of the available actuator locations for effective control of the whole system or a too crowded frequency distribution. The efficiency of the algorithm was demonstrated by an application to the Space Station.

  15. Chord-wise Tip Actuation on Flexible Flapping Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nathan; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of low aspect ratio flapping plates are strongly influenced by the interaction between tip and edge vortices. This has led to the development of tip actuation mechanisms which bend the tip towards the root of the plate in the span-wise direction during oscillation to investigate its impact. In our current work, a tip actuation mechanism to bend a flat plate's two free corners towards one another in the chord-wise direction is developed using a shape memory alloy. The aerodynamic forces and resulting flow field are investigated from dynamically altering the tip chord-wise curvature while flapping. The frequency of oscillation, stroke angle, flexibility, and tip actuation timing are independently varied to determine their individual effects. These results will further the fundamental understanding of flapping wing aerodynamics. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE 1144469.

  16. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays

    PubMed Central

    Lu, S. G.; Chen, X.; Levard, T.; Diglio, P. J.; Gorny, L. J.; Rahn, C. D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly. PMID:26079628

  17. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S. G.; Chen, X.; Levard, T.; Diglio, P. J.; Gorny, L. J.; Rahn, C. D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-06-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly.

  18. Large Displacement in Relaxor Ferroelectric Terpolymer Blend Derived Actuators Using Al Electrode for Braille Displays.

    PubMed

    Lu, S G; Chen, X; Levard, T; Diglio, P J; Gorny, L J; Rahn, C D; Zhang, Q M

    2015-06-16

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) based polymers are attractive for applications for artificial muscles, high energy density storage devices etc. Recently these polymers have been found great potential for being used as actuators for refreshable full-page Braille displays for visually impaired people in terms of light weight, miniaturized size, and larger displacement, compared with currently used lead zirconate titanate ceramic actuators. The applied voltages of published polymer actuators, however, cannot be reduced to meet the requirements of using city power. Here, we report the polymer actuator generating quite large displacement and blocking force at a voltage close to the city power. Our embodiments also show good self-healing performance and disuse of lead-containing material, which makes the Braille device safer, more reliable and more environment-friendly.

  19. Active flow control over a backward-facing step using plasma actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruisi, R.; Zare-Behtash, H.; Kontis, K.; Erfani, R.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the more stringent aviation regulations on fuel consumption and noise reduction, the interest for smaller and mechanically less complex devices for flow separation control has increased. Plasma actuators are currently among the most studied typology of devices for active flow control purposes due to their small size and lightweight. In this study, a single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) actuator is used on a backward-facing step to assess its effects on the separated turbulent shear layer and its reattachment location. A range of actuating modulation frequencies, related to the natural frequencies of shear layer instability (flapping) and vortex shedding instability, are examined. The particle image velocimetry technique is used to analyse the flow over the step and the reattachment location. The bulk-flow experiments show negligible effects both on the shear layer and on the reattachment location for every frequency considered, and the actuator is not able to induce a sufficient velocity increase at the step separation point.

  20. Dielectric elastomer actuators with enhanced permittivity and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böse, Holger; Uhl, Detlev; Flittner, Klaus; Schlaak, Helmut

    2011-04-01

    The impact of the modification of silicone rubber with barium titanate particles on the permittivity and hence on the performance of dielectric elastomer actuators has been investigated. Barium titanate powders with different particle sizes in the micrometer and nanometer range were used in this study. The mechanical properties of the composite materials in terms of the Young's modulus in tension and compression load as well as the viscoelastic behavior in shear load were experimentally determined. Additionally, the electric properties like permittivity, specific conductivity and electric breakdown field strength were evaluated. Model film actuators with the modified silicone material were prepared and their actuation strain was measured. With a concentration of 20 vol.% barium titanate particles, an enhancement of the permittivity of 140 % and an increase of the actuation strain of about 100 % with respect to the unmodified material could be achieved. Furthermore, first multilayer actuators were manufactured with an automatic spin coating process and their permittivity and strain were measured. The results of these investigations are in good agreement with the data of the experiments with single layer dielectric elastomer films.

  1. Piezoelectric-hydraulic pump based band brake actuation system for automotive transmission control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gi-Woo; Wang, K. W.

    2007-04-01

    The actuation system of friction elements (such as band brakes) is essential for high quality operations in modern automotive automatic transmissions (in short, ATs). The current band brake actuation system consists of several hydraulic components, including the oil pump, the regulating valve and the control valves. In general, it has been recognized that the current AT band brake actuation system has many limitations. For example, the oil pump and valve body are relatively heavy and complex. Also, the oil pumps induce inherently large drag torque, which affects fuel economy. This research is to overcome these problems of the current system by exploring the utilization of a hybrid type piezo-hydraulic pump device for AT band brake control. This new actuating system integrates a piezo-hydraulic pump to the input of the band brake. Compared with the current systems, this new actuator features much simpler structure, smaller size, and lower weight. This paper describes the development, design and fabrication of the new stand-alone prototype actuator for AT band brake control. An analytical model is developed and validated using experimental data. Performance tests on the hardware and system simulations utilizing the validated model are performed to characterize the new prototype actuator. It is predicted that with increasing of accumulator pressure and driving frequency, the proposed prototype actuating system will satisfy the band brake requirement for AT shift control.

  2. Enhancement of EAP actuated facial expressions by designed chamber geometry in elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D.; Bergs, R.; Tadesse, Y.; White, V.; Priya, S.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, the authors explore various ways that designed chambering of elastomers can enhance electroactive polymer (EAP) actuation. Such enhancements include structuring of chambers for various mechanical functions and advantages, boosting of surface area of a polymer for enhanced ionic migration, construction of advanced electret foams for sensing and for tunable hydrophobicity for micro/pumping action, and distribution of composite EAP devices throughout the chambered elastomer to achieve discrete controllability of electroactive polymer actuators. The authors also discuss the chambering of EAP materials themselves for enhanced actuation effects. With varied design of the chambers of the elastomer, the mechanical and structural properties of the elastomer can be tuned to greatly enhance EAP actuation. The chambers can be designed in accordion-like bellows to achieve extreme elongation with low forces, in spiral geometries to effect negative or neutral poisson's ratio under actuation, and with embedded fluidic bellows for fluidic actuation or sensing. These are but a few examples of the advantages that can be achieved via designed chambering of elastomers. The authors also discuss various application uses of the described chambering technologies. Such chambered elastomers, combined with advanced muscle-like actuators, can substantially benefit facelike robots (useful for entertainment and education etc), prosthetics, and numerous modalities of bio-inspired locomotion. In the efforts of the authors to generate facial expression robots with low-power lightweight actuators is described.

  3. Improving dry carbon nanotube actuators by chemical modifications, material hybridization, and proper engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biso, Maurizio; Ansaldo, Alberto; Ricci, Davide

    2013-04-01

    Low voltage, dry electrochemical actuators can be prepared by using a gel made of carbon nanotubes and ionic liquid.1 Their performance can be significantly improved by combining physical and chemical modifications with a proper engineering. We demonstrated that multi walled carbon nanotubes can be effectively used for actuators preparation;2 we achieved interesting performance improvements by chemically cross linking carbon nanotubes using both aromatic and aliphatic diamines;3 we introduced a novel hybrid material, made by in-situ chemical polymerization of pyrrole on carbon nanotubes, that further boosts actuation by taking advantage of the peculiar properties of both materials in terms of maximum strain and conductivity;4 we investigated the influence of actuator thickness showing that the generated strain at high frequency is strongly enhanced when thickness is reduced. To overcome limitations set by bimorphs, we designed a novel actuator in which a metal spring, embedded in the solid electrolyte of a bimorph device, is used as a non-actuating counter plate resulting in a three electrode device capable of both linear and bending motion. Finally, we propose a way to model actuators performance in terms of purely material-dependent parameters instead of geometry-dependent ones.5

  4. Impact of Dose Rate Effects and Damage Engineering on Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Kyuha; Guo, Baonian; Liu, Jinning; Erokhin, Yuri; Hwang, Yeonsang; Lee, Yongseung; An, Jungsoo; Ryu, Seonho; Hahn, Seungho; Cho, Changjune; Hur, Namhae

    2006-11-13

    Traditional implant conditions during source/drain formation process, such as dopant, dose, energy and incident angle have been known as key parameters determining device electrical characteristics. As devices scale down, instant dose rate of BF2 ion implantation, however, should be considered as an important factor to control buried channel PMOS characteristics since fluorine and boron diffusion behavior can be varied depending on implant damage and results in change of effective channel length. Ribbon beam single wafer high current implanters enable ion beam density to be modulated. By changing beam size with same beam current during source/drain implantation, PMOS electrical characteristics of 70nm Flash memory have been investigated. With achieved results, device matching to spot beam batch ion implanter has been demonstrated.

  5. Measuring RF-induced currents inside implants: Impact of device configuration on MRI safety of cardiac pacemaker leads.

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Weiss, Ingo; Ehses, Philipp; Ritter, Oliver; Warmuth, Marcus; Fidler, Florian; Herold, Volker; Jakob, Peter M; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Bauer, Wolfgang R

    2009-03-01

    Radiofrequency (RF)-related heating of cardiac pacemaker leads is a serious concern in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recent investigations suggest such heating to be strongly dependent on an implant's position within the surrounding medium, but this issue is currently poorly understood. In this study, phantom measurements of the RF-induced electric currents inside a pacemaker lead were performed to investigate the impact of the device position and lead configuration on the amount of MRI-related heating at the lead tip. Seven hundred twenty device position/lead path configurations were investigated. The results show that certain configurations are associated with a highly increased risk to develop MRI-induced heating, whereas various configurations do not show any significant heating. It was possible to precisely infer implant heating on the basis of current intensity values measured inside a pacemaker lead. Device position and lead configuration relative to the surrounding medium are crucial to the amount of RF-induced heating in MRI. This indicates that a considerable number of implanted devices may incidentally not develop severe heating in MRI because of their specific configuration in the body. Small variations in configuration can, however, strongly increase the risk for such heating effects, meaning that hazardous situations might appear during MRI.

  6. Impact of Air Filter Material on Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) Device Characteristics in HF Vapor Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chih-Wen; Lou, Jen-Chung; Yeh, Ching-Fa; Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Lin, Shiuan-Jeng; Kusumi, Toshio

    2004-05-01

    Airborne molecular contamination (AMC) is becoming increasingly important as devices are scaled down to the nanometer generation. Optimum ultra low penetration air (ULPA) filter technology can eliminate AMC. In a cleanroom, however, the acid vapor generated from the cleaning process may degrade the ULPA filter, releasing AMC to the air and the surface of wafers, degrading the electrical characteristics of devices. This work proposes the new PTFE ULPA filter, which is resistant to acid vapor corrosion, to solve this problem. Experimental results demonstrate that the PTFE ULPA filter can effectively eliminate the AMC and provide a very clean cleanroom environment.

  7. MEMS-based fabrication of multiple-degree-of-freedom ionic polymer-metal composite actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zheng; Tan, Xiaobo

    2010-04-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMC) are soft actuation materials with promising applications in robotics and biomedical devices. In this paper, a MEMS-based approach is presented for monolithic, batch fabrication of IPMC pectoral fin actuators that are capable of complex deformation. Such an actuator consists of multiple, individually controlled IPMC regions that are mechanically coupled through compliant, passive regions. Prototypes of artificial pectoral fins have been fabricated with the proposed method, and sophisticated deformation modes, including bending, twisting, and cupping, have been demonstrated, which shows the promise of the pectoral fin in robotic fish applications.

  8. Electrokinetic pumps and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip M. Paul

    2000-03-01

    Flow and ionic transport in porous media are central to electrokinetic pumping as well as to a host of other microfluidic devices. Electrokinetic pumping provides the ability to create high pressures (to over 10,000 psi) and high flow rates (over 1 mL/min) with a device having no moving parts and all liquid seals. The electrokinetic pump (EKP) is ideally suited for applications ranging from a high pressure integrated pump for chip-scale HPLC to a high flow rate integrated pump for forced liquid convection cooling of high-power electronics. Relations for flow rate and current fluxes in porous media are derived that provide a basis for analysis of complex microfluidic systems as well as for optimization of electrokinetic pumps.

  9. DEVICE FOR CONTROL OF OXYGEN PARTIAL PRESSURE

    DOEpatents

    Bradner, H.; Gordon, H.S.

    1957-12-24

    A device is described that can sense changes in oxygen partial pressure and cause a corresponding mechanical displacement sufficient to actuate meters, valves and similar devices. A piston and cylinder arrangement contains a charge of crystalline metal chelate pellets which have the peculiar property of responding to variations in the oxygen content of the ambient atmosphere by undergoing a change in dimension. A lever system amplifies the relative displacement of the piston in the cylinder, and actuates the controlled valving device. This partial pressure oxygen sensing device is useful in controlled chemical reactions or in respiratory devices such as the oxygen demand meters for high altitude aircraft.

  10. Optimal Control of Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions Using Micro-Array Actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Tinapple, Jon; Surber, Lewis

    2006-01-01

    The intent of this study on micro-array flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to determine optimal designs of micro-array actuation for controlling the shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions within supersonic inlets and compare these concepts to conventional bleed performance. The term micro-array refers to micro-actuator arrays which have heights of 25 to 40 percent of the undisturbed supersonic boundary layer thickness. This study covers optimal control of shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions using standard micro-vane, tapered micro-vane, and standard micro-ramp arrays at a free stream Mach number of 2.0. The effectiveness of the three micro-array devices was tested using a shock pressure rise induced by the 10 shock generator, which was sufficiently strong as to separate the turbulent supersonic boundary layer. The overall design purpose of the micro-arrays was to alter the properties of the supersonic boundary layer by introducing a cascade of counter-rotating micro-vortices in the near wall region. In this manner, the impact of the shock wave boundary layer (SWBL) interaction on the main flow field was minimized without boundary bleed.

  11. Characterization of electrostatic glass actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, R.; Wüthrich, R.; Sache, L.; Higuchi, T.; Bleuler, H.

    2003-06-01

    Electrostatic glass actuators are a promising concept for various applications. The use of the interaction between glassy substances and electrostatic fields allows synchronous propulsion akin to the electret actuator. Even though some properties of electrostatic glass motors have been observed and described, a characterization is still missing. The authors would like to present the experimental work leading to the determination of the optimal glass blend and to the optimal electrode pattern in order to maximize the exploitable forces. An analytical model is also presented, satisfactorily close to the measured data. These measurements and models constitute a tool to design electrostatic glass actuators such as, for example, a miniature disk drive, which is presented as one of several promising applications.

  12. Wellhead with hydraulic pump actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H.D.; Brown, M.A.; Rohling, L.J.

    1984-07-31

    A wellhead assembly especially suited for oil wells has a wide working pressure range and employs three components which fit together to seal the well casing, hold the tubing against high wellhead pressures, and provide a connection to the tubing through which the sucker rods are operated. The primary casing seal is formed by the mating contact of metal surfaces that are not subject to deterioration. The actuator for the subsurface pump is a vertically disposed hydraulic cylinder unit aligned with the sucker rods and forming the uppermost section of an elongated cylindrical housing, which also has a lowermost section on the wellhead that provides the outlets for the fluid pumped from the well, and an intermediate, control section that contains a spool valve for controlling the hydraulic actuator. The spool is shifted by the piston and rod of the hydraulic actuator at the upper and lower limits of their stroke to thereby reciprocate the sucker rods and operate the subsurface pump.

  13. A Parylene Bellows Electrochemical Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-Ying; Sheybani, Roya; Gutierrez, Christian A.; Kuo, Jonathan T. W.; Meng, Ellis

    2011-01-01

    We present the first electrochemical actuator with Parylene bellows for large-deflection operation. The bellows diaphragm was fabricated using a polyethylene-glycol-based sacrificial molding technique followed by coating in Parylene C. Bellows were mechanically characterized and integrated with a pair of interdigitated electrodes to form an electrochemical actuator that is suitable for low-power pumping of fluids. Pump performance (gas generation rate and pump efficiency) was optimized through a careful examination of geometrical factors. Overall, a maximum pump efficiency of 90% was achieved in the case of electroplated electrodes, and a deflection of over 1.5 mm was demonstrated. Real-time wireless operation was achieved. The complete fabrication process and the materials used in this actuator are bio-compatible, which makes it suitable for biological and medical applications. PMID:21318081

  14. Electromechanical propellant control system actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill; Weir, Rae Ann

    1990-01-01

    New control mechanism technologies are currently being sought to provide alternatives to hydraulic actuation systems. The Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in the development of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for this purpose. Through this effort, an in-house designed electromechanical propellant valve actuator has been assembled and is presently being evaluated. This evaluation will allow performance comparisons between EMA and hydraulics systems. The in-house design consists of the following hardware: a three-phase brushless motor, a harmonic drive, and an output spline which will mate with current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant control valves. A resolver and associated electronics supply position feedback for the EMA. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. Frequency response testing has been performed with further testing planned as hardware and test facilities become available.

  15. The Impact of Discourse Signaling Devices on the Listening Comprehension of L2 Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tajabadi, Fahimeh; Taghizadeh, Mahboubeh

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: first, it aimed at examining the impact of expository text topics on the listening comprehension of L2 learners; second, it aimed to investigate the impact of macro, micro, and macro-micro discourse markers on the listening comprehension of expository texts by L2 learners. The participants (N =105) were male…

  16. Impact of sanctions on procurement of medicine and medical devices in Iran; a technical response.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Alireza

    2013-12-01

    Following recent sanctions on foreign trade, financial and banking services, Iran has faced major difficulties for importing medicines (both finished products and pharmaceutical raw materials) and medical devices. Problems with money transfer have made it extremely lengthy in time to import medicine and medical devices and these have negatively affected access to and affordability of medicines. Quality of pharmaceuticals and treatment of patients have also been affected due to changing the sources of imported medicines and raw materials for locally produced pharmaceuticals. Several interventions have been employed during the past few months in Iran to overcome the effects imposed by recent sanctions and drug shortages have been managed to some extent with attempts made by Iran Food and Drug Organization (IRI FDO). As recommended by the experts, a specific Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication line should be allocated for transferring money for medicines and medical devices and certain financial institutions are assigned for this purpose. It is also suggested that defining a white list of Iranian pharmaceuticals and medical device companies together with their foreign counterparts would facilitate this process. It appears that, in a public health prospective, ordinary people and patients are hurt and paying the cost for current sanctions. It remains the responsibility of the public health and international communities to separate public health from politics and to ease the pain of public from sanctions.

  17. Assistive Devices for Children with Functional Impairments: Impact on Child and Caregiver Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Stacey; Skelton, Heather; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Functional impairments can limit a child's ability to participate in the experiences of childhood. This "deprivation" can, in turn, have a negative effect on such children's development, academic performance, and quality of life, as well as on the lives of their caregivers and families. Many adults use assistive devices to overcome functional…

  18. Biomedical Impact in Implantable Devices-The Transcatheter Aortic Valve as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Alexandros; Saatsakis, George

    2015-09-01

    Objective: To update of the scientific community about the biomedical engineering involvement in the implantable devices chain. Moreover the transcatheter Aortic Valve (TAV) replacement, in the field of cardiac surgery, will be analyzed as an example of contemporary implantable technology. Methods: A detailed literature review regarding biomedical engineers participating in the implantable medical product chain, starting from the design of the product till the final implantation technique. Results: The scientific role of biomedical engineers has clearly been established. Certain parts of the product chain are implemented almost exclusively by experienced biomedical engineers such as the transcatheter aortic valve device. The successful professional should have a multidisciplinary knowledge, including medicine, in order to pursue the challenges for such intuitive technology. This clearly indicates that biomedical engineers are among the most appropriate scientists to accomplish such tasks. Conclusions: The biomedical engineering involvement in medical implantable devices has been widely accepted by the scientific community, worldwide. Its important contribution, starting from the design and extended to the development, clinical trials, scientific support, education of other scientists (surgeons, cardiologists, technicians etc.), and even to sales, makes biomedical engineers a valuable player in the scientific arena. Notably, the sector of implantable devices is constantly raising, as emerging technologies continuously set up new targets.

  19. Impact of photon recycling and luminescence coupling in III-V photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. W.; Höhn, O.; Micha, D. N.; Wagner, L.; Helmers, H.; Bett, A. W.; Dimroth, F.

    2015-03-01

    Single junction photovoltaic devices composed of direct bandgap III-V semiconductors such as GaAs can exploit the effects of photon recycling to achieve record-high open circuit voltages. Modeling such devices yields insight into the design and material criteria required to achieve high efficiencies. For a GaAs cell to reach 28 % efficiency without a substrate, the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) lifetimes of the electrons and holes must be longer than 3 μs and 100 ns respectively in a 2 μm thin active region coupled to a very high reflective (>99%) rear-side mirror. The model is generalized to account for luminescence coupling in tandem devices, which yields direct insight into the top cell's non-radiative lifetimes. A heavily current mismatched GaAs/GaAs tandem device is simulated and measured experimentally as a function of concentration between 3 and 100 suns. The luminescence coupling increases from 14 % to 33 % experimentally, whereas the model requires an increasing SRH lifetime for both electrons and holes to explain these experimental results. However, intermediate absorbing GaAs layers between the two sub-cells may also increasingly contribute to the luminescence coupling as a function of concentration.

  20. Mobile Devices and the Teacher Perceived Barriers Impacting Effective Integration in the K-5 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Tina S.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, phenomenological study explored the teacher perceived barriers of using mobile devices in the K-5 classroom. Research confirms teachers face various types of variables and become reluctant to use technology within their curriculum driven lessons. This study sought to understand what teachers perceive as barriers, and how the…