Science.gov

Sample records for actuated reefing line

  1. Reefing Line Tension in CPAS Main Parachute Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Reefing lines are an essential feature to manage inflation loads. During each Engineering Development Unit (EDU) test of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS), a chase aircraft is staged to be level with the cluster of Main ringsail parachutes during the initial inflation and reefed stages. This allows for capturing high-quality still photographs of the reefed skirt, suspension line, and canopy geometry. The over-inflation angles are synchronized with measured loads data in order to compute the tension force in the reefing line. The traditional reefing tension equation assumes radial symmetry, but cluster effects cause the reefed skirt of each parachute to elongate to a more elliptical shape. This effect was considered in evaluating multiple parachutes to estimate the semi-major and semi-minor axes. Three flight tests are assessed, including one with a skipped first stage, which had peak reefing line tension over three times higher than the nominal parachute disreef sequence.

  2. Fabrication of Spiral Micro Coil Lines for Electromagnetic Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setomoto, Masaru; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Yamashita, Shuhei; Noda, Daiji; Hattori, Tadashi

    With the recent progress in downsizing and the sophistication of various industrial products, the need for more compact actuators is increasing. Actuators account for the larger percentage of volume and weight of a product compared with other parts and devices. We have proposed fabrication process of spiral micro coils that employs X-ray lithography. This process will be effective for fabricating coils of a high aspect ratio lines. Reducing the size of coil lines and increasing their aspect ratio are expected to reduce the size and increase the output of actuators. Using this process, we formed spiral coil lines that can be used in electromagnetic actuators. X-ray lithography was used to form a high aspect ratio helical structure on the surface of an acrylic resin pipe. As a measure to suppress void generation, which is one of the shortcomings of electroplating processes, the sputtering apparatus and plating equipment were improved, a pretreatment process was additionally provided, and the actual electroplating method was improved. As a result, a void-free metallic deposit could be formed on a thin coil line. At the final step of this research study, we etched the coil line to determine optimal etching conditions.

  3. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jens N; Mikkelsen, Robert F; Henningson, Dan S; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J

    2015-02-28

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake. PMID:25583862

  4. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jens N.; Mikkelsen, Robert F.; Henningson, Dan S.; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J.

    2015-01-01

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake. PMID:25583862

  5. Apparatus for simultaneously disreefing a centrally reefed clustered parachute system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.

    1988-06-21

    A parachute assembly for controlled dropping of a payload is described, comprising: a cluster of parachutes each having a canopy skirt with a periphery attached by load lines to the payload; reefing means for reefing each of the parachutes; disreefing means for disreefing all of the parachutes simultaneously; each of the parachute having a reefing line disposed substantially along the periphery of the parachute and through the disreefing means; retaining means for retaining the disreefing means to a single point of attachment on the periphery of each parachute, the retaining means comprising tether lines each disposed between a corresponding parachute and the disreefing means; the disreefing means comprising line-cutting means to simultaneously cut all reefing and tether lines; and actuation means, connected to the payload, for actuating the disreefing means after deployment of the parachutes in a reefed state thereof to disreef all of the parachutes simultaneously and to disconnect the disreefing means from each of the parachutes.

  6. Evaluation of tire reefs for enhancing aquatic communities in concrete-lined canals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, Gordon; Liston, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    Large earthen canals in the arid southwest are being lined with concrete to reduce seepage and conserve limited water supplies. Lining reduces habitat and increases operational velocities (relative to unaltered streams), which are detrimental to aquatic communities. Fish communities that become reestablished in these waterways exhibit lower species diversity, densities, and biomass than they did in the former earthen canals. Placement of low-profile tire reefs in the Coachella Canal, California, and the Hayden-Rhodes Aqueduct, Arizona, reversed these trends. Comparative sampling revealed that invertebrate and fish densities were 3 and 20 times higher, respectively, in reef areas than in typical canal sections without reefs. Tire reefs are recommended as an effective means of enhancing aquatic communities in concrete canals.

  7. Line Fluid Actuated Valve Development Program. [for application on the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a line-fluid actuated valve design for potential application as a propellant-control valve on the space shuttle was examined. Design and analysis studies of two prototype valve units were conducted and demonstrated performance is reported. It was shown that the line-fluid actuated valve concept offers distinct weight and electrical advantages over alternate valve concepts. Summaries of projected performance and design goals are also included.

  8. Baselines and Degradation of Coral Reefs in the Northern Line Islands

    PubMed Central

    Sandin, Stuart A.; Smith, Jennifer E.; DeMartini, Edward E.; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Donner, Simon D.; Friedlander, Alan M.; Konotchick, Talina; Malay, Machel; Maragos, James E.; Obura, David; Pantos, Olga; Paulay, Gustav; Richie, Morgan; Rohwer, Forest; Schroeder, Robert E.; Walsh, Sheila; Jackson, Jeremy B. C.; Knowlton, Nancy; Sala, Enric

    2008-01-01

    Effective conservation requires rigorous baselines of pristine conditions to assess the impacts of human activities and to evaluate the efficacy of management. Most coral reefs are moderately to severely degraded by local human activities such as fishing and pollution as well as global change, hence it is difficult to separate local from global effects. To this end, we surveyed coral reefs on uninhabited atolls in the northern Line Islands to provide a baseline of reef community structure, and on increasingly populated atolls to document changes associated with human activities. We found that top predators and reef-building organisms dominated unpopulated Kingman and Palmyra, while small planktivorous fishes and fleshy algae dominated the populated atolls of Tabuaeran and Kiritimati. Sharks and other top predators overwhelmed the fish assemblages on Kingman and Palmyra so that the biomass pyramid was inverted (top-heavy). In contrast, the biomass pyramid at Tabuaeran and Kiritimati exhibited the typical bottom-heavy pattern. Reefs without people exhibited less coral disease and greater coral recruitment relative to more inhabited reefs. Thus, protection from overfishing and pollution appears to increase the resilience of reef ecosystems to the effects of global warming. PMID:18301734

  9. Baselines and degradation of coral reefs in the Northern Line Islands.

    PubMed

    Sandin, Stuart A; Smith, Jennifer E; Demartini, Edward E; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Donner, Simon D; Friedlander, Alan M; Konotchick, Talina; Malay, Machel; Maragos, James E; Obura, David; Pantos, Olga; Paulay, Gustav; Richie, Morgan; Rohwer, Forest; Schroeder, Robert E; Walsh, Sheila; Jackson, Jeremy B C; Knowlton, Nancy; Sala, Enric

    2008-01-01

    Effective conservation requires rigorous baselines of pristine conditions to assess the impacts of human activities and to evaluate the efficacy of management. Most coral reefs are moderately to severely degraded by local human activities such as fishing and pollution as well as global change, hence it is difficult to separate local from global effects. To this end, we surveyed coral reefs on uninhabited atolls in the northern Line Islands to provide a baseline of reef community structure, and on increasingly populated atolls to document changes associated with human activities. We found that top predators and reef-building organisms dominated unpopulated Kingman and Palmyra, while small planktivorous fishes and fleshy algae dominated the populated atolls of Tabuaeran and Kiritimati. Sharks and other top predators overwhelmed the fish assemblages on Kingman and Palmyra so that the biomass pyramid was inverted (top-heavy). In contrast, the biomass pyramid at Tabuaeran and Kiritimati exhibited the typical bottom-heavy pattern. Reefs without people exhibited less coral disease and greater coral recruitment relative to more inhabited reefs. Thus, protection from overfishing and pollution appears to increase the resilience of reef ecosystems to the effects of global warming. PMID:18301734

  10. Laser line-scan fluorescence and multispectral imaging of coral reef environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, Michael P.; Coles, Bryan W.; Nevis, Andrew J.; Regan, Richard F.

    1997-02-01

    During the summer of 1996 a series of field trials were conducted in the Florida Keys and Bahama Islands to evaluate the ability of a unique laser line scan system to measure and map the fluorescent characteristics of coral reef environments. Typical fluorescence maps that were obtained are presented and compared with monochrome and RGB color images of the same reefs. The monochrome images were obtained with the laser line scan system simuftaneously with the fluorescent maps. The RGB images, which were also obtained with the laser line scan system, were recorded in the same location on a subsequent thai.

  11. Apparatus for simultaneously disreefing a centrally reefed clustered parachute system

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Donald W.

    1988-01-01

    A single multi-line cutter is connected to each of a cluster of parachutes by a separate short tether line that holds the parachutes, initially reefed by closed loop reefing lines, close to one another. The closed loop reefing lines and tether lines, one from each parachute, are disposed within the cutter to be simultaneously cut by its actuation when a central line attached between the payload and the cutter is stretched upon deployment of the cluster. A pyrotechnic or electronic time delay may be included in the cutter to delay the actual simultaneous cutting of all lines until the clustered parachutes attain a measure of stability prior to being disreefed. A second set of reefing lines and second tether lines may be provided for each parachute, to enable a two-stage, separately timed, step-by-step disreefing.

  12. Apparatus for simultaneously disreefing a centrally reefed clustered parachute system

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, D.W.

    1988-06-21

    A single multi-line cutter is connected to each of a cluster of parachutes by a separate short tether line that holds the parachutes, initially reefed by closed loop reefing lines, close to one another. The closed loop reefing lines and tether lines, one from each parachute, are disposed within the cutter to be simultaneously cut by its actuation when a central line attached between the payload and the cutter is stretched upon deployment of the cluster. A pyrotechnic or electronic time delay may be included in the cutter to delay the actual simultaneous cutting of all lines until the clustered parachutes attain a measure of stability prior to being disreefed. A second set of reefing lines and second tether lines may be provided for each parachute, to enable a two-stage, separately timed, step-by-step disreefing. 13 figs.

  13. Apparatus for simultaneously disreefing a centrally reefed clustered parachute system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D W

    1986-10-23

    A single multi-line cutter is connected to each of a cluster of parachutes by a separate short tether line that holds the parachutes, initially reefed by closed loop reefing lines, close to one another. The closed loop reefing lines and tether lines, one from each parachute, are disposed within the cutter to be simultaneously cut by its actuation when a central line attached between the payload and the cutter is stretched upon deployment of the cluster. A pyrotechnic or electronic time delay may be included in the cutter to delay the actual simultaneous cutting of all lines until the clustered parachutes attain a measure of stability prior to being disreefed. A second set of reefing lines and second tether lines may be provided for each parachute, to enable a two-stage, separately timed, step-by-step disreefing.

  14. Design and Control of a 1-DOF MRI Compatible Pneumatically Actuated Robot with Long Transmission Lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Tan, U-Xuan; McMillan, Alan; Gullapalli, Rao; Desai, Jaydev P

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the design and control of an MRI-compatible 1-DOF needle driver robot and its precise position control using pneumatic actuation with long transmission lines. MRI provides superior image quality compared to other imaging modalities such as CT or ultrasound, but imposes severe limitations on the material and actuator choice (to prevent image distortion) due to its strong magnetic field. We are primarily interested in developing a pneumatically actuated breast biopsy robot with a large force bandwidth and precise targeting capability during radio-frequency ablation (RFA) of breast tumor, and exploring the possibility of using long pneumatic transmission lines from outside the MRI room to the device in the magnet to prevent any image distortion whatsoever. This paper presents a model of the entire pneumatic system. The pneumatic lines are approximated by a first order system with time delay, because its dynamics are governed by the telegraph equation with varying coefficients and boundary conditions, which cannot be solved precisely. The slow response of long pneumatic lines and valve subsystems make position control challenging. This is further compounded by the presence of non-uniform friction in the device. Sliding mode control (SMC) was adopted, where friction was treated as an uncertainty term to drive the system onto the sliding surface. Three different controllers were designed, developed, and evaluated to achieve precise position control of the RFA probe. Experimental results revealed that all SMCs gave satisfactory performance with long transmission lines. We also performed several experiments with a 3-DOF fiber-optic force sensor attached to the needle driver to evaluate the performance of the device in the MRI under continuous imaging. PMID:22058649

  15. Design and Control of a 1-DOF MRI Compatible Pneumatically Actuated Robot with Long Transmission Lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Tan, U-Xuan; McMillan, Alan; Gullapalli, Rao; Desai, Jaydev P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design and control of an MRI-compatible 1-DOF needle driver robot and its precise position control using pneumatic actuation with long transmission lines. MRI provides superior image quality compared to other imaging modalities such as CT or ultrasound, but imposes severe limitations on the material and actuator choice (to prevent image distortion) due to its strong magnetic field. We are primarily interested in developing a pneumatically actuated breast biopsy robot with a large force bandwidth and precise targeting capability during radio-frequency ablation (RFA) of breast tumor, and exploring the possibility of using long pneumatic transmission lines from outside the MRI room to the device in the magnet to prevent any image distortion whatsoever. This paper presents a model of the entire pneumatic system. The pneumatic lines are approximated by a first order system with time delay, because its dynamics are governed by the telegraph equation with varying coefficients and boundary conditions, which cannot be solved precisely. The slow response of long pneumatic lines and valve subsystems make position control challenging. This is further compounded by the presence of non-uniform friction in the device. Sliding mode control (SMC) was adopted, where friction was treated as an uncertainty term to drive the system onto the sliding surface. Three different controllers were designed, developed, and evaluated to achieve precise position control of the RFA probe. Experimental results revealed that all SMCs gave satisfactory performance with long transmission lines. We also performed several experiments with a 3-DOF fiber-optic force sensor attached to the needle driver to evaluate the performance of the device in the MRI under continuous imaging. PMID:22058649

  16. High-speed, compact, adaptive lenses using in-line transparent dielectric elastomer actuator membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shian, Samuel; Diebold, Roger M.; Clarke, David R.

    2013-04-01

    Electrically tunable adaptive lenses provide several advantages over traditional lens assemblies in terms of compactness, speed, efficiency, and flexibility. We present an elastomer-liquid lens system which makes use of an in-line, transparent electroactive polymer actuator. The lens has two liquid-filled cavities enclosed within two frames, with two passive outer elastomer membranes and an internal transparent electroactive membrane. Advantages of the lens design over existing systems include large apertures, flexibility in choosing the starting lens curvature, and electrode encapsulation with a dielectric liquid. A lens power change up to 40 diopters, corresponding to focal length variation up to 300%, was recorded during actuation, with a response time on the order of tens of milliseconds.

  17. The origins of ambient biological sound from coral reef ecosystems in the Line Islands archipelago.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Simon E; Rohwer, Forest L; D'Spain, Gerald L; Friedlander, Alan M; Gregg, Allison K; Sandin, Stuart A; Buckingham, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    Although ambient biological underwater sound was first characterized more than 60 years ago, attributing specific components of ambient sound to their creators remains a challenge. Noise produced by snapping shrimp typically dominates the ambient spectra near tropical coasts, but significant unexplained spectral variation exists. Here, evidence is presented indicating that a discernible contribution to the ambient sound field over coral reef ecosystems in the Line Islands archipelago originates from the interaction of hard-shelled benthic macro-organisms with the coral substrate. Recordings show a broad spectral peak centered between 14.30 and 14.63 kHz, incoherently added to a noise floor typically associated with relatively "white" snapping shrimp sounds. A 4.6 to 6.2 dB increase of pressure spectral density level in the 11 to 17 kHz band occurs simultaneously with an increase in benthic invertebrate activity at night, quantified through time-lapse underwater photography. Spectral-level-filtered recordings of hermit crabs Clibanarius diugeti in quiet aquarium conditions reveal that transient sounds produced by the interaction between the crustaceans' carapace, shell, and coral substrate are spectrally consistent with Line Islands recordings. Coral reef ecosystems are highly interconnected and subtle yet important ecological changes may be detected quantitatively through passive monitoring that utilizes the acoustic byproducts of biological activity. PMID:25234977

  18. Simulating wind and marine hydrokinetic turbines with actuator lines in RANS and LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    As wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine designs mature, focus is shifting towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow or horizontal-axis turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow or vertical-axis turbines. Towards this goal, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An additional sub-model is considered for injecting turbulence model scalar quantities based on actuator line element loading. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of axial- and cross-flow turbines and compared with moderate Reynolds number experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Work supported by NSF-CBET grant 1150797.

  19. Determining the optimal smoothing length scale for actuator line models of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Luis; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a widely used tool for simulating wind turbines when performing Large-Eddy Simulations. The ALM uses a smearing kernel ηɛ = 1 /ɛ3π 3 / 2 exp (-r2 /ɛ2) , where r is the distance to an actuator point, and ɛ is the smoothing length scale which establishes the kernel width, to project the lift and drag forces onto the grid. In this work, we develop formulations to establish the optimum value of the smoothing length scale ɛ, based on physical arguments, instead of purely numerical constraints. This parameter has a very important role in the ALM, to provide a length scale, which may, for example, be related to the chord of the airfoil being studied. In the proposed approach, we compare features (such as vertical pressure gradient) of a potential flow solution for flow over a lifting surface with features of the solution of the Euler equations with a body force term. The potential flow solution over a lifting surface is used as a general representation of an airfoil. The method presented aims to minimize the difference between these features of the flow fields as a function of the smearing length scale (ɛ), in order to obtain the optimum value. This work is supported by NSF (IGERT and IIA-1243482) and computations use XSEDE resources.

  20. Management under uncertainty: guide-lines for incorporating connectivity into the protection of coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCook, L. J.; Almany, G. R.; Berumen, M. L.; Day, J. C.; Green, A. L.; Jones, G. P.; Leis, J. M.; Planes, S.; Russ, G. R.; Sale, P. F.; Thorrold, S. R.

    2009-06-01

    The global decline in coral reefs demands urgent management strategies to protect resilience. Protecting ecological connectivity, within and among reefs, and between reefs and other ecosystems is critical to resilience. However, connectivity science is not yet able to clearly identify the specific measures for effective protection of connectivity. This article aims to provide a set of principles or practical guidelines that can be applied currently to protect connectivity. These ‘rules of thumb’ are based on current knowledge and expert opinion, and on the philosophy that, given the urgency, it is better to act with incomplete knowledge than to wait for detailed understanding that may come too late. The principles, many of which are not unique to connectivity, include: (1) allow margins of error in extent and nature of protection, as insurance against unforeseen or incompletely understood threats or critical processes; (2) spread risks among areas; (3) aim for networks of protected areas which are: (a) comprehensive and spread—protect all biotypes, habitats and processes, etc., to capture as many possible connections, known and unknown; (b) adequate—maximise extent of protection for each habitat type, and for the entire region; (c) representative—maximise likelihood of protecting the full range of processes and spatial requirements; (d) replicated—multiple examples of biotypes or processes enhances risk spreading; (4) protect entire biological units where possible (e.g. whole reefs), including buffers around core areas. Otherwise, choose bigger rather than smaller areas; (5) provide for connectivity at a wide range of dispersal distances (within and between patches), emphasising distances <20-30 km; and (6) use a portfolio of approaches, including but not limited to MPAs. Three case studies illustrating the application of these principles to coral reef management in the Bohol Sea (Philippines), the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) and Kimbe Bay (Papua New

  1. Active control of crossflow-induced transition by means of in-line pneumatic actuator orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, J.; Barth, H. P.; Nitsche, W.

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of a pneumatic actuator system for controlling the crossflow vortex-induced laminar breakdown is investigated by means of hot-wire measurements. Steady blowing or suction through a spanwise row of periodically arranged orifices initiates a system of longitudinal vortices which reduces the amplitude of the most amplified stationary crossflow vortices. Thus, the onset of high-frequency secondary instability and the following laminar-turbulent transition was shifted farther downstream. All experiments were conducted at the redesigned DLR swept flat plate experiment in the open test section of the 1 m wind tunnel at the DLR in Göttingen.

  2. A Fresh Look at the Geologic Evolution of Kingman Reef and Palmyra Atoll, U.S. Line Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, G. A.; Eakins, B.; Scheirer, D. S.; Wong, F. L.; Jones, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Extended continental shelf (ECS) interest has provided a vehicle for renewed scientific study of the geologic framework of the U.S. Line Islands. In support of ECS studies, GLORIA sidescan sonar imagery has been refreshed and re-released. New multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data and a compilation of bathymetric tracks of opportunity enhance the credibility of new backscatter interpretations. Two-channel seismic reflection data collected during the GLORIA program in 1991 have been reprocessed and compiled into a digital database and have yielded a new understanding of sediment distribution and basement morphology within the 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ) surrounding Kingman Reef and Palmyra Atoll. Kingman Reef and Palmyra Atoll are small islands today. We infer that they are the last subaerial remnants of what was once a complex volcanic island, made up of no fewer than 8 different volcanic centers and spanning roughly 200 km in total diameter. Edifice heights above the immediately surrounding volcanic basement exceed 3000 m, and in several cases exceed 4000 m. Voluminous sediment accumulations flanking these now-submerged and significantly buried edifices point to their past existence as shallow-water or emergent volcanic systems capable of producing large quantities of volcaniclastic as well as carbonate sediment quite different from the thinner layer of pelagic sediment blanketing the adjacent central Pacific deep sea floor. The sediment pond east of Palmyra Atoll, in a perched basin near the center of this ancient complex, exceeds 1200 m in thickness. The Kingman-Palmyra region today is a showcase of mass transport features, with rugged erosional topography on steep volcanic flanks, a collapsed or eroding carbonate platform covering part of the central complex, and wide, sinuous leveed channels sweeping predominantly toward the north, carrying sediment away from the remnant high and out onto the deep sea floor to the east of the Line

  3. Drawing lines at the sand: evidence for functional vs. visual reef boundaries in temperate Marine Protected Areas.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, E V; Cousens, S L; Nancollas, S J; Stauss, C; Royle, J; Attrill, M J

    2013-11-15

    Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) can either protect all seabed habitats within them or discrete features. If discrete features within the MPA are to be protected humans have to know where the boundaries are. In Lyme Bay, SW England a MPA excluded towed demersal fishing gear from 206 km(2) to protect rocky reef habitats and the associated species. The site comprised a mosaic of sedimentary and reef habitats and so 'non reef' habitat also benefited from the MPA. Following 3 years protection, video data showed that sessile Reef Associated Species (RAS) had colonised sedimentary habitat indicating that 'reef' was present. This suggested that the functional extent of the reef was potentially greater than its visual boundary. Feature based MPA management may not adequately protect targeted features, whereas site based management allows for shifting baselines and will be more effective at delivering ecosystem goods and services. PMID:24075618

  4. 49 CFR 393.47 - Brake actuators, slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... drums/rotors. 393.47 Section 393.47 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation..., slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors. (a) General requirements. Brake components must be... shoe with two pads; or worn to the wear indicator if the lining is so marked, for air drum brakes....

  5. 49 CFR 393.47 - Brake actuators, slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... drums/rotors. 393.47 Section 393.47 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation..., slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors. (a) General requirements. Brake components must be... shoe with two pads; or worn to the wear indicator if the lining is so marked, for air drum brakes....

  6. 49 CFR 393.47 - Brake actuators, slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... drums/rotors. 393.47 Section 393.47 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation..., slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors. (a) General requirements. Brake components must be... shoe with two pads; or worn to the wear indicator if the lining is so marked, for air drum brakes....

  7. 49 CFR 393.47 - Brake actuators, slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... drums/rotors. 393.47 Section 393.47 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation..., slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors. (a) General requirements. Brake components must be... shoe with two pads; or worn to the wear indicator if the lining is so marked, for air drum brakes....

  8. 49 CFR 393.47 - Brake actuators, slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... drums/rotors. 393.47 Section 393.47 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation..., slack adjusters, linings/pads and drums/rotors. (a) General requirements. Brake components must be... shoe with two pads; or worn to the wear indicator if the lining is so marked, for air drum brakes....

  9. Shifting base-lines, declining coral cover, and the erosion of reef resilience: comment on Sweatman et al. (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, T. P.; Bellwood, D. R.; Baird, A. H.; Brodie, J.; Bruno, J. F.; Pandolfi, J. M.

    2011-09-01

    Formal monitoring of the Great Barrier Reef was initiated in 1986 in response to the clear scientific evidence (and growing public concern) over the loss of corals caused by two protracted outbreaks of crown-of thorns starfish, which began in 1962 and 1979. Using monitoring data from manta tows along and across the Great Barrier Reef, Sweatman et al. (Coral Reefs 30:521-531, 2011) show that coral cover after these outbreaks declined further from 28 to 22% between 1986 and 2004. Pointing to the current levels of protection of the Great Barrier Reef, they state that earlier estimates of losses of coral cover since the early 1960s have been exaggerated. However, the loss of close to one-quarter of the coral cover over the past two decades represents an average loss of 0.34% cover per year across the whole GBR after 1986, which is very similar to previously reported rates of annual loss measured over a longer timeframe. The heaviest recent losses have occurred on inshore and mid-shelf reefs, which Sweatman et al. (Coral Reefs 30:521-531, 2011) attribute to a natural cycle of disturbance and recovery. But there has been very limited recovery. While coral cover has increased for short periods on some individual reefs, it has declined sharply on many more to produce the observed system-wide trend of declining cover. Close to 40% of coral cover on inner reefs has been lost since 1986. Of particular significance is the new evidence that coral cover has remained unchanged or declined further from a low 1986 baseline in 28 out of 29 sub-regions of the Great Barrier Reef, indicating a gradual erosion of resilience that is impeding the capacity of this huge reef system to return towards its earlier condition. This result, and other clear evidence of widespread incremental degradation from overfishing, pollution, and climate change, calls for action rather than complacency or denial.

  10. Enhanced Actuator Line Simulation of a Wind Turbine by including the Conservative Load at the Blade Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herraez, Ivan; Micallef, Daniel; van Kuik, Gijs A. M.; Peinke, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    At the tip of wind turbine blades, the radial bound circulation is transformed into chordwise circulation just before being released as trailing vorticity, giving rise to the tip vortex. The force acting on the chordwise circulation contains a radial and a normal component with respect to the blade axis. This load does not contribute to the torque, so it is a conservative load. Due to this, it is disregarded in the engineering tools used for the design of wind turbines. However, as we demonstrated in a previous work, the conservative load might influence the trajectory of the tip vortex. In order to see how this affects the blade loads, in this research we perform large eddy simulations with an actuator line model where the conservative load has been included. The conservative load reduces the angle of attack in the tip region as a consequence of the modified tip vortex trajectory. This has a negative influence on the lift and the power output. We conclude that the accuracy of engineering design tools of wind turbines can be improved if the conservative load acting at the tip is considered.

  11. Non-collinear valve actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A non-collinear valve actuator includes a primary actuating system and a return spring system with each applying forces to a linkage system in order to regulate the flow of a quarter-turn valve. The primary actuating system and return spring system are positioned non-collinearly, which simply means the primary actuating system and return spring system are not in line with each other. By positioning the primary actuating system and return spring system in this manner, the primary actuating system can undergo a larger stroke while the return spring system experiences significantly less displacement. This allows the length of the return spring to be reduced due to the minimization of displacement thereby reducing the weight of the return spring system. By allowing the primary actuating system to undergo longer strokes, the weight of the primary actuating system may also be reduced. Accordingly, the weight of the non-collinear valve actuator is reduced.

  12. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  13. Devonian reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhme, A.K.

    1986-05-01

    Three reef settings in northern Alberta and British Columbia were examined: (1) shelf edge, in the Clarke Lake shale basin; (2) open-marine pinnacle, in the Clarke Lake shale basin; and (3) restricted basin pinnacle, in the Shekilie evaporite basin. The shelf-edge reef tends to be water prone and does not offer the same reserves potential as pinnacle reefs; therefore, it is not examined in detail. The pinnacle reefs in the open-marine setting tend to be gas prone, whereas the pinnacle reefs in the restricted basin setting tend to be oil prone. Seismic models were generated from geologic cross sections over existing, economically producing reef anomalies. Seismic responses from these models were then examined, and criteria for reef identification established. For the acid test, seismic anomalies that were tested by the drill bit were examined, and the validity of the reef identification criteria was confirmed. Examples include both economic successes and failures. A different set of criteria for pinnacle reef identification were established for open-marine and restricted basin settings. Criteria are not universally applicable, so each basin will have a different set. Detecting the content and amount of porosity in reefs using seismic studies is elusive at best and remains a challenge to the explorationist.

  14. Digital Reef Rugosity Estimates Coral Reef Habitat Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Dustan, Phillip; Doherty, Orla; Pardede, Shinta

    2013-01-01

    Ecological habitats with greater structural complexity contain more species due to increased niche diversity. This is especially apparent on coral reefs where individual coral colonies aggregate to give a reef its morphology, species zonation, and three dimensionality. Structural complexity is classically measured with a reef rugosity index, which is the ratio of a straight line transect to the distance a flexible chain of equal length travels when draped over the reef substrate; yet, other techniques from visual categories to remote sensing have been used to characterize structural complexity at scales from microhabitats to reefscapes. Reef-scale methods either lack quantitative precision or are too time consuming to be routinely practical, while remotely sensed indices are mismatched to the finer scale morphology of coral colonies and reef habitats. In this communication a new digital technique, Digital Reef Rugosity (DRR) is described which utilizes a self-contained water level gauge enabling a diver to quickly and accurately characterize rugosity with non-invasive millimeter scale measurements of coral reef surface height at decimeter intervals along meter scale transects. The precise measurements require very little post-processing and are easily imported into a spreadsheet for statistical analyses and modeling. To assess its applicability we investigated the relationship between DRR and fish community structure at four coral reef sites on Menjangan Island off the northwest corner of Bali, Indonesia and one on mainland Bali to the west of Menjangan Island; our findings show a positive relationship between DRR and fish diversity. Since structural complexity drives key ecological processes on coral reefs, we consider that DRR may become a useful quantitative community-level descriptor to characterize reef complexity. PMID:23437380

  15. Behavioural thermoregulation in a temperature-sensitive coral reef fish, the five-lined cardinalfish ( Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nay, Tiffany J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Habary, Adam; Steffensen, John F.; Rummer, Jodie L.

    2015-12-01

    As global temperatures increase, fish populations at low latitudes are thought to be at risk as they are adapted to narrow temperature ranges and live at temperatures close to their thermal tolerance limits. Behavioural movements, based on a preference for a specific temperature ( T pref), may provide a strategy to cope with changing conditions. A temperature-sensitive coral reef cardinalfish ( Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus) was exposed to 28 °C (average at collection site) or 32 °C (predicted end-of-century) for 6 weeks. T pref was determined using a shuttlebox system, which allowed fish to behaviourally manipulate their thermal environment. Regardless of treatment temperature, fish preferred 29.5 ± 0.25 °C, approximating summer average temperatures in the wild. However, 32 °C fish moved more frequently to correct their thermal environment than 28 °C fish, and daytime movements were more frequent than night-time movements. Understanding temperature-mediated movements is imperative for predicting how ocean warming will influence coral reef species and distribution patterns.

  16. Black reefs: iron-induced phase shifts on coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Linda Wegley; Barott, Katie L; Dinsdale, Elizabeth; Friedlander, Alan M; Nosrat, Bahador; Obura, David; Sala, Enric; Sandin, Stuart A; Smith, Jennifer E; Vermeij, Mark J A; Williams, Gareth J; Willner, Dana; Rohwer, Forest

    2012-03-01

    The Line Islands are calcium carbonate coral reef platforms located in iron-poor regions of the central Pacific. Natural terrestrial run-off of iron is non-existent and aerial deposition is extremely low. However, a number of ship groundings have occurred on these atolls. The reefs surrounding the shipwreck debris are characterized by high benthic cover of turf algae, macroalgae, cyanobacterial mats and corallimorphs, as well as particulate-laden, cloudy water. These sites also have very low coral and crustose coralline algal cover and are call black reefs because of the dark-colored benthic community and reduced clarity of the overlying water column. Here we use a combination of benthic surveys, chemistry, metagenomics and microcosms to investigate if and how shipwrecks initiate and maintain black reefs. Comparative surveys show that the live coral cover was reduced from 40 to 60% to <10% on black reefs on Millennium, Tabuaeran and Kingman. These three sites are relatively large (>0.75 km(2)). The phase shift occurs rapidly; the Kingman black reef formed within 3 years of the ship grounding. Iron concentrations in algae tissue from the Millennium black reef site were six times higher than in algae collected from reference sites. Metagenomic sequencing of the Millennium Atoll black reef-associated microbial community was enriched in iron-associated virulence genes and known pathogens. Microcosm experiments showed that corals were killed by black reef rubble through microbial activity. Together these results demonstrate that shipwrecks and their associated iron pose significant threats to coral reefs in iron-limited regions. PMID:21881615

  17. A Novel Hybrid Error Criterion-Based Active Control Method for on-Line Milling Vibration Suppression with Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Gao, Robert X; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Wang, Shibin

    2016-01-01

    Milling vibration is one of the most serious factors affecting machining quality and precision. In this paper a novel hybrid error criterion-based frequency-domain LMS active control method is constructed and used for vibration suppression of milling processes by piezoelectric actuators and sensors, in which only one Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is used and no Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) is involved. The correction formulas are derived by a steepest descent procedure and the control parameters are analyzed and optimized. Then, a novel hybrid error criterion is constructed to improve the adaptability, reliability and anti-interference ability of the constructed control algorithm. Finally, based on piezoelectric actuators and acceleration sensors, a simulation of a spindle and a milling process experiment are presented to verify the proposed method. Besides, a protection program is added in the control flow to enhance the reliability of the control method in applications. The simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is an effective and reliable way for on-line vibration suppression, and the machining quality can be obviously improved. PMID:26751448

  18. A Novel Hybrid Error Criterion-Based Active Control Method for on-Line Milling Vibration Suppression with Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Gao, Robert X.; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Wang, Shibin

    2016-01-01

    Milling vibration is one of the most serious factors affecting machining quality and precision. In this paper a novel hybrid error criterion-based frequency-domain LMS active control method is constructed and used for vibration suppression of milling processes by piezoelectric actuators and sensors, in which only one Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is used and no Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) is involved. The correction formulas are derived by a steepest descent procedure and the control parameters are analyzed and optimized. Then, a novel hybrid error criterion is constructed to improve the adaptability, reliability and anti-interference ability of the constructed control algorithm. Finally, based on piezoelectric actuators and acceleration sensors, a simulation of a spindle and a milling process experiment are presented to verify the proposed method. Besides, a protection program is added in the control flow to enhance the reliability of the control method in applications. The simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is an effective and reliable way for on-line vibration suppression, and the machining quality can be obviously improved. PMID:26751448

  19. A Paddock to reef monitoring and modelling framework for the Great Barrier Reef: Paddock and catchment component.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Chris; Waters, David; Vardy, Suzanne; Silburn, David M; Attard, Steve; Thorburn, Peter J; Davis, Aaron M; Halpin, Neil; Schmidt, Michael; Wilson, Bruce; Clark, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Targets for improvements in water quality entering the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) have been set through the Reef Water Quality Protection Plan (Reef Plan). To measure and report on progress towards the targets set a program has been established that combines monitoring and modelling at paddock through to catchment and reef scales; the Paddock to Reef Integrated Monitoring, Modelling and Reporting Program (Paddock to Reef Program). This program aims to provide evidence of links between land management activities, water quality and reef health. Five lines of evidence are used: the effectiveness of management practices to improve water quality; the prevalence of management practice adoption and change in catchment indicators; long-term monitoring of catchment water quality; paddock & catchment modelling to provide a relative assessment of progress towards meeting targets; and finally marine monitoring of GBR water quality and reef ecosystem health. This paper outlines the first four lines of evidence. PMID:22277580

  20. Reef grief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    As the first of the world's ecosystems faces extermination at our hands, coral reef ecologist Peter Sale -- Assistant Director of the Institute of Water, Environment and Health at the United Nations University in Ontario, Canada, and author of Our Dying Planet (published this autumn) -- talks to Nature Climate Change.

  1. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  2. Onondage pinnacle reefs in New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, G.M.

    1995-09-01

    Onondaga pinnacle reefs, part of the Onondaga Formation, developed in an epeiric setting of the lowermost Middle Devonian (Eifelian). The reefs were initiated as coral-crinoidal mounds in the Edgecliff Member of the formation. Whereas most Devonian reefs are composed of rugose corals. Coral is the predominant kind of fossil, followed by crinoids, brachiopods, mollusks, undifferentiated skeletal debris, and possible sponges. The initial mineralogy of the corals is inferred to have been calcite. The porosity of these reefs is almost unique among reef reservoirs. most reefs produce from secondary or diagenetic porosity; by contrast Onondaga reefs display primary intracoralline or framework porosity. Between framework builders and/or skeletal particles cryptocrystalline/microcrystalline cement fills pores. As observed in modern reefs this kind of cement resembles micrite, but probable formed as high-magnesian calcite in a high-energy setting. Syntaxial or rim cement common lines crinoid particles. Some of these pinnacle reefs, formerly gas producers, are presently under development as gas-storage reservoirs.

  3. Actuator-valve interface optimization. [Explosive actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1987-02-01

    The interface of explosive actuator driven valves can be optimized to maximize the velocity of the valve plunger by using the computer code Actuator-Valve Response. Details of the AVR model of the actuator driven valve plunger and the results of optimizing an actuator-valve interface with AVR are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Rotary actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotary actuators and other mechanical devices incorporating shape memory alloys are provided herein. Shape memory alloys are a group of metals which when deformed at temperatures below their martensite temperatures, resume the shapes which they had prior to the deformation if they are heated to temperatures above their austensite temperatures. Actuators in which shape memory alloys are employed include bias spring types, in which springs deform the shape memory alloy (SMA), and differential actuators, which use two SMA members mechanically connected in series. Another type uses concentric cylindrical members. One member is in the form of a sleeve surrounding a cylinder, both being constructed of shape memory alloys. Herein two capstans are mounted on a shaft which is supported in a framework. Each capstan is capable of rotating the shaft. Shape memory wire, as two separate lengths of wire, is wrapped around each capstan to form a winding around that capstan. The winding on one capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a prestretched state. The winding on the other capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a taut, but not a prestretched, state. Heating one performs work in one direction, thus deforming the other one. When the other SMA is heated the action is reversed.

  5. Great Barrier Reef

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... reef, but a vast maze of reefs, passages, and coral cays (islands that are part of the reef). This nadir true-color image was acquired by ... visible in this image is Whitsunday Island, with smaller islands and reefs extending southeast, parallel to the coast. These include ...

  6. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  7. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  8. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan

    in tactile display is investigated by the prototyping of a large scale refreshable Braille display device. Braille is a critical way for the vision impaired community to learn literacy and improve life quality. Current piezoelectrics-based refreshable Braille display technologies are limited to up to 1 line of Braille text, due to the bulky size of bimorph actuators. Based on the unique actuation feature of BSEP, refreshable Braille display devices up to smartphone-size have been demonstrated by polymer sheet laminates. Dots in the devices can be individually controlled via incorporated field-driven BSEP actuators and Joule heater units. A composite material consisting of silver nanowires (AgNW) embedded in a polymer substrate is brought up as a compliant electrode candidate for BSEP application. The AgNW composite is highly conductive (Rs: 10 Ω/sq) and remains conductive at strains as high as 140% (Rs: <10 3 Ω/sq). The baseline conductivity has only small changes up to 90% strain, which makes it low enough for both field driving and stretchable Joule heating. An out-of-plane bistable area strain up to 68% under Joule heating is achieved.

  9. Thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports design and characterization testing of thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays. The micromirrors were fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs polysilicon surface micromachining process. The power averaging characteristic of thermal actuation is exploited in a novel line addressing scheme which reduces wiring for an n2 array to 2n wires. Mirror deflections were measured with a microscope laser interferometer system equipped with a vacuum chamber. Data presented includes device uniformity, frequency response, and deflection versus drive power for varied ambient pressure. Initial test results confirm that thermally actuated piston micromirrors offer several advantages over more common electrostatic designs. Thermally actuated micromirrors offer greater deflections at drive voltages compatible with CMOS circuitry. Measured thermal piston micromirror deflection versus drive voltage is nonlinear, but does not exhibit the 'snap through instability' characteristic of electrostatic devices. Operation of thermally actuated devices in rarefied ambient significantly decreases power dissipation. For a given deflection range, the power reduction facilitated by vacuum operation makes large arrays feasible. Frequency response of thermally actuated devices is limited by the ability of the device to dissipate heat, but operation at 1 kHz rates is feasible.

  10. Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This detailed view of the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia (19.5S, 149.5E) shows several small patch reefs within the overall reef system. The Great Barrier Reef, largest in the world, comprises thousands of individual reefs of great variety and are closely monitored by marine ecologists. These reefs are about 6000 years old and sit on top of much older reefs. The most rapid coral growth occurs on the landward side of the reefs.

  11. Biomimetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, Vaclav; Boudova, Lea; Haluzikova, Denisa

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the presentation is to propose an alternative model of mammalian skeletal muscle function, which reflects the simplicity of nature and can be applied in engineering. Van der Waals attractive and repulsive electrostatic forces are assumed to control the design of internal structures and functions of contractile units of the muscles - sarcomere. The role of myosin heads is crucial for the higher order formation. The model of the myosin head lattice is the working model for the sarcomere contraction interpretation. The contraction is interpreted as a calcium induced phase transition of the lattice, which results in relative actin-myosin sliding and/or force generation. The model should provide the engineering science with a simple analogy to technical actuators of high performance.

  12. Silurian pinnacle reef distribution in Illinois: model for hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, S.T.

    1987-09-01

    Approximately 92 million bbl of oil have been produced in Illinois from buried Silurian pinnacle reefs and from younger strata draped over these reefs. Better understanding of Silurian reef distribution and the use of appropriate exploration methods should lead to the discovery of new reef-associated hydrocarbon reserves. Evidence presented in this study suggest that Silurian pinnacle reef development was not limited to hinge-line trend around a subsiding basin center. Instead, isolated reefs grew through most of Illinois along a broad ramp dipping gently southeastward under a relatively shallow sea that opened to the south during the Silurian. Uplift of the Wabash platform in Indiana enabled concurrent pinnacle reef development along its flanks and formed the Fort Wayne and Terre Haute banks. These reef banks merged with and extended the scattered trends in Illinois. Erosion of Silurian strata prior to the Middle Devonian, particularly along the emerging Sangamon arch, removed or reduced the pinnacle reef structures across much of the central Illinois. These reef remnants are not easily detected by exploration methods commonly used in the basin, yet they can be oil-productive. Applications of geophysical and detailed lithologic surveys can greatly enhance the ability to locate these reefs.

  13. Powerful Electromechanical Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John R.; Myers, William N.

    1994-01-01

    Powerful electromechanical linear actuator designed to replace hydraulic actuator that provides incremental linear movements to large object and holds its position against heavy loads. Electromechanical actuator cleaner and simpler, and needs less maintenance. Two principal innovative features that distinguish new actuator are use of shaft-angle resolver as source of position feedback to electronic control subsystem and antibacklash gearing arrangement.

  14. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  15. Journey to the Reef

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Despite their experiences with a cartoon sponge, most elementary students know little about the diverse inhabitants of coral reefs. Therefore, with vivid photography and video, diverse coral reef inhabitants were brought to life for the author's fifth-grade students. Students shared their knowledge in language arts and even explored coral reefs in…

  16. The effectiveness of coral reefs for coastal hazard risk reduction and adaptation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrario, Filippo; Beck, Michael W.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Micheli, Fiorenza; Shepard, Christine C.; Airoldi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The world’s coastal zones are experiencing rapid development and an increase in storms and flooding. These hazards put coastal communities at heightened risk, which may increase with habitat loss. Here we analyse globally the role and cost effectiveness of coral reefs in risk reduction. Meta-analyses reveal that coral reefs provide substantial protection against natural hazards by reducing wave energy by an average of 97%. Reef crests alone dissipate most of this energy (86%). There are 100 million or more people who may receive risk reduction benefits from reefs or bear hazard mitigation and adaptation costs if reefs are degraded. We show that coral reefs can provide comparable wave attenuation benefits to artificial defences such as breakwaters, and reef defences can be enhanced cost effectively. Reefs face growing threats yet there is opportunity to guide adaptation and hazard mitigation investments towards reef restoration to strengthen this first line of coastal defence.

  17. The effectiveness of coral reefs for coastal hazard risk reduction and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Filippo; Beck, Michael W; Storlazzi, Curt D; Micheli, Fiorenza; Shepard, Christine C; Airoldi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The world's coastal zones are experiencing rapid development and an increase in storms and flooding. These hazards put coastal communities at heightened risk, which may increase with habitat loss. Here we analyse globally the role and cost effectiveness of coral reefs in risk reduction. Meta-analyses reveal that coral reefs provide substantial protection against natural hazards by reducing wave energy by an average of 97%. Reef crests alone dissipate most of this energy (86%). There are 100 million or more people who may receive risk reduction benefits from reefs or bear hazard mitigation and adaptation costs if reefs are degraded. We show that coral reefs can provide comparable wave attenuation benefits to artificial defences such as breakwaters, and reef defences can be enhanced cost effectively. Reefs face growing threats yet there is opportunity to guide adaptation and hazard mitigation investments towards reef restoration to strengthen this first line of coastal defence. PMID:24825660

  18. The effectiveness of coral reefs for coastal hazard risk reduction and adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Filippo; Beck, Michael W.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Micheli, Fiorenza; Shepard, Christine C.; Airoldi, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The world’s coastal zones are experiencing rapid development and an increase in storms and flooding. These hazards put coastal communities at heightened risk, which may increase with habitat loss. Here we analyse globally the role and cost effectiveness of coral reefs in risk reduction. Meta-analyses reveal that coral reefs provide substantial protection against natural hazards by reducing wave energy by an average of 97%. Reef crests alone dissipate most of this energy (86%). There are 100 million or more people who may receive risk reduction benefits from reefs or bear hazard mitigation and adaptation costs if reefs are degraded. We show that coral reefs can provide comparable wave attenuation benefits to artificial defences such as breakwaters, and reef defences can be enhanced cost effectively. Reefs face growing threats yet there is opportunity to guide adaptation and hazard mitigation investments towards reef restoration to strengthen this first line of coastal defence. PMID:24825660

  19. Reefing of Quarter Spherical Ribbon Parachutes used in the Ares I First Stage Deceleration Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Jason R.; McFadden, Peter G.

    2009-01-01

    Normalizing drop test reefed drag area for suspension line length with data from Wolf allows best match of test results with Knacke reefing ratio curve. Various sizes and porosities of quarter spherical ribbon parachutes were tested. All appear to fit the published reefing ratio curve-quarter spherical parachutes match.

  20. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  1. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  2. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  3. AMSD Cryo Actuator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullette, Mark; Matthews, Gary; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The actuator technology required for AMSD and subsequently NGST are critical in the successful development for future cryogenic systems. Kodak has undertaken an extensive test plan to determine the performance of the force actuators developed under the AMSD program. These actuators are currently in testing at MSFC and are expected to finish this test cycle in early June 2002.

  4. Subminiature hydraulic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.

    1978-01-01

    Subminiature, single-vane rotary actuator for wind-tunnel test-model control-surface actuation systems presents severe torque and system band-pass requirements with stringent space and weight limitations. Actuator has very low leakage of fluid from one side to other, permitting use in precision position servo-systems.

  5. Dual drive actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new class of electromechanical actuators is described. These dual drive actuators were developed for the NASA-JPL Galileo Spacecraft. The dual drive actuators are fully redundant and therefore have high inherent reliability. They can be used for a variety of tasks, and they can be fabricated quickly and economically.

  6. Refreshable Braille Displays Using EAP Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2010-01-01

    Refreshable Braille can help visually impaired persons benefit from the growing advances in computer technology. The development of such displays in a full screen form is a great challenge due to the need to pack many actuators in small area without interferences. In recent years, various displays using actuators such as piezoelectric stacks have become available in commercial form but most of them are limited to one line Braille code. Researchers in the field of electroactive polymers (EAP) investigated methods of using these materials to form full screen displays. This manuscript reviews the state of the art of producing refreshable Braille displays using EAP-based actuators..

  7. Omnidirectional Actuator Handle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed actuator handle comprises two normally concentric rings, cables, and pulleys arranged such that relative displacement of rings from concentricity results in pulling of cable and consequent actuation of associated mechanism. Unlike conventional actuator handles like levers on farm implements, actuated from one or two directions only, proposed handle reached from almost any direction and actuated by pulling or pushing inner ring in any direction with respect to outer ring. Flanges installed on inner ring to cover gap between inner ring and housing to prevent clothing from being caught.

  8. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  9. Smart patch piezoceramic actuator issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven F.; Denoyer, Keith K.; Yost, Brad

    1993-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is undertaking the challenge of finding new and innovative ways to integrate sensing, actuation, and the supporting control and power electronics into a compact self-contained unit to provide vibration suppression for a host structure. This self-contained unit is commonly referred to as a smart patch. The interfaces to the smart patch will be limited to standard spacecraft power and possibly a communications line. The effort to develop a smart patch involves both contractual and inhouse programs which are currently focused on miniaturization of the electronics associated with vibrational control using piezoceramic sensors and actuators. This paper is comprised of two distinct parts. The first part examines issues associated with bonding piezoceramic actuators to a host structure. Experimental data from several specimens with varying flexural stiffness are compared to predictions from two piezoelectric/substructure coupling models, the Blocked Force Model and the Uniform Strain Model with Perfect Bonding. The second part of the paper highlights a demonstration article smart patch created using the insights gained from inhouse efforts at the Phillips Laboratory. This demonstration article has self contained electronics on the same order of size as the actuator powered by a voltage differential of approximately 32 volts. This voltage is provided by four rechargeable 8 volt batteries.

  10. Smart patch piezoceramic actuator issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steven F.; Denoyer, Keith K.; Yost, Brad

    1993-02-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is undertaking the challenge of finding new and innovative ways to integrate sensing, actuation, and the supporting control and power electronics into a compact self-contained unit to provide vibration suppression for a host structure. This self-contained unit is commonly referred to as a smart patch. The interfaces to the smart patch will be limited to standard spacecraft power and possibly a communications line. The effort to develop a smart patch involves both contractual and inhouse programs which are currently focused on miniaturization of the electronics associated with vibrational control using piezoceramic sensors and actuators. This paper is comprised of two distinct parts. The first part examines issues associated with bonding piezoceramic actuators to a host structure. Experimental data from several specimens with varying flexural stiffness are compared to predictions from two piezoelectric/substructure coupling models, the Blocked Force Model and the Uniform Strain Model with Perfect Bonding. The second part of the paper highlights a demonstration article smart patch created using the insights gained from inhouse efforts at the Phillips Laboratory. This demonstration article has self contained electronics on the same order of size as the actuator powered by a voltage differential of approximately 32 volts. This voltage is provided by four rechargeable 8 volt batteries.

  11. Reef Education Evaluation: Environmental Knowledge and Reef Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Reef education evaluation: environmental knowledge and reef experience report concerns PhD research about marine education, and the investigation of learning with high school students and the effect of coral reef monitoring marine experiential education interventions. The effectiveness of classroom learning and reef trips were…

  12. Electropneumatic actuator, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, D. P.

    1989-10-01

    The program demonstrated the feasibility of an electropneumatic actuator which can be used in manufacturing applications. The electropneumatic actuator, an alternative to the electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators used in industry, consists of an electrochemical compressor, a power supply, and an actuator. The electrochemical compressor working fluid is hydrogen and a solvent such as water or ammonia. The compressor has no moving parts and runs on low voltage DC. The actuator is a conventional, commercially available unit. Researchers designed, constructed, and tested the electrochemical compressor in conjunction with the actuator, power supply, and computerized control. The one inch actuator can lift a fifty pound weight a distance of ten inches in about 1.5 minutes. The electrochemically powered system is capable of driving its loaded actuator to a prescribed location at a controlled rate. A defined set of design changes will combine the compressor and actuator in the same housing, and will develop two orders of magnitude increased actuator speed at the same or higher force levels.

  13. Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A better than average view of the Great Barrier Reef was captured by SeaWiFS on a recent overpass. There is sunglint northeast of the reef and there appears to be some sort of filamentous bloom in the Capricorn Channel.

  14. Complementarity of no-take marine reserves and individual transferable catch quotas for managing the line fishery of the great barrier reef.

    PubMed

    Little, L R; Grafton, R Q; Kompas, T; Smith, A D M; Punt, A E; Mapstone, B D

    2011-04-01

    Changes in the management of the fin fish fishery of the Great Barrier Reef motivated us to investigate the combined effects on economic returns and fish biomass of no-take areas and regulated total allowable catch allocated in the form of individual transferable quotas (such quotas apportion the total allowable catch as fishing rights and permits the buying and selling of these rights among fishers). We built a spatially explicit biological and economic model of the fishery to analyze the trade-offs between maintaining given levels of fish biomass and the net financial returns from fishing under different management regimes. Results of the scenarios we modeled suggested that a decrease in total allowable catch at high levels of harvest either increased net returns or lowered them only slightly, but increased biomass by up to 10% for a wide range of reserve sizes and an increase in the reserve area from none to 16% did not greatly change net returns at any catch level. Thus, catch shares and no-take reserves can be complementary and when these methods are used jointly they promote lower total allowable catches when harvest is relatively high and encourage larger no-take areas when they are small. PMID:20964713

  15. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  16. Comprehensive piezoceramic actuator review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chris J.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2002-07-01

    Piezoceramic actuation has become an area of increased interest in the past ten years. Having been used for many years as sensors in such applications as pressure transducers and smoke detectors, piezoceramics are now being used as prime movers in fuel injectors and valve lifters. In an effort to aid the engineering community, this paper will conduct a comprehensive review of several piezoceramic actuators. Classical design parameters will be derived for each actuator such as blocked force and free stroke. In addition, more esoteric entities such as mechanical efficiency and energy density will also be derived. The result will be design metrics of popular piezoceramic actuators containing vital design equations, validated with empirical data. Of the many different configurations of piezoceramic actuators, this paper will investigate the bimorph and unimorph bender. These actuator types are finding increased use in semi-active structural damping, energy harvesting and vibration control. The work in this paper will show experimental verification of various actuator types as well as theoretical derivations. In addition to unimorphs, bimorphs and stack actuators a novel type of unimorph bender, the THUNDER actuator (developed and licensed by NASA) will be included in the review.

  17. Remote control thermal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Harrigill, W. T.; Krsek, A.

    1969-01-01

    Thermal actuator makes precise changes in the position of one object with respect to another. Expansion of metal tubes located in the actuator changes the position of the mounting block. Capacitance probe measures the change in position of the block relative to the fixed target plate.

  18. Self-actuated device

    DOEpatents

    Hecht, Samuel L.

    1984-01-01

    A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

  19. Control surface actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Gerhard E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A device which actuates aircraft control surfaces is disclosed. The actuator is disposed entirely within the control surface structure. This allows the gap between the wing structural box and the control surface to be reduced. Reducing the size of the gap is especially desirable for wings with high aspect ratio, wherein the volume of the structural box is at a premium.

  20. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  1. Australia's Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Great Barrier Reef extends for 2,000 kilometers along the northeastern coast of Australia. It is not a single reef, but a vast maze of reefs, passages, and coral cays (islands that are part of the reef). This nadir true-color image was acquired by the MISR instrument on August 26, 2000 (Terra orbit 3679), and shows part of the southern portion of the reef adjacent to the central Queensland coast. The width of the MISR swath is approximately 380 kilometers, with the reef clearly visible up to approximately 200 kilometers from the coast. It may be difficult to see the myriad details in the browse image, but if you retrieve the higher resolution version, a zoomed display reveals the spectacular structure of the many reefs.

    The more northerly coastal area in this image shows the vast extent of sugar cane cultivation, this being the largest sugar producing area in Australia, centered on the city of Mackay. Other industries in the area include coal, cattle, dairying, timber, grain, seafood, and fruit. The large island off the most northerly part of the coast visible in this image is Whitsunday Island, with smaller islands and reefs extending southeast, parallel to the coast. These include some of the better known resort islands such as Hayman, Lindeman, Hamilton, and Brampton Islands.

    Further south, just inland of the small semicircular bay near the right of the image, is Rockhampton, the largest city along the central Queensland coast, and the regional center for much of central Queensland. Rockhampton is just north of the Tropic of Capricorn. Its hinterland is a rich pastoral, agricultural, and mining region.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  2. Coral Reef Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, Helen T.

    Coral reefs are geological structures of significant dimensions, constructed over millions of years by calcifying organisms. The present day reef-builders are hard corals belonging to the order Scleractinia, phylum Cnidaria. The greatest concentrations of coral reefs are in the tropics, with highest levels of biodiversity situated in reefs of the Indo-West Pacific region. These ecosystems have provided coastal protection and livelihood to human populations over the millennia. Human activities have caused destruction of these habitats, the intensity of which has increased alarmingly since the latter decades of the twentieth century. The severity of this impact is directly related to exponential growth rates of human populations especially in the coastal areas of the developing world. However, a more recently recognized phenomenon concerns disturbances brought about by the changing climate, manifested mainly as rising sea surface temperatures, and increasing acidification of ocean waters due to greater drawdown of higher concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Management efforts have so far not kept pace with the rates of degradation, so that the spatial extent of damaged reefs and the incidences of localized extinction of reef species are increasing year after year. The major management efforts to date consist of establishing marine protected areas and promoting the active restoration of coral habitats.

  3. Electro-Mechanical Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The electro-mechanical actuator, a new electronics technology, is an electronic system that provides the force needed to move valves that control the flow of propellant to the engine. It is proving to be advantageous for the main propulsion system plarned for a second generation reusable launch vehicle. Hydraulic actuators have been used successfully in rocket propulsion systems. However, they can leak when high pressure is exerted on such a fluid-filled hydraulic system. Also, hydraulic systems require significant maintenance and support equipment. The electro-mechanical actuator is proving to be low maintenance and the system weighs less than a hydraulic system. The electronic controller is a separate unit powering the actuator. Each actuator has its own control box. If a problem is detected, it can be replaced by simply removing one defective unit. The hydraulic systems must sustain significant hydraulic pressures in a rocket engine regardless of demand. The electro-mechanical actuator utilizes power only when needed. A goal of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program is to substantially improve safety and reliability while reducing the high cost of space travel. The electro-mechanical actuator was developed by the Propulsion Projects Office of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  4. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  5. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  6. An overview of Miocene reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.F. Jr. ); Colgan, M.W. ); Frost, S.H. ); Glenn, E.C. ); Bosence, D. ); Esteban, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Miocene reefs lived approximately within the latitudes of 27{degree}S to 48{degree}N compared with 25{degree}S and 32{degree}N for Holocene reefs. This expansion of reef-growing environments was the result of warm Miocene climates, aided by a eustatic sea level rise and tectonic styles that provided numerous foundations for reef development. The majority of Miocene reefs are found in three main areas: (1) Southeast Asia and the western Pacific, (2) the Mediterranean-Middle East, and (3) Middle America and the Caribbean. These regions, with their distinctive suites of coral and foramineral species, formed three biological provinces; respectively, they are the Indo-Pacific, Tethyan, and Western Atlantic provinces. Miocene reefs in Southeast Asia occur in several foreland basins as patch reef complexes on paleohighs and as barrier reefs in back-arc basins. Those reefs in the Mediterranean occur as fringing reefs, middle-shelf patch reefs, or as barrier reefs on the edges of tectonic blocks associated with Alpine thrust belts. Most reefs in the Caribbean grew on isolated open-ocean highs of volcanic origin. Miocene reefs display a diversity of framework types: (1) coral-encrusting, red algal boundstones with diverse coral faunas, (2) branching coral-encrusting, red algal boundstones with a limited Poritid fauna, (3) encrusting red algal boundstones. Barrier reef systems are especially rich in encrusting red algae and robust corals; grainstones are common as interbedded sediment. Patch reef complexes, however, display muddy carbonate textures, may have less diverse coral faunas, and commonly have larger foraminifera. The global distribution of Miocene reefs is important because (1) it provides insight into a paleoclimatic view of the earth during a major greenhouse stage and (2) Miocene buildups, such as the Arun (EUR of 14 tcf) and Bima fields (EUR of about 100 MMBO), are exploration targets.

  7. Coral reefs: Turning back time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lough, Janice M.

    2016-03-01

    An in situ experiment finds that reducing the acidity of the seawater surrounding a natural coral reef significantly increases reef calcification, suggesting that ocean acidification may already be slowing coral growth. See Letter p.362

  8. Magnetically Actuated Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinera, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a magnetically actuated seal in which either a single electromagnet, or multiple electromagnets, are used to control the seal's position. This system can either be an open/ close type of system or an actively controlled system.

  9. Rotary Series Elastic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  10. Rotary series elastic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  11. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  12. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The linear proof mass actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (mass, upper housing, lower housing, and center support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operating testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  13. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, S. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The Linear Proof Mass Actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (Mass, Upper Housing, Lower Housing, and Center Support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operational testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  14. Laser Initiated Actuator study

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.

    1991-06-27

    The program task was to design and study a laser initiated actuator. The design of the actuator is described, it being comprised of the fiber and body subassemblies. The energy source for all experiments was a Spectra Diode 2200-H2 laser diode. The diode is directly coupled to a 100 micron core, 0.3 numerical aperture fiber optic terminated with an SMA connector. The successful testing results are described and recommendations are made.

  15. Inertial Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren

    1995-01-01

    Inertial linear actuators developed to suppress residual accelerations of nominally stationary or steadily moving platforms. Function like long-stroke version of voice coil in conventional loudspeaker, with superimposed linear variable-differential transformer. Basic concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations of terrestrial platforms. For example, laboratory table equipped with such actuators plus suitable vibration sensors and control circuits made to vibrate much less in presence of seismic, vehicular, and other environmental vibrational disturbances.

  16. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  17. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  18. Reefs at risk.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1999-01-01

    Coral reefs, considered the rainforests of the seas, are home to a diverse number of marine species. These reefs are tightly woven ecosystems with complex linkages, which, if disturbed, result in an unpleasant chain of events. Furthermore, these reefs are the main source of animal protein for more than a billion people. Aside from supplying food, they stabilize shorelines and protect the land from rising seas and storm damage. Also, they provide sources of medicines used for bone grafts and treatment for certain viruses. However, these reefs are in danger of being permanently damaged as a result of natural and man-made forces. In response to this threat, most marine scientists have suggested that local communities be involved in the implementation and management of programs, with the aim of achieving sustainable reef maintenance. In addition, international agencies have taken the initiative to finance such programs to ensure their continuity. Overall, the management and development of coastal ecosystems depend on how they are managed and not on how they are being exploited. Resources must be rebuilt and their protection ensured for future generations. PMID:12322541

  19. Coral reef hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Oberdorfer, J.A.

    1985-05-21

    Knowledge of internal flow velocities and pore water residence time is important in understanding pore water geochemistry, nutrient fluxes at the benthic boundary, reef diagenesis, and fresh water resources in reef islands. Hydrogeologic studies of Pacific and Indian Ocean reef and atoll islands indicate a dual aquifer systems; the major Pleistocene aquifer has hydraulic conductivities on the order of 1000 m/d, while the overlying Holocene aquifer of unconsolidated sediments is at least an order of magnitude less permeable. The high permeability in the Pleistocene formation is the result of large voids, both constructional and from subaerial solution during low stands of the sea. Wind, wave and tide induced head differences ranging from a few centimeters to several tens of centimeters provide the driving force for internal flow. Pore water residence times and geochemistry will vary greatly, depending on whether the water is in a major flow channel or in more restricted pores. Studies of both submerged reefs and atoll islands give bulk pore water residence times on the order of months to a few years. Chemical analyses of pore water indicate that both carbonate solution and precipitation are taking place, which will alter porosity and permeability with time. The dual aquifer model also suggests that the Ghyben-Herzberg lens approach to reef island fresh water resources is inaccurate and can lead to a gross overestimation of the potable resource. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Distribution, abundance and diversity of crustose coralline algae on the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Angela J.; Steneck, Robert S.; Tager, Danika; Pandolfi, John M.

    2015-06-01

    The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is the world's largest coral reef ecosystem. Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are important contributors to reef calcium carbonate and can facilitate coral recruitment. Despite the importance of CCA, little is known about species-level distribution, abundance, and diversity, and how these vary across the continental shelf and key habitat zones within the GBR. We quantified CCA species distributions using line transects ( n = 127) at 17 sites in the northern and central regions of the GBR, distributed among inner-, mid-, and outer-shelf regions. At each site, we identified CCA along replicate transects in three habitat zones: reef flat, reef crest, and reef slope. Taxonomically, CCA species are challenging to identify (especially in the field), and there is considerable disagreement in approach. We used published, anatomically based taxonomic schemes for consistent identification. We identified 30 CCA species among 12 genera; the most abundant species were Porolithon onkodes, Paragoniolithon conicum (sensu Adey), Neogoniolithon fosliei, and Hydrolithon reinboldii. Significant cross-shelf differences were observed in CCA community structure and CCA abundance, with inner-shelf reefs exhibiting lower CCA abundance than outer-shelf reefs. Shelf position, habitat zone, latitude, depth, and the interaction of shelf position and habitat were all significantly associated with variation in composition of CCA communities. Collectively, shelf position, habitat, and their interaction contributed to 22.6 % of the variation in coralline communities. Compared to mid- and outer-shelf sites, inner-shelf sites exhibited lower relative abundances of N. fosliei and Lithophyllum species. Reef crest habitats exhibited greater abundance of N. fosliei than reef flat and reef slope habitats. Reef slope habitats exhibited lower abundance of P. onkodes, but greater abundance of Neogoniolithon clavycymosum than reef crest and reef slope habitats. These findings

  1. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  2. Hybrid electromechanical actuator and actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid electromechanical actuator has two different types of electromechanical elements, one that expands in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto and one that contracts in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto. The two electromechanical elements are (i) disposed in relation to one another such that the transverse directions thereof are parallel to one another, and (ii) mechanically coupled to one another at least at two opposing edges thereof. Electric power is applied simultaneously to the elements.

  3. A novel multi-actuation CMOS RF MEMS switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chiung-I.; Ko, Chih-Hsiang; Huang, Tsun-Che

    2008-12-01

    This paper demonstrates a capacitive shunt type RF MEMS switch, which is actuated by electro-thermal actuator and electrostatic actuator at the same time, and than latching the switching status by electrostatic force only. Since thermal actuators need relative low voltage compare to electrostatic actuators, and electrostatic force needs almost no power to maintain the switching status, the benefits of the mechanism are very low actuation voltage and low power consumption. Moreover, the RF MEMS switch has considered issues for integrated circuit compatible in design phase. So the switch is fabricated by a standard 0.35um 2P4M CMOS process and uses wet etching and dry etching technologies for postprocess. This compatible ability is important because the RF characteristics are not only related to the device itself. If a packaged RF switch and a packaged IC wired together, the parasitic capacitance will cause the problem for optimization. The structure of the switch consists of a set of CPW transmission lines and a suspended membrane. The CPW lines and the membrane are in metal layers of CMOS process. Besides, the electro-thermal actuators are designed by polysilicon layer of the CMOS process. So the RF switch is only CMOS process layers needed for both electro-thermal and electrostatic actuations in switch. The thermal actuator is composed of a three-dimensional membrane and two heaters. The membrane is a stacked step structure including two metal layers in CMOS process, and heat is generated by poly silicon resistors near the anchors of membrane. Measured results show that the actuation voltage of the switch is under 7V for electro-thermal added electrostatic actuation.

  4. Environmental quality and preservation; reefs, corals, and carbonate sands; guides to reef-ecosystem health and environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lidz, Barbara H.

    2001-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, the health of the entire coral reef ecosystem that lines the outer shelf off the Florida Keys has declined markedly. In particular, loss of those coral species that are the building blocks of solid reef framework has significant negative implications for economic vitality of the region. What are the reasons for this decline? Is it due to natural change, or are human activities (recreational diving, ship groundings, farmland runoff, nutrient influx, air-borne contaminants, groundwater pollutants) a contributing factor and if so, to what extent? At risk of loss are biologic resources of the reefs, including habitats for endangered species in shoreline mangroves, productive marine and wetland nurseries, and economic fisheries. A healthy reef ecosystem builds a protective offshore barrier to catastrophic wave action and storm surges generated by tropical storms and hurricanes. In turn, a healthy reef protects the homes, marinas, and infrastructure on the Florida Keys that have been designed to capture a lucrative tourism industry. A healthy reef ecosystem also protects inland agricultural and livestock areas of South Florida whose produce and meat feed much of the United States and other parts of the world. In cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Marine Sanctuary Program, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) continues longterm investigations of factors that may affect Florida's reefs. One of the first steps in distinguishing between natural change and the effects of human activities, however, is to determine how coral reefs have responded to past environmental change, before the advent of man. By so doing, accurate scientific information becomes available for Marine Sanctuary management to understand natural change and thus to assess and regulate potential human impact better. The USGS studies described here evaluate the distribution (location) and historic vitality (thickness) of Holocene

  5. Postglacial fringing-reef to barrier-reef conversion on Tahiti links Darwin's reef types.

    PubMed

    Blanchon, Paul; Granados-Corea, Marian; Abbey, Elizabeth; Braga, Juan C; Braithwaite, Colin; Kennedy, David M; Spencer, Tom; Webster, Jody M; Woodroffe, Colin D

    2014-01-01

    In 1842 Charles Darwin claimed that vertical growth on a subsiding foundation caused fringing reefs to transform into barrier reefs then atolls. Yet historically no transition between reef types has been discovered and they are widely considered to develop independently from antecedent foundations during glacio-eustatic sea-level rise. Here we reconstruct reef development from cores recovered by IODP Expedition 310 to Tahiti, and show that a fringing reef retreated upslope during postglacial sea-level rise and transformed into a barrier reef when it encountered a Pleistocene reef-flat platform. The reef became stranded on the platform edge, creating a lagoon that isolated it from coastal sediment and facilitated a switch to a faster-growing coral assemblage dominated by acroporids. The switch increased the reef's accretion rate, allowing it to keep pace with rising sea level, and transform into a barrier reef. This retreat mechanism not only links Darwin's reef types, but explains the re-occupation of reefs during Pleistocene glacio-eustacy. PMID:24845540

  6. Postglacial Fringing-Reef to Barrier-Reef conversion on Tahiti links Darwin's reef types

    PubMed Central

    Blanchon, Paul; Granados-Corea, Marian; Abbey, Elizabeth; Braga, Juan C.; Braithwaite, Colin; Kennedy, David M.; Spencer, Tom; Webster, Jody M.; Woodroffe, Colin D.

    2014-01-01

    In 1842 Charles Darwin claimed that vertical growth on a subsiding foundation caused fringing reefs to transform into barrier reefs then atolls. Yet historically no transition between reef types has been discovered and they are widely considered to develop independently from antecedent foundations during glacio-eustatic sea-level rise. Here we reconstruct reef development from cores recovered by IODP Expedition 310 to Tahiti, and show that a fringing reef retreated upslope during postglacial sea-level rise and transformed into a barrier reef when it encountered a Pleistocene reef-flat platform. The reef became stranded on the platform edge, creating a lagoon that isolated it from coastal sediment and facilitated a switch to a faster-growing coral assemblage dominated by acroporids. The switch increased the reef's accretion rate, allowing it to keep pace with rising sea level, and transform into a barrier reef. This retreat mechanism not only links Darwin's reef types, but explains the re-occupation of reefs during Pleistocene glacio-eustacy. PMID:24845540

  7. Postglacial Fringing-Reef to Barrier-Reef conversion on Tahiti links Darwin's reef types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchon, Paul; Granados-Corea, Marian; Abbey, Elizabeth; Braga, Juan C.; Braithwaite, Colin; Kennedy, David M.; Spencer, Tom; Webster, Jody M.; Woodroffe, Colin D.

    2014-05-01

    In 1842 Charles Darwin claimed that vertical growth on a subsiding foundation caused fringing reefs to transform into barrier reefs then atolls. Yet historically no transition between reef types has been discovered and they are widely considered to develop independently from antecedent foundations during glacio-eustatic sea-level rise. Here we reconstruct reef development from cores recovered by IODP Expedition 310 to Tahiti, and show that a fringing reef retreated upslope during postglacial sea-level rise and transformed into a barrier reef when it encountered a Pleistocene reef-flat platform. The reef became stranded on the platform edge, creating a lagoon that isolated it from coastal sediment and facilitated a switch to a faster-growing coral assemblage dominated by acroporids. The switch increased the reef's accretion rate, allowing it to keep pace with rising sea level, and transform into a barrier reef. This retreat mechanism not only links Darwin's reef types, but explains the re-occupation of reefs during Pleistocene glacio-eustacy.

  8. Typhoon damage on a shallow mesophotic reef in Okinawa, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Taku; Fujii, Takuma; Kawamura, Iori; Mizuyama, Masaru; Montenegro, Javier; Shikiba, Haruka; Naruse, Tohru; McClelland, TY; Denis, Vianney; Reimer, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about effects of large storm systems on mesophotic reefs. This study reports on how Typhoon 17 (Jelawat) affected Ryugu Reef on Okinawa-jima, Japan in September 2012. Benthic communities were surveyed before and after the typhoon using line intercept transect method. Comparison of the benthic assemblages showed highly significant differences in coral coverage at depths of 25–32 m before and after Typhoon 17. A large deep stand of Pachyseris foliosa was apparently less resistant to the storm than the shallower high diversity area of this reef. Contradictory to common perception, this research shows that large foliose corals at deeper depths are just as susceptible to typhoon damage as shallower branching corals. However, descriptive functional group analyses resulted in only minor changes after the disturbance, suggesting the high likelihood of recovery and the high resilience capacity of this mesophotic reef. PMID:24032094

  9. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  10. Waveguiding Actuators Based on Photothermally Responsive Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Hauser, Adam; Bende, Nakul; Kuzyk, Mark; Hayward, Ryan

    A simple means to achieve rapid and highly reversible photo-responsiveness in a hydrogel is to combine a thermally-responsive gel such as poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM), with the photothermal effect of gold nanoparticles. Relying on such composite gels, we fabricate micro-scale bilayer photoactuators by photolithographic patterning, and demonstrate their controlled bending/unbending behavior in response to visible light. In addition to actuation by flood exposure, 532 nm laser light can be waveguided through a plastic optical fiber to direct it into the photoactuator, providing the possibility for remotely controllable actuators that do not require line-of-sight access. The actuators show large magnitude responses within time-scales of ~1 s, consistent with the small dimensions of the actuators, but also exhibit smaller-scale responses over much longer times, suggesting the possibility of slow internal relaxations within the network. Based on our study on this bilayer system, we further explore fabrication methods for cylindrical actuators that are able to bend in arbitrary directions.

  11. Coral reef resilience through biodiversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, Caroline S.

    2013-01-01

    Irrefutable evidence of coral reef degradation worldwide and increasing pressure from rising seawater temperatures and ocean acidification associated with climate change have led to a focus on reef resilience and a call to “manage” coral reefs for resilience. Ideally, global action to reduce emission of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases will be accompanied by local action. Effective management requires reduction of local stressors, identification of the characteristics of resilient reefs, and design of marine protected area networks that include potentially resilient reefs. Future research is needed on how stressors interact, on how climate change will affect corals, fish, and other reef organisms as well as overall biodiversity, and on basic ecological processes such as connectivity. Not all reef species and reefs will respond similarly to local and global stressors. Because reef-building corals and other organisms have some potential to adapt to environmental changes, coral reefs will likely persist in spite of the unprecedented combination of stressors currently affecting them. The biodiversity of coral reefs is the basis for their remarkable beauty and for the benefits they provide to society. The extraordinary complexity of these ecosystems makes it both more difficult to predict their future and more likely they will have a future.

  12. The evolution of reef communities

    SciTech Connect

    Fagerstrom, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the composition, structure, occurrence, and changes in reefs during the past 2 billion years. It emphasizes the functional roles of major groups (guilds) of reef-building, reef-destroying, and reed-dwelling organisms in the most complex of all marine communities. A structural model, based on modern reef guilds, is developed. Then the functional roles of each major reef-building higher biologic taxon (algae, sponges, coral, etc.) is determined, and, on this basis, each such taxon is assigned to a reef community guild. Next, the authors traces the geologic history and guild assignment of each major taxon through geologic time. The final chapter establishes a succession of ten major reef community types, and considers their extinction and recovery in the light of modern theories of cosmic and earthly events.

  13. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator

  14. Thermally actuated mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sul, Onejae

    This thesis will discuss the generation of controlled sub-micron motions using novel micro actuators. Our research focuses on the development of an arm-type actuator and a free-motion locomotive walking device. Nano-science and nano-technology focuses on the creation of novel functional materials and also at the development of new fabrication techniques incorporating them. In the fields of novel fabrication techniques, manipulations of micron or sub-micron objects by micro actuators have been suggested in the science and engineering societies for mainly two reasons. From a scientific standpoint, new tools enable new prospective sciences, as is evident from the development of the atomic force microscope. From an engineering standpoint, the miniaturization of manipulation tools will require less material and less energy during a material's production. In spite of such importance, progress in the actuator miniaturization is in a primitive state, especially for the micro mobile devices. The thesis will be a key step in pursuit of this goal with an emphasis on generating motions. Our static actuator uses the excellent elastic properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes as a template for a bimorph system. Deflections in response to temperature variations are demonstrated. The mobile device itself is a bimorph system consisting of thin metal films. Control mechanisms for its velocity and steering are discussed. Finally, fundamental limits on the capabilities of the two devices in a more general sense are discussed under via laws of physics.

  15. Coral Reef Biological Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs worldwide are experiencing decline from a variety of stressors. Some important stressors are land-based sources of pollution and human activities in the coastal zone. However, few tools are available to offset the impact of these stressors. The Clean Water Act (CWA...

  16. CORAL REEF BIOCRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs worldwide are experiencing the greatest decline of their known existence and few tools are available to offset the growing impacts of human coastal and watershed activities. Biocriteria are a potentially effective means to evaluate and restore impaired waters, but are...

  17. Electrostatic actuators for portable microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Joshua

    minimize actuation potentials while eliminating stiction. Two strategies were developed to overcome challenges with electrode screening in the presence of aqueous fluids. First, instead of using the electrostatic actuators to interact directly with aqueous solutions, the actuators were used to regulate pressurized control lines for pneumatic microvalves. Secondly, by adopting a normally-closed architecture, the actuators were converted into microvalves capable of directly interacting with aqueous solutions. The two strategies are complementary, and together should enable sophisticated microfluidic systems for applications ranging from point-of-care diagnostics to portable chemical detection. To conclude the dissertation, I demonstrate a proof-of-principle microfluidic system that contained sixteen independently-operated electrostatic valves, operated with battery-operated electrical ancillaries in a hand-held format.

  18. Torsional Ratcheting Actuating System

    SciTech Connect

    BARNES,STEPHEN MATTHEW; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; RODGERS,M. STEVEN; BITSIE,FERNANDO

    2000-01-24

    A new type of surface micromachined ratcheting actuation system has been developed at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories. The actuator uses a torsional electrostatic comb drive that is coupled to an external ring gear through a ratcheting scheme. The actuator can be operated with a single square wave, has minimal rubbing surfaces, maximizes comb finger density, and can be used for open-loop position control. The prototypes function as intended with a minimum demonstrated operating voltage of 18V. The equations of motion are developed for the torsional electrostatic comb drive. The resonant frequency, voltage vs. displacement and force delivery characteristics are predicted and compared with the fabricated device's performance.

  19. Optimization of Actuating Origami Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskohl, Philip; Fuchi, Kazuko; Bazzan, Giorgio; Joo, James; Gregory, Reich; Vaia, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Origami structures morph between 2D and 3D conformations along predetermined fold lines that efficiently program the form, function and mobility of the structure. By leveraging design concepts from action origami, a subset of origami art focused on kinematic mechanisms, reversible folding patterns for applications such as solar array packaging, tunable antennae, and deployable sensing platforms may be designed. However, the enormity of the design space and the need to identify the requisite actuation forces within the structure places a severe limitation on design strategies based on intuition and geometry alone. The present work proposes a topology optimization method, using truss and frame element analysis, to distribute foldline mechanical properties within a reference crease pattern. Known actuating patterns are placed within a reference grid and the optimizer adjusts the fold stiffness of the network to optimally connect them. Design objectives may include a target motion, stress level, or mechanical energy distribution. Results include the validation of known action origami structures and their optimal connectivity within a larger network. This design suite offers an important step toward systematic incorporation of origami design concepts into new, novel and reconfigurable engineering devices. This research is supported under the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funding, LRIR 13RQ02COR.

  20. Miocene reefs in western Mediterranean

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, M.

    1988-01-01

    Coral reefs were particularly abundant and well developed during the late Tortonian and Messinian in southeastern Spain, the Balearic Islands, Italy, Sicily, Algeria, and Morocco. These reefs occurred just before and during the deposition of the thick Messinian evaporite units in the basinal areas and disappeared completely from Mediteranean during the early Pliocene. Most of the coral reefs are fringing terrigenous coastal fan complexes with very small lagoons and show progradation of less than 2 km. Some of the reefs occur on, or are intercalated with, Neogene volcanics or Messinian evaporites. Barrier-reef complexes are less common, have extensive lagoons behind them, and show complex progradational geometries more than 10 km wide. Excellent outcrops allow detailed reconstruction of paleogeography and sea level changes. Progradation predominated during phases of relative sea level drops and stillsands, while significant retrogradation occurred during sea level rises. The coral reef wall framework is commonly less than 20 m thick and is dominated by Porites and, locally, Tarbellastrae. Older Miocene reefs are less well developed, but show greater diversity of corals and reef organisms. Younger Miocene reef complexes occurring in open ocean settings are formed by only one branching coral genus (Porites or, locally, Tarbellastraea) with branching colonies up to 7 m high. Halimeda sands are particularly abundant in the upper reef slopes with occasional intercalations of red algae pavements that most likely coincide with episodes of terrigenous influx.

  1. Tetherless thermobiochemically actuated microgrippers

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Timothy G.; Randall, Christina L.; Benson, Bryan R.; Bassik, Noy; Stern, George M.; Gracias, David H.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate mass-producible, tetherless microgrippers that can be remotely triggered by temperature and chemicals under biologically relevant conditions. The microgrippers use a self-contained actuation response, obviating the need for external tethers in operation. The grippers can be actuated en masse, even while spatially separated. We used the microgrippers to perform diverse functions, such as picking up a bead on a substrate and the removal of cells from tissue embedded at the end of a capillary (an in vitro biopsy). PMID:19139411

  2. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  3. Hydraulic involute cam actuator

    DOEpatents

    Love, Lonnie J.; Lind, Randall F.

    2011-11-01

    Mechanical joints are provided in which the angle between a first coupled member and a second coupled member may be varied by mechanical actuators. In some embodiments the angle may be varied around a pivot axis in one plane and in some embodiments the angle may be varied around two pivot axes in two orthogonal planes. The joints typically utilize a cam assembly having two lobes with an involute surface. Actuators are configured to push against the lobes to vary the rotation angle between the first and second coupled member.

  4. The Barrier Reef sediment apron: Tobacco Reef, Belize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntyre, Ian G.; Graus, Richard R.; Reinthal, Peter N.; Littler, Mark M.; Littler, Diane S.

    1987-07-01

    Sedimentological and biological surveys of the back-reef sediment apron of Tobacco Reef, a continuous segment of the Belizean Barrier Reef, reveal five distinct biogeological zones: (1) coralline-coral- Dictyota pavement, (2) Turbinaria-Sargassum rubble, (3) Laurencia-Acanthophora sand and gravel, (4) bare sand and 95 Thalassia sand. These zones parallel the entire 9-km reef. The distribution of these zones is related to the spatial patterns of fish herbivory, the size of bottom sediments, and the stability of the substrate. Sedimentological and hydrodynamic studies indicate that most of the sediments in this area are transported from the reef crest and fore reef during periods of storm or hurricane activity and that their size distribution is largely the result of differential transport by high bottom-water velocities during those periods.

  5. An Actuator Curve Embedding Method to Model Wind Turbine Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pankaj; Schmitz, Sven

    2013-11-01

    The Actuator Line Method (ALM) is widely used in the wind energy community to model the complex interactions within large wind farms in large-eddy simulation (LES) of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at various stability states. The state-of-the-art in ALM modeling is rooted in the work of Sorensen and Shen (2002). The major weakness of the ALM still remains in having the actuator line discretized as a superposition of individual spherically-spread body forces. The associated overlap of adjacent spherical force fields leads to a large sensitivity of computed blade loads to the way in which the spherical spreading radius is altered along the actuator line (Jha et al. 2013). An Actuator Curve Embedding (ACE) method is developed that considers a general actuator line in 3-D space where the force distribution along the actuator curve is embedded continuously onto the background mesh and without overlap. The ACE method thus is expected to show improved body-force discretization for wind turbine blades, in particular those subject to aeroelastic deformations. Some preliminary results contrasting the ALM and ACE methods are discussed. Support: DOE. Graduate Research Assistant, Aerospace Engineering.

  6. Conceptual hermetically sealed elbow actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuenscher, H. F.

    1968-01-01

    Electrically or hydraulically powered, hermetically sealed angular or rotary actuator deflects mechanical members over a range of plus or minus 180 degrees. The actuator design provides incremental flexures which keep the local deflection rate within elastic limits.

  7. Low-Shock Pyrotechnic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Miniature 1-ampere, 1-watt pyrotechnic actuator enclosed in flexible metal bellows. Bellows confines outgassing products, and pyrotechnic shock reduction achieved by action of bellows, gas cushion within device, and minimum use of pyrotechnic material. Actuator inexpensive, compact, and lightweight.

  8. Applications of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelrine, Ron; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Kornbluh, Roy D.; Heydt, Richard; Kofod, Guggi; Pei, Qibing; Gravesen, Peter

    2001-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators, based on the field-induced deformation of elastomeric polymers with compliant electrodes, can produce a large strain response, combined with a fast response time and high electromechanical efficiency. This unique performance, combined with other factors such as low cost, suggests many potential applications, a wide range of which are under investigation. Applications that effectively exploit the properties of dielectric elastomers include artificial muscle actuators for robots; low-cost, lightweight linear actuators; solid- state optical devices; diaphragm actuators for pumps and smart skins; acoustic actuators; and rotary motors. Issues that may ultimately determine the success or failure of the actuation technology for specific applications include the durability of the actuator, the performance of the actuator under load, operating voltage and power requirements, and electronic driving circuitry, to name a few.

  9. Ecological intereactions of reef building corals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs are very important marine ecosystems because they support tremendous biodiversity and reefs are critical economic resources many coastal nations. Tropical reef structures are largely built by stony corals. This presentation provides background on basic coral biology t...

  10. Angular-Momentum-Compensating Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiktor, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Reactionless actuator developed for instrument-pointing platforms on flexible spacecraft; by eliminating reactions, actuator changes aiming angle of platform without inducing vibrations in spacecraft, eliminateing vibrations in point angle of instrument platform. Actuator used on Earth in such systems as helicopter platforms for television cameras in law enforcement and news telecasts.

  11. An observational heat budget analysis of a coral reef, Heron Reef, Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKellar, Mellissa C.; McGowan, Hamish A.; Phinn, Stuart R.

    2013-03-01

    Measurements of the surface energy balance, the structure and evolution of the convective atmospheric reef layer (CARL), and local meteorology and hydrodynamics were made during June 2009 and February 2010 at Heron Reef, Australia, to establish the relative partitioning of heating within the water and atmosphere. Horizontal advection was shown to moderate temperature in the CARL and the water, having a cooling influence on the atmosphere, and providing an additional source or sink of energy to the water overlying the reef, depending on tide. The key driver of atmospheric heating was surface sensible heat flux, while heating of the reef water was primarily due to solar radiation, and thermal conduction and convection from the reef substrate. Heating and cooling processes were more defined during winter due to higher sensible and latent heat fluxes and strong diurnal evolution of the CARL. Sudden increases in water temperature were associated with inundation of warmer oceanic water during the flood tide, particularly in winter due to enhanced nocturnal cooling of water overlying the reef. Similarly, cooling of the water over the reef occurred during the ebb tide as heat was transported off the reef to the surrounding ocean. While these results are the first to shed light on the heat budget of a coral reef and overlying CARL, longer-term, systematic measurements of reef thermal budgets are needed under a range of meteorological and hydrodynamic conditions, and across various reef types to elucidate the influence on larger-scale oceanic and atmospheric processes. This is essential for understanding the role of coral reefs in tropical and sub-tropical meteorology; the physical processes that take place during coral bleaching events, and coral and algal community dynamics on coral reefs.

  12. Electromechanical flight control actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using an electromechanical actuator (EMA) as the primary flight control equipment in aerospace flight is examined. The EMA motor design is presented utilizing improved permanent magnet materials. The necessary equipment to complete a single channel EMA using the single channel power electronics breadboard is reported. The design and development of an improved rotor position sensor/tachometer is investigated.

  13. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing. 49 figs.

  14. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    1999-01-01

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing.

  15. Actuators Acting without Actin.

    PubMed

    Geitmann, Anja

    2016-06-30

    Plant actuators move organs, allowing the plant to respond to environmental cues or perform other mechanical tasks. In Cardamine hursuta the dispersal of seeds is accomplished by explosive opening of the fruit. The biomechanical mechanism relies on a complex interplay between turgor regulation and cell wall mechanical properties. PMID:27368097

  16. "Mighty Worm" Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, Robert M.; Wada, Ben K.; Moore, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    "Mighty Worm" piezoelectric actuator used as adjustable-length structural member, active vibrator or vibration suppressor, and acts as simple (fixed-length) structural member when inactive. Load force not applied to piezoelectric element in simple-structural-member mode. Piezoelectric element removed from load path when not in use.

  17. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  18. Wave transformation over coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ian R.

    1989-07-01

    Ocean wave attenuation on coral reefs is discussed using data obtained from a preliminary field experiment and from the Seasat altimeter. Marked attenuation of the waves is observed, the rate being consistent with existing theories of bottom friction and wave breaking decay. In addition, there is a significant broadening of the spectrum during propagation across reefs. Three-dimensional effects, such as refraction and defraction, can also lead to substantial wave height reduction for significant distances adjacent to coral reefs. As a result, a matrix of such reefs provides significantly more wave attenuation than may initially be expected.

  19. Site fidelity and homing in tropical coral reef cardinalfish: are they using olfactory cues?

    PubMed

    Døving, Kjell B; Stabell, Ole B; Ostlund-Nilsson, Sara; Fisher, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    A number of tropical coral reef fish hold station and display restricted home ranges. If artificially displaced, they will return to their home site. We questioned if marine fish are using the same mechanisms for home site detection as many freshwater fish, that is, by olfactory sensing of chemical signals deposited on the substrate by conspecific fish. Behavioral experiments were conducted on Lizard Island Research Station, Queensland, Australia, in 2001 and 2002. Five-lined cardinalfish (Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus) were tested in groups with split-branded cardinalfish (Apogon compressus) as a reference species and individually against Apogon leptacanthus as well as conspecifics of another reef site. The group tests showed that both species preferred artificial reef sites that had previously been occupied by conspecifics. Individual C. quinquelineatus preferred scent of conspecifics from their own reef site to that from another site. They also preferred the scent released by artificial reefs previously occupied by conspecifics of their reef site to that of similar reefs previously occupied by conspecifics of another reef site. No discrimination between species from the same reef site was obtained in experiments with individual fish. Our data suggest that cardinalfish are keeping station and are homing by use of conspecific olfactory signals. PMID:16436688

  20. Flushing of Bowden Reef lagoon, Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanski, Eric; King, Brian

    1990-12-01

    Field and numerical studies were undertaken in 1986 and 1987 of the water circulation around and over Bowden Reef, a 5-km long kidney-shaped coral reef lagoon system in the Great Barrier Reef. In windy conditions, the flushing of the lagoon was primarily due to the intrusion into the lagoon of topographically induced tidal eddies generated offshore. In calm weather, such eddies did not prevail and lagoon flushing was much slower. The observed currents at sites a few kilometres apart in inter-reefal waters, have a significant horizontal shear apparently due to the complex circulation in the reef matrix. Under such conditions, sensitivity tests demonstrate the importance of including this shear in the specification of open boundary conditions of numerical models of the hydrodynamics around reefs. Contrary to established practice, the water circulation around a coral reef should not be modelled by assuming reefs are hydrodynamically isolated from surrounding ones. Little improvement appears likely in the reliability of reef-scale numerical models until the inter-reefal shear can be reliably incorporated in such models.

  1. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  2. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  3. Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Monica (Compiler); Sharkey, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the NASA Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging (ELA-TB) Workshop held in Huntsville, Alabama, September 29-October 1, 1992. The workshop was sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Systems Development and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The workshop addressed key technologies bridging the entire field of electrical actuation including systems methodology, control electronics, power source systems, reliability, maintainability, and vehicle health management with special emphasis on thrust vector control (TVC) applications on NASA launch vehicles. Speakers were drawn primarily from industry with participation from universities and government. In addition, prototype hardware demonstrations were held at the MSFC Propulsion Laboratory each afternoon. Splinter sessions held on the final day afforded the opportunity to discuss key issues and to provide overall recommendations. Presentations are included in this document.

  4. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, Milton A.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1997-01-01

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The "micro" size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed.

  5. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    1997-07-08

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The ``micro`` size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed. 22 figs.

  6. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  7. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  8. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  9. Passively actuated valve

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  10. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  11. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  12. Coral reefs and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    This commentary argues the conclusion from a previous article, which investigates diurnal changes in carbon dioxide partial pressure and community metabolism on coral reefs, that coral `reefs might serve as a sink, not a source, for atmospheric carbon dioxide.` Commentaries from two groups are given along with the response by the original authors, Kayanne et al. 27 refs.

  13. Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.

    2012-07-31

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

  14. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  15. 40 CFR 230.44 - Coral reefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Coral reefs. 230.44 Section 230.44... Aquatic Sites § 230.44 Coral reefs. (a) Coral reefs consist of the skeletal deposit, usually of calcareous... organisms present in growing portions of the reef. (b) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged...

  16. 40 CFR 230.44 - Coral reefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coral reefs. 230.44 Section 230.44... Aquatic Sites § 230.44 Coral reefs. (a) Coral reefs consist of the skeletal deposit, usually of calcareous... organisms present in growing portions of the reef. (b) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged...

  17. 40 CFR 230.44 - Coral reefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coral reefs. 230.44 Section 230.44... Aquatic Sites § 230.44 Coral reefs. (a) Coral reefs consist of the skeletal deposit, usually of calcareous... organisms present in growing portions of the reef. (b) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged...

  18. 40 CFR 230.44 - Coral reefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coral reefs. 230.44 Section 230.44... Aquatic Sites § 230.44 Coral reefs. (a) Coral reefs consist of the skeletal deposit, usually of calcareous... organisms present in growing portions of the reef. (b) Possible loss of values: The discharge of dredged...

  19. Macro Fiber Piezocomposite Actuator Poling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J.; Bryant, Robert G.; Manos, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The performance and advantages of Piezocomposite Actuators are to provide a low cost, in-situ actuator/sensor that is flexible, low profile and high strain per volt performance in the same plane of poled voltage. This paper extends reported data for the performance of these Macrofiber Composite (MFC) Actuators to include 4 progressively narrower Intedigitized electrode configurations with several line widths and spacing ratios. Data is reported for max free strain, average strain per applied volt, poling (alignment of the electric dipoles of the PZT ceramic) voltage vs. strain and capacitance, time to poling voltage 95% saturation. The output strain per volt progressively increases as electrode spacing decreases, with saturation occurring at lower poling voltages. The narrowest spacing ratio becomes prone to voltage breakdown or short circuits limiting the spacing width with current fabrication methods. The capacitance generally increases with increasing poling voltage level but has high sensitivity to factors such as temperature, moisture and time from poling which limit its usefulness as a simple indicator. The total time of applied poling voltage to saturate or fully line up the dipoles in the piezoceramic was generally on the order of 5-20 seconds. Less sensitivity to poling due to the applied rate of voltage increase over a 25 to 500 volt/second rate range was observed.

  20. MOSFET Switching Circuit Protects Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A small-footprint, full surface-mount-component printed circuit board employs MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) power switches to switch high currents from any input power supply from 3 to 30 V. High-force shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators generally require high current (up to 9 A at 28 V) to actuate. SMA wires (the driving element of the actuators) can be quickly overheated if power is not removed at the end of stroke, which can damage the wires. The new analog driver prevents overheating of the SMA wires in an actuator by momentarily removing power when the end limit switch is closed, thereby allowing complex control schemes to be adopted without concern for overheating. Either an integral pushbutton or microprocessor-controlled gate or control line inputs switch current to the actuator until the end switch line goes from logic high to logic low state. Power is then momentarily removed (switched off by the MOSFET). The analog driver is suited to use with nearly any SMA actuator.

  1. On reliable control system designs. Ph.D. Thesis; [actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birdwell, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A mathematical model for use in the design of reliable multivariable control systems is discussed with special emphasis on actuator failures and necessary actuator redundancy levels. The model consists of a linear time invariant discrete time dynamical system. Configuration changes in the system dynamics are governed by a Markov chain that includes transition probabilities from one configuration state to another. The performance index is a standard quadratic cost functional, over an infinite time interval. The actual system configuration can be deduced with a one step delay. The calculation of the optimal control law requires the solution of a set of highly coupled Riccati-like matrix difference equations. Results can be used for off-line studies relating the open loop dynamics, required performance, actuator mean time to failure, and functional or identical actuator redundancy, with and without feedback gain reconfiguration strategies.

  2. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  3. Coral reef protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced the establishment on 13 November of the first U.S. zone to protect a sensitive coral reef area from potential damage by ships.The Florida Keys' Particularly Sensitive Sea Area, just one of a handful of such areas globally, has been designated by the International Maritime Organization, a specialized agency of the United Nations. The area protects a zone of more than 3,000 square nautical miles stretching from the Biscayne National Park to the Dry Tortugas.

  4. Cellular Pressure-Actuated Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    A modification of a pressure-actuated joint has been proposed to improve its pressure actuation in such a manner as to reduce the potential for leakage of the pressurizing fluid. The specific joint for which the modification is proposed is a field joint in a reusable solid-fuel rocket motor (RSRM), in which the pressurizing fluid is a mixture of hot combustion gases. The proposed modification could also be applicable to other pressure-actuated joints of similar configuration.

  5. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  6. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  7. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  8. Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional form of a coral reef develops through interactions and feedbacks between its constituent organisms and their environment. Reef morphology therefore contains a potential wealth of ecological information, accessible if the relationships between morphology and ecology can be decoded. Traditionally, reef morphology has been attributed to external controls such as substrate topography or hydrodynamic influences. Little is known about inherent reef morphology in the absence of external control. Here we use reef growth simulations, based on observations in the cellular reefs of Western Australia’s Houtman Abrolhos Islands, to show that reef morphology is fundamentally determined by the mechanical behaviour of the reef-building organisms themselves—specifically their tendency to either remain in place or to collapse. Reef-building organisms that tend to remain in place, such as massive and encrusting corals or coralline algae, produce nodular reefs, whereas those that tend to collapse, such as branching Acropora, produce cellular reefs. The purest reef growth forms arise in sheltered lagoons dominated by a single type of reef builder, as in the branching Acropora-dominated lagoons of the Abrolhos. In these situations reef morphology can be considered a phenotype of the predominant reef building organism. The capacity to infer coral type from reef morphology can potentially be used to identify and map specific coral habitat in remotely sensed images. More generally, identifying ecological mechanisms underlying other examples of self-generated reef morphology can potentially improve our understanding of present-day reef ecology, because any ecological process capable of shaping a reef will almost invariably be an important process in real time on the living reef. PMID:26175962

  9. Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs.

    PubMed

    Blakeway, David; Hamblin, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional form of a coral reef develops through interactions and feedbacks between its constituent organisms and their environment. Reef morphology therefore contains a potential wealth of ecological information, accessible if the relationships between morphology and ecology can be decoded. Traditionally, reef morphology has been attributed to external controls such as substrate topography or hydrodynamic influences. Little is known about inherent reef morphology in the absence of external control. Here we use reef growth simulations, based on observations in the cellular reefs of Western Australia's Houtman Abrolhos Islands, to show that reef morphology is fundamentally determined by the mechanical behaviour of the reef-building organisms themselves-specifically their tendency to either remain in place or to collapse. Reef-building organisms that tend to remain in place, such as massive and encrusting corals or coralline algae, produce nodular reefs, whereas those that tend to collapse, such as branching Acropora, produce cellular reefs. The purest reef growth forms arise in sheltered lagoons dominated by a single type of reef builder, as in the branching Acropora-dominated lagoons of the Abrolhos. In these situations reef morphology can be considered a phenotype of the predominant reef building organism. The capacity to infer coral type from reef morphology can potentially be used to identify and map specific coral habitat in remotely sensed images. More generally, identifying ecological mechanisms underlying other examples of self-generated reef morphology can potentially improve our understanding of present-day reef ecology, because any ecological process capable of shaping a reef will almost invariably be an important process in real time on the living reef. PMID:26175962

  10. Global microbialization of coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andreas F; Fairoz, Mohamed F M; Kelly, Linda W; Nelson, Craig E; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Edwards, Robert A; Giles, Steve; Hatay, Mark; Hisakawa, Nao; Knowles, Ben; Lim, Yan Wei; Maughan, Heather; Pantos, Olga; Roach, Ty N F; Sanchez, Savannah E; Silveira, Cynthia B; Sandin, Stuart; Smith, Jennifer E; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-01-01

    Microbialization refers to the observed shift in ecosystem trophic structure towards higher microbial biomass and energy use. On coral reefs, the proximal causes of microbialization are overfishing and eutrophication, both of which facilitate enhanced growth of fleshy algae, conferring a competitive advantage over calcifying corals and coralline algae. The proposed mechanism for this competitive advantage is the DDAM positive feedback loop (dissolved organic carbon (DOC), disease, algae, microorganism), where DOC released by ungrazed fleshy algae supports copiotrophic, potentially pathogenic bacterial communities, ultimately harming corals and maintaining algal competitive dominance. Using an unprecedented data set of >400 samples from 60 coral reef sites, we show that the central DDAM predictions are consistent across three ocean basins. Reef algal cover is positively correlated with lower concentrations of DOC and higher microbial abundances. On turf and fleshy macroalgal-rich reefs, higher relative abundances of copiotrophic microbial taxa were identified. These microbial communities shift their metabolic potential for carbohydrate degradation from the more energy efficient Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway on coral-dominated reefs to the less efficient Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways on algal-dominated reefs. This 'yield-to-power' switch by microorganism directly threatens reefs via increased hypoxia and greater CO2 release from the microbial respiration of DOC. PMID:27572833

  11. A preliminary survey of the artisanal fishery on coral reefs of the Tulear Region (southwest Madagascar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroche, J.; Ramananarivo, N.

    1995-11-01

    Fish catches from the coral reefs of the Tulear region (southwest Madagascar), are analyzed based on fish landings. This region of the island consists of two barrier reefs, two coral banks, three lagoon reefs and a fringing reef. The total reef area studied was 190 km2. Of the whole fishing area, the reef flat was the most frequently used by fishermen. Line catches per unit effort (CPUE) were stable throughout the eight month sampling period (6 to 8 kg/trip to sea), whereas gillnet and seine catches showed differences between the cold period and the warm period. These results appear to be representative of the artisanal fishery catches in the southwest Indian Ocean. Annual fish yield was estimated at 12 t km-2 yr-1. Comparable yields have been recorded in certain regions of the Indo-Pacific, that have similar ratios of coral reef area to adjacent shallows and similar fishing practices. Reef species (Lethrinidae, Siganidae) dominated the catches. At present, coastal waters of the Tulear region are heavily fished, and the fishermen report a progressive decrease in the average size of fish caught over the last 15 years. Management measures are suggested, based on preliminary findings.

  12. Strain actuated aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarus, Kenneth B.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on strain actuated aeroelastic control are presented. Topics covered include: structural and aerodynamic modeling; control law design methodology; system block diagram; adaptive wing test article; bench-top experiments; bench-top disturbance rejection: open and closed loop response; bench-top disturbance rejection: state cost versus control cost; wind tunnel experiments; wind tunnel gust alleviation: open and closed loop response at 60 mph; wind tunnel gust alleviation: state cost versus control cost at 60 mph; wind tunnel command following: open and closed loop error at 60 mph; wind tunnel flutter suppression: open loop flutter speed; and wind tunnel flutter suppression: closed loop state cost curves.

  13. Compact valve actuation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A valve actuation device. The device may include a free floating valve bridge movably supported within a cavity in the engine housing. The bridge may be provided with a cavity and an orifice arrangement for pumping gases entrained with lubricating fluid toward the piston stems as the bridge reciprocates back and forth. The device may also include a rocker arm that has a U-shaped cross-sectional shape for receiving at least a portion of the valve bridge, valve stem valve spring and spring retainer therein. The rocker arm may be provided with lubrication passages for directing lubrication to the point wherein it is pivotally affixed to the engine housing.

  14. Lead screw linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A linear actuator which can apply high forces is described, which includes a reciprocating rod having a threaded portion engaged by a nut that is directly coupled to the rotor of an electric motor. The nut is connected to the rotor in a manner that minimizes loading on the rotor, by the use of a coupling that transmits torque to the nut but permits it to shift axially and radially with respect to the rotor. The nut has a threaded hydrostatic bearing for engaging the threaded rod portion, with an oilcarrying groove in the nut being interrupted.

  15. Piezoelectric actuated gimbal

    DOEpatents

    Tschaggeny, Charles W.; Jones, Warren F.; Bamberg, Eberhard

    2011-09-13

    A gimbal is described and which includes a fixed base member defining an axis of rotation; a second member concentrically oriented relative to the axis of rotation; a linear actuator oriented in immediate, adjoining force transmitting relation relative to the base member or to the second member, and which applies force along a linear axis which is tangential to the axis of rotation so as to cause the second member to rotate coaxially relative to the fixed base member; and an object of interest mounted to the second member such that the object of interest is selectively moved relative to the base member about the axis of rotation.

  16. Miocene reef corals: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    Tectonic blockage in the Middle East of westward-flowing Tethys surface circulation during the latest Oligocene led to creation in the earliest Miocene of endemic Mediterranean, Western Atlantic-Caribbean, and Indo-Pacific realms. A great reduction in reef coral diversity from 60-80 Oligocene species to 25-35 early Miocene species occurred in the Western Atlantic-Caribbean and Mediterranean areas accompanied by a decrease in reef growth. A slower and less drastic change apparently occurred in the Indo-Pacific area. Early Miocene reef corals of the Western Atlantic-Caribbean comprise a transition between the cosmopolitan Oligocene fauna and its endemic mid-Miocene to modern counterpart. Although early Miocene reefs were dominated by a Porites-Montastrea assemblage, eastward flow of Pacific circulation brought with it ''exotic'' corals such as Coscinaraea and Pseudocolumnastrea. Also, many cosmopolitan genera persisted from the Oligocene. During the middle to late Miocene, most of the species still living on Holocene reefs evolved. As the Mediterranean basin became more restricted, there was a slow decline in reef corals from 20 - 25 species in the Aquitainian to less than five species in the Messinian. Eustatic lowstand led to the extinction of reef-building corals in the late Messinian. In the Indo-Pacific, Neogene evolution of reef corals was conservative. Excluding the Acroporidae and Seriatoporidae, most Holocene framework species had evolved by the middle Miocene. Interplay between regional tectonics and eustatic sea level changes led to extensive development of middle to late Miocene pinnacle reefs over the southwestern Pacific.

  17. NOAA's hydrolab conducts reef studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This summer, scuba-diving scientists operating from Hydrolab, NOAA's undersea laboratory, are carrying out four experiments aimed at producing better management of coral reefs and their fishery resources. Hydrolab is located at a depth of 50 feet, near the mouth of the Salt River, off St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. The lab houses four scientists for up to 2 weeks at a time, permitting them to swim out into the water to conduct research. The projects make use of both the natural coral reef near Hydrolab and the nearby artificial reef constructed for comparison studies.

  18. Age of tilted reefs, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Campbell, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Submerged carbonate reefs are preserved as a series of submarine terraces between Molokai and Hawaii along a 200-km span of the SE Hawaiian Ridge. Limestones from 2 of the terraces have been dated at 13 and 120 ka. Recognition that the terraces are tilted permits assignment of about a dozen terraces from 150 to 1300 m depth to 8 general reef platforms. These reefs were drowned by the combined effects of island subsidence and sea level rise at the end of successive glacial stages from 13 to 647 ka. The platforms are tilted 5 m/km SE toward the locus of volcanic centered on the island of Hawaii.-from Authors

  19. Robotic Arm Actuated by Electroactie Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Xue, T.; Shaninpoor, M.; Simpson, J. O.; Smith, J.

    1998-01-01

    Actuators are used for many planetary and space applications. To meet the NASA goal to reduce the actuators size, mass, cost and power consumption, electroactie polymers (EAP) are being developed to induce large bending and longitudinal actuation strains.

  20. Actuator operated microvalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuator operated microvalve and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The microvalve comprises a SiC housing which includes a first lower portion and a second upper portion. The lower portion of the SiC housing includes a passageway therethrough, a microvalve seat, and a moveable SiC diaphragm. The SiC diaphragm includes a centrally located boss and radially extending corrugations which may be sinusoidally shaped. The boss of the SiC diaphragm moves and modulates in a range of positions between a closed position wherein the boss interengages said microvalve seat prohibiting communication of fluid through the passageway and a fully open position when the boss is spaced apart from the seat at its maximum permitting communication of fluid through said passageway. The actuator includes a SiC top plate affixed to the boss of the diaphragm and a first electrode and the second upper portion of the SiC housing further includes a second electrode.

  1. Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Redding, David; Lowman, Andrew; Cohen, David; Ohara, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts the planned Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope (AHMT), which is intended to demonstrate a new approach to the design and construction of wide-aperture spaceborne telescopes for astronomy and Earth science. This technology is also appropriate for Earth-based telescopes. The new approach can be broadly summarized as using advanced lightweight mirrors that can be manufactured rapidly at relatively low cost. More specifically, it is planned to use precise replicated metallic nanolaminate mirrors to obtain the required high-quality optical finishes. Lightweight, dimensionally stable silicon carbide (SiC) structures will support the nanolaminate mirrors in the required surface figures. To enable diffraction- limited telescope performance, errors in surface figures will be corrected by use of mirror-shape-control actuators that will be energized, as needed, by a wave-front-sensing and control system. The concepts of nanolaminate materials and mirrors made from nanolaminate materials were discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Nanolaminates constitute a relatively new class of materials that can approach theoretical limits of stiffness and strength. Nanolaminate mirrors are synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition of metallic alloys and/or compounds on optically precise master surfaces to obtain optical-quality reflector surfaces backed by thin shell structures. As an integral part of the deposition process, a layer of gold that will constitute the reflective surface layer is deposited first, eliminating the need for a subsequent and separate reflective-coating process. The crystallographic textures of the nanolaminate will be controlled to optimize the performance of the mirror. The entire deposition process for making a nanolaminate mirror takes less than 100 hours, regardless of the mirror diameter. Each nanolaminate mirror will be bonded to its lightweight SiC supporting structure. The lightweight nanolaminate mirrors and Si

  2. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  3. Home Reef, South Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In the South Pacific, south of Late Island along the Tofua volcanic arc in Tonga, a new volcanic island Home Reef is being re-born. The island is thought to have emerged after a volcanic eruption in mid-August that has also spewed large amounts of floating pumice into Tongan waters and sweeping across to Fiji about 350 km (220 miles) to the west of where the new island has formed. In 2004 a similar eruption created an ephemeral island about 0.5 by 1.5 km (0.3 by 0.9 miles) in size; it was no longer visible in an ASTER image acquired November 2005. This simulated natural color image shows the vegetation-covered stratovolcanic island of Late in the upper right. Home Reef is found in the lower left. The two bluish plumes are hot seawater that is laden with volcanic ash and chemicals; the larger one can be traced for more than 14 km (8.4 miles) to the east. The image was acquired October 10, 2006 and covers an area of 24.3 by 30.2 km. It is located at 18.9 degrees South latitude, 174.7 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation

  4. Coral Reefs on the Edge? Carbon Chemistry on Inshore Reefs of the Great Barrier Reef

    PubMed Central

    Uthicke, Sven; Furnas, Miles; Lønborg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    While increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration alters global water chemistry (Ocean Acidification; OA), the degree of changes vary on local and regional spatial scales. Inshore fringing coral reefs of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are subjected to a variety of local pressures, and some sites may already be marginal habitats for corals. The spatial and temporal variation in directly measured parameters: Total Alkalinity (TA) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration, and derived parameters: partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2); pH and aragonite saturation state (Ωar) were measured at 14 inshore reefs over a two year period in the GBR region. Total Alkalinity varied between 2069 and 2364 µmol kg−1 and DIC concentrations ranged from 1846 to 2099 µmol kg−1. This resulted in pCO2 concentrations from 340 to 554 µatm, with higher values during the wet seasons and pCO2 on inshore reefs distinctly above atmospheric values. However, due to temperature effects, Ωar was not further reduced in the wet season. Aragonite saturation on inshore reefs was consistently lower and pCO2 higher than on GBR reefs further offshore. Thermodynamic effects contribute to this, and anthropogenic runoff may also contribute by altering productivity (P), respiration (R) and P/R ratios. Compared to surveys 18 and 30 years ago, pCO2 on GBR mid- and outer-shelf reefs has risen at the same rate as atmospheric values (∼1.7 µatm yr−1) over 30 years. By contrast, values on inshore reefs have increased at 2.5 to 3 times higher rates. Thus, pCO2 levels on inshore reefs have disproportionately increased compared to atmospheric levels. Our study suggests that inshore GBR reefs are more vulnerable to OA and have less buffering capacity compared to offshore reefs. This may be caused by anthropogenically induced trophic changes in the water column and benthos of inshore reefs subjected to land runoff. PMID:25295864

  5. Actuator-valve interface optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code, Actuator Valve Response (AVR), has been developed to optimize the explosive actuator-valve interface parameters so that the valve plunger velocity is at a maximum when the plunger reaches the valve tubes. The code considers three forces to act on the valve plunger before the plunger reaches the valve tubes. These are the pressure force produced by the actuator, the shear force necessary to shear the seal disks on the actuator and the valve plunger, and the friction force caused by friction between the plunger and the plunger bore. The three forces are modeled by expressions that are explicitly functions of the plunger displacement. A particular actuator-valve combination was analyzed with the computer code AVR with four different combinations of valve plunger seal disk shear strength and initial friction force. (LEW)

  6. Artificial Reefs and Ocean Dumping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glueck, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Activities and instructional strategies for two multigrade lessons are provided. Activity objectives include describing an artificial reef (such as a sunken ocean liner) as an ecosystem, knowing animal types in the ecosystem, and describing a food web. (JN)

  7. Commencement on a Coral Reef

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Steven K.

    1973-01-01

    Describes an environmental program in which sixteen students and three biology teachers from Northfield Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts spent two weeks examining the ecology of a Caribbean reef.. (JR)

  8. A latchable thermally activated phase change actuator for microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    Complex microfluidic systems often require a high number of individually controllable active components like valves and pumps. In this paper we present the development and optimization of a latchable thermally controlled phase change actuator which uses a solid/liquid phase transition of a phase change medium and the displacement of the liquid phase change medium to change and stabilize the two states of the actuator. Because the phase change is triggered by heat produced with ohmic resistors the used control signal is an electrical signal. In contrast to pneumatically activated membrane valves this concept allows the individual control of several dozen actuators with only two external pressure lines. Within this paper we show the general working principle of the actuator and demonstrate its general function and the scalability of the concept at an example of four actuators. Additionally we present the complete results of our studies to optimize the response behavior of the actuator - the influence of the heating power as well as the used phase change medium on melting and solidifying times.

  9. Benthic community composition on submerged reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, T. E.; Moloney, J. M.; Sweatman, H. P. A.; Bridge, T. C. L.

    2015-06-01

    Community dynamics on coral reefs are often examined only in relatively shallow waters, which are most vulnerable to many disturbances. The Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA) includes extensive submerged reefs that do not approach sea level and are within depths that support many coral reef taxa that also occur in shallow water. However, the composition of benthic communities on submerged reefs in the GBRWHA is virtually unknown. We examined spatial patterns in benthic community composition on 13 submerged reefs in the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR) at depths of 10-30 m. We show that benthic communities on submerged reefs include similar species groups to those on neighbouring emergent reefs. The spatial distribution of species groups was well explained by depth and cross-shelf gradients that are well-known determinants of community composition on emergent reefs. Many equivalent species groups occurred at greater depths on submerged reefs, likely due to variability in the hydrodynamic environment among reef morphologies. Hard coral cover and species richness were lowest at the shallowest depth (6 m) on emergent reefs and were consistently higher on submerged reefs for any given depth. These results suggest that disturbances are less frequent on submerged reefs, but evidence that a severe tropical cyclone in 2011 caused significant damage to shallow regions of more exposed submerged reefs demonstrates that they are not immune. Our results confirm that submerged reefs in the central GBR support extensive and diverse coral assemblages that deserve greater attention in ecosystem assessments and management decisions.

  10. Coral reef bleaching: ecological perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glynn, P. W.

    1993-03-01

    Coral reef bleaching, the whitening of diverse invertebrate taxa, results from the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or a reduction in photosynthetic pigment concentrations in zooxanthellae residing within the gastrodermal tissues of host animals. Of particular concern are the consequences of bleaching of large numbers of reef-building scleractinian corals and hydrocorals. Published records of coral reef bleaching events from 1870 to the present suggest that the frequency (60 major events from 1979 to 1990), scale (co-occurrence in many coral reef regions and often over the bathymetric depth range of corals) and severity (>95% mortality in some areas) of recent bleaching disturbances are unprecedented in the scientific literature. The causes of small scale, isolated bleaching events can often be explained by particular stressors (e.g., temperature, salinity, light, sedimentation, aerial exposure and pollutants), but attempts to explain large scale bleaching events in terms of possible global change (e.g., greenhouse warming, increased UV radiation flux, deteriorating ecosystem health, or some combination of the above) have not been convincing. Attempts to relate the severity and extent of large scale coral reef bleaching events to particular causes have been hampered by a lack of (a) standardized methods to assess bleaching and (b) continuous, long-term data bases of environmental conditions over the periods of interest. An effort must be made to understand the impact of bleaching on the remainder of the reef community and the long-term effects on competition, predation, symbioses, bioerosion and substrate condition, all factors that can influence coral recruitment and reef recovery. If projected rates of sea warming are realized by mid to late AD 2000, i.e. a 2°C increase in high latitude coral seas, the upper thermal tolerance limits of many reef-building corals could be exceeded. Present evidence suggests that many corals would be unable to adapt

  11. Fish Assemblages on Estuarine Artificial Reefs: Natural Rocky-Reef Mimics or Discrete Assemblages?

    PubMed Central

    Folpp, Heath; Lowry, Michael; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M.

    2013-01-01

    If the primary goal of artificial reef construction is the creation of additional reef habitat that is comparable to adjacent natural rocky-reef, then performance should be evaluated using simultaneous comparisons with adjacent natural habitats. Using baited remote underwater video (BRUV) fish assemblages on purpose-built estuarine artificial reefs and adjacent natural rocky-reef and sand-flat were assessed 18 months post-deployment in three south-east Australian estuaries. Fish abundance, species richness and diversity were found to be greater on the artificial reefs than on either naturally occurring reef or sand-flat in all estuaries. Comparisons within each estuary identified significant differences in the species composition between the artificial and natural rocky-reefs. The artificial reef assemblage was dominated by sparid species including Acanthopagrus australis and Rhabdosargus sarba. The preference for a range of habitats by theses sparid species is evident by their detection on sand-flat, natural rocky reef and artificial reef habitats. The fish assemblage identified on the artificial reefs remained distinct from the adjacent rocky-reef, comprising a range of species drawn from naturally occurring rocky-reef and sand-flat. In addition, some mid-water schooling species including Trachurus novaezelandiae and Pseudocaranx georgianus were only identified on the artificial reef community; presumably as result of the reef's isolated location in open-water. We concluded that estuarine artificial reef assemblages are likely to differ significantly from adjacent rocky-reef, potentially as a result of physical factors such as reef isolation, coupled with species specific behavioural traits such as the ability of some species to traverse large sand flats in order to locate reef structure, and feeding preferences. Artificial reefs should not be viewed as direct surrogates for natural reef. The assemblages are likely to remain distinct from naturally occurring

  12. Fish assemblages on estuarine artificial reefs: natural rocky-reef mimics or discrete assemblages?

    PubMed

    Folpp, Heath; Lowry, Michael; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M

    2014-01-01

    If the primary goal of artificial reef construction is the creation of additional reef habitat that is comparable to adjacent natural rocky-reef, then performance should be evaluated using simultaneous comparisons with adjacent natural habitats. Using baited remote underwater video (BRUV) fish assemblages on purpose-built estuarine artificial reefs and adjacent natural rocky-reef and sand-flat were assessed 18 months post-deployment in three south-east Australian estuaries. Fish abundance, species richness and diversity were found to be greater on the artificial reefs than on either naturally occurring reef or sand-flat in all estuaries. Comparisons within each estuary identified significant differences in the species composition between the artificial and natural rocky-reefs. The artificial reef assemblage was dominated by sparid species including Acanthopagrus australis and Rhabdosargus sarba. The preference for a range of habitats by theses sparid species is evident by their detection on sand-flat, natural rocky reef and artificial reef habitats. The fish assemblage identified on the artificial reefs remained distinct from the adjacent rocky-reef, comprising a range of species drawn from naturally occurring rocky-reef and sand-flat. In addition, some mid-water schooling species including Trachurus novaezelandiae and Pseudocaranx georgianus were only identified on the artificial reef community; presumably as result of the reef's isolated location in open-water. We concluded that estuarine artificial reef assemblages are likely to differ significantly from adjacent rocky-reef, potentially as a result of physical factors such as reef isolation, coupled with species specific behavioural traits such as the ability of some species to traverse large sand flats in order to locate reef structure, and feeding preferences. Artificial reefs should not be viewed as direct surrogates for natural reef. The assemblages are likely to remain distinct from naturally occurring

  13. Ecology of the south Florida coral reefs: a community profile

    SciTech Connect

    Jaap, W.C.

    1984-08-01

    An overview of coral reef research in southern Florida is provided as a prelude to a genuine description of the coral reef ecosystem in the Florida Keys and surrounding environments. Coral reef community types, reef benthos, plankton and reef fish are given specific treatment. Coral reef ecology and management are described. 27 figs., 31 tabs.

  14. Reefing of Quarter Spherical Ribbon Parachutes Used in the Ares I First Stage Deceleration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Jason R.; McFadden, Peter G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the parachutes that have been drop tested in support of the Ares I first stage deceleration system development. The results of the tests show that the reefing ratios for these quarter spherical ribbon parachutes provide the same reefed drag area as historical conical ribbon parachutes. Two sources are investigated for properly normalizing the parachutes relative to their suspension line length, and one is found to be superior.

  15. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off

  16. Research on HOPE actuator power unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itagaki, Haruaki; Iida, Tooru; Ishii, Yasuo

    1992-08-01

    An Overview of the review conducted on Actuator Power Unit (APU) of HOPE (H-2 Orbiting Plane) based on a base line constructed combining conventional technologies are presented. Partial trial production and test on lubrication subsystems to acquire fundamental data on lubricant supply and retrieval system which is not affected by microgravity and gravity directions were conducted. The subject subsystem was constructed to facilitate visual observation from the side of gas and liquid separating conditions. The results of test conducted changing parameters such as void ratio, the ratio of lubricant to residual space (GN2 gas) in the gear box are shown. A lubrication system flow chart is shown.

  17. Sedimentation processes in a coral reef embayment: Hanalei Bay, Kauai

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Field, M.E.; Bothner, Michael H.; Presto, M.K.; Draut, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Oceanographic measurements and sediment samples were collected during the summer of 2006 as part of a multi-year study of coastal circulation and the fate of terrigenous sediment on coral reefs in Hanalei Bay, Kauai. The goal of this study was to better understand sediment dynamics in a coral reef-lined embayment where winds, ocean surface waves, and river floods are important processes. During a summer period that was marked by two wave events and one river flood, we documented significant differences in sediment trap collection rates and the composition, grain size, and magnitude of sediment transported in the bay. Sediment trap collection rates were well correlated with combined wave-current near-bed shear stresses during the non-flood periods but were not correlated during the flood. The flood's delivery of fine-grained sediment to the bay initially caused high turbidity and sediment collection rates off the river mouth but the plume dispersed relatively quickly. Over the next month, the flood deposit was reworked by mild waves and currents and the fine-grained terrestrial sediment was advected around the bay and collected in sediment traps away from the river mouth, long after the turbid surface plume was gone. The reworked flood deposits, due to their longer duration of influence and proximity to the seabed, appear to pose a greater long-term impact to benthic coral reef communities than the flood plumes themselves. The results presented here display how spatial and temporal differences in hydrodynamic processes, which result from variations in reef morphology and orientation, cause substantial variations in the deposition, residence time, resuspension, and advection of both reef-derived and fluvial sediment over relatively short spatial scales in a coral reef embayment.

  18. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  19. Miniature Inchworm Actuators Fabricated by Use of LIGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    those of structures >1 mm high, affords submicron precision, and is amenable to mass production at relatively low unit cost. Fabrication of the proposed actuators would involve some technological risks - in particular, in the integration of electrode connection lines and placement of actuator elements. It will also be necessary to perform an intensive study of the feasibility of growing piezoelectric crystals onto LIGA molds.

  20. Miocene precursors to Great Barrier Reef

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, P.J.; Symonds, P.A.; Feary, D.A.; Pigram, C.

    1988-01-01

    Huge reefs of Miocene age are present in the Gulf of Papua north of the present-day Great Barrier Reef and to the east on the Marion and Queensland Plateaus. In the Gulf of Papua, Miocene barrier reefs formed the northern forerunner of the Great Barrier Reef, extending for many hundreds of kilometers along the eastern and northern margin of the Australian craton within a developing foreland basin. Barrier reefs, slope pinnacle reefs, and platform reefs are seen in seismic sections and drill holes. Leeside talus deposits testify to the high energy impinging on the eastern margin of these Miocene reefs. The Queensland Plateau is a marginal plateau east of the central Great Barrier Reef and separated from it by a rift trough. Miocene reefs occupied an area of about 50,000 km/sup 2/ and grew on salt-controlled highs on the western margin of the plateau and on a regional basement high extending from the platform interior to its southern margin. Reef growth has continued to the present day, although two major contractions in the area covered by reefs occurred during the Miocene. The Marion Plateau is present directly east of the Great Barrier Reef and during the Micoene formed a 30,000-km/sup 2/ platform with barrier reefs along its northern margin and huge platform reefs and laggons on the platform interior. These reefs grew on a flat peneplained surface, the whole area forming a large shallow epicontinental sea. In all three areas, the middle Miocene formed the acme of reef expansion in the region.

  1. Pneumatic actuator with hydraulic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Hobart R., Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The present invention provides a pneumatically powered actuator having hydraulic control for both locking and controlling the velocity of an output rod without any sponginess. The invention includes a double-acting pneumatic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and a control rod connected to the piston. The double-acting pneumatic actuator is mounted to a frame. A first double-acting hydraulic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and a follower rod mounted to the piston is mounted to the frame such that the follower rod is fixedly connected to the control rod. The maximum translation of the piston within the bore of the first double-acting hydraulic actuator provides a volumetric displacement V1. The present invention also includes a second double-acting hydraulic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and an output rod mounted to the piston. The maximum translation of the piston within the bore of the second double-acting hydraulic actuator provides a volumetric displacement V2, where V2=V1. A pair of fluid ports in each of the first and second double-acting hydraulic cylinders are operably connected by fluid conduits, one of which includes a valve circuit which may be used to control the velocity of the output rod or to lock the output rod in a static position by regulating the flow of hydraulic fluid between the double-acting cylinders.

  2. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Segalman, Daniel J.; Witkowski, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  3. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  4. Gear-Driven Turnbuckle Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Ricky N.

    2010-01-01

    This actuator design allows the extension and contraction of turnbuckle assemblies. It can be operated manually or remotely, and is extremely compact. It is ideal for turnbuckles that are hard to reach by conventional tools. The tool assembly design solves the problem of making accurate adjustments to the variable geometry guide vanes without having to remove and reinstall the actuator system back on the engine. The actuator does this easily by adjusting the length of the turnbuckles while they are still attached to the engine.

  5. Ocean acidification worse in coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Eric O.

    2014-12-01

    The rate of ocean acidification in coral reefs outpaces the rise in carbon dioxide (CO2) in Earth's atmosphere, indicating that anthropogenic carbon emissions alone are not to blame for the threat to coral reefs, a new study shows.

  6. Snorkelling and trampling in shallow-water fringing reefs: Risk assessment and proposed management strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hannak, Judith S.; Kompatscher, Sarah; Stachowitsch, Michael; Herler, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Shallow reefs (reef flats <1.5 m) in the northern Red Sea are impacted by growing tourism that includes swimmers, snorkellers and reef walkers but have largely been neglected in past studies. We selected a fringing reef along the lagoon of Dahab (Sinai, Egypt) as a model for a management strategy. Point-intercept line transects were used to determine substrate composition, coral community and condition, and the coral damage index (CDI) was applied. Approximately 84% of the coral colonies showed signs of damage such as breakage, partial mortality or algal overgrowth, especially affecting the most frequent coral genus Acropora. Questionnaires were used to determine the visitors’ socio-economic background and personal attitudes regarding snorkelling, SCUBA-diving and interest in visiting a prospective snorkelling trail. Experiencing nature (97%) was by far the strongest motivation, and interest in further education about reef ecology and skill training was high. Less experienced snorkellers and divers – the target group for further education and skill training – were those most prepared to financially support such a trail. We therefore recommend a guided underwater snorkelling trail and restricting recreational use to a less sensitive ‘ecotourism zone’ while protecting the shallow reef flat. Artificial structures can complete the trail and offer the opportunity to snorkel over deeper areas at unfavourable tide or wind conditions. This approach provides a strategy for the management and conservation of shallow-water reefs, which are facing increasing human impact here and elsewhere. PMID:21708420

  7. Snorkelling and trampling in shallow-water fringing reefs: risk assessment and proposed management strategy.

    PubMed

    Hannak, Judith S; Kompatscher, Sarah; Stachowitsch, Michael; Herler, Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    Shallow reefs (reef flats <1.5 m) in the northern Red Sea are impacted by growing tourism that includes swimmers, snorkellers and reef walkers but have largely been neglected in past studies. We selected a fringing reef along the lagoon of Dahab (Sinai, Egypt) as a model for a management strategy. Point-intercept line transects were used to determine substrate composition, coral community and condition, and the coral damage index (CDI) was applied. Approximately 84% of the coral colonies showed signs of damage such as breakage, partial mortality or algal overgrowth, especially affecting the most frequent coral genus Acropora. Questionnaires were used to determine the visitors' socio-economic background and personal attitudes regarding snorkelling, SCUBA-diving and interest in visiting a prospective snorkelling trail. Experiencing nature (97%) was by far the strongest motivation, and interest in further education about reef ecology and skill training was high. Less experienced snorkellers and divers--the target group for further education and skill training--were those most prepared to financially support such a trail. We therefore recommend a guided underwater snorkelling trail and restricting recreational use to a less sensitive 'ecotourism zone' while protecting the shallow reef flat. Artificial structures can complete the trail and offer the opportunity to snorkel over deeper areas at unfavourable tide or wind conditions. This approach provides a strategy for the management and conservation of shallow-water reefs, which are facing increasing human impact here and elsewhere. PMID:21708420

  8. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  9. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of the

  10. Frontier seismic geologic techniques and the exploration of the Miocene reefs in offshore Palawan, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Buddhadeb

    An 88 km grid of Seislog sections (synthetic sonic log traces) was used to supplement the conventional seismic interpretation to assess the hydrocarbon potential of Lower Miocene reefs of offshore Palawan, Philippines. The porosity distribution in the zone of interest as well as the oil-water contact in and around the Tara and Libro patch reefs were mapped. The structural mapping was also fine tuned, including mapping of faults with small displacements. The paradox of pooling of hydrocarbons is evident in the maximum fill in the front line of traps near the shelf-slope break that are in the lowest structural position. Progressively dwindling amounts of fill in the structurally higher updip basin positions are interpreted to be due to the migration of hydrocarbons from the hydrocarbon kitchen in the Palawan Trough. The front line of traps had the benefit of maximum fill, the traps at the rear only of residual fill that spilled past the frontal traps. Three play types corresponding to the front line of traps, the rear line of traps and the most remote line of traps have been identified. Frontal reefs are considered to have the highest hydrocarbon potential. Diminishing hydrocarbon potential is inferred for closures in the updip direction. A thorough screening of all available seismic control for mapping all the patch reefs that might compensate for their dimensions by their numbers as well as for detecting possible pinnacle reefs in the downdip basin position has been suggested.

  11. Structure/control synthesis with nonnegligible actuator mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, David C.

    1990-01-01

    The simultaneous design of a structure/active control system is addressed in which the mass of the actuators required to implement the active control is considered. An algorithm for estimating the required actuator mass given the control law and the desired maneuver is presented. A nonlinear optimization algorithm is used to direct the design process. Results are given for the design of a L shaped structure where it is desired to minimize the line of sight pointing error after a worst case slew maneuver.

  12. Optical pendulum generator based on photomechanical liquid-crystalline actuators.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rong; Liu, Ziyi; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Jian; Yu, Li; Yu, Haifeng

    2015-04-29

    For converting light energy into electricity, an optical pendulum generator was designed by combining photomechanical movement of liquid-crystalline actuator (LCA) with Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. Bilayer cantilever actuators were first fabricated with LDPE and LCA. Their photomechanical movement drove the attached copper coils to cut magnetic line of force generating electricity. The output electricity was proportional to the changing rate of the magnetic flux, which was greatly influenced by light intensity, film thickness, and sample size. Continuous electrical output was also achieved. This simple strategy may expand applications of photoactive materials in the capture and storage of light energy. PMID:25875214

  13. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  14. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A.; Eide, S.A.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  15. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A. ); Eide, S.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  16. Detailed gravity survey over a known carbonate reef (Devonian) in Williston basin

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, S.M.

    1988-07-01

    A detailed gravity study, conducted over the Shell Golden carbonate reef located in the Winnipegosis Formation (Devonian) of the Williston basin in north-central North Dakota, indicates a massive carbonate platform with several interconnected vertical accumulations, perhaps pinnacle in nature, from this platform. This reef is found at a depth of about 2400 m (8000 ft). Because elevations and north-south positions were surveyed to /+-/3 cm (0.1 ft) and /+-/ 1 (3.3 ft), respectively, an accuracy of 0.01 mgal was obtained. Five profiles were made: three lines running east-west and two lines running north-south, forming a grid pattern over the reef. The distance between each line was 1.6 km (1.0 mi) with gravity-station spacing along each line being 0.4 km (0.25 mi). The Golden reef and most reefs of this nature throughout the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin have been interpreted to be isolated pinnacles with physical dimensions about 60-75 m (200-250 ft) thick and 0.8 km (0.5 mi) in basal diameter. However, analysis of the residual Bouguer gravity anomalies (0.2-0.5 mgal) obtained from this study indicates this reef is more complex than previously thought. The maximum thicknesses of the complex are on the order of 120-185 m (400-600 ft) with compaction anticlines also contributing to the total gravity anomaly. The modeled reef complex extends in a northeast-southwest direction and probably extends beyond the study area along that line.

  17. Photography of Coral Reefs from ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the uses of photography from the International Space Station (ISS) in studying Earth's coral reefs. The photographs include reefs in various oceans . The photographs have uses for science in assisting NASA mapping initiatives, distribution worldwide through ReefBase, and by biologist in the field.

  18. Miocene reefs of Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    The reefs are overlain by conglomeratic strata. The stratigraphic setting of these reefs suggests that they have developed along the stalled portions of rapidly prograding fan deltas. Thickets and layers of coral debris are found seaward and stratigraphically above the well-developed reef. The matrix sediments are exclusively fine-grained sand to mud, and the fauna are suggestive of more open shelf conditions. In thickets, branched (porites spp., Pocillopora spp.), small massive (Montastrea spp., Siderastrea spp.), and foliose or plate like (Agaricia spp.) corals are found upright in the muddy sediment. Similarities in coral species and areal proximity suggest that thickets are the source of most layers of coralline debris. The association of coral debris with graded bedding and cross-bedding suggests that coral debris has been reworked by storms. The growth of corals and development of coral reefs in the Miocene-Pliocene Yaque Group is limited only by opportunities created by the slowing of siliciclastic sedimentation. Soft, muddy, terrigenous substrates and a continuing supply of terrigenous mud exert only a limited, indirect effect on reef growth.

  19. REEF: Retainable Evaluator Execution Framework

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Markus; Chen, Yingda; Chun, Byung-Gon; Condie, Tyson; Curino, Carlo; Douglas, Chris; Lee, Yunseong; Majestro, Tony; Malkhi, Dahlia; Matusevych, Sergiy; Myers, Brandon; Narayanamurthy, Shravan; Ramakrishnan, Raghu; Rao, Sriram; Sears, Russell; Sezgin, Beysim; Wang, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Resource Managers like Apache YARN have emerged as a critical layer in the cloud computing system stack, but the developer abstractions for leasing cluster resources and instantiating application logic are very low-level. This flexibility comes at a high cost in terms of developer effort, as each application must repeatedly tackle the same challenges (e.g., fault-tolerance, task scheduling and coordination) and re-implement common mechanisms (e.g., caching, bulk-data transfers). This paper presents REEF, a development framework that provides a control-plane for scheduling and coordinating task-level (data-plane) work on cluster resources obtained from a Resource Manager. REEF provides mechanisms that facilitate resource re-use for data caching, and state management abstractions that greatly ease the development of elastic data processing work-flows on cloud platforms that support a Resource Manager service. REEF is being used to develop several commercial offerings such as the Azure Stream Analytics service. Furthermore, we demonstrate REEF development of a distributed shell application, a machine learning algorithm, and a port of the CORFU [4] system. REEF is also currently an Apache Incubator project that has attracted contributors from several instititutions.1 PMID:26819493

  20. Influence of hydrodynamic energy on Holocene reef flat accretion, Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechnik, Belinda; Webster, Jody M.; Nothdurft, Luke; Webb, Gregory E.; Zhao, Jian-xin; Duce, Stephanie; Braga, Juan C.; Harris, Daniel L.; Vila-Concejo, Ana; Puotinen, Marji

    2016-01-01

    The response of platform reefs to sea-level stabilization over the past 6 ka is well established for the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), with reefs typically accreting laterally from windward to leeward. However, these observations are based on few cores spread across reef zones and may not accurately reflect a reef's true accretional response to the Holocene stillstand. We present a new record of reef accretion based on 49 U/Th ages from Heron and One Tree reefs in conjunction with re-analyzed data from 14 reefs across the GBR. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic energy is the main driver of accretional direction; exposed reefs accreted primarily lagoon-ward while protected reefs accreted seawards, contrary to the traditional growth model in the GBR. Lateral accretion rates varied from 86.3 m/ka-42.4 m/ka on the exposed One Tree windward reef and 68.35 m/ka-15.7 m/ka on the protected leeward Heron reef, suggesting that wind/wave energy is not a dominant control on lateral accretion rates. This represents the most comprehensive statement of lateral accretion direction and rates from the mid-outer platform reefs of the GBR, confirming great variability in reef flat growth both within and between reef margins over the last 6 ka, and highlighting the need for closely-spaced transects.

  1. Sensors, actuators, and smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiler-McKinstry, S.; Newnham, R. E.

    1993-04-01

    Electroceramic materials are presently noted to have a wide array of sensing and actuating functions which can be incorporated into smart-material designs. The sensor types extend to temperature, piezoelectricity and piezoresistivity, and the presence of oxygen. Attention is given to the prospects for developing composite smart materials that encompass various sensing and actuating functions; these may ultimately reach a level of complexity and sophistication that may be termed 'biomimetric' in its approximation to the functions of the living tissues of organisms.

  2. Fail-safe electric actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.J.

    1988-07-19

    In combination with a control mechanism characterized by the ability to be moved from inoperative to operative position and back, a fail-safe actuator device for automatically returning the control mechanism to inoperative position when interruption of electric power occurs is described which comprises: a fluid-driven vaned torque actuator: electric-motor-driven fluid power means for operating the torque actuator; electrically operated valve means for controlling the power fluid flow between the torque actuator and the fluid power generating means; at least one shaft projecting from the torque actuator; coupling means for operatively connecting the shaft to the control mechanism to be operated by the failsafe actuator device; reversible means for storing energy, the reversible means being operatively connected to the shaft; a limit-switch operating cam mounted on and rotable with the shaft; a limit switch positioned for activation by the limit-switch operating cam; and electric circuitry means for interconnecting the motordriven fluid power generating means, the valve means, and the limit switch.

  3. Explosive actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Kenneth G.

    1983-01-01

    1. A device of the character described comprising the combination of a housing having an elongate bore and including a shoulder extending inwardly into said bore, a single elongate movable plunger disposed in said bore including an outwardly extending flange adjacent one end thereof overlying said shoulder, normally open conduit means having an inlet and an outlet perpendicularly piercing said housing intermediate said shoulder and said flange and including an intermediate portion intersecting and normally openly communicating with said bore at said shoulder, normally closed conduit means piercing said housing and intersecting said bore at a location spaced from said normally open conduit means, said elongate plunger including a shearing edge adjacent the other end thereof normally disposed intermediate both of said conduit means and overlying a portion of said normally closed conduit means, a deformable member carried by said plunger intermediate said flange and said shoulder and normally spaced from and overlying the intermediate portion of said normally open conduit means, and means on the housing communicating with the bore to retain an explosive actuator for moving said plunger to force the deformable member against the shoulder and extrude a portion of the deformable member out of said bore into portions of the normally open conduit means for plugging the same and to effect the opening of said normally closed conduit means by the plunger shearing edge substantially concomitantly with the plugging of the normally open conduit means.

  4. Nanotube Nano-actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennifer, Sippel; Arnason, Steve; Baughman, Ray; Rinzler, Andrew

    2002-03-01

    In 1999 it was found that a thin sheet of single wall carbon nanotubes (buckypaper) can act as an electromechanical transducer (an actuator), converting an applied voltage into a dimensional change, with the potential to do work.[1] The mechanism proposed for the effect is quite fundamental, relying on modification of the nearest neighbor carbon-carbon distance due to charge injected into the nanotube pi-orbital system. Because the experiment relied on buckypaper, which possesses nanoscale pores (where gas generation might also account for dimensional changes), as well as creep (where ropes sliding against one another make it difficult to determine the magnitude of the effect in the fundamental unit), the demonstration was less than ideal. Using an atomic force microscope for detection, we have now performed corresponding measurements on individual ropes of nanotubes tethered across micromachined trenches in silicon substrates. The experiment and results will be described. 1. R. H. Baughman, C. X. Cui, A. A. Zakhidov, Z. Iqbal, J. N. Barisci, G. M. Spinks, G. G. Wallace, A. Mazzoldi, D DeRossi, A. G. Rinzler, O. Jaschinski, S. Roth, M. Kertesz, Science, 284, 1340 (1999).

  5. Quick actuating closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, III, Dorsey E. (Inventor); Updike, deceased, Benjamin T. (Inventor); Allred, Johnny W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quick actuating closure for a pressure vessel 80 in which a wedge ring 30 with a conical outer surface 31 is moved forward to force shear blocks 40, with conical inner surfaces 41, radially outward to lock an end closure plug 70 within an opening 81 in the pressure vessel 80. A seal ring 60 and a preload ramp 50 sit between the shear blocks 40 and the end closure plug 70 to provide a backup sealing capability. Conical surfaces 44 and 55 of the preload ramp 50 and the shear blocks 40 interact to force the seal ring 60 into shoulders 73 and 85 in the end closure plug 70 and opening 81 to form a tight seal. The end closure plug 70 is unlocked by moving the wedge ring 30 rearward, which causes T-bars 32 of the wedge ring 30 riding within T -slots 42 of the shear blocks 40 to force them radially inward. The end closure plug 70 is then removed, allowing access to the interior of the pressure vessel 80.

  6. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Mahrholz, T.; Wierach, P.; Sinapius, M.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750-2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs.

  7. Multiple switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Edward T.

    1976-01-06

    The present invention relates to switches and switch actuating devices to be operated for purposes of arming a bomb or other missile as it is dropped or released from an aircraft. The particular bomb or missile in which this invention is applied is one in which there is a plurality of circuits which are to be armed by the closing of switches upon dropping or releasing of the bomb. The operation of the switches to closed position is normally accomplished by means of a pull-out wire; that is, a wire which is withdrawn from the bomb or missile at the time of release of the bomb, one end of the wire being attached to the aircraft. The conditions to be met are that the arming switches must be positively and surely maintained in open position until the bomb is released and the arming action is effected. The action of the pull-out wire in achieving the arming action must be sure and positive with minimum danger of malfunctioning, jamming or binding.

  8. Coral reef crisis in deep and shallow reefs: 30 years of constancy and change in reefs of Curacao and Bonaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Rolf P. M.; Nieuwland, Gerard; Meesters, Erik H.

    2005-11-01

    Coral reefs are thought to be in worldwide decline but available data are practically limited to reefs shallower than 25 m. Zooxanthellate coral communities in deep reefs (30-40 m) are relatively unstudied. Our question is: what is happening in deep reefs in terms of coral cover and coral mortality? We compare changes in species composition, coral mortality, and coral cover at Caribbean (Curacao and Bonaire) deep (30-40 m) and shallow reefs (10-20 m) using long-term (1973-2002) data from permanent photo quadrats. About 20 zooxanthellate coral species are common in the deep-reef communities, dominated by Agaricia sp., with coral cover up to 60%. In contrast with shallow reefs, there is no decrease in coral cover or number of coral colonies in deep reefs over the last 30 years. In deep reefs, non-agaricid species are decreasing but agaricid domination will be interrupted by natural catastrophic mortality such as deep coral bleaching and storms. Temperature is a vastly fluctuating variable in the deep-reef environment with extremely low temperatures possibly related to deep-reef bleaching.

  9. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  10. A deep reef in deep trouble

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menza, Charles; Kendall, M.; Rogers, C.; Miller, J.

    2007-01-01

    The well-documented degradation of shallower reefs which are often closer to land and more vulnerable to pollution, sewage and other human-related stressors has led to the suggestion that deeper, more remote offshore reefs could possibly serve as sources of coral and fish larvae to replenish the shallower reefs. Yet, the distribution, status, and ecological roles of deep (>30 m) Caribbean reefs are not well known. In this report, an observation of a deep reef which has undergone a recent extensive loss of coral cover is presented. In stark contrast to the typical pattern of coral loss in shallow reefs, the deeper corals were most affected. This report is the first description of such a pattern of coral loss on a deep reef.

  11. Accretion history of mid-Holocene coral reefs from the southeast Florida continental reef tract, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathakopoulos, A.; Riegl, B. M.

    2015-03-01

    Sixteen new coral reef cores were collected to better understand the accretion history and composition of submerged relict reefs offshore of continental southeast (SE) Florida. Coral radiometric ages from three sites on the shallow inner reef indicate accretion initiated by 8,050 Cal BP and terminated by 5,640 Cal BP. The reef accreted up to 3.75 m of vertical framework with accretion rates that averaged 2.53 m kyr-1. The reef was composed of a nearly even mixture of Acropora palmata and massive corals. In many cases, cores show an upward transition from massives to A. palmata and may indicate local dominance by this species prior to reef demise. Quantitative macroscopic analyses of reef clasts for various taphonomic and diagenetic features did not correlate well with depth/environmental-related trends established in other studies. The mixed coral framestone reef lacks a classical Caribbean reef zonation and is best described as an immature reef and/or a series of fused patch reefs; a pattern that is evident in both cores and reef morphology. This is in stark contrast to the older and deeper outer reef of the SE Florida continental reef tract. Accretion of the outer reef lasted from 10,695-8,000 Cal BP and resulted in a larger and better developed structure that achieved a distinct reef zonation. The discrepancies in overall reef morphology and size as well as the causes of reef terminations remain elusive without further study, yet they likely point to different climatic/environmental conditions during their respective accretion histories.

  12. High precision cell slicing by harmonically actuated ultra-sharp SixNy blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hwapyeong; Li, Tao; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.; Park, Jaesung

    2015-02-01

    We describe a micro-knife system with an ultra-sharp blade that is harmonically actuated by lead zirconate titanate (PZT). In particular, harmonic actuation along its cutting direction is demonstrated to provide clean and sharp cut lines for hepatocytes. Such performance is not provided by ordinary ultrasonic actuation. The blade is 500 nm-thick silicon nitride (SixNy); it can cut a single cell. Finite element analysis and measurements of displacement around resonant frequencies were used to optimize the dimensions, driving frequency and voltage. To evaluate the cutting precision, commercial scalpels and the SixNy blade without and with harmonic actuation were compared. When used to cut primary hepatocytes in a mono-layer, a commercial stainless scalpel burst cells, and the SixNy blade without harmonic actuation cut cells with a wide and ragged line. However, due to the controlled ultrasonic mode shape, operating frequency, high frequency and low applied power, the SixNy blade with harmonic actuation at 1Vpp and 70.1 kHz provided a clean and sharp cut line which was as narrow as 2 µm. The SixNy blade with harmonic actuation has potential applications as a tool for minimally invasive surgery.

  13. Punctuated Stratigraphic Appearance of Cold-Water Coral Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberli, G. P.; Correa, T.; Massaferro, J. L.

    2008-05-01

    Existing and new data acquired with an AUV document a high abundance of cold-water coral mounds in the bottom of the Straits of Florida (SoF). These mounds display a large variability of shapes and heights. The abundance and variability encountered in these and modern cold-water coral mounds elsewhere is in stark contrast to lack of reported ancient cold-water coral reefs. Furthermore, the stratigraphic distribution suggests that cold-water corals punctuate the stratigraphic record with times of bloom and times of near complete absence. In the Florida Bahamas region, for example, the stratigraphic distribution is non-uniform. Preliminary age dating of the modern coral mounds produce ages of a few hundred to 1300 years for corals at the surface of the mounds. Sub-bottom profiles and seismic data across the investigated mound fields reveal that the "modern" mounds root in Pleistocene strata but are absent in the Pliocene strata below. Cores taken during ODP Legs 101 and 166 in the SoF confirm the punctuated appearance as deep-water coral rubble was penetrated only in the Pleistocene and in the upper Oligocene strata. The vast occurrence of Oligocene cold-water coral mounds is also visible on a 2-D seismic line in the northern SoF and on a 3-D seismic survey in the southwestern portion of the SoF. In this latter data set a mid-Miocene and the base of Tertiary seismic horizon also image mounded features. These spikes in reef development indicate that environmental conditions were only occasionally favorable for reef growth. The punctuated appearance is surprising as the core and seismic data document continuous current activity since the late Miocene in the SoF. We speculate that the "modern" bloom of cold-water coral reefs in the Pleistocene coincides with the onset of the large barrier reef systems in the Australia and Belize.

  14. Cryogenic actuator for subnanometer positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bree, B. v.; Janssen, H.; Paalvast, S.; Albers, R.

    2012-09-01

    This paper discusses the development, realization, and qualification of a positioning actuator concept specifically for cryogenic environments. Originally developed for quantum physics research, the actuator also has many applications in astronomic cryogenic instruments to position optical elements with nanometer level accuracy and stability. Typical applications include the correction of thermally induced position errors of optical components after cooling down from ambient to cryogenic temperatures or sample positioning in microscopes. The actuator is nicknamed the ‘PiezoKnob’ because it is piezo based and it is compatible with the typical manipulator knob often found in standard systems for optical benches, such as linear stages or tip/tilt lens holders. Actuation with high stiffness piezo elements enables the Piezoknob to deliver forces up to 50 Newton which allows relatively stiff guiding mechanisms or large pre-loads. The PiezoKnob has been qualified at 77 Kelvin and was shown to work down to 2 Kelvin. As part of the qualification program, the custom developed driving electronics and set point profile have been fine-tuned, by combing measurements with predictions from a dynamic model, thus maximizing efficiency and minimizing power dissipation. Furthermore, the actuator holds its position without power and thanks to its mechanical layout it is absolutely insensitive to drift of the piezo elements or the driving electronics.

  15. Temperature-memory polymer actuators

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Marc; Kratz, Karl; Noechel, Ulrich; Sauter, Tilman; Lendlein, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Reading out the temperature-memory of polymers, which is their ability to remember the temperature where they were deformed recently, is thus far unavoidably linked to erasing this memory effect. Here temperature-memory polymer actuators (TMPAs) based on cross-linked copolymer networks exhibiting a broad melting temperature range (ΔTm) are presented, which are capable of a long-term temperature-memory enabling more than 250 cyclic thermally controlled actuations with almost constant performance. The characteristic actuation temperatures Tacts of TMPAs can be adjusted by a purely physical process, guiding a directed crystallization in a temperature range of up to 40 °C by variation of the parameter Tsep in a nearly linear correlation. The temperature Tsep divides ΔTm into an upper Tm range (T > Tsep) forming a reshapeable actuation geometry that determines the skeleton and a lower Tm range (T < Tsep) that enables the temperature-controlled bidirectional actuation by crystallization-induced elongation and melting-induced contraction. The macroscopic bidirectional shape changes in TMPAs could be correlated with changes in the nanostructure of the crystallizable domains as a result of in situ X-ray investigations. Potential applications of TMPAs include heat engines with adjustable rotation rate and active building facades with self-regulating sun protectors. PMID:23836673

  16. The LDCM actuator for vibration suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Eric N.; Lindner, Douglas K.

    1988-01-01

    A linear dc motor (LDCM) has been proposed as an actuator for the COFS I mast and the COFS program ground test Mini-Mast. The basic principles of operation of the LDCM as an actuator for vibration suppression in large flexible structures are reviewed. Because of force and stroke limitations, control loops are required to stabilize the actuator, which results in a non-standard actuator-plant configuration. A simulation model that includes LDCM actuator control loops and a finite element model of the Mast is described, with simulation results showing the excitation capability of the actuator.

  17. Mid-late Holocene Reef Growth and Sedimentation History at Inshore Fringing Reefs in the Central Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, E.; Smithers, S.; Lewis, S.; Zhao, J. X.; Clark, T.

    2014-12-01

    Inshore coral reefs of Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are threatened by terrestrial sediment loads that are argued to have increased by five to six times since coastal catchments were settled by Europeans in the mid-1850s. Nutrient and contaminant delivery to the inshore GBR has also increased over this period. However, direct evidence that European colonisation has changed the ecology of inshore reefs on the GBR remains limited, partly due to a lack of baseline historical data on coral reef growth. Coral reefs have been growing in inshore areas of the GBR since 6 or 7 ky BP, and have experienced natural fluctuations in terrestrial sediment loads over this period. For example, floods associated with episodic cyclones and major rainfall events often deliver pulses of sediment, especially if they follow prolonged dry spells. To better understand this history of sediment influx and reef development, we have examined in detail the chronostratigraphy of several inshore GBR reefs that have grown since the mid-Holocene. Here, we report on eight percussion cores collected at Bramston Reef (148°15'E, 20°03'S). Two cores terminate in the pre-Holocene substrate and therefore capture the entire Holocene sequence of both reef framework and terrigenous sediment matrix. Results from detailed core analyses indicate variable sedimentation patterns throughout the period of reef development. Furthermore, reef ecological condition and variability through the mid-late Holocene is described using palaeoecological analyses. We explore the impacts of sedimentation variability on reef growth and ecology, and compare reef ecological condition pre- and post-European colonisation.

  18. The future of coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, Nancy

    2001-05-01

    Coral reefs, with their millions of species, have changed profoundly because of the effects of people, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Reefs are subject to many of the same processes that affect other human-dominated ecosystems, but some special features merit emphasis: (i) Many dominant reef builders spawn eggs and sperm into the water column, where fertilization occurs. They are thus particularly vulnerable to Allee effects, including potential extinction associated with chronic reproductive failure. (ii) The corals likely to be most resistant to the effects of habitat degradation are small, short-lived "weedy" corals that have limited dispersal capabilities at the larval stage. Habitat degradation, together with habitat fragmentation, will therefore lead to the establishment of genetically isolated clusters of inbreeding corals. (iii) Increases in average sea temperatures by as little as 1°C, a likely result of global climate change, can cause coral "bleaching" (the breakdown of coral-algal symbiosis), changes in symbiont communities, and coral death. (iv) The activities of people near reefs increase both fishing pressure and nutrient inputs. In general, these processes favor more rapidly growing competitors, often fleshy seaweeds, and may also result in explosions of predator populations. (v) Combinations of stress appear to be associated with threshold responses and ecological surprises, including devastating pathogen outbreaks. (vi) The fossil record suggests that corals as a group are more likely to suffer extinctions than some of the groups that associate with them, whose habitat requirements may be less stringent.

  19. Quantifying Coral Reef Ecosystem Services

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs have been declining during the last four decades as a result of both local and global anthropogenic stresses. Numerous research efforts to elucidate the nature, causes, magnitude, and potential remedies for the decline have led to the widely held belief that the recov...

  20. New evidence for the barrier reef model, Permian Capitan Reef complex, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, B.L.; Moore, C.H. Jr. )

    1990-05-01

    Recent paleontologic and petrologic observations suggest that the Capitan Formation was deposited as an organic or ecologic reef that acted as an emergent barrier to incoming wave energy. In outcrops in the Guadalupe Mountains and within Carlsbad Caverns, massive reef boundstone contains a highly diverse assemblage of frame-building and binding organisms. In modern reefs, diversity among frame builders decreases dramatically with depth. Marine cement is abundant in reef boundstone, but limited in back-reef grainstone and packstone. This cementation pattern is similar to that observed in modern emergent barrier reef systems. Based on comparison with modern analogs, these dasycladrominated back-reef sediments and their associated biota are indicative of shallow, hypersaline conditions. Few of these dasyclads exhibit broken or abraded segments and some thallus sections are still articulated suggesting that low-energy, hypersaline conditions occurred immediately shelfward of the reef. In addition, large-scale topographic features, such as possible spur and groove structures between Walnut Canyon and Rattlesnake Canyon, and facies geometries, such as the reef to shelf transition, resemble those found in modern shallow-water reefs. The organisms that formed the Capitan Reef appear to have lived in, and responded to, physical and chemical conditions similar to those that control the geometry of modern shallow-water reefs. Like their modern counterparts, they seem to have strongly influenced adjacent environments. In light of this evidence, consideration should be given to either modifying or abandoning the marginal mound model in favor of the originally proposed barrier reef model.

  1. Electromechanical propellant control system actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill; Weir, Rae Ann

    1990-01-01

    New control mechanism technologies are currently being sought to provide alternatives to hydraulic actuation systems. The Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in the development of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for this purpose. Through this effort, an in-house designed electromechanical propellant valve actuator has been assembled and is presently being evaluated. This evaluation will allow performance comparisons between EMA and hydraulics systems. The in-house design consists of the following hardware: a three-phase brushless motor, a harmonic drive, and an output spline which will mate with current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant control valves. A resolver and associated electronics supply position feedback for the EMA. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. Frequency response testing has been performed with further testing planned as hardware and test facilities become available.

  2. A Parylene Bellows Electrochemical Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-Ying; Sheybani, Roya; Gutierrez, Christian A.; Kuo, Jonathan T. W.; Meng, Ellis

    2011-01-01

    We present the first electrochemical actuator with Parylene bellows for large-deflection operation. The bellows diaphragm was fabricated using a polyethylene-glycol-based sacrificial molding technique followed by coating in Parylene C. Bellows were mechanically characterized and integrated with a pair of interdigitated electrodes to form an electrochemical actuator that is suitable for low-power pumping of fluids. Pump performance (gas generation rate and pump efficiency) was optimized through a careful examination of geometrical factors. Overall, a maximum pump efficiency of 90% was achieved in the case of electroplated electrodes, and a deflection of over 1.5 mm was demonstrated. Real-time wireless operation was achieved. The complete fabrication process and the materials used in this actuator are bio-compatible, which makes it suitable for biological and medical applications. PMID:21318081

  3. Battelle developing reefs to ease habitat losses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Artificial reefs may be the answer to solving a worldwide problem of declining fish habitats, or they may only be good for creating fishing spots. Researchers at Battelle's Ocean Sciences Laboratory in Duxbury, Massachusetts, are studying artificial reefs in the Delaware River to determine if they are a solution to habitat losses in estuaries and coastal regions. [open quotes]Right now, we don't know if the fish are using the reefs simply as a grazing land, and then moving on, or if they're using the areas to colonize,[close quotes] said researcher Karen Foster. [open quotes]Ultimately, we hope to find they are colonizing.[close quotes] In 1989, Battelle researchers placed 16 prefabricated concrete reefs 45 feet deep in Delaware Bay. The reefs were placed in clusters of four, and monitoring began the following year. The federal government ordered the reefs placed in the bay as a mitigation technique for fish habitat that was lost when the river was dredged for navigational purposes. Researchers examined the reefs twice last summer. It will take five years, Foster said, before researchers can determine if the reefs are increasing the fish population. Early tests show, however, the populations of mussels, sponges, corals, and anemones increased by up to 150 percent over an area of bay bottom where the reefs were placed. Divers take crustacean samples from the reefs, and fish are caught near the reefs for examination. Researchers dissect the fish stomachs and analyze the contents to determine if they have been feeding at the reefs. [open quotes]If we find blue mussels in the stomach of the fish, that's great because we know that blue mussels are growing on the reef,[close quotes] Foster said.

  4. Biological models for Mesozoic reef evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, E.G. )

    1990-11-01

    Throughout the Mesozoic, shallow-water carbonate ramps and platforms of the circumequatorial Tethyan Ocean were characterized by extensive development of reef ecosystems, especially during times of eustatic highstand, expansion of the Tropics, and warm equable global climates. The greatest reef development was north of the paleoequator in the Caribbean and Indo-Mediterranean provinces. These reefs and associated debris facies comprise major petroleum reservoirs, in some cases with remarkable porosity and permeability normally attributed to a combination of sedimentologic, tectonic, and diagenetic factors. The biological evolution of Mesozoic reefs also has had an important, and in some cases dominant, role in determining reservoir quality. Three major biological factors are critical to mesozoic reef-associated reservoir development: (1) the replacement/competitive displacement of coral-algal dominated, highly integrated reef ecosystems by loosely packed rudistid bivalve-dominated reef ecosystems in the Barremian-Albian; (2) the evolution of dominantly aragonitic, highly porous shells among framework-building rudistids in the middle and Late Cretaceous; and (3) competitive strategies among rudistids that effectively prevented widespread biological binding of Cretaceous reefs, leading to the production of large marginal fans that comprise major carbonate reservoirs. Detailed studies of these evolutionary trends in reef/framework development and of the distribution of different groups of bioconstructors on reefs lead to predictive modeling for primary and secondary porosity development in mesozoic carbonate reservoirs. The competitive displacement of coral-algal communities by rudistids on Cretaceous reefs was so effective that, even after Maastrichtian mass extinction of rudistids and other important groups comprising Mesozoic reef/carbonate platform ecosystems, coral-algal reef-building communities did not evolve again until the late Eocene.

  5. Fast-acting valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  6. Electrostatically actuatable light modulating device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    The electrostatically actuatable light modulator utilizes an opaque substrate plate patterned with an array of aperture cells, the cells comprised of physically positionable dielectric shutters and electrostatic actuators. With incorporation of a light source and a viewing screen, a projection display system is effected. Inclusion of a color filter array aligned with the aperture cells accomplishes a color display. The system is realized in terms of a silicon based manufacturing technology allowing fabrication of a high resolution capability in a physically small device which with the utilization of included magnification optics allows both large and small projection displays.

  7. Method and apparatus for actuating vehicle transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Ishihara, M.; Uriuhara, M.

    1988-11-15

    This patent describes a method of actuating a vehicle parallel-gear transmission having gears and an internal lever for moving shift blocks connected with shift rods and shift forks for changing gear ratios of the transmission, a hydraulically controlled select actuator operatively connected to the internal lever for moving the internal lever in a select direction, a hydraulically controlled shift actuator operatively connected to the internal lever for moving the internal lever in a shift direction substantially normal to the select direction, a hydraulically controlled clutch actuator for connecting and disconnecting a clutch of the transmission, and a common fluid discharge passage connected to fluid discharge ports of the select and shift actuators and a fluid discharge port of the clutch actuator, the select and shift actuators being alternately actuatable to effect a gear changing operation.

  8. Miniature linear-to-rotary motion actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorokach, Michael R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A miniature hydraulic actuation system capable of converting linear actuator motion to control surface rotary motion has been designed for application to active controls on dynamic wind tunnel models. Due to space constraints and the torque requirements of an oscillating control surface at frequencies up to 50 Hertz, a new actuation system was developed to meet research objectives. This new actuation system was designed and developed to overcome the output torque limitations and fluid loss/sealing difficulties associated with an existing vane type actuator. Static control surface deflections and dynamic control surface oscillations through a given angle are provided by the actuation system. The actuator design has been incorporated into a transonic flutter model with an active trailing edge flap and two active spoilers. The model is scheduled for testing in the LaRC 16 Foot Transonic Dynamics Tunnel during Summer 1993. This paper will discuss the actuation system, its design, development difficulties, test results, and application to aerospace vehicles.

  9. New electrode materials for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Lam, Tuling; Biggs, James; Hu, Liangbing; Yu, Zhibin; Ha, Soonmok; Xi, Dongjuan; Senesky, Matthew K.; Grüner, George; Pei, Qibing

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators exert strain due to an applied electric field. With advantageous properties such as high efficiency and their light weight, these actuators are attractive for a variety of applications ranging from biomimetic robots, medical prosthetics to conventional pumps and valves. The performance and reliability however, are limited by dielectric breakdown which occurs primarily from localized defects inherently present in the polymer film during actuation. These defects lead to electric arcing, causing a short circuit that shuts down the entire actuator and can lead to actuator failure at fields significantly lower than the intrinsic strength of the material. This limitation is particularly a problem in actuators using large-area films. Our recent studies have shown that the gap between the strength of the intrinsic material and the strength of large-area actuators can be reduced by electrically isolating defects in the dielectric film. As a result, the performance and reliability of dielectric elastomers actuators can be substantially improved.

  10. Electrodynamic actuators for rocket engine valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiet, O.; Doshi, D.

    1972-01-01

    Actuators, employed in acoustic loudspeakers, operate liquid rocket engine valves by replacing light paper cones with flexible metal diaphragms. Comparative analysis indicates better response time than solenoid actuators, and improved service life and reliability.

  11. Distributed structural control using multilayered piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudney, Harley H.; Inman, Daniel J.; Oshman, Yaakov

    1990-01-01

    A method of segmenting piezoelectric sensors and actuators is proposed which can preclude the currently experienced cancelation of sensor signals, or the reduction of actuator effectiveness, due to the integration of the property undergoing measurement or control. The segmentation method is demonstrated by a model developed for beam structures, to which multiple layers of piezoelectric materials are attached. A numerical study is undertaken of increasing active and passive damping of a beam using the segmented sensors and actuators over unsegmented sensors and actuators.

  12. Piezoelectric Actuators On A Cold Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Chin-Po; Garba, John A.; Glaser, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental system for active suppression of vibrations of cold finger includes three piezoelectric actuators bonded to outer surface. Actuators used to suppress longitudinal and lateral vibrations of upper end of cold finger by applying opposing vibrations. Cold finger in question is part of a cryogenic system associated with an infrared imaging detector. When fully developed, system would be feedback sensor/control/actuator system automatically adapting to changing vibrational environment and suppresses pressure-induced vibrations by imposing compensatory vibrations via actuators.

  13. Delineating optimal settlement areas of juvenile reef fish in Ngederrak Reef, Koror state, Republic of Palau.

    PubMed

    Ticzon, Victor S; Foster, Greg; David, Laura T; Mumby, Peter J; Samaniego, Badi R; Madrid, Val Randolf

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the effectiveness of habitat features to act as surrogate measures of diversity and abundance of juvenile reef fish provides information that is critical to coral reef management. When accurately set on a broader spatial context, microhabitat information becomes more meaningful and its management application becomes more explicit. The goal of the study is to identify coral reef areas potentially important to juvenile fishes in Ngederrak Reef, Republic of Palau, across different spatial scales. To achieve this, the study requires the accomplishment of the following tasks: (1) structurally differentiate the general microhabitat types using acoustics; (2) quantify microhabitat association with juvenile reef fish community structure; and (3) conduct spatial analysis of the reef-wide data and locate areas optimal for juvenile reef fish settlement. The results strongly suggest the importance of branching structures in determining species count and abundance of juvenile reef fish at the outer reef slope of Ngederrak Reef. In the acoustic map, the accurate delineation of these features allowed us to identify reef areas with the highest potential to harbor a rich aggregation of juvenile reef fish. Using a developed spatial analysis tool that ranks pixel groups based on user-defined parameters, the reef area near the Western channel of Ngederrak is predicted to have the most robust aggregation of juvenile reef fish. The results have important implications not only in management, but also in modeling the impacts of habitat loss on reef fish community. At least for Ngederrak Reef, the results advanced the utility of acoustic systems in predicting spatial distribution of juvenile fish. PMID:25394769

  14. Modeling Reef Hydrodynamics to Predict Coral Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, James; Steinberg, Craig; Hardy, Tom

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study is to use environmental physics to predict water temperatures around and within coral reefs. Anomalously warm water is the leading cause for mass coral bleaching; thus a clearer understanding of the oceanographic mechanisms that control reef water temperatures will enable better reef management. In March 1998 a major coral bleaching event occurred at Scott Reef, a 40 km-wide lagoon 300 km off the northwest coast of Australia. Meteorological and coral cover observations were collected before, during, and after the event. In this study, two hydrodynamic models are applied to Scott Reef and validated against oceanographic data collected between March and June 2003. The models are then used to hindcast the reef hydrodynamics that led up to the 1998 bleaching event. Results show a positive correlation between poorly mixed regions and bleaching severity.

  15. Astronaut Photography of Coral Reefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Noordeloos, Marco

    2001-01-01

    Astronaut photographs of tropical coastal areas may contain information on submerged features, including coral reefs, up to depths of about 15 m in clear waters. Previous research efforts have shown that astronaut photographs can aid in estimating coral reef locations and extent on national, regional and global scales, and allow characterization of major geomorphological rim and lagoon features (Andrefouet et al. 2000, in preparation). They can be combined with traditional satellite data to help distinguish between clouds and lagoon features such as pinnacles (Andrefouet and Robinson, in review). Furthermore, astronaut photographs may provide reef scientists and managers with information on the location and extent of river plumes and sediment run off, or facilitate identification of land cover types, including mangroves (Webb et al., in press). Photographs included in the section were selected based on several criteria. The primary consideration of the editors was that the photographs represent a worldwide distribution of coral reefs, have extremely low visual interference by cloud cover, and display a spatial scale reasonable for examining reef-related features. Once photographs were selected, they were digitized from 2nd generation copies. The color and contrast were hand corrected to an approximation of natural color (required to account for spectral differences between photographs due to the color sensitivities of films used, and differences in sun angle and exposure of the photographs). None of the photographs shown here have been georeferenced to correct them to a map projection and scale. Any distortions in features due to slightly oblique look angles when the photographs were taken through spacecraft windows remain. When feasible, near vertical photographs have been rotated so that north is toward the top. An approximate scale bar and north arrow have added using distinctive features on each photograph with reference to a 1:1,000,000 scale navigation chart

  16. Microbial photosynthesis in coral reef sediments (Heron Reef, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Ursula; Blazejak, Anna; Bird, Paul; Eickert, Gabriele; Schoon, Raphaela; Abed, Raeid M. M.; Bissett, Andrew; de Beer, Dirk

    2008-03-01

    We investigated microphytobenthic photosynthesis at four stations in the coral reef sediments at Heron Reef, Australia. The microphytobenthos was dominated by diatoms, dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria, as indicated by biomarker pigment analysis. Conspicuous algae firmly attached to the sand grains (ca. 100 μm in diameter, surrounded by a hard transparent wall) were rich in peridinin, a marker pigment for dinoflagellates, but also showed a high diversity based on cyanobacterial 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. Specimens of these algae that were buried below the photic zone exhibited an unexpected stimulation of respiration by light, resulting in an increase of local oxygen concentrations upon darkening. Net photosynthesis of the sediments varied between 1.9 and 8.5 mmol O 2 m -2 h -1 and was strongly correlated with Chl a content, which lay between 31 and 84 mg m -2. An estimate based on our spatially limited dataset indicates that the microphytobenthic production for the entire reef is in the order of magnitude of the production estimated for corals. Photosynthesis stimulated calcification at all investigated sites (0.2-1.0 mmol Ca 2+ m -2 h -1). The sediments of at least three stations were net calcifying. Sedimentary N 2-fixation rates (measured by acetylene reduction assays at two sites) ranged between 0.9 to 3.9 mmol N 2 m -2 h -1 and were highest in the light, indicating the importance of heterocystous cyanobacteria. In coral fingers no N 2-fixation was measurable, which stresses the importance of the sediment compartment for reef nitrogen cycling.

  17. Inflated Soft Actuators with Reversible Stable Deformations.

    PubMed

    Hines, Lindsey; Petersen, Kirstin; Sitti, Metin

    2016-05-01

    Most soft robotic systems are currently dependent on bulky compressors or pumps. A soft actuation method is presented combining hyperelastic membranes and dielectric elastomer actuators to switch between stable deformations of sealed chambers. This method is capable of large repeatable deformations, and has a number of stable states proportional to the number of actuatable membranes in the chamber. PMID:27008455

  18. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  19. Note: Seesaw actuation of atomic force microscope probes for improved imaging bandwidth and displacement range

    SciTech Connect

    Torun, H.; Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. L.

    2011-08-15

    The authors describe a method of actuation for atomic force microscope (AFM) probes to improve imaging speed and displacement range simultaneously. Unlike conventional piezoelectric tube actuation, the proposed method involves a lever and fulcrum ''seesaw'' like actuation mechanism that uses a small, fast piezoelectric transducer. The lever arm of the seesaw mechanism increases the apparent displacement range by an adjustable gain factor, overcoming the standard tradeoff between imaging speed and displacement range. Experimental characterization of a cantilever holder implementing the method is provided together with comparative line scans obtained with contact mode imaging. An imaging bandwidth of 30 kHz in air with the current setup was demonstrated.

  20. ReefLink Database: A decision support tool for Linking Coral Reefs and Society Through Systems Thinking

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs provide the ecological foundation for productive and diverse fish and invertebrate communities that support multibillion dollar reef fishing and tourism industries. Yet reefs are threatened by growing coastal development, climate change, and over-exploitation. A key i...

  1. Shape memory actuated release devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bernie F.; Clark, Cary R.; Weems, Weyman

    1996-05-01

    Spacecraft require a variety of separation and release devices to accomplish mission related functions. Current off-the-shelf devices such as pyrotechnics, gas-discharge systems, paraffin wax actuators, and other electro-mechanical devices may not be able to meet future design needs. The use of pyrotechnics on advanced lightweight spacecraft, for example, will expose fragile sensors and electronics to high shock levels and sensitive optics might be subject to contamination. Other areas of consideration include reliability, safety, and cost reduction. Shape memory alloys (SMA) are one class of actuator material that provides a solution to these design problems. SMA's utilize a thermally activated reversible phase transformation to recover their original heat treated shape (up to 8% strain) or to generate high recovery stresses (> 700 Mpa) when heated above a critical transition temperature. NiTiCu alloy actuators have been fabricated to provide synchronized, shockless separation within release mechanisms. In addition, a shape memory damper has been incorporated to absorb the elastic energy of the preload bolt and to electrically reset the device during ground testing. Direct resistive heating of the SMA actuators was accomplished using a programmable electric control system. Release times less than 40 msec have been determined using 90 watt-sec of power. Accelerometer data indicate less than 500 g's of shock were generated using a bolt preload of 1350 kgs.

  2. Electro-active paper actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Seo, Yung B.

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, the actuation mechanism of electro-active paper (EAPap) actuators is addressed and the potential of the actuators is demonstrated. EAPap is a paper that produces large displacement with small force under an electrical excitation. EAPap is made with a chemically treated paper by constructing thin electrodes on both sides of the paper. When electrical voltage is applied on the electrodes the EAPap produces bending displacement. However, the displacement output has been unstable and degraded with timescale. To improve the bending performance of EAPap, different paper fibers - softwood, hardwood, bacteria cellulose, cellophane, carbon mixture paper, electrolyte containing paper and Korean traditional paper, in conjunction with additive chemicals, were tested. Two attempts were made to construct the electrodes: the direct use of aluminum foil and the gold sputtering technique. It was found that a cellophane paper exhibits a remarkable bending performance. When 2 MV m-1 excitation voltage was applied to the paper actuator, more than 3 mm tip displacement was observed from the 30 mm long paper beam. This is quite a low excitation voltage compared with that of other EAPs. Details of the experiments and results are addressed.

  3. Multilayer Piezoelectric Stack Actuator Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher M.; Aldrich, Jack B.; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xioaqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2008-01-01

    Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to use actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of fractions of a nanometer. For this purpose, multilayer piezoelectric stacks are being considered as actuators for driving these precision mechanisms. In this study, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and extreme temperatures and voltages. AC signal testing included impedance, capacitance and dielectric loss factor of each actuator as a function of the small-signal driving sinusoidal frequency, and the ambient temperature. DC signal testing includes leakage current and displacement as a function of the applied DC voltage. The applied DC voltage was increased to over eight times the manufacturers' specifications to investigate the correlation between leakage current and breakdown voltage. Resonance characterization as a function of temperature was done over a temperature range of -180C to +200C which generally exceeded the manufacturers' specifications. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators from one manufacturer were driven by a 60volt, 2 kHz sine-wave for ten billion cycles. The tests were performed using a Lab-View controlled automated data acquisition system that monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The measurements included the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current and the analysis of the experimental results will be presented.

  4. Status of Electrical Actuator Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Taylor, Linda M.; Hansen, Irving G.

    1996-01-01

    An ever increasing number of actuation functions historically performed by hydraulics or pneumatics are being accomplished by electric actuation. If 'end to end' systems are considered, electric actuators (EA's) are potentially lighter and more efficient. In general, system redundancies may be more easily implemented and operationally monitored. Typically, electrical components exhibit longer mean times to failure and projected lifetime costs of EA's are potentially much lower than those of other options. EA's have certain characteristics which must be considered in their application. The actual mechanical loadings must be established, for the more easily controlled EA may be operated much closer to its full capabilities. At higher rates of motion, EA's are operating as constant power devices. Therefore, it may be possible to start a movement that can not be stopped. The incorporation of high power electronics into remote locations introduces new concerns of EMI and thermal control. It is the management of these and other characteristics that forms the engineering design challenges. Work is currently in progress on EA's for aircraft and expendable launch vehicles. These applications span from ten to 40+ horsepower. The systematics and status of these actuators will be reported along with current technical trends in this area.

  5. Ball Aerospace Actuator Cryogenic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Lana; Lightsey, Paul; Quigley, Phil; Rutkowski, Joel; Russell, J. Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ambient testing characterizing step size and repeatability for the Ball Aerospace Cryogenic Nano-Positioner actuators for the AMSD (Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator) program has been completed and are presented. Current cryogenic testing is underway. Earlier cryogenic test results for a pre-cursor engineering model are presented.

  6. Pearl and Hermes Reef, Hawaiian Island Chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Pearl and Hermes Reef (28.0N, 176.0W) in the Hawaiian Island Chain, are seen with several small sandy islands, forming an atoll that caps a seamount on the long chain that extends some 1,500 miles northwestward from the more familiar Hawaiian Islands proper. Pearl and Hermes Reef lies about 100 miles southeast of Midway island. A reticulate network of coral patch reefs separates the lagoon into more or less isolated pools.

  7. Piezoelectric multilayer actuator life test.

    PubMed

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Jones, Christopher M; Aldrich, Jack B; Blodget, Chad J; Moore, James D; Carson, John W; Goullioud, Renaud

    2011-04-01

    Potential NASA optical missions such as the Space Interferometer Mission require actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of nanometers. Commercially available multilayer piezoelectric stack actuators are being considered for driving these precision mirror positioning mechanisms. These mechanisms have potential mission operational requirements that exceed 5 years for one mission life. To test the feasibility of using these commercial actuators for these applications and to determine their reliability and the redundancy requirements, a life test study was undertaken. The nominal actuator requirements for the most critical actuators on the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) in terms of number of cycles was estimated from the Modulation Optics Mechanism (MOM) and Pathlength control Optics Mechanism (POM) and these requirements were used to define the study. At a nominal drive frequency of 250 Hz, one mission life is calculated to be 40 billion cycles. In this study, a set of commercial PZT stacks configured in a potential flight actuator configuration (pre-stressed to 18 MPa and bonded in flexures) were tested for up to 100 billion cycles. Each test flexure allowed for two sets of primary and redundant stacks to be mechanically connected in series. The tests were controlled using an automated software control and data acquisition system that set up the test parameters and monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The samples were driven between 0 and 20 V at 2000 Hz to accelerate the life test and mimic the voltage amplitude that is expected to be applied to the stacks during operation. During the life test, 10 primary stacks were driven and 10 redundant stacks, mechanically in series with the driven stacks, were open-circuited. The stroke determined from a strain gauge, the temperature and humidity in the chamber, and the temperature of each individual stack were recorded. Other properties of the stacks, including the

  8. Design of torque actuator based on ferromagnetic shape memory alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Victor J.; Taya, Minoru; Lee, Jae Kon; Kusaka, Masahiro; Wada, Taishi

    2004-07-01

    Experimental tests were conducted on a torque actuator based on ferromagnetic shape memory alloy composite and performance data obtained. Based on experimental results of the initial design, several design changes were made to the actuator that resulted in improved torque capability and maximum angle of twist compared to the original design. A full 3-D finite element method model was undertaken to optimize magnetic flux lines generated by the hybrid magnet.

  9. Studies on the Great Barrier Reef

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, S.

    1985-01-01

    Proposals to drill for oil on Australia's Great Barrier Reef have led to the appointment of a royal commission to study the environmental impact of such activities. The Australian Institute of Marine Science has developed a 5-part research plant which covers the Australian mangrove environment; nearshore habitat; processes and interactions, energy flows, resource cycling and their consequences within the reef ecosystems; patterns, abundances and relationships within the reef; and the continental shelf of the Great Barrier Reef region. Research in each of these areas is described.

  10. Spectral wave dissipation over a barrier reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Falter, James L.; Bandet, Marion D.; Pawlak, Geno; Atkinson, Marlin J.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.

    2005-04-01

    A 2 week field experiment was conducted to measure surface wave dissipation on a barrier reef at Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii. Wave heights and velocities were measured at several locations on the fore reef and the reef flat, which were used to estimate rates of dissipation by wave breaking and bottom friction. Dissipation on the reef flat was found to be dominated by friction at rates that are significantly larger than those typically observed at sandy beach sites. This is attributed to the rough surface generated by the reef organisms, which makes the reef highly efficient at dissipating energy by bottom friction. Results were compared to a spectral wave friction model, which showed that the variation in frictional dissipation among the different frequency components could be described using a single hydraulic roughness length scale. Surveys of the bottom roughness conducted on the reef flat showed that this hydraulic roughness length was comparable to the physical roughness measured at this site. On the fore reef, dissipation was due to the combined effect of frictional dissipation and wave breaking. However, in this region the magnitude of dissipation by bottom friction was comparable to wave breaking, despite the existence of a well-defined surf zone there. Under typical wave conditions the bulk of the total wave energy incident on Kaneohe Bay is dissipated by bottom friction, not wave breaking, as is often assumed for sandy beach sites and other coral reefs.

  11. Impacts of Artificial Reefs on Surrounding Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoukian, Sarine

    Artificial reefs are becoming a popular biological and management component in shallow water environments characterized by soft seabed, representing both important marine habitats and tools to manage coastal fisheries and resources. An artificial reef in the marine environment acts as an open system with exchange of material and energy, altering the physical and biological characteristics of the surrounding area. Reef stability will depend on the balance of scour, settlement, and burial resulting from ocean conditions over time. Because of the unstable nature of sediments, they require a detailed and systematic investigation. Acoustic systems like high-frequency multibeam sonar are efficient tools in monitoring the environmental evolution around artificial reefs, whereas water turbidity can limit visual dive and ROV inspections. A high-frequency multibeam echo sounder offers the potential of detecting fine-scale distribution of reef units, providing an unprecedented level of resolution, coverage, and spatial definition. How do artificial reefs change over time in relation to the coastal processes? How accurately does multibeam technology map different typologies of artificial modules of known size and shape? How do artificial reefs affect fish school behavior? What are the limitations of multibeam technology for investigating fish school distribution as well as spatial and temporal changes? This study addresses the above questions and presents results of a new approach for artificial reef seafloor mapping over time, based upon an integrated analysis of multibeam swath bathymetry data and geoscientific information (backscatter data analysis, SCUBA observations, physical oceanographic data, and previous findings on the geology and sedimentation processes, integrated with unpublished data) from Senigallia artificial reef, northwestern Adriatic Sea (Italy) and St. Petersburg Beach Reef, west-central Florida continental shelf. A new approach for observation of fish

  12. Freshwater impacts in the central Great Barrier Reef: 1648-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lough, J. M.; Lewis, S. E.; Cantin, N. E.

    2015-09-01

    The Australian summer monsoon is highly variable from year to year resulting in high variability in the magnitude and extent of freshwater river flood plumes affecting the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). These flood plumes transport terrestrial materials and contaminants to the reef and can have significant impacts on both water quality and ecosystem health. The occurrence and intensity of these freshwater flood plumes are reliably recorded as annual luminescent lines in inshore massive corals and occasional luminescent lines in mid-shelf corals. We use measured luminescence in a long Porites core and four recently collected short cores from Havannah Island (a nearshore reef in the central GBR) to reconstruct Burdekin River flow, 1648-2011, and five recent short cores from Britomart Reef (a mid-shelf reef, 65 km northeast of Havannah Island) to assess the frequency of flood plume events extending beyond the inshore to mid-shelf reefs. The reconstruction highlights that the frequency of high flow events has increased in the GBR from 1 in every 20 yr prior to European settlement (1748-1847) to 1 in every 6 yr reoccurrence (1948-2011). Three of the most extreme events in the past 364 yr have occurred since 1974, including 2011. The reconstruction also shows a shift to higher flows, increased variability from the latter half of the nineteenth century, and likely more frequent freshwater impacts on mid-shelf reefs. This change coincided with European settlement of northern Queensland and substantial changes in land use, which resulted in increased sediment loads exported to the GBR. The consequences of increased sediment loads to the GBR were, therefore, likely exacerbated by this climate shift. This change in Burdekin River flow characteristics appears to be associated with a shift towards greater El Niño-Southern Oscillation variability and rapid warming in the southwest Pacific, evident in independent palaeoclimatic records.

  13. Bryozoa of Floridan Oculina reefs.

    PubMed

    Winston, Judith E

    2016-01-01

    The deep-water Oculina coral reefs on the continental shelf off the east central coast of Florida are a unique protected marine habitat. A complete inventory of the Oculina-associated fauna is important to support its conservation. This paper provides an inventory of the bryozoans of the Oculina reef area. Unusually, the bryozoan fauna is dominated by encrusting cribrilinid bryozoans. These include two new species of Puellina and three other Floridan-Atlantic shelf Puellina only recently described. Additional cribrilinid species belong to the genera Klugerella and Rosulapelta. Other bryozoans found in the habitat include 38 encrusting cheilostome species, six of them new to science, belonging to the genera Callopora, Parasmittina, Parasmittina, Smittina, Microporella and Stephanollona. Cyclostomes were only sparsely represented, comprising three encrusting taxa. PMID:27395907

  14. Conservation, precaution, and Caribbean reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, Richard B.; Precht, William F.

    2006-08-01

    Some authors argue that overfishing is an important reason that reef corals have declined in recent decades. Their reasoning is that overfishing removes herbivores, releasing macroalgae to overgrow and kill the corals. The evidence suggests, however, that global climate change and emergent marine diseases make a far greater contribution to coral mortality, and that macroalgae generally grow on the exposed skeletal surfaces of corals that are already dead. Macroalgal dominance, therefore, is an effect rather than a cause of coral mortality. Marine protected areas (MPAs), which are usually established to protect stocks of reef fish, foster populations of herbivorous fish under at least some circumstances. Increased herbivory can reduce algal cover, potentially accelerating the recovery of coral populations inside MPAs; however, establishing MPAs will have only a limited impact on coral recovery unless policymakers confront the accelerating negative effects of the global-scale sources of coral mortality.

  15. Tilt/Tip/Piston Manipulator with Base-Mounted Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad

    2006-01-01

    A proposed three-degree-of-freedom (tilt/tip/piston) manipulator, suitable for aligning an optical or mechanical component, would offer several advantages over prior such manipulators: Unlike in some other manipulators, no actuator would support the weight of another actuator: All of the actuators would be mounted on a base. Hence, there would be less manipulated weight. The basic geometry of the manipulator would afford mechanical advantage: that is, actuator motions would be larger than the motions they produce in the manipulated object. Mechanical advantage inherently increases the accuracy and resolution of manipulation. Unlike in some other manipulators, it would not be necessary to route power and/or data lines through manipulator joints. The proposed manipulator (see figure) would include three prismatic actuators (T1N1, T2N2, and T3N3) mounted on the base and operating in the same plane. Examples of suitable prismatic actuators include lead-screw mechanisms, linear hydraulic motors, piezoelectric linear drives, inchworm-movement linear stepping motors, and linear flexure drives. The actuators would control the lengths of links R1T1, R2T2, and R3T3. Three spherical joints (P1, P2, and P3) would be located at the corners of an equilateral triangle of side length q on the platform holding the object to be manipulated. Three inextensible limbs (R1P1, R2P2, and R3P3) having length r would connect the spherical joints on the platform to revolute joints (R1, R2, and R3) at the ends of the actuator-controlled links R1T1, R2T2, and R3T3. By varying the lengths of these links, one could control the tilt, tip, and piston coordinates of the platform. Closed-form equations for direct or forward kinematics of the manipulator (given the lengths of the variable links, find the tilt, tip, and piston coordinates) have been derived. The equations of inverse kinematics (find the variable link lengths needed to obtain the desired tilt, tip, and piston coordinates) have also

  16. Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Along the coast of Queensland, Australia (18.0S, 147.5E), timbered foothills of the Great Dividing Range separate the semi-arid interior of Queensland from the farmlands of the coastal plains. Prominent cleared areas in the forest indicate deforestation for farm and pasture lands. Offshore, islands and the Great Barrier Reef display sand banks along the southern sides of the structures indicating a dominant southerly wind and current direction.

  17. Influence of reef geometry on wave attenuation on a Brazilian coral reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Mirella B. S. F.; Araújo, Moacyr; Araújo, Tereza C. M.; Siegle, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    This study presents data from field experiments that focus on the influence of coral reef geometry on wave transformation in the Metropolitan Area of Recife (MAR) on the northeast coast of Brazil. First, a detailed bathymetric survey was conducted, revealing a submerged reef bank, measuring 18 km long by 1 km wide, parallel to the coastline with a quasi-horizontal top that varies from 0.5 m to 4 m in depth at low tide. Cluster similarity between 180 reef profiles indicates that in 75% of the area, the reef geometry has a configuration similar to a platform reef, whereas in 25% of the area it resembles a fringing reef. Measurements of wave pressure fluctuations were made at two stations (experiments E1 and E2) across the reef profile. The results indicate that wave height was tidally modulated at both experimental sites. Up to 67% (E1) and 99.9% (E2) of the incident wave height is attenuated by the reef top at low tide. This tidal modulation is most apparent at E2 due to reef geometry. At this location, the reef top is only approximately 0.5 m deep during mean low spring water, and almost all incident waves break on the outer reef edge. At E1, the reef top depth is 4 m, and waves with height ratios smaller than the critical breaking limit are free to pass onto the reef and are primarily attenuated by bottom friction. These results highlight the importance of reef geometry in controlling wave characteristics of the MAR beaches and demonstrate its effect on the morphology of the adjacent coast. Implications of differences in wave attenuation and the level of protection provided by the reefs to the adjacent shoreline are discussed.

  18. Composite flight-control actuator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bott, Richard; Ching, Fred

    1992-01-01

    The composite actuator is 'jam resistant', satisfying a survivability requirement for the Navy. Typically, the push-pull force needed to drive through the wound area of the composite actuator is 73 percent less than that of an all-metal actuator. In addition to improving the aircraft's combat survivability, significant weight savings were realized. The current design of the survivable, composite actuator cylinder is 36 percent lighter than that of the production steel cylinder, which equates to a 15 percent overall actuator weight savings.

  19. IPMC actuator array as a 3D haptic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masanori; Mazzone, Andrea; Piffaretti, Filippo; Gassert, Roger; Nakao, Masayuki; Bleuler, Hannes

    2005-05-01

    Based on the concept of Mazzone et al., we have designed a novel system to be used simultaneously as an input and output device for designing, presenting, or recognizing objects in three-dimensional space. Unlike state of the art stereoscopic display technologies that generate a virtual image of a three-dimensional object, the proposed system, a "digital clay" like device, physically imitates the desired object. The object can not only be touched and explored intuitively but also deform itself physically. In order to succeed in developing such a deformable structure, self-actuating ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) materials are proposed. IPMC is a type of electro active polymer (EAP) and has recently been drawing much attention. It has high force to weight ratio and shape flexibility, making it ideal for robotic applications. This paper introduces the first steps and results in the attempt of developing such a structure. A strip consisting of four actuators arranged in line was fabricated and evaluated, showing promising capabilities in deforming two-dimensionally. A simple model to simulate the deformation of an IPMC actuator using finite element methods (FEM) is also proposed and compared with the experimental results. The model can easily be implemented into computer aided engineering (CAE) software. This will expand the application possibilities of IPMCs. Furthermore, a novel method for creating multiple actuators on one membrane with a laser machining tool is introduced.

  20. A swimming robot actuated by living muscle tissue

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Hugh; Dennis, Robert G

    2004-01-01

    Biomechatronics is the integration of biological components with artificial devices, in which the biological component confers a significant functional capability to the system, and the artificial component provides specific cellular and tissue interfaces that promote the maintenance and functional adaptation of the biological component. Based upon functional performance, muscle is potentially an excellent mechanical actuator, but the larger challenge of developing muscle-actuated, biomechatronic devices poses many scientific and engineering challenges. As a demonstratory proof of concept, we designed, built, and characterized a swimming robot actuated by two explanted frog semitendinosus muscles and controlled by an embedded microcontroller. Using open loop stimulation protocols, the robot performed basic swimming maneuvers such as starting, stopping, turning (turning radius ~400 mm) and straight-line swimming (max speed >1/3 body lengths/second). A broad spectrum antibiotic/antimycotic ringer solution surrounded the muscle actuators for long term maintenance, ex vivo. The robot swam for a total of 4 hours over a 42 hour lifespan (10% duty cycle) before its velocity degraded below 75% of its maximum. The development of functional biomechatronic prototypes with integrated musculoskeletal tissues is the first critical step toward the long term objective of controllable, adaptive and robust biomechatronic robots and prostheses. PMID:15679914

  1. Mars Science Laboratory Rover Actuator Thermal Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Keith S.; Liu, Yuanming; Lee, Chern-Jiin; Hendricks, Steven

    2010-01-01

    NASA will launch a 900 kg rover, part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, to Mars in October of 2011. The MSL rover is scheduled to land on Mars in August of 2012. The rover employs 31, electric-motor driven actuators to perform a variety of engineering and science functions including: mobility, camera pointing, telecommunications antenna steering, soil and rock sample acquisition and sample processing. This paper describes the MSL rover actuator thermal design. The actuators have stainless steel housings and planetary gearboxes that are lubricated with a "wet" lubricant. The lubricant viscosity increases with decreasing temperature. Warm-up heaters are required to bring the actuators up to temperature (above -55 C) prior to use in the cold wintertime environment of Mars (when ambient atmosphere temperatures are as cold as -113 C). Analytical thermal models of all 31 MSL actuators have been developed. The actuators have been analyzed and warm-up heaters have been designed to improve actuator performance in cold environments. Thermal hardware for the actuators has been specified, procured and installed. This paper presents actuator thermal analysis predicts, and describes the actuator thermal hardware and its operation. In addition, warm-up heater testing and thermal model correlation efforts for the Remote Sensing Mast (RSM) elevation actuator are discussed.

  2. Development of micro inchworm robot actuated by electrostrictive polymer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sunghwi; Ryew, Sungmoo; Jeon, Jaewook; Kim, Hunmo; Nam, Jaedo; Choi, Hyoukryeol

    2001-07-01

    In previous works, the possibility of the electrostrictive polymer as the actuator use has been proved. In this paper we address an actual design of an actuator and an inchworm type robotic mechanism using the electrostrictive polymer. The robot will be developed to move horizontally, vertically with steering capability, aiming for navigation in small tubular structures such as flexible pipes but now in this stage a simple bellows type robot capable of accomplishing the linear movement like that of an inchworm is introduced. The issues about the mechanism design of the prototype, which has already been developed and under the consideration of reduction in size, are discussed and preliminary results of experiments are given.

  3. Mapping Oyster Reef Habitats in Mobile Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolte, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Oyster reefs around the world are declining rapidly, and although they haven t received as much attention as coral reefs, they are just as important to their local ecosystems and economies. Oyster reefs provide habitats for many species of fish, invertebrates, and crustaceans, as well as the next generations of oysters. Oysters are also harvested from many of these reefs and are an important segment of many local economies, including that of Mobile Bay, where oysters rank in the top five commercial marine species both by landed weight and by dollar value. Although the remaining Mobile Bay oyster reefs are some of the least degraded in the world, projected climate change could have dramatic effects on the health of these important ecosystems. The viability of oyster reefs depends on water depth and temperature, appropriate pH and salinity levels, and the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water. Projected increases in sea level, changes in precipitation and runoff patterns, and changes in pH resulting from increases in the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in the oceans could all affect the viability of oyster reefs in the future. Human activities such as dredging and unsustainable harvesting practices are also adversely impacting the oyster reefs. Fortunately, several projects are already under way to help rebuild or support existing or previously existing oyster reefs. The success of these projects will depend on the local effects of climate change on the current and potential habitats and man s ability to recognize and halt unsustainable harvesting practices. As the extent and health of the reefs changes, it will have impacts on the Mobile Bay ecosystem and economy, changing the resources available to the people who live there and to the rest of the country, since Mobile Bay is an important national source of seafood. This project identified potential climate change impacts on the oyster reefs of Mobile Bay, including the possible addition of newly viable

  4. Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, J.M.; Braga, J.C.; Clague, D.A.; Gallup, C.; Hein, J.R.; Potts, D.C.; Renema, W.; Riding, R.; Riker-Coleman, K.; Silver, E.; Wallace, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of well-developed submerged coral reefs are preserved in the Huon Gulf (Papua New Guinea) and around Hawaii. Despite different tectonics settings, both regions have experienced rapid subsidence (2-6??m/ka) over the last 500??ka. Rapid subsidence, combined with eustatic sea-level changes, is responsible for repeated drowning and backstepping of coral reefs over this period. Because we can place quantitative constraints on these systems (i.e., reef drowning age, eustatic sea-level changes, subsidence rates, accretion rates, basement substrates, and paleobathymetry), these areas represent unique natural laboratories for exploring the roles of tectonics, reef accretion, and eustatic sea-level changes in controlling the evolution of individual reefs, as well as backstepping of the entire system. A review of new and existing bathymetric, radiometric, sedimentary facies and numerical modeling data indicate that these reefs have had long, complex growth histories and that they are highly sensitive, recording drowning not only during major deglaciations, but also during high-frequency, small-amplitude interstadial and deglacial meltwater pulse events. Analysis of five generalized sedimentary facies shows that reef drowning is characterized by a distinct biological and sedimentary sequence. Observational and numerical modeling data indicate that on precessional (20??ka) and sub-orbital timescales, the rate and amplitude of eustatic sea-level changes are critical in controlling initiation, growth, drowning or sub-aerial exposure, subsequent re-initiation, and final drowning. However, over longer timescales (> 100-500??ka) continued tectonic subsidence and basement substrate morphology influence broad scale reef morphology and backstepping geometries. Drilling of these reefs will yield greatly expanded stratigraphic sections compared with similar reefs on slowly subsiding, stable and uplifting margins, and thus they represent a unique archive of sea-level and climate

  5. Novel applications of plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Arzu Ceren

    The current study investigates the effectiveness of two different dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator configurations, a 3-D annular geometry for use in micro thrusters and internal duct aerodynamics and a jet vectoring actuator that acts as a vortex generator and flow control device. The first configuration consists of a closed circumferential arrangement which yields a body force when a voltage difference is applied across the inner and outer electrodes separated by a dielectric. The primary flow is driven by this zero-net mass flux jet at the wall that then entrains fluid in the core of the duct. PIV experiments in both quiescent flow and freestream are conducted on tubes of different diameters while varying parameters such as the modulation frequency, duty cycle and tunnel speed. The values of the induced velocities increase with the forcing frequency and duty cycle although there is a peak value for the forcing frequency after which the velocity and thrust decrease for each thruster. The velocities and thrust increase as the inner diameter of the tubes are increased while the velocity profiles show a great difference with the (l/di) ratio; recirculation occurs after going below a critical value. Experiments in the wind tunnel illustrate that the jet exit characteristics significantly change upon actuation in freestream flow but the effect tends to diminish with increasing inner diameters and tunnel speeds. Using staged arrays of these thrusters result in higher velocities while operating at both in phase and out of phase. The jet vectoring configuration consists of a single embedded electrode separated from two exposed electrodes on either side by the dielectric. The embedded electrode is grounded while the exposed electrodes are driven with a high frequency high voltage input signal. PIV measurements of the actuator in a freestream show that vectoring the jet yields stronger vortices than a linear configuration and increasing the difference between

  6. Efficient Hybrid Actuation Using Solid-State Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leo, Donald J.; Cudney, Harley H.; Horner, Garnett (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Piezohydraulic actuation is the use of fluid to rectify the motion of a piezoelectric actuator for the purpose of overcoming the small stroke limitations of the material. In this work we study a closed piezohydraulic circuit that utilizes active valves to rectify the motion of a hydraulic end affector. A linear, lumped parameter model of the system is developed and correlated with experiments. Results demonstrate that the model accurately predicts the filtering of the piezoelectric motion caused by hydraulic compliance. Accurate results are also obtained for predicting the unidirectional motion of the cylinder when the active valves are phased with respect to the piezoelectric actuator. A time delay associated with the mechanical response of the valves is incorporated into the model to reflect the finite time required to open or close the valves. This time delay is found to be the primary limiting factor in achieving higher speed and greater power from the piezohydraulic unit. Experiments on the piezohydraulic unit demonstrate that blocked forces on the order of 100 N and unloaded velocities of 180 micrometers/sec are achieved.

  7. Light-Driven Polymeric Bimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Gregory; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are being developed as alternatives to prior electrically and optically driven actuators in advanced, highly miniaturized devices and systems exemplified by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems (MEOMS), and sensor and actuator arrays in smart structures. These light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are intended to satisfy a need for actuators that (1) in comparison with the prior actuators, are simpler and less power-hungry; (2) can be driven by low-power visible or mid-infrared light delivered through conventional optic fibers; and (3) are suitable for integration with optical sensors and multiple actuators of the same or different type. The immediate predecessors of the present light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are bimorph actuators that exploit a photorestrictive effect in lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics. The disadvantages of the PLZT-based actuators are that (1) it is difficult to shape the PLZT ceramics, which are hard and brittle; (2) for actuation, it is necessary to use ultraviolet light (wavelengths < 380 nm), which must be generated by use of high-power, high-pressure arc lamps or lasers; (3) it is difficult to deliver sufficient ultraviolet light through conventional optical fibers because of significant losses in the fibers; (4) the response times of the PLZT actuators are of the order of several seconds unacceptably long for typical applications; and (5) the maximum mechanical displacements of the PLZT-based actuators are limited to those characterized by low strains beyond which PLZT ceramics disintegrate because of their brittleness. The basic element of a light-driven bimorph actuator of the present developmental type is a cantilever beam comprising two layers, at least one of which is a polymer that exhibits a photomechanical effect (see figure). The dominant mechanism of the photomechanical effect is a photothermal one: absorption of

  8. Coral reef ecosystem decline: changing dynamics of coral reef carbonate production and implications for reef growth potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Global-scale deteriorations in coral reef health have caused major shifts in species composition and are likely to be exacerbated by climate change. It has been suggested that one effect of these ecological changes will be to lower reef carbonate production rates, which will impair reef growth potential and, ultimately, may lead to states of net reef erosion. However, quantitative data to support such assertions are limited, and linkages between the ecological state of coral reefs and their past and present geomorphic performance (in other words their growth potential) are poorly resolved. Using recently collected data from sites in the Caribbean and Indian Ocean, and which have undergone very different post-disturbance ecological trajectories over the last ~20-30 years, the differential impacts of disturbance on contemporary carbonate production regimes and on reef growth potential can be explored. In the Caribbean, a region which has been severely impacted ecological over the last 30+ years, our datasets show that average carbonate production rates on reefs are now less than 50% of pre-disturbance rates, and that calculated accretion rates (mm yr-1) are an about order of magnitude lower within shallow water habitats compared to Holocene averages. Collectively, these data suggest that recent ecological declines are now propagating through the system to impact on the geomorphic performance of Caribbean reefs and will impair their future growth potential. In contrast, the carbonate budgets of most reefs across the Chagos archipelago (central Indian Ocean), which is geographically remote and largely isolated from direct human disturbances, have recovered rapidly from major past disturbances (specifically the 1998 coral bleaching event). The carbonate budgets on these remote reefs now average +3.7 G (G = kg CaCO3 m-2 yr-1). Most significantly the production rates on Acropora-dominated reefs, which were most severely impacted by the 1998 bleaching event, average +8.4 G

  9. Coral reef community composition in the context of disturbance history on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Graham, Nicholas A J; Chong-Seng, Karen M; Huchery, Cindy; Januchowski-Hartley, Fraser A; Nash, Kirsty L

    2014-01-01

    Much research on coral reefs has documented differential declines in coral and associated organisms. In order to contextualise this general degradation, research on community composition is necessary in the context of varied disturbance histories and the biological processes and physical features thought to retard or promote recovery. We conducted a spatial assessment of coral reef communities across five reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with known disturbance histories, and assessed patterns of coral cover and community composition related to a range of other variables thought to be important for reef dynamics. Two of the reefs had not been extensively disturbed for at least 15 years prior to the surveys. Three of the reefs had been severely impacted by crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks and coral bleaching approximately a decade before the surveys, from which only one of them was showing signs of recovery based on independent surveys. We incorporated wave exposure (sheltered and exposed) and reef zone (slope, crest and flat) into our design, providing a comprehensive assessment of the spatial patterns in community composition on these reefs. Categorising corals into life history groupings, we document major coral community differences in the unrecovered reefs, compared to the composition and covers found on the undisturbed reefs. The recovered reef, despite having similar coral cover, had a different community composition from the undisturbed reefs, which may indicate slow successional processes, or a different natural community dominance pattern due to hydrology and other oceanographic factors. The variables that best correlated with patterns in the coral community among sites included the density of juvenile corals, herbivore fish biomass, fish species richness and the cover of macroalgae. Given increasing impacts to the Great Barrier Reef, efforts to mitigate local stressors will be imperative to encouraging coral communities to persist into

  10. Coral Reef Community Composition in the Context of Disturbance History on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Nicholas A. J.; Chong-Seng, Karen M.; Huchery, Cindy; Januchowski-Hartley, Fraser A.; Nash, Kirsty L.

    2014-01-01

    Much research on coral reefs has documented differential declines in coral and associated organisms. In order to contextualise this general degradation, research on community composition is necessary in the context of varied disturbance histories and the biological processes and physical features thought to retard or promote recovery. We conducted a spatial assessment of coral reef communities across five reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with known disturbance histories, and assessed patterns of coral cover and community composition related to a range of other variables thought to be important for reef dynamics. Two of the reefs had not been extensively disturbed for at least 15 years prior to the surveys. Three of the reefs had been severely impacted by crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks and coral bleaching approximately a decade before the surveys, from which only one of them was showing signs of recovery based on independent surveys. We incorporated wave exposure (sheltered and exposed) and reef zone (slope, crest and flat) into our design, providing a comprehensive assessment of the spatial patterns in community composition on these reefs. Categorising corals into life history groupings, we document major coral community differences in the unrecovered reefs, compared to the composition and covers found on the undisturbed reefs. The recovered reef, despite having similar coral cover, had a different community composition from the undisturbed reefs, which may indicate slow successional processes, or a different natural community dominance pattern due to hydrology and other oceanographic factors. The variables that best correlated with patterns in the coral community among sites included the density of juvenile corals, herbivore fish biomass, fish species richness and the cover of macroalgae. Given increasing impacts to the Great Barrier Reef, efforts to mitigate local stressors will be imperative to encouraging coral communities to persist into

  11. Project O.R.B (Operation Reef Ball): Creating Artificial Reefs, Educating the Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Project O.R.B. (Operation Reef Ball) team at South Plantation High School's Everglades Restoration & Environmental Science Magnet Program is trying to help our ailing south Florida coral reefs by constructing, deploying, and monitoring designed artificial reefs. Students partnered with the Reef Ball Foundation, local concrete companies, state parks, Girl Scouts, Sea Scouts, local universities and environmental agencies to construct concrete reef balls, each weighing approximately 500 lbs (227 kg). Students then deployed two artificial reefs consisting of over 30 concrete reef balls in two sites previously permitted for artificial reef deployment. One artificial reef was placed approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km) offshore of Golden Beach in Miami-Dade County with the assistance of Florida Atlantic University and their research vessel. A twin reef was deployed at the mouth of the river in Oleta River State Park in Miami. Monitoring and maintenance of the sites is ongoing with semi-annual reports due to the Reef Ball Foundation and DERM (Department of Environmental Resource Management) of Miami-Dade County. A second goal of Project O.R.B. is aligned with the Florida Local Action Strategy, the Southeast Florida Coral Reef Initiative, and the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force, all of which point out the importance of awareness and education as key components to the health of our coral reefs. Project O.R.B. team members developed and published an activity book targeting elementary school students. Outreach events incorporate cascade learning where high school students teach elementary and middle school students about various aspects of coral reefs through interactive "edu-tainment" modules. Attendees learn about water sampling, salinity, beach erosion, surface runoff, water cycle, ocean zones, anatomy of coral, human impact on corals, and characteristics of a well-designed artificial reef. Middle school students snorkel on the artificial reef to witness first-hand the success

  12. Piezoelectric aluminum nitride nanoelectromechanical actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Nipun; Wabiszewski, Graham E.; Mahameed, Rashed; Felmetsger, Valery V.; Tanner, Shawn M.; Carpick, Robert W.; Piazza, Gianluca

    2009-08-01

    This letter reports the implementation of ultrathin (100 nm) aluminum nitride (AlN) piezoelectric layers for the fabrication of vertically deflecting nanoactuators. The films exhibit an average piezoelectric coefficient (d31˜-1.9 pC/N), which is comparable to its microscale counterpart. This allows vertical deflections as large as 40 nm from 18 μm long and 350 nm thick multilayer cantilever bimorph beams with 2 V actuation. Furthermore, in-plane stress and stress gradients have been simultaneously controlled. The films exhibit leakage currents lower than 2 nA/cm2 at 1 V, and have an average relative dielectric constant of approximately 9.2 (as in thicker films). These material characteristics and actuation results make the AlN nanofilms ideal candidates for the realization of nanoelectromechanical switches for low power logic applications.

  13. Hydraulically amplified PZT mems actuator

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-11-02

    A hydraulically amplified microelectromechanical systems actuator. A piece of piezoelectric material or stacked piezo bimorph is bonded or deposited as a thin film. The piece is operatively connected to a primary membrane. A reservoir is operatively connected to the primary membrane. The reservoir contains a fluid. A membrane is operatively connected to the reservoir. In operation, energizing the piezoelectric material causing the piezoelectric material to bow. Bowing of the piezoelectric material causes movement of the primary membrane. Movement of the primary membrane results in a force in being transmitted to the liquid in the reservoir. The force in the liquid causes movement of the membrane. Movement of the membrane results in an operating actuator.

  14. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana; Charles P.

    2006-10-10

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  15. Impact micro-positioning actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuerden, Brian (Inventor); Angel, J. Roger P. (Inventor); Burge, James H. (Inventor); DeRigne, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An impact micro-positioning actuator. In one aspect of the invention, a threaded shaft is threadably received in a nut and the nut is impacted by an impacting device, causing the nut first to rotate relative to the shaft by slipping as a result of shaft inertia and subsequently to stick to the shaft as a result of the frictional force therebetween. The nut is returned to its initial position by a return force provided by a return mechanism after impact. The micro-positioning actuator is further improved by controlling at least one and preferably all of the following: the friction, the impact provided by the impacting device, the return force provided by the return mechanism, and the inertia of the shaft. In another aspect of the invention, a threaded shaft is threadably received in a nut and the shaft is impacted by an impacting device, causing the shaft to rotate relative to the nut.

  16. Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John; Zawada, Dave

    2006-01-01

    "Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS)" describes the U.S. Geological Survey's Along-Track Reef Imaging System, a boat-based sensor package for rapidly mapping shallow water benthic environments. ATRIS acquires high resolution, color digital images that are accurately geo-located in real-time.

  17. Subtropical Biotic Fringing Reefs as Ecological Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Jeffrey W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a 16-week course in marine biology involving a class-coordinated investigation of a subtropical biotic fringing reef of Hawaii. Describes in detail the development of preliminary hypotheses regarding general cause-effect relationships on the reef, and the exploration of specific areas, such as chemical or physical factors. (CS)

  18. REEF MANAGER'S GUIDE TO CORAL BLEACHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Reef Manager's Guide to Coral Bleaching is the result of a collaborative effort by over 50 scientists and managers to: (1) engage in information-sharing in the areas of coral reef science and management for climate change and coral bleaching; and (2) compile a management tool ...

  19. Artificial Reefs--A Coastal Classroom Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dindo, John J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the construction of artificial reefs for such uses as commercial fishing and recreational boating. Describes a class project in which students construct a small artificial reef and observe the changes over time in terms of temperature, salinity, flora and fauna. (TW)

  20. Disease of coral and coral reef fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panek, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Department of the Interior protects sensitive habitats amounting to about 3,600,000 acres of coral reefs and other submerged lands. These reefs are important ecosystems in 13 National Wildlife Refuges, 10 National Parks and in certain territorial waters such as the Wake Atoll.

  1. Silurian pinnacle reefs of the Canadian Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    De Freitas, T.A.; Dixon, O.A. ); Mayr, U. )

    1993-04-01

    Pinnacle reefs are commonly an attractive target for oil exploration because they are usually porous carbonate bodies entombed in impervious, deep-water shales that provide both the source and the seal for hydrocarbons. Silurian pinnacle reefs, the first described in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, are exposed on Ellesmere and Devon Islands. Two main reef trends occur, one of early middle Llandovery to middle Ludlow age and a second of middle Ludlow to Late Silurian or Early Devonian age. Reefs of both phases contain lime mudstone cores: some are stromatactoid-rich and others consist predominantly of microbialite-rich lime mudstone or microbial boundstone. Facies sequences of both reef phases show evidence of upward-shallowing overall, but, in the older reefs, isochronous capping facies are dominated either by coral-mirian or by stromatoporoid boundstone and floatstone. This difference perhaps reflects variation in wave stress and apparent ability of a few corals,thickly encrusted by or associated with microbial boundstone and skeletal algae, to withstand greater wave energy than a stromatoporoid-coral-rich reef community. These reefs constitute one of the bright prospects of hydrocarbon exploration in rocks of the Franklinian succession. 43 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Reefs and Learning: Education Evaluation Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2006-01-01

    Marine education research designs are discussed, and student learning outcomes while monitoring a coral reef is evaluated. Changes in environmental knowledge and attitudes, ecological intention to act, and direct reef experience were investigated. Differences between student pre-test and the post-test responses were observed, and analysis is…

  3. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  4. Enhancing the force capability of permanent magnet latching actuators for electromechanical valve actuation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rens, J.; Clark, R. E.; Jewell, G. W.; Howe, D.

    2005-05-01

    This article introduces a topology of parallel-polarized permanent magnet latching actuator for use in electromagnetic valve actuation systems for internal combustion engines. The actuator has a number of advantages over reluctance actuators, commonly employed in such systems, in terms of reduced starting currents and fail-safe capability. The influence of a number of design features on actuator performance, such as tooth tapering, additional magnets to improve the main magnet flux path and prevent the onset of saturation, and mechanical clearances required to protect the permanent magnet from shock loads are investigated. The design study findings are verified by measurements on a prototype actuator.

  5. Actuators for a space manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, W.; Brunson, P.

    1987-01-01

    The robotic manipulator can be decomposed into distinct subsytems. One particular area of interest of mechanical subsystems is electromechanical actuators (or drives). A drive is defined as a motor with an appropriate transmission. An overview is given of existing, as well as state-of-the-art drive systems. The scope is limited to space applications. A design philosophy and adequate requirements are the initial steps in designing a space-qualified actuator. The focus is on the d-c motor in conjunction with several types of transmissions (harmonic, tendon, traction, and gear systems). The various transmissions will be evaluated and key performance parameters will be addressed in detail. Included in the assessment is a shuttle RMS joint and a MSFC drive of the Prototype Manipulator Arm. Compound joints are also investigated. Space imposes a set of requirements for designing a high-performance drive assembly. Its inaccessibility and cryogenic conditions warrant special considerations. Some guidelines concerning these conditions are present. The goal is to gain a better understanding in designing a space actuator.

  6. Halbach array type focusing actuator for small and thin optical data storage device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Q.; Park, Kang-Ho; Paek, Mun Chul

    2004-09-01

    The small form factor optical data storage devices are developing rapidly nowadays. Since it is designed for portable and compatibility with flesh memory, its components such as disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within 5 mm. The thickness of focusing actuator is within 2 mm and the total working range is +/-100um, with the resolution of less than 1μm. Since the thickness is limited tightly, it is hard to place the yoke that closes the magnetic circuit and hard to make strong flux density without yoke. Therefore, Halbach array is adopted to increase the magnetic flux of one side without yoke. The proposed Halbach array type focusing actuator has the advantage of thin actuation structure with sacrificing less flex density than conventional magnetic array. The optical head unit is moved on the swing arm type tracking actuator. Focusing coil is attached to swing arm, and Halbach magnet array is positioned at the bottom of deck along the tracking line, and focusing actuator exerts force by the Fleming's left hand rule. The dynamics, working range, control resolution of focusing actuator are analyzed and performed.

  7. Design of high performance piezo composites actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajid, Abdulhakim A.

    Design of high performance piezo composites actuators are developed. Functionally Graded Microstructure (FGM) piezoelectric actuators are designed to reduce the stress concentration at the middle interface existed in the standard bimorph actuators while maintaining high actuation performance. The FGM piezoelectric laminates are composite materials with electroelastic properties varied through the laminate thickness. The elastic behavior of piezo-laminates actuators is developed using a 2D-elasticity model and a modified classical lamination theory (CLT). The stresses and out-of-plane displacements are obtained for standard and FGM piezoelectric bimorph plates under cylindrical bending generated by an electric field throughout the thickness of the laminate. The analytical model is developed for two different actuator geometries, a rectangular plate actuator and a disk shape actuator. The limitations of CLT are investigated against the 2D-elasticity model for the rectangular plate geometry. The analytical models based on CLT (rectangular and circular) and 2D-elasticity are compared with a model based on Finite Element Method (FEM). The experimental study consists of two FGM actuator systems, the PZT/PZT FGM system and the porous FGM system. The electroelastic properties of each layer in the FGM systems were measured and input in the analytical models to predict the FGM actuator performance. The performance of the FGM actuator is optimized by manipulating the thickness of each layer in the FGM system. The thickness of each layer in the FGM system is made to vary in a linear or non-linear manner to achieve the best performance of the FGM piezoelectric actuator. The analytical and FEM results are found to agree well with the experimental measurements for both rectangular and disk actuators. CLT solutions are found to coincide well with the elasticity solutions for high aspect ratios while the CLT solutions gave poor results compared to the 2D elasticity solutions for

  8. Towards an Ontology for Reef Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duce, Stephanie

    Reef islands are complex, dynamic and vulnerable environments with a diverse range of stake holders. Communication and data sharing between these different groups of stake holders is often difficult. An ontology for the reef island domain would improve the understanding of reef island geomorphology and improve communication between stake holders as well as forming a platform from which to move towards interoperability and the application of Information Technology to forecast and monitor these environments. This paper develops a small, prototypical reef island domain ontology, based on informal, natural language relations, aligned to the DOLCE upper-level ontology, for 20 fundamental terms within the domain. A subset of these terms and their relations are discussed in detail. This approach reveals and discusses challenges which must be overcome in the creation of a reef island domain ontology and which could be relevant to other ontologies in dynamic geospatial domains.

  9. Wave Forced Normal Modes on Fringing Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pequignet, A. N.; Becker, J. M.; Merrifield, M. M.; Aucan, J.

    2008-12-01

    In an effort to assess wave-driven coastal inundation at the shoreline of fringing reefs, pressure and current observations were collected at reefs on Guam (Ipan) and Oahu, Hawaii (Mokuleia) as part of the PILOT (Pacific Island Land-Ocean Typhoon) experiment. Similar to dissipative sandy beaches, nearshore surface elevation at both reefs is dominated by energy in the infragravity frequency band. Coherent infragravity oscillations across the reef tend to occur at discrete frequencies and with standing wave cross-shore structures that are consistent with open basin resonant modes. The modes are forced by swell wave groups, similar to a time-dependent setup. The resonant modes are most apparent during energetic wave events, in part because wave setup over the reef increases the low mode resonant frequencies to a range that is conducive to wave group forcing. Evidence of the excitation of resonant modes during tropical storm Man-Yi at Ipan, Guam is presented.

  10. Geologic reconnaissance of natural fore-reef slope and a large submarine rockfall exposure, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Halley, R.B.; Slater, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In 1958 a submarine rockfall exposed a cross section through the reef and fore-reef deposits along the northwestern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands. Removal of more than 10/sup 8/ MT of rock left a cirque-shaped submarine scarp 220 m high, extending back 190 m into the modern reef, and 1000 m along the reef trend. The scarp exposed older, steeply dipping beds below 220 m along which the rockfall detached. They sampled this exposure and the natural fore-reef slope surrounding it in 1984 and 1985 using a manned submersible. The natural slope in this area is characterized by three zone: (1) the reef plate, crest, and near fore reef that extends from sea level to -16 m, with a slope of less than 10/sup 0/, (2) the bypass slope that extends from -16 to -275 m, with slopes of 55/sup 0/ decreasing to 35/sup 0/ near the base, and (3) a debris slope of less than 35/sup 0/ below -275 m. Vertical walls, grooves, and chutes, common on other fore-reef slopes, are sparse on the northwestern slope of Enewetak. The scarp exposes three stratigraphic units that are differentiated by surficial appearance: (1) a near-vertical wall from the reef crest to 76 m that appears rubbly, has occasional debris-covered ledges, and is composed mainly of coral; (2) a vertical to overhanging wall from -76 m to -220 m that is massive and fractured, and has smooth, blocky surfaces; and (3) inclined bedding below -220 m along which the slump block has fractured, exposing a dip slope of hard, dense, white limestone and dolomite that extends below -400 m. Caves occur in all three units. Open cement-lined fractures and voids layered with cements are most common in the middle unit, which now lies within the thermocline. Along the sides of the scarp are exposed fore-reef boulder beds dipping at 30/sup 0/ toward the open sea; the steeper (55/sup 0/) dipping natural surface truncates these beds, which gives evidence of the erosional nature of the bypass slope.

  11. Bathymetric distribution of foraminifera in Jamaican reef environments

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.E.; Liddell, W.D.

    1985-02-01

    Recent foraminifera inhabiting Jamaican north-coast fringing reefs display variations in distributional patterns that are related to bathymetry and reef morphology. Sediment samples containing foraminifera were collected along a profile that traversed the back reef (depth 1-2 m), fore-reef terrace (3-15 m), fore-reef escarpment (15-27 m), fore-reef slope (30-55 m), and upper deep fore reef (70 m). Approximately 150 species distributed among 80 genera were identified from the samples. Preliminary analyses indicate that diversity values (S, H') are lowest on the fore-reef terrace (79, 3.0, respectively), increase similarly in back-reef and fore-reef escarpment and slope settings (93, 3.4), and are highest on the deep fore reef (109, 3.7). Larger groupings (suborders) exhibit distinct bathymetric trends with miliolids occurring more commonly in back-reef (comprising 51% of the fauna) than in fore-reef (28%) zones, whereas agglutinated and planktonic species occur more commonly in deeper reef (> 15 m, 9% and 4%, respectively) than in shallower reef zones (< 15 m, 3%, and 0.5%, respectively). Among the more common species Amphistegina gibbosa (Rotolina) is much more abundant in fore-reef (3%) environments, and Sorites marginalis (Miliolina) occurs almost exclusively in the back reef, where it comprises 5.5% of the fauna. Q-mode cluster analysis, involving all species collected, enabled the delineation of back-reef, shallow fore-reef, and deeper fore-reef biofacies, also indicating the potential utility of foraminiferal distributions in detailed paleoenvironment interpretations of ancient reef settings.

  12. Design, test and model of a hybrid magnetostrictive hydraulic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban; Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Wereley, Norman M.

    2009-08-01

    The basic operation of hybrid hydraulic actuators involves high frequency bi-directional operation of an active material that is converted to uni-directional motion of hydraulic fluid using valves. A hybrid actuator was developed using magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D as the driving element and hydraulic oil as the working fluid. Two different lengths of Terfenol-D rod, 51 and 102 mm, with the same diameter, 12.7 mm, were used. Tests with no load and with load were carried out to measure the performance for uni-directional motion of the output piston at different pumping frequencies. The maximum no-load flow rates were 24.8 cm3 s-1 and 22.7 cm3 s-1 with the 51 mm and 102 mm long rods respectively, and the peaks were noted around 325 Hz pumping frequency. The blocked force of the actuator was close to 89 N in both cases. A key observation was that, at these high pumping frequencies, the inertial effects of the fluid mass dominate over the viscous effects and the problem becomes unsteady in nature. In this study, we also develop a mathematical model of the hydraulic hybrid actuator in the time domain to show the basic operational principle under varying conditions and to capture phenomena affecting system performance. Governing equations for the pumping piston and output shaft were obtained from force equilibrium considerations, while compressibility of the working fluid was taken into account by incorporating the bulk modulus. Fluid inertia was represented by a lumped parameter approach to the transmission line model, giving rise to strongly coupled ordinary differential equations. The model was then used to calculate the no-load velocities of the actuator at different pumping frequencies and simulation results were compared with experimental data for model validation.

  13. A Global Estimate of the Number of Coral Reef Fishers

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Louise S. L.; Teh, Lydia C. L.; Sumaila, U. Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Overfishing threatens coral reefs worldwide, yet there is no reliable estimate on the number of reef fishers globally. We address this data gap by quantifying the number of reef fishers on a global scale, using two approaches - the first estimates reef fishers as a proportion of the total number of marine fishers in a country, based on the ratio of reef-related to total marine fish landed values. The second estimates reef fishers as a function of coral reef area, rural coastal population, and fishing pressure. In total, we find that there are 6 million reef fishers in 99 reef countries and territories worldwide, of which at least 25% are reef gleaners. Our estimates are an improvement over most existing fisher population statistics, which tend to omit accounting for gleaners and reef fishers. Our results suggest that slightly over a quarter of the world’s small-scale fishers fish on coral reefs, and half of all coral reef fishers are in Southeast Asia. Coral reefs evidently support the socio-economic well-being of numerous coastal communities. By quantifying the number of people who are employed as reef fishers, we provide decision-makers with an important input into planning for sustainable coral reef fisheries at the appropriate scale. PMID:23840327

  14. A Global Estimate of the Number of Coral Reef Fishers.

    PubMed

    Teh, Louise S L; Teh, Lydia C L; Sumaila, U Rashid

    2013-01-01

    Overfishing threatens coral reefs worldwide, yet there is no reliable estimate on the number of reef fishers globally. We address this data gap by quantifying the number of reef fishers on a global scale, using two approaches - the first estimates reef fishers as a proportion of the total number of marine fishers in a country, based on the ratio of reef-related to total marine fish landed values. The second estimates reef fishers as a function of coral reef area, rural coastal population, and fishing pressure. In total, we find that there are 6 million reef fishers in 99 reef countries and territories worldwide, of which at least 25% are reef gleaners. Our estimates are an improvement over most existing fisher population statistics, which tend to omit accounting for gleaners and reef fishers. Our results suggest that slightly over a quarter of the world's small-scale fishers fish on coral reefs, and half of all coral reef fishers are in Southeast Asia. Coral reefs evidently support the socio-economic well-being of numerous coastal communities. By quantifying the number of people who are employed as reef fishers, we provide decision-makers with an important input into planning for sustainable coral reef fisheries at the appropriate scale. PMID:23840327

  15. Edgecliff reefs - Devonian temperate water carbonate deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wolosz, T.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The Middle Devonian Edgecliff Member of the Onondaga Formation in New York and Ontario, Canada, is a coral-rich, reefy,' crinoidal grainstone/packstone. The reefs contain only rare stromatoporoids and are devoid of algae, having been constructed by a fauna of mound and thicket-forming branching colonial rugosans, and large sheet favositids that populated grainstone/packstone flank beds and banks. Despite the restricted fauna, the reefs display a variety of growth patterns. Rugosan mounds range in size from 2-3 m diameter by 1 m thick, up to 230 m diameter by 15 m thick. Composite structures consist of interbedded rugosan buildups and packstone/grainstone flanks, ranging from shield-shaped reefs (240 m diameter by 6 m thick) in which the rugosans occur only as thickets, to pinnacle reefs (up to 3 km diameter by 60 m thick) in which rugosan mounds are interbedded with crinoidal flanks. Geographic distribution of these reef types and analysis of surrounding facies suggests that reef growth pattern was controlled by water depth and local rate of subsidence. Despite superfacial resemblance to modern deep water ahermatypic coral mounds and thickets, abundant coral breakage and overturning, and erosion of at least one reef core during an intermediate stage of reef growth supports a shallow water origin of these reefs. It is suggested that the Edgecliff and its reefs represent an example of Devonian cool water carbonate deposition, a hypothesis supported by a trend of increasing stromatoporoid abundance westwards across New York (in the direction of the paleo-equator).

  16. The spatial arrangement of reefs alters the ecological patterns of fauna between interspersed algal habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuya, F.; Wernberg, T.; Thomsen, M. S.

    2008-07-01

    Reef landscapes dominated by canopy-forming species are often irregular mosaics of habitats, with important influences on associated fauna. This study tested if differences in the ecological patterns of mobile fauna inhabiting interspersed (morphologically distinct) algal habitats were altered by the spatial arrangement of reefs of varying proximity to the shoreline. Specifically, prosobranch gastropods were used as models to test that: (1) there were differences in the ecological patterns (species composition and abundances) between three algal habitats (the kelp Ecklonia radiata, fucalean macroalgae, and erect red algae); (2) the magnitude of these differences depended on the position of reef lines ('in-shore' vs. 'off-shore'); and (3) these effects were regionally consistent across a ˜4° latitudinal gradient (˜600 km of coastline) in Western Australia. The ecological patterns of algal-associated gastropods responded strongly to the presence of algal habitats with different physical structure at small spatial scales. Importantly, differences in assemblage structure (e.g. differences in total abundances) between habitats across the latitudinal gradient were especially accentuated on the in-shore reefs compared with the off-shore reefs, where a general amelioration of differences between habitats was observed, probably associated with a more widespread effect of stronger wave forces across habitats. Overall, red algae supported higher total abundances and species richness (per algal weight) compared to the other algal habitats, particularly on in-shore reefs. Patterns for individual species were considerably location-dependent, reflecting the natural variability of species across geographical gradients. In contrast, patterns at the assemblage-level were consistent, providing evidence for the existence of general rules underlying the assemblage-level organization of mobile invertebrates on subtidal reefs across this geographical gradient.

  17. Trapping and dispersion of coral eggs around Bowden Reef, Great Barrier Reef, following mass coral spawning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanski, Eric; Burrage, Derek; King, Brian

    1989-05-01

    Bowden Reef is a 5 km long kidney-shaped coral reef with a lagoon, located on the mid-shelf of the central region of the Great Barrier Reef. Field studies were carried out, in November 1986, at the time of mass coral spawning, of the water circulation around Bowden Reef and in the surrounding inter-reefal waters. The near-reef water circulation was strongly three-dimensional although the stratification was weak. In calm weather, coral eggs were aggregated in slicks along topographically controlled fronts. In the absence of a longshore current, water and coral eggs were trapped in the lagoon and in a boundary layer around Bowden Reef, by tidally driven recirculating motions. In the presence of a longshore current, some trapping occurred in the lagoon, but the bulk of the coral eggs was advected away from Bowden Reef and reached downstream reefs in a few days. This implies a likelihood of both self-seeding of reefs, and connectivity between reefs.

  18. A novel reef coral symbiosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantos, O.; Bythell, J. C.

    2010-09-01

    Reef building corals form close associations with unicellular microalgae, fungi, bacteria and archaea, some of which are symbiotic and which together form the coral holobiont. Associations with multicellular eukaryotes such as polychaete worms, bivalves and sponges are not generally considered to be symbiotic as the host responds to their presence by forming physical barriers with an active growth edge in the exoskeleton isolating the invader and, at a subcellular level, activating innate immune responses such as melanin deposition. This study describes a novel symbiosis between a newly described hydrozoan ( Zanclea margaritae sp. nov.) and the reef building coral Acropora muricata (= A. formosa), with the hydrozoan hydrorhiza ramifying throughout the coral tissues with no evidence of isolation or activation of the immune systems of the host. The hydrorhiza lacks a perisarc, which is typical of symbiotic species of this and related genera, including species that associate with other cnidarians such as octocorals. The symbiosis was observed at all sites investigated from two distant locations on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and appears to be host species specific, being found only in A. muricata and in none of 30 other species investigated at these sites. Not all colonies of A. muricata host the hydrozoans and both the prevalence within the coral population (mean = 66%) and density of emergent hydrozoan hydranths on the surface of the coral (mean = 4.3 cm-2, but up to 52 cm-2) vary between sites. The form of the symbiosis in terms of the mutualism-parasitism continuum is not known, although the hydrozoan possesses large stenotele nematocysts, which may be important for defence from predators and protozoan pathogens. This finding expands the known A. muricata holobiont and the association must be taken into account in future when determining the corals’ abilities to defend against predators and withstand stress.

  19. Benthic foraminifera baseline assemblages from a coastal nearshore reef complex on the central Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jamie; Perry, Chris; Smithers, Scott; Morgan, Kyle

    2016-04-01

    Declining water quality due to river catchment modification since European settlement (c. 1850 A.D.) represents a major threat to the health of coral reefs on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR), particularly for those located in the coastal waters of the GBR's inner-shelf. These nearshore reefs are widely perceived to be most susceptible to declining water quality owing to their close proximity to river point sources. Despite this, nearshore reefs have been relatively poorly studied with the impacts and magnitudes of environmental degradation still remaining unclear. This is largely due to ongoing debates concerning the significance of increased sediment yields against naturally high background sedimentary regimes. Benthic foraminifera are increasingly used as tools for monitoring environmental and ecological change on coral reefs. On the GBR, the majority of studies have focussed on the spatial distributions of contemporary benthic foraminiferal assemblages. While baseline assemblages from other environments (e.g. inshore reefs and mangroves) have been described, very few records exist for nearshore reefs. Here, we present preliminary results from the first palaeoecological study of foraminiferal assemblages of nearshore reefs on the central GBR. Cores were recovered from the nearshore reef complex at Paluma Shoals using percussion techniques. Recovery was 100%, capturing the entire Holocene reef sequence of the selected reef structures. Radiocarbon dating and subsequent age-depth modelling techniques were used to identify reef sequences pre-dating European settlement. Benthic foraminifera assemblages were reconstructed from the identified sequences to establish pre-European ecological baselines with the aim of providing a record of foraminiferal distribution during vertical reef accretion and against which contemporary ecological change may be assessed.

  20. Geomorphology and sediment transport on a submerged back-reef sand apron: One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel L.; Vila-Concejo, Ana; Webster, Jody M.

    2014-10-01

    Back-reef sand aprons are conspicuous and dynamic sedimentary features in coral reef systems. The development of these features influences the evolution and defines the maturity of coral reefs. However, the hydrodynamic processes that drive changes on sand aprons are poorly understood with only a few studies directly assessing sediment entrainment and transport. Current and wave conditions on a back-reef sand apron were measured during this study and a digital elevation model was developed through topographic and bathymetric surveying of the sand apron, reef flats and lagoon. The current and wave processes that may entrain and transport sediment were assessed using second order small amplitude (Stokes) wave theory and Shields equations. The morphodynamic interactions between current flow and geomorphology were also examined. The results showed that sediment transport occurs under modal hydrodynamic conditions with waves the main force entraining sediment rather than average currents. A morphodynamic relationship between current flow and geomorphology was also observed with current flow primarily towards the lagoon in shallow areas of the sand apron and deeper channel-like areas directing current off the sand apron towards the lagoon or the reef crest. These results show that the short-term mutual interaction of hydrodynamics and geomorphology in coral reefs can result in morphodynamic equilibrium.

  1. Microwave Power for Smart Membrane Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.; Golembiewski, Walter T.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; King, Glen C.

    2002-01-01

    The concept of microwave-driven smart membrane actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wired control circuitry. A large, ultra-light space structure, such as solar sails and Gossamer spacecrafts, requires a distribution of power into individual membrane actuators to control them in an effective way. A patch rectenna array with a high voltage output was developed to drive smart membrane actuators. Networked patch rectenna array receives and converts microwave power into a DC power for an array of smart actuators. To use microwave power effectively, the concept of a power allocation and distribution (PAD) circuit is developed and tested for networking a rectenna/actuator patch array. For the future development, the PAD circuit could be imbedded into a single embodiment of rectenna and actuator array with the thin-film microcircuit embodiment. Preliminary design and fabrication of PAD circuitry that consists of a sixteen nodal elements were made for laboratory testing.

  2. Plasma actuators for bluff body flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Alexey V.

    The aerodynamic plasma actuators have shown to be efficient flow control devices in various applications. In this study the results of flow control experiments utilizing single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators to control flow separation and unsteady vortex shedding from a circular cylinder in cross-flow are reported. This work is motivated by the need to reduce landing gear noise for commercial transport aircraft via an effective streamlining created by the actuators. The experiments are performed at Re D = 20,000...164,000. Circular cylinders in cross-flow are chosen for study since they represent a generic flow geometry that is similar in all essential aspects to a landing gear oleo or strut. The minimization of the unsteady flow separation from the models and associated large-scale wake vorticity by using actuators reduces the radiated aerodynamic noise. Using either steady or unsteady actuation at ReD = 25,000, Karman shedding is totally eliminated, turbulence levels in the wake decrease significantly and near-field sound pressure levels are reduced by 13.3 dB. Unsteady actuation at an excitation frequency of St D = 1 is found to be most effective. The unsteady actuation also has the advantage that total suppression of shedding is achieved for a duty cycle of only 25%. However, since unsteady actuation is associated with an unsteady body force and produces a tone at the actuation frequency, steady actuation is more suitable for noise control applications. Two actuation strategies are used at ReD = 82,000: spanwise and streamwise oriented actuators. Near field microphone measurements in an anechoic wind tunnel and detailed study of the near wake using LDA are presented in the study. Both spanwise and streamwise actuators give nearly the same noise reduction level of 11.2 dB and 14.2 dB, respectively, and similar changes in the wake velocity profiles. The contribution of the actuator induced noise is found to be small compared to the natural shedding

  3. Silkworm protein: its possibility as an actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyoung-Joon; Myung, Seung Jun; Kim, Heung Soo; Jung, Woochul; Kim, Jaehwan

    2006-03-01

    The possibility of silkworm (Bombyx mori) protein as a base material of biomimetic actuator was investigated in this paper. Silkworm films were prepared from high concentrations of regenerated fibroin in aqueous solution. Films with thickness of about 100 μm were prepared for coating electrodes. The cast silk films were coated by very thin gold electrode on both sides of the film. Tensile test of cast film showed bi-modal trend, which is typical stress-strain relation of polymeric film. As the test of a possible biomimetic actuator, silkworm film actuator provides bending deformations according to the magnitude and frequency of the applied electric filed. Although the present bending deformation of silkworm film actuator is smaller than that of Electro-Active Paper actuator, it provides the possibility of biomimetic actuator.

  4. STS-32 Earth observation of the western Coral Sea and the Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-32 Earth observation taken onboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, is of the western Coral Sea and the Great Barrier Reef. The scene shows phytoplankton or algal bloom in the northwest Coral Sea. The western Coral Sea and the Great Barrier Reef waters offshore Queensland, Australia are the sites of some of the larger concentrations or 'blooms' of phytoplankton and algae in the open ocean. In the instance illustrated here, the leading edge of a probable concentration of algae or phytoplankton is seen as a light irregular line and sheen between the offshore Great Barrier Reef and the Queensland coast. Previous phytoplankton concentrations in this area have been reported by ships at sea as having formed floating mats as thick as two meters.

  5. Extraordinarily high coral cover on a nearshore, high-latitude reef in south-west Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, D. P.; Frisch, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Photographic line transects were used to quantify the benthic community at Hall Bank, a small, nearshore, high-latitude reef in south-west Australia. On one of the seven transects, the coral cover was 72.5% (mean = 52.6 ± 0.45%), which is the highest ever recorded coral cover at or beyond 32°S. There were no macro-algae, possibly due to the high density of herbivorous sea-urchins (mean = 5.0 ± 0.8 m-2). Fourteen species of scleractinian corals dominated the benthos, seven of which were from the family Faviidae. Given that Hall Bank is at the limit of environmental tolerance for reef formation, it represents a valuable research opportunity for understanding the factors that build and maintain coral reef biodiversity and resilience.

  6. Marine debris: Implications for conservation of rocky reefs in Manabi, Ecuador (Se Pacific Coast).

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Pico, Juan; Valle, David Mero-Del; Castillo-Ruperti, Ricardo; Macías-Mayorga, Dayanara

    2016-08-15

    Marine debris (MD) pollution is a problem of global concern because of its impact on marine ecosystems. The current extent of this problem and its implications concerning reef conservation are unknown in Ecuador. The composition and distribution of submerged MD was assessed on two reefs using underwater surveys of geomorphological areas: crest, slope and bottom. MD items were classified according to source and use. Plastic-derived debris represents >90% of total MD found on the reefs, principally composed by plastic containers and nets. 63% of the MD was associated to fishing activities. The composition showed differences between sites and geomorphological areas, monofilament nets were found on the crests, multifilament lines on the slopes and plastic containers on the bottom. MD disposal might be a result of the influx of visitors and fishing activities. Distribution is related to bottom type, level of boating/fishing activity and benthic features. PMID:27263979

  7. The coral reefs optimization algorithm: a novel metaheuristic for efficiently solving optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Sanz, S; Del Ser, J; Landa-Torres, I; Gil-López, S; Portilla-Figueras, J A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel bioinspired algorithm to tackle complex optimization problems: the coral reefs optimization (CRO) algorithm. The CRO algorithm artificially simulates a coral reef, where different corals (namely, solutions to the optimization problem considered) grow and reproduce in coral colonies, fighting by choking out other corals for space in the reef. This fight for space, along with the specific characteristics of the corals' reproduction, produces a robust metaheuristic algorithm shown to be powerful for solving hard optimization problems. In this research the CRO algorithm is tested in several continuous and discrete benchmark problems, as well as in practical application scenarios (i.e., optimum mobile network deployment and off-shore wind farm design). The obtained results confirm the excellent performance of the proposed algorithm and open line of research for further application of the algorithm to real-world problems. PMID:25147860

  8. The Coral Reefs Optimization Algorithm: A Novel Metaheuristic for Efficiently Solving Optimization Problems

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Sanz, S.; Del Ser, J.; Landa-Torres, I.; Gil-López, S.; Portilla-Figueras, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel bioinspired algorithm to tackle complex optimization problems: the coral reefs optimization (CRO) algorithm. The CRO algorithm artificially simulates a coral reef, where different corals (namely, solutions to the optimization problem considered) grow and reproduce in coral colonies, fighting by choking out other corals for space in the reef. This fight for space, along with the specific characteristics of the corals' reproduction, produces a robust metaheuristic algorithm shown to be powerful for solving hard optimization problems. In this research the CRO algorithm is tested in several continuous and discrete benchmark problems, as well as in practical application scenarios (i.e., optimum mobile network deployment and off-shore wind farm design). The obtained results confirm the excellent performance of the proposed algorithm and open line of research for further application of the algorithm to real-world problems. PMID:25147860

  9. Actuation fluid adapter for hydraulically-actuated electronically-controlled fuel injector and engine using same

    DOEpatents

    Keyster, Eric S.; Merchant, Jack A.

    2002-01-01

    A fuel injector adapter consists of a block defining a pressure communication passage therethrough and an actuation fluid passage. The actuation fluid passage includes three separate branches that open through an outer surface of the block at three separate locations.

  10. MRI-powered Actuators for Robotic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vartholomeos, Panagiotis; Qin, Lei; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel actuation technology for robotically assisted MRI-guided interventional procedures. Compact and wireless, the actuators are both powered and controlled by the MRI scanner. The design concept and performance limits are described and derived analytically. Simulation and experiments in a clinical MR scanner are used to validate the analysis and to demonstrate the capability of the approach for needle biopsies. The concepts of actuator locking mechanisms and multi-axis control are also introduced. PMID:22287082

  11. Fluidic self-actuating control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Grantz, Alan L.

    1979-01-01

    A fluidic self-actuating control assembly for use in a reactor wherein no external control inputs are required to actuate (scram) the system. The assembly is constructed to scram upon sensing either a sudden depressurization of reactor inlet flow or a sudden increase in core neutron flux. A fluidic control system senses abnormal flow or neutron flux transients and actuates the system, whereupon assembly coolant flow reverses, forcing absorber balls into the reactor core region.

  12. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1995-01-01

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  13. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1995-07-11

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor is disclosed including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 37 figs.

  14. Wave transformation across coral reefs under changing sea levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel; Power, Hannah; Vila-Conejo, Ana; Webster, Jody

    2015-04-01

    The transformation of swell waves from deep water across reef flats is the primary process regulating energy regimes in coral reef systems. Coral reefs are effective barriers removing up to 99% of wave energy during breaking and propagation across reef flats. Consequently back-reef environments are often considered low energy with only limited sediment transport and geomorphic change during modal conditions. Coral reefs, and specifically reef flats, therefore provide important protection to tropical coastlines from coastal erosion and recession. However, changes in sea level could lead to significant changes in the dissipation of swell wave energy in coral reef systems with wave heights dependent on the depth over the reef flat. This suggests that a rise in sea level would also lead to significantly higher energy conditions exacerbating the transgressive effects of sea level rise on tropical beaches and reef islands. This study examines the potential implications of different sea level scenarios on the transformation of waves across the windward reef flats of One Tree Reef, southern Great Barrier Reef. Waves were measured on the reef flats and back-reef sand apron of One Tree Reef. A one-dimensional wave model was calibrated and used to investigate wave processes on the reef flats under different mean sea level (MSL) scenarios (present MSL, +1 m MSL, and +2 m MSL). These scenarios represent both potential future sea level states and also the paleo sea level of the late Holocene in the southern Great Barrier Reef. Wave heights were shown to increase under sea level rise, with greater wave induced orbital velocities affecting the bed under higher sea levels. In general waves were more likely to entrain and transport sediment both on the reef flat and in the back reef environment under higher sea levels which has implications for not only forecasted climate change scenarios but also for interpreting geological changes during the late Holocene when sea levels were 1

  15. Oyster reef restoration supports increased nekton biomass and potential commercial fishery value.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Austin T; La Peyre, Megan K

    2015-01-01

    Across the globe, discussions centered on the value of nature drive many conservation and restoration decisions. As a result, justification for management activities increasingly asks for two lines of evidence: (1) biological proof of augmented ecosystem function or service, and (2) monetary valuation of these services. For oyster reefs, which have seen significant global declines and increasing restoration work, the need to provide both biological and monetary evidence of reef services on a local-level has become more critical in a time of declining resources. Here, we quantified species biomass and potential commercial value of nekton collected from restored oyster (Crassostrea virginica) reefs in coastal Louisiana over a 3-year period, providing multiple snapshots of biomass support over time. Overall, and with little change over time, fish and invertebrate biomass is 212% greater at restored oyster reefs than mud-bottom, or 0.12 kg m(-2). The additional biomass of commercial species is equivalent to an increase of local fisheries value by 226%, or $0.09 m(-2). Understanding the ecosystem value of restoration projects, and how they interact with regional management priorities, is critical to inform local decision-making and provide testable predictions. Quantitative estimates of potential commercial fisheries enhancement by oyster reef restoration such as this one can be used directly by local managers to determine the expected return on investment. PMID:26336635

  16. Catch Rates, Composition and Fish Size from Reefs Managed with Periodically-Harvested Closures

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philippa Jane; Alexander, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Periodically-harvested closures are commonly employed within co-management frameworks to help manage small-scale, multi-species fisheries in the Indo-Pacific. Despite their widespread use, the benefits of periodic harvesting strategies for multi-species fisheries have, to date, been largely untested. We examine catch and effort data from four periodically-harvested reef areas and 55 continuously-fished reefs in Solomon Islands. We test the hypothesis that fishing in periodically-harvested closures would yield: (a) higher catch rates, (b) proportionally more short lived, fast growing, sedentary taxa, and (c) larger finfish and invertebrates, compared to catches from reefs continuously open to fishing. Our study showed that catch rates were significantly higher from periodically-harvested closures for gleaning of invertebrates, but not for line and spear fishing. The family level composition of catches did not vary significantly between open reefs and periodically-harvested closures. Fish captured from periodically-harvested closures were slightly larger, but Trochus niloticus were significantly smaller than those from continuously open reefs. In one case of intense and prolonged harvesting, gleaning catch rates significantly declined, suggesting invertebrate stocks were substantially depleted in the early stages of the open period. Our study suggests periodically-harvested closures can have some short term benefits via increasing harvesting efficiency. However, we did not find evidence that the strategy had substantially benefited multi-species fin-fisheries. PMID:24066044

  17. Oyster reef restoration supports increased nekton biomass and potential commercial fishery value

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Across the globe, discussions centered on the value of nature drive many conservation and restoration decisions. As a result, justification for management activities increasingly asks for two lines of evidence: (1) biological proof of augmented ecosystem function or service, and (2) monetary valuation of these services. For oyster reefs, which have seen significant global declines and increasing restoration work, the need to provide both biological and monetary evidence of reef services on a local-level has become more critical in a time of declining resources. Here, we quantified species biomass and potential commercial value of nekton collected from restored oyster (Crassostrea virginica) reefs in coastal Louisiana over a 3-year period, providing multiple snapshots of biomass support over time. Overall, and with little change over time, fish and invertebrate biomass is 212% greater at restored oyster reefs than mud-bottom, or 0.12 kg m−2. The additional biomass of commercial species is equivalent to an increase of local fisheries value by 226%, or $0.09 m−2. Understanding the ecosystem value of restoration projects, and how they interact with regional management priorities, is critical to inform local decision-making and provide testable predictions. Quantitative estimates of potential commercial fisheries enhancement by oyster reef restoration such as this one can be used directly by local managers to determine the expected return on investment. PMID:26336635

  18. Mineral accretion technology for coral reef restoration, shore protection, and adaptation to rising sea level

    SciTech Connect

    Goreau, T.J.; Hilbertz, W.

    1997-12-31

    Electrolysis of seawater is used to precipitate limestone on top of underwater steel structures to create growing artificial reefs to enhance coral growth, restore coral reef habitat, provide shelter for fish, shellfish, and other marine organisms, generate white sand for beach replenishment, and protect shore lines from wave erosion. Films and slides will be shown of existing structures in Jamaica, Panama, and the Maldives, and projects being developed in these and other locations will be evaluated. The method is unique because it creates the only artificial reef structures that generate the natural limestone substrate from which corals and coral reefs are composed, speeding the settlement and growth of calcareous organisms, and attracting the full range of other reef organisms. The structures are self-repairing and grow stronger with age. Power sources utilized include batteries, battery chargers, photovoltaic panels, and windmills. The cost of seawalls and breakwaters produced by this method is less than one tenth that of conventional technology. Because the technology is readily scaled up to build breakwaters and artificial islands able to keep pace with rising sea level it is capable of playing an important role in protecting low lying coastal areas from the effects of global climate change.

  19. Actuator selection for variable camber foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, John D.

    2004-07-01

    A number of polymer based actuator technologies have emerged over the past decade. How do these compare with traditional actuators and are there applications for which they are appropriate? Some of the answers to these questions are provided by outlining the rationale for employing an electroactive polymer to control hydrodynamic surfaces. The surfaces are sections of propeller blades whose trailing edges are deflected in order to change camber. The objective is to insert the actuators into the blades. High work per unit volume is required of the actuators. The ideal actuator technologies also feature relatively large strains in order to deflect the trailing edges with minimal mechanical amplification. It is argued that the high work densities, flexibility in shaping and the ability to hold a force without expending energy (catch state) provide electroactive polymers with advantages over electromagnetic actuators, which also lack the torque to directly drive the blade deflection. Candidate actuators are compared, including electroactive polymers, shape memory alloys, magnetostrictives and traditional piezoceramics. Selections are made on the bases of work density, strain, existence of a catch state, drive voltage and cost. It is suggested that conducting polymer actuators are best suited for the variable camber application. It is also argued that in general electroactive polymers are well-suited for applications in which actuator volume or mass are very limited, catch states are desired, cycle life is moderate to low, or noise cannot be tolerated. Some electroactive polymers also feature low voltage operation, and may be biocompatible.

  20. Bucky gel actuators optimization towards haptic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubak, Grzegorz; Ansaldo, Alberto; Ceseracciu, Luca; Hata, Kenji; Ricci, Davide

    2014-03-01

    An ideal plastic actuator for haptic applications should generate a relatively large displacement (minimum 0.2-0.6 mm, force (~50 mN/cm2) and a fast actuation response to the applied voltage. Although many different types of flexible, plastic actuators based on electroactive polymers (EAP) are currently under investigation, the ionic EAPs are the only ones that can be operated at low voltage. This property makes them suitable for applications that require inherently safe actuators. Among the ionic EAPs, bucky gel based actuators are very promising. Bucky gel is a physical gel made by grounding imidazolium ionic liquids with carbon nanotubes, which can then be incorporated in a polymeric composite matrix to prepare the active electrode layers of linear and bending actuators. Anyhow, many conflicting factors have to be balanced to obtain required performance. In order to produce high force a large stiffness is preferable but this limits the displacement. Moreover, the bigger the active electrode the larger the force. However the thicker an actuator is, the slower the charging process becomes (it is diffusion limited). In order to increase the charging speed a thin electrolyte would be desirable, but this increases the probability of pinholes and device failure. In this paper we will present how different approaches in electrolyte and electrode preparation influence actuator performance and properties taking particularly into account the device ionic conductivity (which influences the charging speed) and the electrode surface resistance (which influences both the recruitment of the whole actuator length and its speed).

  1. The Mariner Mars 1971 gimbal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1971-01-01

    The actuator that will point the gimbaled engine, thus performing the autopilot actuation function for the Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft, is described. The gimbaled engine has two axes of freedom, providing two-axis control to the spacecraft. Motion for the two axes is provided by identical and interchangeable actuators-gearless electromechanical linear servomechanisms. Each actuator is designed to have a long service life in the space environment and to be able to function at speeds ranging from hours per cycle to cycles per second.

  2. Two position optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

  3. Bi-stable optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a bistable optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to move an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, between two stable positions. A non-powered means holds the actuation arm in either of the two stable positions. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm between the two stable positions.

  4. Mapping Health of Bonaire Coral Reefs Using a Lightweight Hyperspectral Mapping System - First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suomalainen, Juha; Mucher, Sander; Kooistra, Lammert; Meesters, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The Dutch Caribbean island of Bonaire is one of the world's top diving holiday destinations much due to its clear waters and healthy coral reefs. The coral reefs surround the western side of the island as an approximately 50-150m wide band. However, the general consensus is that the extent and biodiversity of the Bonarian coral reef is constantly decreasing due to anthropogenic pressures. The last extensive study of the health of the reef ecosystem was performed in 1985 by Van Duyl creating an underwater atlas. In order to update this atlas of Bonaire's coral reefs, in October 2013, a hyperspectral mapping campaign was performed using the WUR Hyperspectral Mapping System (HYMSY). A dive validation campaign has been planned for early 2014. The HYMSY consists of a custom pushbroom spectrometer (range 450-950nm, FWHM 9nm, ~20 lines/s, 328 pixels/line), a consumer camera (collecting 16MPix raw image every 2 seconds), a GPS-Inertia Navigation System (GPS-INS), and synchronization and data storage units. The weight of the system at take-off is 2.0kg allowing it to be mounted on varying platforms. In Bonaire the system was flown on two platforms. (1) on a Cessna airplane to provide a coverage for whole west side of the island with a hyperspectral map in 2-4m resolution and a RGB orthomosaic in 15cm resolution, and (2) on a kite pulled by boat and car to provide a subset coverage in higher resolution. In this presentation we will present our mapping technique and first results including a preliminary underwater atlas and conclusions on reef development.

  5. Thermite Reaction to Produce Artificial Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevino, Alexandro; Martirosyan, Karen; Kline, Richard

    The degradation of coral reefs is an ecological issue that has prompted new collaboration by different scientific communities that would assist in the regeneration of the reefs. Unfortunately, these processes can be inefficient and extremely expensive prompting a new scientific approach by using solid-state combustion synthesis to regenerate the reefs. In this report we aimed to consolidate a multi-composite material to produce artificial reefs by initiating thermite reaction based on aluminum and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with natural reefs. By Thermodynamic analysis and experimentation it was established that a range between .03-.07 number of moles of PTFE was sufficient to reach an adiabatic temperature of over 1900 K, a sustained reaction and a physically stable product was achieved. Reefs are primarily composed of carbonates but their exact chemical composition can vary. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the chemical composition of the reef and revealed presence of oxides, carbonates, silicates. The dominant chemical compounds that were identified are, SiO2 -17%, MgSiO3-14.5%, CaCO3- 11.4%, Ca(Si3O4). Using our thermite reaction we aimed to achieve optimal physical, chemical, and biological properties and maintain cost efficiency of the multi-composite material.

  6. Miocene reef carbonates of Mariana Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, H.G. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    Miocene carbonates in the southern Mariana Islands are impressive for their lithologic diversity, thicknesses (over 250 m), and geographic extent (> 20% combined outcrop coverage over four major high islands: Guam, Rota, Tinian and Saipan). Sections are dominated either by lagoonal algal-foraminiferal wackestones and mudstones with locally abundant high-energy shelly-skeletal facies, or by rubbly to muddy, fore-reef-to-bank deposits of packstones and grainstones with highly diverse and variable biogenic clasts. Fresh to deeply weathered volcaniclastic material may comprise at least 80% of some high-energy fore-reef facies, whereas lagoonal and bank deposits usually contain less than 0.5% terrigenous material. Surprisingly, the Miocene in the Marianas lacks almost completely any reef-core facies. Several poorly developed coral-rich mounds on Saipan and localized laminated red algal buildups on Guam appear to constitute the extant reef-wall facies in the Miocene. The lack of buildups may be a matter of differential survival; it may result from headland erosion and benching associated with emergence of narrow reef tracts as has been postulated by others for south Guam. Alternatively, the authors are proposing that Miocene bathymetry and the volume of terrigenous influx militated against significant reef core formation. Radiometric age dating of these reef carbonates has proven unsuccessful because pervasive diagenesis has transformed the entire Miocene section into low-magnesium calcite with minor and occasional dolomite. Freshwater phreatic diagenesis accounts for the principal porosity variation and trace element distribution.

  7. Surface micromachined sensors and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.

    1995-08-01

    A description of a three-level mechanical polysilicon surface-micromachining technology including a discussion of the advantages of this level of process complexity is presented. This technology is capable of forming mechanical elements ranging from simple cantilevered beams to complex, interconnected, interactive, microactuated micromechanisms. The inclusion of a third deposited layer of mechanical polysilicon greatly extends the degree of complexity available for micromechanism design. Additional features of the Sandia three-level process include the use of Chemical-Mechanical Polishing (CMP) for planarization, and the integration of micromechanics with the Sandia CMOS circuit process. The latter effort includes a CMOS-first, tungsten metallization process to allow the CMOS electronics to withstand high-temperature micromechanical processing. Alternatively, a novel micromechanics-first approach wherein the micromechanical devices are processed first in a well below the surface of the CMOS starting material followed by the standard, aluminum metallization CMOS process is also being pursued. Following the description of the polysilicon surface micromachining are examples of the major sensor and actuator projects based on this technology at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) at Sandia National Laboratories. Efforts at the MDL are concentrated in the technology of surface micromachining due to the availability of and compatibility with standard CMOS processes. The primary sensors discussed are a silicon nitride membrane pressure sensor, hot polysilicon filaments for calorimetric gas sensing, and a smart hydrogen sensor. Examples of actuation mechanisms coupled to external devices are also presented. These actuators utilize the three-level process (plus an additional passive level) and employ either surface tension or electrostatic forces.

  8. Coral Reef Color: Remote and In-Situ Imaging Spectroscopy of Reef Structure and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberg, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Coral reefs are threatened at local to global scales by a litany of anthropogenic impacts, including overfishing, coastal development, marine and watershed pollution, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification. However, available data for the primary indicator of coral reef condition — proportional cover of living coral — are surprisingly sparse and show patterns that contradict the prevailing understanding of how environment impacts reef condition. Remote sensing is the only available tool for acquiring synoptic, uniform data on reef condition at regional to global scales. Discrimination between coral and other reef benthos relies on narrow wavebands afforded by imaging spectroscopy. The same spectral information allows non-invasive quantification of photosynthetic pigment composition, which shows unexpected phenological trends. There is also potential to link biodiversity with optical diversity, though there has been no effort in that direction. Imaging spectroscopy underlies the light-use efficiency model for reef primary production by quantifying light capture, which in turn indicates biochemical capacity for CO2 assimilation. Reef calcification is strongly correlated with primary production, suggesting the possibility for an optics-based model of that aspect of reef function, as well. By scaling these spectral models for use with remote sensing, we can vastly improve our understanding of reef structure, function, and overall condition across regional to global scales. By analyzing those remote sensing products against ancillary environmental data, we can construct secondary models to predict reef futures in the era of global change. This final point is the objective of CORAL (COral Reef Airborne Laboratory), a three-year project funded under NASA's Earth Venture Suborbital-2 program to investigate the relationship between coral reef condition at the ecosystem scale and various nominal biogeophysical forcing parameters.

  9. USGS research on Atlantic coral reef ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Yates, Kimberly K.; Zawada, David G.; Richey, Julie N.; Kellogg, Christina A.; Toth, Lauren T.

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are massive, biomineralized structures that protect coastal communities by acting as barriers to hazards such as hurricanes and tsunamis. They provide sand for beaches through the natural process of erosion, support tourism and recreational industries, and provide essential habitat for fisheries. The continuing global degradation of coral reef ecosystems is well documented. There is a need for focused, coordinated science to understand the complex physical and biological processes and interactions that are impacting the condition of coral reefs and their ability to respond to a changing environment.

  10. Could some coral reefs become sponge reefs as our climate changes?

    PubMed

    Bell, James J; Davy, Simon K; Jones, Timothy; Taylor, Michael W; Webster, Nicole S

    2013-09-01

    Coral reefs across the world have been seriously degraded and have a bleak future in response to predicted global warming and ocean acidification (OA). However, this is not the first time that biocalcifying organisms, including corals, have faced the threat of extinction. The end-Triassic mass extinction (200 million years ago) was the most severe biotic crisis experienced by modern marine invertebrates, which selected against biocalcifiers; this was followed by the proliferation of another invertebrate group, sponges. The duration of this sponge-dominated period far surpasses that of alternative stable-ecosystem or phase-shift states reported on modern day coral reefs and, as such, a shift to sponge-dominated reefs warrants serious consideration as one future trajectory of coral reefs. We hypothesise that some coral reefs of today may become sponge reefs in the future, as sponges and corals respond differently to changing ocean chemistry and environmental conditions. To support this hypothesis, we discuss: (i) the presence of sponge reefs in the geological record; (ii) reported shifts from coral- to sponge-dominated systems; and (iii) direct and indirect responses of the sponge holobiont and its constituent parts (host and symbionts) to changes in temperature and pH. Based on this evidence, we propose that sponges may be one group to benefit from projected climate change and ocean acidification scenarios, and that increased sponge abundance represents a possible future trajectory for some coral reefs, which would have important implications for overall reef functioning. PMID:23553821

  11. Exploring the hidden shallows: extensive reef development and resilience within the turbid nearshore Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kyle; Perry, Chris; Smithers, Scott; Johnson, Jamie; Daniell, James

    2016-04-01

    Mean coral cover on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) has reportedly declined by over 15% during the last 30 years. Climate change events and outbreaks of coral disease have been major drivers of degradation, often exacerbating the stresses caused by localised human activities (e.g. elevated sediment and nutrient inputs). Here, however, in the first assessment of nearshore reef occurrence and ecology across meaningful spatial scales (15.5 sq km), we show that areas of the GBR shelf have exhibited strong intra-regional variability in coral resilience to declining water quality. Specifically, within the highly-turbid "mesophotic" nearshore (<10 m depth) of the central GBR, where terrigenous seafloor sediments are persistently resuspended by wave processes, coral cover averages 38% (twice that reported on mid- and outer-shelf reefs). Of the mapped area, 11% of the seafloor has distinct reef or coral community cover, a density comparable to that measured across the entire GBR shelf (9%). Identified coral taxa (21 genera) exhibited clear depth-stratification corresponding closely to light attenuation and seafloor topography. Reefs have accreted relatively rapidly during the late-Holocene (1.8-3.0 mm y‑1) with rates of vertical reef growth influenced by intrinsic shifts in coral assemblages associated with reef development. Indeed, these shallow-water reefs may have similar potential as refugia from large-scale disturbance as their deep-water (>30 m) "mesophotic" equivalents, and also provide a basis from which to model future trajectories of reef growth within nearshore areas.

  12. Demography of the ecosystem engineer Crassostrea gigas, related to vertical reef accretion and reef persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walles, Brenda; Mann, Roger; Ysebaert, Tom; Troost, Karin; Herman, Peter M. J.; Smaal, Aad C.

    2015-03-01

    Marine species characterized as structure building, autogenic ecosystem engineers are recognized worldwide as potential tools for coastal adaptation efforts in the face of sea level rise. Successful employment of ecosystem engineers in coastal protection largely depends on long-term persistence of their structure, which is in turn dependent on the population dynamics of the individual species. Oysters, such as the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas), are recognized as ecosystem engineers with potential for use in coastal protection. Persistence of oyster reefs is strongly determined by recruitment and shell production (growth), processes facilitated by gregarious settlement on extant shell substrate. Although the Pacific oyster has been introduced world-wide, and has formed dense reefs in the receiving coastal waters, the population biology of live oysters and the quantitative mechanisms maintaining these reefs has rarely been studied, hence the aim of the present work. This study had two objectives: (1) to describe the demographics of extant C. gigas reefs, and (2) to estimate vertical reef accretion rates and carbonate production in these oyster reefs. Three long-living oyster reefs (>30 years old), which have not been exploited since their first occurrence, were examined in the Oosterschelde estuary in the Netherlands. A positive reef accretion rate (7.0-16.9 mm year-1 shell material) was observed, consistent with self-maintenance and persistent structure. We provide a framework to predict reef accretion and population persistence under varying recruitment, growth and mortality scenarios.

  13. Dielectric elastomer actuators for adaptive photonic microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Marcus; Schröder, Henning; Marx, Sebastian; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-03-01

    Various applications in the field of photonic microsystems for Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA) were shown with this research. DEA belong to the class of Electro Active Polymers (EAP) and have the potential to substitute common technologies like piezoelectric actuators. DEAs offers several advantages like compact and variable shapes, large actuation ranges and cost efficient production processes that have to be emphasized. For the market of adaptive photonic microsystems especially area actuators are very suitable. They can be used e.g. as tuneable lens, mirror or grating component and tool for optical fiber alignment. These area actuators have a similar structure like a capacitor. They consist of three layers, two electrode layers on top and bottom and one dielectric layer in the center. The dielectric layer is made of a deformable and prestretched elastomer film. When applying a voltage between both electrode layers the thickness of the dielectric film is compressed and the actuator is displaced in the plane. The use of material compositions like a polymer matrix with graphite, carbon nano particles or carbon nano tubes as well as thin metal films for the electrodes were studied. The paper presents results on suitable dielectric and electrode materials, actuator geometries and respective adaptive photonic components. The manufacturing process of area actuators is described in detail. As a basic size of the area actuators (20 × 20) mm2 were chosen. Onto the produced area actuators polymer lenses or mirrors were assembled. The deflection of the optical beam path is calculated with optical simulations and measured at the prepared adaptive optical components. Static actuations of about +/-15 μm are achieved when applying a voltage of 200 V. Also the function of a tuneable beam splitter is demonstrated to show further applications.

  14. NASA pyrotechnically actuated systems program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1993-01-01

    The Office of Safety and Mission Quality initiated a Pyrotechnically Actuated Systems (PAS) Program in FY-92 to address problems experienced with pyrotechnically actuated systems and devices used both on the ground and in flight. The PAS Program will provide the technical basis for NASA's projects to incorporate new technological developments in operational systems. The program will accomplish that objective by developing/testing current and new hardware designs for flight applications and by providing a pyrotechnic data base. This marks the first applied pyrotechnic technology program funded by NASA to address pyrotechnic issues. The PAS Program has been structured to address the results of a survey of pyrotechnic device and system problems with the goal of alleviating or minimizing their risks. Major program initiatives include the development of a Laser Initiated Ordnance System, a pyrotechnic systems data base, NASA Standard Initiator model, a NASA Standard Linear Separation System and a NASA Standard Gas Generator. The PAS Program sponsors annual aerospace pyrotechnic systems workshops.

  15. A thermopneumatically actuated bistable microvalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bocong; Wang, Boxiong; Schomburg, Werner Karl

    2010-09-01

    A bistable polymer microvalve with a thermopneumatic actuator has been developed. The microvalve was fabricated by micro milling of a polymer combined with sputtering and photolithography. The valve comprises two 2/2-way valves which are alternately switched such that they can be connected to serve as a 3/2-way valve. Two permanent magnets work with a movable soft magnet to keep the valve in its current state, resulting in bistable switching with a minimum energy of 320 mJ. An air flow rate of 1.36 L min-1 is achieved at 20 °C with a pressure difference of 200 kPa. No leakage is observed up to a differential pressure of 350 kPa. Flowing and switching performances were also tested at different temperatures. Sealing the flow channels from the actuator chamber makes the valve less sensitive to the temperature and other properties of the fluid to be switched. An initial gap between the valve seat and the silicone sealing membrane at least reduces the sticking problem. Switching time is found to be significantly influenced by the thickness of the heating membrane. With an 8 µm thick heating membrane, a response time of 10 ms can be achieved.

  16. Coral reefs of the Mascarenes, Western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Turner, John; Klaus, Rebecca

    2005-01-15

    The reefs of the Mascarenes differ in structure and stage of development. Mauritius is the oldest island, bound by a discontinuous fringing reef and small barrier reef, with large lagoon patch reefs. Rodrigues has nearly continuous fringing reefs bounding an extensive lagoon with deep channels and few patch reefs. Reunion, the youngest island, has short stretches of narrow fringing reefs along southwestern coasts. The islets of St Brandon are bound to the east by an extensive arc of fringing reef. Reef mapping of the Mascarenes using satellite imagery provides an estimate of 705 km2 of shallow reef habitats. These areas have been modified over geological time by changes in sea level, ocean-atmosphere disturbances and biological and chemical forcing. Further modification has resulted from historical changes in land-use patterns. Recent economic development has placed many of these reefs at risk from anthropogenic impact. The reefs of the Mascarenes have escaped mass mortality from bleaching to date, which increases their conservation significance within the wider Indian Ocean. The reefs are poorly protected. A case study shows how a geographic information system incorporating reef-habitat maps can help formulate and demonstrate Marine Protected Area boundaries. PMID:15598634

  17. Silicon Membrane Mirrors with Electrostatic Shape Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Efforts are under way to develop deformable mirrors equipped with microscopic electrostatic actuators that would be used to maintain their reflective surfaces in precise shapes required for their intended applications. Unlike actuators that depend on properties of materials (e.g., piezoelectric and electrostrictive actuators), electrostatic actuators are effective over a wide temperature range. A mirror of the present type would be denoted a MEMSDM (for microelectromechanical system deformable mirror). The reflective surface of such a mirror would be formed on a single-crystal silicon membrane that would be attached by posts to a silicon actuator membrane that would, in turn, be attached by posts to a rigid silicon base (see figure). The actuator membrane would serve as the upper electrode of a capacitor. Multiple lower electrodes, each occupying a conveniently small fraction of the total area, would be formed on an electrically insulating oxide layer on the base, thereby defining a multiplicity of actuator pixels. The actuator membrane would be corrugated in a pattern that would impart mechanical compliance needed for relaxation of operational and fabrication-induced stresses and to minimize the degree of nonlinearity of deformations. The compliance afforded by the corrugations would also help to minimize the undesired coupling of deformations between adjacent pixels (a practical goal being to keep the influence coefficient between adjacent pixels below 10 percent).

  18. Improvements In Ball-Screw Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskenderian, Theodore; Joffe, Benjamin; Summers, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Report describes modifications of design of type of ball-screw linear actuator driven by dc motor, with linear-displacement feedback via linear variable-differential transformer (LVDT). Actuators used to position spacecraft engines to direct thrust. Modifications directed toward ensuring reliable and predictable operation during planned 12-year cruise and interval of hard use at end of cruise.

  19. Integrated piezoelectric actuators in deep drawing tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, R.; Mainda, P.; Drossel, W.-G.; Kerschner, M.; Wolf, K.

    2011-04-01

    The production of car body panels are defective in succession of process fluctuations. Thus the produced car body panel can be precise or damaged. To reduce the error rate, an intelligent deep drawing tool was developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU in cooperation with Audi and Volkswagen. Mechatronic components in a closed-loop control is the main differentiating factor between an intelligent and a conventional deep drawing tool. In correlation with sensors for process monitoring, the intelligent tool consists of piezoelectric actuators to actuate the deep drawing process. By enabling the usage of sensors and actuators at the die, the forming tool transform to a smart structure. The interface between sensors and actuators will be realized with a closed-loop control. The content of this research will present the experimental results with the piezoelectric actuator. For the analysis a production-oriented forming tool with all automotive requirements were used. The disposed actuators are monolithic multilayer actuators of the piezo injector system. In order to achieve required force, the actuators are combined in a cluster. The cluster is redundant and economical. In addition to the detailed assembly structures, this research will highlight intensive analysis with the intelligent deep drawing tool.

  20. Synthesis of branched chains with actuation redundancy for eliminating interior singularities of 3T1R parallel mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shihua; Liu, Yanmin; Cui, Hongliu; Niu, Yunzhan; Zhao, Yanzhi

    2016-03-01

    Although it is common to eliminate the singularity of parallel mechanism by adding the branched chain with actuation redundancy, there is no theory and method for the configuration synthesis of the branched chain with actuation redundancy in parallel mechanism. Branched chains with actuation redundancy are synthesized for eliminating interior singularity of 3-translational and 1- rotational(3T1R) parallel mechanisms. Guided by the discriminance method of hybrid screw group according to Grassmann line geometry, all the possibilities are listed for the occurrence of interior singularities in 3T1R parallel mechanism. Based on the linear relevance of screw system and the principles of eliminating parallel mechanism singularity with actuation redundancy, different types of branched chains with actuation redundancy are synthesized systematically to indicate the layout and the number of the branched chainsinterior with actuation redundancy. A general method is proposed for the configuration synthesis of the branched chains with actuation redundancy of the redundant parallel mechanism, and it builds a solid foundation for the subsequent performance optimization of the redundant actuation parallel mechanism.

  1. Actuator lifetime predictions for Ni60Ti40 shape memory alloy plate actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Robert; Ottmers, Cade; Hewling, Brett; Lagoudas, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs), due to their ability to repeatedly recover substantial deformations under applied mechanical loading, have the potential to impact the aerospace, automotive, biomedical, and energy industries as weight and volume saving replacements for conventional actuators. While numerous applications of SMA actuators have been flight tested and can be found in industrial applications, these actuators are generally limited to non-critical components, are not widely implemented and frequently one-off designs, and are generally overdesigned due to a lack of understanding of the effect of the loading path on the fatigue life and the lack of an accurate method of predicting actuator lifetimes. Previous efforts have been effective at predicting actuator lifetimes for isobaric dogbone test specimens. This study builds on previous work and investigates the actuation fatigue response of plate actuators with various stress concentrations through the use of digital image correlation and finite element simulations.

  2. Quaternary coral reef refugia preserved fish diversity.

    PubMed

    Pellissier, Loïc; Leprieur, Fabien; Parravicini, Valeriano; Cowman, Peter F; Kulbicki, Michel; Litsios, Glenn; Olsen, Steffen M; Wisz, Mary S; Bellwood, David R; Mouillot, David

    2014-05-30

    The most prominent pattern in global marine biogeography is the biodiversity peak in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Yet the processes that underpin this pattern are still actively debated. By reconstructing global marine paleoenvironments over the past 3 million years on the basis of sediment cores, we assessed the extent to which Quaternary climate fluctuations can explain global variation in current reef fish richness. Comparing global historical coral reef habitat availability with the present-day distribution of 6316 reef fish species, we find that distance from stable coral reef habitats during historical periods of habitat loss explains 62% of the variation in fish richness, outweighing present-day environmental factors. Our results highlight the importance of habitat persistence during periods of climate change for preserving marine biodiversity. PMID:24876495

  3. Ocean acidification impairs vermetid reef recruitment.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Marco; Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo; Chan, Vera Bin San; Fine, Maoz; Alessi, Cinzia; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Chemello, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Vermetids form reefs in sub-tropical and warm-temperate waters that protect coasts from erosion, regulate sediment transport and accumulation, serve as carbon sinks and provide habitat for other species. The gastropods that form these reefs brood encapsulated larvae; they are threatened by rapid environmental changes since their ability to disperse is very limited. We used transplant experiments along a natural CO2 gradient to assess ocean acidification effects on the reef-building gastropod Dendropoma petraeum. We found that although D. petraeum were able to reproduce and brood at elevated levels of CO2, recruitment success was adversely affected. Long-term exposure to acidified conditions predicted for the year 2100 and beyond caused shell dissolution and a significant increase in shell Mg content. Unless CO2 emissions are reduced and conservation measures taken, our results suggest these reefs are in danger of extinction within this century, with significant ecological and socioeconomic ramifications for coastal systems. PMID:24577050

  4. Ocean acidification impairs vermetid reef recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, Marco; Rodolfo-Metalpa, Riccardo; Chan, Vera Bin San; Fine, Maoz; Alessi, Cinzia; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.; Chemello, Renato

    2014-02-01

    Vermetids form reefs in sub-tropical and warm-temperate waters that protect coasts from erosion, regulate sediment transport and accumulation, serve as carbon sinks and provide habitat for other species. The gastropods that form these reefs brood encapsulated larvae; they are threatened by rapid environmental changes since their ability to disperse is very limited. We used transplant experiments along a natural CO2 gradient to assess ocean acidification effects on the reef-building gastropod Dendropoma petraeum. We found that although D. petraeum were able to reproduce and brood at elevated levels of CO2, recruitment success was adversely affected. Long-term exposure to acidified conditions predicted for the year 2100 and beyond caused shell dissolution and a significant increase in shell Mg content. Unless CO2 emissions are reduced and conservation measures taken, our results suggest these reefs are in danger of extinction within this century, with significant ecological and socioeconomic ramifications for coastal systems.

  5. MANGROVE-DERIVED NUTRIENTS AND CORAL REEFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the consequences of the declining global cover of mangroves due to anthropogenic disturbance necessitates consideration of how mangrove-derived nutrients contribute to threatened coral reef systems. We sampled potential sources of organic matter and a suite of sessi...

  6. Plate tectonics drive tropical reef biodiversity dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Leprieur, Fabien; Descombes, Patrice; Gaboriau, Théo; Cowman, Peter F.; Parravicini, Valeriano; Kulbicki, Michel; Melián, Carlos J.; de Santana, Charles N.; Heine, Christian; Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R.; Pellissier, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    The Cretaceous breakup of Gondwana strongly modified the global distribution of shallow tropical seas reshaping the geographic configuration of marine basins. However, the links between tropical reef availability, plate tectonic processes and marine biodiversity distribution patterns are still unknown. Here, we show that a spatial diversification model constrained by absolute plate motions for the past 140 million years predicts the emergence and movement of diversity hotspots on tropical reefs. The spatial dynamics of tropical reefs explains marine fauna diversification in the Tethyan Ocean during the Cretaceous and early Cenozoic, and identifies an eastward movement of ancestral marine lineages towards the Indo-Australian Archipelago in the Miocene. A mechanistic model based only on habitat-driven diversification and dispersal yields realistic predictions of current biodiversity patterns for both corals and fishes. As in terrestrial systems, we demonstrate that plate tectonics played a major role in driving tropical marine shallow reef biodiversity dynamics. PMID:27151103

  7. Plate tectonics drive tropical reef biodiversity dynamics.

    PubMed

    Leprieur, Fabien; Descombes, Patrice; Gaboriau, Théo; Cowman, Peter F; Parravicini, Valeriano; Kulbicki, Michel; Melián, Carlos J; de Santana, Charles N; Heine, Christian; Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R; Pellissier, Loïc

    2016-01-01

    The Cretaceous breakup of Gondwana strongly modified the global distribution of shallow tropical seas reshaping the geographic configuration of marine basins. However, the links between tropical reef availability, plate tectonic processes and marine biodiversity distribution patterns are still unknown. Here, we show that a spatial diversification model constrained by absolute plate motions for the past 140 million years predicts the emergence and movement of diversity hotspots on tropical reefs. The spatial dynamics of tropical reefs explains marine fauna diversification in the Tethyan Ocean during the Cretaceous and early Cenozoic, and identifies an eastward movement of ancestral marine lineages towards the Indo-Australian Archipelago in the Miocene. A mechanistic model based only on habitat-driven diversification and dispersal yields realistic predictions of current biodiversity patterns for both corals and fishes. As in terrestrial systems, we demonstrate that plate tectonics played a major role in driving tropical marine shallow reef biodiversity dynamics. PMID:27151103

  8. Reef Ecosystem Services and Decision Support Database

    EPA Science Inventory

    This scientific and management information database utilizes systems thinking to describe the linkages between decisions, human activities, and provisioning of reef ecosystem goods and services. This database provides: (1) Hierarchy of related topics - Click on topics to navigat...

  9. Oysters and Oyster Reef Communities in Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jean; Bly, Joe

    1989-01-01

    The habitat, life history, feeding, classification, anatomy and pearl production of the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) are presented. A list of other oyster reef inhabitants and predators is provided. Harvest and habitat loss are discussed. (CW)

  10. Plate tectonics drive tropical reef biodiversity dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leprieur, Fabien; Descombes, Patrice; Gaboriau, Théo; Cowman, Peter F.; Parravicini, Valeriano; Kulbicki, Michel; Melián, Carlos J.; de Santana, Charles N.; Heine, Christian; Mouillot, David; Bellwood, David R.; Pellissier, Loïc

    2016-05-01

    The Cretaceous breakup of Gondwana strongly modified the global distribution of shallow tropical seas reshaping the geographic configuration of marine basins. However, the links between tropical reef availability, plate tectonic processes and marine biodiversity distribution patterns are still unknown. Here, we show that a spatial diversification model constrained by absolute plate motions for the past 140 million years predicts the emergence and movement of diversity hotspots on tropical reefs. The spatial dynamics of tropical reefs explains marine fauna diversification in the Tethyan Ocean during the Cretaceous and early Cenozoic, and identifies an eastward movement of ancestral marine lineages towards the Indo-Australian Archipelago in the Miocene. A mechanistic model based only on habitat-driven diversification and dispersal yields realistic predictions of current biodiversity patterns for both corals and fishes. As in terrestrial systems, we demonstrate that plate tectonics played a major role in driving tropical marine shallow reef biodiversity dynamics.

  11. EPA Field Manual for Coral Reef Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Quality Research Program (WQRP) supports development of coral reef biological criteria. Research is focused on developing methods and tools to support implementation of legally defensible biological standards for maintaining biological integrity, which is protected by ...

  12. Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Actuation of Mechanisms and Robotic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Leary, S.; Harrison, J.; Smith, J.

    1999-01-01

    Actuators are responsible to the operative capability of manipulation systems and robots. In recent years, electroactive polymers (EAP) have emerged as potential alternative to conventional actuators.

  13. Piezoelectric actuator models for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Lefebvre, Sylvie

    1993-01-01

    Analytical models for piezoelectric actuators, adapted from flat plate concepts, are developed for noise and vibration control applications associated with vibrating circular cylinders. The loadings applied to the cylinder by the piezoelectric actuators for the bending and in-plane force models are approximated by line moment and line force distributions, respectively, acting on the perimeter of the actuator patch area. Coupling between the cylinder and interior acoustic cavity is examined by studying the modal spectra, particularly for the low-order cylinder modes that couple efficiently with the cavity at low frequencies. Within the scope of this study, the in-plane force model produced a more favorable distribution of low-order modes, necessary for efficient interior noise control, than did the bending model.

  14. Conducting IPN actuators for biomimetic vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festin, Nicolas; Plesse, Cedric; Chevrot, Claude; Teyssié, Dominique; Pirim, Patrick; Vidal, Frederic

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, many studies on electroactive polymer (EAP) actuators have been reported. One promising technology is the elaboration of electronic conducting polymers based actuators with Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (IPNs) architecture. Their many advantageous properties as low working voltage, light weight and high lifetime (several million cycles) make them very attractive for various applications including robotics. Our laboratory recently synthesized new conducting IPN actuators based on high molecular Nitrile Butadiene Rubber, poly(ethylene oxide) derivative and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxithiophene). The presence of the elastomer greatly improves the actuator performances such as mechanical resistance and output force. In this article we present the IPN and actuator synthesis, characterizations and design allowing their integration in a biomimetic vision system.

  15. Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning

    DOEpatents

    Swift, C.D.; Bergum, J.W.

    1994-10-25

    An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated. 3 figs.

  16. Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Charles D.; Bergum, John W.

    1994-01-01

    An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated.

  17. Piezoelectric Actuator/Sensor Technology at Rockwell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neurgaonkar, Ratnakar R.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the state-of-the art of piezoelectric materials based on perovskite and tungsten bronze families for sensor, actuator and smart structure applications. The microstructural defects in these materials have been eliminated to a large extent and the resulting materials exhibit exceedingly high performance for various applications. The performance of Rockwell actuators/sensors is at least 3 times better than commercially available products. These high performance actuators are being incorporated into various applications including, DOD, NASA and commercial. The multilayer actuator stacks fabricated from our piezoceramics are advantageous for sensing and high capacitance applications. In this presentation, we will describe the use of our high performance piezo-ceramics for actuators and sensors, including multilayer stacks and composite structures.

  18. Electrostatic micromembrane actuator arrays as motion generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. T.; Hui, J.; Young, M.; Kayatta, P.; Wong, J.; Kennith, D.; Zhe, J.; Warde, C.

    2004-05-01

    A rigid-body motion generator based on an array of micromembrane actuators is described. Unlike previous microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques, the architecture employs a large number (typically greater than 1000) of micron-sized (10-200 μm) membrane actuators to simultaneously generate the displacement of a large rigid body, such as a conventional optical mirror. For optical applications, the approach provides optical design freedom of MEMS mirrors by enabling large-aperture mirrors to be driven electrostatically by MEMS actuators. The micromembrane actuator arrays have been built using a stacked architecture similar to that employed in the Multiuser MEMS Process (MUMPS), and the motion transfer from the arrayed micron-sized actuators to macro-sized components was demonstrated.

  19. MEMS Electrostatic Actuation in Conducting Biological Media

    PubMed Central

    Mukundan, Vikram; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2009-01-01

    We present design and experimental implementation of electrostatic comb-drive actuators in solutions of high conductivity relevant for biological cells. The actuators are operated in the frequency range 1–10 MHz in ionic and biological cell culture media, with ionic strengths up to 150 mMoles/L. Typical displacement is 3.5 μm at an applied peak-to-peak signal of 5V. Two different actuation schemes are presented and tested for performance at high frequency. A differential drive design is demonstrated to overcome the attenuation due to losses in parasitic impedances. The frequency dependence of the electrostatic force has been characterized in media of different ionic strengths. Circuit models for the electric double layer phenomena are used to understand and predict the actuator behavior. The actuator is integrated into a planar force sensing system to measure the stiffness of cells cultured on suspended structures. PMID:20161046

  20. Genetic Algorithm Approaches for Actuator Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, William A.

    2000-01-01

    This research investigated genetic algorithm approaches for smart actuator placement to provide aircraft maneuverability without requiring hinged flaps or other control surfaces. The effort supported goals of the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization focus efforts in NASA's Aircraft au program. This work helped to properly identify various aspects of the genetic algorithm operators and parameters that allow for placement of discrete control actuators/effectors. An improved problem definition, including better definition of the objective function and constraints, resulted from this research effort. The work conducted for this research used a geometrically simple wing model; however, an increasing number of potential actuator placement locations were incorporated to illustrate the ability of the GA to determine promising actuator placement arrangements. This effort's major result is a useful genetic algorithm-based approach to assist in the discrete actuator/effector placement problem.

  1. Mass Spawning in Tropical Reef Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Peter L.; Babcock, Russell C.; Bull, Gordon D.; Oliver, James K.; Wallace, Carden C.; Willis, Bette L.

    1984-03-01

    Synchronous multispecific spawning by a total of 32 coral species occurred a few nights after late spring full moons in 1981 and 1982 at three locations on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The data invalidate the generalization that most corals have internally fertilized, brooded planula larvae. In every species observed, gametes were released; external fertilization and development then followed. The developmental rates of externally fertilized eggs and longevities of planulae indicate that planulae may be dispersed between reefs.

  2. Hysteresis compensation for piezoelectric actuators in single-point diamond turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng; Hu, Dejin; Wan, Daping; Liu, Hongbin

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, interests have been growing for fast tool servo (FTS) systems to increase the capability of existing single-point diamond turning machines. Although piezoelectric actuator is the most universal base of FTS system due to its high stiffness, accuracy and bandwidth, nonlinearity in piezoceramics limits both the static and dynamic performance of piezoelectric-actuated control systems evidently. To compensate the nonlinear hysteresis behavior of piezoelectric actuators, a hybrid model coupled with Preisach model and feedforward neural network (FNN) has been described. Since the training of FNN does not require a special calibration sequence, it is possible for on-line identification and real-time implementation with general operating data of a specific piezoelectric actuator. To describe the rate dependent behavior of piezoelectric actuators, a hybrid dynamic model was developed to predict the response of piezoelectric actuators in a wider range of input frequency. Experimental results show that a maximal error of less than 3% was accomplished by this dynamic model.

  3. Inflated dielectric elastomer actuator for eyeball's movements: fabrication, analysis and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanju; Shi, Liang; Liu, Liwu; Zhang, Zhen; Leng, Jinsong

    2008-03-01

    Bio-mimetic actuators are inspired to the human or animal organ and they are aimed at replicating actions exerted by the main organic muscles. We present here an inflated dielectric Electroactive Polymer actuator based on acrylic elastomer aiming at mimicing the ocular muscular of the human eye. Two sheets of polyacrylic elastomer coated with conductive carbon grease are sticked to a rotatable backbone, which function like an agonist-antagonist configuration. When stimulating the two elastomer sheets separately, the rotatable mid-arc of the actuator is capable of rotating from -50° to 50°. Experiments shows that the inflated actuator, compared with uninflated one, performs much bigger rotating angle and more strengthened. Connected with the actuator via an elastic tensive line, the eyeball rotates around the symmetrical axes. The realization of more accurate movements and emotional expressions of our native eye system is the next step of our research and still under studied. This inflated dielectric elastomer actuator shows as well great potential application in robofish and adaptive stucture.

  4. Rapid vertical accretion on a `young' shore-detached turbid zone reef: Offshore Paluma Shoals, central Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C. T.; Smithers, S. G.; Gulliver, P.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the age structure and net accretion rates determined for an open water turbid zone reef, known as Offshore Paluma Shoals, located on the inner central Great Barrier Reef. Twenty-eight radiocarbon dates from 5 cores through the reef structure indicate that this reef began growing ~1,700 years ago and that net vertical accretion through the main phase of reef development was rapid (averaging 7.8 mm yr-1), this despite the reef growing in highly turbid waters. The most rapid growth phases coincided with the accumulation of mud-rich terrigenoclastic sediments within the reef fabric. The study emphasises the capacity of turbid zone reefs to vertically accrete at rates matching or exceeding many clear water reefs despite seemingly detrimental water quality conditions.

  5. Miocene reef carbonates of Mariana Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, H.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Miocene carbonates in the southern Mariana Islands are impressive for their lithologic diversity, thicknesses (over 250 m), and geographic extend (>20% combined outcrop coverage over four major high islands: Guam, Rota, Tinian and Saipan). Sections are dominated either by lagoonal algal-foraminiferal wackestones and mudstones with locally abundant high-energy shelly-skeletal facies, or by rubbly to muddy, fore-reef-to-bank deposits of packstones and grainstones with highly diverse and variable biogenic clasts. Fresh to deeply weathered volcaniclastic material may comprise at least 80% of some high-energy fore-reef facies, whereas lagoonal and bank deposits usually contain less than 0.5% terrigenous material. Surprisingly, the Miocene in the Marianas lacks almost completely any reef-core facies. Several poorly developed coral-rich mounds on Saipan and localized laminated red algal buildups on Guam appear to constitute the extant reef-wall facies in the Miocene. The lack of buildups may be a matter of differential survival; it may result from headland erosion and benching associated with emergency of narrow reef tracts as has been postulated by others for south Guam. Radiometric age dating of these reef carbonates has proven unsuccessful because pervasive diagenesis has transformed the entire Miocene section into low-magnesium calcite with minor and occasional dolomite. Freshwater phreatic diagenesis accounts for the principal porosity variation and trace element distribution.

  6. ReefSAM - Reef Sedimentary Accretion Model: A new 3D coral reef evolution model/simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Samuel; Webster, Jody

    2013-04-01

    Coral reefs show characteristic morphological patterns (e.g. coral dominated margins with detrital carbonate dominated lagoons/back-reef) and temporal development (e.g. Hopley et al. 2007). While the processes which lead to predictable patterns on a range of scales have been discussed qualitatively, a full quantitative understanding of the range of processes and parameters involved requires modelling. Previous attempts to model complex Holocene reef systems (i.e. One Tree Reef, GBR - Barrett and Webster 2012) using a carbonate stratigraphic forward model (Carbonate3D - Warrlich et al. 2002) identified a number of important but unsimulated processes and potential model improvements. ReefSAM has been written from scratch in Matlab using these findings and experiences from using Carbonate3D. It simulates coralgal accretion and carbonate sand production and transport. Specific improvements include: 1. a more complex hydrodynamic model based on wave refraction and incorporating vertical (depth) and lateral (substrate dependent) variations in transport energy and erosion. 2. a complex reef growth model incorporating depth, wave energy/turbidity and substrate composition. 3. Paleo-water depth, paleo-wave energy and bio-zone (combination of paleo-water depth and wave energy) model outputs allowing coralgal habitat changes through time and space to be simulated and compared to observational data. The model is compared to the well studied One Tree Reef - tests similar to those undertaken in Barrett and Webster 2012 with Carbonate3D are presented. Model development coincides with plans for further intensive drilling at One Tree Reef (mid 2013) providing an opportunity to test the model predictively. The model is still in active development. References: Barrett, S.J., Webster, J.M.,2012. Holocene evolution of the Great Barrier Reef: Insights from 3D numerical modelling. Sedimentary Geology 265-266, 56-71. Warrlich, G.M.D., Waltham, D.A., Bosence D.W.J., 2002. Quantifying the

  7. Eulerian and Lagrangian Measurements of Water Flow and Residence Time in a Fringing Coral Reef Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storlazzi, C. D.; Messina, A. M.; Cheriton, O. M.; Biggs, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrodynamic processes on coral reefs are important for nutrient cycling, larval dispersal, temperature variability, and understanding the impacts of terrestrial sediment, nutrients, and contaminants from adjacent impaired watersheds on coral reef ecosystems. Our goal was to understand the spatial and temporal variability in flow velocities and the associated residence time of water in the fringing coral reef flat-lined embayment of Faga'alu, on the island of Tutuila in American Samoa. To accomplish this, data from three bottom-mounted acoustic current profilers and 102 individual Lagrangian ocean surface current drifter deployments (5 drifters x 21 deployments) were combined with meteorologic data and numerical wave model results. These data and model results, collected over nine days, made it possible to evaluate the relative contribution of tidal, wind, and wave forcing on the flow patterns. The high number of drifter deployments made it possible for the velocity data to be binned into 100 m x 100 m grid cells and the resulting residence times computed for the different sets of forcing conditions. Cumulative progressive vectors calculated from the acoustic current profilers closely matched the tracks from concurrently deployed surface current drifters, showing the applicability of this hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian measurement scheme to understand flow patterns in this geomorphically complex embayment. The bay-wide man current speeds (residence times) varied from 1-37 cm/s (2.78-0.08 hr), 1-36 cm/s (2.78-0.08 hr), and 5-64 cm/s (0.56-0.04 hr) under tidal, wind, and wave forcing, respectively; the highest speeds (shortest residence times) were measured on the outer reef flat closest to where waves were breaking on the reef crest and were slowest (longest) over the inner reef flat close to shore and deep in the embayment.

  8. Submerged fossil reefs discovered beyond the limit of modern reef growth in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linklater, M.; Brooke, B. P.; Hamylton, S. M.; Nichol, S. L.; Woodroffe, C. D.

    2015-10-01

    Balls Pyramid is the southernmost island in a linear island chain in the southwest Pacific Ocean, 24 km south of the limit of known coral reef formation at Lord Howe Island. This paper describes the geomorphometric structure of the shelf surrounding Balls Pyramid through the application of remote sensing data to create a high-resolution digital elevation model of the shelf (5 m cell size) and seafloor feature classification. Seafloor features were delineated using the bathymetry model together with slope, backscatter and sub-bottom profile data. The average depth of the 260.6 km2 shelf was 55 m (± 21 m), with the majority of shelf area (77%) within 30-60 m water depth. Dominating the shelf is an extensive, mid-shelf reef at 30-50 m depth, dissected by basin and channel features. Outer-shelf reef and platform features surround the mid shelf, with terrace sequences marking the seaward outer-shelf rim in 65-100 m depth. Sub-bottom profiles and backscatter data demonstrate substantial accumulation (up to 16.5 m) of unconsolidated sediments within basin and channel features. The submerged mid-shelf reefs of Balls Pyramid are similar to the fossil coral reef system discovered on the Lord Howe Island shelf, implying origins as a drowned coral reef system. This paper reveals complex shelf topography with extensive submerged reefs on what was previously considered to be a planated volcanic shelf outside of reef-forming seas.

  9. Oyster Reef Communities in the Chesapeake Bay: A Brief Primer. VORTEX: Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Juliana M.; Mann, Roger; Clark, Vicki P.

    This document introduces Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience (VORTEX), which is an interdisciplinary program focusing on the importance of oyster reef communities in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The VORTEX program uses field and laboratory experience supported by multimedia instruction. This document presents an overview on the biology of…

  10. Grazing pressure of herbivorous coral reef fishes on low coral-cover reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paddack, Michelle J.; Cowen, Robert K.; Sponaugle, Su

    2006-08-01

    The impact of grazing by herbivorous fishes (Acanthuridae, Scaridae, and Pomacentridae) on low coral-cover reefs was assessed by measuring rates of benthic algal production and consumption on inshore and offshore reefs in the upper Florida Keys. Algal production rates, determined in situ with caged and uncaged experimental plates, were low (mean 1.05gCm-2 day-1) and similar among reef types. Algal consumption rates were estimated using two different models, a detailed model incorporating fish bite rates and algal yield-per-bite for one species extrapolated to a guild-wide value, and a general regression relating fish biomass to algal consumption. Algal consumption differed among reef types: a majority of algal production was consumed on offshore reefs (55-100%), whereas consumption on inshore patch reefs was 31-51%. Spatial variation in algal consumption was driven by differences in herbivorous fish species composition, density, and size-structure among reef types. Algal consumption rates also varied temporally due to seasonal declines in bite rates and intermittent presence of large-bodied, vagile, schooling species. Spatial coherence of benthic community structure and temporal stability of algal turf over 3 years suggests that grazing intensity is currently sufficient to limit further spread of macroalgal cover on these low coral-cover reefs, but not to exclude it from the system.

  11. Spooled packaging of shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, John A.

    A vast cross-section of transportation, manufacturing, consumer product, and medical technologies rely heavily on actuation. Accordingly, progress in these industries is often strongly coupled to the advancement of actuation technologies. As the field of actuation continues to evolve, smart materials show significant promise for satisfying the growing needs of industry. In particular, shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators present an opportunity for low-cost, high performance actuation, but until now, they have been limited or restricted from use in many otherwise suitable applications by the difficulty in packaging the SMA wires within tight or unusually shaped form constraints. To address this packaging problem, SMA wires can be spool-packaged by wrapping around mandrels to make the actuator more compact or by redirecting around multiple mandrels to customize SMA wire pathways to unusual form factors. The goal of this dissertation is to develop the scientific knowledge base for spooled packaging of low-cost SMA wire actuators that enables high, predictable performance within compact, customizable form factors. In developing the scientific knowledge base, this dissertation defines a systematic general representation of single and multiple mandrel spool-packaged SMA actuators and provides tools for their analysis, understanding, and synthesis. A quasi-static analytical model distills the underlying mechanics down to the three effects of friction, bending, and binding, which enables prediction of the behavior of generic spool-packaged SMA actuators with specifiable geometric, loading, frictional, and SMA material parameters. An extensive experimental and simulation-based parameter study establishes the necessary understanding of how primary design tradeoffs between performance, packaging, and cost are governed by the underlying mechanics of spooled actuators. A design methodology outlines a systematic approach to synthesizing high performance SMA wire actuators

  12. Lost-motion valve actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, W.J. III; Ringgenberg, P.D.

    1987-04-07

    A lost-motion valve actuator is described for a bore closure valve employed in a well bore, comprising: operating connector means adapted to move the bore closure valve between open and closed positions through longitudinal movement of the operating connector means. The operating connector means comprises an operating connector and a connector insert defining a recess therebetween; locking dog means comprising at least one locking dog received in the recess and spring biasing means adapted to urge at least one locking dog radially inwardly; and mandrel means slidably received within the operating connector means and including dog slot means associated therewith. The dog slot means comprises an annular slot on the exterior of the mandrel means adapted to lockingly receive at least one inwardly biased locking dog when proximate thereto, whereby longitudinal movement of the mandrel means is transmitted to the operating connector means.

  13. Magnetic actuation of hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state. PMID:22163368

  14. Magnetic actuation of hair cells.

    PubMed

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state. PMID:22163368

  15. Droplet actuator analyzer with cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory F. (Inventor); Sturmer, Ryan A. (Inventor); Paik, Philip Y. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Vijay (Inventor); Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Pamula, Vamsee K. (Inventor); Brafford, Keith R. (Inventor); West, Richard M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator with cartridge is provided. According to one embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes an analyzer unit comprising electronic or optical receiving means, a cartridge comprising self-contained droplet handling capabilities, and a wherein the cartridge is coupled to the analyzer unit by a means which aligns electronic and/or optical outputs from the cartridge with electronic or optical receiving means on the analyzer unit. According to another embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes a sample analyzer comprising a cartridge coupled thereto and a means of electrical interface and/or optical interface between the cartridge and the analyzer, whereby electrical signals and/or optical signals may be transmitted from the cartridge to the analyzer.

  16. Pressure-actuated joint system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided that includes first and second case segments mated with one another. First and second annular rubber layers are disposed inboard of the first and second case segments, respectively. The second annular rubber layer has a slot extending from the radial inner surface across a portion of its thickness to define a main body portion and a flexible portion. The flexible portion has an interfacing surface portion abutting against an interfacing surface portion of the first annular rubber layer to follow movement of the first annular rubber layer during operation of the pressure vessel. The slot receives pressurized gas and establishes a pressure-actuated joint between the interfacing surface portions. At least one of the interfacing surface portions has a plurality of enclosed and sealed recesses formed therein.

  17. Reefs, bioherms, and banks: a semantic and genetic continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.B.; Gerhard, L.C.

    1987-05-01

    Recent literature has restated old concepts of a one-to-one relationship between frameworks and reefs. It is important to revise reef definitions to fit natural systems into generic models of reef complexes rather than to force artificial models on natural systems. St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, has a variety of reef types including classical framework reefs (i.e., algal ridges nearest shore), extensive bank barrier reefs on the shelf farther offshore, and submerged shelf-edge reefs. Reef architecture demonstrates the balanced roles of framework growth, skeletal degradation, hydrodynamic transport of degradation products, and marine cementation. Reef fabrics provide a record of the processes that produced these reef architectures. Because the processes result in a characteristic fabric, process/fabric relationships can be plotted on a tetrahedral diagram where the processes are used as end members. Thus, a classification evolves that is descriptive, with architectural end members resulting from whichever process dominates. Reefs can be classified either quantitatively, or qualitatively, on any scale, outcrop or thin section, modern or ancient, in addition to being independent from organism evolution. A flexible classification scheme such as this is required because reefs are the synergistic product of the various processes acting in concert to produce the continuum of reef types and fabrics observed. Framework reefs probably represent a minority of reefs, as would each architectural end member. Framework reefs, because they tend to be more mineralogically homogeneous, typically have less effective permeability after early and intermediate diagenesis than non-framework reefs. Where porosity is developed in a framework system, however, it is likely to be very effective.

  18. A methodology for identification and control of electro-mechanical actuators

    PubMed Central

    Tutunji, Tarek A.; Saleem, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Mechatronic systems are fully-integrated engineering systems that are composed of mechanical, electronic, and computer control sub-systems. These integrated systems use electro-mechanical actuators to cause the required motion. Therefore, the design of appropriate controllers for these actuators are an essential step in mechatronic system design. In this paper, a three-stage methodology for real-time identification and control of electro-mechanical actuator plants is presented, tested, and validated. First, identification models are constructed from experimental data to approximate the plants’ response. Second, the identified model is used in a simulation environment for the purpose of designing a suitable controller. Finally, the designed controller is applied and tested on the real plant through Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) environment. The described three-stage methodology provides the following practical contributions: • Establishes an easy-to-follow methodology for controller design of electro-mechanical actuators. • Combines off-line and on-line controller design for practical performance. • Modifies the HIL concept by using physical plants with computer control (rather than virtual plants with physical controllers). Simulated and experimental results for two case studies, induction motor and vehicle drive system, are presented in order to validate the proposed methodology. These results showed that electromechanical actuators can be identified and controlled using an easy-to-duplicate and flexible procedure. PMID:26150992

  19. A methodology for identification and control of electro-mechanical actuators.

    PubMed

    Tutunji, Tarek A; Saleem, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Mechatronic systems are fully-integrated engineering systems that are composed of mechanical, electronic, and computer control sub-systems. These integrated systems use electro-mechanical actuators to cause the required motion. Therefore, the design of appropriate controllers for these actuators are an essential step in mechatronic system design. In this paper, a three-stage methodology for real-time identification and control of electro-mechanical actuator plants is presented, tested, and validated. First, identification models are constructed from experimental data to approximate the plants' response. Second, the identified model is used in a simulation environment for the purpose of designing a suitable controller. Finally, the designed controller is applied and tested on the real plant through Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) environment. The described three-stage methodology provides the following practical contributions: •Establishes an easy-to-follow methodology for controller design of electro-mechanical actuators.•Combines off-line and on-line controller design for practical performance.•Modifies the HIL concept by using physical plants with computer control (rather than virtual plants with physical controllers). Simulated and experimental results for two case studies, induction motor and vehicle drive system, are presented in order to validate the proposed methodology. These results showed that electromechanical actuators can be identified and controlled using an easy-to-duplicate and flexible procedure. PMID:26150992

  20. Out-of-Plane Translational PZT Bimorph Actuator with Archimedes’ Spiral Actuating Tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenye; Liu, Sanwei; Livermore, Carol

    2015-12-01

    The design, finite element analysis (FEA), and experimental characterization of a MEMS out-of-plane (vertical) translational lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) bimorph actuator supported on Archimedes’ spiral tethers are presented. Two types of bimorph actuators with different electrode patterns (with spiral tethers half actuated or fully actuated) are designed and fabricated. Both designs are fabricated by commercial processes and are compatible with integration into more complex MEMS systems. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to analyze and predict the displacements of both types of actuators. The deflections of both fully- actuated and half-actuated devices were measured experimentally to validate the design. At an applied voltage of 110V, the out-of-plane deflections of the actuators with half-actuated and fully-actuated tethers were measured at about 17 μm and 29 μm respectively, in good agreement with FEA predictions of 17.1 μm and 25.8 μm. The corresponding blocking forces are predicted as 10 mN and 17 mN by FEA.

  1. Enhanced Actuation Performance and Reduced Heat Generation in Shear-Bending Mode Actuator at High Temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Guoxi; Cheng, Jinrong; Dong, Shuxiang

    2016-08-01

    The actuation performance, strain hysteresis, and heat generation of the shear-bending mode actuators based on soft and hard BiScO3-PbTiO3 (BS-PT) ceramics were investigated under different thermal (from room temperature to 300 °C) and electrical loadings (from 2 to 10 kV/cm and from 1 to 1000 Hz). The actuator based on both soft and hard BS-PT ceramics worked stably at the temperature as high as 300 °C. The maximum working temperature of this shear-bending actuators is 150 °C higher than those of the traditional piezoelectric actuators based on commercial Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 materials. Furthermore, although the piezoelectric properties of soft-type ceramics based on BS-PT ceramics were superior to those of hard ceramics, the maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was larger than that fabricated by soft ceramics at high temperature. The maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was [Formula: see text] under an applied electric field of 10 kV/cm at 300 °C. The strain hysteresis and heat generation of the actuator based on hard ceramics was smaller than those of the actuator based on soft ceramics in the wide temperature range. These results indicated that the shear-bending actuator based on hard piezoelectric ceramics was more suitable for high-temperature piezoelectric applications. PMID:27214895

  2. Soundscapes from a Tropical Eastern Pacific reef and a Caribbean Sea reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staaterman, E.; Rice, A. N.; Mann, D. A.; Paris, C. B.

    2013-06-01

    Underwater soundscapes vary due to the abiotic and biological components of the habitat. We quantitatively characterized the acoustic environments of two coral reef habitats, one in the Tropical Eastern Pacific (Panama) and one in the Caribbean (Florida Keys), over 2-day recording durations in July 2011. We examined the frequency distribution, temporal variability, and biological patterns of sound production and found clear differences. The Pacific reef exhibited clear biological patterns and high temporal variability, such as the onset of snapping shrimp noise at night, as well as a 400-Hz daytime band likely produced by damselfish. In contrast, the Caribbean reef had high sound levels in the lowest frequencies, but lacked clear temporal patterns. We suggest that acoustic measures are an important element to include in reef monitoring programs, as the acoustic environment plays an important role in the ecology of reef organisms at multiple life-history stages.

  3. Bi-directional series-parallel elastic actuator and overlap of the actuation layers.

    PubMed

    Furnémont, Raphaël; Mathijssen, Glenn; Verstraten, Tom; Lefeber, Dirk; Vanderborght, Bram

    2016-02-01

    Several robotics applications require high torque-to-weight ratio and energy efficient actuators. Progress in that direction was made by introducing compliant elements into the actuation. A large variety of actuators were developed such as series elastic actuators (SEAs), variable stiffness actuators and parallel elastic actuators (PEAs). SEAs can reduce the peak power while PEAs can reduce the torque requirement on the motor. Nonetheless, these actuators still cannot meet performances close to humans. To combine both advantages, the series parallel elastic actuator (SPEA) was developed. The principle is inspired from biological muscles. Muscles are composed of motor units, placed in parallel, which are variably recruited as the required effort increases. This biological principle is exploited in the SPEA, where springs (layers), placed in parallel, can be recruited one by one. This recruitment is performed by an intermittent mechanism. This paper presents the development of a SPEA using the MACCEPA principle with a self-closing mechanism. This actuator can deliver a bi-directional output torque, variable stiffness and reduced friction. The load on the motor can also be reduced, leading to a lower power consumption. The variable recruitment of the parallel springs can also be tuned in order to further decrease the consumption of the actuator for a given task. First, an explanation of the concept and a brief description of the prior work done will be given. Next, the design and the model of one of the layers will be presented. The working principle of the full actuator will then be given. At the end of this paper, experiments showing the electric consumption of the actuator will display the advantage of the SPEA over an equivalent stiff actuator. PMID:26813145

  4. Magnetic suspension characteristics of electromagnetic actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Dantam K.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1993-01-01

    Electromagnetic actuators that use a current-carrying coil (which is placed in a magnetic field) to generate mechanical force are conceptually attractive components for active control of rotating shafts. In one concept that is being tested in the laboratory, the control forces from such actuators are applied on the flexibly supported bearing housings of the rotor. Development of this concept into a practical reality requires a clear and thorough understanding of the role of electromechanical parameters of these actuators in delivering the right amount of control force at the right phase into the rotor. The electromechanical parameters of the actuators investigated are the mass of the armature, stiffness of its suspension, electrical resistance, and inductance of the coils. Improper selection of these parameters can result in degradation in their performance, leading to mistuning between the actuator and the rotor. Through a simple analysis, it is shown that use of such mistuned actuators could result in sharp fluctuations in the phase of the control force delivered into the rotor around the critical speeds. These sharp fluctuations in phase, called 'Phase Glitches', are undesirable. Hence, future designs of controllers should take into account the undesirable mistuning effects between the actuator and the rotor caused by the phase glitches.

  5. Dielectric elastomer actuators with hydrostatic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2009-03-01

    The rapidly growing adoption of dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators as a high performance EAP technology for many kinds of new applications continuously opens new technical challenges, in order to take always the most from each adopted device and actuating configuration. This paper presents a new type of DE actuators, which show attractive potentialities for specific application needs. The concept here proposed adopts an incompressible fluid to mechanically couple active and passive parts. The active parts work according to the DE actuation principle, while the passive parts represent the end effector, in contact with the load. The fluid is used to transfer actuation hydrostatically from an active to a passive part and, then, to the load. This can provide specific advantages, including improved safety and less stringent design constraints for the architecture of the actuator, especially for soft end effectors. Such a simple concept can be readily implemented according to different shapes and intended functionalities of the resulting actuators. The paper describes the structure and the performance of the first prototype devices developed so far.

  6. Thermostatic Valves Containing Silicone-Oil Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana C.; Bame, David P.; Karlmann, Paul B.; Prina, Mauro; Young, William; Fisher, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Flow-splitting and flow-mixing thermally actuated spool valves have been developed for controlling flows of a heat-transfer fluid in a temperature-regulation system aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. Valves like these could also be useful in terrestrial temperature-regulation systems, including automobile air-conditioning systems and general refrigeration systems. These valves are required to provide smoother actuation over a wider temperature range than the flow-splitting, thermally actuated spool valves used in the Mars Explorer Rover (MER). Also, whereas the MER valves are unstable (tending to oscillate) in certain transition temperature ranges, these valves are required not to oscillate. The MER valves are actuated by thermal expansion of a wax against spring-loaded piston rods (as in common automotive thermostats). The MSL valves contain similar actuators that utilize thermal expansion of a silicone oil, because silicone-oil actuators were found to afford greater and more nearly linear displacements, needed for smoother actuation, over the required wider temperature range. The MSL valves also feature improved spool designs that reflect greater understanding of fluid dynamics, consideration of pressure drops in valves, and a requirement for balancing of pressures in different flow branches.

  7. Active Damping Using Distributed Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Quinones, Juan D.; Wier, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    A helicopter structure experiences substantial high-frequency mechanical excitation from powertrain components such as gearboxes and drive shafts. The resulting structure-borne vibration excites the windows which then radiate sound into the passenger cabin. In many cases the radiated sound power can be reduced by adding damping. This can be accomplished using passive or active approaches. Passive treatments such as constrained layer damping tend to reduce window transparency. Therefore this paper focuses on an active approach utilizing compact decentralized control units distributed around the perimeter of the window. Each control unit consists of a triangularly shaped piezoelectric actuator, a miniature accelerometer, and analog electronics. Earlier work has shown that this type of system can increase damping up to approximately 1 kHz. However at higher frequencies the mismatch between the distributed actuator and the point sensor caused control spillover. This paper describes new anisotropic actuators that can be used to improve the bandwidth of the control system. The anisotropic actuators are composed of piezoelectric material sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes, which enables the application of the electric field in a preferred in-plane direction. When shaped correctly the anisotropic actuators outperform traditional isotropic actuators by reducing the mismatch between the distributed actuator and point sensor at high frequencies. Testing performed on a Plexiglas panel, representative of a helicopter window, shows that the control units can increase damping at low frequencies. However high frequency performance was still limited due to the flexible boundary conditions present on the test structure.

  8. Elastomeric actuator devices for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Jolesz, Ferenc A. (Inventor); Kacher, Daniel F. (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed to devices and systems used in magnetic imaging environments that include an actuator device having an elastomeric dielectric film with at least two electrodes, and a frame attached to the actuator device. The frame can have a plurality of configurations including, such as, for example, at least two members that can be, but not limited to, curved beams, rods, plates, or parallel beams. These rigid members can be coupled to flexible members such as, for example, links wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. The frame preferably provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The linear actuation force characteristic is defined as .+-.20% and preferably 10% over a displacement range. The actuator further includes a passive element disposed between the flexible members to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. The preferred embodiment actuator includes one or more layers of the elastomeric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of many elastomeric materials such as, for example, but not limited to, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  9. Characterization of piezoelectric macrofiber composite actuated winglets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, T. K.; Oates, W. S.; Kumar, R.

    2015-06-01

    The present study primarily focuses on the design, development, and structural characterization of an oscillating winglet actuated using a piezoelectric macrofiber composite (MFC). The primary objective is to study the effect of controlled wingtip oscillations on the evolution of wingtip vortices, with a goal of weakening these potentially harmful tip vortices by introducing controlled instabilities through both spatial and temporal perturbations producible through winglet oscillations. MFC-actuated winglets have been characterized under different input excitation and pressure-loading conditions. The winglet oscillations show bimodal behavior for both structural and actuation modes of resonance. The oscillatory amplitude at these actuation modes increases linearly with the magnitude of excitation. During wind-tunnel tests, fluid-structure interactions led to structural vibrations of the wing. The effect of these vibrations on the overall winglet oscillations decreased when the strength of actuation increased. At high input excitation, the actuated winglet was capable of generating controlled oscillations. As a proof of concept, the current study has demonstrated that microfiber composite-actuated winglets produce sufficient displacements to alter the development of the wingtip vortex.

  10. V2O5 nanofibre sheet actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Gang; Schmid, Michael; Chiu, Po-Wen; Minett, Andrew; Fraysse, Jerôme; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Roth, Siegmar; Kozlov, Mikhail; Muñoz, Edgar; Baughman, Ray H.

    2003-05-01

    Vanadium oxides, such as V2O5, are promising for lithium-ion batteries, catalysis, electrochromic devices and sensors. Vanadium oxides were proposed more than a decade ago for another redox-dependent application: the direct conversion of electrical energy to mechanical energy in actuators (artificial muscles). Although related conducting polymer and carbon nanotube actuators have been demonstrated, electromechanical actuators based on vanadium oxides have not be realized. V2O5 nanofibres and nanotubes provide the potential advantages of low-cost synthesis by sol-gel routes and high charging capacity and long cycle life. Here, we demonstrate electromechanical actuation for obtained high modulus V2O5 sheets comprising entangled V2O5 nanofibres. The high surface area of these V2O5 sheets facilitates electrochemical charge injection and intercalation that causes the electromechanical actuation. We show that the V2O5 sheets provide high Young's modulus, high actuator-generated stress, and high actuator stroke at low applied voltage.

  11. A MODULAR ACTUATOR ARCHITECTURE FOR ROBOTIC APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    2001-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Complexes perform numerous hazardous material handling operations within the confines of a glovebox. The DOE is continuing to seek more efficient and safer means of handling these materials inside gloveboxes rather than the conventional, labor-intensive method through lead lined gloves. The use of glovebox automation technology will also be critical to the DOE in its efforts to comply with its mandated ALARA principles in handling the hazardous materials associated with the cleanup process. Operations associated with materials processing in a glovebox are similar to many industrial tasks, but the unique glovebox environment and Plutonium material properties create a unique set of challenges for conventional automation machinery. Such properties include: Low to moderate levels of ionizing radiation, high abrasiveness, corrosiveness, pyrophoric tendencies, rapid dispersal and permeation of environment, diffuses quickly, and possible incompatible material interaction. The glovebox presents the following challenges: existing gloveboxes may not be readily altered or even modified at all, complex mechanical operations for maintenance and repair are difficult or impossible through gloves, failed equipment may not be removed easily or at all. If a broken piece of equipment cannot be bagged-out through a glove port (approximately 216 mm (8 1/2 inch) diameter) it must remain in place. Broken equipment obstructs further operations. If it renders the entire glovebox unusable, a significant volume of waste is generated and an expensive system must be disposed of and replaced. A moderate sized glovebox alone costs between $250,000 and $500,000 and an equipment malfunction, which penetrates the glovebox and exposes the room to Plutonium or other toxic materials, is catastrophic. In addition to the human exposure issues, cleanup can easily run into the millions of dollars. A solution to the issues described above is ARM Automation Inc

  12. Advanced piezoelectric single crystal based actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Smith, Edward; Dong, Shuxiang; Viehland, Dwight; Moore, Jim, Jr.; Patrick, Brian

    2005-05-01

    TRS is developing new actuators based on single crystal piezoelectric materials such as Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)1-xTixO3 (PZN-PT) and Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)x-1TixO3 (PMN-PT) which exhibit very high piezoelectric coefficients (d33 = 1800-2200 pC/N) and electromechanical coupling factors (k33 > 0.9), respectively, for a variety of applications, including active vibration damping, active flow control, high precision positioning, ultrasonic motors, deformable mirrors, and adaptive optics. The d32 cut crystal plate actuators showed d32 ~ -1600 pC/N, inter-digital electroded (IDE) plate actuators showed effective d33 ~ 1100 pC/N. Single crystal stack actuators with stroke of 10 μm-100 μm were developed and tested at both room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Flextensional single crystal piezoelectric actuators with either stack driver or plate driver were developed with stroke 70 μm - > 250 μm. For large stroke cryogenic actuation (> 1mm), a single crystal piezomotor was developed and tested at temperature of 77 K-300K and stroke of > 10mm and step resolution of 20 nm were achieved. In order to demonstrate the significance of developed single crystal actuators, modeling on single crystal piezoelectric deformable mirrors and helicopter flap control using single crystal actuators were conducted and the modeling results show that more than 20 wavelength wavefront error could be corrected by using the single crystal deformable mirrors and +/- 5.8 ° flap deflection will be obtained for a 36" flap using single crystal stack actuators.

  13. Actuator Exerts Tensile Or Compressive Axial Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozzi, John; Richards, Cuyler H.

    1994-01-01

    Compact, manually operated mechanical actuator applies controlled, limited tensile or compressive axial force. Designed to apply loads to bearings during wear tests in clean room. Intended to replace hydraulic actuator. Actuator rests on stand and imparts axial force to part attached to clevis inside or below stand. Technician turns control screw at one end of lever. Depending on direction of rotation of control screw, its end of lever driven downward (for compression) or upward (for tension). Lever pivots about clevis pin at end opposite of control screw; motion drives downward or upward link attached via shearpin at middle of lever. Link drives coupling and, through it, clevis attached to part loaded.

  14. Membrane Mirrors With Bimorph Shape Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Deformable mirrors of a proposed type would be equipped with relatively-large-stroke microscopic piezoelectric actuators that would be used to maintain their reflective surfaces in precise shapes. These mirrors would be members of the class of MEMS-DM (for microelectromechanical system deformable mirror) devices, which offer potential for a precise optical control in adaptive-optics applications in such diverse fields as astronomy and vision science. The proposed mirror would be fabricated, in part, by use of a membrane-transfer technique. The actuator design would contain bimorph-type piezoelectric actuators.

  15. Diagnostics for characterisation of plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsonis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    The popularity of plasma actuators as flow control devices has sparked a flurry of diagnostic efforts towards their characterisation. This review article presents an overview of experimental investigations employing diagnostic techniques specifically aimed at AC dielectric barrier discharge, DC corona and nanosecond pulse plasma actuators. Mechanical, thermal and electrical characterisation techniques are treated. Various techniques for the measurement of induced velocity, body force, heating effects, voltage, current, power and discharge morphology are presented and common issues and challenges are described. The final part of this report addresses the effect of ambient conditions on the performance of plasma actuators.

  16. Optimization Strategies for Sensor and Actuator Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of actuator and sensor placement problems from a wide range of engineering disciplines and a variety of applications. Combinatorial optimization methods are recommended as a means for identifying sets of actuators and sensors that maximize performance. Several sample applications from NASA Langley Research Center, such as active structural acoustic control, are covered in detail. Laboratory and flight tests of these applications indicate that actuator and sensor placement methods are effective and important. Lessons learned in solving these optimization problems can guide future research.

  17. Microcantilever actuation via periodic internal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jungchul; King, William P.

    2007-12-15

    This paper reports electrothermal actuation of silicon microcantilevers having integrated resistive heaters. Periodic electrical excitation induced periodic resistive heating in the cantilever, while the cantilever deflection was monitored with a photodetector. Excitation was either at the cantilever resonant frequency, f{sub 0}, f{sub 0}/2, or f{sub 0}/3. When the time averaged maximum cantilever temperature was 174 deg. C, the cantilever out-of-plane actuation amplitude was 484 nm near the cantilever resonance frequency of 24.9 kHz. This actuation was sufficiently large to operate the cantilever in intermittent contact mode and scan a calibration grating of height of 20 nm.

  18. Misfire tolerant combustion-powered actuation

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Marron, Lisa C.; Kuehl, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a combustion-powered actuator that is suitable for intermittent actuation, that is suitable for use with atmospheric pressure carburetion, and that requires little electrical energy input. The present invention uses energy from expansion of pressurized fuel to effectively purge a combustion chamber, and to achieve atmospheric pressure carburetion. Each purge-fill-power cycle can be independent, allowing the actuator to readily tolerate misfires. The present invention is suitable for use with linear and rotary operation combustion chambers, and is suitable for use in a wide variety of applications.

  19. A Model of the THUNDER Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Alan R. D.

    1997-01-01

    A THUNDER actuator is a composite of three thin layers, a metal base, a piezoelectric wafer and a metal top cover, bonded together under pressure and at high temperature with the LaRC SI polyimid adhesive. When a voltage is applied between the metal layers across the PZT the actuator will bend and can generate a force. This document develops and describes an analytical model the transduction properties of THUNDER actuators. The model development is divided into three sections. First, a static model is described that relates internal stresses and strains and external displacements to the thermal pre-stress and applied voltage. Second, a dynamic energy based model is described that allows calculation of the resonance frequencies, developed force and electrical input impedance. Finally, a fully coupled electro-mechanical transducer model is described. The model development proceeds by assuming that both the thermal pre-stress and the piezoelectric actuation cause the actuator to deform in a pure bend in a single plane. It is useful to think of this as a two step process, the actuator is held flat, differential stresses induce a bending moment, the actuator is released and it bends. The thermal pre-stress is caused by the different amounts that the constituent layers shrink due to their different coefficients of thermal expansion. The adhesive between layers sets at a high temperature and as the actuator cools, the metal layers shrink more than the PZT. The PZT layer is put into compression while the metal layers are in tension. The piezoelectric actuation has a similar effect. An applied voltage causes the PZT layer to strain, which in turn strains the two metal layers. If the PZT layer expands it will put the metal layers into tension and PZT layer into compression. In both cases, if shear force effects are neglected, the actuator assembly will experience a uniform in-plane strain. As the materials each have a different elastic modulus, different stresses will

  20. Peristaltic pump made of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Peter; Matysek, Marc; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2009-03-01

    The functional principle of peristaltic motion is inspired by the pattern in which hollow organs move. The technology of dielectric elastomer actuators provides the possibility to design a very compact peristaltic pump. The geometries of the whole pump and the actuator elements have been determined by numerical simulations of the mechanical behaviour and the fluid dynamics. With eight independent actuators the pumping channel is self-sealing and there is no need for any valves. The first generation of this pump is able to generate flow rates up to 0.36 μl/min.

  1. Bluff Body Flow Control Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Flint

    2005-11-01

    In this study, the use of single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for the control of bluff body flow separation is investigated. In particular, surface mounted plasma actuators are used to reduce both drag and unsteady vortex shedding from circular cylinders in cross-flow. It is demonstrated that the plasma-induced surface blowing gives rise to a local Coanda effect that promotes the maintenance of flow attachment. Large reductions in vortex shedding and drag are demonstrated for Reynolds numbers ˜ 10^410^5. Both steady and unsteady plasma-induced surface blowing is explored. Results are presented from experiments involving both two and four surface mounted actuators.

  2. Recent Developments in NASA Piezocomposite Actuator Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William K.; Inman, Daniel J.; High, James W.; Williams, R. Brett

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress in the development of the NASA Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) piezocomposite actuator device. This will include a brief history of the development of the MFC, a description of the standard manufacturing process used to fabricate MFC actuators, and a summary of ongoing MFC electromechanical characterization testing. In addition, we describe the development of a prototype single-crystal piezoelectric MFC device, and compare its performance with MFC actuator specimens utilizing conventional piezoceramic materials.

  3. Hydraulic Actuator System for Rotor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz; Althaus, Josef

    1991-01-01

    In the last ten years, several different types of actuators were developed and fabricated for active control of rotors. A special hydraulic actuator system capable of generating high forces to rotating shafts via conventional bearings is addressed. The actively controlled hydraulic force actuator features an electrohydraulic servo valve which can produce amplitudes and forces at high frequencies necessary for influencing rotor vibrations. The mathematical description will be given in detail. The experimental results verify the theoretical model. Simulations already indicate the usefulness of this compact device for application to a real rotor system.

  4. Hyperspectral remote sensing of wild oyster reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, Anthony; Rosa, Philippe; Lerouxel, Astrid; Cognie, Bruno; Gernez, Pierre; Launeau, Patrick; Robin, Marc; Barillé, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    The invasion of the wild oyster Crassostrea gigas along the western European Atlantic coast has generated changes in the structure and functioning of intertidal ecosystems. Considered as an invasive species and a trophic competitor of the cultivated conspecific oyster, it is now seen as a resource by oyster farmers following recurrent mass summer mortalities of oyster spat since 2008. Spatial distribution maps of wild oyster reefs are required by local authorities to help define management strategies. In this work, visible-near infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral and multispectral remote sensing was investigated to map two contrasted intertidal reef structures: clusters of vertical oysters building three-dimensional dense reefs in muddy areas and oysters growing horizontally creating large flat reefs in rocky areas. A spectral library, collected in situ for various conditions with an ASD spectroradiometer, was used to run Spectral Angle Mapper classifications on airborne data obtained with an HySpex sensor (160 spectral bands) and SPOT satellite HRG multispectral data (3 spectral bands). With HySpex spectral/spatial resolution, horizontal oysters in the rocky area were correctly classified but the detection was less efficient for vertical oysters in muddy areas. Poor results were obtained with the multispectral image and from spatially or spectrally degraded HySpex data, it was clear that the spectral resolution was more important than the spatial resolution. In fact, there was a systematic mud deposition on shells of vertical oyster reefs explaining the misclassification of 30% of pixels recognized as mud or microphytobenthos. Spatial distribution maps of oyster reefs were coupled with in situ biomass measurements to illustrate the interest of a remote sensing product to provide stock estimations of wild oyster reefs to be exploited by oyster producers. This work highlights the interest of developing remote sensing techniques for aquaculture applications in coastal

  5. Coralline reefs classification in Banco Chinchorro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Silva, Ameris I.; López-Caloca, Alejandra A.

    2009-09-01

    The coralline reefs in Banco Chinchorro, Mexico, are part of the great reef belt of the western Atlantic. This reef complex is formed by an extensive coralline structure with great biological richness and diversity of species. These colonies are considered highly valuable ecologically, economically, socially and culturally, and they also inherently provide biological services. Fishing and scuba diving have been the main economic activities in this area for decades. However, in recent years, there has been a bleaching process and a decrease of the coral colonies in Quintana Roo, Mexico. This drop is caused mainly by the production activities performed in the oil platforms and the presence of hurricanes among other climatic events. The deterioration of the reef system can be analyzed synoptically using remote sensing. Thanks to this type of analysis, it is possible to have updated information of the reef conditions. In this paper, satellite imagery in Landsat TM and SPOT 5 is applied in the coralline reefs classification in the 1980- 2006 time period. Thus, an integral analysis of the optical components of the water surrounding the coralline reefs, such as on phytoplankton, sediments, yellow substance and even on the same water adjacent to the coral colonies, is performed. The use of a texture algorithm (Markov Random Field) was a key tool for their identification. This algorithm, does not limit itself to image segmentation, but also works on edge detection. In future work the multitemporal analysis of the results will determine the deterioration degree of these habitats and the conservation status of the coralline areas.

  6. Upper Carboniferous reef mounds and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.R.; Archer, A.W. )

    1992-01-01

    Tetractinomorph demosponges (chaetetids) are a minor component of extant tropical reefs, but they were the major framebuilder of reef mounds during the Westphalian (Carboniferous). These chaetetids were confined to tropical latitudes during the Carboniferous, reached an abundance peak in the Westphalian, and then declined suddenly until the Upper Triassic. After their decline, red and green algae became the dominant reef builders of the Stephanian. The marked decline of chaetetids corresponds with the disappearance, and/or decline of other marine benthic invertebrates, as well as some terrestrial plants and is the basis for the biostratigraphic boundary between the Westphalian and Stephanian (Desmoinesian and Missourian). This biostratigraphic boundary coincides with a minor extinction event and a major'' climatic change. The Westphalian climate was wetter than that of the Stephanian, and in the midcontinent this change is recorded by a gradual decline in coals and siliciclastic lithologies and a corresponding increase in carbonate lithologies. A rise in water temperature might be expected in a drier tropical climate, and if extant chaetetids are any clue, elevated water temperature may have been detrimental. Extant chaetetids are associated with tropical coral reefs that are confined to a narrow temperature range. It is not unreasonable to suggest that elevated seawater temperatures were responsible, in part, for the disappearance of chaetetid reef mounds. Red and green algae, presumably more tolerate of higher water temperatures, became the major framebuilders of reef mounds in the Stephanian. Thus, the demise of chaetetid reef mounds, and other organisms at the end of the Westphalian, may be the result of global warming.

  7. Reef-sourced slope deposits, Holocene, Bahamas

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, R.N.; Eberli, G.P.; Harris, P.M.; Slater, R.; Swart, P.K.

    1987-05-01

    Observations and sampling to 350 m from a two-person submersible off Chub Cay, Berry Island, Bahamas, support the idea that the Holocene deep reef is a principal source of talus, now cemented, that foots the windward margins of Great Bahama Bank. At the Chub Cay dive site, a wall extends from 30 to 170 m subsea; below is a low-relief fore reef slope, ca. 50/sup 0/, of limestone veneered with sediment. The upper wall from 30 to 80 m, the deep reef, has a luxuriant growth of corals and a profusion of the calcareous alga halimeda spp. Below 50 m, living coral decreases, and from 80 to 170 m the wall is highly irregular with discontinuous ledges and blind-end caves. At depths from 150 to 170 m, the wall gives way to the fore reef slope whose relative smooth surface dips at 50/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/ and extends to 350 m. The fore reef is limestone, but its topography resembles that of alluvial fans; rounded ridges rise a few meters above the intervening valleys that are tens of meters wide. The limestone surface has a discontinuous veneer of fine sediment and algal plates, and locally loose cobble and boulder-sized blocks of limestone. A sample of the limestone slope is of well-cemented coral clasts and skeletal sediment. They infer that the deep reef grows outward so rapidly that it caves periodically. The resulting debris bypasses the wall, but some is perched on the steep fore reef slope below where it is soon incorporated into the slope by submarine cementation.

  8. 12. Photo copy of drawing, May 5, 1930. PENFIELD REEF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photo copy of drawing, May 5, 1930. PENFIELD REEF L/S MODERNIZATION. Drawing no. NY-1393, U.S. Coast GUard Civil Engineering Unit, Warwick, Rhode Island. - Penfield Reef Lighthouse, Long Island Sound, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  9. Coral reef formation theory may apply to oil, gas exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-10

    This paper reports a coral reef formation theory that has implications for hydrocarbon exploration. The theory states that many coral reefs and carbonate buildups from at and are dependent upon nutrient rich fluids seeping through the seabed.

  10. Recent and relict topography of Boo Bee patch reef, Belize

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, R.B.; Shinn, E.A.; Hudson, J.H.; Lidz, B.

    1977-01-01

    Five core borings were taken on and around Boo Bee Patch Reef to better understand the origin of such shelf lagoon reefs. The cores reveal 4 stages of development: (1) subaerial exposure of a Pleistocene "high" having about 8 meters of relief, possibly a Pleistocene patch reef; (2) deposition of peat and impermeable terrigenous clay 3 meters thick around the high; (3) initiation of carbonate sediment production by corals and algae on the remaining 5 meters of hard Pleistocene topography and carbonate mud on the surrounding terrigenous clay; and (4) accelerated organic accumulation on the patch reef. Estimates of patch reef sedimentation rates (1.6 m/1000 years) are 3 to 4 times greater than off-reef sedimentation rates (0.4-0.5 m/1000 years). During periods of Pleistocene sedimentation on the Belize shelf, lagoon patch reefs may have grown above one another, stacking up to form reef accumulation of considerable thickness.

  11. Choosing Actuators for Automatic Control Systems of Thermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunov, A. I.; Serdyukov, O. V.

    2015-03-15

    Two types of actuators for automatic control systems of thermal power plants are analyzed: (i) pulse-controlled actuator and (ii) analog-controlled actuator with positioning function. The actuators are compared in terms of control circuit, control accuracy, reliability, and cost.

  12. Devonian Winnipegosis reefs of Manitoba outcrop belt - possible basin model

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, H.R.

    1988-07-01

    Devonian Winnipegosis reefs crop out intermittently along a 350-km belt in southwestern Manitoba and represent an almost complete facies sequence ranging from central-basin reefs in the northwest to shelf-edge reefs in the southeast. In addition, structural complexities of the overlying Devonian strata mirror precisely the configuration of the underlying reefs. These outcrop data, supplemented by closely spaced stratigraphic core holes that have been sited specifically with respect to reef-controlled structures, permit development of a tentative reef model. Reef parameters are (a) size, from less than 0.5 km to a maximum of about 12 km; (b) shape, small pinnacle-type features to broad, irregular, flat-topped, atoll-like complexes, all with relatively steep margins (5/degrees/-20/degrees/); and (c) height, uniform in any given area, ranging from 40-50 m at shelf edge to 65-90 m in central basin areas. Internal reef structure shows flat central beds, and flank dips ranging from 20/degrees/ to 45/degrees/ or more in the most basinward reefs. Locally, reefs are abundantly fossiliferous, but organic framework is difficult to identify. Black bituminous mudstones in the interreef and reef-flank areas, with or without reef-derived carbonate detritus, are the only time-stratigraphic equivalents of the reefs. (The Ratner-type bituminous carbonate laminites appear to entirely postdate reef development.) Configuration of the steep-sided reefs and the well-defined shelf edge may have been controlled not only by organic (biohermal.) development, but also by anoxic containment resulting from restriction of lateral growth by anoxic bottom waters. Pinnacle reefs could thus have developed, in part, as anoxically contained pinnacle mounds rather than true bioherms.

  13. Torsional actuation with extension-torsion composite coupling and a magnetostrictive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, Christopher M.; Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1995-04-01

    An analytical-experimental study of using magnetostrictive actuators in conjunction with an extension-torsion coupled composite tube to actuate a rotor blade trailing-edge flap to actively control helicopter vibration is presented. Thin walled beam analysis based on Vlasov theory was used to predict the induced twist and extension in a composite tube with magnetostrictive actuation. The study achieved good correlation between theory and experiment. The Kevlar-epoxy systems showed good correlation between measured and predicted twist values.

  14. Exploring Drowned Reefs on Gardner Pinnacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Braga, J. C.; Humphrey, C.; Hinestrosa, G.; Fullagar, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    Gardner Pinnacles (GP), located in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands within Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, is one of the largest volcanic structures in the entire Hawaiian-Emperor chain. In Oct. 2011, the R/V Ka'imikai-o-Kanaloa mapped and the Pisces IV submersible explored the GP during 7 dives, mainly on drowned reef terraces. New multibeam bathymetric data from the cruise, combined with pre-existing multibeam data mostly collected during transits across the structure, show at least 4 separate volcanoes partially surrounded by several Miocene to Pleistocene drowned coral reefs with extensive lagoons, with the largest volcano surmounted by an active carbonate platform. Large landslides modify the flanks, and the eastern flank is incised by submarine canyons. Seven submersible dives explored and sampled mainly the drowned reef structures. The largest reef complex is on the NW flank above the main break-in-slope, and is a barrier reef surrounding extensive lagoon deposits with complex channel structures. Similar wide lagoons with deep channels parallel to the outer reef terraces are present elsewhere on GP, but unusual elsewhere in the Hawaiian Islands. Seven corals, coralline algae, and echinoid spines from dive P4-266 on that NW edge of GP from 1268-1637 m depth yield a tight age cluster based on Sr-isotopes calibrated to seawater that range from 15.51 to 15.98 Ma, and average 15.76 Ma. Five ages of echinoid spines, mollusk shells, and large foraminfers from dive P4-255 on the SW edge of GP from 1538-1558 m depth range from 14.88 to 15.10 Ma, and average 14.98 Ma. Three ages of corals and coralline algae from dive P4-253 on the SE edge of GP at 1955 m depth range from 12.35 and 12.7 Ma, and average 12.57 Ma. The ages of these reefs indicate when volcanic activity waned and reef deposits could accumulate without constant burial by lava flows; the nearly 3.2 Ma range in reef ages from the flanks of GP suggest that volcanic activity at GP spanned a

  15. 77 FR 32572 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coral and Coral Reefs Off the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ....gov . Correction In notice document FR Doc. 2012-10372, published in the Federal Register issue of April 30, 2012 (77 FR 83), make the following corrections: 1. On page 25407, column 3: a. Line 10, after..., and South Atlantic; Coral and Coral Reefs Off the Southern Atlantic States; Exempted Fishing...

  16. The Global Coral Reef Crisis: Trends and Solutions (Coral Reefs: Values, Threats, and the Marine Aquarium Trade)

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Craig S.

    2003-02-05

    Second only to tropical rainforests, coral reefs support one of the world's most diverse natural habitats. Over 350 million individuals depend on coral reef resources for food and income. Unfortunately, the Earth is in the midst of a coral reef crisis. Anthropogenic impacts including overfishing, destructive fishing practices, sedimentation and pollution, as well as global climate change, have served to disrupt the natural processes that maintain the health of these ecosystems. Until recently, however, the global extent of the coral reef crisis was unknown. Reef Check was developed in 1996 as a volunteer, community-based monitoring protocol designed to measure the health of coral reefs on a global scale. With goals of education, monitoring, and management, Reef Check has activities in over 60 countries and territories. They have not only provided scientific evidence of the global extent of the coral reef crisis, but have provided the first community based steps to alleviate this urgent situation.

  17. Electromechanical characteristic analysis of a dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yinlong; Zhou, Hongpin; Wang, Huaming

    2015-10-01

    To assist in the design and optimization of dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) actuators, an analytical model for the electromechanical response of cone DEAP actuators is developed. Using the Yeoh form strain energy potential and the Maxwell stress tensor, the constitutive relationship of the DEAP that accounts for the electromechanical coupling behavior is deduced. The equilibrium equations of DEAP actuators with a cone configuration are derived and an analytical model is then proposed. With this model, the actuation characteristics of the DEAP actuator, including actuation displacement, force output and efficiency can be calculated. Additionally, the principal stresses and principal stretch ratio of the membrane under different actuation voltages can be determined, along with the wrinkling failure mode of DEAP actuators. The experimental results for the DEAP actuator matched the numerical results determined using the proposed model. As such, the proposed work is beneficial as a guide for the design optimization of DEAP actuators.

  18. Framework of barrier reefs threatened by ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Comeau, Steeve; Lantz, Coulson A; Edmunds, Peter J; Carpenter, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    To date, studies of ocean acidification (OA) on coral reefs have focused on organisms rather than communities, and the few community effects that have been addressed have focused on shallow back reef habitats. The effects of OA on outer barrier reefs, which are the most striking of coral reef habitats and are functionally and physically different from back reefs, are unknown. Using 5-m long outdoor flumes to create treatment conditions, we constructed coral reef communities comprised of calcified algae, corals, and reef pavement that were assembled to match the community structure at 17 m depth on the outer barrier reef of Moorea, French Polynesia. Communities were maintained under ambient and 1200 μatm pCO2 for 7 weeks, and net calcification rates were measured at different flow speeds. Community net calcification was significantly affected by OA, especially at night when net calcification was depressed ~78% compared to ambient pCO2 . Flow speed (2-14 cm s(-1) ) enhanced net calcification only at night under elevated pCO2 . Reef pavement also was affected by OA, with dissolution ~86% higher under elevated pCO2 compared to ambient pCO2 . These results suggest that net accretion of outer barrier reef communities will decline under OA conditions predicted within the next 100 years, largely because of increased dissolution of reef pavement. Such extensive dissolution poses a threat to the carbonate foundation of barrier reef communities. PMID:26154126

  19. Developing a multi-stressor gradient for coral reefs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs are often found near coastal waters where multiple anthropogenic stressors co-occur at areas of human disturbance. Developing coral reef biocriteria under the U.S. Clean Water Act requires relationships between anthropogenic stressors and coral reef condition to be es...

  20. 36 CFR 7.73 - Buck Island Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...), seashells, corals, dead coral, sea fans, sponges and all associated reef invertebrates, plants, fruits and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buck Island Reef National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.73 Buck Island Reef National...

  1. 36 CFR 7.73 - Buck Island Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...), seashells, corals, dead coral, sea fans, sponges and all associated reef invertebrates, plants, fruits and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buck Island Reef National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.73 Buck Island Reef National...

  2. 36 CFR 7.73 - Buck Island Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...), seashells, corals, dead coral, sea fans, sponges and all associated reef invertebrates, plants, fruits and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buck Island Reef National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.73 Buck Island Reef National...

  3. 36 CFR 7.73 - Buck Island Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...), seashells, corals, dead coral, sea fans, sponges and all associated reef invertebrates, plants, fruits and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buck Island Reef National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.73 Buck Island Reef National...

  4. 36 CFR 7.73 - Buck Island Reef National Monument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...), seashells, corals, dead coral, sea fans, sponges and all associated reef invertebrates, plants, fruits and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buck Island Reef National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.73 Buck Island Reef National...

  5. 78 FR 67128 - Coral Reef Conservation Program; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coral Reef Conservation Program; Meeting AGENCY: Coral Reef... of public comment. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of a public meeting of the U.S. Coral Reef Task.../uscrtf-registration-form . Commenters may address the meeting, the role of the USCRTF, or general...

  6. Coral Reef Education and Australian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2004-01-01

    Educational programs that focus on humans and their relationship to coral reefs are becoming necessary, as reef structures along the Queensland coast come under mounting ecological pressure. This paper reports on a PhD research project which investigated marine education and learning with high school students in coral reef environments along the…

  7. Coral Reefs: A Gallery Program, Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD. Dept. of Education.

    Gallery classes at the National Aquarium in Baltimore give the opportunity to study specific aquarium exhibits which demonstrate entire natural habitats. The coral reef gallery class features the gigantic western Atlantic coral reef (325,000 gallons) with over 1,000 fish. The exhibit simulates a typical Caribbean coral reef and nearby sandy…

  8. Study of Unsteady Flow Actuation Produced by Surface Plasma Actuator on 2-D Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Minh Khang; Shin, Jichul

    2014-10-01

    Effect of flow actuation driven by low current continuous or pulsed DC surface glow discharge plasma actuator is studied. Schlieren image of induced flow on flat plate taken at a high repetition rate reveals that the actuation is mostly initiated near the cathode. Assuming that the actuation is mostly achieved by ions in the cathode sheath region, numerical model for the source of flow actuation is obtained by analytical estimation of ion pressure force created in DC plasma sheath near the cathode and added in momentum equation as a body force term. Modeled plasma flow actuator is simulated with NACA0012 airfoil oscillating over a certain range of angle of attack (AoA) at specific reduced frequencies of airfoil. By changing actuation authority according to the change in AoA, stabilization of unsteady flow field is improved and hence steady aerodynamic performance can be maintained. Computational result shows that plasma actuation is only effective in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of separated flow. It turns out that plasma pulse frequency should be tuned for optimal performance depending on phase angle and rotating speed. The actuation authority can be parameterized by a ratio between plasma pulse frequency and reduced frequency.

  9. Can coral reefs be monitored from space?

    PubMed

    Philipson, Petra; Lindell, Tommy

    2003-12-01

    The dramatic bleaching events on the coral reefs recently have enhanced the need for environmental monitoring. Remote sensing is an important constituent for monitoring of reefs, and an invaluable complement to field observations. This paper discusses the possibilities and limitations of present high resolution satellites for mapping and monitoring coral reefs. The sensors with the best spatial and radiometric resolution available today, e.g. IKONOS, can be useful for mapping and monitoring of reefs, but they are too costly for global surveys. However, our coral bleaching studies indicate that massive bleaching could be detected even from satellites with lower resolution, like Landsat, SPOT, and IRS. They could also be useful for coarser, from a spatial and thematic point of view, global mapping and updating purposes. A more detailed monitoring requires both better spatial resolution and spectral resolution than today's sensors. In the future, it is necessary to construct a more reef specific sensor with a few specially selected narrow bands and a good spatial, radiometric and temporal resolution. PMID:15049357

  10. Population trends among Jamaican reef corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, James W.; Woodley, Jeremy D.; Jason Smith, G.; Neigel, Joseph E.; Battey, James F.; Dallmeyer, Dorinda G.

    1981-11-01

    Disturbance has been cited as a potentially important agent in structuring ecological communities by modifying the effects of competition1-5. Catastrophic disturbance has also been proposed as a factor promoting the coexistence of competing species in highly diverse tropical ecosystems such as rain forests and coral reefs2,6-11. Here we describe patterns of recruitment and mortality among reef corals over 4 yr at several depths on the reefs of Discovery Bay, Jamaica, which were struck by Hurricane Alien on 6 August 198012. Photographic quadrats monitored since 1976 on a shallow water reef showed a negative correlation between coral abundance and mortality which was not offset by compensatory patterns of recruitment. This slow trend in the disproportionate reduction of rarer, competitively inferior species was reversed by Hurricane Alien, with storm-induced mortality being greatest in the most abundant species. On deeper reef stations, undisturbed by the storm, slower rates of colony loss were compensated for by commensurate rates of colony recruitment. Thus, patterns of differential mortality and recruitment contribute to the maintenance of high species diversity in this tropical marine ecosystem.

  11. New directions in coral reef microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    Garren, Melissa; Azam, Farooq

    2012-04-01

    Microbial processes largely control the health and resilience of coral reef ecosystems, and new technologies have led to an exciting wave of discovery regarding the mechanisms by which microbial communities support the functioning of these incredibly diverse and valuable systems. There are three questions at the forefront of discovery: What mechanisms underlie coral reef health and resilience? How do environmental and anthropogenic pressures affect ecosystem function? What is the ecology of microbial diseases of corals? The goal is to understand the functioning of coral reefs as integrated systems from microbes and molecules to regional and ocean-basin scale ecosystems to enable accurate predictions of resilience and responses to perturbations such as climate change and eutrophication. This review outlines recent discoveries regarding the microbial ecology of different microenvironments within coral ecosystems, and highlights research directions that take advantage of new technologies to build a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of how coral health is connected through microbial processes to its surrounding environment. The time is ripe for natural resource managers and microbial ecologists to work together to create an integrated understanding of coral reef functioning. In the context of long-term survival and conservation of reefs, the need for this work is immediate. PMID:21955796

  12. Serpentine Robot Arm Contains Electromagnetic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moya, Israel A.; Studer, Philip A.

    1994-01-01

    Identical modules assembled into flexible robot arm configured in serpentlike fashion to manipulate objects while avoiding obstacles. Each module includes integral electromagnetic actuators energized selectively to produce variety of motions, stationary configurations, and combinations thereof.

  13. Surface chemistry driven actuation in nanoporous gold

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Wittstock, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Biener, M M; Zielasek, V; Kramer, D; Viswanath, R N; Weissmuller, J; Baumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2008-04-14

    Although actuation in biological systems is exclusively powered by chemical energy, this concept has not been realized in man-made actuator technologies, as these rely on generating heat or electricity first. Here, we demonstrate that surface-chemistry driven actuation can be realized in high surface area materials such as nanoporous gold. For example, we achieve reversible strain amplitudes in the order of a few tenths of a percent by alternating exposure of nanoporous Au to ozone and carbon monoxide. The effect can be explained by adsorbate-induced changes of the surface stress, and can be used to convert chemical energy directly into a mechanical response thus opening the door to surface-chemistry driven actuator and sensor technologies.

  14. Electromechanically active polymer blends for actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ji; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Leary, Sean P.

    2000-06-01

    Actuator mechanisms that are lightweight, durable, and efficient are needed to support telerobotic requirements, for future NASA missions. In this work, we present a series of electromechanically active polymer blends that can potentially be used as actuators for a variety of applications. This polymer blend combines an electrostrictive graft-elastomer with a ferroelectric poly (vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) polymer. Mechanical and piezoelectric properties of the blends as a function of temperature, frequency and relative composition of the two constituents in the blends have been studied. Electric field induced strain response of the blend films has also been studied as a function of the relative composition. A bending actuator device was developed incorporating the use of the polymer blend materials. The results and the possible effects of the combination of piezoelectricity and electrostriction in a material system are presented and discussed. This type of analysis may enable the design of blend compositions with optimal strain, mechanical, and dielectric properties for specific actuator applications.

  15. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lenore Rasmussen, David Schramm, Paul Rasmussen, Kevin Mullaly, Ras Labs, LLC, Intelligent Materials for Prosthetics & Automation, Lewis D. Meixler, Daniel Pearlman and Alice Kirk

    2011-05-23

    Ras Labs produces contractile electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple, and contract (new development) with low electric input. In addition, Ras Labs produces EAP materials that quickly contract and expand, repeatedly, by reversing the polarity of the electric input, which can be cycled. This phenomenon was explored using molecular modeling, followed by experimentation. Applied voltage step functions were also investigated. High voltage steps followed by low voltage steps produced a larger contraction followed by a smaller contraction. Actuator control by simply adjusting the electric input is extremely useful for biomimetic applications. Muscles are able to partially contract. If muscles could only completely contract, nobody could hold an egg, for example, without breaking it. A combination of high and low voltage step functions could produce gross motor function and fine manipulation within the same actuator unit. Plasma treated electrodes with various geometries were investigated as a means of providing for more durable actuation.

  16. Research on Plasma Synthetic Jet Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, X. K.; Nie, W. S.; Hou, Z. Y.

    2011-09-01

    Circular dielectric barrier surface discharge (DBDs) actuator is a new concept of zero mass synthetic jet actuator. The characteristic of discharge and flow control effect of annular-circular plasma synthetic jet actuator has been studied by means of of numerical simulation and experiment. The discharge current density, electron density, electrostatic body force density and flowfield have been obtained. The results show annular-circular actuator can produce normal jet whose velocity will be greater than 2.0 m/s. The jet will excite circumfluence. In order to insure the discharge is generated in the exposed electrode annular and produce centripetal and normal electrostatic body force, the width and annular diameter of exposed electrode must be big enough, or an opposite phase drove voltage potential should be applied between the two electrodes.

  17. Considerations for contractile electroactive materials and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Schramm, David; Rasmussen, Paul; Mullally, Kevin; Meixler, Lewis D.; Pearlman, Daniel; Kirk, Alice

    2011-04-01

    Ras Labs produces contractile electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple, and contract (new development) with low electric input. In addition, Ras Labs produces EAP materials that quickly contract and expand, repeatedly, by reversing the polarity of the electric input, which can be cycled. This phenomenon was explored using molecular modeling, followed by experimentation. Applied voltage step functions were also investigated. High voltage steps followed by low voltage steps produced a larger contraction followed by a smaller contraction. Actuator control by simply adjusting the electric input is extremely useful for biomimetic applications. Muscles are able to partially contract. If muscles could only completely contract, nobody could hold an egg, for example, without breaking it. A combination of high and low voltage step functions could produce gross motor function and fine manipulation within the same actuator unit. Plasma treated electrodes with various geometries were investigated as a means of providing for more durable actuation.

  18. Tension Stiffened and Tendon Actuated Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R. (Inventor); Dorsey, John T. (Inventor); Ganoe, George G. (Inventor); King, Bruce D. (Inventor); Jones, Thomas C. (Inventor); Mercer, Charles D. (Inventor); Corbin, Cole K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A tension stiffened and tendon actuated manipulator is provided performing robotic-like movements when acquiring a payload. The manipulator design can be adapted for use in-space, lunar or other planetary installations as it is readily configurable for acquiring and precisely manipulating a payload in both a zero-g environment and in an environment with a gravity field. The manipulator includes a plurality of link arms, a hinge connecting adjacent link arms together to allow the adjacent link arms to rotate relative to each other and a cable actuation and tensioning system provided between adjacent link arms. The cable actuation and tensioning system includes a spreader arm and a plurality of driven and non-driven elements attached to the link arms and the spreader arm. At least one cable is routed around the driven and non-driven elements for actuating the hinge.

  19. Sensors and actuators inherent in biological species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taya, Minoru; Stahlberg, Rainer; Li, Fanghong; Zhao, Ying Joyce

    2007-04-01

    This paper addresses examples of sensing and active mechanisms inherent in some biological species where both plants and animals cases are discussed: mechanosensors and actuators in Venus Fly Trap and cucumber tendrils, chemosensors in insects, two cases of interactions between different kingdoms, (i) cotton plant smart defense system and (ii) bird-of-paradise flower and hamming bird interaction. All these cases lead us to recognize how energy-efficient and flexible the biological sensors and actuators are. This review reveals the importance of integration of sensing and actuation functions into an autonomous system if we make biomimetic design of a set of new autonomous systems which can sense and actuate under a number of different stimuli and threats.

  20. Actuators Based on Liquid Crystalline Elastomer Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongrui; Li, Chensha; Huang, Xuezhen

    2013-01-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) exhibit a number of remarkable physical effects, including the unique, high-stroke reversible mechanical actuation when triggered by external stimuli. This article reviews some recent exciting developments in the field of LCEs materials with an emphasis on their utilization in actuator applications. Such applications include artificial muscles, industrial manufacturing, health and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). With suitable synthetic and preparation pathways and well-controlled actuation stimuli, such as heat, light, electric and magnetic field, excellent physical properties of LCE materials can be realized. By comparing the actuating properties of different systems, general relationships between the structure and the property of LCEs are discussed. How these materials can be turned into usable devices using interdisciplinary techniques is also described. PMID:23648966

  1. Nylon-muscle-actuated robotic finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lianjun; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Rome, Richard S.; Haines, Carter; Lima, Marcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Tadesse, Yonas

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental analysis of novel artificial muscles, made of twisted and coiled nylon fibers, for powering a biomimetic robotic hand. The design is based on circulating hot and cold water to actuate the artificial muscles and obtain fast finger movements. The actuation system consists of a spring and a coiled muscle within a compliant silicone tube. The silicone tube provides a watertight, expansible compartment within which the coiled muscle contracts when heated and expands when cooled. The fabrication and characterization of the actuating system are discussed in detail. The performance of the coiled muscle fiber in embedded conditions and the related characteristics of the actuated robotic finger are described.

  2. Self-actuating reactor shutdown system

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Brummond, Willian A; Peterson, Leslie F.

    1988-01-01

    A control system for the automatic or self-actuated shutdown or "scram" of a nuclear reactor. The system is capable of initiating scram insertion by a signal from the plant protection system or by independent action directly sensing reactor conditions of low-flow or over-power. Self-actuation due to a loss of reactor coolant flow results from a decrease of pressure differential between the upper and lower ends of an absorber element. When the force due to this differential falls below the weight of the element, the element will fall by gravitational force to scram the reactor. Self-actuation due to high neutron flux is accomplished via a valve controlled by an electromagnet and a thermionic diode. In a reactor over-power, the diode will be heated to a change of state causing the electromagnet to be shorted thereby actuating the valve which provides the changed flow and pressure conditions required for scramming the absorber element.

  3. Coral reef soundscapes may not be detectable far from the reef

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Maxwell B.; Mooney, T. Aran

    2016-01-01

    Biological sounds produced on coral reefs may provide settlement cues to marine larvae. Sound fields are composed of pressure and particle motion, which is the back and forth movement of acoustic particles. Particle motion (i.e., not pressure) is the relevant acoustic stimulus for many, if not most, marine animals. However, there have been no field measurements of reef particle motion. To address this deficiency, both pressure and particle motion were recorded at a range of distances from one Hawaiian coral reef at dawn and mid-morning on three separate days. Sound pressure attenuated with distance from the reef at dawn. Similar trends were apparent for particle velocity but with considerable variability. In general, average sound levels were low and perhaps too faint to be used as an orientation cue except very close to the reef. However, individual transient sounds that exceeded the mean values, sometimes by up to an order of magnitude, might be detectable far from the reef, depending on the hearing abilities of the larva. If sound is not being used as a long-range cue, it might still be useful for habitat selection or other biological activities within a reef. PMID:27550394

  4. Surface alkaline phosphatase activities of macroalgae on coral reefs of the central Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffelke, B.

    2001-05-01

    Inshore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are subject to episodic nutrient supply, mainly by flood events, whereas midshelf reefs have a more consistent low nutrient availability. Alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) enables macroalgae to increase their phosphorus (P) supply by using organic P. APA was high (~4.0 to 15.5 µmol PO4 3- g DW-1 h-1) in species colonising predominantly inshore reefs and low (<2 µmol PO4 3- g DW-1 h-1) in species with a cross-shelf distribution. However, APA values of GBR algae in this study were much lower than data reported from other coral reef systems. In experiments with two Sargassum species tissue P levels were correlated negatively, and N:P ratios were positively correlated with APA. High APA can compensate for a relative P-limitation of macroalgae in coral reef systems that are subject to significant N-inputs, such as the GBR inshore reefs. APA and other mechanisms to acquire a range of nutrient species allow inshore species to thrive in habitats with episodic nutrient supply. These species also are likely to benefit from an increased nutrient supply caused by human activity, which currently is a global problem.

  5. Distributions of coral reef macroalgae in a back reef habitat in Moorea, French Polynesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poray, A. K.; Carpenter, R. C.

    2014-03-01

    On tropical reefs where macroalgae are subjected to continuous herbivore pressure, spatial refuges typically are identified as large-scale, landscape interfaces that limit foraging behavior. However, algal distributions and community assemblages may also rely on the availability of smaller scale spatial refuges within the reef. The results of this study demonstrate that the patterns of macroalgal distribution across the back reef of Moorea, French Polynesia, are maintained by herbivores interacting with the small-scale structural complexities of the coral reef landscape. Although the majority of space available for colonization is composed of exposed surfaces, macroalgae rarely are found in the open. Instead, macroalgal occurrence is highest in the protected narrow crevices and hole microhabitats provided by massive Porites spp. coral heads. These distributions are determined initially by post-settlement mortality of young algal recruits in exposed habitats. Rates of consumption for two of the most common macroalgal species found in refuges across the back reef, Halimeda minima and Amansia rhodantha, indicate that algal recruits in exposed habitats are limited by herbivory. While algal abundance and community structure are highly dependent upon herbivore grazing, the availability of small-scale spatial refuges ultimately shapes the distinct community patterns and distributional boundaries of coral reef macroalgae in the back reefs of Moorea.

  6. Coral Reef Remote Sensing: Helping Managers Protect Reefs in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, C.; Liu, G.; Li, J.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Heron, S. F.; Gledhill, D. K.; Christensen, T.; Rauenzahn, J.; Morgan, J.; Parker, B. A.; Skirving, W. J.; Nim, C.; Burgess, T.; Strong, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change and ocean acidification are already having severe impacts on coral reef ecosystems. Warming oceans have caused corals to bleach, or expel their symbiotic algae (zooxanthellae) with alarming frequency and severity and have contributed to a rise in coral infectious diseases. Ocean acidification is reducing the availability of carbonate ions needed by corals and many other marine organisms to build structural components like skeletons and shells and may already be slowing the coral growth. These two impacts are already killing corals and slowing reef growth, reducing biodiversity and the structure needed to provide crucial ecosystem services. NOAA’s Coral Reef Watch (CRW) uses a combination of satellite data, in situ observations, and models to provide coral reef managers, scientists, and others with information needed to monitor threats to coral reefs. The advance notice provided by remote sensing and models allows resource managers to protect corals, coral reefs, and the services they provide, although managers often encounter barriers to implementation of adaptation strategies. This talk will focus on application of NOAA’s satellite and model-based tools that monitor the risk of mass coral bleaching on a global scale, ocean acidification in the Caribbean, and coral disease outbreaks in selected regions, as well as CRW work to train managers in their use, and barriers to taking action to adapt to climate change. As both anthropogenic CO2 and temperatures will continue to rise, local actions to protect reefs are becoming even more important.

  7. Coral reef soundscapes may not be detectable far from the reef.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Maxwell B; Mooney, T Aran

    2016-01-01

    Biological sounds produced on coral reefs may provide settlement cues to marine larvae. Sound fields are composed of pressure and particle motion, which is the back and forth movement of acoustic particles. Particle motion (i.e., not pressure) is the relevant acoustic stimulus for many, if not most, marine animals. However, there have been no field measurements of reef particle motion. To address this deficiency, both pressure and particle motion were recorded at a range of distances from one Hawaiian coral reef at dawn and mid-morning on three separate days. Sound pressure attenuated with distance from the reef at dawn. Similar trends were apparent for particle velocity but with considerable variability. In general, average sound levels were low and perhaps too faint to be used as an orientation cue except very close to the reef. However, individual transient sounds that exceeded the mean values, sometimes by up to an order of magnitude, might be detectable far from the reef, depending on the hearing abilities of the larva. If sound is not being used as a long-range cue, it might still be useful for habitat selection or other biological activities within a reef. PMID:27550394

  8. Mirrors Containing Biomimetic Shape-Control Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart

    2003-01-01

    Curved mirrors of a proposed type would comprise lightweight sheets or films containing integral, biologically inspired actuators for controlling their surface figures. These mirrors could be useful in such applications as collection of solar energy, focusing of radio beams, and (provided sufficient precision could be achieved) imaging. These mirrors were originally intended for use in outer space, but it should also be possible to develop terrestrial versions. Several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles have described a variety of approaches to the design of curved, lightweight mirrors containing integral shape-control actuators. The primary distinction between the present approach and the prior approaches lies in the actuator design concept, which involves shapes and movements reminiscent of those of a variety of small, multi-armed animals. The shape and movement of an actuator of this type can also be characterized as reminiscent of that of an umbrella. This concept can be further characterized as a derivative of that of multifinger grippers, the fingers of which are bimorph bending actuators (see Figure 1). The fingers of such actuators can be strips containing any of a variety of materials that have been investigated for use as actuators, including such electroactive polymers as ionomeric polymer/metal composites (IPMCs), ferroelectric polymers, and grafted elastomers. A mirror according to this proposal would be made from a sheet of one of the actuator composites mentioned above. The design would involve many variables, including the pre-curvature and stiffness of the mirror sheet, the required precision of figure control, the required range of variation in focal length (see Figure 2), the required precision of figure control for imaging or non-imaging use, the bending and twisting moments needed to effect the required deformations, and voltage-tomoment coefficients of the actuators, and the voltages accordingly required for actuation. A typical design would call

  9. Handbook of actuators and edge alignment sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D A

    1992-11-01

    This actuator and sensor handbook was developed during a cooperative project between the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, the SDI-Directed Energy Program and LLNL. The common purpose of the joint effort was to develop precision actuators and sensors for the NASA initiated SpacE Laser ENE-rgy Program (SELENE). The purpose of the SELENE Program is to develop a highly cost effective segmented adaptive optics system for beaming laser power directly to spacecraft in earth orbit.

  10. Redundancy of hydraulic flight control actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenoweth, C. C.; Ryder, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The constraint of requiring airplanes to have inherent aerodynamic stability can be removed by using active control systems. The resulting airplane requires control system reliability approaching that of the basic airframe. Redundant control actuators can be used to achieve the required reliability, but create mechanization and operational problems. Of numerous candidate systems, two different approaches to solving the problems associated with redundant actuators which appear the most likely to be used in advanced airplane control systems are described.

  11. Unusual and Superfast Temperature-Triggered Actuators.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaohua; Liu, Fangyao; Lerch, Arne; Ionov, Leonid; Agarwal, Seema

    2015-09-01

    A superfast actuator based on a bilayer fibrous mat shows folding/unfolding and the formation of 3D structures in a fraction of a second. The actuation is reversible for many cycles without losing its form and size, with unfolding at room temperature and folding above 35 °C. The system is promising for making 3D bioscaffolds, electrodes, and micro-/macroactuators. PMID:26186175

  12. Electromechanical flight control actuator, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An electromechanical actuator was developed that will follow a proportional control command with minimum wasted energy to demonstrate the feasibility of meeting space vehicle actuator requirements using advanced electromechanical concepts. The approach was restricted to a four-channel redundant configuration. Each channel has independent drive and control electronics, a brushless electric motor with brake, and velocity and position feedback transducers. A differential gearbox sums the output velocities of the motors. Normally, two motors are active and the other two are braked.

  13. Digital flight control actuation system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossing, R.; Hupp, R.

    1974-01-01

    Flight control actuators and feedback sensors suitable for use in a redundant digital flight control system were examined. The most appropriate design approach for an advanced digital flight control actuation system for development and use in a fly-by-wire system was selected. The concept which was selected consisted of a PM torque motor direct drive. The selected system is compatible with concurrent and independent development efforts on the computer system and the control law mechanizations.

  14. Design and application of shape memory actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertmann, M.; Vergani, G.

    2008-05-01

    The use of shape memory alloys in actuators allows the development of robust, simple and lightweight elements for application in a multitude of different industries. Over the years, the intermetallic compound Nickel-Titanium (NiTi or Nitinol) together with its ternary and quaternary derivates has gained general acceptance as a standard alloy. Even though as many as 99% of all shape memory actuator applications make use of Nitinol there are certain properties of this alloy system which require further research in order to find improvements and new markets: • Lack of higher transformation temperatures in the available alloys in order to open the field of automotive applications (Mf temperature > 80 °C) • Non-linearity in the electrical resistivity in order to improve the controllability of the actuator, • Wide hysteresis in the temperature-vs.-strain behaviour, which has a signi-ficant effect on both, the dynamics of the actuator and its controllability. Hence, there is a constant strive in the field towards an improvement of the related properties. However, these improvements are not always just alloy composition related. There is also a tremendous potential in the thermomechanical treatment of the material and in the design of the actuator. Significant improvement steps are already possible if the usage of the existent materials is optimized for the projected application and if the actuator system is designed in the most efficient way. This paper provides an overview about existent designs, applications and alloys for use in actuators, as well as examples of new shape memory actuator application with improved performance. It also gives an overview about general design rules and reflects about the strengths of the material and the related opportunities for its application.

  15. Microelectromechanical Systems Actuator Based Reconfigurable Printed Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A polarization reconfigurable patch antenna is disclosed. The antenna includes a feed element, a patch antenna element electrically connected to the feed element, and at least one microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator, with a partial connection to the patch antenna element along an edge of the patch antenna element. The polarization of the antenna can be switched between circular polarization and linear polarization through action of the at least one MEMS actuator.

  16. Holocene reef associated carbonate sediments and their Pleistocene counterparts, Miyako Islands, Ryukyus, southwest of Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Y.; Yamamura, T.; Kodato, T.; Sunouchi, H.

    1988-01-01

    Holocene carbonate sedimentary facies distribution, from sea level to shelf slope about 1,000 m in depth, and its relationship to bathymeltry, off Miyako Island, Ryukyus, southwest of Japan were clarified by surveys with sidescan sonar, sparker, uniboom, sea-bottom camera, and sediment sampler. Six facies were recognized using the acoustic data, sample analytical data, and sea-bottom photographs. These are as follows: (A) Reef facies: made mainly of autochthonous hermatypic corals and encrusting algae, 0-60 m deep. (B) Inter-reef muddy facies: consists of very fine sand-size carbonate fraction and line mud, 20-60 m deep surrounded area be reefal relief and islands. (C) Inter-reef and near-reef sandy facies: characterized by tests of shallow benthic foraminifera Calcarina and Marginopora, and Halimeda fragments, 0-90 m deep. (D) Rhodolith and large foraminiferal gravelly shelf facies: contains pebble to cobble-size rhodolith and/and foraminifera Cycloclypeus and Operculina, 60-200 m deep. (E) Bryozoan sandy shelf facies: rich in byrozoan fragments, 80-200 m deep. (F) Shelf slope pelagic foraminiferal facies: dominated by pelagic foraminifera and pteropod molluscan tests, deeper than 200 m. Counterparts of these facies in emerged Pleistocene limestone sequences have been recognized in outcrops and core samples. The results of the marine survey on Holocene deposits made it easy to interpret the Pleistocene depositional environments and sea level changes.

  17. Reassessing the trophic role of reef sharks as apex predators on coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Ashley J.; Ireland, Matthew; Rizzari, Justin R.; Lönnstedt, Oona M.; Magnenat, Katalin A.; Mirbach, Christopher E.; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Apex predators often have strong top-down effects on ecosystem components and are therefore a priority for conservation and management. Due to their large size and conspicuous predatory behaviour, reef sharks are typically assumed to be apex predators, but their functional role is yet to be confirmed. In this study, we used stomach contents and stable isotopes to estimate diet, trophic position and carbon sources for three common species of reef shark ( Triaenodon obesus, Carcharhinus melanopterus and C. amblyrhynchos) from the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) and evaluated their assumed functional role as apex predators by qualitative and quantitative comparisons with other sharks and large predatory fishes. We found that reef sharks do not occupy the apex of coral reef food chains, but instead have functional roles similar to those of large predatory fishes such as snappers, emperors and groupers, which are typically regarded as high-level mesopredators. We hypothesise that a degree of functional redundancy exists within this guild of predators, potentially explaining why shark-induced trophic cascades are rare or subtle in coral reef ecosystems. We also found that reef sharks participate in multiple food webs (pelagic and benthic) and are sustained by multiple sources of primary production. We conclude that large conspicuous predators, be they elasmobranchs or any other taxon, should not axiomatically be regarded as apex predators without thorough analysis of their diet. In the case of reef sharks, our dietary analyses suggest they should be reassigned to an alternative trophic group such as high-level mesopredators. This change will facilitate improved understanding of how reef communities function and how removal of predators (e.g., via fishing) might affect ecosystem properties.

  18. Large stroke actuators for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, B.; Kubby, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we review the use of a 3-dimensional MEMS fabrication process to prototype long stroke (>10 μm) actuators as are required for use in future adaptive optics systems in astronomy and vision science. The Electrochemical Fabrication (EFAB TM) process that was used creates metal micro-structures by electroplating multiple, independently patterned layers. The process has the design freedom of rapid prototyping where multiple patterned layers are stacked to build structures with virtually any desired geometry, but in contrast has much greater precision, the capability for batch fabrication and provides parts in engineering materials such as nickel. The design freedom enabled by this process has been used to make both parallel plate and comb drive actuator deformable mirror designs that can have large vertical heights of up to 1 mm. As the thickness of the sacrificial layers used to release the actuator is specified by the designer, rather than by constraints of the fabrication process, the design of large-stroke actuators is straightforward and does not require any new process development. Since the number of material layers in the EFAB TM process is also specified by the designer it has been possible to gang multiple parallel plate actuators together to decrease the voltage required for long-stroke actuators.

  19. Actuators For A Segmented Mirror Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, George

    1983-11-01

    The active control of segmented mirrors requires actuators to move the segments in response to perturbations. Each segment of the University of California Ten Meter Telescope has three of its six rigid-body degrees of freedom actively controlled; piston and tilt about two axes. The system design requires the actuator to carry a load that varies as the telescope moves from zenith to horizon. The maximum load is one third of the segment mass, about 150kg. The system design also needs actuator adjustment resolution less than 20nm over a range of 3mm with a 2µm/sec response rate. Actuators which satisfy these requirements have been designed, built, and tested. A torque motor turns a screw shaft whose axial load is taken by a roller thrust bearing. Simultaneously the screw drives a roller nut to position the mirror segment. The roller screw converts rotary to linear motion with nanometer smoothness over a large dynamic range. A stick-slip behavior in the thrust bearing makes the mechanical system non-linear for small motions. Each actuator has a microprocessor-controlled servo loop and the servo loop algorithm compensates for this non-linear behavior. The actuator design and servo loop algorithm are described and the results of servo loop performance tests are given.

  20. Actuators for a segmented mirror control system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, George

    1984-01-01

    The active control of segmented mirrors requires actuators to move the segments in response to perturbations. Each segment of the University of California Ten Meter Telescope has three of its six rigid-body degrees of freedom actively controlled; piston and tilt about two axes. The system design requires the actuator to carry a load that varies as the telescope moves from zenith to horizon. The maximum load is one third of the segment mass, about 150kg. The system design also needs actuator adjustment resolution less than 20nm over a range of 3mm with a 2 m/sec response rate. Actuators which satisfy these requirements have been designed, built, and tested. A torque motor turns a screw shaft whose axial load is taken by a roller thrust bearing. Simultaneously the screw drives a roller nut to position the mirror segment. The roller screw converts rotary to linear motion with nanometer smoothness over a large dynamic range. A stick-slip behavior in the thrust bearing makes the mechanical system non-linear for small motions. Each actuator has a microprocessor-controlled servo loop and the servo loop algorithm compensates for this non-linear behavior. The actuator design and servo loop algorithm are described and the results of servo loop performance tests are given.

  1. Dielectric Elastomer Actuated Systems and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The system of the present invention includes an actuator having at least two electrodes, an elastomeric dielectric film disposed between the two electrodes, and a frame attached to the elastomeric dielectric film. The frame provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The displacement range is preferably the stroke of the actuator. The displacement range can be about 5 mm and greater. Further, the frame can include a plurality of configurations, for example, at least a rigid members coupled to a flexible member wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. In preferred embodiments, the rigid member can be, but is not limited to, curved beams, parallel beams, rods and plates. In a preferred embodiment the actuator can further include a passive element disposed between two flexible members such as, for example, links to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. Further, the actuator can include a plurality of layers of the elastomeric dielectric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of different materials such as, for example, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  2. Networked Rectenna Array for Smart Material Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Golembiewski, Walter T.; Song, Kyo D.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of microwave-driven smart material actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wired control circuitry. Networked rectenna patch array receives and converts microwave power into a DC power for an array of smart actuators. To use microwave power effectively, the concept of a power allocation and distribution (PAD) circuit is adopted for networking a rectenna/actuator patch array. The PAD circuit is imbedded into a single embodiment of rectenna and actuator array. The thin-film microcircuit embodiment of PAD circuit adds insignificant amount of rigidity to membrane flexibility. Preliminary design and fabrication of PAD circuitry that consists of a few nodal elements were made for laboratory testing. The networked actuators were tested to correlate the network coupling effect, power allocation and distribution, and response time. The features of preliminary design are 16-channel computer control of actuators by a PCI board and the compensator for a power failure or leakage of one or more rectennas.

  3. Sweeping Jet Actuator in a Quiescent Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti; Melton, Latunia P.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a detailed analysis of a sweeping jet (fluidic oscillator) actuator. The sweeping jet actuator promises to be a viable flow control actuator candidate due to its simple, no moving part structure and its high momentum, spatially oscillating flow output. Hot-wire anemometer and particle image velocimetry measurements were carried out with an emphasis on understanding the actuator flow field in a quiescent environment. The time averaged, fluctuating, and instantaneous velocity measurements are provided. A modified actuator concept that incorporates high-speed solenoid valves to control the frequency of oscillation enabled phase averaged measurements of the oscillating jet. These measurements reveal that in a given oscillation cycle, the oscillating jet spends more time on each of the Coanda surfaces. In addition, the modified actuator generates four different types of flow fields, namely: a non oscillating downward jet, a non oscillating upward jet, a non oscillating straight jet, and an oscillating jet. The switching from an upward jet to a downward jet is accomplished by providing a single pulse from the solenoid valve. Once the flow is switched, the flow stays there until another pulse is received. The oscillating jet is compared with a non oscillating straight jet, which is a typical planar turbulent jet. The results indicate that the oscillating jet has a higher (5 times) spreading rate, more flow entrainment, and higher velocity fluctuations (equal to the mean velocity).

  4. Electrically actuated multiple store launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Frank P.; Travor, Bruce W.

    1991-12-01

    This invention comprises a multi-store, electrical pulse initiated launcher that fits into, and is electrically connected with a transporting vehicle and that contains sequentially stacked assemblies. An electrical pulse from the transporting vehicle causes a resistor with the least value to transfer the electric sufficient gas pressure to force the store out of the launcher. The present invention discloses an electrically-actuated, multi-store dispenser wherein an initial electrical charge ignites gas cartridges causing sequential launching of stores from their tandem position inside a launch container. In some environments, it is desirable to dispense multiple stores from a launch vehicle, for instance sonobuoys, in dense patterns. Due to physical limitations of space in the dispensing vehicle, an effort was made to miniaturize the active components inside the store and therefore reduce the overall outer dimensions thereof. Once the size of the store was reduced, in order to meet the demands of the denser patterns, the inside of the individual launch containers were modified to allow each to hold and dispense more than one store. This new type of launch container, in addition to maintaining the size requirement dictated by the transporting vehicle, is operated by the vehicle's electrical system.

  5. High-pressure microhydraulic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mosier, Bruce P [San Francisco, CA; Crocker, Robert W [Fremont, CA; Patel, Kamlesh D [Dublin, CA

    2008-06-10

    Electrokinetic ("EK") pumps convert electric to mechanical work when an electric field exerts a body force on ions in the Debye layer of a fluid in a packed bed, which then viscously drags the fluid. Porous silica and polymer monoliths (2.5-mm O.D., and 6-mm to 10-mm length) having a narrow pore size distribution have been developed that are capable of large pressure gradients (250-500 psi/mm) when large electric fields (1000-1500 V/cm) are applied. Flowrates up to 200 .mu.L/min and delivery pressures up to 1200 psi have been demonstrated. Forces up to 5 lb-force at 0.5 mm/s (12 mW) have been demonstrated with a battery-powered DC-DC converter. Hydraulic power of 17 mW (900 psi@ 180 uL/min) has been demonstrated with wall-powered high voltage supplies. The force and stroke delivered by an actuator utilizing an EK pump are shown to exceed the output of solenoids, stepper motors, and DC motors of similar size, despite the low thermodynamic efficiency.

  6. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1994-10-25

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw. 10 figs.

  7. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1994-01-01

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw.

  8. Fully redundant mechanical release actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, Melvin H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for performing a mechanical release function exhibiting low shock. This system includes two pyrotechnic detents fixed mounted in opposing axial alignment within a cylindrical housing having two mechanical bellows. Two mechanical bellow assemblies, each having one end hermetically bonded to the housing and the other to the respective actuator pin extending from either end of the housing, ensure that all outgassing and contamination from the operation of the pyrotechnic devices will be contained within the housing and bellows. The pin on one end of the assembly is fixed mounted and supported, via a bolt or ball-and-socket joint so that when the charge corresponding to that pin ignites, the entire assembly will exhibit rectilinear movement, including the opposing pin providing the unlatching motion. The release detent pin is supported by a linear bearing and when its corresponding pyrotechnic charge ignites the pin is retracted within the housing producing the same unlatching motion without movement of the entire assembly, thus providing complete mechanical, electrical and pyrotechnic redundancy for the unlatching pin.

  9. Lightweight Exoskeletons with Controllable Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mavrodis, Constantinos; Melli-Huber, Juan; Fisch, Avi (Alan)

    2004-01-01

    A proposed class of lightweight exoskeletal electromechanical systems would include electrically controllable actuators that would generate torques and forces that, depending on specific applications, would resist and/or assist wearers movements. The proposed systems would be successors to relatively heavy, bulky, and less capable human-strength-amplifying exoskeletal electromechanical systems that have been subjects of research during the past four decades. The proposed systems could be useful in diverse applications in which there are needs for systems that could be donned or doffed easily, that would exert little effect when idle, and that could be activated on demand: examples of such applications include (1) providing controlled movement and/or resistance to movement for physical exercise and (2) augmenting wearers strengths in the performance of military, law-enforcement, and industrial tasks. An exoskeleton according to the proposal would include adjustable lightweight graphite/epoxy struts and would be attached to the wearer's body by belts made of hook-and-pile material. At selected rotary and linear joints, the exoskeleton would be fitted, variously, with lightweight, low-power-consumption rotary and linear brakes, clutches, and motors. The exoskeleton would also be equipped with electronic circuitry for monitoring, control, and possibly communication with external electronic circuits that would perform additional monitoring and control functions.

  10. Perturbation and change in coral reef communities.

    PubMed

    Porter, J W; Battey, J F; Smith, G J

    1982-03-01

    Ninety-six percent of surveyed shallow-water Dry Tortugas reef corals died during the severe winter of 1976-1977. Data from skeletal stains indicate that death occurred during the mid-January intrusion of 14 degrees C water onto the reef. In deeper water, community parameters such as percent cover, species number, and relative abundance showed no significant change. However, an analysis of competitive interactions at the growing edges of adjacent colonies reveals a 70% reduction in space competition during this environmental disturbance. These results can explain high variability in the growth rate of Floridian reefs and demonstrate the importance of obtaining long-term spatial information to interpret successional dynamics of complex communities. PMID:16578761

  11. REEF: searching REgionally Enriched Features in genomes

    PubMed Central

    Coppe, Alessandro; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Bortoluzzi, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    Background In Eukaryotic genomes, different features including genes are not uniformly distributed. The integration of annotation information and genomic position of functional DNA elements in the Eukaryotic genomes opened the way to test novel hypotheses of higher order genome organization and regulation of expression. Results REEF is a new tool, aimed at identifying genomic regions enriched in specific features, such as a class or group of genes homogeneous for expression and/or functional characteristics. The method for the calculation of local feature enrichment uses test statistic based on the Hypergeometric Distribution applied genome-wide by using a sliding window approach and adopting the False Discovery Rate for controlling multiplicity. REEF software, source code and documentation are freely available at . Conclusion REEF can aid to shed light on the role of organization of specific genomic regions in the determination of their functional role. PMID:17042935

  12. Past corals and recent reefs in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekschoten, G. J.; Best, Maya Borel; Oosterbaan, A.; Molenkamp, F. M.

    During the Snellius-II Expedition Lower Pilocene coral material was collected near Salayer, and Quaternary reefs were sampled on Ambon and Sumba. Coral collections from the Pliocene of Nias were also available for study. This new material is presented together with earlier data. Preservation potentials of different coral growth forms are reviewed. The absence of Acropora and Montipora from Quaternary coral faunae is striking. This is interpreted with the model of POTTS (1983), on the disturbance by Pleistocene sea level fluctuations in the reef coral fauna. Diversification within both genera is apparently very recent, which may explain their complex taxonomy. Given the dominant role of Acropora and Montipora in many present day Indonesian reefs, these are better described as transitional assemblages of corals than as established coral communities.

  13. New protection initiatives announced for coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Off the coasts of some of the South Pacific's most idyllic-sounding atolls, Austin Bowden-Kerby has seen first-hand the heavy damage to coral reefs from dynamite and cyanide fishing. For instance, while snorkeling near Chuuk, an island in Micronesia, he has observed craters and rubble beds of coral, which locals have told him date to World War II ordnance.A marine biologist and project scientist for the Coral Gardens Initiative of the Foundation for the Peoples of the South Pacific, Bowden-Kerby has also identified what he says are some public health effects related to destroyed coral reefs and their dying fisheries. These problems include protein and vitamin A deficiency and blindness, all of which may—in some instances—be linked to poor nutrition resulting from lower reef fish consumption by islanders, according to Bowden-Kerby.

  14. Re-creating missing population baselines for Pacific reef sharks.

    PubMed

    Nadon, Marc O; Baum, Julia K; Williams, Ivor D; McPherson, Jana M; Zgliczynski, Brian J; Richards, Benjamin L; Schroeder, Robert E; Brainard, Russell E

    2012-06-01

    Sharks and other large predators are scarce on most coral reefs, but studies of their historical ecology provide qualitative evidence that predators were once numerous in these ecosystems. Quantifying density of sharks in the absence of humans (baseline) is, however, hindered by a paucity of pertinent time-series data. Recently researchers have used underwater visual surveys, primarily of limited spatial extent or nonstandard design, to infer negative associations between reef shark abundance and human populations. We analyzed data from 1607 towed-diver surveys (>1 ha transects surveyed by observers towed behind a boat) conducted at 46 reefs in the central-western Pacific Ocean, reefs that included some of the world's most pristine coral reefs. Estimates of shark density from towed-diver surveys were substantially lower (<10%) than published estimates from surveys along small transects (<0.02 ha), which is not consistent with inverted biomass pyramids (predator biomass greater than prey biomass) reported by other researchers for pristine reefs. We examined the relation between the density of reef sharks observed in towed-diver surveys and human population in models that accounted for the influence of oceanic primary productivity, sea surface temperature, reef area, and reef physical complexity. We used these models to estimate the density of sharks in the absence of humans. Densities of gray reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos), whitetip reef sharks (Triaenodon obesus), and the group "all reef sharks" increased substantially as human population decreased and as primary productivity and minimum sea surface temperature (or reef area, which was highly correlated with temperature) increased. Simulated baseline densities of reef sharks under the absence of humans were 1.1-2.4/ha for the main Hawaiian Islands, 1.2-2.4/ha for inhabited islands of American Samoa, and 0.9-2.1/ha for inhabited islands in the Mariana Archipelago, which suggests that density of reef sharks

  15. Juvenile coral reef fish use sound to locate habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford, C. A.; Stanley, J. A.; Simpson, S. D.; Jeffs, A. G.

    2011-06-01

    There is limited knowledge of the orientation cues used by reef fish in their movement among different habitats, especially those cues used during darkness. Although acoustic cues have been found to be important for settlement-stage fish as they seek settlement habitats, only a small number of studies support the possible role of acoustic cues in the orientation of post-settled and adult reef fish. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether habitat-specific acoustic cues were involved in the nocturnal movements of juvenile reef fish to small experimental patch reefs that were broadcasting sound previously recorded from different habitats (Fringing Reef, Lagoon, Silent). Juvenile fish arriving at each patch reef were caught the next morning by divers and were identified. There were a greater number of occasions when juvenile fish (from all species together) moved onto the patch reefs broadcasting Fringing Reef and Lagoon sound (43 and 38%, respectively) compared to Silent reefs (19%) (χ2 = 33.5; P < 0.05). There were significantly more occasions when juvenile fish from the family Nemipteridae were attracted to the patch reefs broadcasting Lagoon sound (63%) versus those reefs broadcasting either Fringing Reef sound (31%) or Silent (6%). In contrast, there were more occasions when juveniles from the family Pomacentridae were attracted to the patch reefs broadcasting Fringing Reef sound (56%) than either Lagoon (24%) or Silent patch reefs (20%) (χ2 = 19.5; P < 0.05). These results indicate that some juvenile fish use specific habitat sounds to guide their nocturnal movements. Therefore, the fish are able to not only use the directional information contained in acoustic cues, but can also interpret the content of the acoustic signals for relevant habitat information which is then used in their decision-making for orientation.

  16. Larger-Stroke Piezoelectrically Actuated Microvalve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    A proposed normally-closed microvalve would contain a piezoelectric bending actuator instead of a piezoelectric linear actuator like that of the microvalve described in the preceding article. Whereas the stroke of the linear actuator of the preceding article would be limited to approximately equal to 6 micrometers, the stroke of the proposed bending actuator would lie in the approximate range of 10 to 15 micrometers-large enough to enable the microvalve to handle a variety of liquids containing suspended particles having sizes up to 10 m. Such particulate-laden liquids occur in a variety of microfluidic systems, one example being a system that sorts cells or large biomolecules for analysis. In comparison with the linear actuator of the preceding article, the bending actuator would be smaller and less massive. The combination of increased stroke, smaller mass, and smaller volume would be obtained at the cost of decreased actuation force: The proposed actuator would generate a force in the approximate range of 1 to 4 N, the exact amount depending on operating conditions and details of design. This level of actuation force would be too low to enable the valve to handle a fluid at the high pressure level mentioned in the preceding article. The proposal encompasses two alternative designs one featuring a miniature piezoelectric bimorph actuator and one featuring a thick-film unimorph piezoelectric actuator (see figure). In either version, the valve would consume a power of only 0.01 W when actuated at a frequency of 100 Hz. Also, in either version, it would be necessary to attach a soft elastomeric sealing ring to the valve seat so that any particles that settle on the seat would be pushed deep into the elastomeric material to prevent or reduce leakage. The overall dimensions of the bimorph version would be 7 by 7 by 1 mm. The actuator in this version would generate a force of 1 N and a stroke of 10 m at an applied potential of 150 V. The actuation force would be

  17. Enhanced Visualization of Fine Needles Under Sonographic Guidance Using a MEMS Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Yufeng; Miao, Jianmin; Vu, Kien Fong

    2015-01-01

    Localization of a needle tip is important for biopsy examinations in clinics. However, the needle tip is sometimes difficult to discern under the guidance of sonography due to its poor visibility. A mini actuator that radiates a low-intensity ultrasound wave was manufactured using micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology. Interference between the radiated and diagnostic ultrasound pulses was observed as bright lines in the B-mode ultrasound image, from which the mini actuator could be recognized with ease. Because the distance between the mini actuator and the needle tip is fixed, the needle tip can be determined despite its inconsistent appearance in the sonography. Both gel phantom and ex vivo tissue evaluation showed that the needle tip can be determined reliably utilizing the acoustic interference pattern. PMID:25647740

  18. Linear Parameter Varying Control Synthesis for Actuator Failure, Based on Estimated Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Wu, N. Eva; Belcastro, Christine

    2002-01-01

    The design of a linear parameter varying (LPV) controller for an aircraft at actuator failure cases is presented. The controller synthesis for actuator failure cases is formulated into linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimizations based on an estimated failure parameter with pre-defined estimation error bounds. The inherent conservatism of an LPV control synthesis methodology is reduced using a scaling factor on the uncertainty block which represents estimated parameter uncertainties. The fault parameter is estimated using the two-stage Kalman filter. The simulation results of the designed LPV controller for a HiMXT (Highly Maneuverable Aircraft Technology) vehicle with the on-line estimator show that the desired performance and robustness objectives are achieved for actuator failure cases.

  19. Gravity investigation of a Niagaran reef

    SciTech Connect

    Bolla, W.O.; Noel, J.A.

    1983-09-01

    North Ridge and West Ridge, two isolated hills north of Cary, Ohio, in Wyandott County, were described by Winchell more than 100 years ago. About 75 years later, Cummings designated the ridges as being underlain by Niagaran reefs after studying exposures in several small quarries. The extensive exposures in the large quarries subsequently operated in North Ridge left little doubt that this ridge is underlain by a Niagaran reef. West Ridge is analogous in size, shape, orientation, and topographic expression. From the similarities, coupled with Cummings' earlier studies, it is assumed that West Ridge is also a Niagaran reef. A gravity survey, using a LaCoste-Romberg gravity meter, was conducted over West Ridge. The survey was several traverses consisting of 423 stations with station spacing along the traverses of 200 ft (61 m). Elevations were determined by transit surveys, and densities were measured in the laboratory from samples collected in the reef and enclosing rocks exposed in the Wyandott Dolomite Co. quarry on North Ridge. The thickness of the glacial drift was determined from all available water well records. The gravity profiles were analyzed using the Talwani Method. The theoretical profiles were computed using parameters which simulated the size, shape, and density of the reef exposed in the quarries on North Ridge. The field gravity profiles over West Ridge matched the theoretical closely with only 0.008 mgal difference. A cross section constructed from electric logs shows the stratigraphy of the area. A structure contour map of the bed rock reveals that West Ridge is a bedrock-controlled topogrpahic feature, and that its size and shape, although modified by glacial erosion, are similar to other Niagaran reefs in northwestern Ohio.

  20. Climate Change, Human Impacts, and the Resilience of Coral Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, T. P.; Baird, A. H.; Bellwood, D. R.; Card, M.; Connolly, S. R.; Folke, C.; Grosberg, R.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Jackson, J. B. C.; Kleypas, J.; Lough, J. M.; Marshall, P.; Nyström, M.; Palumbi, S. R.; Pandolfi, J. M.; Rosen, B.; Roughgarden, J.

    2003-08-01

    The diversity, frequency, and scale of human impacts on coral reefs are increasing to the extent that reefs are threatened globally. Projected increases in carbon dioxide and temperature over the next 50 years exceed the conditions under which coral reefs have flourished over the past half-million years. However, reefs will change rather than disappear entirely, with some species already showing far greater tolerance to climate change and coral bleaching than others. International integration of management strategies that support reef resilience need to be vigorously implemented, and complemented by strong policy decisions to reduce the rate of global warming.