Science.gov

Sample records for actuating fluid pressure

  1. Actuation fluid adapter for hydraulically-actuated electronically-controlled fuel injector and engine using same

    DOEpatents

    Keyster, Eric S.; Merchant, Jack A.

    2002-01-01

    A fuel injector adapter consists of a block defining a pressure communication passage therethrough and an actuation fluid passage. The actuation fluid passage includes three separate branches that open through an outer surface of the block at three separate locations.

  2. High-pressure microhydraulic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mosier, Bruce P [San Francisco, CA; Crocker, Robert W [Fremont, CA; Patel, Kamlesh D [Dublin, CA

    2008-06-10

    Electrokinetic ("EK") pumps convert electric to mechanical work when an electric field exerts a body force on ions in the Debye layer of a fluid in a packed bed, which then viscously drags the fluid. Porous silica and polymer monoliths (2.5-mm O.D., and 6-mm to 10-mm length) having a narrow pore size distribution have been developed that are capable of large pressure gradients (250-500 psi/mm) when large electric fields (1000-1500 V/cm) are applied. Flowrates up to 200 .mu.L/min and delivery pressures up to 1200 psi have been demonstrated. Forces up to 5 lb-force at 0.5 mm/s (12 mW) have been demonstrated with a battery-powered DC-DC converter. Hydraulic power of 17 mW (900 psi@ 180 uL/min) has been demonstrated with wall-powered high voltage supplies. The force and stroke delivered by an actuator utilizing an EK pump are shown to exceed the output of solenoids, stepper motors, and DC motors of similar size, despite the low thermodynamic efficiency.

  3. Pressure-actuated joint system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided that includes first and second case segments mated with one another. First and second annular rubber layers are disposed inboard of the first and second case segments, respectively. The second annular rubber layer has a slot extending from the radial inner surface across a portion of its thickness to define a main body portion and a flexible portion. The flexible portion has an interfacing surface portion abutting against an interfacing surface portion of the first annular rubber layer to follow movement of the first annular rubber layer during operation of the pressure vessel. The slot receives pressurized gas and establishes a pressure-actuated joint between the interfacing surface portions. At least one of the interfacing surface portions has a plurality of enclosed and sealed recesses formed therein.

  4. Energy efficient fluid powered linear actuator with variable area

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2016-09-13

    Hydraulic actuation systems having variable displacements and energy recovery capabilities include cylinders with pistons disposed inside of barrels. When operating in energy consuming modes, high speed valves pressurize extension chambers or retraction chambers to provide enough force to meet or counteract an opposite load force. When operating in energy recovery modes, high speed valves return a working fluid from extension chambers or retraction chambers, which are pressurized by a load, to an accumulator for later use.

  5. Unsteady fluid flow in smart material actuated fluid pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Shaju; Cadou, Christopher

    2005-05-01

    Smart materials' ability to deliver large block forces in a small package while operating at high frequencies makes them extremely attractive for converting electrical to mechanical power. This has led to the development of hybrid actuators consisting of co-located smart material actuated pumps and hydraulic cylinders that are connected by a set of fast-acting valves. The overall success of the hybrid concept hinges on the effectiveness of the coupling between the smart material and the fluid. This, in turn, is strongly dependent on the resistance to fluid flow in the device. This paper presents results from three-dimensional unsteady simulations of fluid flow in the pumping chamber of a prototype hybrid actuator powered by a piezo-electric stack. The results show that the forces associated with moving the fluid into and out of the pumping chamber already exceed 10% of the piezo stack blocked force at relatively low frequencies ~120 Hz and approach 40% of the blocked force at 800 Hz. This reduces the amplitude of the piston motion in such a way that the volume flow rate remains approximately constant above operating frequencies of 500 Hz while the efficiency of the pump decreases rapidly.

  6. Extreme pressure fluid sample transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, Justin E.; Bowman, Wilfred W.

    1990-01-01

    A transfer pump for samples of fluids at very low or very high pressures comprising a cylinder having a piston sealed with an O-ring, the piston defining forward and back chambers, an inlet and exit port and valve arrangement for the fluid to enter and leave the forward chamber, and a port and valve arrangement in the back chamber for adjusting the pressure across the piston so that the pressure differential across the piston is essentially zero and approximately equal to the pressure of the fluid so that the O-ring seals against leakage of the fluid and the piston can be easily moved, regardless of the pressure of the fluid. The piston may be actuated by a means external to the cylinder with a piston rod extending through a hole in the cylinder sealed with a bellows attached to the piston head and the interior of the back chamber.

  7. Extreme pressure fluid sample transfer pump

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, J.E.; Bowman, W.W.

    1990-12-04

    This patent describes a transfer pump for samples of fluids at very low or very high pressures comprising a cylinder having a piston sealed with an O-ring, the piston defining forward and back chambers, an inlet and exit port and valve arrangement for the fluid to enter and leave the forward chamber, and a port and valve arrangement in the back chamber for adjusting the pressure across the piston so that the pressure differential across the piston is essentially zero and approximately equal to the pressure of the fluid so that the O-ring seals against leakage of the fluid and the piston can be easily moved, regardless of the pressure of the fluid. The piston may be actuated by a means external to the cylinder with a piston rod extending through a hole in the cylinder sealed with a bellows attached to the piston head and the interior of the back chamber.

  8. A New Type of Hydraulic Actuator Using Electrorheological Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Eckhard; Büsing, Klaus W.

    Electrorheological Fluids (ERF) are usually used in semi active damping elements, e.g. shock absorbers or engine mounts because of their continuously controllable shear stress. A totally new field of application may be achieved, if an ERF is used as a hydraulic fluid and not only as a control medium. In this case a fundamental need is the capability to produce a volume flow by using normal hydraulic pumps, e.g. gear pumps. The ERF and the hydraulic components both must have a long lifetime without unusual wear. Bayer AG has developed an ERF based on soft crosslinked PU-particles dispersed in silicone oil. These ERF are characterised by a low basic viscosity, a high ER-effect and a moderate conductivity. Compared with previous ERF where hard inorganic particles were used, the new fluid is not abrasive. It is foremostly this characteristic which gives the possibility of using the ERF in hydraulic systems with high shear rates and high shear stresses. The usage of ERF as hydraulic fluid allows the construction of proportional valves without mechanically driven parts. The control of the pressure drop over the valves is realised directly by an electrical signal. It is possible to realise actuators with very fast response times since the reaction time of ERF is within milliseconds. For demonstration purpose Bayer AG has built an actuator which is controlled by an electrorheological valve-block. The calculation of the dimension of this actuator and the valves will be shown and the realised response time will be demonstrated.

  9. Pressure-actuated cellular structures.

    PubMed

    Pagitz, M; Lamacchia, E; Hol, J M A M

    2012-03-01

    Shape changing structures will play an important role in future engineering designs since rigid structures are usually only optimal for a small range of service conditions. Hence, a concept for reliable and energy-efficient morphing structures that possess a large strength to self-weight ratio would be widely applicable. We propose a novel concept for morphing structures that is inspired by the nastic movement of plants. The idea is to connect prismatic cells with tailored pentagonal and/or hexagonal cross sections such that the resulting cellular structure morphs into given target shapes for certain cell pressures. An efficient algorithm for computing equilibrium shapes as well as cross-sectional geometries is presented. The potential of this novel concept is demonstrated by several examples that range from a flagellum like propulsion device to a morphing aircraft wing.

  10. Electrochemically actuated mercury pump for fluid flow and delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ni, J.; Zhong, C. J.; Coldiron, S. J.; Porter, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype pumping system with the potential for incorporation into miniaturized, fluid-based analytical instruments. The approach exploits the well-established electrocapillarity phenomena at a mercury/electrolyte interface as the mechanism for pump actuation. That is, electrochemically induced changes in the surface tension of mercury result in the pistonlike movement of a mercury column confined within a capillary. We present herein theoretical and experimental assessments of pump performance. The design and construction of the pump are detailed, and the potential attributes of this design, including the generated pumping pressure, flow rate, and power consumption, are discussed. The possible miniaturization of the pump for use as a field-deployable, fluid-delivery device is also briefly examined.

  11. Fluid logic control circuit operates nutator actuator motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Fluid logic control circuit operates a pneumatic nutator actuator motor. It has no moving parts and consists of connected fluid interaction devices. The operation of this circuit demonstrates the ability of fluid interaction devices to operate in a complex combination of series and parallel logic sequence.

  12. Pressurized honeycombs as soft-actuators: a theoretical study

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Lorenzo; Fratzl, Peter; Bréchet, Yves J. M.; Dunlop, John W. C.

    2014-01-01

    The seed capsule of Delosperma nakurense is a remarkable example of a natural hygromorph, which unfolds its protecting valves upon wetting to expose its seeds. The beautiful mechanism responsible for this motion is generated by a specialized organ based on an anisotropic cellular tissue filled with a highly swelling material. Inspired by this system, we study the mechanics of a diamond honeycomb internally pressurized by a fluid phase. Numerical homogenization by means of iterative finite-element (FE) simulations is adapted to the case of cellular materials filled with a variable pressure fluid phase. Like its biological counterpart, it is shown that the material architecture controls and guides the otherwise unspecific isotropic expansion of the fluid. Deformations up to twice the original dimensions can be achieved by simply setting the value of input pressure. In turn, these deformations cause a marked change of the honeycomb geometry and hence promote a stiffening of the material along the weak direction. To understand the mechanism further, we also developed a micromechanical model based on the Born model for crystal elasticity to find an explicit relation between honeycomb geometry, swelling eigenstrains and elastic properties. The micromechanical model is in good qualitative agreement with the FE simulations. Moreover, we also provide the force-stroke characteristics of a soft actuator based on the pressurized anisotropic honeycomb and show how the internal pressure has a nonlinear effect which can result in negative values of the in-plane Poisson's ratio. As nature shows in the case of the D. nakurense seed capsule, cellular materials can be used not only as low-weight structural materials, but also as simple but convenient actuating materials. PMID:24966238

  13. Light-driven actuation of fluids at microscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Mandar; Saggere, Laxman

    2004-07-01

    This paper discusses the prospects of light-driven actuation particularly for actuating fluids at micro-scale for potential use in a novel retinal prosthesis and other drug delivery applications. The prosthesis is conceived to be comprised of an array of light-driven microfluidic-dispenser units, devices that eject very small amounts of fluids on the order of 1 picoliter per second in response to incident light energy in the range of 0.1-1 mW/cm2. A light-driven actuator, whose size will ideally be smaller than about 100 micrometers in diameter, independently powers each dispenser unit. Towards this application, various approaches for transducing light energy for actuation of fluids are explored. These approaches encompass both direct transduction of light energy to mechanical actuation of fluid and indirect transduction through an intermediary form of energy, for instance, light energy to thermal or electrical energy followed by mechanical actuation of fluid. Various existing schemes for such transduction are reviewed comprehensively and discussed from the standpoint of the application requirements. Direct transduction schemes exploiting recent developments in optically sensitive materials that exhibit direct strain upon illumination, particularly the photostrictive PLZT (Lanthanum modified Lead Zirconate Titanate), are studied for the current application, and results of some preliminary experiments involving measurement of photovoltage, photocurrent, and photo-induced strain in the meso-scale samples of the PLZT material are presented.

  14. Energy efficient fluid powered linear actuator with variable area and concentric chambers

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F.; Love, Lonnie J.

    2016-11-15

    Hydraulic actuation systems having concentric chambers, variable displacements and energy recovery capabilities include cylinders with pistons disposed inside of barrels. When operating in energy consuming modes, high speed valves pressurize extension chambers or retraction chambers to provide enough force to meet or counteract an opposite load force. When operating in energy recovery modes, high speed valves return a working fluid from extension chambers or retraction chambers, which are pressurized by a load, to an accumulator for later use.

  15. Design and development of magnetorheological fluid-based passive actuator.

    PubMed

    Shokrollahi, Elnaz; Price, Karl; Drake, James M; Goldenberg, Andrew A

    2015-08-01

    We present the design and experimental validation of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid-based passive actuator for tele-robotic bone biopsy procedures. With Finite Element Method Magnet (FEMM) software, the required uniform magnetic field circuit design was simulated. An 1100 turn 24 AWG copper wire coil wrapped around a magnetic core was used to create a magnetic field. The field strength was measured with a Hall effect sensor, and compared to the simulation. The maximum magnetic field flux produced by a constant current of 1.4 A was 0.2 T, similar to the simulation results. A series of quasi-static experiments were conducted to characterize the forces generated by the MR fluid-based actuator under various currents up to 12 N. An analytical model was developed to validate the measurements from the passive actuator.

  16. Characterization of magnetically actuated resonant cantilevers in viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vančura, Cyril; Lichtenberg, Jan; Hierlemann, Andreas; Josse, Fabien

    2005-10-01

    The vibration behavior of magnetically actuated resonant microcantilevers immersed in viscous fluids has been studied. A dependence of the resonance frequency and the quality factor (Q factor) on the fluid properties, such as density and viscosity and on the cantilever geometry is described. Various cantilever geometries are analyzed in pure water and glycerol solutions, and the results are explained in terms of the added displaced fluid mass and the fluid damping force for both the resonance frequency and the quality factor. An in-depth knowledge and understanding of such systems is necessary when analyzing resonant cantilevers as biochemical sensors in liquid environments.

  17. Fluid pressure balanced seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. W. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A seal which increases in effectiveness with increasing pressure is presented. The seal's functional capability throughout both static and dynamic operation makes it particularly useful for sealing ball valve ports. Other features of the seal include the ability to seal two opposed surfaces simultaneously, tolerance of small misalignments, tolerance of wide temperature ranges, ability to maintain positive sealing contact under conditions of internal or external pressurization, and ability to conform to slight irregularities in seal or surface contours.

  18. Holistic design and implementation of pressure actuated cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramüller, B.; Köke, H.; Hühne, C.

    2015-12-01

    Providing the possibility to develop energy-efficient, lightweight adaptive components, pressure-actuated cellular structures (PACS) are primarily conceived for aeronautics applications. The realization of shape-variable flaps and even airfoils provides the potential to safe weight, increase aerodynamic efficiency and enhance agility. The herein presented holistic design process points out and describes the necessary steps for designing a real-life PACS structure, from the computation of truss geometry to the manufacturing and assembly. The already published methods for the form finding of PACS are adjusted and extended for the exemplary application of a variable-camber wing. The transfer of the form-finding truss model to a cross-sectional design is discussed. The end cap and sealing concept is described together with the implementation of the integral fluid flow. Conceptual limitations due to the manufacturing and assembly processes are discussed. The method’s efficiency is evaluated by finite element method. In order to verify the underlying methods and summarize the presented work a modular real-life demonstrator is experimentally characterized and validates the numerical investigations.

  19. Flow control in low pressure turbine blades using plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakumar, Karthik

    2005-11-01

    An experimental study of plasma flow control actuators for flow separation control in low pressure turbine (LPT) blades is presented. The actuator arrangement consists of two copper strips separated by a dielectric medium with an input voltage of approximately 5kV and a frequency input varying from 3-5 kHz, creating a region of plasma used for boundary layer flow control. The effect of varying waveform on control efficacy is investigated using sine, square and saw tooth waveforms. The impact of duty cycle and forcing frequency on both displacement and momentum thickness are also examined. Boundary layer measurements are carried out using PIV while measurements of the wake downstream are performed using a 7-hole probe for Reynolds number ranging from 30,000 to 50,000. Separation is fully controlled in most configurations and boundary layer parameters reveal that the actuator entrains the free-stream flow at the actuator location and creates a region of high turbulence, essentially behaving similar to an active boundary layer trip. A small region of reversed flow near the surface indicates the presence of cross-stream vortical structures. The use of plasma synthetic jet actuators flow LPT flow control is also discussed.

  20. Development of a magneto-rheological fluid based hybrid actuation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Shaju

    A hybrid hydraulic actuation system is proposed as an active pitch link for rotorcraft applications. Such an active pitch link can be used to implement Individual Blade Control (IBC) techniques for vibration and noise reduction, in addition to providing primary control for the helicopter. Conventional technologies like electric motors and hydraulic actuators have major disadvantages when it come to applications on a rotating environment. Centralized hydraulic system require the use of mechanically complex hydraulic slip rings and electric motors have high precision mechanical moving parts that make them unattractive in application with high centrifugal load. The high energy density of smart materials can be used to design hydraulic actuators in a compact package. MagnetoRheological (MR) fluids can be used as the working fluid in such a hybrid hydraulic actuation system to implement a valving system with no moving parts. Thus, such an actuation system can be theoretically well-suited for application in a rotating environment. To develop an actuation system based on an active material stack and MR fluidic valves, a fundamental understanding of the hydraulic circuit is essential. In order to address this issue, a theoretical model was developed to understand the effect of pumping chamber geometry on the pressure losses in the pumping chamber. Three dimensional analytical models were developed for steady and unsteady flow and the results were correlated to results obtained from Computation Fluid Dynamic simulation of fluid flow inside the pumping chamber. Fundamental understanding regarding the pressure losses in a pumping chamber are obtained from the modeling process. Vortices that form in the pumping chamber (during intake) and the discharge tube (during discharge) are identified as a major cause of pressure loss in the chamber. The role of vortices during dynamic operation is also captured through a frequency domain model. Extensive experimental studies were

  1. Fluid pressure waves trigger earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Fluids-essentially meteoric water-are present everywhere in the Earth's crust, occasionally also with pressures higher than hydrostatic due to the tectonic strain imposed on impermeable undrained layers, to the impoundment of artificial lakes or to the forced injections required by oil and gas exploration and production. Experimental evidence suggests that such fluids flow along preferred paths of high diffusivity, provided by rock joints and faults. Studying the coupled poroelastic problem, we find that such flow is ruled by a nonlinear partial differential equation amenable to a Barenblatt-type solution, implying that it takes place in form of solitary pressure waves propagating at a velocity which decreases with time as v ∝ t [1/(n - 1) - 1] with n ≳ 7. According to Tresca-Von Mises criterion, these waves appear to play a major role in earthquake triggering, being also capable to account for aftershock delay without any further assumption. The measure of stress and fluid pressure inside active faults may therefore provide direct information about fault potential instability.

  2. A description of model 3B of the multipurpose ventricular actuating system. [providing controlled driving pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The multipurpose ventricular actuating system is a pneumatic signal generating device that provides controlled driving pressures for actuating pulsatile blood pumps. Overall system capabilities, the timing circuitry, and calibration instruction are included.

  3. Apparatus for unloading pressurized fluid

    DOEpatents

    Rehberger, Kevin M.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for unloading fluid, preferably pressurized gas, from containers in a controlled manner that protects the immediate area from exposure to the container contents. The device consists of an unloading housing, which is enclosed within at least one protective structure, for receiving the dispensed contents of the steel container, and a laser light source, located external to the protective structure, for opening the steel container instantaneously. The neck or stem of the fluid container is placed within the sealed interior environment of the unloading housing. The laser light passes through both the protective structure and the unloading housing to instantaneously pierce a small hole within the stem of the container. Both the protective structure and the unloading housing are specially designed to allow laser light passage without compromising the light's energy level. Also, the unloading housing allows controlled flow of the gas once it has been dispensed from the container. The external light source permits remote operation of the unloading device.

  4. New Actuators Using ER Fluid and Their Applications to Force Display Devices in Virtual Reality and Medical Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusho, Junji; Sakaguchi, Masamichi

    We developed ER actuators with low inertia. ER actuator is a torque-controllable clutch which uses an electrorheological fluid. It is shown that this actuator has good properties for force display device, physical therapy treatment, etc. We developed new force display devices for virtual reality which use ER actuators.

  5. Fluid Power Multi-actuator Circuit Board with Microcomputer Control Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKechnie, R. E.; Vickers, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a portable fluid power engineering laboratory and class demonstration apparatus designed to enable students to design, build, and test multi-actuator circuits. Features a variety of standard pneumatic values and actuators fitted with quick disconnect couplings. Discusses sequencing circuit boards, microcomputer control, cost, and…

  6. Efficient pressure-transformer for fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morando, J. A.

    1970-01-01

    Fluid transformer utilizes fluid under pressure at one level to drive series of free pistons in positive displacement pump. Pump in turn delivers hydraulic fluid at different pressure level to a load. Transformer is constructed of corrosion resistant materials and is extremely light and compact in relation to capacity.

  7. Frequency-dependent stability of parallel-plate electrostatic actuators in conductive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sounart, T. L.; Panchawagh, H. V.; Mahajan, R. L.

    2010-05-01

    We present an electromechanical stability analysis of passivated parallel-plate electrostatic actuators in conductive dielectric media and show that the pull-in instability can be eliminated by tuning the applied frequency below a design-dependent stability limit. A partial instability region is also obtained, where the actuator jumps from the pull-in displacement to another stable position within the gap. The results predict that the stability limit is always greater than the critical actuation frequency, and therefore any device that is feasible to actuate in a conductive fluid can be operated with stability over the full range of motion.

  8. Line Fluid Actuated Valve Development Program. [for application on the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a line-fluid actuated valve design for potential application as a propellant-control valve on the space shuttle was examined. Design and analysis studies of two prototype valve units were conducted and demonstrated performance is reported. It was shown that the line-fluid actuated valve concept offers distinct weight and electrical advantages over alternate valve concepts. Summaries of projected performance and design goals are also included.

  9. Use of self-actuating and self-sensing cantilevers for imaging biological samples in fluid

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, R J; Deutschinger, A; Todorov, V; Gray, D S; Belcher, A M; Rangelow, I W; Youcef-Toumi, K

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed investigation into the suitability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers with integrated deflection sensor and micro-actuator for imaging of soft biological samples in fluid. The Si cantilevers are actuated using a micro-heater at the bottom end of the cantilever. Sensing is achieved through p-doped resistors connected in a Wheatstone bridge. We investigated the influence of the water on the cantilever dynamics, the actuation and the sensing mechanisms, as well as the crosstalk between sensing and actuation. Successful imaging of yeast cells in water using the integrated sensor and actuator shows the potential of the combination of this actuation and sensing method. This constitutes a major step towards the automation and miniaturization required to establish AFM in routine biomedical diagnostics and in vivo applications. PMID:19801750

  10. Competition between pressure effects and airflow influence for the performance of plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegseis, J.; Barckmann, K.; Grundmann, S.; Frey, J.; Tropea, C.

    2014-05-15

    The present work addresses the combined influence of pressure variations and different airflow velocities on the discharge intensity of plasma actuators. Power consumption, plasma length, and discharge capacitance were investigated systematically for varying pressure levels (p = 0.1–1 bar) and airflow velocities (U{sub ∞}=0−100 m/s) to characterize and quantify the favorable and adverse effects on the discharge intensity. In accordance with previous reports, an increasing plasma actuator discharge intensity is observed for decreasing pressure levels. At constant pressure levels, an adverse airflow influence on the electric actuator performance is demonstrated. Despite the improved discharge intensity at lower pressure levels, the seemingly improved performance of the plasma actuators is accompanied with a more pronounced drop of the relative performance. These findings demonstrate the dependency of the (kinematic and thermodynamic) environmental conditions on the electric performance of plasma actuators, which in turn affects the control authority of plasma actuators for flow control applications.

  11. Apparatus for unloading pressurized fluid

    DOEpatents

    Rehberger, K.M.

    1994-01-04

    An apparatus is described for unloading fluid, preferably pressurized gas, from containers in a controlled manner that protects the immediate area from exposure to the container contents. The device consists of an unloading housing, which is enclosed within at least one protective structure, for receiving the dispensed contents of the steel container, and a laser light source, located external to the protective structure, for opening the steel container instantaneously. The neck or stem of the fluid container is placed within the sealed interior environment of the unloading housing. The laser light passes through both the protective structure and the unloading housing to instantaneously pierce a small hole within the stem of the container. Both the protective structure and the unloading housing are specially designed to allow laser light passage without compromising the light's energy level. Also, the unloading housing allows controlled flow of the gas once it has been dispensed from the container. The external light source permits remote operation of the unloading device. 2 figures.

  12. Design of a Magnetostrictive-Hydraulic Actuator Considering Nonlinear System Dynamics and Fluid-Structure Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, John Philip

    Smart material electro-hydraulic actuators (EHAs) utilize fluid rectification via one-way check valves to amplify the small, high-frequency vibrations of certain smart materials into large motions of a hydraulic cylinder. Although the concept has been demonstrated in previously, the operating frequency of smart material EHA systems has been limited to a small fraction of the available bandwidth of the driver materials. The focus of this work is to characterize and model the mechanical performance of a magnetostrictive EHA considering key system components: rectification valves, smart material driver, and fluid-system components, leading to an improved actuator design relative to prior work. The one-way valves were modeled using 3-D finite element analysis, and their behavior was characterized experimentally by static and dynamic experimental measurement. Taking into account the effect of the fluid and mechanical conditions applied to the valves within the pump, the dynamic response of the valve was quantified and applied to determine rectification bandwidth of different valve configurations. A novel miniature reed valve, designed for a frequency response above 10~kHz, was fabricated and tested within a magnetostrictive EHA. The nonlinear response of the magnetostrictive driver, including saturation and hysteresis effects, was modeled using the Jiles-Atherton approach to calculate the magnetization and the resulting magnetostriction based on the applied field calculated within the rod from Maxwell's equations. The dynamic pressure response of the fluid system components (pumping chamber, hydraulic cylinder, and connecting passages) was measured over a range of input frequencies. For the magnetostrictive EHA tested, the peak performance frequency was found to be limited by the fluid resonances within the system. A lumped-parameter modeling approach was applied to model the overall behavior of a magnetostrictive EHA, incorporating models for the reed valve response

  13. Shape-variable seals for pressure actuated cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramüller, B.; Tempel, A.; Hühne, C.

    2015-09-01

    Sealing concepts that allow a large change of cross-sectional area are investigated. Shape variable seals are indispensable for biologically inspired pressure actuated cellular structures (PACS), which can be utilized to develop energy efficient, lightweight and adaptive structures for diverse applications. The extensibility, stiffness and load capacity requirements exceed the characteristics of state of the art solutions. This work focuses on the design of seals suitable for extensional deformations of more than 25%. In a first step, a number of concepts are generated. Then the most suitable concept is chosen, based on numerical characterization and experimental examination. The deformation supportive end cap (DSEC) yields satisfying results as it displays a stress optimized shape under maximum load, an energetically inexpensive bending-based deformation mechanism and utilizes the applied forces to support distortion. In the first real-life implementation of a double row PACS demonstrator, which contains the DSEC, the proof of concept is demonstrated.

  14. Modeling and test of a kinaesthetic actuator based on MR fluid for haptic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tae-Heon; Koo, Jeong-Hoi; Kim, Sang-Youn; Kwon, Dong-Soo

    2017-03-01

    Haptic display units have been widely used for conveying button sensations to users, primarily employing vibrotactile actuators. However, the human feeling for pressing buttons mainly relies on kinaesthetic sensations (rather than vibrotactile sensations), and little studies exist on small-scale kinaesthetic haptic units. Thus, the primary goals of this paper are to design a miniature kinaesthetic actuator based on Magneto-Rheological (MR) fluid that can convey various button-clicking sensations and to experimentally evaluate its haptic performance. The design focuses of the proposed actuator were to produce sufficiently large actuation forces (resistive forces) for human users in a given size constraint and to offer a wide range of actuation forces for conveying vivid haptic sensations to users. To this end, this study first performed a series of parametric studies using mathematical force models for multiple operating modes of MR fluid in conjunction with finite element electromagnetism analysis. After selecting design parameters based on parametric studies, a prototype actuator was constructed, and its performance was evaluated using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. It measured the actuator's resistive force with a varying stroke (pressed depth) up to 1 mm and a varying input current from 0 A to 200 mA. The results show that the proposed actuator creates a wide range of resistive forces from around 2 N (off-state) to over 9.5 N at 200 mA. In order to assess the prototype's performance in the terms of the haptic application prospective, a maximum force rate was calculated to determine just noticeable difference in force changes for the 1 mm stoke of the actuator. The results show that the force rate is sufficient to mimic various levels of button sensations, indicating that the proposed kinaesthetic actuator can offer a wide range of resistive force changes that can be conveyed to human operators.

  15. a New ER Fluid Based Haptic Actuator System for Virtual Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böse, H.; Baumann, M.; Monkman, G. J.; Egersdörfer, S.; Tunayar, A.; Freimuth, H.; Ermert, H.; Khaled, W.

    The concept and some steps in the development of a new actuator system which enables the haptic perception of mechanically inhomogeneous virtual objects are introduced. The system consists of a two-dimensional planar array of actuator elements containing an electrorheological (ER) fluid. When a user presses his fingers onto the surface of the actuator array, he perceives locally variable resistance forces generated by vertical pistons which slide in the ER fluid through the gaps between electrode pairs. The voltage in each actuator element can be individually controlled by a novel sophisticated switching technology based on optoelectric gallium arsenide elements. The haptic information which is represented at the actuator array can be transferred from a corresponding sensor system based on ultrasonic elastography. The combined sensor-actuator system may serve as a technology platform for various applications in virtual reality, like telemedicine where the information on the consistency of tissue of a real patient is detected by the sensor part and recorded by the actuator part at a remote location.

  16. Exact Pressure Evolution Equation for Incompressible Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarotto, M.; Ellero, M.; Aslan, N.; Mond, M.; Nicolini, P.

    2008-12-01

    An important aspect of computational fluid dynamics is related to the determination of the fluid pressure in isothermal incompressible fluids. In particular this concerns the construction of an exact evolution equation for the fluid pressure which replaces the Poisson equation and yields an algorithm which is a Poisson solver, i.e., it permits to time-advance exactly the same fluid pressure without solving the Poisson equation. In fact, the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations represent a mixture of hyperbolic and elliptic pde's, which are extremely hard to study both analytically and numerically. This amounts to transform an elliptic type fluid equation into a suitable hyperbolic equation, a result which usually is reached only by means of an asymptotic formulation. Besides being a still unsolved mathematical problem, the issue is relevant for at least two reasons: a) the proliferation of numerical algorithms in computational fluid dynamics which reproduce the behavior of incompressible fluids only in an asymptotic sense (see below); b) the possible verification of conjectures involving the validity of appropriate equations of state for the fluid pressure. Another possible motivation is, of course, the ongoing quest for efficient numerical solution methods to be applied for the construction of the fluid fields {ρ,V,p}, solutions of the initial and boundary-value problem associated to the incompressible N-S equations (INSE). In this paper we intend to show that an exact solution to this problem can be achieved adopting the approach based on inverse kinetic theory (IKT) recently developed for incompressible fluids by Tessarotto et al. [7, 6, 7, 8, 9]. In particular we intend to prove that the evolution of the fluid fields can be achieved by means of a suitable dynamical system, to be identified with the so-called Navier-Stokes (N-S) dynamical system. As a consequence it is found that the fluid pressure obeys a well-defined evolution equation. The result appears

  17. An actuated elastic sheet interacting with passive and active structures in a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrispell, J. C.; Fauci, L. J.; Shelley, M.

    2013-01-01

    We adapt the classic Taylor swimming sheet set-up to investigate both the transient and long-time dynamics of an actuated elastic sheet immersed in a viscoelastic fluid as it interacts with neighboring structures. While the preferred kinematics of the sheet are specified, the flexible sheet interacts with the surrounding fluid and other structures, and its realized kinematics emerges from this coupling. We use an immersed boundary framework to evolve the Oldroyd-B/Navier-Stokes equations and capture the spatial and temporal development of viscoelastic stresses and sheet shape. We compare the dynamics when the actuated sheet swims next to a free elastic membrane, with and without bending rigidity, and next to a fixed wall. We demonstrate that the sheets can exploit the neighboring structures to enhance their swimming speed and efficiency, and also examine how this depends upon fluid viscoelasticity. When the neighboring structure is likewise an actuated elastic sheet, we investigate the viscoelastic dynamics of phase-locking.

  18. Feasibility study of polyurethane shape-memory polymer actuators for pressure bandage application

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Manzoor; Luo, Jikui; Miraftab, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of laboratory-synthesized polyurethane-based shape-memory polymer (SMPU) actuators has been investigated for possible application in medical pressure bandages where gradient pressure is required between the ankle and the knee for treatment of leg ulcers. In this study, using heat as the stimulant, SMPU strip actuators have been subjected to gradual and cyclic stresses; their recovery force, reproducibility and reusability have been monitored with respect to changes in temperature and circumference of a model leg, and the stress relaxation at various temperatures has been investigated. The findings suggest that SMPU actuators can be used for the development of the next generation of pressure bandages. PMID:27877473

  19. Feasibility study of polyurethane shape-memory polymer actuators for pressure bandage application.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Manzoor; Luo, Jikui; Miraftab, Mohsen

    2012-02-01

    The feasibility of laboratory-synthesized polyurethane-based shape-memory polymer (SMPU) actuators has been investigated for possible application in medical pressure bandages where gradient pressure is required between the ankle and the knee for treatment of leg ulcers. In this study, using heat as the stimulant, SMPU strip actuators have been subjected to gradual and cyclic stresses; their recovery force, reproducibility and reusability have been monitored with respect to changes in temperature and circumference of a model leg, and the stress relaxation at various temperatures has been investigated. The findings suggest that SMPU actuators can be used for the development of the next generation of pressure bandages.

  20. Droplet actuation by surface acoustic waves: an interplay between acoustic streaming and radiation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Philippe; Baudoin, Michael; Matar, Olivier Bou; Zoueshtiagh, Farzam

    2010-11-01

    Surface acoustic waves (SAW) are known to be a versatile technique for the actuation of sessile drops. Droplet displacement, internal mixing or drop splitting, are amongst the elementary operations that SAW can achieve, which are useful on lab-on-chip microfluidics benches. On the purpose to understand the underlying physical mechanisms involved during these operations, we study experimentally the droplet dynamics varying different physical parameters. Here in particular, the influence of liquid viscosity and acoustic frequency is investigated: it is indeed predicted that both quantities should play a role in the acoustic-hydrodynamic coupling involved in the dynamics. The key point is to compare the relative magnitude of the attenuation length, i.e. the scale within which the acoustic wave decays in the fluid, and the size of the drop. This relative magnitude governs the relative importance of acoustic streaming and acoustic radiation pressure, which are both involved in the droplet dynamics.

  1. Fluid Dynamics of a Pressure Reducing Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Instruments for the monitoring of hazardous gases in and near the space shuttle collect sample gas at pressures on the order of one atmosphere and analyze their properties in an ultra-high vacuum by means of a quadrupole-mass-spectrometer partial pressure transducer. Sampling systems for such devices normally produce the required pressure reduction through combinations of vacuum pumps, fluid Tees and flow restrictors (e.g. orifices, sintered metal frits or capillaries). The present work presents an analytical model of the fluid dynamics of such a pressure reduction system which enables the calculation of the pressure in the receiver vessal in terms of system parameters known from the specifications for a given system (e.g. rated pumping speeds of the pumping hardware and the diameters of two orifices situated in two branches of a fluid Tee). The resulting formulas will expedite the fine tuning of instruments now under development and the design of later generations of such devices.

  2. Magnetically Actuated Propellant Orientation, Controlling Fluids in a Low-Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James J.; Holt, James B.

    2000-01-01

    Cryogenic fluid management (CFM) is a technology area common to virtually every space transportation propulsion concept envisioned. Storage, supply, transfer and handling of sub-critical cryogenic fluids are basic capabilities that have long been needed by multiple programs and the need is expected to continue in the future. The use of magnetic fields provides another method, which could replace or augment current/traditional approaches, potentially simplifying vehicle operational constraints. The magnetically actuated propellant orientation (MAPO) program effort focused on the use of magnetic fields to control fluid motion as it relates to positioning (i.e. orientation and acquisition) of a paramagnetic substance such as LO2. Current CFM state- of-the-art systems used to control and acquire propellant in low gravity environments rely on liquid surface tension devices which employ vanes, fine screen mesh channels and baskets. These devices trap and direct propellant to areas where it's needed and have been used routinely with storable (non-cryogenic) propellants. However, almost no data exists r,egarding their operation in cryogenics and the use of such devices confronts designers with a multitude of significant technology issues. Typical problems include a sensitivity to screen dry out (due to thermal loads and pressurant gas) and momentary adverse accelerations (generated from either internal or external sources). Any of these problems can potentially cause the acquisition systems to ingest or develop vapor and fail. The use of lightweight high field strength magnets may offer a valuable means of augmenting traditional systems potentially mitigating or at least easing operational requirements. Two potential uses of magnetic fields include: 1) strategically positioning magnets to keep vent ports clear of liquid (enabling low G vented fill operations), and 2) placing magnets in the center or around the walls of the tank to create an insulating vapor pocket (between

  3. Rubber muscle actuation with pressurized CO2 from enzyme-catalyzed urea hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutter, Thomas M.; Dickerson, Matthew B.; Creasy, Terry S.; Justice, Ryan S.

    2013-09-01

    A biologically inspired pneumatic pressure source was designed and sized to supply high pressure CO2(g) to power a rubber muscle actuator. The enzyme urease served to catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, producing CO2(g) that flowed into the actuator. The actuator’s power envelope was quantified by testing actuator response on a custom-built linear-motion rig. Reaction kinetics and available work density were determined by replacing the actuator with a double-action piston and measuring volumetric gas generation against a fixed pressure on the opposing piston. Under the conditions investigated, urease catalyzed the generation of up to 0.81 MPa (117 psi) of CO2(g) in the reactor headspace within 18 min, and the evolved gas produced a maximum work density of 0.65 J ml-1.

  4. Pressure induced polymerization of fluid ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scelta, Demetrio; Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    The spontaneous polymerization of fluid ethylene under high temperature and pressure conditions has been characterized by using FTIR absorption spectroscopy. The fluid has been isobarically heated at pressures ranging between 0.4 and 1.5 GPa by means of a resistively heated membrane diamond anvil cell. Besides tracing the instability boundary for spontaneous polymerization in the fluid, we have also measured the reaction kinetics at 1.5 GPa and temperatures ranging between 340 and 423 K. From the rate constants the activation energy of the overall reaction could be computed, information that joined to the molecularity of the initiation step provides some insight about the reaction mechanism. The polymers recovered from the different reactions have been characterized by FTIR, Raman, and X-ray diffraction revealing in all the cases a crystalline material of astonishing quality, likely related to the growth of the polymer in the hot fluid monomer.

  5. Enabling Novel Minimally-Actuated Robotic Capabilities Through Active Fluids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-25

    journals : 1. Ahmed Helal. Society of Rheology Meeting, Feb 2013, "Design of Integrated ER valves" 2. Boston Dynamics Active Fluids Program: IEEE RAS...adhesive climbers. (a) Papers published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or published that acknowledge ARO support...from the start of the project to the date of this printing. List the papers, including journal references, in the following categories: Received

  6. Modulus-pressure equation for confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor, Gennady Y.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Shen, Vincent K.; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasonic experiments allow one to measure the elastic modulus of bulk solid or fluid samples. Recently such experiments have been carried out on fluid-saturated nanoporous glass to probe the modulus of a confined fluid. In our previous work [G. Y. Gor et al., J. Chem. Phys., 143, 194506 (2015)], using Monte Carlo simulations we showed that the elastic modulus K of a fluid confined in a mesopore is a function of the pore size. Here we focus on the modulus-pressure dependence K(P), which is linear for bulk materials, a relation known as the Tait-Murnaghan equation. Using transition-matrix Monte Carlo simulations we calculated the elastic modulus of bulk argon as a function of pressure and argon confined in silica mesopores as a function of Laplace pressure. Our calculations show that while the elastic modulus is strongly affected by confinement and temperature, the slope of the modulus versus pressure is not. Moreover, the calculated slope is in a good agreement with the reference data for bulk argon and experimental data for confined argon derived from ultrasonic experiments. We propose to use the value of the slope of K(P) to estimate the elastic moduli of an unknown porous medium.

  7. Pressurized fluid damping of nanoelectromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Svitelskiy, Oleksiy; Sauer, Vince; Liu, Ning; Cheng, Kar-Mun; Finley, Eric; Freeman, Mark R; Hiebert, Wayne K

    2009-12-11

    Interactions of nanoscale structures with fluids are of current interest both in the elucidation of fluid dynamics at these small scales, and in determining the ultimate performance of nanoelectromechanical systems outside of vacuum. We present a comprehensive study of nanomechanical damping in three gases (He, N2, CO2), and liquid CO2. Resonant dynamics in multiple devices of varying size and frequency is measured over 10 decades of pressure (1 mPa-20 MPa) using time-domain stroboscopic optical interferometry. The wide pressure range allows full exploration of the regions of validity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow damping models. Observing free molecular flow behavior extending above 1 atm, we find a fluid relaxation time model to be valid throughout, but not beyond, the non-Newtonian regime, and a Newtonian flow vibrating spheres model to be valid in the viscous limit.

  8. Remotely actuated localized pressure and heat apparatus and method of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merret, John B. (Inventor); Taylor, DeVor R. (Inventor); Wheeler, Mark M. (Inventor); Gale, Dan R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the use of a remotely actuated localized pressure and heat apparatus for the consolidation and curing of fiber elements in, structures. The apparatus includes members for clamping the desired portion of the fiber elements to be joined, pressure members and/or heat members. The method is directed to the application and use of the apparatus.

  9. Fluid hydrogen at high density - Pressure dissociation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saumon, Didier; Chabrier, Gilles

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Helmholtz free energy of fluid hydrogen at high density and high temperature is developed. This model aims at describing both pressure and temperature dissociation and ionization and bears directly on equations of state of partially ionized plasmas, as encountered in astrophysical situations and high-pressure experiments. This paper focuses on a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules and is devoted to the study of the phenomenon of pressure dissociation at finite temperatures. In the present model, the strong interactions are described with realistic potentials and are computed with a modified Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fluid perturbation theory that reproduces Monte Carlo simulations to better than 3 percent. Theoretical Hugoniot curves derived from the model are in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  10. Potential pressurized payloads: Fluid and thermal experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D.

    1992-01-01

    Space Station Freedom (SSF) presents the opportunity to perform long term fluid and thermal experiments in a microgravity environment. This presentation provides perspective on the need for fluids/thermal experimentation in a microgravity environment, addresses previous efforts, identifies possible experiments, and discusses the capabilities of a proposed fluid physics/dynamics test facility. Numerous spacecraft systems use fluids for their operation. Thermal control, propulsion, waste management, and various operational processes are examples of such systems. However, effective ground testing is very difficult. This is because the effect of gravity induced phenomena, such as hydrostatic pressure, buoyant convection, and stratification, overcome such forces as surface tension, diffusion, electric potential, etc., which normally dominate in a microgravity environment. Hence, space experimentation is necessary to develop and validate a new fluid based technology. Two broad types of experiments may be performed on SSF: basic research and applied research. Basic research might include experiments focusing on capillary phenomena (with or without thermal and/or solutal gradients), thermal/solutal convection, phase transitions, and multiphase flow. Representative examples of applied research might include two-phase pressure drop, two-phase flow instabilities, heat transfer coefficients, fluid tank fill/drain, tank slosh dynamics, condensate removal enhancement, and void formation within thermal energy storage materials. In order to better support such fluid/thermal experiments on board SSF, OSSA has developed a conceptual design for a proposed Fluid Physics/Dynamics Facility (FP/DF). The proposed facility consists of one facility rack permanently located on SSF and one experimenter rack which is changed out as needed to support specific experiments. This approach will minimize the on-board integration/deintegration required for specific experiments. The FP/DF will have

  11. Feasibility of controlling speed-dependent low-frequency brake vibration amplification by modulating actuation pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Osman Taha; Dreyer, Jason T.; Singh, Rajendra

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a feasibility study of controlling the low frequency torque response of a disc brake system with modulated actuation pressure (in the open loop mode) is conducted. First, a quasi-linear model of the torsional system is introduced, and analytical solutions are proposed to incorporate the modulation effect. Tractable expressions for three different modulation schemes are obtained, and conditions that would lead to a reduction in the oscillatory amplitudes are identified. Second, these conditions are evaluated with a numerical model of the torsional system with clearance nonlinearity, and analytical solutions are verified in terms of the trends observed. Finally, a laboratory experiment with a solenoid valve is built to modulate actuation pressure with a constant duty cycle, and time-frequency domain data are acquired. Measurements are utilized to assess analytical observations, and all methods show that the speed-dependent brake torque amplitudes can be altered with an appropriate modulation of actuation pressure.

  12. Application of metal hydride paper to simple pressure generator for use in soft actuator systems.

    PubMed

    Ino, Shuichi; Sakaki, Kouji; Hosono, Minako; Doi, Kouki; Shimada, Shigenobu; Chikai, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) actuators have a simple structure and a number of features that make them attractive for use in rehabilitation engineering and assistive technology. The MH actuator provides a high power-to-weight ratio, high-strain actuation, human-compatible softness, and noiseless operation, while being environmentally benign. On the other hand, there remain technical challenges to be overcome to improve the MH actuator regarding its speed of operation and energy efficiency, given the low heat conductivity of the MH powder that is used as the pressure generator for soft actuation. To overcome the issues of low heat conductivity and the handling of MH powder, we developed an MH paper, which is a special paper incorporating MH powder and carbon fiber, for use as a new pressure-generating element for a soft MH actuator system. In addition, the basic properties and structure of the proposed MH paper were investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and several thermodynamic experiments. The results of these experiments showed that the hydrogen absorption and desorption rates of the MH paper were significantly higher than those of the MH powder around room temperature.

  13. Topology optimization of adaptive fluid-actuated cellular structures with arbitrary polygonal motor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jun; Tang, Liang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Hongwu

    2016-05-01

    This paper mainly focuses on the fast and efficient design method for plant bioinspired fluidic cellular materials and structures composed of polygonal motor cells. Here we developed a novel structural optimization method with arbitrary polygonal coarse-grid elements based on multiscale finite element frameworks. The fluidic cellular structures are meshed with irregular polygonal coarse-grid elements according to their natural size and the shape of the imbedded motor cells. The multiscale base functions of solid displacement and hydraulic pressure are then constructed to bring the small-scale information of the irregular motor cells to the large-scale simulations on the polygonal coarse-grid elements. On this basis, a new topology optimization method based on the resulting polygonal coarse-grid elements is proposed to determine the optimal distributions or number of motor cells in the smart cellular structures. Three types of optimization problems are solved according to the usages of the fluidic cellular structures. Firstly, the proposed optimization method is utilized to minimize the system compliance of the load-bearing fluidic cellular structures. Second, the method is further extended to design biomimetic compliant actuators of the fluidic cellular materials due to the fact that non-uniform volume expansions of fluid in the cells can induce elastic action. Third, the optimization problem focuses on the weight minimization of the cellular structure under the constraints for the compliance of the whole system. Several representative examples are investigated to validate the effectiveness of the proposed polygon-based topology optimization method of the smart materials.

  14. Separation control in low pressure turbines using plasma actuators with passing wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burman, Debashish

    A Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is operated in flow over the suction surface of a Pack-B Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) airfoil at a Reynolds number of 50,000 (based on exit velocity and suction surface length) and inlet free-stream turbulence intensity of 2.5%. Preliminary characterization studies were made of the effect of varying actuator pulsing frequency and duty cycle, actuator edge effects, and orientation of the actuator with the flow. Flow control was demonstrated with the actuator imparting momentum opposite to the stream-wise flow direction, showing that it is possible to use disturbances alone to destabilize the flow and effect transition. No frequencies of strong influence were found over the range tested, indicating that a broad band of effective frequencies exists. Edge effects were found to considerably enhance separation control. Total pressure measurements of the flow without passing wakes were taken using a glass total-pressure tube. Corrections for streamline displacement due to shear and wall effects were made, and comparisons with previous hot-wire measurements were used to validate data. Performance features of conventional two-electrode and a novel three-electrode actuator configuration were compared. Hot-wire anemometry was used to take time-varying ensemble-averaged near-wall velocity measurements of the flow with periodic passing wakes. Corrections were made for near-wall effects, temperature effects, and interference of the electric field. The wakes were generated by a wake generator mechanism located upstream of the airfoil passage. The near-suction-surface total pressure field (flow without wakes) and velocity field (flow with wakes) in the trailing part of the airfoil passage, and the wall-normal gradient of these quantities, were used to demonstrate effective prevention of flow separation using the plasma actuator. Both flows (with and without passing wakes) showed fully attached flow (or very thin separation zones

  15. Biomimetic cilia arrays - fabrication, magnetic actuation, and driven fluid transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Adam

    The cilium is one of biology's most basic functional nanostructures, present on nearly every cell and increasingly realized as vital to many aspects of human health. A fundamental reason for the ubiquity of cilia is their ability to effectively interact with fluids at the microscale, where the Reynolds number is low and thus inertia is irrelevant. This ability makes cilia an attractive and popular candidate for an engineered biomimic with potential applications in microfluidics and sensing. In addition, biological ciliated systems are difficult to study for many reasons, and so I demonstrate how a functional biomimetic system can also serve as a model platform for highly controlled studies of biologically relevant, cilia-driven hydrodynamics. Using the template-based microfabrication of a magnetic nanoparticle/polymer composite, I fabricate arrays of magnetically actuated biomimetic cilia at the scale of their biological analogues. I will discuss this fabrication technique and the magnetic actuation of these arrays to mimic the beat of biological cilia. I also report on the nature of the fluid flows driven by the cilia beat, and demonstrate how these cilia arrays can simultaneously generate long-range fluid transport and mixing in distinct fluid flow regimes. Finally, I present these results within the context of canonical hydrodynamics problems and discuss the implications for biological systems, such as the motile cilia recently discovered in the embryonic node.

  16. Smart mouse: 5-DOF haptic hand master using magneto-rheological fluid actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Nam, Y. J.; Yamane, R.; Park, M. K.

    2009-02-01

    This paper is concerned with a haptic hand master intended to display force feedback at the fingertip of the human user. The haptic hand master, named 'Smart Mouse' has two significant differences from previous other hand masters: actuators and structure. Five passive actuators featured with magneto-rheological fluid are used to ensure the interface safety and the control stability. In order to eliminate the unnecessary reaction force and reduce muscular fatigue during operating, the mouse-like structure is adapted. Also, two assumptions are proposed for the simplicity of its kinematics and manufacturing; one is that the fingertips lies on a plane during grasping the objects, and the other is that the equilibrium point of the fingertip reaction forces is in the object. Due to these characteristics, the human hand operating the smart mouse has the kinematic configuration similar to a 5-DOF parallel manipulator.

  17. A non-intrusive fluid-wave actuator and sensor pair for the active control of fluid-borne vibrations in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, M. J.; Elliott, S. J.; Pinnington, R. J.

    1996-06-01

    This paper describes the design of a non-intrusive fluid-wave actuator and sensor pair for use in an active control system to control fluid-borne vibrations in pipework systems. Piping systems can be excited by sources such as pumps and compressors and vibrational energy can propagate both in the pipe wall and the fluid. The transducers developed in this paper are designed only for the control of the fluid-borne vibrational energy. A theoretical framework is developed that integrates the transducers into the pipe and couples them to the motion of the fluid inside the pipe. A hydraulic actuator driven with a magnetostrictive element and fitted to a water-filled perspex pipe has been designed and tested. The sensor was made from piezoelectric elements fitted around the outer circumference of the pipe. Experimental results show that the actuator is capable of suppressing a propagating fluid-wave, but in doing so it increases the vibration of the pipe-wall in the vicinity of the actuator. When the sensor is employed as an error sensor together with the actuator in the frequency range 10 - 1000 Hz, a reduction in the fluid-wave amplitude of around 20 dB is possible.

  18. Sensing of fluid viscoelasticity from piezoelectric actuation of cantilever flexural vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeongwon; Jeong, Seongbin; Kim, Seung Joon; Park, Junhong

    2015-01-15

    An experimental method is proposed to measure the rheological properties of fluids. The effects of fluids on the vibration actuated by piezoelectric patches were analyzed and used in measuring viscoelastic properties. Fluid-structure interactions induced changes in the beam vibration properties and frequency-dependent variations of the complex wavenumber of the beam structure were used in monitoring these changes. To account for the effects of fluid-structure interaction, fluids were modelled as a simple viscoelastic support at one end of the beam. The measured properties were the fluid’s dynamic shear modulus and loss tangent. Using the proposed method, the rheological properties of various non-Newtonian fluids were measured. The frequency range for which reliable viscoelasticity results could be obtained was 10–400 Hz. Viscosity standard fluids were tested to verify the accuracy of the proposed method, and the results agreed well with the manufacturer’s reported values. The simple proposed laboratory setup for measurements was flexible so that the frequency ranges of data acquisition were adjustable by changing the beam’s mechanical properties.

  19. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids--Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Robert A; Shaw, J M

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  20. A needle-free technique for interstitial fluid sample acquisition using a lorentz-force actuated jet injector.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jean H; Hogan, N Catherine; Hunter, Ian W

    2015-08-10

    We present a novel method of quickly acquiring dermal interstitial fluid (ISF) samples using a Lorentz-force actuated needle-free jet injector. The feasibility of the method is first demonstrated on post-mortem porcine tissue. The jet injector is used to first inject a small volume of physiological saline to breach the skin, and the back-drivability of the actuator is utilized to create negative pressure in the ampoule and collect ISF. The effect of the injection and extraction parameters on sample dilution and extracted volumes is investigated. A simple finite element model is developed to demonstrate why this acquisition method results in faster extractions than conventional sampling methods. Using this method, we are able to collect a sample that contains up to 3.5% ISF in 3.1s from post-mortem skin. The trends revealed from experimentation on post-mortem skin are then used to identify the parameters for a live animal study. The feasibility of the acquisition process is successfully demonstrated using live rats; the process is revealed to extract samples that have been diluted by a factor of 111-125.

  1. Heat transfer enhancement with actuation of magnetic nanoparticles suspended in a base fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şeşen, Muhsincan; Tekşen, Yiǧit; Şendur, Kürşat; Pınar Mengüç, M.; Öztürk, Hande; Yaǧcı Acar, H. F.; Koşar, Ali

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we have experimentally demonstrated that heat transfer can be substantially increased by actuating magnetic nanoparticles inside a nanofluid. In order to materialize this, we have utilized a miniature heat transfer enhancement system based on the actuation of magnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a base fluid (water). This compact system consists of a pool filled with a nanofluid containing ferromagnetic nanoparticles, a heater, and two magnetic stirrers. The ferromagnetic particles within the pool were actuated with the magnetic stirrers. Single-phase heat transfer characteristics of the system were investigated at various fixed heat fluxes and were compared to those of stationary nanofluid (without magnetic stirring). The heat transfer enhancement realized by the circulation of ferromagnetic nanoparticles dispersed in a nanofluid was studied using the experimental setup. The temperatures were recorded from the readings of thin thermocouples, which were integrated to the heater surface. The surface temperatures were monitored against the input heat flux and data were processed to compare the heat transfer results of the configuration with magnetic stirrers to the heat transfer of the configuration without the magnetic stirrers.

  2. Pressure Transfer Functions for Interfacial Fluids Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Hur, Vera Mikyoung; Walsh, Samuel

    2017-03-01

    We make a consistent derivation, from the governing equations, of the pressure transfer function in the small-amplitude Stokes wave regime and the hydrostatic approximation in the small-amplitude solitary water wave regime, in the presence of a background shear flow. The results agree with the well-known formulae in the zero vorticity case, but they incorporate the effects of vorticity through solutions to the Rayleigh equation. We extend the results to permit continuous density stratification and to internal waves between two constant-density fluids. Several examples are discussed.

  3. Combined Effect of Fluid and Pressure on Middle Ear Function

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Wood, Mark W.; Gan, Rong Z.

    2008-01-01

    In our previous studies, the effects of effusion and pressure on sound transmission were investigated separately. The aim of this study is to investigate the combined effect of fluid and pressure on middle ear function. An otitis media with effusion model was created by injecting saline solution and air pressure simultaneously into the middle ear of human temporal bones. Tympanic membrane displacement in response to 90 dB SPL sound input was measured by a laser vibrometer and the compliance of the middle ear was measured by a tympanometer. The movement of the tympanic membrane at the umbo was reduced up to 17 dB by the combination of fluid and pressure in the middle ear over the auditory frequency range. The fluid and pressure effects on the umbo movement in the fluid-pressure combination are not additive. The combined effect of fluid and pressure on the umbo movement is different compared with that of only fluid or pressure change in the middle ear. Negative pressure in fluid-pressure combination had more effect on middle ear function than positive pressure. Tympanometry can detect the middle ear pressure of the fluid-pressure combination. This study provides quantitative information for analysis of the combined effect of fluid and pressure on tympanic membrane movement. PMID:18162348

  4. Valve assembly for use with high temperature and high pressure fluids

    DOEpatents

    De Feo, Angelo

    1982-01-01

    The valve assembly for use with high temperature and high pressure fluids has inner and outer spaced shells and a valve actuator support of inner and outer spaced members which are connected at their end portions to the inner and outer shells, respectively, to extend substantially normal to the longitudinal axis of the inner shell. A layer of resilient heat insulating material covers the outer surfaces of the inner shell and the inner actuator support member and is of a thickness to only occupy part of the spaces between the inner and outer shells and inner and outer actuator support members. The remaining portion of the space between the inner and outer shells and the space between the inner and outer members is substantially filled with a body of castable, rigid refractory material. A movable valve member is disposed in the inner shell. A valve actuator assembly is supported in the valve actuator support to extend into the inner shell for connection with the movable valve member for movement of the movable valve member to positions from a fully open to a fully closed position to control flow of fluid through the inner shell. An anchor mneans is disposed adjacent opposite sides of the axis of the valve actuator support and attached to the inner shell so that relative radial movement between the inner and outer shell is permitted by the layer of resilient heat insulating material and relative longitudinal movement of the inner shell to the outer shell is permitted in opposite directions from the anchor means to thereby maintain the functional integrity of the movable valve member by providing an area of the inner shell surrounding the movable valve member longitdinally stationary, but at the same time allowing radial movement.

  5. Fluid transport at low Reynolds number with magnetically actuated artificial cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauger, E. M.; Downton, M. T.; Stark, H.

    2009-02-01

    By numerical modeling we investigate fluid transport in low-Reynolds-number flow achieved with a special elastic filament or artifical cilium attached to a planar surface. The filament is made of superparamagnetic particles linked together by DNA double strands. An external magnetic field induces dipolar interactions between the beads of the filament which provides a convenient way of actuating the cilium in a well-controlled manner. The filament has recently been used to successfully construct the first artificial micro-swimmer (R. Dreyfus et al., Nature 437, 862 (2005)). In our numerical study we introduce a measure, which we call pumping performance, to quantify the fluid transport induced by the magnetically actuated cilium and identify an optimum stroke pattern of the filament. It consists of a slow transport stroke and a fast recovery stroke. Our detailed parameter study also reveals that for sufficiently large magnetic fields the artificial cilium is mainly governed by the Mason number that compares frictional to magnetic forces. Initial studies on multi-cilia systems show that the pumping performance is very sensitive to the imposed phase lag between neighboring cilia, i.e., to the details of the initiated metachronal wave.

  6. Pressure Actuated Leaf Seals for Improved Turbine Shaft Sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grondahl, Clayton

    2006-01-01

    This presentation introduces a shaft seal in which leaf seal elements are constructed from slotted shim material formed and layered into a frusto-conical assembly. Limited elastic deflection of seal leaves with increasing system pressure close large startup clearance to a small, non-contacting, steady state running clearance. At shutdown seal elements resiliently retract as differential seal pressure diminishes. Large seal clearance during startup and shutdown provides a mechanism for rub avoidance. Minimum operating clearance improves performance and non-contacting operation promises long seal life. Design features of this seal, sample calculations at differential pressures up to 2400 psid and benefit comparison with brush and labyrinth seals is documented in paper, AIAA 2005 3985, presented at the Advanced Seal Technology session of the Joint Propulsion Conference in Tucson this past July. In this presentation use of bimetallic leaf material will be discussed. Frictional heating of bimetallic leaf seals during a seal rub can relieve the rub condition to some extent with a change in seal shape. Improved leaf seal rub tolerance is expected with bimetallic material.

  7. Characterization of hydrofoil damping due to fluid-structure interaction using piezocomposite actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, Charles; Coutu, André; Monette, Christine; Nennemann, Bernd; Marmont, Hugues

    2012-03-01

    Hydroelectric power generation is an important non-fossil fuel power source to help meet the world’s energy needs. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI), in the form of mass loading and damping, governs the dynamic response of water turbines, such as Francis turbines. Although the effects of fluid mass loading are well documented, fluid damping is also a critical quantity that may limit vibration amplitudes during service, and therefore help to avoid premature failure of the turbines. However, fluid damping has received less attention in the literature. This paper presents an experimental investigation of damping due to FSI. Three hydrofoils were designed and built to investigate damping due to FSI. Piezoelectric actuation using macrofiber composites (MFCs) provided excitation to the hydrofoil test structure, independent of the flow conditions, to overcome the noisy environment. Natural frequency and damping estimates were experimentally obtained from sine sweep frequency response functions measured with a laser vibrometer through a window in the test section. The results indicate that, although the natural frequencies were not substantially affected by the flow, the damping ratios were observed to increase in a linear manner with respect to flow velocity.

  8. FLUID PRESSURE AND CAM OPERATED VACUUM VALVE

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.

    1963-11-26

    An ultra-high vacuum valve that is bakable, reusable, and capable of being quickly opened and closed is described. A translationally movable valve gate having an annular ridge is adapted to contact an annular soft metal gasket disposed at the valve seat such that the soft metal gasket extends beyond the annular ridge on all sides. The valve gate is closed, by first laterally aligning the valve gate with the valve seat and then bringing the valve gate and valve seat into seating contact by the translational movement of a ramp-like wedging means that engages similar ramp-like stractures at the base of the valve gate to force the valve gate into essentially pressureless contact with the annular soft metal gasket. This gasket is then pressurized from beneath by a fluid thereby effecting a vacuura tight seal between the gasket and the ridge. (AEC)

  9. Transcapillary fluid responses to lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aratow, Michael; Fortney, Suzanne M.; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Crenshaw, Albert G.; Hargens, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) on transcapillary fluid balance, with and without saline ingestion, was investigated in normally hydrated human subjects by measuring leg interstitial fluid pressure, leg circumference, plasma volume, and net whole body transcapillary fluid transport during and after supine LBNP in human subjects. The results indicate that prolonged LBNP, especially with saline ingestion, promotes fluid filtration into lower body tissues.

  10. Laboratory investigation of a fluid-dynamic actuator designed for CubeSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Daniel; Brieß, Klaus

    2014-03-01

    In general, the attitude control systems (ACS) for precise spacecraft operations rely on reaction wheel technology for angular momentum exchange. In this paper, an alternative ACS concept using fluid rings for this task is presented. This novel actuator—based on Lorentz body force—uses a direct-current conduction pump to accelerate liquid metal within a circular channel structure. As working fluid for the fluid-dynamic actuator (FDA) serves the eutectic alloy Galinstan. Along with a microcontroller that runs the FDA, a MEMS gyroscope is implemented on the device for closed loop operation. Several models of FDAs for small satellites were tested successfully for various attitude control maneuvers on an air bearing platform. Thus advantageous performance has been achieved in terms of torque and power consumption in comparison to similarly dimensioned reaction wheels. Further considerable advantages are wear-free operations and higher reliability as well as expected passive damping properties. A next generation FDA prototype for nano-satellites is currently in development for in-orbit testing.

  11. Pressure-actuated microfluidic devices for electrophoretic separation of pre-term birth biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Sahore, V; Kumar, S; Rogers, C I; Jensen, J K; Sonker, M; Woolley, A T

    2016-01-01

    We have developed microfluidic devices with pressure-driven injection for electrophoretic analysis of amino acids, peptides, and proteins. The novelty of our approach lies in the use of an externally actuated on-chip peristaltic pump and closely spaced pneumatic valves that allow well-defined, small-volume sample plugs to be injected and separated by microchip electrophoresis. We fabricated three-layer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices. The fluidic layer had injection and separation channels, and the control layer had an externally actuated on-chip peristaltic pump and four pneumatic valves around the T-intersection to carry out sample injection. An unpatterned PDMS membrane layer was sandwiched between the fluidic and control layers as the actuated component in pumps and valves. Devices with the same peristaltic pump design but different valve spacings (100, 200, 300, and 400 μm) from the injection intersection were fabricated using soft lithographic techniques. Devices were characterized through fluorescent imaging of captured plugs of a fluorescein-labeled amino acid mixture and through microchip electrophoresis separations. A suitable combination of peak height, separation efficiency, and analysis time was obtained with a peristaltic pump actuation rate of 50 ms, an injection time of 30 s, and a 200-μm valve spacing. We demonstrated the injection of samples in different solutions and were able to achieve a 2.4-fold improvement in peak height and a 2.8-fold increase in separation efficiency though sample stacking. A comparison of pressure-driven injection and electrokinetic injection with the same injection time and separation voltage showed a 3.9-fold increase in peak height in pressure-based injection with comparable separation efficiency. Finally, the microchip systems were used to separate biomarkers implicated in pre-term birth. Although these devices have initially been demonstrated as a stand-alone microfluidic separation tool, they

  12. Apparatus for Pumping a Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van Boeyen, Roger W. (Inventor); Reeh, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Kesmez, Mehmet (Inventor); Heselmeyer, Eric A. (Inventor); Parkey, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An electrochemically actuated pump and an electrochemical actuator for use with a pump. The pump includes one of various stroke volume multiplier configurations with the pressure of a pumping fluid assisting actuation of a driving fluid bellows. The electrochemical actuator has at least one electrode fluidically coupled to the driving fluid chamber of the first pump housing and at least one electrode fluidically coupled to the driving fluid chamber of the second pump housing. Accordingly, the electrochemical actuator selectively pressurizes hydrogen gas within a driving fluid chamber. The actuator may include a membrane electrode assembly including an ion exchange membrane with first and second catalyzed electrodes in contact with opposing sides of the membrane, and first and second hydrogen gas chambers in fluid communication with the first and second electrodes, respectively. A controller may reverse the polarity of a voltage source electrically coupled to the current collectors.

  13. Controlled differential pressure system for an enhanced fluid blending apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis

    2009-02-24

    A system and method for producing a controlled blend of two or more fluids. Thermally-induced permeation through a permeable tube is used to mix a first fluid from outside the tube with a second fluid flowing through the tube. Mixture ratios may be controlled by adjusting the temperature of the first fluid or by adjusting the pressure drop through the permeable tube. The combination of a back pressure control valve and a differential regulator is used to control the output pressure of the blended fluid. The combination of the back pressure control valve and differential regulator provides superior flow control of the second dry gas. A valve manifold system may be used to mix multiple fluids, and to adjust the volume of blended fluid produced, and to further modify the mixture ratio.

  14. A timer-actuated immunoassay cassette for detecting molecular markers in oral fluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changchun; Qiu, Xianbo; Ongagna, Serge; Chen, Dafeng; Chen, Zongyuan; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L A M; Bau, Haim H

    2009-03-21

    An inexpensive, hand-held, point-of-care, disposable, self-contained immunoassay cassette comprised of air pouches for pumping, a metering chamber, reagents storage chambers, a mixer, and a lateral flow strip was designed, constructed, and tested. The assay was carried out in a consecutive flow format. The detection was facilitated with up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles. The automated, timely pumping of the various reagents was driven by a spring-loaded timer. The utility of the cassette was demonstrated by detecting antibodies to HIV in saliva samples and further evaluated with a non-contagious, haptenized DNA assay. The cassette has several advantages over dip sticks such as sample preprocessing, integrated storage of reagents, and automated operation that reduces operator errors and training. The cassette and actuator described herein can readily be extended to detect biomarkers of other diseases in body fluids and other fluids at the point of care. The system is particularly suitable for resource-poor countries, where funds and trained personnel are in short supply.

  15. The transmission of gas pressure to xylem fluid pressure when plants are inside a pressure bomb.

    PubMed

    Wei, C; Tyree, M T; Bennink, J P

    2000-02-01

    In earlier work tobacco leaves were placed in a Scholander-Hammel pressure bomb and the end of the petiole sealed with a pressure transducer in order to measure pressure transmission from the compressed gas (Pg) in the bomb to the xylem fluid (Px). Pressure bomb theory would predict a 1:1 relationship for Pg:Px when tobacco leaves start at a balance pressure of zero. Failure to observe the expected 1:1 relationship has cast doubt on the pressure-bomb technique in the measurement of the xylem pressure of plants. The experimental and theoretical relationship between Px and Pg was investigated in Tsuga canadensis (L) branches and Nicotiana rustica (L) leaves in this paper. It is concluded that the non 1:1 outcome was due to the compression of air bubbles in embolized xylem vessels, evaporation of water from the tissue, and the expansion of the sealed stem segment (or petiole) protruding beyond the seal of the pressure bomb. The expected 1:1 relationship could be obtained when xylem embolism was eliminated and stem expansion prevented. It is argued that the non 1:1 relationship in the positive pressure range does not invalidate the Scholander pressure bomb method of measuring xylem pressure in plants because Px never reaches positive values during the determination of the balance pressure.

  16. Influence of air pressure on the performance of plasma synthetic jet actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Jia, Min; Wu, Yun; Li, Ying-hong; Zong, Hao-hua; Song, Hui-min; Liang, Hua

    2016-09-01

    Plasma synthetic jet actuator (PSJA) has a wide application prospect in the high-speed flow control field for its high jet velocity. In this paper, the influence of the air pressure on the performance of a two-electrode PSJA is investigated by the schlieren method in a large range from 7 kPa to 100 kPa. The energy consumed by the PSJA is roughly the same for all the pressure levels. Traces of the precursor shock wave velocity and the jet front velocity vary a lot for different pressures. The precursor shock wave velocity first decreases gradually and then remains at 345 m/s as the air pressure increases. The peak jet front velocity always appears at the first appearance of a jet, and it decreases gradually with the increase of the air pressure. A maximum precursor shock wave velocity of 520 m/s and a maximum jet front velocity of 440 m/s are observed at the pressure of 7 kPa. The averaged jet velocity in one period ranges from 44 m/s to 54 m/s for all air pressures, and it drops with the rising of the air pressure. High velocities of the precursor shock wave and the jet front indicate that this type of PSJA can still be used to influence the high-speed flow field at 7 kPa. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51407197, 51522606, 51336011, 91541120, and 11472306).

  17. Active noise control - Piezoceramic actuators in fluid/structure interaction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Fang, W.; Smith, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    A model for a 2-D acoustic cavity with a flexible boundary (a beam) controlled via piezoceramic patches producing bending moments in the beam is considered. The associated control problem for this fluid/structure interaction system to reduce the acoustic pressure in the cavity involves unbounded control inputs. Approximation methods in the context of an LQR state space formulation are discussed, and numerical results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach in computing feedback controls for noise reduction.

  18. Fluid infiltration pressure for hydrophobic nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Jingwen; Li, Long; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Dongyan; Huang, Baoling; Li, Zhigang

    2015-03-01

    We investigate water infiltration pressure for hydrophobic nanochannels through molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the entrance energy barrier significantly raises the infiltration pressure, which makes the classic Young-Laplace equation invalid for nanochannels. As the channel surface is tuned from superhydrophobic to hydrophobic, the infiltration pressure is greatly reduced mainly due to the decrease of the capillary pressure (Young-Laplace equation) caused by the contact angle change, while the contribution of the entrance energy barrier to the infiltration pressure, which is termed entrance barrier pressure, increases from 25% to 60%.

  19. Investigation of change in surface morphology of heated surfaces upon pool boiling of magnetic fluids under magnetic actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaeian, Mostafa; Yildizhan, Melike-Mercan; Coşkun, Ömer; Ozkalay, Ebrar; Tekşen, Yiğit; Gulgun, Mehmet Ali; Funda Yagci Acar, Havva; Koşar, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Nanofluids are becoming a significant candidate for new generation coolants to be used in industrial applications. In order to reduce clustering and sedimentation of nanoparticles and improve the heat transfer performance simultaneously, magnetic fluids prepared with magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles dispersed in water, which were placed in a pool and were exposed to varying magnetic fields to actuate nanoparticles in the system. The effect of magnetic actuation on boiling heat transfer characteristics and on the surface morphology of the pool was examined. An average enhancement of 29% in boiling heat transfer was achieved via magnetic actuation with rather low magnetic field (magnetic flux densities up to 11 mT) densities. Furthermore, it was observed that magnetic actuation significantly prevented the deposition and sedimentation of the nanoparticles in the pool. Otherwise, significant destabilization of nanoparticles causing aggregation and heavy sedimentation was present as a result of the performed surface analysis. Even though magnetic actuation reduced the sedimentation on the macroscale, the deposition of a thick and porous film occurred onto the pool floor, increasing the surface roughness.

  20. A hybrid ultrasonic motor and electrorheological fluid clutch actuator for force-feedback in MRI/fMRI.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Dominique; Gassert, Roger; Burdet, Etienne; Bleuler, Hannes

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a safe, electrically powered MR-compatible actuator with a large range of output impedance, which can be used at the entry of the scanner bore. This actuator is composed of an ultrasonic motor (USM) and a torque-controlled electrorheological fluid clutch which modulates the output torque of the USM. This paper describes the developments on the electrorheological fluid (ERF) clutch and its high voltage driver. The performances of the ERF brake constituting the clutch are evaluated, and its torque range is adapted using an epicyclic differential. The transmissible torque of the ERF clutch, i.e., the maximum system output torque, is 94.4 mNm and its drag torque is 2.6 mNm. The MR compatibility of the complete hybrid actuator is shown in extensive tests including subtraction of images and comparison of signal-to-noise ratios in powered and unpowered conditions. This novel MR-compatible actuator may be used to study the neural control of the hand.

  1. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7 kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  2. Evaluation of high-pressure drilling fluid supply systems

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.C.; Reichman, J.M.; Theimer, K.J.

    1981-10-01

    A study was undertaken to help determine the technical and economic feasibility of developing a high-pressure fluid-jet drilling system for the production of geothermal wells. Three system concepts were developed and analyzed in terms of costs, component availability, and required new-component development. These concepts included a single-conduit system that supplies the downhole cutting nozzles directly via surface-located high-pressure pumps; a single-conduit system utilizing low-pressure surface pumps to supply and operate a high-pressure downhole pump, which in turn supplies the cutting nozzles; and a dual-conduit system supplying surface-generated high-pressure fluid for cutting via one conduit and low-pressure scavenging fluid via the other. It is concluded that the single-conduit downhole pump system concept has the greatest potential for success in this application. 28 figures, 11 tables.

  3. The thermodynamical instability induced by pressure ionization in fluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiong; Liu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Gong-Mu; Zhao, Yan-Hong; Lu, Guo; Tian, Ming-Feng; Song, Hai-Feng

    2016-11-01

    A systematic study of pressure ionization is carried out in the chemical picture by the example of fluid helium. By comparing the variants of the chemical model, it is demonstrated that the behavior of pressure ionization depends on the construction of the free energy function. In the chemical model with the Coulomb free energy described by the Padé interpolation formula, thermodynamical instability induced by pressure ionization is found to be manifested by a discontinuous drop or a continuous fall and rise along the pressure-density curve as well as the pressure-temperature curve, which is very much like the first order liquid-liquid phase transition of fluid hydrogen from the first principles simulations. In contrast, in the variant chemical model with the Coulomb free energy term empirically weakened, no thermodynamical instability is induced when pressure ionization occurs, and the resulting equation of state achieves a good agreement with the first principles simulations of fluid helium.

  4. Calculating Mass Diffusion in High-Pressure Binary Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model of mass diffusion has been developed for binary fluids at high pressures, including critical and supercritical pressures. Heretofore, diverse expressions, valid for limited parameter ranges, have been used to correlate high-pressure binary mass-diffusion-coefficient data. This model will likely be especially useful in the computational simulation and analysis of combustion phenomena in diesel engines, gas turbines, and liquid rocket engines, wherein mass diffusion at high pressure plays a major role.

  5. Microseismicity Induced by Fluid Pressure Drop (Laboratory Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuntaev, Sergey; Zenchenko, Evgeny; Melchaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Pore pressure change in saturated porous rocks may result in its fracturing (Maury et Fourmaintraux, 1993) and corresponding microseismic event occurrences. Microseismicity due to fluid injection is considered in numerous papers (Maxwell, 2010, Shapiro et al., 2005). Another type of the porous medium fracturing is related with rapid pore pressure drop at some boundary. The mechanism of such fracturing was considered by (Khristianovich, 1985) as a model of sudden coal blowing and by (Alidibirov, Panov, 1998) as a model of volcano eruptions. If the porous saturated medium has a boundary where it directly contacted with fluid under the high pressure (in a hydraulic fracture or in a borehole), and the pressure at that boundary is dropped, the conditions for tensile cracks can be achieved at some distance from the boundary. In the paper, the results of experimental study of saturated porous sample fracturing due to pore pressure rapid drop are discussed. The samples (82 mm high, ∅60 mm) were made of quartz sand, which was cemented by "liquid glass" glue with mass fraction 1%. The sample (porosity 35%, uniaxial unconfined compression strength 2.5 MPa) was placed in a mould and saturated by oil. The upper end of the sample contacted with the mould upper lid, the lower end contacted with fluid. The fluid pressure was increased to 10 MPa and then discharged through the bottom nipple. The pressure increases/drops were repeated 30-50 times. Pore pressure and acoustic emission (AE) were registered by transducers mounted into upper and bottom lids of the mould. It was found, that AE sources (corresponded to microfracturing) were spreading from the open end to the closed end of the sample, and that maximal number of AE events was registered at some distance from the opened end. The number of AE pulses increased with every next pressure drop, meanwhile the number of pulses with high amplitudes diminished. It was found that AE maximal rate corresponded to the fluid pressure

  6. System-Level Design of a Shape Memory Alloy Actuator for Active Clearance Control in the High-Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Melcher, Kevin J.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes results of a numerical analysis evaluating the feasibility of high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) for active clearance control actuation in the high-pressure turbine section of a modern turbofan engine. The prototype actuator concept considered here consists of parallel HTSMA wires attached to the shroud that is located on the exterior of the turbine case. A transient model of an HTSMA actuator was used to evaluate active clearance control at various operating points in a test bed aircraft engine simulation. For the engine under consideration, each actuator must be designed to counteract loads from 380 to 2000 lbf and displace at least 0.033 inches. Design results show that an actuator comprised of 10 wires 2 inches in length is adequate for control at critical engine operating points and still exhibits acceptable failsafe operability and cycle life. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with integrator windup protection was implemented to control clearance amidst engine transients during a normal mission. Simulation results show that the control system exhibits minimal variability in clearance control performance across the operating envelope. The final actuator design is sufficiently small to fit within the limited space outside the high-pressure turbine case and is shown to consume only small amounts of bleed air to adequately regulate temperature.

  7. Constant-Differential-Pressure Two-Fluid Accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piecuch, Benjamin; Dalton, Luke T.

    2010-01-01

    A two-fluid accumulator has been designed, built, and demonstrated to provide an acceptably close approximation to constant differential static pressure between two fluids over the full ranges of (1) accumulator stroke, (2) rates of flow of the fluids, and (3) common static pressure applied to the fluids. Prior differential- pressure two-fluid accumulators are generally not capable of maintaining acceptably close approximations to constant differential pressures. The inadequacies of a typical prior differential-pressure two-fluid accumulator can be summarized as follows: The static differential pressure is governed by the intrinsic spring rate (essentially, the stiffness) of an accumulator tank. The spring rate can be tailored through selection of the tank-wall thickness, selection of the number and/or shape of accumulator convolutions, and/or selection of accumulator material(s). Reliance on the intrinsic spring rate of the tank results in three severe limitations: (1) The spring rate and the expulsion efficiency tend to be inversely proportional to each other: that is to say, as the stiffness (and thus the differential pressure) is increased, the range of motion of the accumulator is reduced. (2) As the applied common static pressure increases, the differential pressure tends to decrease. An additional disadvantage, which may or may not be considered limiting, depending on the specific application, is that an increase in stiffness entails an increase in weight. (3) The additional weight required by a low expulsion efficiency accumulator eliminates the advantage given to such gas storage systems. The high expulsion efficiency provided by this two-fluid accumulator allows for a lightweight, tightly packaged system, which can be used in conjunction with a fuel cell-based system.

  8. Osmotic generation of 'anomalous' fluid pressures in geological environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzii, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    Osmotic pressures are generated by differences in chemical potential of a solution across a membrane. But whether osmosis can have a significant effect on the pressure of fluids in geological environments has been controversial, because the membrane properties of geological media are poorly understood. 'Anomalous' pressures - large departures from hydrostatic pressure that are not explicable in terms of topographic or fluid-density effects are widely found in geological settings, and are commonly considered to result from processes that alter the pore or fluid volume, which in turn implies crustal changes happening at a rate too slow to observe directly. Yet if osmosis can explain some anomalies, there is no need to invoke such dynamic geological processes in those cases. Here I report results of a nine- year in situ measurement of fluid pressures and solute concentrations in shale that are consistent with the generation of large (up to 20 MPa) osmotic-pressure anomalies which could persist for tens of millions of years. Osmotic pressures of this magnitude and duration can explain many of the pressure anomalies observed in geological settings. The require, however, small shale porosity and large contrasts in the amount of dissolved solids in the pore waters - criteria that may help to distinguish between osmotic and crystal-dynamic origins of anomalous pressures.

  9. Engine with hydraulic fuel injection and ABS circuit using a single high pressure pump

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2001-01-01

    An engine system comprises a hydraulically actuated fuel injection system and an ABS circuit connected via a fluid flow passage that provides hydraulic fluid to both the fuel injection system and to the ABS circuit. The hydraulically actuated system includes a high pressure pump. The fluid control passage is in fluid communication with an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  10. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  11. Tissue fluid pressures - From basic research tools to clinical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Akeson, Wayne H.; Mubarak, Scott J.; Owen, Charles A.; Gershuni, David H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes clinical applications of two basic research tools developed and refined in the past 20 years: the wick catheter (for measuring tissue fluid pressure) and the colloid osmometer (for measuring osmotic pressure). Applications of the osmometer include estimations of the reduced osmotic pressure of sickle-cell hemoglobin with deoxygenation, and of reduced swelling pressure of human nucleus pulposus with hydration or upon action of certain enzymes. Clinical uses of the wick-catheter technique include an improvement of diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic compartment syndromes, the elucidation of the tissue pressure thresholds for neuromuscular dysfunction, and the development of a better tourniquet for orthopedics.

  12. Optimization of sensing and feedback control for vibration/flutter of rotating disk by PZT actuators via air coupled pressure.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tianhong; Xu, Xinsheng; Han, Jianqiang; Lin, Rongming; Ju, Bingfeng; Li, Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT) actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin's discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations.

  13. Modeling actuation forces and strains in nastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Luke A.; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2006-03-01

    Nastic structures are capable of three dimensional shape change using biological principles borrowed from plant motion. The plant motor cells increase or decrease in size through a change in osmotic pressure. When nonuniform cell swelling occurs, it causes the plant tissue to warp and change shape, resulting it net movement, known as nastic motion, which is the same phenomena that causes plants to angle their broad leaf and flower surfaces to face light sources. The nastic structures considered in this paper are composed of a bilayer of microactuator arrays with a fluid reservoir in between the two layers. The actuators are housed in a thin plate and expand when water from the fluid reservoir is pumped into the actuation chamber through a phospholipid bilayer with embedded active transport proteins, which move the water from the low pressure fluid reservoir into a high pressure actuation chamber. Increasing water pressure inside the actuator causes lateral expansion and axial bulging, and the non-uniform net volume change of actuators throughout the nastic structure results in twisting or bending shape change. Modifying the actuation displacement allows controlled volume change. This paper presents an analytical model of the driving and blocking forces involved in actuation, as well as stress and strain that occurs due to the pressure changes. Actuation is driven by increasing osmotic pressure, and blocking forces are taken into consideration to plan actuator response so that outside forces do not counteract the displacement of actuation. Nastic structures are designed with use in unmanned aerial vehicles in mind, so blocking forces are modeled to be similar to in-flight conditions. Stress in the system is modeled so that any residual strain or lasting deformation can be determined, as well as a lifespan before failure from repeated actuation. The long-term aim of our work is to determine the power and energy efficiency of nastic structures actuation mechanism.

  14. Coupling device for pressurized fluid connections

    DOEpatents

    van Boxtel, R.P.; Yayanos, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Quick-coupling device for high pressure connections, comprising a cylindrical adapter member, closed at an outer end thereof, the opposite end being attachable to a pressure fitting, and an aperture therein spaced from the closed end of the adapter member. The device also comprises a coupler body having a first passageway therein for slidably receiving the outer end of the adapter, a central portion of said passageway being in communication with the adapter aperture, a pair of seal members disposed on opposite sides of the central portion of the passageway to provide a seal between the coupler body and the adapter member, and a second passageway in said coupler body in communication with said central portion.

  15. Pressurized fluid torque driver control and method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  16. Pressurized fluid torque driver control and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  17. Study of fluid parameters in high pressure descaling valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Param; Panta, Yogendra

    2012-11-01

    Our work is focused on the high pressure valves used for descaling purposes in steel mills. A reverse flow operation was set in one of such valves due to piping constraints. Computational approaches are being utilized to understand the fluid phenomena at such high pressures. Though the valve geometry accounts for the complete fluid flow path, a study has been initiated from an axisymmetric model of the valve core. The highly energized fluid from the descaling pump sets off a static pressure of 5000 psi at the valve inlet. It is responsible for continuous fluid flow rate of up to 208 gpm for fully open position. A Shear Stress Transport turbulence model is utilized to study pressure at nearly closed position of the poppet part while Renormalization Group Turbulence model is compared with Shear Stress Transport turbulence model for full opening position. A very low pressure developed below the poppet seat suggests the onset of cavitation zones which may lead to leakage. A full 3D model is studied after a complete studies of fluid phenomenon in the axisymmetric geometry. Using ANSYS Fluent, a commercial CFD software package, the poppet valve assembly was processed for modeling, meshing and setting up of physical parameters. Computational results show the cavitation intensities higher at small openings than at larger openings which is further verified by literature research and currently comparing with experiments.

  18. Fluid balance, renal function, and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Guyton, A C; Young, D B; DeClue, J W; Trippodo, N; Hall, J E

    1975-10-01

    After many detours in the search for the basic mechanism of hypertension, evidence now seems to corroborate the earliest concept that developed in the 1800's, namely, that hypertension almost always results from a tendency of the kidneys to retain water and salt. Animal studies show that the amount of excess body water and salt required to cause hypertension is exceedingly small, and that the hypertensive effect of the excess water and salt may not develop for days or weeks. When vascular constriciton occurs simultaneously, as occurs in the presence of large quantities of angiotensin, the blood volume may be less than normal, but even in these circumstances the fluid volume is relatively increased and is responsible for the hypertension because the vascular constrictont has decreased the capacity of the circulation to a greater extent than the decrease in blood volume.

  19. Fluid-filled blood pressure measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Li, J K; van Brummelen, A G; Noordergraaf, A

    1976-05-01

    The performance of catheter-manometer systems for the measurement of pulsatile pressure has been evaluated by both experimental techniques and theoretical considerations. The former approach has shown, on occasion, multiple maxima in the amplitude response. The latter has been approached in a variety of ways, ranging from extreme lumping to application of transmission line theory while employing different configurations in the system's representation. Multiple maxima have also been seen, The present paper identifies the sources of the differences found and compares the relative merits of various theoretical approaches. It introduces the compliance of the system as a figure of merit and provides a simple first-order approximation formula for evaluation of the quality of a system. Damping and impedance matching to improve the system's frequency response were studied. It was found that they were not needed in a very stiff or a very compliant system, nor should one worry about the representation of such a system.

  20. Measuring Fluid Pressure on the Pore-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, N.; Petrovitch, C.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2008-12-01

    The capillary pressure plays an important role in theoretical descriptions of immiscible two-phase flow in porous media. Most measurements of capillary pressure on the pore-scale are either based on external measurements of the fluid pressure of two immiscible fluids in a porous media or extracted from the analysis of interfacial curvature from digital-photomicroscopy. Experimentally, it is very difficult to measure local pressure at the interface of a two-phase flow system at the pore scale. In this study, we developed micro- capacitors for measuring local pressures in two-dimensional micro-models. Micro-models are transparent microfluidic flow cells that enable direct imaging of fluid distributions in known pore geometries. They are made using photo-projection lithography to make percolative structures that have areal dimensions of 600 µm x 600 µm with an aperture of 2.0 μ m. The size of the micro-model enables full-frame optical imaging during drainage and imbibition experiments. We have modified the micro-model fabrication process to include micro-capacitors to measure local pressure. We added two thin metal films to the opposing glass substrates prior to our normal micromodel assembly. The metal films act as a parallel plate capacitor. The capacitance depends on the dielectric material inside the plates which in our study is decane and nitrogen. As the pressure in the fluids changes, there is a corresponding change in the density of the fluid, and hence a change in the dielectric constant. The changes in dieletric constant are measured via precision measurements of the capacitance. Capacitance changes as small of 1/107 are measured which corresponds to pressure changes of 102 Pa. This pressure resolution is approximately 1% of the full range in our typical drainage/imbibition cycles. This capacitance method enables us to make measurements of small pressure changes with high spatial resolution. The spatial resolution is set by the size of the capacitor

  1. Development of micropump-actuated negative pressure pinched injection for parallel electrophoresis on array microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Li, Bowei; Jiang, Lei; Xie, Hua; Gao, Yan; Qin, Jianhua; Lin, Bingcheng

    2009-09-01

    A micropump-actuated negative pressure pinched injection method is developed for parallel electrophoresis on a multi-channel LIF detection system. The system has a home-made device that could individually control 16-port solenoid valves and a high-voltage power supply. The laser beam is excitated and distributes to the array separation channels for detection. The hybrid Glass-PDMS microfluidic chip comprises two common reservoirs, four separation channels coupled to their respective pneumatic micropumps and two reference channels. Due to use of pressure as a driving force, the proposed method has no sample bias effect for separation. There is only one high-voltage supply needed for separation without relying on the number of channels, which is significant for high-throughput analysis, and the time for sample loading is shortened to 1 s. In addition, the integrated micropumps can provide the versatile interface for coupling with other function units to satisfy the complicated demands. The performance is verified by separation of DNA marker and Hepatitis B virus DNA samples. And this method is also expected to show the potential throughput for the DNA analysis in the field of disease diagnosis.

  2. Subsea valve actuator for ultra deepwater

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S.Z.; Skeels, H.B.; Montemayor, B.K.; Williams, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews the continuing development of gate valve and actuator technology for subsea completions extending into ultra deep water. The basic technical challenges inherent to subsea valve actuators are reviewed, along with the various factors which affect the design and performance of these devices in deepwater applications. The high external ambient pressures which occur in deep water, coupled with high specific gravity hydraulic control fluids, are shown to have a significant impact on the performance of the actuators. This paper presents design and analysis methods and the verification test procedures which are required to develop and qualify new deep water actuator designs. Gate valve actuators of the type described in this paper are currently in use on subsea christmas trees on the world`s deepest subsea wells offshore Brazil (water depths >3,000 feet). New applications of the deepwater actuators are in process for upcoming Gulf of Mexico subsea production systems in water depths approaching 6,000 feet. The actuator/valve development method described in this paper has been confirmed by performance verification testing of full scale valves and actuators using a hyperbaric chamber to simulate ultra deepwater operating conditions. Performance of the test valves and actuators correlated very well with analytical predictions. Test results have confirmed that the new valve actuator designs will satisfy API 17D performance requirements for water depths up to 7,500 feet, well in excess of the upcoming GOM application.

  3. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve

    PubMed Central

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D® software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink® in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system. PMID:27213398

  4. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve.

    PubMed

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-05-20

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D(®) software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink(®) in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system.

  5. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids—Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert A.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (<180 μm diameter), and bubbles within porous media that are not readily visualized. Envisioned applications include assessment of the impacts of vibration on reaction, mass transfer, and flow/flow pattern outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  6. Exact solutions: neutral and charged static perfect fluids with pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijalwan, Naveen

    2012-01-01

    We show in this article that charged fluid with pressure derived by Bijalwan (Astrophys. Space. Sci. doi:10.1007/s10509-011-0691-0, 011a) can be used to model classical electron, quark, neutron stars and pulsar with charge matter, quasi black hole, white dwarf, super-dense star etc. Recent analysis by Bijalwan (Astrophys. Space. Sci., 2011d) that all charged fluid solutions in terms of pressure mimic the classical electron model are partially correct because solutions by Bijalwan (Astrophys. Space. Sci. doi:10.1007/s10509-011-0691-0, 011a) may possess a neutral counterpart. In this paper we characterized solutions in terms of pressure for charged fluids that have and do not have a well behaved neutral counter part considering same spatial component of metric e λ for neutral and charged fluids. We discussed solution by Gupta and Maurya (Astrophys. Space Sci. 331(1):135-144, 2010a) and solutions by Bijalwan (Astrophys. Space Sci. doi:10.1007/s10509-011-0735-5, 2011b; Astrophys. Space Sci. doi:10.1007/s10509-011-0780-0, 2011c; Astrophys. Space Sci., 2011d) such that charged fluids possess and do not possess a neutral counterpart as special cases, respectively. For brevity, we only present some analytical results in this paper.

  7. Earthquakes, fluid pressures and rapid subduction zone metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viete, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    High-pressure/low-temperature (HP/LT) metamorphism is commonly incomplete, meaning that large tracts of rock can remain metastable at blueschist- and eclogite-facies conditions for timescales up to millions of years [1]. When HP/LT metamorphism does take place, it can occur over extremely short durations (<<1 Myr) [1-2]. HP/LT metamorphism must be associated with processes that allow large volumes of rock to remain unaffected over long periods of time, but then suddenly undergo localized metamorphism. Existing models for HP/LT metamorphism have focussed on the role of fluids in providing heat for metamorphism [2] or catalyzing metamorphic reactions [1]. Earthquakes in subduction zone settings can occur to depths of 100s of km. Metamorphic dehydration and the associated development of elevated pore pressures in HP/LT metamorphic rocks has been identified as a cause of earthquake activity at such great depths [3-4]. The process of fracturing/faulting significantly increases rock permeability, causing channelized fluid flow and dissipation of pore pressures [3-4]. Thus, deep subduction zone earthquakes are thought to reflect an evolution in fluid pressure, involving: (1) an initial increase in pore pressure by heating-related dehydration of subduction zone rocks, and (2) rapid relief of pore pressures by faulting and channelized flow. Models for earthquakes at depth in subduction zones have focussed on the in situ effects of dehydration and then sudden escape of fluids from the rock mass following fracturing [3-4]. On the other hand, existing models for rapid and incomplete metamorphism in subduction zones have focussed only on the effects of heating and/or hydration with the arrival of external fluids [1-2]. Significant changes in pressure over very short timescales should result in rapid mineral growth and/or disequilibrium texture development in response to overstepping of mineral reaction boundaries. The repeated process of dehydration-pore pressure development

  8. Theoretical Insights for Practical Handling of Pressurized Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aranda, Alfonso; Rodriguez, Maria del Prado

    2006-01-01

    The practical scenarios discussed in a chemistry or chemical engineering course that use solid or liquid reactants are presented. Important ideas to be considered when handling pressurized fluids are provided and three typical examples are described to enable students develop secondary skills such as the selective search of data, identification of…

  9. Properties of planetary fluids at high shock pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.; Mitchell, A.C.; Holmes, N.C.; McCandless, P.C.

    1991-03-01

    Models of the interiors of Uranus and Neptune are discussed. Pressures and temperatures in the interiors can be achieved in representative constituent molecular fluids by shock compression. Experimental techniques are described and recent results for synthetic Uranus and hydrogen are discussed. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Fluid pressure and reaction zone formation at a lithological interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    Chemical composition variations in reaction zones between two distinct lithologies are generally interpreted in terms of chemical potential gradients and diffusion process. Concentration profiles can then be used to quantify the species diffusion coefficients or the time scale of geological events. However, chemical potential gradients are also functions of temperature and pressure and local variations of these parameters can thus potentially modify the diffusion process. In northern Corsica, a centimeter scale reaction zone formed under blueschist conditions at a serpentinite - marble contact of sedimentary origin. Three sub-zones having chemical compositions evolving from one rock end-member to another divide the reaction zone along sharp interfaces. At the reaction zone - marble interface, marble decarbonation occurs to form wollastonite and carbonaceous matter. Thermodynamic calculations for this reaction and the respective increase in density of 25 % and 7 % in the bulk rock and in the garnet minerals are interpreted as records of a pressure gradient during reaction zone formation. Moreover, the formation of a volatile-free sub-zone in the reaction zone from reaction between the H2O-bearing serpentinite and the CO2-bearing marble released fluids at the contact. The impact of such a release on the fluid pressure was modelled by considering the effects of both the rock compaction and the transport of fluid by hydraulic diffusion. Modelling results indicates that > 0.5 GPa fluid overpressure can be generated at the contact if devolatilization rates are of the order of the one experimentally measured (> 10-5 kg of fluid/m3 of rock/s). The resulting pressure gradient is of the order of magnitude of the one necessary to counter-balance the effect on chemical potential of the chemical composition variations across the contact. Finally, after the reaction has run to completion, the model predicts that fluid rapidly diffuses away from the interface which thus stops

  11. Characteristics of the muscle activities of the elderly for various pressures in the pneumatic actuator of lower limb orthosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyong; Yu, Chang-Ho; Kwon, Tae-Kyu; Hong, Chul-Un; Kim, Nam-Gyun

    2005-12-01

    There developed a lower limb orthosis with a pneumatic rubber actuator, which can assist and improve the muscular activities in the lower limb of the elderly. For this purpose, the characteristics of the lower limbs muscle activities for various pressures in the pneumatic actuator for the lower limb orthosis was investigated. To find out the characteristics of the muscle activities for various pneumatic pressures, it analyzed the flexing and extending movement of the knees, and measured the lower limbs muscular power. The subjects wearing the lower limbs orthosis were instructed to perform flexing and extending movement of the knees. The variation in the air pressure of the pneumatic actuator was varies from one kgf/cm2 to four kgf/cm2. The muscular power was measured by monitoring electromyogram using MP100 (BIOPAC Systems, Inc.) and detailed three-dimensional motions of the lower limbs were collected by APAS 3D Motion Analysis system. Through this study, it expected to find the most suitable air pressure for the improvement of the muscular power of the aged.

  12. Modeling, fabrication and plasma actuator coupling of flexible pressure sensors for flow separation detection and control in aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francioso, L.; De Pascali, C.; Pescini, E.; De Giorgi, M. G.; Siciliano, P.

    2016-06-01

    Preventing the flow separation could enhance the performance of propulsion systems and future civil aircraft. To this end, a fast detection of boundary layer separation is mandatory for a sustainable and successful application of active flow control devices, such as plasma actuators. The present work reports on the design, fabrication and functional tests of low-cost capacitive pressure sensors coupled with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators to detect and then control flow separation. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were used to obtain information on the deflection and the stress distribution in different-shaped floating membranes. The sensor sensitivity as a function of the pressure load was also calculated by experimental tests. The results of the calibration of different capacitive pressure sensors are reported in this work, together with functional tests in a wind tunnel equipped with a curved wall plate on which a DBD plasma actuator was mounted to control the flow separation. The flow behavior was experimentally investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Statistical and spectral analysis, applied to the output signals of the pressure sensor placed downstream of the profile leading edge, demonstrated that the sensor is able to discriminate different ionic wind velocity and turbulence conditions. The sensor sensitivity in the 0-100 Pa range was experimentally measured and it ranged between 0.0030 and 0.0046 pF Pa-1 for the best devices.

  13. Tubular dielectric elastomer actuator for active fluidic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David; Pei, Qibing

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel low-profile, biomimetic dielectric elastomer tubular actuator capable of actively controlling hydraulic flow. The tubular actuator has been established as a reliable tunable valve, pinching a secondary silicone tube completely shut in the absence of a fluidic pressure bias or voltage, offering a high degree of resistance against fluidic flow, and able to open and completely remove this resistance to flow with an applied low power actuation voltage. The system demonstrates a rise in pressure of ∼3.0 kPa when the dielectric elastomer valve is in the passive, unactuated state, and there is a quadratic fall in this pressure with increasing actuation voltage, until ∼0 kPa is reached at 2.4 kV. The device is reliable for at least 2000 actuation cycles for voltages at or below 2.2 kV. Furthermore, modeling of the actuator and fluidic system yields results consistent with the observed experimental dependence of intrasystem pressure on input flow rate, actuator prestretch, and actuation voltage. To our knowledge, this is the first actuator of its type that can control fluid flow by directly actuating the walls of a tube. Potential applications may include an implantable artificial sphincter, part of a peristaltic pump, or a computerized valve for fluidic or pneumatic control.

  14. Negative pressure in shear thickening band of a dilatant fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Nakanishi, Hiizu

    2016-12-01

    We perform experiments and numerical simulations to investigate spatial distribution of pressure in a sheared dilatant fluid of the Taylor-Couette flow under a constant external shear stress. In a certain range of shear stress, the flow undergoes the shear thickening oscillation around 20 Hz. We find that, during the oscillation, a localized thickened band rotates around the axis with the flow. Based upon experiments and numerical simulations, we show that a major part of the thickened band is under negative pressure even in the case of discontinuous shear thickening, which indicates that the thickening is caused by Reynolds dilatancy; the dilatancy causes the negative pressure in interstitial fluid, which generates contact structure in the granular medium, then frictional resistance hinders rearrangement of the structure and solidifies the medium.

  15. The colloid osmotic pressures of invertebrate body fluids.

    PubMed

    Mangum, C P; Johansen, K

    1975-12-01

    Colloid osmotic pressures of the body fluids of twenty invertebrate species were measured directly. The results, which are generally lower than predicted values for the same species, pertain to several physiological questions: (1) they do not quantitatively explain the frequently observed hyperosmoticity of body fluids in species believed to be osmoconformers, indicating that the condition cannot be merely a consequence of a Gibbs-Donnan equilibrium; (2) the excess of hydrostatic over colloid osmotic pressure is very small. This result supports the hypothesis that the oxygen transport function of bloods with extracellular haemocyanins and haem proteins is limited by their colligative properties; (3) the pressure relationships and the absence of colloid osmotic activity in urine indicates that filtration contributes to urine formation in several species.

  16. PACS—Realization of an adaptive concept using pressure actuated cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramüller, B.; Boblenz, J.; Hühne, C.

    2014-10-01

    A biologically inspired concept is investigated which can be utilized to develop energy efficient, lightweight and applicational flexible adaptive structures. Building a real life morphing unit is an ambitious task as the numerous works in the particular field show. Summarizing fundamental demands and barriers regarding shape changing structures, the basic challenges of designing morphing structures are listed. The concept of Pressure Actuated Cellular Structures (PACS) is arranged within the recent morphing activities and it is shown that it complies with the underlying demands. Systematically divided into energy-related and structural subcomponents the working principle is illuminated and relationships between basic design parameters are expressed. The analytical background describing the physical mechanisms of PACS is presented in concentrated manner. This work focuses on the procedure of dimensioning, realizing and experimental testing of a single cell and a single row cantilever made of PACS. The experimental outcomes as well as the results from the FEM computations are used for evaluating the analytical methods. The functionality of the basic principle is thus validated and open issues are determined pointing the way ahead.

  17. ELECTRICALLY ACTUATED, PRESSURE-DRIVEN LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY SEPARATIONS IN MICROFABRICATED DEVICES

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Hernan V.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2012-01-01

    Electrolysis-based micropumps integrated with microfluidic channels in micromachined glass substrates are presented. Photolithography combined with wet chemical etching and thermal bonding enabled the fabrication of multi-layer devices containing electrically actuated micropumps interfaced with sample and mobile phase reservoirs. A stationary phase was deposited on the microchannel walls by coating with 10% (w/w) chlorodimethyloctadecylsilane in toluene. Pressure-balanced injection was implemented by controlling the electrolysis time and voltage applied in the two independent micropumps. Current fluctuations in the micropumps due to the stochastic formation of bubbles on the electrode surfaces were determined to be the main cause of variation between separations. On-chip electrochemical pumping enabled the loading of pL samples with no dead volume between injection and separation. A mobile phase composed of 70% acetonitrile and 30% 50 mM acetate buffer (pH 5.45) was used for the chromatographic separation of three fluorescently labeled amino acids in <40 s with an efficiency of >3000 theoretical plates in a 2.5-cm-long channel. Our results demonstrate the potential of electrochemical micropumps integrated with microchannels to perform rapid chromatographic separations in a microfabricated platform. Importantly, these devices represent a significant step toward the development of miniaturized and fully integrated liquid chromatography systems. PMID:17960281

  18. Dynamic high pressure: Why it makes metallic fluid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, W. J.

    2015-09-01

    Metallic fluid H has been made by dynamic compression decades after Wigner and Huntington (WH) predicted its existence in 1935. The density at which it was made is within a few percent of the density predicted by WH. Metallic fluid H was achieved by multiple-shock compression of liquid H2, which is quasi-isentropic and thermally equilibrated. That is, the compressions were isentropic but for enough temperature and entropy to drive the crossover to completion from H2 to H at 9-fold compression. The metallic fluid is highly degenerate: T/TF≈0.014. The basic ideas of dynamic compression, also known as supersonic, adiabatic, nonlinear hydrodynamics, were developed in the last half of the Nineteenth Century in European universities. Today dynamic compression is generally unfamiliar to the scientific community, which impedes general understanding as to why fluid H becomes metallic at a pressure observable in a laboratory. The purposes of this paper are to (i) present a brief review of dynamic compression and its affects on materials, (ii) review considerations that led to the sample holder designed specifically to make metallic fluid H, and (iii) present a brief inter-comparison of dynamic and static methods to achieve high pressure relative to their prospects for making metallic H.

  19. Dependency of hydromechanical properties of monzonitic granite on confining pressure and fluid pressure under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Lui, Zaobao; Chao, Zhiming; Meng, Qingxiang

    2016-05-01

    Monzonitic granite is a low-permeability rock. Monzonitic granite formations are ideal for underground storage of oil due to their low permeability and high mechanical strength. In this study, a series of coupled hydromechanical triaxial tests are carried out using monzonitic granite specimens. The influence of confining and fluid pressures on stress, strain, and permeability is investigated. Failure characteristics under different confining and fluid pressures are discussed based on the analysis of macro fracture planes and micro scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The test results show that the change of permeability with stress and strain reflects the deformation stages of compaction, compression, crack propagation, coalesce, and failure of cracks. Due to the low porosity, the change of permeability is small in the initial phases of compaction and compression, whereas there is a significant increase in permeability when new cracks start to develop and coalesce. Confining pressures have a significant impact on the strength and permeability, particularly the crack damage stress of the rock. Compared with confining pressure, the effect of fluid pressure on rock strength and crack damage stress is small. For the monzonitic granite specimens tested, changing the confining pressure results in different failure modes, whereas the fluid pressure has a relatively small effect on the failure modes.

  20. Thermostatic Valves Containing Silicone-Oil Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana C.; Bame, David P.; Karlmann, Paul B.; Prina, Mauro; Young, William; Fisher, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Flow-splitting and flow-mixing thermally actuated spool valves have been developed for controlling flows of a heat-transfer fluid in a temperature-regulation system aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. Valves like these could also be useful in terrestrial temperature-regulation systems, including automobile air-conditioning systems and general refrigeration systems. These valves are required to provide smoother actuation over a wider temperature range than the flow-splitting, thermally actuated spool valves used in the Mars Explorer Rover (MER). Also, whereas the MER valves are unstable (tending to oscillate) in certain transition temperature ranges, these valves are required not to oscillate. The MER valves are actuated by thermal expansion of a wax against spring-loaded piston rods (as in common automotive thermostats). The MSL valves contain similar actuators that utilize thermal expansion of a silicone oil, because silicone-oil actuators were found to afford greater and more nearly linear displacements, needed for smoother actuation, over the required wider temperature range. The MSL valves also feature improved spool designs that reflect greater understanding of fluid dynamics, consideration of pressure drops in valves, and a requirement for balancing of pressures in different flow branches.

  1. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators at Atmospheric and Sub-Atmospheric Pressures: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likhanskii, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This report is the final report of a SBIR Phase I project. It is identical to the final report submitted, after some proprietary information of administrative nature has been removed. The development of a numerical simulation tool for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is reported. The objectives of the project were to analyze and predict DBD operation at wide range of ambient gas pressures. It overcomes the limitations of traditional DBD codes which are limited to low-speed applications and have weak prediction capabilities. The software tool allows DBD actuator analysis and prediction for subsonic to hypersonic flow regime. The simulation tool is based on the VORPAL code developed by Tech-X Corporation. VORPAL's capability of modeling DBD plasma actuator at low pressures (0.1 to 10 torr) using kinetic plasma modeling approach, and at moderate to atmospheric pressures (1 to 10 atm) using hydrodynamic plasma modeling approach, were demonstrated. In addition, results of experiments with pulsed+bias DBD configuration that were performed for validation purposes are reported.

  2. Validation of an All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model: Heptane Fluid Drops in Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.; Bulzan, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Despite the fact that supercritical fluids occur both in nature and in industrial situations, the fundamentals of their behavior is poorly understood because supercritical fluids combine the characteristics of both liquids and gases, and therefore their behavior is not intuitive. There are several specific reasons for the lack of understanding: First, data from (mostly optical) measurements can be very misleading because regions of high density thus observed are frequently identified with liquids. A common misconception is that if in an experiment one can optically identify "drops" and "ligaments", the observed fluid must be in a liquid state. This inference is incorrect because in fact optical measurements detect any large change (i.e. gradients) in density. Thus, the density ratio may be well below Omicron(10(exp 3)) that characterizes its liquid/gas value, but the measurement will still identify a change in the index of refraction providing that the change is sudden (steep gradients). As shown by simulations of supercritical fluids, under certain conditions the density gradients may remain large during the supercritical binary fluids mixing, thus making them optically identifiable. Therefore, there is no inconsistency between the optical observation of high density regions and the fluids being in a supercritical state. A second misconception is that because a fluid has a liquid-like density, it is appropriate to model it as a liquid. However, such fluids may have liquid-like densities while their transport properties differ from those of a liquid. Considering that the critical pressure of most fuel hydrocarbons used in Diesel and gas turbine engines is in the range of 1.5 - 3 MPa, and the fact that the maximum pressure attained in these engines is about 6 Mps, it is clear that the fuel in the combustion chamber will experience both subcritical and supercritical conditions. Studies of drop behavior over a wide range of pressures were performed in the past

  3. Pore fluid pressure, apparent friction, and Coulomb failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Simpson, R.W.; Hickman, S.H.; Lockner, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Many recent studies of stress-triggered seismicity rely on a fault failure model with a single free parameter, the apparent coefficient of friction, presumed to be a material constant with possible values 0 ≤ μ′ ≤ 1. These studies may present a misleading view of fault strength and the role of pore fluid pressure in earthquake failure. The parameter μ′ is intended to incorporate the effects of both friction and pore pressure, but is a material constant only if changes in pore fluid pressure induced by changes in stress are proportional to the normal stress change across the potential failure plane. Although specific models of fault zones permit such a relation, neither is it known that fault zones within the Earth behave this way, nor is this behavior expected in all cases. In contrast, for an isotropic homogeneous poroelastic model the pore pressure changes are proportional to changes in mean stress, μ′ is not a material constant, and −∞ ≤ μ′ ≤ +∞. Analysis of the change in Coulomb failure stress for tectonically loaded reverse and strike-slip faults shows considerable differences between these two pore pressure models, suggesting that such models might be distinguished from one another using observations of triggered seismicity (e.g., aftershocks). We conclude that using the constant apparent friction model exclusively in studies of Coulomb failure stress is unwise and could lead to significant errors in estimated stress change and seismic hazard.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure in conscious head-down tilted rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, Walter B.; Morrow, Bret A.; Keil, Lanny C.

    1991-01-01

    The acute effects of a 1-h -45 deg head-down tilt on continouously recorded cerebrospinal fluid pressure (PCSF) of conscious rats are studied in order to investigate the shift of blood volume into the thoracic cavity in microgravity. PCSF, evaluated in 15-min time blocks over a 3-h experiment, increased slightly (less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of a control hour at 0 deg. There was a transient increase for about 5 min immediately after tilt (-45 deg) that may have been due to head movement after the position change. PCSF was statistically unchanged (above 0.05) during the second (-45 deg) hour and the third (0 deg) recovery hour. It is shown that the dynamics of intracranial pressure regulation can accommodate the acute cephalad fluid shift after tilting.

  5. Electrically actuatable doped polymer flakes and electrically addressable optical devices using suspensions of doped polymer flakes in a fluid host

    DOEpatents

    Trajkovska-Petkoska, Anka; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.

    2010-05-11

    Doped electrically actuatable (electrically addressable or switchable) polymer flakes have enhanced and controllable electric field induced motion by virtue of doping a polymer material that functions as the base flake matrix with either a distribution of insoluble dopant particles or a dopant material that is completely soluble in the base flake matrix. The base flake matrix may be a polymer liquid crystal material, and the dopants generally have higher dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity than the electrically actuatable polymer base flake matrix. The dopant distribution within the base flake matrix may be either homogeneous or non-homogeneous. In the latter case, the non-homogeneous distribution of dopant provides a dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity gradient within the body of the flakes. The dopant can also be a carbon-containing material (either soluble or insoluble in the base flake matrix) that absorbs light so as to reduce the unpolarized scattered light component reflected from the flakes, thereby enhancing the effective intensity of circularly polarized light reflected from the flakes when the flakes are oriented into a light reflecting state. Electro-optic devices contain these doped flakes suspended in a host fluid can be addressed with an applied electric field, thus controlling the orientation of the flakes between a bright reflecting state and a non-reflecting dark state.

  6. Adjustable steam producing flexible orifice independent of fluid pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A self-adjusting choke for a fluids nozzle includes a membrane constructed of a single piece of flexible or elastic material. This flexible material is shaped to fit into the outlet of a nozzle. The body of the membrane has at least two flow channels, from one face to the other, which directs two streams of water to cross at the opening of the nozzle or at some point beyond. The elasticity and thickness of the membrane is selected to match the range of expected pressures and fluid velocities. The choke may have more than two flow channels, as long as they are aligned adjacent to one another and directed towards each other at the exit face. In a three orifice embodiment, one is directed upward, one is directed downward, and the one in the middle is directed forward. In this embodiment all three fluid streams intersect at some point past the nozzle opening. Under increased pressure the membrane will deform causing the orifices to realign in a more forward direction, causing the streams to intersect at a smaller angle. This reduces the force with which the separate streams impact each other, still allowing the separate streams to unify into a single stable spiralling stream in spite of the increased pressure.

  7. Fluid film force control in lubricated journal bearings by means of a travelling wave generated with a piezoelectric actuators' system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iula, Antonio; Lamberti, Nicola; Savoia, Alessandro; Caliano, Giosue

    2012-05-01

    In this work an experimental evaluation of the possiblity to influence and control the fluid film forces in the gap of a lubricated journal bearing by means of a rotating travelling wave is carried out. The travellig wave is generated by two power actuators opportunely positioned on the outer surface of the bearing and electrically driven with a phase shift of 90°. Each transducer is designed to work at the natural frequency of the radial nonaxisymmetrical mode 0-5 (23.6 kHz). Experimental results show that the travelling wave is capable to control the motion of an oil drop on the inner surface of the bearing and that it is capable to put in rotation a rotor layed on the drop oil via the viscous forces in the oil drop itself.

  8. A rapid infusion pump driven by micro electromagnetic linear actuation for pre-hospital intravenous fluid administration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Chong, Yinbao; Zhao, An; Lang, Lang; Wang, Qing; Liu, Jiuling

    2015-02-01

    A rapid infusion pump with a maximum flow rate of 6 L/h was designed experimentally using a micro electromagnetic linear actuator, and its effectiveness was evaluated by comparing with that of a commercial Power Infuser under preset flow rates of 0.2, 2, and 6 L/h. The flow rate, air detection sensitivity, occlusion response time, quantitative determination of hemolysis, and power consumption of the infusion devices were extensively investigated using statistical analysis methods (p < 0.05). The experimental results revealed that the flow rate of the designed infusion pump was more stable and accurate, and the hemolysis was significantly less than that of the Power Infuser. The air detection sensitivity and the power consumption could be comparable to that of the Power Infuser except the occlusion response time. The favorable performance made the designed infusion pump a potential candidate for applications in pre-hospital fluid administration.

  9. Effect of cerebrospinal fluid shunts on intracranial pressure and on cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Fox, John L.; McCullough, David C.; Green, Robert C.

    1973-01-01

    Part 2 describes measurements of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure in 18 adult patients with CSF shunts, all pressure measurements being referred to a horizontal plane close to the foramina of Monro. All 18 patients had normal CSF pressure by lumbar puncture; however, in one patient an intracranial pressure of +280 mm was subsequently measured after pneumoencephalography. Twelve patients had pre-shunt CSF pressures measured intracranially: 11 ranged from +20 to +180 mm H2O and one was +280 mm H2O in the supine position. In the upright posture nine patients had values of −10 to −140 mm H2O, while three others were +60, +70, and +280 mm H2O. After CSF shunting in these 18 patients the pressures were −30 to +30 mm H2O in the supine position and −210 to −370 mm in the upright position. The effect of posture on the siphoning action of these longer shunts in the erect, adult patient is a major uncontrollable variable in maintenance of intracranial pressure after shunting. Other significant variables are reviewed. In Part 3 a concept of the hydrocephalus phenomenon is described. Emphasis is placed on the pressure differential (Pd) and force differential (Fd) causing pre-shunt ventricular enlargement and post-shunt ventricular size reduction. The site of Pd, which must be very small and not to be confused with measured ventricular pressure, P, must be at the ventricular wall. Images PMID:4541079

  10. Documentation and Control of Flow Separation on a Low Pressure Turbine Linear Cascade of Pak-B Blades Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, Thomas c.; Thomas, FLint, O.; Huang, Junhui

    2007-01-01

    This work involved the documentation and control of flow separation that occurs over low pressure turbine (LPT) blades at low Reynolds numbers. A specially constructed linear cascade was utilized to study the flow field over a generic LPT cascade consisting of Pratt & Whitney "Pak-B" shaped blades. Flow visualization, surface pressure measurements, LDV measurements, and hot-wire anemometry were conducted to examine the flow fields with and without separation control. Experimental conditions were chosen to give a range of chord Reynolds numbers (based on axial chord and inlet velocity) from 10,000 to 100,000, and a range of freestream turbulence intensities from u'/U(infinity) = 0.08 to 2.85 percent. The blade pressure distributions were measured and used to identify the region of separation that depends on Reynolds number and the turbulence intensity. Separation control was performed using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators. Both steady and unsteady actuation were implemented and found to work well. The comparison between the steady and unsteady actuators showed that the unsteady actuators worked better than the steady ones. For the steady actuators, it was found that the separated region is significantly reduced. For the unsteady actuators, where the signal was pulsed, the separation was eliminated. The total pressure losses (a low Reynolds number) was reduced by approximately a factor of two. It was also found that lowest plasma duty cycle (10 percent in this work) was as effective as the highest plasma duty cycle (50 percent in this work). The mechanisms of the steady and unsteady plasma actuators were studied. It was suggested by the experimental results that the mechanism for the steady actuators is turbulence tripping, while the mechanism for the unsteady actuators is to generate a train of spanwise structures that promote mixing.

  11. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  12. Rotational viscometer for high-pressure, high-temperature fluids

    DOEpatents

    Carr, K.R.

    1983-06-06

    The invention is a novel rotational viscometer which is well adapted for use with fluids at high temperatures and/or pressures. In one embodiment, the viscometer include a substantially non-magnetic tube having a closed end and having an open end in communication with a fluid whose viscosity is to be determined. An annular drive magnet is mounted for rotation about the tube. The tube encompasses and supports a rotatable shaft assembly which carries a rotor, or bob, for insertion in the fluid. Affixed to the shaft are (a) a second magnet which is magnetically coupled to the drive magnet and (b) a third magnet. In a typical operation, the drive magnet is rotated to turn the shaft assembly while the shaft rotor is immersed in the fluid. The viscous drag on the rotor causes the shaft assembly to lag the rotation of the drive magnet by an amount which is a function of the amount of viscous drag. A first magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the drive magnet. A second magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the third magnet. Means are provided to generate an output indicative of the phase difference between the two waveforms. The viscometer is comparatively simple, inexpensive, rugged, and does not require shaft seals.

  13. Rotational viscometer for high-pressure high-temperature fluids

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Kenneth R.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is a novel rotational viscometer which is well adapted for use with fluids at high temperatures and/or pressures. In one embodiment, the viscometer includes a substantially non-magnetic tube having a closed end and having an open end in communication with a fluid whose viscosity is to be determined. An annular drive magnet is mounted for rotation about the tube. The tube encompasses and supports a rotatable shaft assembly which carries a rotor, or bob, for insertion in the fluid. Affixed to the shaft are (a) a second magnet which is magnetically coupled to the drive magnet and (b) a third magnet. In a typical operation, the drive magnet is rotated to turn the shaft assembly while the shaft rotor is immersed in the fluid. The viscous drag on the rotor causes the shaft assembly to lag the rotation of the drive magnet by an amount which is a function of the amount of viscous drag. A first magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the drive magnet. A second magnetic pickup generates a waveform whose phase is a function of the angular position of the third magnet. An output is generated indicative of the phase difference between the two waveforms.

  14. Investigation of holder pressure and size effects in micro deep drawing of rectangular work pieces driven by piezoelectric actuator.

    PubMed

    Aminzahed, Iman; Mashhadi, Mahmoud Mosavi; Sereshk, Mohammad Reza Vaziri

    2017-02-01

    Micro forming is a manufacturing process to fabricate micro parts with high quality and a cost effective manner. Deep drawing could be a favorable method for production of complicated parts in macro and micro sizes. In this paper piezoelectric actuator is used as a novel approach in the field of micro manufacturing. Also, in current work, investigations are conducted with four rectangular punches and blanks with various thicknesses. Blank holder pressure effects on thickness distributions, punch force, and springback are studied. According to the results of this work, increasing of blank holder pressure in scaled deep drawing, in contrast to thickness of drawn part, leads to decrease in the punch forces and springback. Furthermore, it is shown that in micro deep drawing, the effects of holder pressure on mentioned parameters can be ignored.

  15. A Procedure for Measuring Microplastics using Pressurized Fluid Extraction.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Stephen; Gautam, Anil

    2016-06-07

    A method based on pressurized fluid extraction (PFE) was developed for measuring microplastics in environmental samples. This method can address some limitations of the current microplastic methods and provide laboratories with a simple analytical method for quantifying common microplastics in a range of environmental samples. The method was initially developed by recovering 101% to 111% of spiked plastics on glass beads and was then applied to a composted municipal waste sample with spike recoveries ranging from 85% to 94%. The results from municipal waste samples and soil samples collected from an industrial area demonstrated that the method is a promising alternative for determining the concentration and identity of microplastics in environmental samples.

  16. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Tachibana, H.; Hardenberg, J.P.; Dowell, R.E. Jr.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mortel, K.F.

    1984-02-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting.

  17. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J S; Tachibana, H; Hardenberg, J P; Dowell, R E; Kitagawa, Y; Mortel, K F

    1984-02-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting.

  18. Structural changes in supercritical fluids at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mario; Gorelli, Federico A.

    2008-06-01

    The structure of an archetypal model simple fluid system as argon has been investigated by x-ray diffraction at high pressures and room and high temperatures. Despite the markedly supercritical conditions (T=2 4Tc,P>102Pc) , the structure factor S(Q) is very similar, close to the melting line, to that observed in the liquid phase, thereby assessing a liquidlike structure with high atomic correlation, as proposed in a recent inelastic experiment. On the other hand, the S(Q) continuously changes upon approaching the extrapolation of the liquid-gas coexistence line in the (P/Pc,T/Tc) plane, ultimately exhibiting low atomic correlation, which reasonably indicates intermediate character between liquid and gas. The analysis of the S(Q) s based on the hard-sphere model shows that the changes are driven by the decrease in the packing fraction and the increase in the nearest-neighbor distance with decreasing pressure.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure Gradients in Healthy Volunteers and Patients with Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    HAYASHI, Naokazu; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori; YATSUSHIRO, Satoshi; HIRAYAMA, Akihiro; ABDULLAH, Afnizanfaizal; KURODA, Kagayaki

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can depict not only anatomical information, but also physiological factors such as velocity and pressure gradient. Measurement of these physiological factors is necessary to understand the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) environment. In this study we quantified CSF motion in various parts of the CSF space, determined changes in the CSF environment with aging, and compared CSF pressure gradient between patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and healthy elderly volunteers. Fifty-seven healthy volunteers and six iNPH patients underwent four-dimensional (4D) phase-contrast (PC) MRI. CSF motion was observed and the pressure gradient of CSF was quantified in the CSF space. In healthy volunteers, inhomogeneous CSF motion was observed whereby the pressure gradient markedly increased in the center of the skull and gradually decreased in the periphery of the skull. For example, the pressure gradient at the ventral surface of the brainstem was 6.6 times greater than that at the convexity of the cerebrum. The pressure gradient was statistically unchanged with aging. The pressure gradient of patients with iNPH was 3.2 times greater than that of healthy volunteers. The quantitative analysis of 4D-PC MRI data revealed that the pressure gradient of CSF can be used to understand the CSF environment, which is not sufficiently given by subjective impression of the anatomical image. PMID:26226976

  20. Melange rheology, fluid pressure distribution, and seismic style (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Sibson, R. H.

    2010-12-01

    Subduction megathrusts accommodate shear displacements in a range of seismic styles, including standard earthquakes, non-volcanic tremor, and continuous and transitory aseismic slip. Subduction channel shear zones, containing highly sheared, fluid-saturated trench-fill sediments intermingled with fragments of oceanic crust, are commonly inferred to occur along active subduction thrust interfaces. If this interpretation is correct, these plate boundary faults are not discrete planes, but may resemble the mélange shear zones commonly found in exhumed subduction-related rock assemblages. In such shear zones, deformation is accommodated by a mixture of continuous matrix flow and localized slip on numerous shear discontinuities. The dominant deformation mode in a mélange appears to depend critically on the ratio of competent to incompetent material, with shear discontinuities localized along lithological contacts or within competent domains, while matrix flow accommodates shearing by distributed strain. If the style of strain/displacement accommodation in a mélange reflects the partitioning between aseismic and seismic slip, the proportion of competent material seems likely to be a significant factor affecting seismic style within subduction channel shear zones. Along the Hikurangi margin, New Zealand, interseismic coupling varies from strong in the south to weak in the north. Variations in accretionary prism geometry indicate that the megathrust is mechanically stronger in the weakly coupled segment, than in the strongly coupled region. Thus, along this megathrust, weak coupling appears to occur on a relatively strong fault segment, while strong coupling relates to weak segments of the plate boundary. This may be caused by a fluid pressure difference, where frictional sliding is preferred in the strongly coupled, mechanically weak segment, where the incoming plate is relatively smooth and the overlying plate inferred to be relatively impermeable. In the weakly

  1. Passively actuated valve

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  2. Numerical Simulations of Flow Separation Control in Low-Pressure Turbines using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Ashpis, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    A recently introduced phenomenological model to simulate flow control applications using plasma actuators has been further developed and improved in order to expand its use to complicated actuator geometries. The new modeling approach eliminates the requirement of an empirical charge density distribution shape by using the embedded electrode as a source for the charge density. The resulting model is validated against a flat plate experiment with quiescent environment. The modeling approach incorporates the effect of the plasma actuators on the external flow into Navier Stokes computations as a body force vector which is obtained as a product of the net charge density and the electric field. The model solves the Maxwell equation to obtain the electric field due to the applied AC voltage at the electrodes and an additional equation for the charge density distribution representing the plasma density. The new modeling approach solves the charge density equation in the computational domain assuming the embedded electrode as a source therefore automatically generating a charge density distribution on the surface exposed to the flow similar to that observed in the experiments without explicitly specifying an empirical distribution. The model is validated against a flat plate experiment with quiescent environment.

  3. Effects of magmatic and metamorphic volatiles on the evolution of fluid-rock interactions and fluid pressure during contact metamorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Finite difference models of hydrothermal flow around a cooling intrusion that include fluid production from the magma during crystallization and from wall rocks during heating are used to investigate the evolution of fluid pressure and fluid-rock interactions during the contact metamorphism. For a granodiorite intrusion with a width of 9 km and releasing just 1: H[sub 2]O linearly during crystallization, fluid production elevates fluid pressures to lithostatic values above and adjacent to the intrusion when permeabilities are less than 1 [mu]D (10[sup [minus]18] m[sup 2]). Alternatively, hydrofracturing resulting from fluid production would be sufficient to create and maintain a time-averaged permeability of 1 [mu]D for 50,000 years: permeability decreases gradually with time afterward until the magma crystallizes (350,000 years). In detail, the history depends strongly on how fluids are released from the crystallizing magma. The effect is comparable to that obtained for devolatilization of 5% H[sub 2]O by weight over heating of 400 C in adjacent wall rocks. Fluid production dominates other mechanisms for elevating fluid pressures such as thermal expansion of pore fluids or ductile strain. In models with both magmatic and metamorphic fluids, fluid flow is outward from the inner aureole for much of the cooling history at wall-rock permeabilities of [le]100 [mu]D. Extensive up-temperature flow is not predicted. The evolution of flow is such that magmatic fluids can initially dominate fluid-rock interactions in a plume above the intrusion, although the timing of interaction of magmatic and metamorphic waters is sensitive to the detailed devolatilization histories. Initial pore fluids rapidly become insignificant in the overall fluid budget. Surface or external fluids infiltrate only late in the cooling history, as rocks within a few kilometers of the intrusion are cooling.

  4. Pneumatic Variable Series Elastic Actuator.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Wu, Molei; Shen, Xiangrong

    2016-08-01

    Inspired by human motor control theory, stiffness control is highly effective in manipulation and human-interactive tasks. The implementation of stiffness control in robotic systems, however, has largely been limited to closed-loop control, and suffers from multiple issues such as limited frequency range, potential instability, and lack of contribution to energy efficiency. Variable-stiffness actuator represents a better solution, but the current designs are complex, heavy, and bulky. The approach in this paper seeks to address these issues by using pneumatic actuator as a variable series elastic actuator (VSEA), leveraging the compressibility of the working fluid. In this work, a pneumatic actuator is modeled as an elastic element with controllable stiffness and equilibrium point, both of which are functions of air masses in the two chambers. As such, for the implementation of stiffness control in a robotic system, the desired stiffness/equilibrium point can be converted to the desired chamber air masses, and a predictive pressure control approach is developed to control the timing of valve switching to obtain the desired air mass while minimizing control action. Experimental results showed that the new approach in this paper requires less expensive hardware (on-off valve instead of proportional valve), causes less control action in implementation, and provides good control performance by leveraging the inherent dynamics of the actuator.

  5. Intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Albeck, M J; Børgesen, S E; Gjerris, F; Schmidt, J F; Sørensen, P S

    1991-04-01

    Conductance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow (Cout) is an important parameter to be considered in patients with CSF circulation abnormalities. In patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus it is the single most important parameter in determining if the patient needs CSF shunting. The lower normal limit for Cout has been estimated from the effect of shunting in patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus, from patients retrospectively reevaluated after recovering from illness, and from patients with known abnormalities in the brain or the CSF system. The true value of Cout in normal individuals, however, has hitherto not been reported. In the present study, Cout has been measured by a lumbar infusion test in eight young volunteers with no suspicion of disease. The mean intracranial pressure (ICP) was 11 mm Hg and a linear relationship was found between CSF absorption and ICP. The mean Cout was 0.11 ml/min/mm Hg and the lower 95% confidence level was 0.10 ml/min/mm Hg. These values are in accordance with those obtained from previous studies.

  6. A batch fabricated capacitive pressure sensor with an integrated Guyton capsule for interstitial fluid pressure measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Teimour; Fogle, Benjamin; Ziaie, Babak

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we present the design, fabrication and test of a batch fabricated capacitive pressure sensor with an integrated Guyton capsule for interstitial fluid pressure measurement. The sensor is composed of 12 µm thick single crystalline silicon membrane and a 3 µm gap, hermetically sealed through silicon-glass anodic bonding. A novel batch scale method for creating electrical feed-throughs inside the sealed capacitor chamber is developed. The Guyton capsule consists of an array of 10 µm diameter access holes etched onto a silicon back-plate separated from the silicon sensing membrane by a gap of 5 µm. The presence of the Guyton capsule (i.e. plates with access holes plus the gap separating them from the sensing membrane) allows for the ingress of interstitial fluid inside the 5 µm gap following the implantation, thus, providing an accurate measurement of interstitial fluid pressure. The fabricated sensor is 3 × 2 × 0.42 mm3 in dimensions and has a maximum sensitivity of 10 fF mmHg-1.

  7. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  8. Characterization of piezoelectric macrofiber composite actuated winglets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, T. K.; Oates, W. S.; Kumar, R.

    2015-06-01

    The present study primarily focuses on the design, development, and structural characterization of an oscillating winglet actuated using a piezoelectric macrofiber composite (MFC). The primary objective is to study the effect of controlled wingtip oscillations on the evolution of wingtip vortices, with a goal of weakening these potentially harmful tip vortices by introducing controlled instabilities through both spatial and temporal perturbations producible through winglet oscillations. MFC-actuated winglets have been characterized under different input excitation and pressure-loading conditions. The winglet oscillations show bimodal behavior for both structural and actuation modes of resonance. The oscillatory amplitude at these actuation modes increases linearly with the magnitude of excitation. During wind-tunnel tests, fluid-structure interactions led to structural vibrations of the wing. The effect of these vibrations on the overall winglet oscillations decreased when the strength of actuation increased. At high input excitation, the actuated winglet was capable of generating controlled oscillations. As a proof of concept, the current study has demonstrated that microfiber composite-actuated winglets produce sufficient displacements to alter the development of the wingtip vortex.

  9. Intracranial pressure and conductance to outflow of cerebrospinal fluid in normal-pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Børgesen, S E; Gjerris, F; Sørensen, S C

    1979-04-01

    Forty patients with clinical evidence of normal-pressure hydrocephalus were studied by monitoring intraventricular pressure during a 24-hour period, and by a lumboventricular perfusion test for measurement of the conductance to outflow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The purpose of the study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between intraventricular pressure and conductance to outflow of CSF, and whether it is possible to use the results from pressure monitoring in the selection of patients who may be expected to benefit from shunting therapy. The conductance to outflow was used as an evaluation factor in the selection of patients to be treated by a shunt. The conductance to CSF outflow differed by twelvefold between the lowest and highest values. The level of resting intraventricular pressure was within normal limits in all patients. Accordingly, there was no evidence of a relationship between conductance to outflow and intraventricular pressure. So-called B-waves were seen more frequently in patients with decreased conductance to outflow, but were also present in patients with high conductance to outflow. Therefore, the presence of B-waves does not imply a low conductance to outflow of CSF.

  10. Interpreting fluid pressure anomalies in shallow intraplate argillaceous formations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations have revealed several instances of apparently isolated highs or lows in pore fluid potential in shallow (< ~ 1 km depth) argillaceous formations in intraplate settings. Formations with the pressure anomalies are distinguished by (1) smaller ratios of hydraulic conductivity to formation thickness and (2) smaller hydraulic (or pressure) diffusivities than those without anomalies. This is consistent with transient Darcian flow caused by strain at rates of ~ 10−17 to 10-16 s-1, by significant perturbing events in the past 104 to 106 annum or by some combination of the two. Plausible causes include erosional downwasting, tectonic strain, and glaciation. In this conceptualization the anomalies provide constraints on formation-scale flow properties, flow history, and local geological forcing in the last 106 annum and in particular indicate zones of low permeability (10−19–10−22 m2) that could be useful for isolation of nuclear waste.

  11. Pressure updating methods for the steady-state fluid equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiterman, A.; Turkel, E.; Vatsa, V.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the steady state equations for a compressible fluid. Since we wish to solve for a range of speeds we must consider the equations in conservation form. For transonic speeds these equations are of mixed type. Hence, the usual approach is to add time derivatives to the steady state equations and then march these equations in time. One then adds a time derivative of the density to the continuity equation, a derivative of the momentum to the momentum equation and a derivative of the total energy to the energy equation. This choice is dictated by the time consistent equations. However, since we are only interested in the steady state this is not necessary. Thus we shall consider the possibility of adding a time derivative of the pressure to the continuity equation and similar modifications for the energy equation. This can then be generalized to adding combinations of time derivatives to each equation since these vanish in the steady state. When using acceleration techniques such as residual smoothing, multigrid, etc. these are applied to the pressure rather than the density. Hence, the code duplicates the behavior of the incompressible equations for low speeds.

  12. Sound-driven fluid dynamics in pressurized carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    van Iersel, Maikel M; Mettin, Robert; Benes, Nieck E; Schwarzer, Dirk; Keurentjes, Jos T F

    2010-07-28

    Using high-speed visualization we demonstrate that ultrasound irradiation of pressurized carbon dioxide (CO(2)) induces phenomena that do not occur in ordinary liquids at ambient conditions. For a near-critical mixture of CO(2) and argon, sonication leads to extremely fast local phase separation, in which the system enters and leaves the two-phase region with the frequency of the imposed sound field. This phase transition can propagate with the speed of sound, but can also be located at fixed positions in the case of a standing sound wave. Sonication of a vapor-liquid interface creates a fine dispersion of liquid and vapor, irrespective whether the ultrasound horn is placed in the liquid or the vapor phase. In the absence of an interface, sonication of the liquid leads to ejection of a macroscopic vapor phase from the ultrasound horn with a velocity of several meters per second in the direction of wave propagation. The findings reported here potentially provide a tunable and noninvasive means for enhancing mass and heat transfer in high-pressure fluids.

  13. A novel linear elastic actuator for minimally invasive surgery: development of a surgical gripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerboni, G.; Brancadoro, M.; Tortora, G.; Diodato, A.; Cianchetti, M.; Menciassi, A.

    2016-10-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) applications require lightweight actuators that can generate a high force in a limited volume. Among pressure driven actuators, fluid elastic actuators demonstrate high potential for use in the medical field. They are characterized by nearly no friction and wear and they can be made of low-cost biocompatible elastomers. However, when compared to traditional piston-cylinder fluid actuators, fluid elastic actuators often result in smaller output forces as well as weaker return forces. This work is about the design of a linear elastic actuator (LEA) which is able to develop relevant pulling-pushing force in one direction. The LEA is composed of entirely disposable materials and it requires a simple manufacturing process. Thanks to its design, the LEA can be compared to traditional piston-cylinders actuators in terms of output forces (up to 7 N) with the advantage of using relative low working pressures (0, 2 MPa). The actuator has been used for the actuation of a gripper for MIS, as a case study. The whole range of gripping forces developed by the tool actated by the LEA has been evaluated, thus verifying that the gripping device, is able to meet the force requirements for accomplishing typical surgical tasks.

  14. Fluid pressures and fluid flows from boreholes spanning the NanTroSEIZE transect through the Nankai Trough, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. Casey; Barrett, Myles; Thu, Moe Kyaw

    2013-07-01

    IODP Expedition 314 acquired annular pressure while drilling measurements in six holes extending from the outer forearc basin to the base of the trench slope. These data provide pressures inside the borehole near the bit during drilling; the pressures reflect the cuttings load in the borehole, and the viscous resistance to flow of fluids up the borehole due to pumping from the rig floor and due to fluid exchange with the formation. The forearc basin site provides a reference locality that extends to 1402 m and whose pressure curve is apparently controlled dominantly by the cuttings load and the rig-floor pumping rate. All other holes show at least initial pressure curves that are very similar to that at the forearc basin site, despite pumping rates varying by about 20-30%. Some small variations in pressure curves can be positively correlated to the penetration rate that controls cutting load. Two holes crossing a fracture zone show pressure anomalies extending to above-lithostatic conditions, and modeled fluid influx rates of 3000 l/m or 150% of the rig-floor pumping rate. A third hole, probably in the same highly overpressured zone, shows a near lithostatic pressure value just prior to losing the bottom hole assembly due to stuck pipe. The extraordinarily high pressures occur in the upper portion of the hanging wall of the megasplay fault zone and may reflect residual conditions from the 1944 M 8.1 earthquake. A penetration of the lower boundary of the megasplay fault zone shows only minor fluid pressure anomalies around the fault surface. A hole through the frontal thrust records fluid pressure anomalies in sandy sediments of the footwall, apparently due to expulsion of fluids from loading by the hanging wall.

  15. Simply actuated closure for a pressure vessel - Design for use to trap deep-sea animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yayanos, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    A pressure vessel is described that can be closed by a single translational motion within 1 sec. The vessel is a key component of a trap for small marine animals and operates automatically on the sea floor. As the vessel descends to the sea floor, it is subjected both internally and externally to the high pressures of the deep sea. The mechanism for closing the pressure vessel on the sea floor is activated by the timed release of the ballast which was used to sink the trap. As it rises to the sea surface, the internal pressure of the vessel remains near the value present on the sea floor. The pressure vessel has been used in simulated ocean deployments and in the deep ocean (9500 m) with a 75%-85% retention of the deep-sea pressure. Nearly 100% retention of pressure can be achieved by using an accumulator filled with a gas.

  16. Larger-Stroke Piezoelectrically Actuated Microvalve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    A proposed normally-closed microvalve would contain a piezoelectric bending actuator instead of a piezoelectric linear actuator like that of the microvalve described in the preceding article. Whereas the stroke of the linear actuator of the preceding article would be limited to approximately equal to 6 micrometers, the stroke of the proposed bending actuator would lie in the approximate range of 10 to 15 micrometers-large enough to enable the microvalve to handle a variety of liquids containing suspended particles having sizes up to 10 m. Such particulate-laden liquids occur in a variety of microfluidic systems, one example being a system that sorts cells or large biomolecules for analysis. In comparison with the linear actuator of the preceding article, the bending actuator would be smaller and less massive. The combination of increased stroke, smaller mass, and smaller volume would be obtained at the cost of decreased actuation force: The proposed actuator would generate a force in the approximate range of 1 to 4 N, the exact amount depending on operating conditions and details of design. This level of actuation force would be too low to enable the valve to handle a fluid at the high pressure level mentioned in the preceding article. The proposal encompasses two alternative designs one featuring a miniature piezoelectric bimorph actuator and one featuring a thick-film unimorph piezoelectric actuator (see figure). In either version, the valve would consume a power of only 0.01 W when actuated at a frequency of 100 Hz. Also, in either version, it would be necessary to attach a soft elastomeric sealing ring to the valve seat so that any particles that settle on the seat would be pushed deep into the elastomeric material to prevent or reduce leakage. The overall dimensions of the bimorph version would be 7 by 7 by 1 mm. The actuator in this version would generate a force of 1 N and a stroke of 10 m at an applied potential of 150 V. The actuation force would be

  17. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  18. Active vibration control of a ring-stiffened cylindrical shell in contact with unbounded external fluid and subjected to harmonic disturbance by piezoelectric sensor and actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Yang, Dong-Ho

    2013-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the suppression of vibrations and radiated sound of a ring-stiffened circular cylindrical shell in contact with unbounded external fluid by means of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The dynamic model of a circular cylindrical shell based on the Sanders shell theory was considered together with a ring stiffener model. The mass and stiffness matrices for a ring stiffener were newly derived in this study and added to the mass and stiffness matrices of the cylindrical shell, respectively. The fluid-added mass matrix, which was derived by using the baffled shell theory, was also added to the mass matrix. Finally, the equations representing the piezoelectric sensor measurement and piezoelectric actuation complete the theoretical model for the addressed problem. The natural vibration characteristics of the ring-stiffened cylindrical shell both in air and in water were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical predictions were in good agreement with the experimental results. An active vibration controller which can cope with a harmonic disturbance was designed by considering the modified higher harmonic control, which is, in fact, a band rejection filter. An active vibration control experiment on the submerged cylindrical shell was carried out in a water tank and the digital control system was used. The experimental results showed that both vibrations and radiation sound of the submerged cylindrical shell were suppressed by a pair of piezoelectric sensor and actuator.

  19. Design of an electronic oscillator for resonant pressure sensor with non-collocated sensor and actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, Akila; Gandhi, Uma; Kaluvan, Suresh; Choi, Seung-Bok; Umapathy, Mangalanathan

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a simple closed loop circuit (oscillator) design for producing sustained, oscillations required to continuously vibrate the resonance based pressure sensor at its resonant frequency. For each variation in applied input pressure, the sensor's resonant frequency varies and the circuit makes the sensor to vibrate at its new resonant frequency, thereby enabling the measurement of change in resonant frequency shift due to corresponding pressure. The resonant condition is achieved by automatic tuning of phase angle required to satisfy Barkhausen criteria. The proposed circuit is evaluated analytically and verified experimentally for different pressure sensors fabricated using various grades of Stainless Steel material.

  20. Boundary-Layer Separation Control under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions using Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    transition. Gad-el-Hak provides a review of various techniques for flow control in general and Volino discusses recent studies on separation control under low-pressure-turbine conditions utilizing passive as well as active devices. As pointed out by Volino, passive devices optimized for separation control at low Reynolds numbers tend to increase losses at high Reynolds numbers, Active devices have the attractive feature that they can be utilized only in operational regimes where they are needed and when turned off would not affect the flow. The focus in the present paper is an experimental Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modem low-pressure-turbine airfoil ('Pak-B'). The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) Gee-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface- flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control. of active separation control using glow discharge plasma actuators.

  1. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  2. Multiplexed hydraulic valve actuation using ionic liquid filled soft channels and Braille displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Wei; Chen, Hao; Tung, Yi-Chung; Meiners, Jens-Christian; Takayama, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    Pneumatic actuation with multilayer soft lithography enables operation of up to thousands of valves in parallel using far fewer control lines. However, it is dependent on macroscopic switches and external pressure sources that require interconnects and limit portability. The authors present a more portable and multiplexed valve actuation strategy that uses a grid of mechanically actuated Braille pins to hydraulically, rather than pneumatically, deform elastic actuation channels that act as valves. Experimental and theoretical analyses show that the key to reliable operation of the hydraulic system is the use of nonvolatile ionic liquids as the hydraulic fluid.

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Leinonen, Ville; Menon, Lata G.; Carroll, Rona S.; Dello Iacono, Donna; Grevet, Jeremy; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Black, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is still challenging. Alzheimer's disease (AD), along with vascular dementia, the most important differential diagnosis for iNPH, has several potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers which might help in the selection of patients for shunt treatment. The aim of this study was to compare a battery of CSF biomarkers including well-known AD-related proteins with CSF from patients with suspected iNPH collected from the external lumbar drainage test (ELD). A total of 35 patients with suspected iNPH patients were evaluated with ELD. CSF was collected in the beginning of the test, and the concentrations of total tau, ptau181, Aβ42, NFL, TNF-α, TGFβ1, and VEGF were analysed by ELISA. Twenty-six patients had a positive ELD result—that is, their gait symptoms improved; 9 patients had negative ELD. The levels of all analyzed CSF biomarkers were similar between the groups and none of them predicted the ELD result in these patients. Contrary to expectations lumbar CSF TNF-α concentration was low in iNPH patients. PMID:21660204

  4. Dynamic high pressure: why it makes metallic fluid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nellis, William

    2015-06-01

    Metallic fluid H (MFH) was made by dynamic compression decades after Wigner and Huntington (WH) predicted it in 1935. The density of MFH is within a few percent of the density predicted by WH. MFH was made by multiple-shock compression of liquid H2, which process is quasi-isentropic and thermally equilibrated. The compressions were isentropic but produced enough dissipation as temperature T and entropy S to drive the crossover from insulating H2 to metallic H at 9-fold compressed atomic H density. T and S were tuned by temporally shaping the applied pressure pulse such that H2 dissociated to H at sufficiently high density to make a highly degenerate metal. The basic ideas of dynamic compression, also known as supersonic, adiabatic, nonlinear hydrodynamics, were developed in the last half of the Nineteenth Century. Our purposes are to (i) present a brief review of dynamic compression and its affects on materials, (ii) review considerations that led to the sample holder designed specifically to make MFH, and (iii) present a inter-comparison of dynamic and static methods relative to their prospects for making metallic H.

  5. Role of interstitial fluid pressurization in TMJ lubrication.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, B K; Bonnevie, E D; Park, M; Zhou, Y; Wang, L; Burris, D L; Lu, X L

    2015-01-01

    In temporomandibular joints (TMJs), the disc and condylar cartilage function as load-bearing, shock-absorbing, and friction-reducing materials. The ultrastructure of the TMJ disc and cartilage is different from that of hyaline cartilage in other diarthrodial joints, and little is known about their lubrication mechanisms. In this study, we performed micro-tribometry testing on the TMJ disc and condylar cartilage to obtain their region- and direction-dependent friction properties. Frictional tests with a migrating contact area were performed on 8 adult porcine TMJs at 5 different regions (anterior, posterior, central, medial, and lateral) in 2 orthogonal directions (anterior-posterior and medial-lateral). Some significant regional differences were detected, and the lateral-medial direction showed higher friction than the anterior-posterior direction on both tissues. The mean friction coefficient of condylar cartilage against steel was 0.027, but the disc, at 0.074, displayed a significantly higher friction coefficient. The 2 tissues also exhibited different frictional dependencies on sliding speed and normal loading force. Whereas the friction of condylar cartilage decreased with increased sliding speed and was independent of the magnitude of normal force, friction of the disc showed no dependence on sliding speed but decreased as normal force increased. Further analysis of the Péclet number and frictional coefficients suggested that condylar cartilage relies on interstitial fluid pressurization to a greater extent than the corresponding contact area of the TMJ disc.

  6. Pore fluid pressure and shear behavior in debris flows of different compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitna, Roland; Palucis, Marisa; Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, Kimberly; Dietrich, William

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows are mixtures of sediment and water that can have a wide range of different grain size distributions and water contents. The composition of the material is expected to have a strong effect on the development of pore fluid pressures in excess to hydrostatic, which in turn might affect the internal deformation behavior. We present a set of large scale experiments with debris flow mixtures of different compositions in a 4-m diameter rotating drum. Longitudinal profiles of basal fluid pressure and normal stress were measured and a probe to determine fluid pressure at different depths within the flow was developed and tested. Additionally we determined vertical profiles of mean particle velocities in the flow interior by measuring small variations of conductivity of the passing material and calculating the time lag between signals from two independent measurements at a small, known distance apart. Mean values of basal pore fluid pressure range from hydrostatic pressure for gravel-water flows to nearly complete liquefaction for muddy mixtures having a wide grain size distribution. The data indicate that the presence of fines dampens fluctuations of normalized fluid pressure and normal stress and concentrates shear at the base. The mobility of grain-fluid flows is strongly enhanced by a combination of fines in suspension as part of the interstitial fluid and a wide grain size distribution. Excess fluid pressure may arise from fluid displacement by converging grains at the front of the flow and the slow settling of grains through a highly viscous non-Newtonian fluid. Our findings support the need for pore pressure evolution and diffusion equations in debris flow models as they depend on particle size distributions. This study contributes to the understanding of the production of excess fluid pressure in grain fluid mixtures and may guide the development of constitutive models that describe natural events.

  7. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Namtran C.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation actuator. The device utilized a fuel mixture of H2 and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at approx.600 Hz, for the lambda/4 mode. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to specific impulse of 2611 s. This value is comparable to other H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) experiments. The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was approx.600 Hz, and was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the model and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 lb/cu in, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume values of approximately 0.01 lb/cu in.

  8. Ductile creep and compaction: A mechanism for transiently increasing fluid pressure in mostly sealed fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sleep, Norman H.; Blanpied, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    A simple cyclic process is proposed to explain why major strike-slip fault zones, including the San Andreas, are weak. Field and laboratory studies suggest that the fluid within fault zones is often mostly sealed from that in the surrounding country rock. Ductile creep driven by the difference between fluid pressure and lithostatic pressure within a fault zone leads to compaction that increases fluid pressure. The increased fluid pressure allows frictional failure in earthquakes at shear tractions far below those required when fluid pressure is hydrostatic. The frictional slip associated with earthquakes creates porosity in the fault zone. The cycle adjusts so that no net porosity is created (if the fault zone remains constant width). The fluid pressure within the fault zone reaches long-term dynamic equilibrium with the (hydrostatic) pressure in the country rock. One-dimensional models of this process lead to repeatable and predictable earthquake cycles. However, even modest complexity, such as two parallel fault splays with different pressure histories, will lead to complicated earthquake cycles. Two-dimensional calculations allowed computation of stress and fluid pressure as a function of depth but had complicated behavior with the unacceptable feature that numerical nodes failed one at a time rather than in large earthquakes. A possible way to remove this unphysical feature from the models would be to include a failure law in which the coefficient of friction increases at first with frictional slip, stabilizing the fault, and then decreases with further slip, destabilizing it. ?? 1994 Birkha??user Verlag.

  9. Self-actuated device

    DOEpatents

    Hecht, Samuel L.

    1984-01-01

    A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

  10. Fluid-hammer induced pressure oscillations in a cryogenic feed line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Jeswin; Agrawal, Gagan; Agarwal, Deepak; Pisharady, J. C.; Kumar, S. Sunil

    2017-02-01

    A transient, thermodynamic flow model is developed to simulate pressure oscillations in cryogenic fluid occurring due to sudden closing of valves, a phenomenon commonly known as fluid-hammering. The effects of line dimensions and flow rate changes on amplitude and frequency of these oscillations are investigated using numerical analysis. The model is validated with in-house experimental data and literature based on MOC solution for fluid-hammer. Current study is significant for understanding pressure oscillations during valve operation in launch vehicle cryogenic engine. Very low pressures caused due to fluid-hammer could lead to reduction in pump inlet pressure below saturation level, resulting in pump cavitation. Pressure oscillations also cause fluctuations in propellant flow rate, resulting in undesirable variations in thrust output from the engine. Computational analysis shows that increase in line diameter and reduction in the rate of change of flow rate reduce the peak amplitude of pressure oscillations.

  11. Non-invasive method of measuring cerebral spinal fluid pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor); Lambert, James L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The invention provides a method of non-invasively determining intracranial pressure from measurements of an eye. A parameter of an optic nerve of the eye is determined, along with an intraocular pressure of the eye. The intracranial pressure may be determined from the intraocular pressure and the parameter.

  12. Development of abnormal fluid pressures beneath a ramping thrust sheet: Where's the evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltschko, D.V.; Smith, R.E. . Dept. of Geology and Center for Tectonophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Many models for the mechanics of fold and thrust belts hold that fluid pressure is locally, or even everywhere, abnormal, thus aiding both internal deformation and motion along the base. Recent support comes from studies of accretionary prisms where drill-stem measurements of both fluid flow in fault zones and formation pressure are pointed to as evidence for a hydrodynamic system characterized by wide-spread excess fluid pressure. However, despite the general acceptance of high fluid pressure (Pf) as a potentially important controlling mechanism for thrust motion, and despite nearly 30 years of looking, direct evidence for abnormal fluid pressure in ancient continental thrust belts is either rare or ambiguous. The authors have developed a two-dimensional model for the evolution of fluid pressure within and beneath a ramping thrust sheet. In the model, the fluid and heat flow equations are solved and applied at each time step. The model accounts for porosity compaction, thermal pressuring, and fluid flow. Results of this model show, first, that high fluid pressure can be developed during deposition, before thrust motion. The authors used typical rates of deposition, duration of deposition, and a simplified three-layer stratigraphy for North American thrust belts. Second, the models show that high Pf can be maintained and/or further enhanced during thrusting depending upon the permeabilities assigned to the model hydrostratigraphic section. Of the rock properties studied in detail, modes are most sensitive to permeability. Nevertheless, the models show that for best guesses of the relevant rock properties it should be possible to find evidence for high fluid pressure in, (1) the crests of ramp anticlines and, (2) the toe region, especially in the lower plate.

  13. Electrostatic actuators for portable microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, Joshua

    minimize actuation potentials while eliminating stiction. Two strategies were developed to overcome challenges with electrode screening in the presence of aqueous fluids. First, instead of using the electrostatic actuators to interact directly with aqueous solutions, the actuators were used to regulate pressurized control lines for pneumatic microvalves. Secondly, by adopting a normally-closed architecture, the actuators were converted into microvalves capable of directly interacting with aqueous solutions. The two strategies are complementary, and together should enable sophisticated microfluidic systems for applications ranging from point-of-care diagnostics to portable chemical detection. To conclude the dissertation, I demonstrate a proof-of-principle microfluidic system that contained sixteen independently-operated electrostatic valves, operated with battery-operated electrical ancillaries in a hand-held format.

  14. A self-priming, roller-free, miniature, peristaltic pump operable with a single, reciprocating actuator.

    PubMed

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Ramunas, John; Santiago, Juan G

    2010-05-01

    We present a design for a miniature self-priming peristaltic pump actuated with a single linear actuator, and which can be manufactured using conventional materials and methods. The pump is tolerant of bubbles and particles and can pump liquids, foams, and gases. We explore designs actuated by a motor (in depth) and a shape memory alloy (briefly); and briefly present a manually actuated version. The pump consists of a Delrin acetal plastic body with two integrated valves, a flexible silicone tube, and an actuator. Pumping is achieved as the forward motion of the actuator first closes the upstream valve, and then compresses a section of the tube. The increased internal pressure opens a downstream burst valve to expel the fluid. Reduced pressure in the pump tube allows the downstream valve to close, and removal of actuator force allows the upstream valve and pump tube to open, refilling the pump. The motor actuated design offers a linear dependence of flow rate on voltage in the range of 1.75-3 V. Flow rate decreases from 780 μl/min with increasing back pressure up to the maximum back pressure of 48 kPa. At 3 V and minimum back pressure, the pump consumes 90 mW. The shape memory alloy actuated design offers a 5-fold size and 4-fold weight reduction over the motor design, higher maximum back pressure, and substantial insensitivity of flow rate to back pressure at the cost of lower power efficiency and flow rate. The manually actuated version is simpler and appropriate for applications unconstrained by actuation distance.

  15. A self-priming, roller-free, miniature, peristaltic pump operable with a single, reciprocating actuator

    PubMed Central

    Shkolnikov, Viktor; Ramunas, John; Santiago, Juan G.

    2013-01-01

    We present a design for a miniature self-priming peristaltic pump actuated with a single linear actuator, and which can be manufactured using conventional materials and methods. The pump is tolerant of bubbles and particles and can pump liquids, foams, and gases. We explore designs actuated by a motor (in depth) and a shape memory alloy (briefly); and briefly present a manually actuated version. The pump consists of a Delrin acetal plastic body with two integrated valves, a flexible silicone tube, and an actuator. Pumping is achieved as the forward motion of the actuator first closes the upstream valve, and then compresses a section of the tube. The increased internal pressure opens a downstream burst valve to expel the fluid. Reduced pressure in the pump tube allows the downstream valve to close, and removal of actuator force allows the upstream valve and pump tube to open, refilling the pump. The motor actuated design offers a linear dependence of flow rate on voltage in the range of 1.75–3 V. Flow rate decreases from 780 μl/min with increasing back pressure up to the maximum back pressure of 48 kPa. At 3 V and minimum back pressure, the pump consumes 90 mW. The shape memory alloy actuated design offers a 5-fold size and 4-fold weight reduction over the motor design, higher maximum back pressure, and substantial insensitivity of flow rate to back pressure at the cost of lower power efficiency and flow rate. The manually actuated version is simpler and appropriate for applications unconstrained by actuation distance. PMID:24672145

  16. Minesweeping for Pressure Actuated Mines by Air Injection into a Water Column

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    at a separation height of 14 inches from the pressure sensor. However, The installed gantry crane system and yellow stanchion would not allow for data...wide (Y Direction) and 7 feet deep (Z direction). Along the top of this tank is a computer-operated gantry system operated by a simple computer system...incorporated to protect the entire system as well as any gear that may be attached to the gantry . Figure 9 provides a visual image of how the rail

  17. Fluid pressure relaxation depends upon osteonal microstructure: modeling an oscillatory bending experiment.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Fritton, S P; Cowin, S C; Weinbaum, S

    1999-07-01

    When bone is mechanically loaded, bone fluid flow induces shear stresses on bone cells that have been proposed to be involved in bone's mechanosensory system. To investigate bone fluid flow and strain-generated potentials, several theoretical models have been proposed to mimic oscillatory four-point bending experiments performed on thin bone specimens. While these previous models assume that the bone fluid relaxes across the specimen thickness, we hypothesize that the bone fluid relaxes primarily through the vascular porosity (osteonal canals) instead and develop a new poroelastic model that integrates the microstructural details of the lacunar-canalicular porosity, osteonal canals, and the osteonal cement lines. Local fluid pressure profiles are obtained from the model, and we find two different fluid relaxation behaviors in the bone specimen, depending on its microstructure: one associated with the connected osteonal canal system, through which bone fluid relaxes to the nearby osteonal canals; and one associated with the thickness of a homogeneous porous bone specimen (approximately 1 mm in our model), through which bone fluid relaxes between the external surfaces of the bone specimen at relatively lower loading frequencies. Our results suggest that in osteonal bone specimens the fluid pressure response to cyclic loading is not sensitive to the permeability of the osteonal cement lines, while it is sensitive to the applied loading frequency. Our results also reveal that the fluid pressure gradients near the osteonal canals (and thus the fluid shear stresses acting on the nearby osteocytes) are significantly amplified at higher loading frequencies.

  18. Phase equilibria in fluid mixtures at high pressures: The He-CH4 system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, W. B.; Erickson, A. L.; Hill, J. L. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of phase equilibria in the He-CH4 system was carried out over the temperature range 95 to 290 K and at pressures to 10,000 atm. The experimental results consist of equilibrium phase composition for twenty-eight isotherms in the region of coexistence of two fluid phases, together with the pressure-temperature trace of the three-phase boundary at which a CH4-rich solid phase is in equilibrium with the two fluid phases. The system exhibits a fluid-fluid phase separation which persists to temperatures and pressures beyond the range of this experiment. These results, together with those recently obtained for other binary systems, provide information about the form of phase diagrams for binary gas mixtures in the region of pressure induced phase transitions at high pressures. These findings are relevant to problems of deep atmosphere and interior structures in the outer planets.

  19. Disposable Fluidic Actuators for Miniature In-Vivo Surgical Robotics.

    PubMed

    Pourghodrat, Abolfazl; Nelson, Carl A

    2017-03-01

    Fusion of robotics and minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has created new opportunities to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Surgical robotics is advancing from externally actuated systems to miniature in-vivo robotics. However, with miniaturization of electric-motor-driven surgical robots, there comes a trade-off between the size of the robot and its capability. Slow actuation, low load capacity, sterilization difficulties, leaking electricity and transferring produced heat to tissues, and high cost are among the key limitations of the use of electric motors in in-vivo applications. Fluid power in the form of hydraulics or pneumatics has a long history in driving many industrial devices and could be exploited to circumvent these limitations. High power density and good compatibility with the in-vivo environment are the key advantages of fluid power over electric motors when it comes to in-vivo applications. However, fabrication of hydraulic/pneumatic actuators within the desired size and pressure range required for in-vivo surgical robotic applications poses new challenges. Sealing these types of miniature actuators at operating pressures requires obtaining very fine surface finishes which is difficult and costly. The research described here presents design, fabrication, and testing of a hydraulic/pneumatic double-acting cylinder, a limited-motion vane motor, and a balloon-actuated laparoscopic grasper. These actuators are small, seal-less, easy to fabricate, disposable, and inexpensive, thus ideal for single-use in-vivo applications. To demonstrate the ability of these actuators to drive robotic joints, they were modified and integrated in a robotic arm. The design and testing of this surgical robotic arm are presented to validate the concept of fluid-power actuators for in-vivo applications.

  20. Pressure multiplying dispenser

    DOEpatents

    DeFord, Henry S.; Moss, Owen R.

    1986-01-01

    A pressure multiplying dispenser for delivering fluid, preferably as a spray to the atmosphere, from a source of fluid, preferably a spray bottle, is described. The dispenser includes in combination a hollow cylindrical member, a nozzle delivery tube within the cylindrical member and a hollow actuator piston slideable within the cylindrical member which acts to multiply the pressure of a squeeze applied to the spray bottle.

  1. Engine having a high pressure hydraulic system and low pressure lubricating system

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2000-01-01

    An engine includes a high pressure hydraulic system having a high pressure pump and at least one hydraulically-actuated device attached to an engine housing. A low pressure engine lubricating system is attached to the engine housing and includes a circulation conduit fluidly connected to an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  2. Thermodynamically consistent modeling of granular-fluid mixtures incorporating pore pressure evolution and hypoplastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heß, Julian; Wang, Yongqi; Hutter, Kolumban

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new, thermodynamically consistent model for granular-fluid mixtures, derived with the entropy principle of Müller and Liu. Including a pressure diffusion equation combined with the concept of extra pore pressure, and hypoplastic material behavior, thermodynamic restrictions are imposed on the constitutive quantities. The model is applied to a granular-fluid flow, using a closing assumption in conjunction with the fluid pressure. While the focal point of the work is the conceptional part, i.e. the thermodynamic consistent modeling, numerical simulations with physically reasonable results for simple shear flow are also carried out.

  3. Fluid pressures at the shoe-floor-contaminant interface during slips: effects of tread and implications on slip severity.

    PubMed

    Beschorner, Kurt E; Albert, Devon L; Chambers, April J; Redfern, Mark S

    2014-01-22

    Previous research on slip and fall accidents has suggested that pressurized fluid between the shoe and floor is responsible for initiating slips yet this effect has not been verified experimentally. This study aimed to (1) measure hydrodynamic pressures during slipping for treaded and untreaded conditions; (2) determine the effects of fluid pressure on slip severity; and (3) quantify how fluid pressures vary with instantaneous resultant slipping speed, position on the shoe surface, and throughout the progression of the slip. Eighteen subjects walked on known dry and unexpected slippery floors, while wearing treaded and untreaded shoes. Fluid pressure sensors, embedded in the floor, recorded hydrodynamic pressures during slipping. The maximum fluid pressures (mean+/-standard deviation) were significantly higher for the untreaded conditions (124+/-75 kPa) than the treaded conditions (1.1+/-0.29 kPa). Maximum fluid pressures were positively correlated with peak slipping speed (r=0.87), suggesting that higher fluid pressures, which are associated with untreaded conditions, resulted in more severe slips. Instantaneous resultant slipping speed and position of sensor relative to the shoe sole and walking direction explained 41% of the fluid pressure variability. Fluid pressures were primarily observed for untreaded conditions. This study confirms that fluid pressures are relevant to slipping events, consistent with fluid dynamics theory (i.e. the Reynolds equation), and can be modified with shoe tread design. The results suggest that the occurrence and severity of unexpected slips can be reduced by designing shoes/floors that reduce underfoot fluid pressures.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics for the Aerodynamic Design and Modeling of a Ram-Air Parachute with Bleed-Air Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    canopies , often referred to as parafoils. No numerical studies, however, have fully investigated the 3-D aerodynamic performance of these bleed-air actuators...Simulation results are presented for a finite span, ram-air canopy geometry and several configurations amenable for comparison with wind tunnel

  5. Effect of increase in intraperitoneal pressure on fluid distribution in tissue using finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, Selmi; Arif, Idam; Khotimah, Siti Nurul

    2015-04-01

    In this study, peritoneal dialysis transport system was numerically simulated using finite difference method. The increase in the intraperitoneal pressure due to coughing has a high value outside the working area of the void volume fraction of the hydrostatic pressure θ(P). Therefore to illustrate the effects of the pressure increment, the pressure of working area is chosen between 1 and 3 mmHg. The effects of increased pressure in peritoneal tissue cause more fluid to flow into the blood vessels and lymph. Furthermore, the increased pressure in peritoneal tissue makes the volumetric flux jv and solute flux js across the tissue also increase. The more fluid flow into the blood vessels and lymph causes the fluid to flow into tissue qv and the glucose flow qs to have more negative value and also decreases the glucose concentration CG in the tissue.

  6. High pressure stopped-flow apparatus for the rapid mixing and subsequent study of two fluids under high hydrostatic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karan, Daniel M.; Macey, Robert I.

    1980-08-01

    A stopped-flow apparatus is described for the rapid mixing and subsequent study of two dissimilar fluids under pressures up to 1200 bar. The device consists of two identical pressure chambers which contain the two fluids, a third pressure chamber which contains gas to maintain the pressure in the system, an optical port for photometric observation, and various connections. The device has been used to measure reaction times on the order of a hundred milliseconds to tens of seconds, using a maximum of 2 ml of each reagent per experimental determination. The dead time is found to be 5-25 ms with minium average flow velocities of 2.0 m/s. The construction and operation of the device are described and examples of water transport data in red blood cells and the bromophenolblue indicated chemical reaction of NaHCO3 and HCl under pressure are presented.

  7. A fluid pressure and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain

    2012-06-07

    We present a hydro-mechanical model and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process in greater detail. In order for analytical solutions, the simplified hydro-mechanical model includes the geomechanical part that relies on the theory of linear elasticity, while the fluid flow is based on the Darcy’s law. The model was derived through coupling the two parts using the standard linear poroelasticity theory. Analytical solutions for fluid pressure field were obtained for a typical geological sequestration scenario and the solutions for ground deformation were obtained using the method of Green’s function. Solutions predict the temporal and spatial variation of fluid pressure, the effect of permeability and elastic modulus on the fluid pressure, the ground surface uplift, and the radial deformation during the entire injection period.

  8. High accuracy differential pressure measurements using fluid-filled catheters - A feasibility study in compliant tubes.

    PubMed

    Rotman, Oren Moshe; Weiss, Dar; Zaretsky, Uri; Shitzer, Avraham; Einav, Shmuel

    2015-09-18

    High accuracy differential pressure measurements are required in various biomedical and medical applications, such as in fluid-dynamic test systems, or in the cath-lab. Differential pressure measurements using fluid-filled catheters are relatively inexpensive, yet may be subjected to common mode pressure errors (CMP), which can significantly reduce the measurement accuracy. Recently, a novel correction method for high accuracy differential pressure measurements was presented, and was shown to effectively remove CMP distortions from measurements acquired in rigid tubes. The purpose of the present study was to test the feasibility of this correction method inside compliant tubes, which effectively simulate arteries. Two tubes with varying compliance were tested under dynamic flow and pressure conditions to cover the physiological range of radial distensibility in coronary arteries. A third, compliant model, with a 70% stenosis severity was additionally tested. Differential pressure measurements were acquired over a 3 cm tube length using a fluid-filled double-lumen catheter, and were corrected using the proposed CMP correction method. Validation of the corrected differential pressure signals was performed by comparison to differential pressure recordings taken via a direct connection to the compliant tubes, and by comparison to predicted differential pressure readings of matching fluid-structure interaction (FSI) computational simulations. The results show excellent agreement between the experimentally acquired and computationally determined differential pressure signals. This validates the application of the CMP correction method in compliant tubes of the physiological range for up to intermediate size stenosis severity of 70%.

  9. Basic principles of cerebrospinal fluid metabolism and intracranial pressure homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang Yong; Backous, Douglas D

    2005-08-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the production,circulation, and absorption of CSF. In part because of autoregulation, rapid changes in arterial pressure produce parallel but significantly dampened changes in CSF pressure. Chronic arterial hypertension rarely affects ICP,but changes in venous pressure are transmitted directly into the CSF, taking precedence over arterial effects. An understanding of basic CSF physiology,particularly in relation to ICP homeostasis, is important for surgeons treating intracranial hypertension, low ICP pressure, and spontaneous,traumatic, or iatrogenic CSF leakages. The principles discussed in this article are valuable to remember when planning surgical procedures in the head and neck, both to prevent and to treat potential complications related to increased or decreased CSF pressure.

  10. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likhanskii, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Traditional approaches for active flow separation control using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are limited to relatively low speed flows and atmospheric conditions. This results in low feasibility of the DBDs for aerospace applications. For active flow control at turbine blades, fixed wings, and rotary wings and on hypersonic vehicles, DBD plasma actuators must perform at a wide range of conditions, including rarified flows and combustion mixtures. An efficient, comprehensive, physically based DBD simulation tool can optimize DBD plasma actuators for different operation conditions. Researchers are developing a DBD plasma actuator simulation tool for a wide range of ambient gas pressures. The tool will treat DBD using either kinetic, fluid, or hybrid models, depending on the DBD operational condition.

  11. Laplace-Pressure Actuation of Liquid Metal Devices For Reconfigurable Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumby, Brad Lee

    it is resilient and shapeable to allow for reconfigurability. In this dissertation, first background information is given on the existing technology for reconfigurable microwave devices and the basic principles that these mechanisms are based upon. Then a new reconfigurable method is introduced that utilizes Laplace pressure. Materials that are associated with using liquid metals are discussed and an overall systematic view is given to provide a set of proof of concepts that are more applied and understandable by electronic designers and engineers. Finally a novel approach to making essential measurements of liquid metal microwave devices is devised and discussed. This dissertation encompasses a complete device design from materials used for fabrication, fabrication methods and measurement processes to provide a knowledge base for designing liquid metal microwave devices.

  12. One-dimensional pore pressure diffusion of different grain-fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Thannen, Magdalena; Kaitna, Roland

    2015-04-01

    During the release and the flow of fully saturated debris, non-hydrostatic fluid pressure can build up and probably dissipate during the event. This excess fluid pressure has a strong influence on the flow and deposition behaviour of debris flows. Therefore, we investigate the influence of mixture composition on the dissipation of non-hydrostatic fluid pressures. For this we use a cylindrical pipe of acrylic glass with installed pore water pressure sensors in different heights and measure the evolution of the pore water pressure over time. Several mixtures with variable content of fine sediment (silt and clay) and variable content of coarse sediment (with fixed relative fractions of grains between 2 and 32 mm) are tested. For the fines two types of clay (smectite and kaolinite) and loam (Stoober Lehm) are used. The analysis is based on the one-dimensional consolidation theory which uses a diffusion coefficient D to model the decay of excess fluid pressure over time. Starting from artificially induced super-hydrostatic fluid pressures, we find dissipation coefficients ranging from 10-5 m²/s for liquid mixtures to 10-8 m²/s for viscous mixtures. The results for kaolinite and smectite are quite similar. For our limited number of mixtures the effect of fines content is more pronounced than the effect of different amounts of coarse particles.

  13. A photonic wall pressure sensor for fluid mechanics applications.

    PubMed

    Manzo, M; Ioppolo, T; Ayaz, U K; Lapenna, V; Ötügen, M V

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a micro-optical wall pressure sensor concept based on the optical modes of dielectric resonators. The sensing element is a spherical micro-resonator with a diameter of a few hundred micrometers. A latex membrane that is flush mounted on the wall transmits the normal pressure to the sensing element. Changes in the wall pressure perturb the sphere's morphology, leading to a shift in the optical modes. The wall pressure is measured by monitoring the shifts in the optical modes. Prototype sensors with polydimethylsiloxane micro-spheres are tested in a steady two-dimensional channel flow and in a plane wave acoustic tube. Results indicate sensor resolutions of ∼20 mPa and bandwidth of up to 2 kHz.

  14. A spatial bending fluidic actuator: fabrication and quasi-static characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Benjamin; Chew, Allison; Naghshineh, Nastaran; Menon, Carlo

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a novel silicone-based, millimeter-scale, fluidic actuator able to bend about two orthogonal axes. The implemented molding fabrication procedure is discussed and the quasi-static performance of the developed prototypes is experimentally investigated. The relationship between the pressurized working fluid and the position of the actuator tip is determined by using a stereovision measurement system. Such a relationship is mapped through a regression model, which is used to implement a minimalist position controller.

  15. Scalability of Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2008-01-01

    Temporal flow control of a jet has been widely studied in the past to enhance jet mixing or reduce jet noise. Most of this research, however, has been done using small diameter low Reynolds number jets that often have little resemblance to the much larger jets common in real world applications because the flow actuators available lacked either the power or bandwidth to sufficiently impact these larger higher energy jets. The Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators (LAFPA), developed at the Ohio State University (OSU), have demonstrated the ability to impact a small high speed jet in experiments conducted at OSU and the power to perturb a larger high Reynolds number jet in experiments conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. However, the response measured in the large-scale experiments was significantly reduced for the same number of actuators compared to the jet response found in the small-scale experiments. A computational study has been initiated to simulate the LAFPA system with additional actuators on a large-scale jet to determine the number of actuators required to achieve the same desired response for a given jet diameter. Central to this computational study is a model for the LAFPA that both accurately represents the physics of the actuator and can be implemented into a computational fluid dynamics solver. One possible model, based on pressure waves created by the rapid localized heating that occurs at the actuator, is investigated using simplified axisymmetric simulations. The results of these simulations will be used to determine the validity of the model before more realistic and time consuming three-dimensional simulations are conducted to ultimately determine the scalability of the LAFPA system.

  16. Implications of perennial saline springs for abnormally high fluid pressures and active thrusting in western California

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, J.R.; Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.; Moores, E.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Perennial saline springs in the Rumsey Hills area, southwestern Sacramento Valley, California, locally discharge at high elevations and near ridgetops. The springs are cold, are commonly associated with natural gas seeps, and typically emerge along west-vergent thrust faults. Stable isotope analyses indicate that the spring waters are similar to oil-field formation fluids and they have had a significant residence time in the subsurface at moderate temperatures. The nonmeteoric character of the springs demonstrates that they are not being fed by perched water tables. The authors propose that these subsurface formation waters are being forced to the surface by anomalously high porefluid pressures. The Rumsey Hills area is one of Quaternary uplift, thrusting, and crustal shortening, and prospect wells drilled there have encountered anomalously high fluid pressures at shallow depths. They attribute these high fluid pressures to active tectonic compression and shortening of Cretaceous marine sedimentary rocks. The widespread occurrence of anomalously high pore-fluid pressures and perennial saline springs in the Coast Ranges and western Great Valley suggests that much of western California may be characterized as a seismically active, overpressured thrust belt. The emergence of formation waters along thrust faults further suggests that patterns of subsurface fluid flow in western California may be similar to those in overpressured accretionary prisms, and that excess fluid pressures may also play a role in the distribution of seismicity.

  17. Phase equilibria in fluid mixtures at high pressures - The He-CH4 system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, W. B.; Erickson, A. L.; Hill, J. L. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of phase equilibria in the He-CH4 system has been carried out over the temperature range 95 to 290 K and at pressures to 10,000 atm. The experimental results consist of equilibrium phase composition for twenty-eight isotherms in the region of coexistence of two fluid phases, together with the pressure-temperature trace of the three-phase boundary at which a CH4-rich solid phase is in equilibrium with the two fluid phases. The system exhibits a fluid-fluid phase separation which persists to temperatures and pressures beyond the range of this experiment. These findings are relevant to problems of deep atmosphere and interior structures in the outer planets.-

  18. High pressure induced phase transition and superdiffusion in anomalous fluid confined in flexible nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Bordin, José Rafael; Krott, Leandro B. Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2014-10-14

    The behavior of a confined spherical symmetric anomalous fluid under high external pressure was studied with Molecular Dynamics simulations. The fluid is modeled by a core-softened potential with two characteristic length scales, which in bulk reproduces the dynamical, thermodynamical, and structural anomalous behavior observed for water and other anomalous fluids. Our findings show that this system has a superdiffusion regime for sufficient high pressure and low temperature. As well, our results indicate that this superdiffusive regime is strongly related with the fluid structural properties and the superdiffusion to diffusion transition is a first order phase transition. We show how the simulation time and statistics are important to obtain the correct dynamical behavior of the confined fluid. Our results are discussed on the basis of the two length scales.

  19. Porphyry-copper ore shells form at stable pressure-temperature fronts within dynamic fluid plumes.

    PubMed

    Weis, P; Driesner, T; Heinrich, C A

    2012-12-21

    Porphyry-type ore deposits are major resources of copper and gold, precipitated from fluids expelled by crustal magma chambers. The metals are typically concentrated in confined ore shells within vertically extensive vein networks, formed through hydraulic fracturing of rock by ascending fluids. Numerical modeling shows that dynamic permeability responses to magmatic fluid expulsion can stabilize a front of metal precipitation at the boundary between lithostatically pressured up-flow of hot magmatic fluids and hydrostatically pressured convection of cooler meteoric fluids. The balance between focused heat advection and lateral cooling controls the most important economic characteristics, including size, shape, and ore grade. This self-sustaining process may extend to epithermal gold deposits, venting at active volcanoes, and regions with the potential for geothermal energy production.

  20. Micromachined lead zirconium titanate thin-film-cantilever-based acoustic emission sensor with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) actuator for increasing contact pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an innovative acousticemission (AE) sensor with a cantilever sensing structure. A hydrothermal lead zirconium titanate (PZT) film was deposited on the cantilever for AE sensing, and an SU8 micropillar at the free end of the cantilever served as an AE wave coupler; in addition, a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based thermoresponsive actuator was integrated with the cantilever to increase the contact pressure exerted on the target. The AE sensor showed higher performance compared with an existing commercial AE sensor. Micromachining technology was used to fabricate AE sensors, and an array of four sensors was fabricated on a 50 μm thick titanium substrate of dimensions 15 mm × 15 mm. The piezoelectric properties of the hydrothermal PZT film were verified by electrically driving the cantilever and measuring the displacement; the piezoelectric constant d 31 of the cantilever was 2.43 pC N-1. The output force of the sensing cantilever generated by activating the thermoresponsive actuator was determined. For an electrical power input of 2.5 W, the maximum force output at the SU8 micropillar was 1 N. This force corresponded to the application of a pressure of 1.4 MPa on the target. Pencil lead break tests were conducted to determine and compare the performance of the proposed AE sensor with commercial sensors. Here, experimental and theoretical discussions on the effect of the activation of the thermoresponsive actuator of the proposed AE sensor on AE detection are presented.

  1. Method and apparatus for actuating vehicle transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Ishihara, M.; Uriuhara, M.

    1988-11-15

    This patent describes a method of actuating a vehicle parallel-gear transmission having gears and an internal lever for moving shift blocks connected with shift rods and shift forks for changing gear ratios of the transmission, a hydraulically controlled select actuator operatively connected to the internal lever for moving the internal lever in a select direction, a hydraulically controlled shift actuator operatively connected to the internal lever for moving the internal lever in a shift direction substantially normal to the select direction, a hydraulically controlled clutch actuator for connecting and disconnecting a clutch of the transmission, and a common fluid discharge passage connected to fluid discharge ports of the select and shift actuators and a fluid discharge port of the clutch actuator, the select and shift actuators being alternately actuatable to effect a gear changing operation.

  2. Characteristics of silicone fluid as a pressure transmitting medium in diamond anvil cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yongrong; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Pravica, Michael; Nicol, Malcolm F.

    2004-11-01

    The properties of a silicone fluid with initial viscosity of 1 cst as a pressure transmitting medium for diamond anvil cells have been determined by ruby R1 line broadening and R1-R2 separation measurements to 64 GPa at ambient temperature. By these criteria, the silicone fluid is as good a pressure medium as a 4:1 methanol:ethanol mixture at low pressures to about 20 GPa, and is better than the mixture at higher pressures. Although argon media are better than the silicone at pressures to 30 GPa, this silicone behaves as well as argon at higher pressures. Furthermore, the silicone is easier to load than argon and is almost chemically inert.

  3. Magnetically Actuated Propellant Orientation Experiment, Controlling Fluid Motion With Magnetic Fields in a Low-Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. J.; Holt, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    This report details the results of a series of fluid motion experiments to investigate the use of magnets to orient fluids in a low-gravity environment. The fluid of interest for this project was liquid oxygen (LO2) since it exhibits a paramagnetic behavior (is attracted to magnetic fields). However, due to safety and handling concerns, a water-based ferromagnetic mixture (produced by Ferrofluidics Corporation) was selected to simplify procedures. Three ferromagnetic fluid mixture strengths and a nonmagnetic water baseline were tested using three different initial fluid positions with respect to the magnet. Experiment accelerometer data were used with a modified computational fluid dynamics code termed CFX-4 (by AEA Technologies) to predict fluid motion. These predictions compared favorably with experiment video data, verifying the code's ability to predict fluid motion with and without magnetic influences. Additional predictions were generated for LO2 with the same test conditions and geometries used in the testing. Test hardware consisted of a cylindrical Plexiglas tank (6-in. bore with 10-in. length), a 6,000-G rare Earth magnet (10-in. ring), three-axis accelerometer package, and a video recorder system. All tests were conducted aboard the NASA Reduced-Gravity Workshop, a KC-135A aircraft.

  4. Labyrinth and cerebral-spinal fluid pressure changes in guinea pigs and monkeys during simulated zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the hypothesis that shifts of body fluids from the legs and torso toward the head contribute to the motion sickness experienced by astronauts and cosmonauts. The shifts in body fluids observed during zero-G exposure were simulated by elevating guinea pigs' and monkeys' torsos and hindquarters. Cerebral-spinal fluid pressure was recorded from a transducer located in a brain ventricle; labyrinth fluid pressure was recorded from a pipette cemented in a hole in a semicircular canal. An anticipated divergence in cerebral-spinal fluid pressure and labyrinth fluid pressure during torso elevation was not observed. The results of this study do not support a fluid shift mechanism of zero-G-induced motion sickness. However, a more complete test of the fluid shift mechanism would be obtained if endolymph and perilymph pressure changes were determined separately; we have been unable to perform this test to date.

  5. Effect of increased vascular pressure on lung fluid balance in unanesthetized sheep.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, A J; Vaughan, T R; Brigham, K L; Woolverton, W C; Staub, N C

    1975-09-01

    In 20 unanesthetized sheep, we measured lung lymph flow and lymph and plasma protein concentrations during steady-state base-line conditions and during steady-state elevations of pulmonary microvascular hydrostatic pressure (range 3 to 23 cm H2O). In every sheep there was a base-line lung lymph flow (average 5.7 +/- 2.5 (SD) ml/hour), demonstrating that net fluid filtration occurred. The base-line lymph-plasma total protein ratio averaged 0.69 +/- 0.05, indicating a high protein osmotic pressure in the interstitial fluid at the filtration site. Lymph flow increased and lymph protein concentration decreased approximately linearly whenever hydrostatic pressure rose. A new steady-state condition was reached in 1-2 hours. The difference in plasma-to-lymph protein osmotic pressure increased by half the hydrostatic pressure increment (50% negative feedback regulation). Extravascular lung water content, measured post-mortem, did not change significantly until microvascular hydrostatic pressure more than doubled, indicating a large safety factor that protects the lungs against fluid accumulation normally. The major contributions to the safety factor appeared to be a sensitive and efficient lymph pump coupled to a washout of interstitial protein. The fluid filtration coefficient, whose calculation required many assumptions, averaged 1.64 +/- 2.65 ml/(cm H2O times hour) in the base-line condition and did not change significantly over the pressure range studied.

  6. High Pressure, Transport Properties of Fluids: Theory and Data from Levitated Fluid-Drops at Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Ohaska, K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to derive a set of consistent mixing rules for calculating diffusivities and thermal diffusion factors over a thermodynamic regime encompassing the subcritical and supercritical ranges. These should serve for modeling purposes, and therefore for accurate simulations of high pressure phenomena such as fluid disintegration, turbulent flows and sprays. A particular consequence of this work will be the determination of effective Lewis numbers for supercritical conditions, thus enabling the examination of the relative importance of heat and mass transfer at supercritical pressures.

  7. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  8. Pressure transient behavior of dilatant non-Newtonian/Newtonian fluid composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Okpobiri, G.A.; Ikoku, C.U.

    1983-11-01

    This study investigates pressure falloff testing in non-Newtonian/Newtonian fluid composite reservoirs. The non-Newtonian fluids of interest exhibit dilatant behavior. Initial water saturation is accounted for. Application of non-Newtonian well test analysis techniques and conventional Horner (Newtonian) techniques is investigated. The effects of different injection times before shut-in, external radii, flow behavior indexes and non-Newtonian fluid consistencies on the pressure transient behavior constitute the salient features of this work. It is shown that early time falloff pressure data can be analyzed by non-Newtonian techniques while the late shut-in data, under certain conditions, can be analyzed by the conventional Horner method. The time when the Newtonian fluid starts influencing the non-Newtonian falloff curves and the location of the non-Newtonian fluid front can be estimated by using the radius of investigation equation for power-law fluids and volumetric balance equation respectively. Rheological consideration is made to illustrate the pressure transient behavior.

  9. Focal cartilage defect compromises fluid-pressure dependent load support in the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Yaghoub; Li, LePing

    2015-06-01

    A focal cartilage defect involves tissue loss or rupture. Altered mechanics in the affected joint may play an essential role in the onset and progression of osteoarthritis. The objective of the present study was to determine the compromised load support in the human knee joint during defect progression from the cartilage surface to the cartilage-bone interface. Ten normal and defect cases were simulated with a previously tested 3D finite element model of the knee. The focal defects were considered in both condyles within high load-bearing regions. Fluid pressurization, anisotropic fibril-reinforcement, and depth-dependent mechanical properties were considered for the articular cartilages and menisci. The results showed that a small cartilage defect could cause 25% reduction in the load support of the knee joint due to a reduced capacity of fluid pressurization in the defect cartilage. A partial-thickness defect could cause a fluid pressure decrease or increase in the remaining underlying cartilage depending on the defect depth. A cartilage defect also increased the shear strain at the cartilage-bone interface, which was more significant with a full-thickness defect. The effect of cartilage defect on the fluid pressurization also depended on the defect sites and contact conditions. In conclusion, a focal cartilage defect causes a fluid-pressure dependent load reallocation and a compromised load support in the joint, which depend on the defect depth, site, and contact condition.

  10. Properties of planetary fluids at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellis, W. J.; Hamilton, D. C.; Holmes, N. C.; Radousky, H. B.; Ree, F. H.; Ross, M.; Young, D. A.; Nicol, M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to derive models of the interiors of Uranus, Neptune, Jupiter and Saturn, researchers studied equations of state and electrical conductivities of molecules at high dynamic pressures and temperatures. Results are given for shock temperature measurements of N2 and CH4. Temperature data allowed demonstration of shock induced cooling in the the transition region and the existence of crossing isotherms in P-V space.

  11. Aquaporin deletion in mice reduces intraocular pressure and aqueous fluid production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duo; Vetrivel, L; Verkman, A S

    2002-06-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are expressed in the eye at sites of aqueous fluid production and outflow: AQP1 and AQP4 in nonpigmented ciliary epithelium, and AQP1 in trabecular meshwork endothelium. Novel methods were developed to compare aqueous fluid dynamics in wild-type mice versus mice lacking AQP1 and/or AQP4. Aqueous fluid production was measured by in vivo confocal microscopy after transcorneal iontophoretic introduction of fluorescein. Intraocular pressure (IOP), outflow, and anterior chamber compliance were determined from pressure measurements in response to fluid infusions using micropipettes. Aqueous fluid volume and [Cl(-)] were assayed in samples withdrawn by micropipettes. In wild-type mice (CD1 genetic background, age 4-6 wk), IOP was 16.0 +/- 0.4 mmHg (SE), aqueous fluid volume 7.2 +/- 0.3 microl, fluid production 3.6 +/- 0.2 microl/h, fluid outflow 0.36 +/- 0.06 microl/h/mmHg, and compliance 0.036 +/- 0.006 microl/mmHg. IOP was significantly decreased by up to 1.8 mmHg (P < 0.002) and fluid production by up to 0.9 microl/h in age/litter-matched mice lacking AQP1 and/or AQP4 (outbred CD1 and inbred C57/bl6 genetic backgrounds). However, AQP deletion did not significantly affect outflow, [Cl(-)], volume, or compliance. These results provide evidence for the involvement of AQPs in intraocular pressure regulation by facilitating aqueous fluid secretion across the ciliary epithelium. AQP inhibition may thus provide a novel approach for the treatment of elevated IOP.

  12. Prediction of subsidence: Relationship between lowering of formation pressure and subsidence due to fluid withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Serebryakov, V.A.; Chilingar, G.V.

    2000-06-01

    Abnormally low formation pressures develop in petroleum reservoirs during intensive oil and gas production or in aquifers as a result of water extraction. A simple method is presented for calculating (predicting) the amount of compaction (and resulting subsidence) from the pressure drop in formation due to production, i.e., the increase in the effective pressure p{sub e} (p{sub e} = p{sub t} {minus} p{sub p}, where p{sub t} is the total overburden pressure and p{sub p} is the fluid or pore pressure). This work is based on extensive data collected in Russia. For example, large petroliferous areas in Western Siberia became marshlands as a result of fluid withdrawal. One should remember that sophisticated methods, such as FSMT (direct measurement of rock compaction by wireline tools in situ) and GPS (measurement of surface subsidence by satellite microwave Doppler techniques), are not yet available in many areas of the world.

  13. Dynamics of Interstitial Fluid Pressure in Extracellular Matrix Hydrogels in Microfluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Tien, Joe; Li, Le; Ozsun, Ozgur; Ekinci, Kamil L

    2015-09-01

    In order to understand how interstitial fluid pressure and flow affect cell behavior, many studies use microfluidic approaches to apply externally controlled pressures to the boundary of a cell-containing gel. It is generally assumed that the resulting interstitial pressure distribution quickly reaches a steady-state, but this assumption has not been rigorously tested. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and computationally that the interstitial fluid pressure within an extracellular matrix gel in a microfluidic device can, in some cases, react with a long time delay to external loading. Remarkably, the source of this delay is the slight (∼100 nm in the cases examined here) distension of the walls of the device under pressure. Finite-element models show that the dynamics of interstitial pressure can be described as an instantaneous jump, followed by axial and transverse diffusion, until the steady pressure distribution is reached. The dynamics follow scaling laws that enable estimation of a gel's poroelastic constants from time-resolved measurements of interstitial fluid pressure.

  14. Pressure oscillation induced by composite fluid flow - Physical picture generating low frequency earthquake -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, S.; Kurita, K.

    2006-12-01

    Recently low frequency (LF) earthquakes have been found to occur in various geophysical settings. Structural inspection of the source region and analysis of focal mechanism suggest the possible role of fluid in the generation process. The nature of fluid expected in the source region should be characterized by multiphase system such as magma and gas bubble, magma and crystal and aqueous fluid and gas bubble, for example. In this system the physical properties of this composite depends on the mutual volume fraction. The volume fraction is variable depending on the flow situation. We consider the link between the flow situation and the volume fraction is an essential part of the composite flow. Here based on the concept that nature of the composite flow plays a central role in the generation of pressure oscillation, we report a simple laboratory model to demonstrate LF earthquakes. The multiphase system in the source region of the LF earthquakes is modeled here as a composite of viscous fluid and incompressible granular phase. plastic particles made of polystyrene (0.5 mm in diameter) and glycerol solution is packed into a cylindrical case (60 mm in diameter). The packing state of the solid phase is near random closed packing state. The glycerol solution flows into the case from the pressure reservoir and it goes out from exit tube with 60 mm in length and 3 mm in diameter. The pressure is measured using a pressure sensor. The control parameter is fluid pressure (1 atm plus 300 Pa to 1500 Pa) and its viscosity (30 mPas to 100 mPas) in this experiment. When the pressure difference between the case is low, the flow is characterized as a permeable flow. Only the interstitial fluid of the glycerol solution flows out depending on the pressure difference. When the pressure difference is above the critical value, both fluid and particles flow out as a composite flow. In this state the output pressure was observed to oscillate. In the diagram of power spectrum of the

  15. Properties of molecular solids and fluids at high pressure and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Etters, R.D.

    1992-03-01

    This renewal request for DOE grant DE-FG02-86ER45238, is dedicated to providing a complete thermodynamic profile of solids fluids, and fluid mixtures, over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. We are partially motivated by technological interest in detonation, combustion, superhard high pressure materials, and high temperature superconductors, which are important components of interest of various DOE laboratories. Our work on fluids and solids, composed of simple molecules, involves the determination of structures, phase transitions, pressure-volume relations, phonon, vibron, and libron modes of excitation, sound velocities, specific heats, thermal expansion, virial coefficients, sublimation energies, and orientational translational, and magnetic correlations. We hope that the study of these systems under extreme thermodynamic conditions will lead to exotic new materials of value, as well as enhanced fundamental understanding.

  16. Tracking fluid pressure buildup from focal mechanisms during the 2003-2004 Ubaye seismic swarm, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Henri; Daniel, Guillaume; Fabbri, Olivier; Cappa, Frédéric; Thouvenot, François

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the Ubaye seismic swarm that occurred in the French southwestern Alps in 2003-2004 was triggered by fluid overpressures. This contribution provides additional constraints on the temporal and spatial changes in fluid overpressure during this swarm. The orientations of the double-couple nodal planes of an extended set of 74 focal solutions, spanning the whole 2003-2004 episode, are compared with the regional stress field. Based on a Mohr-Coulomb analysis, these comparisons provide estimates of fluid pressures along seismic fault planes. We show that the fluid overpressures required to reactivate the cohesionless fault planes vary through time, with values close to 35 MPa at the inception of the swarm. Overpressures then increase up to 55 MPa during the burst of seismic activity and lastly decrease down to 20 MPa at the end of the crisis. We also show that the fluid overpressures are developed as patches along two parallel faults bordering a releasing bend structure characterized by low to null overpressure. The development of moderate fluid overpressure at the swarm inception enables the reactivation of normal, transtensional, and strike-slip faults while the development of larger fluid overpressures during the burst of seismic activity progressively enables the reactivation of further misoriented normal, transtensional, and transpressional faults. In order to reconcile the spatial and temporal evolution of the fluid overpressures and the seismic activity, we propose that creep compaction could be the process allowing the successive development of fluid overpressure and the migration of seismicity.

  17. A Study Of Fluid Pressure Migration Within The North-Central Oklahoma Seismic Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, C.; Keranen, K. M.; Sickbert, T.

    2015-12-01

    The rise in seismicity in Oklahoma since 2008 provides an unusual opportunity to study fluid migration and the interaction of fluids with faults. One unique area in north-central Oklahoma is a current seismic gap between large clusters in northern and central Oklahoma, providing a window into the temporal evolution of local seismicity. The gap in seismicity occurs across the NNE-SSW trending Nemaha uplift, with long faults relatively well-oriented in the regional stress field. Wastewater disposal occurs both within and on either side of the gap, and seismicity approached both sides of the uplift in 2014. To record seismicity and seismic migration through time within the uplift and along the bounding faults on either side, we deployed a ten station array of broadband sensors in April 2015. Our goal is to detect possible seismic signals related to fluid pressure migration and to ultimately increase our understanding of the fault response to perturbations in fluid pressure. Here we present local earthquake locations from the first months of data and initial focal mechanisms. We detect higher numbers of earthquakes happening within the Nemaha uplift than recorded in existing catalogs. The seismicity is typically fluid pressure within the fault zone is characterized by higher frequencies of low magnitude events. This pattern of seismicity may represent deformation on small faults as the pressure perturbation migrates into the Nemaha uplift from either side and away from wells within the uplift.

  18. Molecular simulation of pressure-driven fluid flow in nanoporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Takaba, Hiromitsu; Onumata, Yasushi; Nakao, Shin-ichi

    2007-08-07

    An extended nonequilibrium molecular dynamics technique has been developed to investigate the transport properties of pressure-driven fluid flow in thin nanoporous membranes. Our simulation technique allows the simulation of the pressure-driven permeation of liquids through membranes while keeping a constant driving pressure using fluctuating walls. The flow of argon in the liquid state was simulated on applying an external pressure difference of 2.4x10(6) Pa through the slitlike and cylindrical pores. The volume flux and velocity distribution in the membrane pores were examined as a function of pore size, along with the interaction with the pore walls, and these were compared with values estimated using the Hagen-Poiseuille flow. The calculated velocity strongly depends on the strength of the interaction between the fluid and the atoms in the wall when the pore size is approximately<20sigma. The calculated volume flux also shows a dependence on the interaction between the fluid and the atoms in the wall. The Hagen-Poiseuille law overestimates or underestimates the flux depending on the interaction. From the analysis of calculated results, a good linear correlation between the density of the fluid in the membrane pores and the deviation of the flux estimated from the Hagen-Poiseuille flow was found. This suggests that the flux deviation in nanopore from the Hagen-Poiseuille flow can be predicted based on the fluid density in the pores.

  19. Kitchen Physics: Lessons in Fluid Pressure and Error Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieyra, Rebecca Elizabeth; Vieyra, Chrystian; Macchia, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Although the advent and popularization of the "flipped classroom" tends to center around at-home video lectures, teachers are increasingly turning to at-home labs for enhanced student engagement. This paper describes two simple at-home experiments that can be accomplished in the kitchen. The first experiment analyzes the density of four liquids using a waterproof case and a smartphone barometer in a container, sink, or tub. The second experiment determines the relationship between pressure and temperature of an ideal gas in a constant volume container placed momentarily in a refrigerator freezer. These experiences provide a ripe opportunity both for learning fundamental physics concepts as well as to investigate a variety of error analysis techniques that are frequently overlooked in introductory physics courses.

  20. Effluent characterization from a conical pressurized fluid bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priem, R. J.; Rollbuhler, R. J.; Patch, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    To obtain useable corrosion and erosion results it was necessary to have data with several levels of particulate matter in the hot gases. One level of particulate loading was as low as possible so that ideally no erosion and only corrosion occurred. A conical fluidized bed was used to obtain some degree of filtration through the top of the bed which would not be highly fluidized. This would minimize the filtration required for the hot gases or conversely the amount of particulate matter in the hot gases after a given level of filtration by cyclones and/or filters. The data obtained during testing characterized the effluent from the bed at different test conditions. A range of bed heights, coal flows, air flows, limestone flows, and pressure are represented. These tests were made to determine the best operating conditions prior to using the bed to determine erosion and corrosion rates of typical turbine blade materials.

  1. METAL FILTERS FOR PRESSURIZED FLUID BED COMBUSTION (PFBC) APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Alvin

    2004-01-02

    Advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation technologies (IGCC, PFBC, PCFBC, and Hipps) are currently under development and demonstration. Efforts at the Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on the development and demonstration of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for power generation. As part of the demonstration effort, SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field-tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report reviews SWPC's material and component assessment efforts, identifying the performance, stability, and life of porous commercial metal, advanced alloy, and intermetallic filters under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) conditions.

  2. Undrained heating and anomalous pore-fluid pressurization of a hardened cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabezloo, S.; Sulem, J.; Saint-Marc, J.

    2009-04-01

    Temperature increase in a fluid-saturated porous material in undrained condition leads to volume change and pore pressure increase due to the discrepancy between the thermal expansion coefficients of the pore fluid and of the pore volume. This increase of the pore fluid pressure induces a reduction of the effective mean stress, and can lead to shear failure or hydraulic fracturing. This phenomenon is important is important in environmental engineering for radioactive (exothermal) waste disposal in deep clay geological formations as well as in geophysics in the studies of rapid fault slip events when shear heating tends to increase the pore pressure and to decrease the effective compressive stress and the shearing resistance of the fault material (Sulem et al. 2007). This is also important in petroleum engineering where the reservoir rock and the well cement lining undergo sudden temperature changes for example when extracting heavy oils by steam injection methods. This rapid increase of temperature could damage cement sheath integrity of wells and lead to loss of zonal isolation. The values of the thermal pressurization coefficient, defined as the pore pressure increase due to a unit temperature increase in undrained condition, is largely dependent upon the nature of the material, the state of stress, the range of temperature change, the induced damage. The large variability of the thermal pressurization coefficient reported in the literature for different porous materials with values from 0.01MPa/°C to 1.5MPa/°C highlights the necessity of laboratory studies. This phenomenon of thermal pressurization is studied experimentally for a fluid-saturated hardened cement paste in an undrained heating test. Careful analysis of the effect of the dead volume of the drainage system of the triaxial cell has been performed based on a simple correction method proposed by Ghabezloo and Sulem (2008, 2009). The drained and undrained thermal expansion coefficients of the hardened

  3. Pressure Distribution in a Porous Squeeze Film Bearing Lubricated with a Herschel-Bulkley Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walicka, A.; Jurczak, P.

    2016-12-01

    The influence of a wall porosity on the pressure distribution in a curvilinear squeeze film bearing lubricated with a lubricant being a viscoplastic fluid of a Herschel-Bulkley type is considered. After general considerations on the flow of the viscoplastic fluid (lubricant) in a bearing clearance and in a porous layer the modified Reynolds equation for the curvilinear squeeze film bearing with a Herschel-Bulkley lubricant is given. The solution of this equation is obtained by a method of successive approximation. As a result one obtains a formula expressing the pressure distribution. The example of squeeze films in a step bearing (modeled by two parallel disks) is discussed in detail.

  4. Automatic design of fiber-reinforced soft actuators for trajectory matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Fionnuala; Walsh, Conor J.; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-01-01

    Soft actuators are the components responsible for producing motion in soft robots. Although soft actuators have allowed for a variety of innovative applications, there is a need for design tools that can help to efficiently and systematically design actuators for particular functions. Mathematical modeling of soft actuators is an area that is still in its infancy but has the potential to provide quantitative insights into the response of the actuators. These insights can be used to guide actuator design, thus accelerating the design process. Here, we study fluid-powered fiber-reinforced actuators, because these have previously been shown to be capable of producing a wide range of motions. We present a design strategy that takes a kinematic trajectory as its input and uses analytical modeling based on nonlinear elasticity and optimization to identify the optimal design parameters for an actuator that will follow this trajectory upon pressurization. We experimentally verify our modeling approach, and finally we demonstrate how the strategy works, by designing actuators that replicate the motion of the index finger and thumb.

  5. Mounting Pressure in the Microenvironment: Fluids, Solids, and Cells in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    DuFort, Christopher C; DelGiorno, Kathleen E; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2016-06-01

    The microenvironment influences the pathogenesis of solid tumors and plays an outsized role in some. Our understanding of the stromal response to cancers, particularly pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, has evolved from that of host defense to tumor offense. We know that most, although not all, of the factors and processes in the microenvironment support tumor epithelial cells. This reappraisal of the roles of stromal elements has also revealed potential vulnerabilities and therapeutic opportunities to exploit. The high concentration in the stroma of the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, together with the large gel-fluid phase and pressures it generates, were recently identified as primary sources of treatment resistance in pancreas cancer. Whereas the relatively minor role of free interstitial fluid in the fluid mechanics and perfusion of tumors has been long appreciated, the less mobile, gel-fluid phase has been largely ignored for historical and technical reasons. The inability of classic methods of fluid pressure measurement to capture the gel-fluid phase, together with a dependence on xenograft and allograft systems that inaccurately model tumor vascular biology, has led to an undue emphasis on the role of free fluid in impeding perfusion and drug delivery and an almost complete oversight of the predominant role of the gel-fluid phase. We propose that a hyaluronan-rich, relatively immobile gel-fluid phase induces vascular collapse and hypoperfusion as a primary mechanism of treatment resistance in pancreas cancers. Similar properties may be operant in other solid tumors as well, so revisiting and characterizing fluid mechanics with modern techniques in other autochthonous cancers may be warranted.

  6. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  7. Measurement of the Density of Base Fluids at Pressures 0.422 to 2.20 Gpa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Jacobson, B. O.; Bergstroem, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of pressure on the density of six base fluids is experimentally studied for a range of pressures from 0.422 to 2.20 GPa. An important parameter used to describe the results is the change in relative volume with change in pressure dv sub r/dp. For pressures less than the solidification pressure (p ps) a small change in pressure results in a large change in dv sub r/ps. For pressures greater than the solidification pressure (p ps) there is no change in dv sub r/dp with changing pressure. The solidification pressures of the base fluids varies considerably, as do the slopes that the experimental data assumes for p ps. A new formula is developed that describes the effect of pressure on density in terms of four constants. These constants vary for the different base fluids tested.

  8. Pressure Distribution in a Squeeze Film Spherical Bearing with Rough Surfaces Lubricated by an Ellis Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurczak, P.; Falicki, J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the solution to a problem of pressure distribution in a curvilinear squeeze film spherical bearing is considered. The equations of motion of an Ellis pseudo-plastic fluid are presented. Using Christensen's stochastic model of rough surfaces, different forms of Reynolds equation for various types of surface roughness pattern are obtained. The analytical solutions of these equations for the cases of externally pressurized bearing and squeeze film bearing are presented. Analytical solutions for the film pressure are found for the longitudinal and circumferential roughness patterns. As a result the formulae expressing pressure distribution in the clearance of bearing lubricated by an Ellis fluid was obtained. The numerical considerations for a spherical bearing are given in detail.

  9. Biocatalytic synthesis of acrylates in supercritical fluids: tuning enzyme activity by changing pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, S V; Iwaskewycz, B; Beckman, E J; Russell, A J

    1993-01-01

    Supercritical fluids are a unique class of nonaqueous media in which biocatalytic reactions can occur. The physical properties of supercritical fluids, which include gas-like diffusivities and liquid-like densities, can be predictably controlled with changing pressure. This paper describes how adjustment of pressure, with the subsequent predictable changes of the dielectric constant and Hildebrand solubility parameter for fluoroform, ethane, sulfur hexafluoride, and propane, can be used to manipulate the activity of lipase in the transesterification of methylmethacrylate with 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. Of particular interest is that the dielectric constant of supercritical fluoroform can be tuned from approximately 1 to 8, merely by increasing pressure from 850 to 4000 psi (from 5.9 to 28 MPa). The possibility now exists to predictably alter both the selectivity and the activity of a biocatalyst merely by changing pressure. Images Fig. 6 PMID:8464910

  10. The role of fluid pressure in frictional stability and earthquake triggering: insights from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Scuderi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Fluid overpressure has been proposed as one of the primary mechanisms that facilitate earthquake slip along faults. However, elastic dislocation theory combined with friction laws suggests that fluid overpressure may inhibit the dynamic instabilities that result in earthquakes, by controlling the critical fault stiffness (kc). This controversy poses a serious problem in our understanding of earthquake physics, with severe implications for both natural and human-induced seismic hazard. Nevertheless, currently, there are no systematic studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions for which the evolution of friction parameters and slip stability can be measured. We have used a state-of-the-art biaxial rock deformation apparatus within a pressure vessel, in order to allow a true triaxial stress field, in a double direct shear configuration. We tested carbonate fault gouge, Carrara marble, sieved to a grain size of 125 μm. Normal stresses and confining pressure were held constant throughout the experiment at values of 5 to 40 MPa, and the pore fluid pressure was varied from hydrostatic up to near lithostatic values. Shear stress was induced by a constant displacement rate and sliding velocities varied from 0.1-1000 μm/s, in order to evaluate slip stability via rate- and state- dependent frictional parameters, such as (a-b), Dc and kc. Our data show that sliding velocity controls the values of friction parameters. In addition we observe a general increase of (a-b) and a decrease of Dc with increasing fluid pressure. Our observations suggest that fluid overpressure does not only facilitate fault reactivation but it also influences frictional parameters with important implications for fault stability and earthquake triggering.

  11. Control of Transient Growth Induced Transition in a Zero--Pressure Gradient Boundary Layer Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Ronald Edwin

    The level of the skin friction drag depends on the boundary layer state, either low, for the laminar case or high for the turbulent case. Flow control is sought to attenuate the streamwise velocity streaks preceding sub-critical bypass transition to turbulence. In addition, the targeted instability is ubiquitous to the self-sustaining wall-bounded turbulence cycle and at the root of the long-term goal of turbulence control. The longer spatial and temporal scales associated with the laminar case make a physical demonstration of a model-based boundary layer flow control more tractable. The effectiveness of control systems is inherently linked to the ability of the actuator to alter the flow to a desired state. Therefore, actuators are a critical enabling technology component in any active flow control system. Arguably, the most important missing technology in boundary layer flow control is effective and robust actuators, which can be readily integrated with an active flow control system. Plasma actuators fulfil these characteristics and are an ideal candidate for the control of the bypass transition instability. In this thesis, the receptivity of the boundary layer to forcing by arrays of plasma actuators capable of producing streamwise streaks was characterized. Following, the transient growth instability was targeted in an open-loop framework to identify the physics of the attenuation mechanism, which was shown to be a linear process. The control loop was then closed with feedback from simultaneous spanwise distributed shear stress sensors. A wavenumber specific control objective was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of feedback for steady disturbance attenuation as well as to provide robustness to off-model conditions. For all cases, the targeted disturbance was reduced by over 94% of its initial energy. The control effectiveness was also validated for quasi-steady forcing by varying the input disturbance level. Ultimately, control of transient growth due to

  12. A vacuum-driven peristaltic micropump with valved actuation chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jianguo; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a simple peristaltic micropump design incorporated with valved actuation chambers and propelled by a pulsed vacuum source. The vacuum-driven peristaltic micropump offers high pumping rates, low backflow, appreciable tolerance to air bubbles, and minimal destruction to fluid contents. The pumping device, fabricated by laser micromachining and plasma bonding of three polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layers, includes a pneumatic network, actuation membranes, and microfluidic channels. As the key to peristaltic motion, the sequential deflection of the elastic membranes is achieved by periodic pressure waveforms (negative) traveling through the pneumatic network, provided by a vacuum source regulated by an electromagnetic valve. This configuration eliminates the complicated control logic typically required in peristaltic motion. Importantly, the valved actuation chambers substantially reduce backflow and improve the pumping rates. In addition, the pneumatic network with negative pressure provides a means to effectively remove air bubbles present in the microflow through the gas-permeable PDMS membrane, which can be highly desired in handling complex fluidic samples. Experimental characterization of the micropump performance has been conducted by controlling the resistance of the pneumatic network, the number of normally closed valves, the vacuum pressure, and the frequency of pressure pulses. A maximal flow rate of 600 µL min-1 has been optimized at the pulsed vacuum frequency of 30 Hz with a vacuum pressure of 50 kPa, which is comparable to that of compressed air-actuated peristaltic micropumps.

  13. Natural occurrence and significance of fluids indicating high pressure and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.

    1981-01-01

    Most natural minerals have formed from a fluid phase such as a silicate melt or a saline aqueous solution. Fluid inclusions are tiny volumes of such fluids that were trapped within the growing crystals. These inclusions can provide valuable but sometimes ambiguous data on the temperature, pressure, and composition of these fluids, many of which are not available from any other source. They also provide "visual autoclaves" in which it is possible to watch, through the microscope, the actual phase changes take place as the inclusions are heated. This paper reviews the methods of study and the results obtained, mainly on inclusions formed from highly concentrated solutions, at temperatures ???500??C. Many such fluids have formed as a result of immiscibility with silicate melt in igneous or high-temperature metamorphic rocks. These include fluids consisting of CO2, H2O, or hydrosaline melts that were <50% H2O. From the fluid inclusion evidence it is clear that a boiling, very hot, very saline fluid was present during the formation of most of the porphyry copper deposits in the world. Similarly, from the inclusion evidence it is clear that early (common) pegmatites formed from essentially silicate melts and that the late, rare-element-bearing and chamber-type pegmatites formed from a hydrosaline melt or a more dilute water solution. The evidence on whether this change in composition from early to late solutions was generally continuous or involved immiscibility is not as clear. ?? 1981.

  14. Fluid dynamic modelling of renal pelvic pressure during endoscopic stone removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oratis, Alexandros; Subasic, John; Bird, James; Eisner, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic kidney stone removal procedures are known to increase internal pressure in the renal pelvis, the kidney's urinary collecting system. High renal pelvic pressure incites systemic absorption of irrigation fluid, which can increase the risk of postoperative fever and sepsis or the unwanted absorption of electrolytes. Urologists choose the appropriate surgical procedure based on patient history and kidney stone size. However, no study has been conducted to compare the pressure profiles of each procedure, nor is there a precise sense of how the renal pelvic pressure scales with various operational parameters. Here we develop physical models for the flow rates and renal pelvic pressure for various procedures. We show that the results of our models are consistent with existing urological data on each procedure and that the models can predict pressure profiles where data is unavailable.

  15. In-line pressure within a HOTLINE® Fluid Warmer, under various flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Midoriko; Yamaura, Ken; Matsubara, Yukie; Fukudome, Takuya; Hoka, Sumio

    2015-04-01

    Roller pump infusion devices are widely used for rapid infusion, and may be combined with separate warming devices. There may be instances however, where the pressures generated by the roller pump may not be compatible with the warming device. We assessed a commonly used roller pump in combination with a HOTLINE® Fluid Warmer, and found that it could generate pressures exceeding the HOTLINE® manufacturers specifications. This was of concern because the HOTLINE® manufacturer guideline states that not for use with pressure devices generating over 300 mmHg. Pressure greater than 300 mmHg may compromise the integrity of the HOTLINE® Fluid Warming Set. The aim of this study was to compare in-line pressure within a HOTLINE® Fluid Warmer at different infusion rates of a roller pump using various sizes of intravenous cannulae. The rapid infusion system comprised a 500 mL-normal saline bag, roller pump type infusion device, HOTLINE® Fluid Warmer (blood and fluid warmer system), and six different sizes of intravenous cannulae. In-line pressure was measured proximal to the HOTLINE® (pre-warmer) and proximal to the cannula (post-warmer), at flow rate of 50-160 mL/min. The in-line pressures increased significantly with increasing flow rate. The pre-warmer pressures exceeded 300 mmHg when the flow rate was ≥120 mL/min with 20-gauge, 48 mm length cannula, 130 with 20-gauge, 25 mm cannula, and 160 mL/min with 18-gauge, 48 mm cannula. However, they were <300 mmHg at any flow rates with 18-gauge, 30 mm cannula and 16-gauge cannulae. The post-warmer pressures exceeded 300 mmHg at the flow rate of 140 mL/min with 20-gauge, 48 mm cannula, and 160 mL/min with 20-gauge, 25 mm cannula, while they were <300 mmHg at any flow rates with 18 and 16-gauge cannulae. The in-line pressure within a HOTLINE® could exceed 300 mmHg, depending on the flow rate and size and length of cannula. It is important to pay attention to the size and length of cannulae and flow rate to keep the maximum

  16. The role of fluid pressure in induced vs. triggered seismicity: insights from rock deformation experiments on carbonates.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, Marco M; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-04-26

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for tectonic fault slip, because fluids lubricate the fault and fluid pressure reduces the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. However, current models of earthquake nucleation, based on rate- and state- friction laws, imply that stable sliding is favoured by the increase of pore fluid pressure. Despite this controversy, currently, there are only a few studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions. Here, we use laboratory experiments, to show that the rate- and state- friction parameters do change with increasing fluid pressure. We tested carbonate gouges from sub hydrostatic to near lithostatic fluid pressure conditions, and show that the friction rate parameter (a - b) evolves from velocity strengthening to velocity neutral behaviour. Furthermore, the critical slip distance, Dc, decreases from about 90 to 10 μm. Our data suggest that fluid overpressure plays an important role in controlling the mode of fault slip. Since fault rheology and fault stability parameters change with fluid pressure, we suggest that a comprehensive characterization of these parameters is fundamental for better assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes.

  17. The role of fluid pressure in induced vs. triggered seismicity: insights from rock deformation experiments on carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Marco M.; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-04-01

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for tectonic fault slip, because fluids lubricate the fault and fluid pressure reduces the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. However, current models of earthquake nucleation, based on rate- and state- friction laws, imply that stable sliding is favoured by the increase of pore fluid pressure. Despite this controversy, currently, there are only a few studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions. Here, we use laboratory experiments, to show that the rate- and state- friction parameters do change with increasing fluid pressure. We tested carbonate gouges from sub hydrostatic to near lithostatic fluid pressure conditions, and show that the friction rate parameter (a ‑ b) evolves from velocity strengthening to velocity neutral behaviour. Furthermore, the critical slip distance, Dc, decreases from about 90 to 10 μm. Our data suggest that fluid overpressure plays an important role in controlling the mode of fault slip. Since fault rheology and fault stability parameters change with fluid pressure, we suggest that a comprehensive characterization of these parameters is fundamental for better assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes.

  18. The role of fluid pressure in induced vs. triggered seismicity: insights from rock deformation experiments on carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Scuderi, Marco M.; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for tectonic fault slip, because fluids lubricate the fault and fluid pressure reduces the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. However, current models of earthquake nucleation, based on rate- and state- friction laws, imply that stable sliding is favoured by the increase of pore fluid pressure. Despite this controversy, currently, there are only a few studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions. Here, we use laboratory experiments, to show that the rate- and state- friction parameters do change with increasing fluid pressure. We tested carbonate gouges from sub hydrostatic to near lithostatic fluid pressure conditions, and show that the friction rate parameter (a − b) evolves from velocity strengthening to velocity neutral behaviour. Furthermore, the critical slip distance, Dc, decreases from about 90 to 10 μm. Our data suggest that fluid overpressure plays an important role in controlling the mode of fault slip. Since fault rheology and fault stability parameters change with fluid pressure, we suggest that a comprehensive characterization of these parameters is fundamental for better assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes. PMID:27112408

  19. A thermodynamically consistent model for granular-fluid mixtures considering pore pressure evolution and hypoplastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Julian; Wang, Yongqi

    2016-11-01

    A new mixture model for granular-fluid flows, which is thermodynamically consistent with the entropy principle, is presented. The extra pore pressure described by a pressure diffusion equation and the hypoplastic material behavior obeying a transport equation are taken into account. The model is applied to granular-fluid flows, using a closing assumption in conjunction with the dynamic fluid pressure to describe the pressure-like residual unknowns, hereby overcoming previous uncertainties in the modeling process. Besides the thermodynamically consistent modeling, numerical simulations are carried out and demonstrate physically reasonable results, including simple shear flow in order to investigate the vertical distribution of the physical quantities, and a mixture flow down an inclined plane by means of the depth-integrated model. Results presented give insight in the ability of the deduced model to capture the key characteristics of granular-fluid flows. We acknowledge the support of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for this work within the Project Number WA 2610/3-1.

  20. Numerical modeling of coupled pressure solution and fluid flow in quartz sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, H. A.; Wheeler, J.; Worden, R.

    2001-12-01

    Pressure solution in quartz sandstones can be envisaged as a 3-stage process, involving dissolution along grain contacts, diffusion of the solute along the grain contact to the pore space, and removal of the solute from the pore fluid by a combination of diffusive and/or advective transport and chemical reactions (e.g. precipitation of dissolved silica on free grain surfaces). A number of authors have developed mathematical models of pressure solution in order to assess the impact of this process on porosity and permeability in sandstones. However, such models have always been based on a simplified subset of the governing equations, in order to reduce the computation time to an acceptable level. For example, some models assume diffusion through the grain contact zone to be the rate-limiting step, with all the dissolved material precipitating locally in the pore space. Other models assume that the rate of removal of solute from the pore fluid, by diffusion and precipitation, is rate-limiting. It is now possible to solve the full coupled system of equations on a PC, without such simplifications. This enables us to investigate the coupling and interactions between pressure solution, chemical reactions in the pore spaces and macroscale advective/diffusive transport in the pore fluid. Preliminary results of such modeling will be presented, highlighting the importance of modeling pressure solution in an open system, where there is a strong coupling between macroscale transport in the pore fluid and the rate of porosity loss due to compaction and cementation.

  1. Fluid pressure responses for a Devil's Slide-like system: problem formulation and simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Matthew A.; Loague, Keith; Voss, Clifford I.

    2015-01-01

    This study employs a hydrogeologic simulation approach to investigate subsurface fluid pressures for a landslide-prone section of the central California, USA, coast known as Devil's Slide. Understanding the relative changes in subsurface fluid pressures is important for systems, such as Devil's Slide, where slope creep can be interrupted by episodic slip events. Surface mapping, exploratory core, tunnel excavation records, and dip meter data were leveraged to conceptualize the parameter space for three-dimensional (3D) Devil's Slide-like simulations. Field observations (i.e. seepage meter, water retention, and infiltration experiments; well records; and piezometric data) and groundwater flow simulation (i.e. one-dimensional vertical, transient, and variably saturated) were used to design the boundary conditions for 3D Devil's Slide-like problems. Twenty-four simulations of steady-state saturated subsurface flow were conducted in a concept-development mode. Recharge, heterogeneity, and anisotropy are shown to increase fluid pressures for failure-prone locations by up to 18.1, 4.5, and 1.8% respectively. Previous estimates of slope stability, driven by simple water balances, are significantly improved upon with the fluid pressures reported here. The results, for a Devil's Slide-like system, provide a foundation for future investigations

  2. X-ray Compton scattering experiments for fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, K.; Fukumaru, T.; Kimura, K.; Tamura, K.; Katoh, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Inui, M.; Yao, M.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a high-pressure vessel and a cell for x-ray Compton scattering measurements of fluid alkali metals. Measurements have been successfully carried out for alkali metal rubidium at elevated temperatures and pressures using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. The width of Compton profiles (CPs) of fluid rubidium becomes narrow with decreasing fluid density, which indicates that the CPs sensitively detect the effect of reduction in the valence electron density. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 10 September 2015. The original article supplied to AIP Publishing was not the final version and contained PDF conversion errors in Formulas (1) and (2). The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  3. X-ray Compton scattering experiments for fluid alkali metals at high temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, K. Fukumaru, T.; Kimura, K.; Yao, M.; Tamura, K.; Katoh, M.; Kajihara, Y.; Inui, M.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2015-08-17

    We have developed a high-pressure vessel and a cell for x-ray Compton scattering measurements of fluid alkali metals. Measurements have been successfully carried out for alkali metal rubidium at elevated temperatures and pressures using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8. The width of Compton profiles (CPs) of fluid rubidium becomes narrow with decreasing fluid density, which indicates that the CPs sensitively detect the effect of reduction in the valence electron density. At the request of all authors of the paper, and with the agreement of the Proceedings Editor, an updated version of this article was published on 10 September 2015. The original article supplied to AIP Publishing was not the final version and contained PDF conversion errors in Formulas (1) and (2). The errors have been corrected in the updated and re-published article.

  4. Universal scaling law for energy and pressure in a shearing fluid.

    PubMed

    Desgranges, Caroline; Delhommelle, Jerome

    2009-05-01

    Using nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation, we study the shear-rate dependence of pressure and potential energy in a liquid metal subjected to shear. We show that both thermodynamic properties vary according to a power law gamma[over ];{beta} of the shear rate gamma[over ] , in which the exponent beta is a simple linear function of temperature and density. Moreover, we establish that the coefficients for this linear law are the same as those previously obtained for a Lennard-Jones fluid by Ge [Phys. Rev. E 67, 061201 (2003)]. This is a strong indication that these coefficients, as well as the linear law for beta , could be applicable to any atomic fluid. It is also an important step toward the determination of a nonequilibrium equation of state, which would predict the value of pressure and energy of a shearing fluid for any state point and any value of the applied shear rate.

  5. Pressure tensor dynamics in the fluid description of Weibel-type instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrat, Mathieu; Del Sarto, Daniele; Ghizzo, Alain

    2016-10-01

    The study of Weibel-type instabilities triggered by temperature or momentum anisotropy normally requires a full kinetic treatement, though reduced kinetic models often provide an efficient alternative, both from a computational point of view and thanks to a simplified analysis that helps a better physical insight. We here show how, similarly to reduced kinetic models, an extended fluid model including the full pressure tensor dynamics provides a consistent description of Weibel-type modes in presence of two counterstreaming, non-relativistic beams with initially anisotropic pressures: focussing on propagation transverse and parallel to the beams we discuss the fluid dispersion relation of Weibel Instability-Current Filamentation Instability coupled modes and of the time resonant Weibel instability. This fluid analysis is shown to agree with the kinetic result and to allow the identification of some thermal effects, whose interpretation appeared more difficult in full kinetic descriptions.

  6. Micromechanism linear actuator with capillary force sealing

    DOEpatents

    Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A class of micromachine linear actuators whose function is based on gas driven pistons in which capillary forces are used to seal the gas behind the piston. The capillary forces also increase the amount of force transmitted from the gas pressure to the piston. In a major subclass of such devices, the gas bubble is produced by thermal vaporization of a working fluid. Because of their dependence on capillary forces for sealing, such devices are only practical on the sub-mm size scale, but in that regime they produce very large force times distance (total work) values.

  7. Towards a non-linear theory for fluid pressure and osmosis in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droghei, Riccardo; Salusti, Ettore

    2015-04-01

    In exploiting deep hydrocarbon reservoirs, often injections of fluid and/or solute are used. To control and avoid troubles as fluid and gas unexpected diffusions, a reservoir characterization can be obtained also from observations of space and time evolution of micro-earthquake clouds resulting from such injections. This is important since several among the processes caused by fluid injections can modify the deep matrix. Information about the evolution of such micro-seismicity clouds therefore plays a realistic role in the reservoir analyses. To reach a better insight about such processes, and obtain a better system control, we here analyze the initial stress necessary to originate strong non linear transients of combined fluid pressure and solute density (osmosis) in a porous matrix. All this can indeed perturb in a mild (i.e. a linear diffusion) or dramatic non linear way the rock structure, till inducing rock deformations, micro-earthquakes or fractures. I more detail we here assume first a linear Hooke law relating strain, stress, solute density and fluid pressure, and analyze their effect in the porous rock dynamics. Then we analyze its generalization, i.e. the further non linear effect of a stronger external pressure, also in presence of a trend of pressure or solute in the whole region. We moreover characterize the zones where a sudden arrival of such a front can cause micro-earthquakes or fractures. All this allows to reach a novel, more realistic insight about the control of rock evolution in presence of strong pressure fronts. We thus obtain a more efficient reservoir control to avoid large geological perturbations. It is of interest that our results are very similar to those found by Shapiro et al.(2013) with a different approach.

  8. A fast pressure-correction method for incompressible two-fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Michael S.; Ferrante, Antonino

    2014-09-01

    We have developed a new pressure-correction method for simulating incompressible two-fluid flows with large density and viscosity ratios. The method's main advantage is that the variable coefficient Poisson equation that arises in solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for two-fluid flows is reduced to a constant coefficient equation, which can be solved with an FFT-based, fast Poisson solver. This reduction is achieved by splitting the variable density pressure gradient term in the governing equations. The validity of this splitting is demonstrated from our numerical tests, and it is explained from a physical viewpoint. In this paper, the new pressure-correction method is coupled with a mass-conserving volume-of-fluid method to capture the motion of the interface between the two fluids but, in general, it could be coupled with other interface advection methods such as level-set, phase-field, or front-tracking. First, we verified the new pressure-correction method using the capillary wave test-case up to density and viscosity ratios of 10,000. Then, we validated the method by simulating the motion of a falling water droplet in air and comparing the droplet terminal velocity with an experimental value. Next, the method is shown to be second-order accurate in space and time independent of the VoF method, and it conserves mass, momentum, and kinetic energy in the inviscid limit. Also, we show that for solving the two-fluid Navier-Stokes equations, the method is 10-40 times faster than the standard pressure-correction method, which uses multigrid to solve the variable coefficient Poisson equation. Finally, we show that the method is capable of performing fully-resolved direct numerical simulation (DNS) of droplet-laden isotropic turbulence with thousands of droplets using a computational mesh of 10243 points.

  9. Abnormally high fluid pressures in the region of the Coalinga earthquake sequence and their significance

    SciTech Connect

    Yerkes, R.F.; Levine, P.; Wentworth, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Abnormally high fluid pressures (AHP's) permitted or aided thrusting of buried tectonic wedges of Franciscan assemblage eastward beneath coeval Great Valley sequence onto mafic basement and thus contributed to the 1983 Coalinga earthquake sequence. Much of the southwestern San Joaquin Valley and adjoining parts of the Diablo Range are underlain by rocks with pressure/depth (P/D) ratios near or greater than 0.5 psi/ft (the hydrostatic gradient for oil-field waters is about 0.47 psi/ft). Plots of P/D ratio versus depth for more than 300 wells show an average ratio of about 0.6 psi/ft above 14,000-ft depth, a lower bound of 0.47 psi/ft, and an upper bound greater than 0.9 psi/ft; ratios greater than 0.60 psi/ft are interpreted to be abnormally high. Several likely sources of AHP's are recognized, but their relative contributions cannot be determined. Chief of these sources are diagenetic-metamorphic generation of fluids in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks, compaction disequilibrium and aquathermal pressuring in Tertiary strata, and horizontal tectonic compression. Yerkes, Levine, and Wentworth infer the presence of near-lithostatic fluid pressures in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks below the Coalinga anticline on the basis of (1) a mapped seismic low-velocity zone; (2) active generation of metamorphic fluids in the Great Valley sequence and Franciscan rocks, which pond below relatively impermeable layers and thus increase fluid pressure; and (3) apparent southward and westward propagation of the 1983 main-shock rupture, which indicates rupture on a gently southwest dipping surface and implies an inverse relation between depth and crustal strength.

  10. Electrolysis-based diaphragm actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, C.; Tai, Y.-C.; Burdick, J. W.; Andersen, R. A.

    2006-02-01

    This work presents a new electrolysis-based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) diaphragm actuator. Electrolysis is a technique for converting electrical energy to pneumatic energy. Theoretically electrolysis can achieve a strain of 136 000% and is capable of generating a pressure above 200 MPa. Electrolysis actuators require modest electrical power and produce minimal heat. Due to the large volume expansion obtained via electrolysis, small actuators can create a large force. Up to 100 µm of movement was achieved by a 3 mm diaphragm. The actuator operates at room temperature and has a latching and reversing capability.

  11. Pressure Profile for an Associating Lennard-Jones Fluid Confined in a Spherical Cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Yuan; Gu, Fang; Wang, Hai-Jun; Sun, Zong-Li

    2017-03-09

    We present the pressure tensor of an associating Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid confined in a spherical cavity of hard wall, where a high-order density correlation has been taken into account. To give the two-body association potential for calculating the pressure tensor, an angle-average of site-site attraction over all orientations of two particles is performed. Furthermore, the classical density functional theory is employed to obtain the density profile of the confined fluid, by which the normal and tangential pressure profiles are illustrated under various conditions to show the dependence of the pressure tensor on the association strength, number of associating sites, radius of cavity, and bulk density. As an application, the corresponding surface tension is calculated. It is shown that under a strong association interaction (both association strength and the number of associating sites are large), the pressure profiles are depleted from the wall of the cavity instead of the oscillatory behavior under a weak association interaction. Such a tendency is mainly determined by the competition between association interaction and excluded volume interaction. Therefore, the aggregation state and related properties of an associating LJ fluid within a confinement of nanoscale can be efficiently regulated by the association interaction.

  12. Pulse pressure variation to predict fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients: tidal vs. forced inspiratory breathing.

    PubMed

    Hong, D M; Lee, J M; Seo, J H; Min, J J; Jeon, Y; Bahk, J H

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated whether pulse pressure variation can predict fluid responsiveness in spontaneously breathing patients. Fifty-nine elective thoracic surgical patients were studied before induction of general anaesthesia. After volume expansion with hydroxyethyl starch 6 ml.kg(-1) , patients were defined as responders by a ≥ 15% increase in the cardiac index. Haemodynamic variables were measured before and after volume expansion and pulse pressure variations were calculated during tidal breathing and during forced inspiratory breathing. Median (IQR [range]) pulse pressure variation during forced inspiratory breathing was significantly higher in responders (n = 29) than in non-responders (n = 30) before volume expansion (18.2 (IQR 14.7-18.2 [9.3-31.3])% vs. 10.1 (IQR 8.3-12.6 [4.8-21.1])%, respectively, p < 0.001). The receiver-operating characteristic curve revealed that pulse pressure variation during forced inspiratory breathing could predict fluid responsiveness (area under the curve 0.910, p < 0.0001). Pulse pressure variation measured during forced inspiratory breathing can be used to guide fluid management in spontaneously breathing patients.

  13. The Influence of Eruptive Fluid Pressure and Vent Radius on the Eruption Style of High- Pressure Supersonic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, D. E.; Wohletz, K. H.; Brodsky, E. E.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2006-12-01

    Through observations, experiments, and modeling much has been learned about the effects of fluid pressure and vent radius on the dynamics of large, explosive volcanic eruptions. The standard semi-analytic model suggests that increasing radius results in less stable columns while the effect of overpressure is neglected by simply assuming a choked flow condition at the base of the thermal plume or a shock-free compressible flow (A.W. Woods, Rev. Geophys. v33, 1995). However, the standing shock waves that may develop in high- pressure supersonic volcanic eruptions complicate the connection between the fluid dynamics of the conduit and the stability of the buoyant plume, and in some cases can result in the inverse dependencies. The strength and position of these standing shock waves (and therefore their effect on energies and column collapse) are dependent on a number of factors including eruptive fluid pressure and vent radius. Here, using computational simulations, we examine the influence of these two parameters on the energy supplied to a buoyant column from a supersonic vent. We use a pseudogas approximation for a rhyolitic ash-gas composite flow to show that increasing the overpressure results in wider plumes at the top of the gas thrust region with slower interior velocities. This effect can be significant at overpressure ratios as low as 10. Since a 1 km deep magma chamber at lithostatic pressure results in an overpressure ratio of 300, most moderate to large eruptions will be affected by the shocks and therefore will likely have these inverse dependencies. For instance, estimates for overpressure at the vent based on petrological evidence and conduit models for many explosive eruptions (e.g. the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo) are of the same order of magnitude as the overpressure ratio in our strongly affected simulations. By combining the results from our simulations with values of overpressures and vent radii from petrologic and field methods, we constrain

  14. Earthquake dynamics. Mapping pressurized volcanic fluids from induced crustal seismic velocity drops.

    PubMed

    Brenguier, F; Campillo, M; Takeda, T; Aoki, Y; Shapiro, N M; Briand, X; Emoto, K; Miyake, H

    2014-07-04

    Volcanic eruptions are caused by the release of pressure that has accumulated due to hot volcanic fluids at depth. Here, we show that the extent of the regions affected by pressurized fluids can be imaged through the measurement of their response to transient stress perturbations. We used records of seismic noise from the Japanese Hi-net seismic network to measure the crustal seismic velocity changes below volcanic regions caused by the 2011 moment magnitude (M(w)) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. We interpret coseismic crustal seismic velocity reductions as related to the mechanical weakening of the pressurized crust by the dynamic stress associated with the seismic waves. We suggest, therefore, that mapping seismic velocity susceptibility to dynamic stress perturbations can be used for the imaging and characterization of volcanic systems.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of Cryogenic Propellant Tank for Integrated Vehicle Fluid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; LeClair, Andre C.; Hedayat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of pressurization of a cryogenic propellant tank for the Integrated Vehicle Fluid (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been running tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to develop an integrated model of the tank and the pressurization system. This paper presents an iterative algorithm for converging the interface boundary conditions between different component models of a large system model. The model results have been compared with test data.

  16. Coupling the Actuator Line and Finite Element Methods to Model Fluid Structure Interaction of a Commercial Wind Turbine in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Javier; Jha, Pankaj; Campbell, Robert; Schmitz, Sven; Brasseur, James

    2013-11-01

    Wind turbine blades deform in response to unsteady loadings from atmospheric turbulence, causing changes in local angle-of-attack and blade loadings. This interaction is modeled by a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver that combines a finite element (FE) solver with an actuator line method (ALM) model for aerodynamic blade loads and vorticity shedding developed by Jha et al. (2013). The FSI solver is embedded within an OpenFOAM large-eddy simulation (LES) solver for daytime atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The flow and structure solvers are tightly coupled to ensure convergence of blade deformation and its impact on the flow field. The structural deformations are computed using a modal summation approach, where the required modal matrix and resonant frequencies are extracted using Abaqus. The ALM and FE algorithms are being optimized to provide a reasonable balance between accuracy of prediction and computation time, particularly due to the sub-iterations required for blade deformation convergence. We also aim to present an analysis of the coupling between blade loading and deformation on the NREL 5MW turbine operating in the ABL. Supported by the DOE. Graduate Research Assistant, Mechanical Engineering.

  17. Interfacial motions and pressure fluctuations during fluid displacement in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Moebius, F.; Mumford, K. G.; Or, D.

    2014-12-01

    Two-phase flow is of interest in many fields including microfluidic devices, geological CO2 sequestration, agriculture, filtration and contaminated site remediation. Macroscopic flow equations are often used to describe two-phase displacement flows in such systems based on constitutive relationships (e.g., capillary pressure-saturation relationships) determined under equilibrium conditions. The potential limitations of such process representation were examined in experiments with direct observation of pore scale dynamics. Transparent sintered glass beads micro-models enabled quantification of the interplay of various phenomena governing fluid flow (e.g., capillary forces, viscous forces, inertial forces). Experiments systematically evaluated the impact of pore water velocity, grain size, surface tension, viscosity and wettability on water pressure and interfacial dynamics, both during flow and after flow cessation. Particular attention was placed on high-velocity conditions, when inertial forces that are not typically considerred in porous media applications can play a larger role. Liquid pressure was quantified at the base of the system and the displacement process was imaged using a high speed camera. Characteristics of pressure fluctuations were strongly linked with interfacial properties with fluctuations manifested during displacement and following flow cessation (pressure relaxation). The patterns of pressure fluctuations varied with boundary conditions and media properties reflecting complex interactions with fluid, surface and dynamics along the displacement front.

  18. Subsurface fluid pressures from drill-stem tests, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    High fluid pressures are known to be associated with oil and gas fields in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Shut-in pressure measurements from drill-stem tests show how pressure varies with depth and by area within the basin. The data base used in this report incorporates over 2,000 pressure measurements from drill-stem tests in wells completed prior to 1985. However, the number of useful pressure measurements is considerably less, because many drill-stem tests fail to stabilize at the actual formation pressure if the permeability is low. By extracting the maximum pressure measurements recorded in a collection of wells within an area, the trend of formation pressure within that area can be approximated. Areal compilations of pressures from drill-stem tests show that overpressured rock formations occur throughout much of the northern and eastern areas of the Uinta Basin. In particular, significant overpressuring (0.5 < pressure gradient < 0.8 psi/ft) is found throughout much of the Altamont-Bluebell field at depths ranging from 10,000 to 13,000 ft, equivalent to 5,000 to 8,000 ft below sea level. Limited data indicate that the pressure gradient declines at depths greater than 13,000 ft. An underpressured zone appears to exist in the Altamont-Bluebell field at depths shallower than 5,000 ft. Throughout the eastern Uinta Basin, moderately overpressured zones (0.46 < pressure gradient < 0.5 psi/ft) are common, with local evidence of significantly overpressured zones, but pressure gradients greater than 0.6 psi/ft are rare.

  19. An earthquake instability model based on faults containing high fluid-pressure compartments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proposed that large strike-slip faults such as the San Andreas contain water in seal-bounded compartments. Arguments based on heat flow and stress orientation suggest that in most of the compartments, the water pressure is so high that the average shear strength of the fault is less than 20 MPa. We propose a variation of this basic model in which most of the shear stress on the fault is supported by a small number of compartments where the pore pressure is relatively low. As a result, the fault gouge in these compartments is compacted and lithified and has a high undisturbed strength. When one of these locked regions fails, the system made up of the neighboring high and low pressure compartments can become unstable. Material in the high fluid pressure compartments is initially underconsolidated since the low effective confining pressure has retarded compaction. As these compartments are deformed, fluid pressure remains nearly unchanged so that they offer little resistance to shear. The low pore pressure compartments, however, are overconsolidated and dilate as they are sheared. Decompression of the pore fluid in these compartments lowers fluid pressure, increasing effective normal stress and shear strength. While this effect tends to stabilize the fault, it can be shown that this dilatancy hardening can be more than offset by displacement weakening of the fault (i.e., the drop from peak to residual strength). If the surrounding rock mass is sufficiently compliant to produce an instability, slip will propagate along the fault until the shear fracture runs into a low-stress region. Frictional heating and the accompanying increase in fluid pressure that are suggested to occur during shearing of the fault zone will act as additional destabilizers. However, significant heating occurs only after a finite amount of slip and therefore is more likely to contribute to the energetics of rupture propagation than to the initiation of the instability. We present

  20. Effect of lower-body positive pressure on postural fluid shifts in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.; Kravik, S. E.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) on the orthostatic fluid and protein shifts were investigated in five men during combined tilt-table/antigravity suit inflation and deflation experiments. Changes in the mass densities of venous blood and plasma were measured and the values were used to calculate the densities of erythrocytes, whole-body blood, and shifted fluid. It was found that the application of 60 mm Hg LBPP during 60-deg head-up tilt prevented about half of the postural hemoconcentration occurring during passive head-up tilt.

  1. Solubility of Aragonite in Aqueous Fluids at High Pressure and High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facq, Sébastien; Daniel, Isabelle; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Cardon, Hervé; Sverjensky, Dimitri

    2014-05-01

    Deep crustal and mantle aqueous fluids play a crucial role in geologic processes occurring in the Earth's interior, especially at high PT conditions. Dissolved carbon appears to be a major element constituting these aqueous fluids, occurring under the form of molecular species (CO2, CO, CH4), ionic species such as carbonate or bicarbonate ions or some more complex organic compounds [1]. However, the nature and the content of the chemical species constituting these C-bearing aqueous fluids may strongly be affected by the environmental geologic conditions such as the pressure and the temperature range. If fluid speciation and solubility of carbonate minerals are well characterized at HT and relatively low pressure, less is evident at pressure above 2 GPa where experimental challenges make trickier speciation and solubility measurements. Thanks to recent advances in theoretical aqueous geochemistry [1-3], combined experimental and theoretical efforts allow now the investigation of speciation and solubility of carbonate minerals with pure water at higher PT conditions than previously feasible [4]. However, direct measurements of solubility of carbonate minerals at HP-HT conditions are still needed to help to the development of quantitative models of carbon transport by aqueous fluids in subduction zones and validate existing aqueous speciation model. In this study, we present recent X-ray fluorescence measurements and thermodynamic model of solubility of carbonate in aqueous fluids at pressure up to 5 GPa. The amount of dissolved aragonite in the fluid has been measured from the intensity of the Ca K-lines at the ESRF-ID27 using an externally-heated membrane-type diamond anvil cell and an incident monochromatic focused X-Ray beam at 20 keV. The combination of the XRF data on dissolution of CaCO3mineral combined to previous speciation results permits now to calculate the solubility KS of aragonite a pressure in excess of 2 GPa. [1] Manning, C. E. et al., Review in

  2. Pressure wave propagation in fluid-filled co-axial elastic tubes. Part 1: Basic theory.

    PubMed

    Berkouk, K; Carpenter, P W; Lucey, A D

    2003-12-01

    Our work is motivated by ideas about the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. This is a serious disease characterized by the appearance of longitudinal cavities within the spinal cord. Its causes are unknown, but pressure propagation is probably implicated. We have developed an inviscid theory for the propagation of pressure waves in co-axial, fluid-filled, elastic tubes. This is intended as a simple model of the intraspinal cerebrospinal-fluid system. Our approach is based on the classic theory for the propagation of longitudinal waves in single, fluid-filled, elastic tubes. We show that for small-amplitude waves the governing equations reduce to the classic wave equation. The wave speed is found to be a strong function of the ratio of the tubes' cross-sectional areas. It is found that the leading edge of a transmural pressure pulse tends to generate compressive waves with converging wave fronts. Consequently, the leading edge of the pressure pulse steepens to form a shock-like elastic jump. A weakly nonlinear theory is developed for such an elastic jump.

  3. On the correlation of buoyancy-influenced turbulent convective heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. D.; Jiang, P. X.; Liu, B.

    2012-07-01

    This paper is concerned with buoyancy-influenced turbulent convective heat transfer in vertical tubes for conditions where the physical properties vary strongly with temperature as in fluids at supercritical pressure in the pseudocritical temperature region. An extended physically-based, semi-empirical model is described which has been developed to account for the extreme non-uniformity of properties which can be present in such fluids and lead to strong influences of buoyancy which cause the mean flow and turbulence fields to be modified in such a manner that has a very profound effect on heat transfer. Data for both upward and downward flow from experiments using carbon dioxide at supercritical pressure (8.80, MPa, p/pc=1.19) in a uniformly heated tube of internal diameter 2 mm and length 290 mm, obtained under conditions of strong non-uniformity of fluid properties, are being correlated and fitted using an approach based on the model. It provides a framework for describing the complex heat transfer behaviour which can be encountered in such experiments by means of an equation of simple form. Buoyancy-induced impairment and enhancement of heat transfer is successfully reproduced by the model. Similar studies are in progress using experimental data for both carbon dioxide and water from other sources. The aim is to obtain an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which deterioration of heat transfer might arise in sensitive applications involving supercritical pressure fluids, such as high pressure, water-cooled reactors operating above the critical pressure. (authors)

  4. Miniature linear-to-rotary motion actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorokach, Michael R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A miniature hydraulic actuation system capable of converting linear actuator motion to control surface rotary motion has been designed for application to active controls on dynamic wind tunnel models. Due to space constraints and the torque requirements of an oscillating control surface at frequencies up to 50 Hertz, a new actuation system was developed to meet research objectives. This new actuation system was designed and developed to overcome the output torque limitations and fluid loss/sealing difficulties associated with an existing vane type actuator. Static control surface deflections and dynamic control surface oscillations through a given angle are provided by the actuation system. The actuator design has been incorporated into a transonic flutter model with an active trailing edge flap and two active spoilers. The model is scheduled for testing in the LaRC 16 Foot Transonic Dynamics Tunnel during Summer 1993. This paper will discuss the actuation system, its design, development difficulties, test results, and application to aerospace vehicles.

  5. Inertial migration of elastic particles in a pressure-driven power-law fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowie, Samuel; Alexeev, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Using three-dimensional computer simulations, we study the cross-stream migration of deformable particles in a channel filled with a non-Newtonian fluid driven by a pressure gradient. Our numerical approach integrates lattice Boltzmann method and lattice spring method in order to model fluid structural interactions of the elastic particle and the surrounding power fluid in the channel. The particles are modeled as elastic shells filled with a viscous fluid that are initially spherical. We focus on the regimes where the inertial effects cannot be neglected and cause cross-stream drift of particles. We probe the flow with different power law indexes including both the shear thickening and thinning fluids. We also examine migration of particles of with different elasticity and relative size. To isolate the non-Newtonian effects on particle migration, we compare the results with the inertial migration results found in the case where the channel is filled with a simple Newtonian fluid. The results can be useful for applications requiring high throughput separation, sorting, and focusing of both synthetic particles and biological cells in microfluidic devices. Financial support provided by National Science Foundation (NSF) Grant No. CMMI1538161.

  6. The effects of Haversian fluid pressure and harmonic axial loading on the poroelastic behaviors of a single osteon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, XiaoGang; Chen, WeiYi; Gao, ZhiPeng; Guo, HongMei; Wang, LiLi

    2012-09-01

    In order to well understand the mechanism of the mechanotransduction in bone, we propose a new model of transverse isotropic and poroelastic osteon cylinder considering Haversian fluid pressure. The analytical pore pressure and velocity solutions are obtained to examine the fluid transport behavior and pressure distribution in a loaded osteon on two different exterior surface cases. Case I is stress free and fully permeable and case II is impermeable. The following are the results obtained. (i) The Haversian fluid may not be ignored because it can enlarge the whole osteonal fluid pressure field, and it bears the external loads together with the solid skeleton. (ii) The increase of both axial strain amplitude and frequency can result in the increase of fluid pressure and velocity amplitudes, while in case II, the frequency has little effect on the fluid pressure amplitude. (iii) Under the same loading conditions, the pressure amplitude in case II is larger than that in case I, while the velocity amplitude is smaller than that in case I. This model permits the linking of the external loads to the osteonal fluid pressure and velocity, which may be a stimulus to the mechanotransduction of bone remodeling signals.

  7. Fluid dynamics of a pressure measuring system for underground explosive tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical and analytical models are used to optimize a pressure measuring system for underground nuclear tests. This system uses a long pipe filled with gas to communicate the pressure level to a transducer in a pressure chamber remote from the explosion cavity. The pressure chamber and pipe are pressurized above the final pressure expected from the explosion. During the explosion, the high pressure gas blows down, preventing debris from entering and clogging the system. The models were first checked against the Junior Jade test series, which used an undergound non-nuclear explosion to simulate a nuclear test. It was found that the measured pressure oscillated for some time before settling down to a steady value. This is shown to be a result of an organ pipe oscillation that can develop in the short pipes used for this test series. The analytical model provided a simple means to optimize the system design parameters and showed that changing the working fluid from nitrogen to helium would improve the time response of the system significantly. The numerical model is then used to obtain more accurate predictions of the sytem response. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Downhole hydraulic actuated pump

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, G.K.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a downhole hydraulically actuated pump assembly of the type having a main housing within which an engine and pump is enclosed; a connecting rod, an engine piston, a pump plunger, means by which the engine and connecting rod reciprocate the pump plunger and thereby produces fluid; the main housing has a lower end having a formation fluid inlet; and upper end having a power fluid inlet; and, a produced fluid outlet; the plunger divides one marginal end of the housing into upper and lower production chambers; the lower end of the connecting rod is hollow and extends through the plunger into fluid communication with the formation fluid inlet to provide a source of formation fluid for the upper and lower production chambers; a traveling value assembly contained within the plunger and arranged to transfer formation fluid from the hollow rod, through the plunger, and into the upper and lower production chambers, respectively, as the plunger upstrokes and downstrokes; produced fluid valve means by which fluid flows from the upper and lower production chambers and through the produced fluid outlet.

  9. Field experiment gathers friction-pressure data for CO{sub 2}-energized fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, H.C.; Sandy, J.M.; McGowen, J.M.; Ridens, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    A field experiment was conducted on a well with 10,000 ft of 3{1/2}-in., 12.9-lbm/ft tubing to gather friction-pressure data for CO{sub 2}-energized fluids. Seventy-three stages were pumped at various rates, gel concentrations, proppant concentrations, and CO{sub 2} qualities to gather sufficient data for modeling and for correlation development. Four side-pocket bundle carriers, with two electronic memory gauges per carrier, were installed at 2,500-ft intervals to monitor pressure and temperature. Four computer data-acquisition systems were used to confirm the integrity of the data collected. The actual friction data that were collected demonstrate the effects of treatment rate, gel concentration, CO{sub 2} quality, proppant concentration, and wellbore depth. This information will help researchers better understand the friction-pressure behavior of CO{sub 2}-energized fluids and should enhance treatment diagnostics, the design of friction-pressure correlations, and existing friction-pressure correlations.

  10. A method for pressure-pulse suppression in fluid-filled piping

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Y.W.; Bielick, E.F. ); Wiedermann, A.H. ); Ockert, C.E. )

    1989-01-01

    A simple, nondestructive method to suppress pressure pulses in fluid-filled piping was proposed and theoretically analyzed earlier. In this paper, the proposed method is verified experimentally. The results of experiments performed for the range of parameters of practical importance indicated that the attenuation of pressure pulses was in accordance with the theoretical predictions. This paper describes the experimental setup and the test models of the proposed pulse suppression devices and discusses the experimental results. In particular, the measured attenuation factors are presented and compared with the theoretical predictions. 8 ref., 17 fig., 2 tab.

  11. Draft tube pressure pulsation predictions in Francis turbines with transient Computational Fluid Dynamics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melot, M.; Nennemann, B.; Désy, N.

    2014-03-01

    An automatic Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) procedure that aims at predicting Draft Tube Pressure Pulsations (DTPP) at part load is presented. After a brief review of the physics involved, a description of the transient numerical setup is given. Next, the paper describes a post processing technique, namely the separation of pressure signals into synchronous, asynchronous and random pulsations. Combining the CFD calculation with the post-processing technique allows the quantification of the potential excitation of the mechanical system during the design phase. Consequently it provides the hydraulic designer with a tool to specifically target DTPP and thus helps in the development of more robust designs for part load operation of turbines.

  12. Numerical vs experimental pressure drops for Boger fluids in sharp-corner contraction flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Aguilar, J. E.; Tamaddon-Jahromi, H. R.; Webster, M. F.; Walters, K.

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses the problem of matching experimental findings with numerical prediction for the extreme experimental levels of pressure-drops observed in the 4:1 sharp-corner contraction flows, as reported by Nigen and Walters ["Viscoelastic contraction flows: Comparison of axisymmetric and planar configurations," J. Non- Newtonian Fluid Mech. 102, 343-359 (2002)]. In this connection, we report on significant success in achieving quantitative agreement between predictions and experiments. This has been made possible by using a new swanINNFM model, employing an additional dissipative function. Notably, one can observe that extremely large pressure-drops may be attained with a suitable selection of the extensional viscous time scale. In addition, and on vortex structure, the early and immediate vortex enhancement for Boger fluids in axisymmetric contractions has also been reproduced, which is shown to be absent in planar counterparts.

  13. Fluid description of Weibel-type instabilities via full pressure tensor dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrat, M.; Del Sarto, D.; Ghizzo, A.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a fluid model for the description of Weibel-type instabilties based on the inclusion of the full pressure tensor dynamics. The linear analysis first performed by Basu B., Phys. Plasmas, 9, (2002) 5131, for the strong anisotropy limit of Weibel's instability is extended to include the coupling between pure Weibel's and current filamentation instability, and the potential of this fluid approach is further developed. It is shown to allow an easier interpretation of some physical features of these coupled modes, notably the role played by thermal effects. It can be used to identify the role of different closure conditions in pressure-driven instabilities which can be numerically investigated at a remarkably lower computational cost than with kinetic simulations.

  14. Physics based simulation of seismicity induced in the vicinity of a high-pressure fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, J.; NicBhloscaidh, M.; Murphy, S.; O'Brien, G. S.; Bean, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    High-pressure fluid injection into subsurface is known, in some cases, to induce earthquakes in the surrounding volume. The increasing importance of ';fracking' as a potential source of hydrocarbons has made the seismic hazard from this effect an important issue the adjudication of planning applications and it is likely that poor understanding of the process will be used as justification of refusal of planning in Ireland and the UK. Here we attempt to understand some of the physical controls on the size and frequency of induced earthquakes using a physics-based simulation of the process and examine resulting earthquake catalogues The driver for seismicity in our simulations is identical to that used in the paper by Murphy et al. in this session. Fluid injection is simulated using pore fluid movement throughout a permeable layer from a high-pressure point source using a lattice Boltzmann scheme. Diffusivities and frictional parameters can be defined independently at individual nodes/cells allowing us to reproduce 3-D geological structures. Active faults in the model follow a fractal size distribution and exhibit characteristic event size, resulting in a power-law frequency-size distribution. The fluid injection is not hydraulically connected to the fault (i.e. fluid does not come into physical contact with the fault); however stress perturbations from the injection drive the seismicity model. The duration and pressure-time function of the fluid injection can be adjusted to model any given injection scenario and the rate of induced seismicity is controlled by the local structures and ambient stress field as well as by the stress perturbations resulting from the fluid injection. Results from the rate and state fault models of Murphy et al. are incorporated to include the effect of fault strengthening in seismically quite areas. Initial results show similarities with observed induced seismic catalogues. Seismicity is only induced where the active faults have not been

  15. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  16. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation for monitoring interstitial fluid pressure in tumours -in vitro and in vivo proof of concept

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsdottir, V G; Dave, J K; Eisenbrey, J R; Machado, P; Zhao, H; Liu, J B; Merton, D A; Forsberg, F

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of using subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) to noninvasively estimate interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) was studied. In vitro, radiofrequency signals, from 0.2 ml/l of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) were acquired within a water-tank with a Sonix RP ultrasound scanner (Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada; fT/R=6.7/3.35 MHz and fT/R =10/5 MHz) and the subharmonic amplitudes of the signals were compared over 0–50 mmHg. In vivo, five swine with naturally occurring melanomas were studied. Subharmonic signals were acquired from tumours and surrounding tissue during infusion of Definity and compared to needle-based pressure measurements. Both in vitro and in vivo, an inverse linear relationship between hydrostatic pressure and subharmonic amplitude was observed with r2=0.63–0.95; p<0.05, maximum amplitude drop 11.36 dB at 10 MHz and −8 dB, and r2 as high as 0.97; p<0.02 (10 MHz and −4/−8 dB most promising), respectively, indicating that SHAPE may be useful in monitoring IFP. PMID:24856899

  17. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation for monitoring interstitial fluid pressure in tumours--in vitro and in vivo proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Halldorsdottir, V G; Dave, J K; Eisenbrey, J R; Machado, P; Zhao, H; Liu, J B; Merton, D A; Forsberg, F

    2014-09-01

    The feasibility of using subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) to noninvasively estimate interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) was studied. In vitro, radiofrequency signals, from 0.2 ml/l of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) were acquired within a water-tank with a Sonix RP ultrasound scanner (Analogic Ultrasound, Richmond, BC, Canada; fT/R=6.7/3.35 MHz and fT/R=10/5 MHz) and the subharmonic amplitudes of the signals were compared over 0-50 mmHg. In vivo, five swine with naturally occurring melanomas were studied. Subharmonic signals were acquired from tumours and surrounding tissue during infusion of Definity and compared to needle-based pressure measurements. Both in vitro and in vivo, an inverse linear relationship between hydrostatic pressure and subharmonic amplitude was observed with r(2)=0.63-0.95; p<0.05, maximum amplitude drop 11.36 dB at 10 MHz and -8 dB, and r(2) as high as 0.97; p<0.02 (10 MHz and -4/-8 dB most promising), respectively, indicating that SHAPE may be useful in monitoring IFP.

  18. Acute synovial fluid eosinophilia associated with delayed pressure urticaria: a role for mast cells?

    PubMed

    Miossec, P; Sullivan, T J; Tharp, M D; Volant, A; Le Goff, P

    1987-04-01

    We report a case of exercise induced joint effusion with synovial fluid (SF) eosinophilia of 9,540/mm3 in a patient with delayed pressure urticaria. The SF eosinophilia was an acute but transient event associated with some evidence of local complement activation. Histologic assessment revealed a normal synovial membrane but with no detectable intact mast cells. These observations suggest that mast cells and eosinophils acting in concert can cause joint inflammation.

  19. Probe systems for measuring static pressure and turbulence intensity in fluid streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for measuring time-averaged static or ambient pressure and turbulence intensity in a turbulent stream are discussed. The procedure involves placing a plurality of probes in the stream. Each probe responds in a different manner to characteristics of the fluid stream, preferably as a result of having varying cross sections. The responses from the probes are used to eliminate unwanted components in the measured quantities for accurate determination of selected characteristics.

  20. Process-Based Characterizations of Subsurface Fluid Pressures for a Devil's Slide-like System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M.; Loague, K.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal margins commonly host slope stability hazards that are influenced by hydrologic, geologic, and / or anthropogenic perturbations. A firm foundation for rigorously understanding the component contributions and process-based linkages among hydrologic and geomorphic response is comprehensive physics-based simulation. This study is motivated by the hydrologically-driven, creeping and episodic deep-seated bedrock slides that intersect a former section of the Pacific Coast Highway in the active landslide zone at Devil's Slide near Pacifica, California. For this study, deterministic-conceptual hydrogeologic simulation was employed to estimate fluid pressures for saturated three-dimensional (3D) subsurface systems. One-dimensional (1D) vertical, transient, variably-saturated simulations were conducted to establish the position of the water table (i.e., the upper boundary condition) for the 3D steady-state saturated problems which encode the geologic information for heterogeneous and anisotropic systems. The concept-development effort undertaken here demonstrates that, for a Devil's Slide-like system: (i) specific climatic conditions facilitate variable lag times associated with water-table dynamics, (ii) recharge is the most sensitive parameter to establish risk-averse estimates of fluid pressure, (iii) nuances in the 3D flow field related to fault zone characteristics markedly influence fluid pressures, and (iv) it is unlikely that seasonal fluctuations in the regional water table account for severe failure modes. The simulated fluid pressures encourage new interdisciplinary data discovery to investigate the spatial and temporal persistence of perched water in the study area. To capture event-driven failures for the Devil's Slide site, future efforts should develop characterizations of the unsaturated near surface with a rigor similar to the treatment of the saturated zone demonstrated by this study.

  1. Relationships Among Rheological, Sensory Texture, and Swallowing Pressure Measurements of Hydrocolloid-Thickened Fluids.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Z; Damodhar, H; Grummer, C; Mendenhall, H; Banaszynski, K; Hartel, R; Hind, J; Joyce, A; Kaufman, A; Robbins, J

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationships among three categories of measurements (rheological, sensory texture, and swallowing pressure) from fluids thickened to two different viscosities with 15 different hydrocolloids. Fluids at viscosities of 300 and 1500 cP (at 30 s(-1)) were targeted because these are the viscosities corresponding to the barium standards used in radiographic dysphagia diagnosis. Within the low viscosity (nectar) fluids (300 cP), the sensory properties thickness, stickiness, adhesiveness, mouth coating, and number of swallows were highly positively correlated with each other and highly positively correlated with the flow behavior index, n value (an indicator of shear-thinning behavior). Within the higher viscosity (thin honey) fluids (1500 cP), the sensory textures of adhesiveness, stickiness, mouth coating, and number of swallows correlated positively with rheological measures of n value. Swallowing pressures measured in the anterior oral cavity correlated negatively with the consistency coefficient k [shear stress/(shear rate) (n) ]. Samples that were more shear thinning (lower n values, higher k values) were generally perceived as less thick, with less adhesive properties (stickiness, adhesiveness, mouthcoating, and number of swallows). This information can be useful for selecting thickeners for people with dysphagia. A desirable thickener for many dysphagic patients would be one that allowed for a safe swallow by being viscous enough to reduce airway penetration, yet pleasant to drink, having the minimal perceived thickness and mouthcoating associated with greater shear thinning.

  2. Fluid pressure diffusion effects on the seismic reflectivity of a single fracture.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Nicolás D; Rubino, J Germán; Caspari, Eva; Milani, Marco; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    When seismic waves travel through a fluid-saturated porous medium containing a fracture, fluid pressure gradients are induced between the compliant fracture and the stiffer embedding background. The resulting equilibration through fluid pressure diffusion (FPD) produces a frequency dependence of the stiffening effect of the fluid saturating the fracture. As the reflectivity of a fracture is mainly controlled by the stiffness contrast with respect to the background, these frequency-dependent effects are expected to affect the fracture reflectivity. The present work explores the P- and S-wave reflectivity of a fracture modeled as a thin porous layer separating two half-spaces. Assuming planar wave propagation and P-wave incidence, this article analyzes the FPD effects on the reflection coefficients through comparisons with a low-frequency approximation of the underlying poroelastic model and an elastic model based on Gassmann's equations. The results indicate that, while the impact of global flow on fracture reflectivity is rather small, FPD effects can be significant, especially for P-waves and low incidence angles. These effects get particularly strong for very thin and compliant, liquid-saturated fractures and embedded in a high-permeability background. In particular, this study suggests that in common environments and typical seismic experiments FPD effects can significantly increase the seismic visibility of fractures.

  3. Effect of pressurization on helical guided wave energy velocity in fluid-filled pipes.

    PubMed

    Dubuc, Brennan; Ebrahimkhanlou, Arvin; Salamone, Salvatore

    2017-03-01

    The effect of pressurization stresses on helical guided waves in a thin-walled fluid-filled pipe is studied by modeling leaky Lamb waves in a stressed plate bordered by fluid. Fluid pressurization produces hoop and longitudinal stresses in a thin-walled pipe, which corresponds to biaxial in-plane stress in a plate waveguide model. The effect of stress on guided wave propagation is accounted for through nonlinear elasticity and finite deformation theory. Emphasis is placed on the stress dependence of the energy velocity of the guided wave modes. For this purpose, an expression for the energy velocity of leaky Lamb waves in a stressed plate is derived. Theoretical results are presented for the mode, frequency, and directional dependent variations in energy velocity with respect to stress. An experimental setup is designed for measuring variations in helical wave energy velocity in a thin-walled water-filled steel pipe at different levels of pressure. Good agreement is achieved between the experimental variations in energy velocity for the helical guided waves and the theoretical leaky Lamb wave solutions.

  4. Apparatus and method for fatigue testing of a material specimen in a high-pressure fluid environment

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An; Feng, Zhili; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Liu, Kenneth C

    2013-06-04

    The invention provides fatigue testing of a material specimen while the specimen is disposed in a high pressure fluid environment. A specimen is placed between receivers in an end cap of a vessel and a piston that is moveable within the vessel. Pressurized fluid is provided to compression and tension chambers defined between the piston and the vessel. When the pressure in the compression chamber is greater than the pressure in the tension chamber, the specimen is subjected to a compression force. When the pressure in the tension chamber is greater than the pressure in the compression chamber, the specimen is subjected to a tension force. While the specimen is subjected to either force, it is also surrounded by the pressurized fluid in the tension chamber. In some examples, the specimen is surrounded by hydrogen.

  5. Electromechanical actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigham, J.

    1982-01-01

    Materials illustrating a presentation on the development of electromechanical actuators (EMA) for electric flight systems are presented. Technology issues are identified, and major steps relative to EMA development, NASA's role, and a technology procurement plan are outlined.

  6. Witness of fluid-flow organization during high-pressure antigorite dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Garrido, Carlos J.; Gómez-Pugnaire, María. Teresa

    2010-05-01

    The link between devolatilization reactions and fluid flow is crucial to unravel important geodynamic processes in subduction zones as deformation and element transfer is extremely controlled by the presence of water. At high confining pressure, significant fluid pressure gradients are expected in a reacting rock being dehydrated, because of its rather limited permeability [1]. Compactation-driven fluid flow seems to be an intrinsic mechanism occurring at devolatilization of viscolastic rocks. Nevertheless, and despite the important implications of this coupled deformation/fluid-migration mechanism for fluid transport, a conclusive confirmation of these processes by petrological and textural evidences in metamorphic terrains has been hampered by the scarcity of devolatilization fronts in the geological record. Evidences of high-pressure antigorite dehydration found at Cerro del Almirez (Betic Cordillera, Spain) [2] represent a noteworthy exception. Here, the transition between the hydrous protolith (antigorite serpentinite) and the prograde product assemblage (olivine + orthopyroxene + chlorite, chlorite harzburgite) is extremely well preserved and can be surveyed in detail. The maximum stability of the antigorite has been experimentally determined at ~680°C at 1.6-1.9 GPa [3]. Antigorite dehydration is accompanied by release of high amounts of high-pressure water-rich fluids (~ 9 wt.% fluid). Distinctive layers (up to 1 m thick) of transitional lithologies occur in between atg-serpentinite and chl-harburgite all along the devolatilization front, consisting of (1) chlorite-antigorite olivine-serpentinite, which gradually changes to (2) chlorite-antigorite-olivine-orthopyroxene serpentinite. These transitional lithologies are more massive and darker in color than atg-serpentinite and largely consist of coarse sized grains of antigorite and chlorite (250-500 μm). Antigorite in these assemblages is characterized by microstructural disorder features, which are

  7. Advanced fluid modeling and PIC/MCC simulations of low-pressure ccrf discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M. M.; Kählert, H.; Sun, A.; Bonitz, M.; Loffhagen, D.

    2017-04-01

    Comparative studies of capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in helium and argon at pressures between 10 and 80 Pa are presented applying two different fluid modeling approaches as well as two independently developed particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) codes. The focus is on the analysis of the range of applicability of a recently proposed fluid model including an improved drift-diffusion approximation for the electron component as well as its comparison with fluid modeling results using the classical drift-diffusion approximation and benchmark results obtained by PIC/MCC simulations. Main features of this time- and space-dependent fluid model are given. It is found that the novel approach shows generally quite good agreement with the macroscopic properties derived by the kinetic simulations and is largely able to characterize qualitatively and quantitatively the discharge behavior even at conditions when the classical fluid modeling approach fails. Furthermore, the excellent agreement between the two PIC/MCC simulation codes using the velocity Verlet method for the integration of the equations of motion verifies their accuracy and applicability.

  8. Thermodynamic properties and vapor pressures of polar fluids from a four-parameter corresponding-states method

    SciTech Connect

    Wilding, W.V.; Johnson, J.K.; Rowley, R.L.

    1987-11-01

    A recently proposed extended Lee-Kesler corresponding-states method (ELK) for polar fluids which accurately predicts compressibility factors and departure functions is considered. Tables of polar deviation functions have been generated and values of the shape/size and polar parameters for 52 polar fluids have been calculated, allowing the method to be used for quick hand calculation in addition to the previous, more accurate, computer applications. Additionally, vapor pressures of 44 pure polar fluids were computed using the full version of the ELK and the equality of the Gibbs free energy criterion for phase equilibrium. An ELK vapor pressure correlation is proposed which is essentially numerically equivalent to, but computationally simpler than, the former method. Computed vapor pressures agree with experimental values as well or better than other vapor pressure equations designed exclusively for vapor pressure prediction of polar fluids.

  9. Self-contained hybrid electro-hydraulic actuators using magnetostrictive and electrostrictive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban

    Hybrid electro-hydraulic actuators using smart materials along with flow rectification have been widely reported in recent years. The basic operation of these actuators involves high frequency bidirectional operation of an active material that is converted into unidirectional fluid motion by a set of valves. While theoretically attractive, practical constraints limit the efficacy of the solid-fluid hybrid actuation approach. In particular, inertial loads, fluid viscosity and compressibility combine with loss mechanisms inherent in the active material to limit the effective bandwidth of the driving actuator and the total output power. A hybrid actuator was developed by using magnetostrictive TerFeNOL-D as the active driving element and hydraulic oil as the working fluid. Tests, both with and without an external load, were carried out to measure the unidirectional performance of the actuator at different pumping frequencies and operating conditions. The maximum no-load output velocity was 84 mm/s with a 51 mm long rod and 88 mm/s with a 102 mm long rod, both noted around 325 Hz pumping frequency, while the blocked force was close to 89 N. Dynamic tests were performed to analyze the axial vibration characteristics of the Terfenol-D rods and frequency responses of the magnetic circuits. A second prototype actuator employing the same actuation principle was then designed by using the electrostrictive material PMN-32%PT as the driving element. Tests were conducted to measure the actuator performance for varying electrical input conditions and fluid bias pressures. The peak output velocity obtained was 330 mm/s while the blocked force was 63 N. The maximum volume flow rate obtained with the PMN-based actuator was more than double that obtained from the Terfenol-D--based actuator. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of the coupled structural-hydraulic system is extremely complex and several models have been proposed earlier. At high pumping frequencies, the fluid inertia

  10. Effects of fluid pressures to the seismic velocity of crustal rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.; Katayama, I.

    2012-12-01

    Introduction Water of the earth interior is mainly supplied at the subduction zone and has important role on seismic activity and volcanism in island arc. It is suggested that slow slip events and tremors occurring at this region are related to water (e.g., Obara, 2000). Based on the seismic tomography beneath Kanto district, high Poisson's ratio area (~0.337) was observed and suggested weak seismic coupling at plate interface (Kamiya and Kobayashi, 2000). Similar high Poisson's ratio is detected beneath Tonankai and Shikoku district, exceeding 0.3. Those regions correspond to the plate boundary generating slow slip events or tremors (Kodaira et al., 2004 ; Shelly et al., 2006). Because relatively young oceanic plates are subducting in districts from Kanto to Sikoku, antigorite which Poisson's ratio is ~0.29 may exist stably in those areas. In this case, the observed high Poisson's ratio requires excess pore fluids in addition to the serpentinized mantle. In order to clarify geometry and the abundance of water, we investigate seismic velocity of crustal rocks under high confining pressure and pore fluid pressure. Experimental methods For the measurement of seismic velocity, we used the hydraulic pressure vessel in Hiroshima University, in which seismic velocity was calculated by using pulse echo method. We used the Aji granite as a test sample, which was prepared into a cylindrical shape with 20 mm diameter and 5-10 mm length. The top and bottom of sample were polished mirror surfaces within 0.001 mm difference. We measured seismic velocity under dry and wet conditions. In the later case, distilled water is supplied into the sample with pore pressure up to 100 MPa, and we also measured permeable time of water at Pc = 20 MPa, Pp = 0 MPa and Pc =40 MPa, Pp =20 MPa. Results and discussion Under dry experiments, seismic velocities of granite were measured up to confining pressure as high as 200 MPa. Calculated velocities were Vp = 5.900 km/s, Vs = 3.478 km/s at

  11. Active control of low-frequency sound radiation by cylindrical shell with piezoelectric stack force actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yin; Sun, Hongling; An, Fengyan; Li, Xiaodong

    2012-05-01

    A novel active control method of sound radiation from a cylindrical shell under axial excitations is proposed and theoretically analyzed. This control method is based on a pair of piezoelectric stack force actuators which are installed on the shell and parallel to the axial direction. The actuators are driven in phase and generate the same forces to control the vibration and the sound radiation of the cylindrical shell. The model considered is a fluid-loaded finite stiffened cylindrical shell with rigid end-caps and only low-frequency axial vibration modes are involved. Numerical simulations are performed to explore the required control forces and the optimal mounting positions of actuators under different cost functions. The results show that the proposed force actuators can reduce the radiated sound pressure of low-frequency axial modes in all directions.

  12. Fluid transients in pipes. Reduction and control of pressure surges in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-11-01

    ESDU 84013 provides a simplified graphical method for predicting maximum pressure changes in liquid filled pipework systems that may be treated as one-line systems. The method applies to pressures induced by partial or total valve closure, covering all common valve types, or pump trips. Data are also given for the estimation of the size of air vessel, situated just downstream of a pump, to protect against excessive upsurge and downsurge pressure changes following pump trip. A computer program is included to analyze transients in one-line systems and does not use the simplifying assumptions necessary for the graphical data. Practical worked examples, illustrating the use of the methods, are included and guidance is given on the data required for a full fluid transients analysis going beyond the scope of ESDU 84013.

  13. Blood viscosity monitoring during cardiopulmonary bypass based on pressure-flow characteristics of a Newtonian fluid.

    PubMed

    Okahara, Shigeyuki; Zu Soh; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro; Tsuji, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a blood viscosity estimation method based on pressure-flow characteristics of oxygenators used during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in a previous study that showed the estimated viscosity to correlate well with the measured viscosity. However, the determination of the parameters included in the method required the use of blood, thereby leading to high cost of calibration. Therefore, in this study we propose a new method to monitor blood viscosity, which approximates the pressure-flow characteristics of blood considered as a non-Newtonian fluid with characteristics of a Newtonian fluid by using the parameters derived from glycerin solution to enable ease of acquisition. Because parameters used in the estimation method are based on fluid types, bovine blood parameters were used to calculate estimated viscosity (ηe), and glycerin parameters were used to estimate deemed viscosity (ηdeem). Three samples of whole bovine blood with different hematocrit levels (21.8%, 31.0%, and 39.8%) were prepared and perfused into the oxygenator. As the temperature changed from 37 °C to 27 °C, the oxygenator mean inlet pressure and outlet pressure were recorded for flows of 2 L/min and 4 L/min, and the viscosity was estimated. The value of deemed viscosity calculated with the glycerin parameters was lower than estimated viscosity calculated with bovine blood parameters by 20-33% at 21.8% hematocrit, 12-27% at 31.0% hematocrit, and 10-15% at 39.8% hematocrit. Furthermore, deemed viscosity was lower than estimated viscosity by 10-30% at 2 L/min and 30-40% at 4 L/min. Nevertheless, estimated and deemed viscosities varied with a similar slope. Therefore, this shows that deemed viscosity achieved using glycerin parameters may be capable of successfully monitoring relative viscosity changes of blood in a perfusing oxygenator.

  14. Microseparation, fluid pressure and flow in failures of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewski, B. M.; Siney, P. D.; Fleming, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacing was introduced into clinical practice because it was perceived to be a better alternative to conventional total hip replacement for young and active patients. However, an increasing number of reports of complications have arisen focusing on design and orientation of the components, the generation of metallic wear particles and serum levels of metallic ions. The procedure introduced a combination of two elements: large-dimension components and hard abrasive particles of metal wear. The objective of our study was to investigate the theory that microseparation of the articular surfaces draws in a high volume of bursal fluid and its contents into the articulation, and at relocation under load would generate high pressures of fluid ejection, resulting in an abrasive water jet. Methods This theoretical concept using MoM resurfacing components (head diameter 55 mm) was modelled mathematically and confirmed experimentally using a material-testing machine that pushed the head into the cup at a rate of 1000 mm/min until fully engaged. Results The mathematical model showed the pattern but not the force of fluid ejection, the highest pressures were expected when the separation of the components was only a fraction of one millimetre. The experimental work confirmed the results; with the mean peak ejection pressure of 43 763 N/m2 equivalent to 306 mmHg or 5 psi. Conclusions The mechanical effect of the high-pressure abrasive water jet is the likely cause of the spectrum of complications reported with metal-on-metal resurfacing. Investigating serum levels of metallic elements may not be the best method for assessing the local mechanical effects of the abrasive water jet. PMID:23610667

  15. Investigation of the different base fluid effects on the nanofluids heat transfer and pressure drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Javad; Nikseresht, Amir Hossein

    2011-09-01

    A numerical study of laminar forced convective flows of three different nanofluids through a horizontal circular tube with a constant heat flux condition has been performed. The effect of Al2O3 volume concentration 0 ≤ φ ≤ 0.09 in the pure water, water-ethylene glycol mixture and pure ethylene glycol as base fluids, and Reynolds number of 100 ≤ Re ≤ 2,000 for different power inputs in the range of 10 ≤ Q( W) ≤ 400 have been investigated. In this study, all of the nanofluid properties are temperature and nanoparticle volume concentration dependent. The governing equations have been solved using finite volume approach with the SIMPLER algorithm. The results indicate an increase in the averaged heat transfer coefficient with increasing the mass of ethylene glycol in the water base fluid, solid concentration and Reynolds number. From the investigations it can be inferred that, the pressure drop and pumping power in the nanofluids at low solid volumetric concentration (φ < 3%) is approximately the same as in the pure base fluid in the various Reynolds numbers, but the higher solid nanoparticle volume concentration causes a penalty drop in the pressure. Moreover, this study shows it is possible to achieve a higher heat transfer rate with lower wall shear stress with the use of proper nanofluids.

  16. Melting-induced fluid flow during exhumation of gneisses of the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Keqing; Liu, Yongsheng; Hu, Zhaochu; Kusky, Timothy; Wang, Dongbin; Gao, Changgui; Gao, Shan; Wang, Jianqi

    2010-12-01

    Hydrothermally altered rocks are products of fluid-rock interactions, and typically preserve numerous quartz veins that formed as chemical precipitates from fluids that fill up cracks. Thus, quartz veins are the record of the fluid system that involved fracture flow in the direction of changing temperature or pressure. In order to decipher the fluid activity in the Sulu ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) terrane in eastern China, quartz veins together with an adjacent eclogite lens and the host gneiss were studied. In one location a deformed quartz vein is located at the boundary between the host gneiss and the eclogite lens. The amphibolite-facies overprinting of the eclogite lens decreases from the rim to the core of the lens, with fresh eclogite preserved in the core. The foliated biotite gneiss contains felsic veins and residual phengites. Zircon rims from the gneiss are characterized by melt-related signatures with steep HREE patterns, high Hf contents and negative Eu anomalies, and a pool of weighted average 206Pb/ 238U analyses reveal an age of 219 ± 3 Ma (2σ), which is younger than the UHP metamorphic age (236 ± 2 Ma, 2σ) recorded by zircons from the eclogite lens. This suggests that the gneiss in the Sulu UHP terrane could have suffered from partial melting due to phengite dehydration during the "hot" exhumation stage. The formation age of the quartz vein (219 ± 2 Ma, 2σ) defined by zircon rims agrees well with the partial melting time (219 ± 3 Ma, 2σ) of the host gneiss. The initial 176Hf/ 177Hf ratios of zircon rims from the quartz vein are obviously lower than zircons from the eclogite lens, but overlap with the coeval zircon domains from the nearby granite dikes produced by partial melting of orthogneiss. These observations suggest that the quartz vein and corresponding fluid flow could be associated with partial melting of the host gneiss. On the other hand, amphibole-bearing and HREE-rich zircon rims from the amphibolite pool an amphibolite

  17. Fluid and rock interactions in silicate and aluminosilicate systems at elevated pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mary Kathleen

    Understanding fluid chemistry in the subduction zone environment is key to unraveling the details of element transport from the slab to the surface. Solubilities of cations, such as silicon, in water strongly affect both the physical and chemical properties of supercritical metamorphic fluids. Modeling the thermodynamics of fluid-rock interactions requires therefore a profound understanding of cation dissolution and aqueous speciation. In situ Raman experiments of the silica-water, alumina-water, and alumina water systems were performed in an externally heated Bassett-type diamond-anvil cell at the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan. Natural quartz samples and synthetic ruby samples were used in the experiments. Samples were loaded in the sample chamber with a water pressure medium. All experiments used rhenium gaskets of uniform thickness with a 500 mum drill hole for the sample chamber. Temperature was measured using K-type thermocouples encompassing both the upper and lower diamond anvils. Pressures are obtained on the basis of the Raman shift of the 464 cm-1 quartz mode where possible or the Raman shift of the tips of the diamond anvils according to a method developed in this work. This work characterizes the state of stress in the diamond anvil cell, which is used as the basis for the pressure calibration using only the diamond anvils. Raman measurements of silicate fluid confirm the presence of H4 SiO4 and H6Si2O7 in solution and expand the pressure range for in-situ structural observations in the silica-water system. Additionally, we identify the presence of another silica species present at mantle conditions, which occurs at long time scales in the diamond cell. This study provides the first in situ data in the alumina-water and alumina-silica-water systems at pressures and temperatures relevant to the slab environment. Al(OH) 3 appears to be the dominant form of alumina present under these conditions and in the alumina

  18. Flow and Drag Formulas for Simple Quadrics. [pressure drag and flow equations for an ellipsoid in incompressible fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A. F.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure distribution and resistance found by theory and experiment for simple quadrics fixed in an infinite uniform stream of practically incompressible fluid are calculated. The experimental values pertain to air and some liquids, especially water; the theoretical refer sometimes to perfect, again to viscid fluids. Formulas for the velocity at all points of the flow field are given. Pressure and pressure drag are discussed for a sphere, a round cylinder, the elliptic cylinder, the prolate and oblate spheroid, and the circular disk. The velocity and pressure in an oblique flow are examined.

  19. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators with Novel Geometries for Flow Modification: Experimental Measurements and Validation with a 2-D Fluid Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-30

    Dielectric barrier discharge ( DBD ) U U U UU 16 Noah Hershkowitz 608-831-5862 SF-298 Abstract / Contract No. FA9550-10-1-0565 Optical characteristics of...surface dielectric barrier discharge ( DBD ) plasma actuators with wire/planar electrodes were studied using an intensified charge-coupled device camera and...grounded planar electrode were observed for the first time. Time resolved velocity measurements of the air flow fields induced by planar DBD actuators

  20. Interfacial jumps and pressure bursts during fluid displacement in interacting irregular capillaries.

    PubMed

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2012-07-01

    The macroscopically regular motion of fluid displacement fronts in porous media often results from numerous pore scale interfacial jumps and associated pressure fluctuations. Such rapid pore scale dynamics defy postulated slow viscous energy dissipation and may shape phase entrapment and subsequent macroscopic transport properties. Certain displacement characteristics are predictable from percolation theory; however, insights into rapid interfacial dynamics require mechanistic models for hydraulically interacting pores such as found along fluid displacement fronts. A model for hydraulically coupled sinusoidal capillaries was used to analyze stick-jump interfacial motions with a significant inertial component absent in Darcy-based description of fluid front displacement. High-speed camera provided measurements of rapid interfacial dynamics in sintered glass beads cell during drainage. Interfacial velocities exceeding 50 times mean front velocity were observed in good agreement with model predictions for a pair of sinusoidal capillaries. In addition to characteristic pinning-jumping behavior, interfacial dynamics were sensitive to initial positions within pores at the onset of a jump. Even for a pair of sinusoidal capillaries, minute variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions yield rich behavior of motions, highlighting challenges and potential new insights offered by consideration of pore scale mechanisms in macroscopic description of fluid displacement fronts in porous media.

  1. Nonlinear wave evolution in pressure-driven stratified flow of Newtonian and Herschel-Bulkley fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Prashant; Sahu, Kirti; Ding, Hang; Spelt, Peter; Matar, Omar; Lawrence, Chris

    2007-11-01

    Pressure-driven stratified channel flow of a Newtonian fluid flowing over a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) fluid is considered. The effects of yield stress and shear-thinning rheology on the nonlinear wave evolution are studied using numerical simulations; the HB rheology is regularized at low shear rates using a bi-viscosity formulation. Two different numerical methods were used to carry out the computations: a level-set method (based on that by Spelt, J. Comput. Phys. 2005) and a diffuse-interface method (based on that by Ding et al., J. Comput. Phys., in press). The simulations, which account for fluid inertia, surface tension and gravity are validated against linear theory predictions at early times. The results at later times show the spatio-temporal evolution into the nonlinear regime wherein waves are strongly deformed, leading to the onset of drop entrainment. It is shown that the apparent viscosity in the region of the HB fluid directly involved in the onset of entrainment is almost constant; unyielded regions are confined to wave troughs at late stages of the nonlinear evolution.

  2. Simulations of the origin of fluid pressure, fracture gen­ eration, and the movement of fluids in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bredehoeft, J.D.; Wesley, J.B.; Fouch, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Altamont oil field in the deep Uinta basin is known to have reservoir fluid pressures that approach lithostatic. One explanation for this high pore-fluid pressure is the generation of oil from kerogen in the Green River oil shale at depth. A three-dimensional simulation of flow in the basin was done to test this hypothesis.In the flow simulation, oil generation is included as a fluid source. The kinetics of oil generation from oil shale is a function of temperature. The temperature is controlled by (1) the depth of sediment burial and (2) the geothermal gradient.Using this conceptual model, the pressure buildup results from the trade-off between the rate of oil generation and the flow away from the source volume. The pressure increase depends primarily on (1) the rate of the oil-generation reaction and (2) the permeability of the reservoir rocks. A sensitivity analysis was performed in which both of these parameters were systematically varied. The reservoir permeability must be lower than most of the observed data for the pressure to build up to near lithostatic.The results of the simulations indicated that once oil generation was initiated, the pore pressure built up rapidly to near lithostatic. We simulated hydrofractures in that part of the system in which the pressures approach lithostatic by increasing both the horizontal and the vertical permeability by an order of magnitude. Because the simulated hydrofractures were produced by the high pore pressure, they were restricted to the Altamont field. A new flow system was established in the vicinity of the reservoir; the maximum pore pressure was limited by the least principal stress. Fluids moved vertically up and down and laterally outward away from the source of oil generation. The analysis indicated that, assuming that one is willing to accept the low values of permeability, oil generati n can account for the observed high pressures at Altamont field.

  3. Dynamic measurement of drilling fluid rheology at elevated temperature and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Moussa, M.M.; Al-Marhoun, M.A.

    1985-03-01

    Due to instability and degradation of the conventional drilling fluids specially under high shear rate, elevated temperatures and chemically complex environments of deep and geothermal wells, it is essential to modify and develop stable batches of clay suspensions that can perform adequately under these conditions. To obtain batches, a reliable set-up should be designed and constructed to examine and measure all the properties that may possibly change under the prevailing conditions. A scaled dynamic flow loop is designed and built in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at the University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran. This set-up can simulate efficiently the bottomhole condition e.g. high temperature up to 450/sup 0/F, high shear rate up to 50,000 sec/sup -1/. The system pressure is maintained above the saturation pressure of water at the test temperature. Dynamic filteration rate and the corrosion rate is monitored instantaneously at wide range of bottomhole conditions. The flow parameters NandK,/tau/, ..gamma.. etc., are obtained by measuring ..delta..P across the 3-tube viscometer using the DP 15-150 pressure differential transducers. The ambient properties are measured by Baroid multi-speed viscometer and compared with data obtained from the loop. Two batches composed of sepiolite and polymer were tested. Effective viscosity is increased significantly at high temperature for the first and second batches. The consistency and thermal stability of these fluids may be attributed to the transfer of sepiolite to smectite at high temperature and high shear.

  4. Sensing the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid utilizing acoustic pressure waves

    PubMed Central

    Antlinger, Hannes; Clara, Stefan; Beigelbeck, Roman; Cerimovic, Samir; Keplinger, Franz; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic sensors can be used to determine physical fluid parameters like viscosity, density, and speed of sound. In this contribution, we present the concept for an integrated sensor utilizing pressure waves to sense the characteristic acoustic impedance of a fluid. We note that the basic setup generally allows to determine the longitudinal viscosity and the speed of sound if it is operated in a resonant mode as will be discussed elsewhere. In this contribution, we particularly focus on a modified setup where interferences are suppressed by introducing a wedge reflector. This enables sensing of the liquid's characteristic acoustic impedance, which can serve as parameter in condition monitoring applications. We present a device model, experimental results and their evaluation. PMID:23565036

  5. Fluid pressure and fault strength: insights from load-controlled experiments on carbonate-bearing rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnuolo, E.; Violay, M.; Nielsen, S. B.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Fluid pressure Pf has been indicated as a major factor controlling natural (e.g., L'Aquila, Italy, 2009 Mw 6.3) and induced seismicity (e.g., Wilzetta, Oklahoma, 2011 Mw 5.7). The Terzaghi's principle states that the effective normal stress σeff= σn (1- α Pf ), with α the Biot coefficient and σn the normal stress, is reduced in proportion to Pf. A value of α=1 is often used by default; however, within a complex fault core of inhomogeneous permeability, α may vary in a yet poorly understood way. To shed light on this problem, we conducted experiments on carbonate-bearing rock samples (Carrara marble) in room humidity conditions and in the presence of pore fluids (drained conditions), where a pre-cut fault is loaded by shear stress τ in a rotary apparatus (SHIVA) under constant σn=15 MPa. Two types of tests were performed with fluids: (1) the fluid pressure was kept constant at Pf=5 MPa (close to hydrostatic conditions at a depth of 0.5 km) and the fault was driven to failure instability by gradually increasing τ; (2) the fluid pressure was kept at Pf=5 MPa and τ was increased until close to instability (τ = 7 MPa): at this point Pf was raised of 0.5 MPa every 10 s up to Pf =10 MPa to induce a main (failure) instability. Assuming α=1 and an effective peak strength (τp)eff=μp σeff at failure, the experiments reveal that: 1) (τp)eff is sensitive to the shear loading rate: fast loading rates (0.5 MPa every 20 s) induce higher peak shear-stress values than slow loading rates (0.5 MPa every 40 s). Such effect is not observed (minor or inexistent) in the absence of pore fluids. 2) Under fast loading rates the (τp)eff may surpass that measured in the absence of pore fluids under identical effective normal stress σeff. 3) An increase of Pf does not necessarily induce the main instability (within the time intervals studied here, i.e. up to ~10 s) even if the effective strength threshold is largely surpassed (e.g., (τp)eff=1.3 μp σeff). We interpret these

  6. Solving the Fluid Pressure Poisson Equation Using Multigrid - Evaluation and Improvements.

    PubMed

    Dick, Christian; Rogowsky, Marcus; Westermann, Ruediger

    2015-12-23

    In many numerical simulations of fluids governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, the pressure Poisson equation needs to be solved to enforce mass conservation. Multigrid solvers show excellent convergence in simple scenarios, yet they can converge slowly in domains where physically separated regions are combined at coarser scales. Moreover, existing multigrid solvers are tailored to specific discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation, and they cannot easily be adapted to other discretizations. In this paper we analyze the convergence properties of existing multigrid solvers for the pressure Poisson equation in different simulation domains, and we show how to further improve the multigrid convergence rate by using a graph-based extension to determine the coarse grid hierarchy. The proposed multigrid solver is generic in that it can be applied to different kinds of discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation, by using solely the specification of the simulation domain and pre-assembled computational stencils. We analyze the proposed solver in combination with finite difference and finite volume discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation. Our evaluations show that, despite the common assumption, multigrid schemes can exploit their potential even in the most complicated simulation scenarios, yet this behavior is obtained at the price of higher memory consumption.

  7. Solving the Fluid Pressure Poisson Equation Using Multigrid-Evaluation and Improvements.

    PubMed

    Dick, Christian; Rogowsky, Marcus; Westermann, Rudiger

    2016-11-01

    In many numerical simulations of fluids governed by the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, the pressure Poisson equation needs to be solved to enforce mass conservation. Multigrid solvers show excellent convergence in simple scenarios, yet they can converge slowly in domains where physically separated regions are combined at coarser scales. Moreover, existing multigrid solvers are tailored to specific discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation, and they cannot easily be adapted to other discretizations. In this paper we analyze the convergence properties of existing multigrid solvers for the pressure Poisson equation in different simulation domains, and we show how to further improve the multigrid convergence rate by using a graph-based extension to determine the coarse grid hierarchy. The proposed multigrid solver is generic in that it can be applied to different kinds of discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation, by using solely the specification of the simulation domain and pre-assembled computational stencils. We analyze the proposed solver in combination with finite difference and finite volume discretizations of the pressure Poisson equation. Our evaluations show that, despite the common assumption, multigrid schemes can exploit their potential even in the most complicated simulation scenarios, yet this behavior is obtained at the price of higher memory consumption.

  8. Total fluid pressure imbalance in the scrape-off layer of tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, R. M.; Canik, J. M.; Chang, C. S.; Hager, R.; Leonard, A. W.; Maingi, R.; Nazikian, R.; Stotler, D. P.

    2017-04-01

    Simulations using the fully kinetic neoclassical code XGCa (X-point included guiding- center axisymmetric) were undertaken to explore the impact of kinetic effects on scrape-off layer (SOL) physics in DIII-D H-mode plasmas. XGCa is a total-f, gyrokinetic code which self-consistently calculates the axisymmetric electrostatic potential and plasma dynamics, and includes modules for Monte Carlo neutral transport. Previously presented XGCa results showed several noteworthy features, including large variations of ion density and pressure along field lines in the SOL, experimentally relevant levels of SOL parallel ion flow (Mach number  ∼ 0.5), skewed ion distributions near the sheath entrance leading to subsonic flow there, and elevated sheath potentials (Churchill 2016 Nucl. Mater. Energy 1–6). In this paper, we explore in detail the question of pressure balance in the SOL, as it was observed in the simulation that there was a large deviation from a simple total pressure balance (the sum of ion and electron static pressure plus ion inertia). It will be shown that both the contributions from the ion viscosity (driven by ion temperature anisotropy) and neutral source terms can be substantial, and should be retained in the parallel momentum equation in the SOL, but still falls short of accounting for the observed fluid pressure imbalance in the XGCa simulation results.

  9. Flow Separation Control Over a Ramp Using Sweeping Jet Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti; Owens, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    Flow separation control on an adverse-pressure-gradient ramp model was investigated using various flow-control methods in the NASA Langley 15-Inch Wind Tunnel. The primary flow-control method studied used a sweeping jet actuator system to compare with more classic flow-control techniques such as micro-vortex generators, steady blowing, and steady- and unsteady-vortex generating jets. Surface pressure measurements and a new oilflow visualization technique were used to characterize the effects of these flow-control actuators. The sweeping jet actuators were run in three different modes to produce steady-straight, steady-angled, and unsteady-oscillating jets. It was observed that all of these flow-control methods are effective in controlling the separated flows on the ramp model. The steady-straight jet energizes the boundary layer by momentum addition and was found to be the least effective method for a fixed momentum coefficient. The steady-angled jets achieved better performance than the steady-straight jets because they generate streamwise vortices that energize the boundary layer by mixing high-momentum fluid with near wall low-momentum fluid. The unsteady-oscillating jets achieved the best performance by increasing the pressure recovery and reducing the downstream flow separation. Surface flow visualizations indicated that two out-of-phase counter-rotating vortices are generated per sweeping jet actuator, while one vortex is generated per vortex-generating jets. The extra vortex resulted in increased coverage, more pressure recovery, and reduced flow separation.

  10. A rocking multianvil: elimination of chemical segregation in fluid-saturated high-pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Max W.; Ulmer, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Fluid saturated high-pressure experiments often result in strongly zoned experimental charges, this hinders experimentation in chemically homogeneous systems which in turn has serious consequences on equilibration, reaction progress, and (apparent) phase stabilities. In order to overcome these problems, a 600-ton press accommodating either a multianvil or end-loaded piston cylinder module has been mounted in such a way that it can be turned by 180°, thus inverting its position in the gravity field. During turning, hydraulic pressure, heating power, and cooling water remain connected allowing fully controlled pressures and temperatures during experiments. A series of experiments at 13 GPa, 950°C, on a serpentine bulk composition in the MgO-SiO 2-H 2O system demonstrates that continuous turning at a rate of 2 turns/min results in a nearly homogeneous charge composed of phase E + enstatite. The same experiment at static conditions resulted in four mineral zones: quench phase E, enstatite, enstatite + phase E, and phase E + phase A. Phase A disappears in experiments at a turning rate ≥1 turn/min. A static 15-min experiment shows that zonation already forms within this short time span. Placing two short capsules within a single static experiment reveals that the fluid migrates to the hot spot in each capsule and is not gravitationally driven toward the top. The zonation pattern follows isotherms within the capsule, and the degree of zonation increases with temperature gradient (measured as 10 °C within a capsule) and run time. Our preferred interpretation is that Soret diffusion causes a density-stratified fluid within the capsule that does not convect in a static experiment and results in temperature dependant chemical zonation. The aggravation of zonation and appearance of additional phases with run time can be explained with a dissolution-reprecipitation process where the cold spot of the capsule is relatively MgO enriched and the hot spot relatively SiO 2 and H

  11. Intracranial cerebrospinal fluid measurement studies in suspected idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, secondary normal pressure hydrocephalus, and brain atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, A; Mitsuoka, H; Bandai, H; Endo, T; Arai, H; Sato, K

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) distribution in patients with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH). Methods: 24 patients with a clinical diagnosis of INPH were studied. Control groups comprised 17 patients with secondary normal pressure hydrocephalus (SNPH), 21 patients with brain atrophy, and 18 healthy volunteers. Ventricular volume (VV) and intracranial CSF volume (ICV) were measured using a magnetic resonance based method and the VV/ICV ratio was calculated. Results: The SNPH group showed a marked increase in the VV/ICV ratio compared with the healthy volunteers (37.8% v 15.6%, p < 0.0001). The brain atrophy group showed a significant increase in ICV compared with the healthy volunteers (284.4 ml v 194.7 ml, p =0.0002). The INPH group showed an increase in ICV (281.2 ml, p = 0.0002) and an increase in the VV/ICV ratio (38.0%, p < 0.0001). Fifteen of 24 INPH patients underwent shunting; 11 improved and four did not. Conclusions: The results suggest that INPH patients have brain atrophy in addition to hydrocephalic features. This may help to explain the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis and the unpredictable response rate to shunt surgery in INPH patients. PMID:12397150

  12. [Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Usefulness of intracranial pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Horcajadas Almansa, Angel; Román Cutillas, Ana; Jorques Infante, Ana; Ruiz Gómez, José; Busquier, Heriberto

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas are rather common in daily practice. The aim of the surgical treatment is closure of the leak, but recurrences are quite frequent. The association between spontaneous CSF fistulas and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is not uncommon, and this is probably the cause of the low rate of success of the surgical treatment. Symptoms of IIH associated with spontaneous CSF fistula are atypical, and diagnosis is often missed. Continuous intracranial pressure monitoring is very useful in the diagnosis of chronic IIH and in patients with spontaneous CSF fistula, as it helps in making decisions on the treatment of these patients.

  13. Internally supported flexible duct joint. [device for conducting fluids in high pressure systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, R. F., Jr. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    An internally supported, flexible duct joint for use in conducting fluids under relatively high pressures in systems where relatively large deflection angles must be accommodated is presented. The joint includes a flexible tubular bellows and an elongated base disposed within the bellows. The base is connected through radiating struts to the bellows near mid-portion and to each of the opposite end portions of the bellows through a pivotal connecting body. A motion-controlling linkage is provided for linking the connecting bodies, whereby angular displacement of the joint is controlled and uniformity in the instantaneous bend radius of the duct is achieved as deflection is imposed.

  14. Second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids: Relativistic effects of pressure, multicomponent, curvature, and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2007-11-15

    We present general relativistic correction terms appearing in Newton's gravity to the second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids. In our previous work we have shown that to the second-order perturbations, the density and velocity perturbation equations of general relativistic zero-pressure, irrotational, single-component fluid in a spatially flat background coincide exactly with the ones known in Newton's theory without using the gravitational potential. We also have shown the effect of gravitational waves to the second order, and pure general relativistic correction terms appearing in the third-order perturbations. Here, we present results of second-order perturbations relaxing all the assumptions made in our previous works. We derive the general relativistic correction terms arising due to (i) pressure, (ii) multicomponent, (iii) background spatial curvature, and (iv) rotation. In the case of multicomponent zero-pressure, irrotational fluids under the flat background, we effectively do not have relativistic correction terms, thus the relativistic equations expressed in terms of density and velocity perturbations again coincide with the Newtonian ones. In the other three cases we generally have pure general relativistic correction terms. In the case of pressure, the relativistic corrections appear even in the level of background and linear perturbation equations. In the presence of background spatial curvature, or rotation, pure relativistic correction terms directly appear in the Newtonian equations of motion of density and velocity perturbations to the second order; to the linear order, without using the gravitational potential (or metric perturbations), we have relativistic/Newtonian correspondences for density and velocity perturbations of a single-component fluid including the rotation even in the presence of background spatial curvature. In the small-scale limit (far inside the horizon), to the second-order, relativistic equations of density and

  15. Protein-based microhydraulic transport for controllable actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba; Leo, Donald J.

    2006-03-01

    Plants have the ability to develop large mechanical force from chemical energy available with bio-fuels. The energy released by the cleavage of a terminal phosphate ion during the hydrolysis of a bio- fuel assists the transport of ions and fluids in cellular homeostasis. Materials that develop pressure and hence strain similar to the response of plants to an external stimuli are classified as nastic materials. Calculations for controlled actuation of an active material inspired by biological transport mechanism demonstrated the feasibility of developing such a material with actuation energy densities on the order of 100 kJ/m 3. The mathematical model for a simplified proof of concept actuator referred to as micro hydraulic actuator uses ion transporters extracted from plants reconstituted on a synthetic bilayer lipid membrane (BLM). Thermodynamic model of the concept actuator predicted the ability to develop 5 percent normalized deformation in thickness of the micro- hydraulic actuator. Controlled fluid transport through AtSUT4 (Proton-sucrose co-transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana) reconstituted on a 1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[Phospho-L- Serine] (Sodium Salt) (POPS), 1-Palmitoyl-2-Oleoyl-sn-Glycero-3- Phosphoethanolamine (POPE) BLM on a porous lead silicate glass plate (50μm with 61μm pitch) was driven by proton gradient. Bulk fluid flux of 1.2 μl/min was observed for each microliter of AtSUT4 transporter suspension (16.6 mg/ml in pH7.0 medium) reconstituted on the BLM. The flux rate is observed to be dependent on the concentration of sucrose present in pH4 buffer. Flux rate of 10 μl/min is observed for 5 mM sucrose in the first 10 minutes. The observed flux scales linearly with BLM area and the amount of proteins reconstituted on the lipid membrane. This article details the next step in the development of the micro hydraulic actuator - fluid transport driven by exergonic Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis reaction in the presence of ATP

  16. Evaluation of implantable actuators by means of a middle ear simulation model.

    PubMed

    Bornitz, Matthias; Hardtke, Hans-Jürgen; Zahnert, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The extension of indication of implantable hearing aids to cases of conductive hearing loss pushed the development of these devices. There is now a great variety of devices available with different actuator concepts and different attachment points to the middle ear or inner ear fluid. But there is little comparative data available about the devices to provide an insight into advantages and disadvantages of different types of actuators and attachment points at the ossicular chain. This paper investigates two principle (idealized) types of actuators in respect of attachments points at the ossicular chain and direction of excitation. Other parts of implantable hearing aids like microphone, amplifier and signal processing electronics were not incorporated into this study. Investigations were performed by means of a mathematical simulation model of the middle ear (finite element model). Actuator performance and theoretical gain were calculated by harmonic analysis in the frequency range of 100-6000 Hz and were compared for the different situations. The stapes head proofed to be an ideal attachment point for actuators of both types as this position is very insensitive to changes in the direction of excitation. The implantable actuators showed higher ratio of equivalent sound pressure to radiated sound pressure compared to an open hearing aid transducer and should therefore allow for more functional gain.

  17. Experimental verification and theoretical prediction of cartilage interstitial fluid pressurization at an impermeable contact interface in confined compression.

    PubMed

    Soltz, M A; Ateshian, G A

    1998-10-01

    Interstitial fluid pressurization has long been hypothesized to play a fundamental role in the load support mechanism and frictional response of articular cartilage. However, to date, few experimental studies have been performed to verify this hypothesis from direct measurements. The first objective of this study was to investigate experimentally the hypothesis that cartilage interstitial fluid pressurization does support the great majority of the applied load, in the testing configurations of confined compression creep and stress relaxation. The second objective was to investigate the hypothesis that the experimentally observed interstitial fluid pressurization could also be predicted using the linear biphasic theory of Mow et al. (J. Biomech. Engng ASME, 102, 73-84, 1980). Fourteen bovine cartilage samples were tested in a confined compression chamber fitted with a microchip piezoresistive transducer to measure interstitial fluid pressure, while simultaneously measuring (during stress relaxation) or prescribing (during creep) the total stress. It was found that interstitial fluid pressure supported more than 90% of the total stress for durations as long as 725 +/- 248 s during stress relaxation (mean +/- S.D., n = 7), and 404 +/- 229 s during creep (n = 7). When comparing experimental measurements of the time-varying interstitial fluid pressure against predictions from the linear biphasic theory, nonlinear coefficients of determination r2 = 0.871 +/- 0.086 (stress relaxation) and r2 = 0.941 +/- 0.061 (creep) were found. The results of this study provide some of the most direct evidence to date that interstitial fluid pressurization plays a fundamental role in cartilage mechanics; they also indicate that the mechanism of fluid load support in cartilage can be properly predicted from theory.

  18. Implantable device for in-vivo intracranial and cerebrospinal fluid pressure monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, Milton N.; McKnight, Timothy E.; Smith, Stephen F.; Hylton, James O.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention relates to a completely implantable intracranial pressure monitor, which can couple to existing fluid shunting systems as well as other internal monitoring probes. The implant sensor produces an analog data signal which is then converted electronically to a digital pulse by generation of a spreading code signal and then transmitted to a location outside the patient by a radio-frequency transmitter to an external receiver. The implanted device can receive power from an internal source as well as an inductive external source. Remote control of the implant is also provided by a control receiver which passes commands from an external source to the implant system logic. Alarm parameters can be programmed into the device which are capable of producing an audible or visual alarm signal. The utility of the monitor can be greatly expanded by using multiple pressure sensors simultaneously or by combining sensors of various physiological types.

  19. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Carbonate Fluids at High Pressures: A New Technique to Study Fluid Species Under Geologically Relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopelas, A.; Black, J. R.; Kavner, A.; Manning, C. E.

    2010-12-01

    The physical and chemical behavior of fluid/mineral interfaces at high pressures and temperatures help govern the generation of magmas, the evolution of the continental crust, and the storage and cycling of volatiles such as water and carbon in and through the Earth’s crust and mantle reservoirs. Little is known of the speciation of silica- and oxidized carbon- bearing fluids at relevant conditions of pressure, temperature and concentration. Currently, our high pressure P/high temperature T Raman spectroscopy studies in the hydrothermal DAC have yielded promising insights into P,T dependence of carbon/bicarbonate speciation. However, due to the low intensity of Raman scattering, results can only be obtained on fluids with carbon species concentrations that are unreasonably high compared with actual geological fluids. To help examine the chemistry of geological fluids at relevant concentrations and P-T conditions, we are developing a technique known as Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) in the hydrothermal diamond anvil cell. SERS is a resonant Raman phenomenon yielding potentially large enhancements in spectroscopic signal for Raman-active species adsorbed on nano-structured metals. Currently, this technique is widely used in the chemistry community, and has been mostly been devoted to studying organic materials, including proteins, aromatics, etc, and fluid-nanoparticle interactions. Enhancements in Raman signal of a few orders of magnitude are typical. Here, we show our SERS results on dilute carbonate/bicarbonate solutions at ambient conditions, and at high pressures in the diamond anvil cell. We obtained ambient pressure SERS signal for a dilute 0.02 M bicarbonate/carbonate fluid, using Au, Ag, and Cu as nanoparticle substrates. In the diamond cell, we obtained SERS spectra on a ~0.1 M bicarbonate solution at pressures ranging from 1 GPa to 3 GPa. The SERS spectra revealed the same sequence carbonate/bicarbonate transformations we observed at higher

  20. Radial-directed fluid-pressure-loaded all-metal-sealed gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    A large diameter gate valve uses a radially directed fluid pressure loaded all metal seal formed by engaging and disengaging a fixed and a moveable seal element. The fixed element is formed of a circular flange which contains a pressure chamber with a deformable wall, and is mounted to the valve body. The moving seal element contains an annular recess which mates with the circular flange, and is carried on a moveable sub-frame which moves on a frame fixed in the valve body. The valve opening defines an axis in a first direction, and the sub-frame moves through the valve body in a second direction which is substantially perpendicular to the first direction. The sub-frame and moveable seal element move in the second direction until the moveable element reaches a stop mounted in the valve body at which position the moveable element is aligned with but spaced apart from the fixed element. As the sub-frame continues to move in the second direction, the moveable element is forced to move toward and engage the fixed element. The pressure chamber in the flange is then pressurized to complete the seal.

  1. Effect of endoscopic third ventriculostomy on cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the cerebral ventricles.

    PubMed

    Farnoush, Azadeh; Tan, Kristy; Juge, Lauriane; Bilston, Lynne E; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to show how endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) treatment may affect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics in hydrocephalus, with and without aqueductal stenosis. Hydrocephalus is a neurological disorder which is characterized by enlarged brain ventricles. The periodic motion of CSF flow as a function of the cardiac cycle was prescribed as the inlet boundary condition at the foramen of Monro, and ETV was modeled as a 5mm diameter hole in the anterior wall of the third ventricle. The results show that ETV reduces the pressure in the ventricles by nine-fold in the model with aqueductal stenosis, and three-fold in the model without aqueductal stenosis. More importantly, ETV changes the temporal characteristics of the CSF pressure waveform in the model without aqueductal stenosis, such that there is higher pressure in the ventricle during diastole. This study suggests that changes in the temporal characteristics of the CSF pressure waveform in the ventricles may be the reason why ETV treatment is not effective for hydrocephalus without aqueductal stenosis.

  2. Subpeak regional analysis of intracranial pressure waveform morphology based on cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics in the cerebral aqueduct and prepontine cistern.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Robert B; Baldwin, Kevin; Vespa, Paul; Bergsneider, Marvin; Hu, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) pulse waveform morphology and selected hydrodynamic metrics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement using a novel method for ICP pulse pressure regional analysis based on the Morphological Clustering and Analysis of Continuous Intracranial Pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm.

  3. Reconstruction of fluid (over-)pressure evolution from sub-seismic fractures in folds and foreland basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Lacombe, Olivier; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    Deciphering the evolution of pressure, temperature and chemistry of fluids during fold history is a challenging problem. While temperature and chemistry of paleo-fluids can be determined using vein mineralizations in fault zones and/or in diffuse sub-seismic fracture sets, few methods exist to constrain the evolution through time of fluid pressure, especially when no hydrocarbons are encountered. This contribution aims at presenting and discussing a new approach to reconstruct the evolution of fluid pressure based on paleostress analyses. The combination of stress inversion of fault slip data and calcite twin data with rock mechanics data allows determining both the orientations and the magnitudes of principal stresses during basin evolution. Assuming no burial change through time, the comparison of the computed magnitudes of the effective vertical stress with its theoretical value (calculated with respect to the paleo-overburden and hydrostatic fluid pressure) may be used to quantitatively estimate fluid overpressure in limestones at different steps of the tectonic history. Alternatively, if hydrostatic fluid pressure is assumed to prevail in the system from step to step, results likely reflect overburden variations. The application focuses on the diffuse fracture populations observed in limestones of the famous Mississippian-Permian Madison and Phosphoria formations in Laramide basement-cored folds of the Rocky Mountains: the Sheep Mountain and the Rattlesnake Mountain anticlines (Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA). The location of these basement-folds on each edge of the Bighorn Basin ensures that depositional and erosional events can be neglected before folding, and thus grants the opportunity to constrain and to discuss the level of fluid overpressure during both the Sevier (thin-skinned) and Laramide (thick-skinned) related Layer-Parallel Shortening (LPS) phases at both fold scale and basin scale. Results highlight an initial fluid overpressure in limestones buried

  4. Experimental Studies of Dynamic Fault Weakening Due to Thermal Pressurization of Pore Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsby, David; Tullis, Terry; Platt, John; Okazaki, Keishi

    2016-04-01

    High-velocity friction experiments and geophysical observations suggest that mature faults weaken dramatically during seismic slip. However, while many coseismic weakening mechanisms have been proposed, it is still unclear which mechanisms are most important or how the efficiency of weakening varies within the seismogenic zone. Thermal pressurization is one possible coseismic weakening mechanism driven by the thermal expansion of native pore fluids, which leads to elevated pore pressures and significant coseismic weakening. While thermal pressurization has been studied theoretically for many decades, and invoked in recent earthquake simulations, its activation in laboratory experiments has remained elusive. Several high-speed friction studies have yielded indirect evidence for thermal pressurization, yet none has directly linked with existing theoretical models or the relevant physical parameters, such as permeability, slip, and slip rate, that control the weakening rate. To fill this gap, we are conducting thermal pressurization experiments on fluid-saturated, low-permeability rocks (Frederick diabase) at slip rates up to ~5 mm/s, at constant confining pressures in the range 21-149 MPa and initial imposed pore pressures in the range 10-25 MPa. The impractically low permeability of the as-is diabase, ~10-23 m2, is increased prior to the test by thermal cracking, yielding measured permeabilities in the range 1.3*10-18 to 6.1*10-19 m2. These values of permeability are high enough to allow sample saturation over one to several days, but low enough to confine the elevated pore pressures generated by frictional heating during rapid sliding. Our experiments reveal a rapid decay of shear stress following a step-change in velocity from 10 μm/s to 4.8 mm/s. In one test, the decrease in shear stress of ~25% over the first 28 mm of slip at 4.8 mm/s agrees closely with the theoretical solution for slip on a plane (Rice [2006]), with an inferred slip-weakening distance of ~500

  5. A Validated All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model and Lewis Number Effects for a Binary Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    1999-01-01

    The differences between subcritical liquid drop and supercritical fluid drop behavior are discussed. Under subcritical, evaporative high emission rate conditions, a film layer is present in the inner part of the drop surface which contributes to the unique determination of the boundary conditions; it is this film layer which contributes to the solution's convective-diffusive character. In contrast, under supercritical condition as the boundary conditions contain a degree of arbitrariness due to the absence of a surface, and the solution has then a purely diffusive character. Results from simulations of a free fluid drop under no-gravity conditions are compared to microgravity experimental data from suspended, large drop experiments at high, low and intermediary temperatures and in a range of pressures encompassing the sub-and supercritical regime. Despite the difference between the conditions of the simulations and experiments (suspension vs. free floating), the time rate of variation of the drop diameter square is remarkably well predicted in the linear curve regime. The drop diameter is determined in the simulations from the location of the maximum density gradient, and agrees well with the data. It is also shown that the classical calculation of the Lewis number gives qualitatively erroneous results at supercritical conditions, but that an effective Lewis number previously defined gives qualitatively correct estimates of the length scales for heat and mass transfer at all pressures.

  6. Practical development of continuous supercritical fluid process using high pressure and high temperature micromixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Shin-Ichiro; Sue, Kiwamu; Ookawara, Ryuto; Wakashima, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Akira

    2015-12-01

    In the synthesis of metal oxide fine particles by continuous supercritical hydrothermal method, the particle characteristics are greatly affected by not only the reaction conditions (temperature, pressure, residence time, concentration, etc.), but also the heating rate from ambient to reaction temperature. Therefore, the heating method by direct mixing of starting solution at room temperature with supercritical water is a key technology for the particle production having smaller size and narrow distribution. In this paper, mixing engineering study through comparison between conventional T-shaped mixers and recently developed swirl mixers was carried out in the hydrothermal synthesis of NiO nanoparticles from Ni(NO3)2 aqueous solution at 400 °C and 30 MPa. Inner diameter in the mixers and total flow rates were varied. Furthermore, the heating rate was calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Relationship between the heating rate and the average particle size were discussed. It was clarified that the miniaturization of mixer inner diameter and the use of the swirl flow were effective for improving mixing performance and contributed to produce small and narrow distribution particle under same experimental condition of flow rate, temperature, pressure, residence time, and concentration of the starting materials. We have focused the mixer optimization due to a difference in fluid viscosity.

  7. Two-fluid and gyroviscosity effects on pressure-driven instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Fatima; Schnack, D. D.; Chapman, B. E.; Caspary, K.

    2010-11-01

    Pressure-driven instabilities in reversed field pinch associated with unfavorable magnetic curvature, which becomes important at high beta, could limit confinement. Recently, a record high plasma beta of 26% for the improved confinement MST has been achieved with no severe side effects. Here we examine in toroidal geometry the behavior of resistive interchange instability using the extended MHD code NIMROD. Equilibrium profiles from MSTFit are fitted and imported into the Grad-Shafranov solver NIMEQ. Two-fluid and MHD stability analysis of the high beta MST plasma is then performed using NIMROD at a Lundquist number of S=10^6. We perform computations for two sets of high beta MST equilibria. In the first equilibrium, the Mercier criterion parameter exceeds the ideal stability limit and in the second equilibrium the plasma is ideally stable. We find that when the ideal stability limit is violated, finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects (in the form of ion gyroviscosity and the Hall term in generalized Ohm's law) suppress the growth rate of localized resistive interchange modes, however they are not completely stabilized. Nonlinear two-fluid single helicity computations for pressure-driven modes are also presented. It will be shown that mean flows which are mainly concentrated in the outer half of the plasma volume due to the m=0 mode perturbation, are generated.

  8. Hyperbaric reservoir fluids: High-pressure phase behavior of asymmetric methane + n-alkane systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flöten, E.; de Loos, Th. W.; de Swaan Arons, J.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, experimental three-phase equilibrium (solid n-alkane + liquid + vapor) data for binary methane + n-alkane systems are presented. For the binary system methane + tetracosane, the three-phase curve was determined based on two phase equilibrium measurements in a composition range from x c24 = 0.0027 to x c24 = 1.0. The second critical endpoint of this system was found at p = (1114.7 ± 0.5) M Pa. T = (322.6 ± 0.25) K, and a mole fraction of tetracosane in the critical fluidphase of x c24 = 0.0415 ± 0.0015. The second critical endpoint occurs where solid tetracosane is in equilibrium with a critical fluid phase ( S c24 + L = V). For the binary systems of methane with the n-alkanes tetradecane, triacontane, tetracontane, and pentacontane, only the coordinates of the second critical endpoints were measured. The second critical endpoint temperature is found close to the atmospheric melting point temperature of the n-alkane. The pressures at the second critical endpoints do not exceed 200 MPa. Based on these experimental data and data from the literature, correlations for the pressure. temperature, and fluid phase composition at the second critical endpoint of binary methane + n-alkane systems with n-alkanes between octane and pentacontane were developed.

  9. Impact of Initial Central Venous Pressure on Outcomes of Conservative versus Liberal Fluid Management in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Semler, Matthew W.; Wheeler, Arthur P.; Thompson, B. Taylor; Bernard, Gordon R.; Wiedemann, Herbert P.; Rice, Todd W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), conservative fluid management increases ventilator-free days without affecting mortality. Response to fluid management may differ based on patients’ initial central venous pressure (CVP). We hypothesized initial CVP would modify the effect of fluid management on outcomes. Design Retrospective analysis of the Fluid and Catheter Treatment Trial, a multicenter randomized trial comparing conservative to liberal fluid management in ARDS. We examined the relationship between initial CVP, fluid strategy, and 60-day mortality in univariate and multivariable analysis. Setting Twenty acute care hospitals. Patients Nine hundred and thirty-four ventilated ARDS patients with a CVP available at enrollment, 609 without baseline shock (for whom fluid balance was managed by study protocol). Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Among patients without baseline shock, those with initial CVP > 8 mmHg experienced similar mortality with conservative and liberal fluid management (18% versus 18%, p=0.928), whereas those with CVP ≤8 mmHg experienced lower mortality with a conservative strategy (17% versus 36%, p=0.005). Multivariable analysis demonstrated an interaction between initial CVP and the effect of fluid strategy on mortality (p=0.031). At higher initial CVPs, the difference in treatment between arms was predominantly furosemide administration, which was not associated with mortality (p=0.122). At lower initial CVPs, the difference between arms was predominantly fluid administration, with additional fluid associated with increased mortality (p=0.013). Conclusions Conservative fluid management decreases mortality for ARDS patients with a low initial central venous pressure. In this population, the administration of intravenous fluids appears to increase mortality. PMID:26741580

  10. Hydraulic actuator for an electric circuit breaker

    DOEpatents

    Imam, Imdad [Colonie, NY

    1983-01-01

    This actuator comprises a fluid motor having a piston, a breaker-opening space at one side of the piston, and a breaker-closing space at its opposite side. An accumulator freely communicates with the breaker-opening space for supplying pressurized fluid thereto during a circuit breaker opening operation. The breaker-opening space and the breaker-closing space are connected by an impeded flow passage. A pilot valve opens to allow the pressurized liquid in the breaker-closing space to flow to a back chamber of a normally closed main valve to cause the main valve to be opened during a circuit breaker opening operation to release the pressurized liquid from the breaker-closing space. An impeded passage affords communication between the back chamber and a sump located on the opposite side of the main valve from the back chamber. The pilot valve and impeded passage allow rapid opening of the main valve with pressurized liquid from the breaker closing side of the piston.

  11. Hydraulic actuator for an electric circuit breaker

    DOEpatents

    Imam, I.

    1983-05-17

    This actuator comprises a fluid motor having a piston, a breaker-opening space at one side of the piston, and a breaker-closing space at its opposite side. An accumulator freely communicates with the breaker-opening space for supplying pressurized fluid thereto during a circuit breaker opening operation. The breaker-opening space and the breaker-closing space are connected by an impeded flow passage. A pilot valve opens to allow the pressurized liquid in the breaker-closing space to flow to a back chamber of a normally closed main valve to cause the main valve to be opened during a circuit breaker opening operation to release the pressurized liquid from the breaker-closing space. An impeded passage affords communication between the back chamber and a sump located on the opposite side of the main valve from the back chamber. The pilot valve and impeded passage allow rapid opening of the main valve with pressurized liquid from the breaker closing side of the piston. 3 figs.

  12. Strength of Calcite-Bearing Faults in Fluid Pressure-Controlled Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnuolo, E.; Di Toro, G.; Violay, M.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid pressure Pf is a major factor controlling natural and induced seismicity. According to the Terzaghi's principle, the effective normal stress σeff = σn (1-α Pf) decreases with increasing Pf, with σn the normal stress and α the Biot coefficient. At α is usually attributed a value of 1, though it may vary with fluid composition and permeability of the fault zone. Here we conducted 10 experiments on pre-cut (experimental fault) hollow-cylinders (50/30 mm ext/int diameter) of Carrara marble (99.9% calcite) installed in the rotary shear apparatus SHIVA. The hollow-cylinders were inserted in a fluid vessel filled with water (drained conditions) and subjected to σn of 15 MPa. After this, the Pf was raised to 5 MPa and the shear stress τ to 6.5 MPa, corresponding to an effective friction coefficient μeff = τ / σeff = 0.65 or close to the instability of the experimental fault; then Pf in the vessel was increased stepwise of ΔPf = 0.5 MPa every 10 to 40 s to induce fault instability. The main instability was preceded by short-living slip bursts. Assuming α = 1, the increase in Pf induced the main instability for μeff = 1.3 in the case of stepwise intervals of duration ~10 s and for μeff = 0.7 in stepwise intervals of ~40 s: the time threshold td that resulted in the two different μeff (0.7 and 1.3) was ~30 s. We interpret our experimental observations as due to the permeability decrease of the fault slipping zone which resulted in a smaller α. Wear and comminution during the slip bursts that preceded the main instability produced a low-permeability ultrafine calcite gouge layer in the experimental fault. The gouge layer isolated the fluid in the slipping zone from the fluid in the vessel. As a consequence, the ΔPf increase imposed on the fluid in the vessel was delayed inside the experimental fault. For each ΔPf increase, the Pf in the slipping zone could re-equilibrate with the Pf in the vessel provided that the duration of the stepwise increase was

  13. Estimating maximum sustainable injection pressure duringgeological sequestration of CO2 using coupled fluid flow andgeomechanical fault-slip analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.; Cappa, F.; Tsang, C.-F.

    2006-10-17

    This paper demonstrates the use of coupled fluid flow andgeomechanical fault slip (fault reactivation) analysis to estimate themaximum sustainable injection pressure during geological sequestration ofCO2. Two numerical modeling approaches for analyzing faultslip areapplied, one using continuum stress-strain analysis and the other usingdiscrete fault analysis. The results of these two approaches to numericalfault-slip analyses are compared to the results of a more conventionalanalytical fault-slip analysis that assumes simplified reservoirgeometry. It is shown that the simplified analytical fault-slip analysismay lead to either overestimation or underestimation of the maximumsustainable injection pressure because it cannot resolve importantgeometrical factors associated with the injection induced spatialevolution of fluid pressure and stress. We conclude that a fully couplednumerical analysis can more accurately account for the spatial evolutionof both insitu stresses and fluid pressure, and therefore results in amore accurate estimation of the maximum sustainable CO2 injectionpressure.

  14. Vehicle having hydraulic and power steering systems using a single high pressure pump

    DOEpatents

    Bartley, Bradley E.; Blass, James R.; Gibson, Dennis H.

    2001-06-22

    A vehicle comprises a plurality of wheels attached to a vehicle housing. Also attached to the vehicle housing is a power steering system, including a fluid flow circuit, which is operably coupled to a number of the wheels. An internal combustion engine attached to the vehicle housing is connected to a hydraulically actuated system that includes a high pressure pump. An outlet of the high pressure pump is in fluid communication with the fluid flow circuit.

  15. Short periods of oscillating fluid pressure directed at a titanium-bone interface in rabbits lead to bone lysis.

    PubMed

    van der Vis, H; Aspenberg, P; de Kleine, R; Tigchelaar, W; van Noorden, C J

    1998-02-01

    Fluctuating high fluid pressures have been reported in pseudojoints after total hip arthroplasty, and may be present throughout the effective joint space. When the pressure extends locally to the bone implant interface, we hypothesized that it might have led to bone resorption. We developed an experimental implant model to study whether oscillating fluid pressure, applied during 2 hours a day, can lead to osteolysis at the bone implant interface. 12 mature rabbits received a titanium implant, which was allowed to osseointegrate. Thereafter, fluid pressure was applied to a specific area of the titanium bone interface at the periosteal side of the cortex in 6 of the rabbits. The pressure, applied during 2 hours a day for 14 days, oscillated between 70 and 150 mm Hg, with a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Bone resorption was not found in any of the control animals, but it occurred under 4 implants exposed to fluid pressure (p = 0.03; Fisher's exact test). Localized osteolytic lesions had developed, with evidence of osteocyte death in the surrounding cortical bone. In 1 of the 2 specimens without osteolysis, there was evidence of fluid leakage into the soft tissues. In 4 specimens (3 with and 1 without osteolysis), bone formation was observed at the endosteal side opposite to the pressure zone. This did not occur in the controls. No signs of infection were observed. Our findings indicate that oscillating fluid pressure, even when present only during short periods, can lead to osteolysis and may be a cause of prosthetic loosening. Endosteal bone apposition may be a result of the interstitial flow that was created, giving false signals of mechanical load to the osteocytes.

  16. Polypyrrole actuators for tremor suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaarup, Steen; Mogensen, Naja; Bay, Lasse; West, Keld

    2003-07-01

    Neurological tremor affecting limbs can be divided into at least 6 different types with frequencies ranging from 2 to about 20 Hz. In order to alleviate the symptoms by suppressing the tremor, sensing and actuation systems able to perform at these frequencies are needed. Electroactive polymers exemplify "soft actuator" technology that may be especially suitable for use in conjunction with human limbs. The electrochemical and mechanical properties of polypyrrole dodecyl benzene sulphonate actuator films have been studied with this application in mind. The results show that the time constants for the change of length and for the stiffness change are significantly different; the stiffness change being about 10 times faster. Both force measurements and Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance measurements indicate that the actuation process is complex and involves at least two different processes. The EQCM results make it possible to formulate a hypothesis for the two different time constants: Sodium ions enter the polymer correlated with a fast mass change that probably involves a few (~4) strongly bound water molecules as well. On further reduction, about 10 additional water molecules enter the polymer in a slower process driven by osmotic pressure. Earlier work has tended to focus on achieving the maximum length change, therefore taking the time needed to include all processes. However, since the slower process described above is associated with the lowest strength of the actuator, concentrating on the faster stiffness change results in only a small reduction in the work done by the actuator. This may make actuation at higher frequencies feasible.

  17. Effect of Nasal Obstruction on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wakayama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Tanuma, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nasal obstruction is a common problem in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and limits treatment compliance. The purpose of this study is to model the effects of nasal obstruction on airflow parameters under CPAP using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to clarify quantitatively the relation between airflow velocity and pressure loss coefficient in subjects with and without nasal obstruction. Methods We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 16 Japanese adult subjects, of whom 9 had nasal obstruction and 7 did not (control group). Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx with a CPAP mask fitted to the nostrils were created from each subject’s CT scans. The digital models were meshed with tetrahedral cells and stereolithography formats were created. CPAP airflow simulations were conducted using CFD software. Airflow streamlines and velocity contours in the nasal cavities and nasopharynx were compared between groups. Simulation models were confirmed to agree with actual measurements of nasal flow rate and with pressure and flow rate in the CPAP machine. Results Under 10 cmH2O CPAP, average maximum airflow velocity during inspiration was 17.6 ± 5.6 m/s in the nasal obstruction group but only 11.8 ± 1.4 m/s in the control group. The average pressure drop in the nasopharynx relative to inlet static pressure was 2.44 ± 1.41 cmH2O in the nasal obstruction group but only 1.17 ± 0.29 cmH2O in the control group. The nasal obstruction and control groups were clearly separated by a velocity threshold of 13.5 m/s, and pressure loss coefficient threshold of approximately 10.0. In contrast, there was no significant difference in expiratory pressure in the nasopharynx between the groups. Conclusion This is the first CFD analysis of the effect of nasal obstruction on CPAP treatment. A strong correlation between the inspiratory pressure loss coefficient and maximum airflow

  18. Development of Design Tools for Flow-Control Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathew, Jose; Gallas, Quentin; Cattafesta, Louis N., III

    2003-01-01

    This report discusses the: 1. Development coupled electro/fluid/structural lumped-element model (LEM) of a prototypical flow-control actuator. 2. Validation the coupled electro/fluid/structural dynamics lumped-element models. 3. Development simple, yet effective, design tools for actuators. 4. Development structural dynamic models that accurately characterize the dynamic response of piezoelectric flap actuators using the Finite Element Method (FEW as well as analytical methods. 5. Perform a parametric study of a piezo-composite flap actuator. 6.Develop an optimization scheme for maximizing the actuator performance.

  19. Magnetostrictive Pressure Regulating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor); Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A magnetostrictive pressure regulating system includes a magnetostrictive valve that incorporates a magnetostrictive actuator with at least one current-carrying coil disposed thereabout. A pressure force sensor, in fluid communication with the fluid exiting the valve, includes (i) a magnetostrictive material, (ii) a magnetic field generator in proximity to the magnetostrictive material for inducing a magnetic field in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material wherein lines of magnetic flux passing through the magnetostrictive material are defined, and (iii) a sensor positioned adjacent to the magnetostrictive material and in the magnetic field for measuring changes in at least one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux. The pressure of the fluid exiting the valve causes the applied force. A controller coupled to the sensor and to the current-carrying coil adjusts a current supplied to the current-carrying coil based on the changes so-measured.

  20. PFLOW: A 3-D Numerical Modeling Tool for Calculating Fluid-Pressure Diffusion from Coulomb Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, L. W.; Lee, M.; Meir, A.; Dyer, G.; Ma, K.; Chan, C.

    2009-12-01

    A new 3D time-dependent pore-pressure diffusion model PFLOW is developed to investigate the response of pore fluids to the crustal deformation generated by strong earthquakes in heterogeneous geologic media. Given crustal strain generated by changes in Coulomb stress, this MATLAB-based code uses Skempton's coefficient to calculate resulting changes fluid pressure. Pore-pressure diffusion can be tracked over time in a user-defined model space with user-prescribed Neumann or Dirchilet boundary conditions and with spatially variable values of permeability. PFLOW employs linear or quadratic finite elements for spatial discretization and first order or second order, explicit or implicit finite difference discretization in time. PFLOW is easily interfaced with output from deformation modeling programs such as Coulomb (Toda et al., 2007) or 3D-DEF (Gomberg and Ellis, 1994). The code is useful for investigating to first-order the evolution of pore pressure changes induced by changes in Coulomb stress and their possible relation to water-level changes in wells or changes in stream discharge. It can also be used for student research and classroom instruction. As an example application, we calculate the coseismic pore pressure changes and diffusion induced by volumetric strain associated with the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake (Mw = 7.6) in Taiwan. The Chi-Chi earthquake provides an unique opportunity to investigate the spatial and time-dependent poroelastic response of near-field rocks and sediments because there exist extensive observational data of water-level changes and crustal deformation. The integrated model allows us to explore whether changes in Coulomb stress can adequately explain hydrologic anomalies observed in areas such as Taiwan’s western foothills and the Choshui River alluvial plain. To calculate coseismic strain, we use the carefully calibrated finite fault-rupture model of Ma et al. (2005) and the deformation modeling code Coulomb 3.1 (Toda et al., 2007

  1. The role of heterogeneous fluid pressures in the shape of critical-taper submarine wedges, with application to Barbados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, En-Chao; Suppe, John

    2014-05-01

    Some classic accretionary wedges such as Nankai trough and Barbados are mechanically heterogeneous based on their spatial variation in taper, showing inward decrease in surface slope α without covariation in detachment dip β. Possible sources of regional heterogeniety include variation in fluid pressure, density, cohesion and fault strength, which can be constrained by the seismic or borehole observable parameter, fluid-retention depth Z_FRD, below which compaction is strongly diminished. In particular the Hubbert-Rubey fluid-pressure weakening can be addressed as (1-lambda)~0.6Z_FRD/Z. We recast the heterogeneous critical-taper wedge theory of Dahlen (1990) in terms of the observable Z_FRD/H, where H is the detachment depth, which allows for real world applications. For example, seismic velocity and borehole data from the Barbados shows that the fluid-retention depth Z_FRD is approximately constant and Z_FRD/H decreases inward. This leads to a factor of four inward decreases in wedge strength, dominated by fluid pressure, with only a second-order role for density and cohesion. An inward decrease in wedge strength should by itself produce an increase in taper, therefore the observed decreasing taper must be dominated by decreasing fault strength mu_b* from 0.03 to 0.01. Static fluid-pressures along the detachment in equilibrium with the overlying wedge predict the observed wedge geometry well, given a constant intrinsic friction coefficient mu_b=0.15.

  2. Proteomic Assessment of Fluid Shifts and Association with Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure in Twin Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rana, Brinda K.; Stenger, Michael B.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Macias, Brandon R.; Siamwala, Jamila; Piening, Brian Donald; Hook, Vivian; Ebert, Doug; Patel, Hemal; Smith, Scott; Snyder, Mike; Hargens, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Astronauts participating in long duration space missions are at an increased risk of physiological disruptions. The development of visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome is one of the leading health concerns for crew members on long-duration space missions; microgravity-induced fluid shifts and chronic elevated cabin CO2 may be contributing factors. By studying physiological and molecular changes in one identical twin during his 1-year ISS mission and his ground-based co-twin, this work extends a current NASA-funded investigation to assess space flight induced "Fluid Shifts" in association with the development of VIIP. This twin study uniquely integrates physiological and -omic signatures to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying space flight-induced VIIP. We are: (i) conducting longitudinal proteomic assessments of plasma to identify fluid regulation-related molecular pathways altered by long-term space flight; and (ii) integrating physiological and proteomic data with genomic data to understand the genomic mechanism by which these proteomic signatures are regulated. PURPOSE: We are exploring proteomic signatures and genomic mechanisms underlying space flight-induced VIIP symptoms with the future goal of developing early biomarkers to detect and monitor the progression of VIIP. This study is first to employ a male monozygous twin pair to systematically determine the impact of fluid distribution in microgravity, integrating a comprehensive set of structural and functional measures with proteomic, metabolomic and genomic data. This project has a broader impact on Earth-based clinical areas, such as traumatic brain injury-induced elevations of intracranial pressure, hydrocephalus, and glaucoma. HYPOTHESIS: We predict that the space-flown twin will experience a space flight-induced alteration in proteins and peptides related to fluid balance, fluid control and brain injury as compared to his pre-flight protein

  3. Fluid-structure Interaction Modeling of Aneurysmal Conditions with High and Normal Blood Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Ryo; Oshima, Marie; Kobayashi, Toshio; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2006-09-01

    Hemodynamic factors like the wall shear stress play an important role in cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the influence of hemodynamic factors in blood vessels, the authors have developed a numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analysis technique. The objective is to use numerical simulation as an effective tool to predict phenomena in a living human body. We applied the technique to a patient-specific arterial model, and with that we showed the effect of wall deformation on the WSS distribution. In this paper, we compute the interaction between the blood flow and the arterial wall for a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm with various hemodynamic conditions, such as hypertension. We particularly focus on the effects of hypertensive blood pressure on the interaction and the WSS, because hypertension is reported to be a risk factor in rupture of aneurysms. We also aim to show the possibility of FSI computations with hemodynamic conditions representing those risk factors in cardiovascular disease. The simulations show that the transient behavior of the interaction under hypertensive blood pressure is significantly different from the interaction under normal blood pressure. The transient behavior of the blood-flow velocity, and the resulting WSS and the mechanical stress in the aneurysmal wall, are significantly affected by hypertension. The results imply that hypertension affects the growth of an aneurysm and the damage in arterial tissues.

  4. Test plan for valveless ash removal from pressurized fluid bed combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hauserman, W.B.

    1989-07-01

    This is a test plan to demonstrate a method of ash removal from pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC) systems through small beds of crushed rock rather than conventional pressure let-down valves and lock hoppers. The economic advantage of such a method is that process-inherent erosive damage will be inflicted upon the cheaply replaceable crushed rock, rather than upon expensive, fabricated valve trim components. The concept to be tested is an extension of the gravel bucket'' principle in which an erosive, high pressure slurry stream passes through a bed of crushed rock with an adjustable flow path and cross-section. The original gravel bucket concept was inspired by the costly valve erosion problems projected for coal liquefaction plants. This project extends the same approach to systems where solids are to be removed from PFBC systems, with more limited possibilities of application to some coal gasification processes. If proven successful, a hot-gas gravel bucket could offer an economic alternative to a lock hopper plus a pair of expensive block valves. 6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Pressurized fluid extraction of essential oil from Lavandula hybrida using a modified supercritical fluid extractor and a central composite design for optimization.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Hossein; Jalilvand, Mohammad Reza; Aminimoghadamfarouj, Noushin

    2012-06-01

    Essential oil components were extracted from lavandin (Lavandula hybrida) flowers using pressurized fluid extraction. A central composite design was used to optimize the effective extraction variables. The chemical composition of extracted samples was analyzed by a gas chromatograph-flame ionization detector column. For achieving 100% extraction yield, the temperature, pressure, extraction time, and the solvent flow rate were adjusted at 90.6°C, 63 bar, 30.4 min, and 0.2 mL/min, respectively. The results showed that pressurized fluid extraction is a practical technique for separation of constituents such as 1,8-cineole (8.1%), linalool (34.1%), linalyl acetate (30.5%), and camphor (7.3%) from lavandin to be applied in the food, fragrance, pharmaceutical, and natural biocides industries.

  6. Influence of phase connectivity on the relationship among capillary pressure, fluid saturation, and interfacial area in two-fluid-phase porous medium systems

    DOE PAGES

    McClure, James E.; Berrill, Mark A.; Gray, William G.; ...

    2016-09-02

    Here, multiphase flow in porous medium systems is typically modeled using continuum mechanical representations at the macroscale in terms of averaged quantities. These models require closure relations to produce solvable forms. One of these required closure relations is an expression relating fluid pressures, fluid saturations, and, in some cases, the interfacial area between the fluid phases, and the Euler characteristic. An unresolved question is whether the inclusion of these additional morphological and topological measures can lead to a non-hysteretic closure relation compared to the hysteretic forms that are used in traditional models, which typically do not include interfacial areas, ormore » the Euler characteristic. We develop a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulation approach to investigate the equilibrium states of a two-fluid-phase porous medium system, which include disconnected now- wetting phase features. The proposed approach is applied to a synthetic medium consisting of 1,964 spheres arranged in a random, non-overlapping, close-packed manner, yielding a total of 42,908 different equilibrium points. This information is evaluated using a generalized additive modeling approach to determine if a unique function from this family exists, which can explain the data. The variance of various model estimates is computed, and we conclude that, except for the limiting behavior close to a single fluid regime, capillary pressure can be expressed as a deterministic and non-hysteretic function of fluid saturation, interfacial area between the fluid phases, and the Euler characteristic. This work is unique in the methods employed, the size of the data set, the resolution in space and time, the true equilibrium nature of the data, the parameterizations investigated, and the broad set of functions examined. The conclusion of essentially non-hysteretic behavior provides support for an evolving class of two-fluid-phase flow in porous medium systems models.« less

  7. Influence of phase connectivity on the relationship among capillary pressure, fluid saturation, and interfacial area in two-fluid-phase porous medium systems

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, James E.; Berrill, Mark A.; Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2016-09-02

    Here, multiphase flow in porous medium systems is typically modeled using continuum mechanical representations at the macroscale in terms of averaged quantities. These models require closure relations to produce solvable forms. One of these required closure relations is an expression relating fluid pressures, fluid saturations, and, in some cases, the interfacial area between the fluid phases, and the Euler characteristic. An unresolved question is whether the inclusion of these additional morphological and topological measures can lead to a non-hysteretic closure relation compared to the hysteretic forms that are used in traditional models, which typically do not include interfacial areas, or the Euler characteristic. We develop a lattice-Boltzmann (LB) simulation approach to investigate the equilibrium states of a two-fluid-phase porous medium system, which include disconnected now- wetting phase features. The proposed approach is applied to a synthetic medium consisting of 1,964 spheres arranged in a random, non-overlapping, close-packed manner, yielding a total of 42,908 different equilibrium points. This information is evaluated using a generalized additive modeling approach to determine if a unique function from this family exists, which can explain the data. The variance of various model estimates is computed, and we conclude that, except for the limiting behavior close to a single fluid regime, capillary pressure can be expressed as a deterministic and non-hysteretic function of fluid saturation, interfacial area between the fluid phases, and the Euler characteristic. This work is unique in the methods employed, the size of the data set, the resolution in space and time, the true equilibrium nature of the data, the parameterizations investigated, and the broad set of functions examined. The conclusion of essentially non-hysteretic behavior provides support for an evolving class of two-fluid-phase flow in porous medium systems models.

  8. Closed form Vaidya-Tikekar type charged fluid spheres with pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijalwan, Naveen; Gupta, Y. K.

    2011-08-01

    Recently, Bijalwan (Astrophys. Space Sci. doi: 10.1007/s10509-011-0691-0 , 2011) discussed all important solutions of charged fluid spheres with pressure and Gupta et al. (Astrophys. Space Sci. doi: 10.1007/s10509-010-0561-1 , 2010) found first closed form solutions of charged Vaidya-Tikekar (V-T) type super-dense star. We extend here the approach evolved by Bijalwan (Astrophys. Space Sci. doi: 10.1007/s10509-011-0691-0 , 2011) to find all possible closed form solutions of V-T type super-dense stars. The existing solutions of Vaidya-Tikekar type charged fluid spheres considering particular form of electric field intensity are being used to model massive stars. Infact at present maximum masses of the star models are found to be 8.223931 M Θ and 8.460857 M Θ subject to ultra-relativistic and non-relativistic conditions respectively. But these stars with such are large masses are not well behaved due to decreasing velocity of sound in the interior of star. We present new results concerning the existence of static, electrically charged perfect fluid spheres that have a regular interior. It is observed that electric intensity used in this article can be used to model superdense stars with ultrahigh surface density of the order 2×1014 gm/cm3 which may have maximum mass 7.26368240 M Θ for ultra-relativistic condition and velocity of sound found to be decreasing towards pressure free interface. We solve the Einstein-Maxwell equations considering a general barotropic equation of state with pressure. For brevity we don't present a detailed analysis of the derived solutions in this paper.

  9. Geometry optimization of linear and annular plasma synthetic jet actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neretti, G.; Seri, P.; Taglioli, M.; Shaw, A.; Iza, F.; Borghi, C. A.

    2017-01-01

    The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) interaction induced in atmospheric air pressure by a surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuator has been experimentally investigated. Plasma synthetic jet actuators (PSJAs) are DBD actuators able to induce an air stream perpendicular to the actuator surface. These devices can be used in the field of aerodynamics to prevent or induce flow separation, modify the laminar to turbulent transition inside the boundary layer, and stabilize or mix air flows. They can also be used to enhance indirect plasma treatment effects, increasing the reactive species delivery rate onto surfaces and liquids. This can play a major role in plasma processing and chemical kinetics modelling, where often only diffusive mechanisms are considered. This paper reports on the importance that different electrode geometries can have on the performance of different PSJAs. A series of DBD aerodynamic actuators designed to produce perpendicular jets has been fabricated on two-layer printed circuit boards (PCBs). Both linear and annular geometries were considered, testing different upper electrode distances in the linear case and different diameters in the annular one. An AC voltage supplied at a peak of 11.5 kV and a frequency of 5 kHz was used. Lower electrodes were connected to the ground and buried in epoxy resin to avoid undesired plasma generation on the lower actuator surface. Voltage and current measurements were carried out to evaluate the active power delivered to the discharges. Schlieren imaging allowed the induced jets to be visualized and gave an estimate of their evolution and geometry. Pitot tube measurements were performed to obtain the velocity profiles of the PSJAs and to estimate the mechanical power delivered to the fluid. The optimal values of the inter-electrode distance and diameter were found in order to maximize jet velocity, mechanical power or efficiency. Annular geometries were found to achieve the best performance.

  10. Microfluidic pressure amplifier circuits and electrostatic gates for pneumatic microsystems

    SciTech Connect

    Tice, Joshua D.; Bassett, Thomas A.; Desai, Amit V.; Apblett, Christopher A.; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2016-09-20

    An electrostatic actuator is provide that can include a fluidic line, a first electrode, and a second electrode such that a gate chamber portion of the fluidic line is sandwiched between the first electrode and the second electrode. The electrostatic actuator can also include a pressure-balancing channel in fluid communication with the gate chamber portion where the first electrode is sandwiched between the pressure-balancing channel and the gate chamber portion. A pneumatic valve system is provided which includes an electrostatic gate and a fluidic channel fluidly separate from a fluidic control line. A pneumatic valve portion of the fluidic control line can be positioned relative to a portion of the fluidic channel such that expansion of the pneumatic valve portion restricts fluid flow through the fluidic channel. Methods of using an electrostatic actuator and a pneumatic valve system are also provided.

  11. Multi-objective control of nonlinear boiler-turbine dynamics with actuator magnitude and rate constraints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pang-Chia

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates multi-objective controller design approaches for nonlinear boiler-turbine dynamics subject to actuator magnitude and rate constraints. System nonlinearity is handled by a suitable linear parameter varying system representation with drum pressure as the system varying parameter. Variation of the drum pressure is represented by suitable norm-bounded uncertainty and affine dependence on system matrices. Based on linear matrix inequality algorithms, the magnitude and rate constraints on the actuator and the deviations of fluid density and water level are formulated while the tracking abilities on the drum pressure and power output are optimized. Variation ranges of drum pressure and magnitude tracking commands are used as controller design parameters, determined according to the boiler-turbine's operation range.

  12. Fluid Shifts: Otoacoustical Emission Changes in Response to Posture and Lower Body Negative Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melgoza, R.; Kemp, D.; Ebert, D.; Danielson, R.; Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the NASA Fluid Shifts Study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. Due to the invasive nature of direct measures of ICP, a noninvasive technique of monitoring ICP is desired for use during spaceflight. The phase angle and amplitude of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) have been shown to be sensitive to posture change and ICP (1, 2), therefore use of OAEs is an attractive option. OAEs are low-level sounds produced by the sensory cells of the cochlea in response to auditory stimulation. These sounds travel peripherally from the cochlea, through the oval window, to the ear canal where they can be recorded. OAE transmission is sensitive to changes in the stiffness of the oval window, occurring as a result of changes in cochlear pressure. Increased stiffness of the oval window largely affects the transmission of sound from the cochlea at frequencies between 800 Hz and 1600 Hz. OAEs can be self-recorded in the laboratory or on the ISS using a handheld device. Our primary objectives regarding OAE measures in this experiment were to 1) validate this method during preflight testing of each crewmember (while sitting, supine and in head-down tilt position), and 2) determine if OAE measures (and presumably ICP) are responsive to lower body negative pressure and to spaceflight. METHODS: Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) were recorded preflight using the Otoport Advance OAE system (Otodynamics Ltd., Hatfield, UK). Data were collected in four conditions (seated

  13. On axial temperature gradients due to large pressure drops in dense fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Colgate, Sam O; Berger, Terry A

    2015-03-13

    The effect of energy degradation (Degradation is the creation of net entropy resulting from irreversibility.) accompanying pressure drops across chromatographic columns is examined with regard to explaining axial temperature gradients in both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The observed effects of warming and cooling can be explained equally well in the language of thermodynamics or fluid dynamics. The necessary equivalence of these treatments is reviewed here to show the legitimacy of using whichever one supports the simpler determination of features of interest. The determination of temperature profiles in columns by direct application of the laws of thermodynamics is somewhat simpler than applying them indirectly by solving the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Both disciplines show that the preferred strategy for minimizing the reduction in peak quality caused by temperature gradients is to operate columns as nearly adiabatically as possible (i.e. as Joule-Thomson expansions). This useful fact, however, is not widely familiar or appreciated in the chromatography community due to some misunderstanding of the meaning of certain terms and expressions used in these disciplines. In fluid dynamics, the terms "resistive heating" or "frictional heating" have been widely used as synonyms for the dissipation function, Φ, in the NS energy equation. These terms have been widely used by chromatographers as well, but often misinterpreted as due to friction between the mobile phase and the column packing, when in fact Φ describes the increase in entropy of the system (dissipation, ∫TdSuniv>0) due to the irreversible decompression of the mobile phase. Two distinctly different contributions to the irreversibility are identified; (1) ΔSext, viscous dissipation of work done by the external surroundings driving the flow (the pump) contributing to its warming, and (2) ΔSint, entropy change accompanying decompression of

  14. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  15. Fast-acting valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  16. Multifield analysis of a piezoelectric valveless micropump: effects of actuation frequency and electric potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayar, Ersin; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2012-07-01

    Coupled multifield analysis of a piezoelectrically actuated valveless micropump device is carried out for liquid (water) transport applications. The valveless micropump consists of two diffuser/nozzle elements; the pump chamber, a thin structural layer (silicon), and a piezoelectric layer, PZT-5A as the actuator. We consider two-way coupling of forces between solid and liquid domains in the systems where actuator deflection causes fluid flow and vice versa. Flow contraction and expansion (through the nozzle and the diffuser respectively) generate net fluid flow. Both structural and flow field analysis of the microfluidic device are considered. The effect of the driving power (voltage) and actuation frequency on silicon-PZT-5A bi-layer membrane deflection and flow rate is investigated. For the compressible flow formulation, an isothermal equation of state for the working fluid is employed. The governing equations for the flow fields and the silicon-PZT-5A bi-layer membrane motions are solved numerically. At frequencies below 5000 Hz, the predicted flow rate increases with actuation frequency. The fluid-solid system shows a resonance at 5000 Hz due to the combined effect of mechanical and fluidic capacitances, inductances, and damping. Time-averaged flow rate starts to drop with increase of actuation frequency above (5000 Hz). The velocity profile in the pump chamber becomes relatively flat or plug-like, if the frequency of pulsations is sufficiently large (high Womersley number). The pressure, velocity, and flow rate prediction models developed in the present study can be utilized to optimize the design of MEMS based micropumps.

  17. Fluid shifts, vasodilatation and ambulatory blood pressure reduction during long duration spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Norsk, Peter; Asmar, Ali; Damgaard, Morten; Christensen, Niels Juel

    2015-01-01

    Acute weightlessness in space induces a fluid shift leading to central volume expansion. Simultaneously, blood pressure is either unchanged or decreased slightly. Whether these effects persist for months in space is unclear. Twenty-four hour ambulatory brachial arterial pressures were automatically recorded at 1–2 h intervals with portable equipment in eight male astronauts: once before launch, once between 85 and 192 days in space on the International Space Station and, finally, once at least 2 months after flight. During the same 24 h, cardiac output (rebreathing method) was measured two to five times (on the ground seated), and venous blood was sampled once (also seated on the ground) for determination of plasma catecholamine concentrations. The 24 h average systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures (mean ± se) in space were reduced by 8 ± 2 mmHg (P = 0.01; ANOVA), 9 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.001) and 10 ± 3 mmHg (P = 0.006), respectively. The nightly blood pressure dip of 8 ± 3 mmHg (P = 0.015) was maintained. Cardiac stroke volume and output increased by 35 ± 10% and 41 ± 9% (P < 0.001); heart rate and catecholamine concentrations were unchanged; and systemic vascular resistance was reduced by 39 ± 4% (P < 0.001). The increase in cardiac stroke volume and output is more than previously observed during short duration flights and might be a precipitator for some of the vision problems encountered by the astronauts. The spaceflight vasodilatation mechanism needs to be explored further. PMID:25774397

  18. Laboratory experiments and continuous fluid monitoring at Campi Flegrei to understand pressure transients in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woith, Heiko; Mangiacapra, Annarita; Chiodini, Giovanni; Pilz, Marco; Walter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The hydrothermal system beneath Campi Flegrei is strongly affected by sub-surface processes as manifested by the existence of a geothermal "plume" below Solfatara (Bruno et al. 2007), associated with formation of new fumaroles and the spatial pattern of exhalation vents. Within the frame of MED-SUV (The MED-SUV project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) under Grant agreement no 308665), pressure tansients in the hydrothermal system of Campi Flegrei shall be studied using a combination of laboratory experiments and continuous pressure/temperature monitoring at fumaroles, mudpools, hot springs, and geothermal wells. Four groundwater monitoring sites were installed in September 2013: one in the Fangaia mud pool inside Solfatara and three within the geothermal area of Agnano, which is located roughly 3 km to the East of the Solfatara crater. In 2014 additional sensors were installed in Pisciarelli. Autonomous devices are being used to record the water level and water temperature at 10 minute intervals. Records reveal significant changes of the hydrothermal system in September 2013 at the Agnano main spring during the night from 23 to 24 September. Both, the water level and the water temperature dropped significantly, confirmed by visual inspection of the spa operators. The pool of the main spring almost emptied and the flow rate was significantly reduced, implying a profound change in the system. Similar water level drops occurred in the following months. Gas bubbles are likely to play a major role with respect to spatio-temporal variations in shallow fluid systems below Solfatara. Thus, additional to the field measurements we investigate potential bubble-related mechanisms capable to increase fluid pressure. The BubbleLab at GFZ has been setup. We are able to simulate earthquake ground motions with a shaking table, track the size and velocity of rising bubbles via a camera system, and quantify transients with a set of

  19. Small-Scale Metal Tanks for High Pressure Storage of Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Adam (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Small scale metal tanks for high-pressure storage of fluids having tank factors of more than 5000 meters and volumes of ten cubic inches or less featuring arrays of interconnected internal chambers having at least inner walls thinner than gage limitations allow. The chambers may be arranged as multiple internal independent vessels. Walls of chambers that are also portions of external tank walls may be arcuate on the internal and/or external surfaces, including domed. The tanks may be shaped adaptively and/or conformally to an application, including, for example, having one or more flat outer walls and/or having an annular shape. The tanks may have dual-purpose inlet/outlet conduits of may have separate inlet and outlet conduits. The tanks are made by fusion bonding etched metal foil layers patterned from slices of a CAD model of the tank. The fusion bonded foil stack may be further machined.

  20. SAPHIR: a physiome core model of body fluid homeostasis and blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S Randall; Baconnier, Pierre; Fontecave, Julie; Françoise, Jean-Pierre; Guillaud, François; Hannaert, Patrick; Hernández, Alfredo; Le Rolle, Virginie; Mazière, Pierre; Tahi, Fariza; White, Ronald J

    2008-09-13

    We present the current state of the development of the SAPHIR project (a Systems Approach for PHysiological Integration of Renal, cardiac and respiratory function). The aim is to provide an open-source multi-resolution modelling environment that will permit, at a practical level, a plug-and-play construction of integrated systems models using lumped-parameter components at the organ/tissue level while also allowing focus on cellular- or molecular-level detailed sub-models embedded in the larger core model. Thus, an in silico exploration of gene-to-organ-to-organism scenarios will be possible, while keeping computation time manageable. As a first prototype implementation in this environment, we describe a core model of human physiology targeting the short- and long-term regulation of blood pressure, body fluids and homeostasis of the major solutes. In tandem with the development of the core models, the project involves database implementation and ontology development.

  1. Research program: The investigation of heat transfer and fluid flow at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, M. S.; Philbin, J. S.; Foushee, F. C.

    1986-04-01

    This paper gives an overview of a multiyear joint research program being conducted at the University of New Mexico (UNM) with support from Sandia National Laboratories and GA Technologies. This research focuses on heat removal and fluid dynamics in flow regimes characterized by low pressure and low Reynolds number. The program was motivated by a desire to characterize and analyze cooling in a broad class of TRIGA-type reactors under: (1) typical operating conditions, (2) anticipated, new operating regimes, and (3) postulated accident conditions. It has also provided experimental verification of analytical tools used in design analysis. The paper includes descriptions of the UNM thermal-hydraulics test facility and the experimental test sections. During the first two years experiments were conducted using single, electrically heated rod in water and air annuli. This configuration provides an observable and serviceable simulation of a fuel rod and its coolant channel.

  2. New configurations of oscillatory flow pumps using bimorph piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatanabe, Sandro L.; Pires, Rogério F.; Nakasone, Paulo H.; Silva, Emílio C. N.

    2008-03-01

    Precision flow pumps have been widely studied over the last three decades. They have been applied in the areas of Biology, Pharmacy and Medicine in applications usually related to the dosage of medicine and chemical reagents. In addition, thermal management solutions for electronic devices have also been recently developed using these kinds of pumps offering better performance with low noise and low power consumption. In previous works was presented the working principle of a pump based on the use of a bimorph piezoelectric actuator inserted in a fluid channel to generate flow. This work presents a novel configuration of piezoelectric flow pumps using a bimorph piezoelectric actuator of different aspect ratio. Sensibility studies of the rectangular cross-sectional area channel are conducted computationally (CFD) and three parameters are investigated: resonance frequency and oscillation amplitude of the piezoelectric actuator, and pressure inside the channel. Also, experimental tests are conducted to verify the influence of clamps' rigidity and actuator's insulator. The experimental results show that improving these two aspects it is possible to achieve higher flow rates.

  3. A skin-contact-actuated micropump for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mousoulis, Charilaos; Ochoa, Manuel; Papageorgiou, Demetrios; Ziaie, Babak

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, a skin-contact-actuated dispenser/micropump for transdermal drug delivery applications is presented. The micropump consists of stacked polydimethylsiloxane layers mounted on a silicon substrate and operates based on the evaporation and condensation of a low-boiling-point liquid. Therefore, there is no need for a heater and a power source, since only the thermal energy provided by skin contact is required for the actuation. A prototype device with overall dimensions of 14 mm × 14 mm × 8 mm is fabricated and characterized. For a perfluoro compound working fluid (3M FC-3284), a flow rate of 28.8 μ L/min and a maximum back pressure of 28.9 kPa is measured.

  4. Intra-Operative Fluid Management in Adult Neurosurgical Patients Undergoing Intracranial Tumour Surgery: Randomised Control Trial Comparing Pulse Pressure Variance (PPV) and Central Venous Pressure (CVP)

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Serina Ruth; Kumar, Amar Nandha; Korula, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluid management in neurosurgery presents specific challenges to the anaesthesiologist. Dynamic para-meters like Pulse Pressure Variation (PPV) have been used successfully to guide fluid management. Aim To compare PPV against Central Venous Pressure (CVP) in neurosurgical patients to assess hemodynamic stability and perfusion status. Materials and Methods This was a single centre prospective randomised control trial at a tertiary care centre. A total of 60 patients undergoing intracranial tumour excision in supine and lateral positions were randomised to two groups (Group 1, CVP n=30), (Group 2, PPV n=30). Intra-operative fluid management was titrated to maintain baseline CVP in Group 1(5-10cm of water) and in Group 2 fluids were given to maintain PPV less than 13%. Acid base status, vital signs and blood loss were monitored. Results Although intra-operative hypotension and acid base changes were comparable between the groups, the patients in the CVP group had more episodes of hypotension requiring fluid boluses in the first 24 hours post surgery. {CVP group median (25, 75) 2400ml (1850, 3110) versus PPV group 2100ml (1350, 2200) p=0.03} The patients in the PPV group received more fluids than the CVP group which was clinically significant. {2250 ml (1500, 3000) versus 1500ml (1200, 2000) median (25, 75) (p=0.002)}. The blood loss was not significantly different between the groups The median blood loss in the CVP group was 600ml and in the PPV group was 850 ml; p value 0.09. Conclusion PPV can be used as a reliable index to guide fluid management in neurosurgical patients undergoing tumour excision surgery in supine and lateral positions and can effectively augment CVP as a guide to fluid management. Patients in PPV group had better hemodynamic stability and less post operative fluid requirement. PMID:27437329

  5. Fluid front displacement dynamics affecting pressure fluctuations and phase entrapment in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, F.; Or, D.

    2012-04-01

    Many natural and engineering processes involve motion of fluid fronts in porous media, from infiltration and drainage in hydrology to reservoir management in petroleum engineering. Macroscopically smooth and continuous motion of displacement fronts involves numerous rapid interfacial jumps and local reconfigurations. Detailed observations of displacement processes in micromodels illustrate the wide array of fluid interfacial dynamics ranging from irregular jumping-pinning motions to gradual pore scale invasions. The pressure fluctuations associated with interfacial motions reflect not only pore geometry (as traditionally hypothesized) but there is a strong influence of boundary conditions (e.g., mean drainage rate). The time scales associated with waiting time distribution of individual invasion events and decay time of inertial oscillations (following a rapid interfacial jump) provide a means for distinguishing between displacement regimes. Direct observations using high-speed camera combined with concurrent pressure signal measurements were instrumental in clarifying influences of flow rates, pore size, and gravity on burst size distribution and waiting times. We compared our results with the early experimental and theoretical study on burst size and waiting time distribution during slow drainage processes of Måløy et al. [Måløy et al., 1992]. Results provide insights on critical invasion events that exert strong influence on macroscopic phenomena such as front morphology and residual phase entrapment behind leading to hysteresis. Måløy, K. J., L. Furuberg, J. Feder, and T. Jossang (1992), Dynamics of Slow Drainage in Porous-Media, Phys Rev Lett, 68(14), 2161-2164.

  6. Properties of molecular solids and fluids at high pressure and temperatures. Progress report, July 1, 1989--July 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Etters, R.D.

    1992-03-01

    This renewal request for DOE grant DE-FG02-86ER45238, is dedicated to providing a complete thermodynamic profile of solids fluids, and fluid mixtures, over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. We are partially motivated by technological interest in detonation, combustion, superhard high pressure materials, and high temperature superconductors, which are important components of interest of various DOE laboratories. Our work on fluids and solids, composed of simple molecules, involves the determination of structures, phase transitions, pressure-volume relations, phonon, vibron, and libron modes of excitation, sound velocities, specific heats, thermal expansion, virial coefficients, sublimation energies, and orientational translational, and magnetic correlations. We hope that the study of these systems under extreme thermodynamic conditions will lead to exotic new materials of value, as well as enhanced fundamental understanding.

  7. Interstitial hydraulic conductivity and interstitial fluid pressure for avascular or poorly vascularized tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2015-09-07

    A correct description of the hydraulic conductivity is essential for determining the actual tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) distribution. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the hydraulic conductivities both in a tumor and normal tissue are constant, and that a tumor has a much larger interstitial hydraulic conductivity than normal tissue. The abrupt transition of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface leads to non-physical results (the hydraulic conductivity and the slope of the TIFP are not continuous at tumor surface). For the sake of simplicity and the need to represent reality, we focus our analysis on avascular or poorly vascularized tumors, which have a necrosis that is mostly in the center and vascularization that is mostly on the periphery. We suggest that there is an intermediary region between the tumor surface and normal tissue. Through this region, the interstitium (including the structure and composition of solid components and interstitial fluid) transitions from tumor to normal tissue. This process also causes the hydraulic conductivity to do the same. We introduce a continuous variation of the hydraulic conductivity, and show that the interstitial hydraulic conductivity in the intermediary region should be monotonically increasing up to the value of hydraulic conductivity in the normal tissue in order for the model to correspond to the actual TIFP distribution. The value of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface should be the lowest in value.

  8. Airborne Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration Pressure Measurements with Computational Fluid Dynamics Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Murray, James E.; Purifoy, Dana D.; Graham, David H.; Meredith, Keith B.; Ashburn, Christopher E.; Stucky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    The Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration project showed for the first time that by careful design of aircraft contour the resultant sonic boom can maintain a tailored shape, propagating through a real atmosphere down to ground level. In order to assess the propagation characteristics of the shaped sonic boom and to validate computational fluid dynamics codes, airborne measurements were taken of the pressure signatures in the near field by probing with an instrumented F-15B aircraft, and in the far field by overflying an instrumented L-23 sailplane. This paper describes each aircraft and their instrumentation systems, the airdata calibration, analysis of the near- and far-field airborne data, and shows the good to excellent agreement between computational fluid dynamics solutions and flight data. The flights of the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration aircraft occurred in two phases. Instrumentation problems were encountered during the first phase, and corrections and improvements were made to the instrumentation system for the second phase, which are documented in the paper. Piloting technique and observations are also given. These airborne measurements of the Shaped Sonic Boom Demonstration aircraft are a unique and important database that will be used to validate design tools for a new generation of quiet supersonic aircraft.

  9. Predictive models for pressure-driven fluid infusions into brain parenchyma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Raghu; Brady, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Direct infusions into brain parenchyma of biological therapeutics for serious brain diseases have been, and are being, considered. However, individual brains, as well as distinct cytoarchitectural regions within brains, vary in their response to fluid flow and pressure. Further, the tissue responds dynamically to these stimuli, requiring a nonlinear treatment of equations that would describe fluid flow and drug transport in brain. We here report in detail on an individual-specific model and a comparison of its prediction with simulations for living porcine brains. Two critical features we introduced into our model—absent from previous ones, but requirements for any useful simulation—are the infusion-induced interstitial expansion and the backflow. These are significant determinants of the flow. Another feature of our treatment is the use of cross-property relations to obtain individual-specific parameters that are coefficients in the equations. The quantitative results are at least encouraging, showing a high fraction of overlap between the computed and measured volumes of distribution of a tracer molecule and are potentially clinically useful. Several improvements are called for; principally a treatment of the interstitial expansion more fundamentally based on poroelasticity and a better delineation of the diffusion tensor of a particle confined to the interstitial spaces.

  10. Predictive models for pressure-driven fluid infusions into brain parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Raghu; Brady, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Direct infusions into brain parenchyma of biological therapeutics for serious brain diseases have been, and are being, considered. However, individual brains, as well as distinct cytoarchitectural regions within brains, vary in their response to fluid flow and pressure. Further, the tissue responds dynamically to these stimuli, requiring a nonlinear treatment of equations that would describe fluid flow and drug transport in brain. We here report in detail on an individual–specific model and a comparison of its prediction with simulations for living porcine brains. Two critical features we introduced into our model — absent from previous ones, but requirements for any useful simulation — are the infusion-induced interstitial expansion and the backflow. These are significant determinants of the flow. Another feature of our treatment is the use of cross–property relations to obtain individual–specific parameters that are coefficients in the equations. The quantitative results are at least encouraging, showing a high fraction of overlap between the computed and measured volumes of distribution of a tracer molecule, and are potentially clinically useful. Several improvements are called for; principally a treatment of the interstitial expansion more fundamentally based on poroelasticity, and a better delineation of the diffusion tensor of a particle confined to the interstitial spaces. PMID:21891847

  11. Overall heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in a typical tubular exchanger employing alumina nano-fluid as the tube side hot fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabeel, A. E.; Abdelgaied, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Nano-fluids are used to improve the heat transfer rates in heat exchangers, especially; the shell-and-tube heat exchanger that is considered one of the most important types of heat exchangers. In the present study, an experimental loop is constructed to study the thermal characteristics of the shell-and-tube heat exchanger; at different concentrations of Al2O3 nonmetallic particles (0.0, 2, 4, and 6 %). This material concentrations is by volume concentrations in pure water as a base fluid. The effects of nano-fluid concentrations on the performance of shell and tube heat exchanger have been conducted based on the overall heat transfer coefficient, the friction factor, the pressure drop in tube side, and the entropy generation rate. The experimental results show that; the highest heat transfer coefficient is obtained at a nano-fluid concentration of 4 % of the shell side. In shell side the maximum percentage increase in the overall heat transfer coefficient has reached 29.8 % for a nano-fluid concentration of 4 %, relative to the case of the base fluid (water) at the same tube side Reynolds number. However; in the tube side the maximum relative increase in pressure drop has recorded the values of 12, 28 and 48 % for a nano-material concentration of 2, 4 and 6 %, respectively, relative to the case without nano-fluid, at an approximate value of 56,000 for Reynolds number. The entropy generation reduces with increasing the nonmetallic particle volume fraction of the same flow rates. For increase the nonmetallic particle volume fraction from 0.0 to 6 % the rate of entropy generation decrease by 10 %.

  12. Effect of resting pressure on the estimate of cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A lumbar infusion test is commonly used as a predictive test for patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and for evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt function. Different infusion protocols can be used to estimate the outflow conductance (Cout) or its reciprocal the outflow resistance (Rout), with or without using the baseline resting pressure, Pr. Both from a basic physiological research and a clinical perspective, it is important to understand the limitations of the model on which infusion tests are based. By estimating Cout using two different analyses, with or without Pr, the limitations could be explored. The aim of this study was to compare the Cout estimates, and investigate what effect Prhad on the results. Methods Sixty-three patients that underwent a constant pressure infusion protocol as part of their preoperative evaluation for normal pressure hydrocephalus, were included (age 70.3 ± 10.8 years (mean ± SD)). The analysis was performed without (Cexcl Pr) and with (Cincl Pr) Pr. The estimates were compared using Bland-Altman plots and paired sample t-tests (p < 0.05 considered significant). Results Mean Cout for the 63 patients was: Cexcl Pr = 7.0 ± 4.0 (mean ± SD) μl/(s kPa) and Cincl Pr = 9.1 ± 4.3 μl/(s kPa) and Rout was 19.0 ± 9.2 and 17.7 ± 11.3 mmHg/ml/min, respectively. There was a positive correlation between methods (r = 0.79, n = 63, p < 0.01). The difference, ΔCout= -2.1 ± 2.7 μl/(s kPa) between methods was significant (p < 0.01) and ΔRout was 1.2 ± 8.8 mmHg/ml/min). The Bland-Altman plot visualized that the variation around the mean difference was similar all through the range of measured values and there was no correlation between ΔCout and Cout. Conclusions The difference between Cout estimates, obtained from analyses with or without Pr, needs to be taken into consideration when comparing results from studies using different infusion test protocols. The study suggests variation in CSF formation rate

  13. Slow slip pulses driven by thermal pressurization of pore fluid: theory and observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garagash, D.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss recently developed solutions for steadily propagating self-healing slip pulses driven by thermal pressurization (TP) of pore fluid [Garagash, 2012] on a fault with a constant sliding friction. These pulses are characterized by initial stage of undrained weakening of the fault (when fluid/heat can not yet escape the frictionally heated shear zone), which gives way to partial restrengthening due to increasing hydrothermal diffusion under conditions of diminished rate of heating, leading to eventual locking of the slip. The rupture speed of these pulses is decreasing function of the thickness (h) of the principal shear zone. We find that "thick" shear zones, h >> hdyna, where hdyna = (μ/τ0) (ρc/fΛ)(4α/cs), can support aseismic TP pulses propagating at a fraction hdyna/h of the shear wave speed cs, while "thin" shear zones, h˜hdyna or thinner, can only harbor seismic slip. (Here μ - shear modulus, τ0 - the nominal fault strength, f - sliding friction, ρc - the heat capacity of the fault gouge, Λ - the fluid thermal pressurization factor, α - hydrothermal diffusivity parameter of the gouge). For plausible range of fault parameters, hdyna is between 10s to 100s of micrometers, suggesting that slow slip transients propagating at 1 to 10 km/day may occur in the form of a TP slip pulse accommodated by a meter-thick shear zone. We verify that this is, indeed, a possibility by contrasting the predictions for aseismic, small-slip TP pulses operating at seismologically-constrained, near-lithostatic pore pressure (effective normal stress ≈ 3 to 10 MPa) with the observations (slip duration at a given fault location ≈ week, propagation speed ≈ 15 km/day, and the inferred total slip ≈ 2 to 3 cm) for along-strike propagation of the North Cascadia slow slip events of '98-99 [Dragert et al., 2001, 2004]. Furthermore, we show that the effect of thermal pressurization on the strength of the subduction interface is comparable to or exceeds that of the rate

  14. Fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual partial pressure of carbon dioxide during hemorrhagic shock in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiefeng; Ma, Linhao; Sun, Shijie; Lu, Xiaoye; Wu, Xiaobo; Li, Zilong; Tang, Wanchun

    2013-04-01

    To avoid aggressive fluid resuscitation during hemorrhagic shock, fluid resuscitation is best guided by a specific measurement of tissue perfusion. We investigated whether fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual PCO2 would reduce the amount of resuscitation fluid without compromising the outcomes of hemorrhagic shock. Ten male domestic pigs weighing between 34 and 37 kg were used. Forty-five percent of estimated blood volume was removed during an interval of 1 h. The animals were then randomized to receive fluid resuscitation based on either sublingual PCO2 or blood pressure (BP). In the sublingual PCO2-guided group, resuscitation was initiated when sublingual PCO2 exceeded 70 Torr and stopped when it decreased to 50 Torr. In the BP-guided group, resuscitation was initiated when mean aortic pressure decreased to 60 mmHg and stopped when it increased to 90 mmHg. First, Ringer's lactate solution (RLS) of 30 mL kg was administered; subsequently, the shed blood was transfused if sublingual PCO2 remained greater than 50 Torr in the sublingual PCO2-guided group or mean aortic pressure was less than 90 mmHg in the BP-guided group. All the animals were monitored for 4 h and observed for an additional 68 h. In the sublingual PCO2-guided group, fluid resuscitation was required in only 40% of the animals. In addition, a significantly lower volume of RLS (170 ± 239 mL, P = 0.005 vs. BP-guided group) was administered without the need for blood infusion in this group. However, in the BP-guided group, all the animals required a significantly larger volume of fluid (955 ± 381 mL), including both RLS and blood. There were no differences in postresuscitation tissue microcirculation, myocardial and neurologic function, and 72-h survival between groups. During hemorrhagic shock, fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual PCO2 significantly reduced the amount of resuscitation fluid without compromising the outcomes of hemorrhagic shock.

  15. The Role of Fluid Pressure in Earthquake Triggering: Insights from an Experimental Study of Frictional Stability of Carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, C.; Scuderi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid overpressure has been often proposed as one of the primary mechanisms that facilitate earthquake slip along faults. However, elastic dislocation theory combined with rate- and state- friction laws suggests that fluid overpressure may inhibit the dynamic instabilities that result in earthquakes, by reducing the critical rheological fault stiffness, kc. This controversy poses a serious problem in our understanding of earthquake physics, with severe implications for seismic hazard and human-induced seismicity. Nevertheless, currently, there are only a few systematic studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions for which the evolution of friction parameters and slip stability can be measured. We have used a biaxial rock deformation apparatus within a pressure vessel, in order to allow a true triaxial stress field, in a double direct shear configuration. We tested carbonate fault gouge, Carrara marble, sieved to a grain size of 125 microns. Normal stresses and confining pressure were held constant throughout the experiment at values of 5 to 40 MPa, and the pore fluid pressure was varied from hydrostatic up to near lithostatic values. Shear stress was induced by a constant displacement rate and sliding velocities varied from 0.1-100 microns/s, in order to evaluate slip stability via rate- and state- dependent frictional parameters, such as (a-b), Dc. With increasing fluid pressure we observe an evolution of (a-b) from slightly velocity strengthening to velocity neutral and a reduction in Dc from about 100 to 20 microns. Our analysis on carbonate fault gouges indicates that the increase in fluid pressure not only favour fault reactivation but it also makes the fault more prone to generate earthquake instabilities.

  16. Misfire tolerant combustion-powered actuation

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Marron, Lisa C.; Kuehl, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a combustion-powered actuator that is suitable for intermittent actuation, that is suitable for use with atmospheric pressure carburetion, and that requires little electrical energy input. The present invention uses energy from expansion of pressurized fuel to effectively purge a combustion chamber, and to achieve atmospheric pressure carburetion. Each purge-fill-power cycle can be independent, allowing the actuator to readily tolerate misfires. The present invention is suitable for use with linear and rotary operation combustion chambers, and is suitable for use in a wide variety of applications.

  17. A motor integrated regenerative pump as the actuator of an electrohydraulic totally implantable artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, T; Taenaka, Y; Kinoshita, M; Nakatani, T; Akagi, H; Takano, H; Fukui, Y; Sasagawa, H; Takahashi, K

    1992-01-01

    The authors have developed a new actuator to drive an electrohydraulic totally implantable artificial heart. The basic concept of this artificial heart is that the blood pumps are implanted in the thorax and an actuator is placed separately in the abdominal region. The actuator is a regenerative pump that pumps fluids against high pressures and is thin enough for easy implantation. The rotor-magnet of the brushless DC motor is mounted on the impeller of the pump to miniaturize the actuator and reduce the number of moving parts. The height, diameter, and weight of the actuator are 32.5 mm, 73 mm, and 360 g, respectively. A pair of oil ports is connected to the left and right blood pumps with mesh reinforced tubes filled with silicone oil. The blood pumps are alternately driven by bidirectional rotation of the motor. Performance of the system was evaluated in in vitro and in vivo experiments. Maximum output of the right heart was 6.7 L/min in both experiments. Systemic circulation was well maintained in acute animal experiments using 49 and 50 kg goats. The feasibility of the actuator was confirmed.

  18. Light-Driven Polymeric Bimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Gregory; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are being developed as alternatives to prior electrically and optically driven actuators in advanced, highly miniaturized devices and systems exemplified by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems (MEOMS), and sensor and actuator arrays in smart structures. These light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are intended to satisfy a need for actuators that (1) in comparison with the prior actuators, are simpler and less power-hungry; (2) can be driven by low-power visible or mid-infrared light delivered through conventional optic fibers; and (3) are suitable for integration with optical sensors and multiple actuators of the same or different type. The immediate predecessors of the present light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are bimorph actuators that exploit a photorestrictive effect in lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics. The disadvantages of the PLZT-based actuators are that (1) it is difficult to shape the PLZT ceramics, which are hard and brittle; (2) for actuation, it is necessary to use ultraviolet light (wavelengths < 380 nm), which must be generated by use of high-power, high-pressure arc lamps or lasers; (3) it is difficult to deliver sufficient ultraviolet light through conventional optical fibers because of significant losses in the fibers; (4) the response times of the PLZT actuators are of the order of several seconds unacceptably long for typical applications; and (5) the maximum mechanical displacements of the PLZT-based actuators are limited to those characterized by low strains beyond which PLZT ceramics disintegrate because of their brittleness. The basic element of a light-driven bimorph actuator of the present developmental type is a cantilever beam comprising two layers, at least one of which is a polymer that exhibits a photomechanical effect (see figure). The dominant mechanism of the photomechanical effect is a photothermal one: absorption of

  19. Engine control system having pressure-based timing

    DOEpatents

    Willi, Martin L.; Fiveland, Scott B.; Montgomery, David T.; Gong, Weidong

    2011-10-04

    A control system for an engine having a first cylinder and a second cylinder is disclosed having a first engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the first cylinder and a first actuator associated with the first engine valve. The control system also has a second engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the second cylinder and a sensor configured to generate a signal indicative of a pressure within the first cylinder. The control system also has a controller that is in communication with the first actuator and the sensor. The controller is configured to compare the pressure within the first cylinder with a desired pressure and selectively regulate the first actuator to adjust a timing of the first engine valve independently of the timing of the second engine valve based on the comparison.

  20. Global Stability for Thermal Convection in a Couple-Stress Fluid with Temperature and Pressure Dependent Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunil; Choudhary, Shalu; Bharti, P. K.

    2013-09-01

    We show that the global nonlinear stability threshold for convection in a couple-stress fluid with temperature and pressure dependent viscosity is exactly the same as the linear instability boundary. This optimal result is important because it shows that linearized instability theory has captured completely the physics of the onset of convection. It has also been found that the couplestress fluid is more stable than the ordinary viscous fluid and then the effect of couple-stress parameter (F) and variable dependent viscosity (Γ) on the onset of convection is also analyzed.

  1. Numerical Model of Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Transport in the Subsurface with Pressure Transient, Density Effects, and Imbibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsell, D.; Rajaram, H.; Dempsey, D.; Viswanathan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transport of hydraulic fracturing (HF) fluid that is injected into the deep subsurface for shale gas extraction is important to ensure that shallow drinking water aquifers are not contaminated from an environmental and public health perspective and to understand formation damage from an oil and gas production perspective. Upward pressure gradients, permeable pathways such as faults or improperly abandoned wellbores, and the density contrast of the HF fluid to the surrounding brine encourages upward HF fluid migration. In contrast, the very low shale permeability and the imbibition of water into partially-saturated shale may sequester much of the HF fluid. Using the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code (FEHM), single-phase flow and transport simulations are performed to quantify how much HF fluid is removed via the wellbore as flowback and produced water and how much reaches overlying aquifers; imbibition is calculated with a semi-analytical one-dimensional solution and treated as a sink term. The travel time for HF fluid to reach the shallow aquifers is highly dependent on the amount of water imbibed and the suction applied to the well. If imbibition rates and suction are small, the pressure transient due to injection and the density contrast allows rapid upward plume migration at early times. The density contrast diminishes considerably within tens to hundreds of years as mixing occurs. We present estimates of HF fluid migration to shallow aquifers during the first 1,000 years after hydraulic fracturing begins for ranges of subsurface properties.

  2. Fluid flow analysis of the SSME high pressure fuel and oxidizer turbine coolant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teal, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to provide improved analysis capability for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel and oxidizer turbine coolant systems. Each of the systems was analyzed to determine fluid flow rate and thermodynamic and transport properties at all key points in the systems. Existing computer codes were used as a baseline for these analyses. These codes were modified to provide improved analysis capability. The major areas of improvement are listed. A review of the drawings was performed, and pertinent geometry changes were included in the models. Improvements were made in the calculation of thermodynamic and transport properties for a mixture of hydrogen and steam. A one-dimensional turbine model for each system is included as a subroutine to each code. This provides a closed loop analysis with a minimum of required boundary conditions as input. An improved labyrinth seal model is included in the high pressure fuel turbine coolant model. The modifications and the analysis results are presented in detail.

  3. High interstitial fluid pressure promotes tumor cell proliferation and invasion in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Liu, Kun; Wu, Yingying; Fan, Jinchuan; Chen, Jianchao; Li, Chao; Zhu, Guiquan; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Longjiang

    2013-11-01

    It has been shown that interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is elevated in many solid tumors. The elevated IFP in tumors is responsible, at least in part, for the poor blood supply, inadequate delivery of therapeutic agents to solid tumors and poor treatment response in patients. The present study was carried out to examine alterations in malignant phenotypes in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells subjected to conditions mimicking IFP and to identify the relevant molecular mechanisms. We investigated tumor cell proliferation and invasion using SCC-4 and SCC-9 cells subjected to an increased extracellular pressure of 0, 15 and 30 mmHg in vitro. The results revealed that the increased IFP resulted in a marked increase in cancer cell proliferation, survival and invasion in vitro and altered the expression of >1,800 genes involved in invasion and metastasis, the heat shock pathway, the p38 and JNK signaling pathway, apoptosis and the cell growth and differentiation signaling pathway. These results suggest the important potential clinical application of measuring IFP, which can be used as a generic marker of prognosis and response to therapy.

  4. Long-term blood pressure and metabolic effects of vasopressin with servo-controlled fluid volume.

    PubMed

    Cowley, A W; Merrill, D C; Quillen, E W; Skelton, M M

    1984-09-01

    Studies were performed in normal mongrel dogs (n = 8) to assess whether changes observed with chronic administration of vasopressin (AVP) were a result of direct actions of AVP or the consequence of changes in body fluid volume. AVP was infused continuously for 2 wk (0.36 ng X kg-1 X min-1 iv), while total body weight and body water (TBW) were maintained constant (+/- 50 g) using a servo-controlled system. A metabolic cage was mounted on sensitive force transducers for continuous monitoring of TBW. The summed voltage output of these transducers was used to servo control an intravenous infusion pump that adjusted the rate of water intake required for maintenance of a constant TBW. AVP infused under these conditions chronically increased plasma AVP levels from 2 to 22 pg/ml but resulted in no change of average 24-h mean arterial pressure, plasma sodium, or osmolality. Urine excretion decreased from 800 to 200 ml/day, whereas urine osmolality increased from 430 to 1,200 mosmol/kg and remained at these levels throughout the 2-wk AVP infusion. A net loss of 20 meq sodium occurred during the 1st day of AVP infusion but thereafter was unchanged. Plasma sodium and osmolality were unchanged from control during AVP infusions. We conclude that AVP-induced changes of arterial pressure, plasma sodium concentration and osmolality, renal escape, suppression of renin activity, and most of the observed natriuresis are events normally dependent on volume expansion.

  5. Performance of dielectric elastomer actuators and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Kofod, Guggi; Shridhar, M. H.; Benslimane, Mohammed; Gravesen, Peter

    2002-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators performance depends on their construction and the way they are driven. We describe the governing equations for the dynamic performance of actuators and show examples of their use. Both the properties of the base elastomer material and the compliant electrodes influence the actuators performance. The mechanical and electrical properties of elastomers are discussed with a focus on an acrylate pressure sensitive adhesive from 3M, which is used by a number of groups. The influence of these properties on the actuator properties is analyzed.

  6. Modeling the fluid-dynamics and oxygen consumption in a porous scaffold stimulated by cyclic squeeze pressure.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Marco; Giusti, Serena; Nascimento, Diana; Silva, Ana; Boschetti, Federica; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2016-08-01

    The architecture and dynamic physical environment of tissues can be recreated in-vitro by combining 3D porous scaffolds and bioreactors able to apply controlled mechanical stimuli on cells. In such systems, the entity of the stimuli and the distribution of nutrients within the engineered construct depend on the micro-structure of the scaffolds. In this work, we present a new approach for optimizing computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) models for the investigation of fluid-induced forces generated by cyclic squeeze pressure within a porous construct, coupled with oxygen consumption of cardiomyocytes. A 2D axial symmetric macro-scaled model of a squeeze pressure bioreactor chamber was used as starting point for generating time dependent pressure profiles. Subsequently the fluid movement generated by the pressure fields was coupled with a complete 3D micro-scaled model of a porous protein cryogel. Oxygen transport and consumption inside the scaffold was evaluated considering a homogeneous distribution of cardiomyocytes throughout the structure, as confirmed by preliminary cell culture experiments. The results show that a 3D description of the system, coupling a porous geometry and time dependent pressure driven flow with fluid-structure-interaction provides an accurate and meaningful description of the microenvironment in terms of shear stress and oxygen distribution than simple stationary 2D models.

  7. Drive piston assembly for a valve actuator assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Zongxuan

    2010-02-23

    A drive piston assembly is provided that is operable to selectively open a poppet valve. The drive piston assembly includes a cartridge defining a generally stepped bore. A drive piston is movable within the generally stepped bore and a boost sleeve is coaxially disposed with respect to the drive piston. A main fluid chamber is at least partially defined by the generally stepped bore, drive piston, and boost sleeve. First and second feedback chambers are at least partially defined by the drive piston and each are disposed at opposite ends of the drive piston. At least one of the drive piston and the boost sleeve is sufficiently configured to move within the generally stepped bore in response to fluid pressure within the main fluid chamber to selectively open the poppet valve. A valve actuator assembly and engine are also provided incorporating the disclosed drive piston assembly.

  8. Mid-crustal shear zone development under retrograde conditions: pressure-temperature-fluid constraints from the Kuckaus Mylonite Zone, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Johann F. A.; Fagereng, Åke; Thomas, Sukey A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The Kuckaus Mylonite Zone (KMZ) forms part of the larger Marshall Rocks-Pofadder shear zone system, a 550 km-long, crustal-scale strike-slip shear zone system that is localized in high-grade granitoid gneisses and migmatites of the Namaqua Metamorphic Complex. Shearing along the KMZ occurred ca. 40 Ma after peak granulite-facies metamorphism during a discrete tectonic event and affected the granulites that had remained at depth since peak metamorphism. Isolated lenses of metamafic rocks within the shear zone allow the P-T-fluid conditions under which shearing occurred to be quantified. These lenses consist of an unsheared core that preserves relict granulite-facies textures and is mantled by a schistose collar and mylonitic envelope that formed during shearing. All three metamafic textural varieties contain the same amphibolite-facies mineral assemblage, from which calculated pseudosections constrain the P-T conditions of deformation at 2.7-4.2 kbar and 450-480 °C, indicating that deformation occurred at mid-crustal depths through predominantly viscous flow. Calculated T-MH2O diagrams show that the mineral assemblages were fluid saturated and that lithologies within the KMZ must have been rehydrated from an external source and retrogressed during shearing. Given that the KMZ is localized in strongly dehydrated granulites, the fluid must have been derived from an external source, with fluid flow allowed by local dilation and increased permeability within the shear zone. The absence of pervasive hydrothermal fractures or precipitates indicates that, even though the KMZ was fluid bearing, the fluid/rock ratio and fluid pressure remained low. In addition, the fluid could not have contributed to shear zone initiation, as an existing zone of enhanced permeability is required for fluid infiltration. We propose that, following initiation, fluid infiltration caused a positive feedback that allowed weakening and continued strain localization. Therefore, the main

  9. Self-actuating and locking control for nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Chung, Dong K.

    1982-01-01

    A self-actuating, self-locking flow cutoff valve particularly suited for use in a nuclear reactor of the type which utilizes a plurality of fluid support neutron absorber elements to provide for the safe shutdown of the reactor. The valve comprises a substantially vertical elongated housing and an aperture plate located in the housing for the flow of fluid therethrough, a substantially vertical elongated nozzle member located in the housing and affixed to the housing with an opening in the bottom for receiving fluid and apertures adjacent a top end for discharging fluid. The nozzle further includes two sealing means, one located above and the other below the apertures. Also located in the housing and having walls surrounding the nozzle is a flow cutoff sleeve having a fluid opening adjacent an upper end of the sleeve, the sleeve being moveable between an upper open position wherein the nozzle apertures are substantially unobstructed and a closed position wherein the sleeve and nozzle sealing surfaces are mated such that the flow of fluid through the apertures is obstructed. It is a particular feature of the present invention that the valve further includes a means for utilizing any increase in fluid pressure to maintain the cutoff sleeve in a closed position. It is another feature of the invention that there is provided a means for automatically closing the valve whenever the flow of fluid drops below a predetermined level.

  10. Actuator operated microvalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuator operated microvalve and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The microvalve comprises a SiC housing which includes a first lower portion and a second upper portion. The lower portion of the SiC housing includes a passageway therethrough, a microvalve seat, and a moveable SiC diaphragm. The SiC diaphragm includes a centrally located boss and radially extending corrugations which may be sinusoidally shaped. The boss of the SiC diaphragm moves and modulates in a range of positions between a closed position wherein the boss interengages said microvalve seat prohibiting communication of fluid through the passageway and a fully open position when the boss is spaced apart from the seat at its maximum permitting communication of fluid through said passageway. The actuator includes a SiC top plate affixed to the boss of the diaphragm and a first electrode and the second upper portion of the SiC housing further includes a second electrode.

  11. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  12. Thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports design and characterization testing of thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays. The micromirrors were fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs polysilicon surface micromachining process. The power averaging characteristic of thermal actuation is exploited in a novel line addressing scheme which reduces wiring for an n2 array to 2n wires. Mirror deflections were measured with a microscope laser interferometer system equipped with a vacuum chamber. Data presented includes device uniformity, frequency response, and deflection versus drive power for varied ambient pressure. Initial test results confirm that thermally actuated piston micromirrors offer several advantages over more common electrostatic designs. Thermally actuated micromirrors offer greater deflections at drive voltages compatible with CMOS circuitry. Measured thermal piston micromirror deflection versus drive voltage is nonlinear, but does not exhibit the 'snap through instability' characteristic of electrostatic devices. Operation of thermally actuated devices in rarefied ambient significantly decreases power dissipation. For a given deflection range, the power reduction facilitated by vacuum operation makes large arrays feasible. Frequency response of thermally actuated devices is limited by the ability of the device to dissipate heat, but operation at 1 kHz rates is feasible.

  13. Commonwealth Edison Company pressure locking test report

    SciTech Connect

    Bunte, B.D.; Kelly, J.F.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure Locking is a phenomena which can cause the unseating thrust for a gate valve to increase dramatically from its typical static unseating thrust. This can result in the valve actuator having insufficient capability to open the valve. In addition, this can result in valve damage in cases where the actuator capability exceeds the valve structural limits. For these reasons, a proper understanding of the conditions which may cause pressure locking and thermal binding, as well as a methodology for predicting the unseating thrust for a pressure locked or thermally bound valve, are necessary. This report discusses the primary mechanisms which cause pressure locking. These include sudden depressurization of piping adjacent to the valve and pressurization of fluid trapped in the valve bonnet due to heat transfer. This report provides a methodology for calculating the unseating thrust for a valve which is pressure locked. This report provides test data which demonstrates the accuracy of the calculation methodology.

  14. Numerical Simulation of a High-Lift Configuration with Embedded Fluidic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Casalino, Damiano; Lin, John C.; Appelbaum, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed for a vertical tail configuration with deflected rudder. The suction surface of the main element of this configuration is embedded with an array of 32 fluidic actuators that produce oscillating sweeping jets. Such oscillating jets have been found to be very effective for flow control applications in the past. In the current paper, a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code known as the PowerFLOW(Registered TradeMark) code is used to simulate the entire flow field associated with this configuration, including the flow inside the actuators. The computed results for the surface pressure and integrated forces compare favorably with measured data. In addition, numerical solutions predict the correct trends in forces with active flow control compared to the no control case. Effect of varying yaw and rudder deflection angles are also presented. In addition, computations have been performed at a higher Reynolds number to assess the performance of fluidic actuators at flight conditions.

  15. A constitutive framework for the non-Newtonian pressure tensor of a simple fluid under planar flows.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Remco; Todd, B D; Luding, Stefan

    2013-06-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of an atomic fluid under shear flow, planar elongational flow, and a combination of shear and elongational flow are unified consistently with a tensorial model over a wide range of strain rates. A model is presented that predicts the pressure tensor for a non-Newtonian bulk fluid under a homogeneous planar flow field. The model provides a quantitative description of the strain-thinning viscosity, pressure dilatancy, deviatoric viscoelastic lagging, and out-of-flow-plane pressure anisotropy. The non-equilibrium pressure tensor is completely described through these four quantities and can be calculated as a function of the equilibrium material constants and the velocity gradient. This constitutive framework in terms of invariants of the pressure tensor departs from the conventional description that deals with an orientation-dependent description of shear stresses and normal stresses. The present model makes it possible to predict the full pressure tensor for a simple fluid under various types of flows without having to produce these flow types explicitly in a simulation or experiment.

  16. One-equation modeling and validation of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jae-San; Han, Jae-Hung

    2014-10-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators with an asymmetric electrode configuration can generate a wall-bounded jet without mechanical moving parts, which require considerable modifications of existing aeronautical objects and which incur high maintenance costs. Despite this potential, one factor preventing the wider application of such actuators is the lack of a reliable actuator model. It is difficult to develop such a model because calculating the ion-electric field and fluid interaction consume a high amount calculation effort during the numerical analysis. Thus, the authors proposed a semi-empirical model which predicted the thrust of plasma actuators with a simple equation. It gave a numeric thrust value, and we implemented the value on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver to describe the two-dimensional flow field induced by the actuator. However, the model had a narrow validation range, depending on the empirical formula, and it did not fully consider environment variables. This study presents an improved model by replacing the empirical formulae in the previous model with physical equations that take into account physical phenomena and environmental variables. During this process, additional operation parameters, such as pressure, temperature and ac waveforms, are newly taken to predict the thrust performance of the actuators with a wider range of existing parameters, the thickness of the dielectric barrier, the exposed electrode, the dielectric constant, the ac frequency and the voltage amplitude. Thrust prediction curves from the model are compared to those of earlier experimental results, showing that the average error is less than 5% for more than one hundred instances of data. As in the earlier work, the predicted thrust value is implemented on a CFD solver, and two-dimensional wall-jet velocity profiles induced by the actuator are compared to the previous experimental results.

  17. A Parylene Bellows Electrochemical Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-Ying; Sheybani, Roya; Gutierrez, Christian A.; Kuo, Jonathan T. W.; Meng, Ellis

    2011-01-01

    We present the first electrochemical actuator with Parylene bellows for large-deflection operation. The bellows diaphragm was fabricated using a polyethylene-glycol-based sacrificial molding technique followed by coating in Parylene C. Bellows were mechanically characterized and integrated with a pair of interdigitated electrodes to form an electrochemical actuator that is suitable for low-power pumping of fluids. Pump performance (gas generation rate and pump efficiency) was optimized through a careful examination of geometrical factors. Overall, a maximum pump efficiency of 90% was achieved in the case of electroplated electrodes, and a deflection of over 1.5 mm was demonstrated. Real-time wireless operation was achieved. The complete fabrication process and the materials used in this actuator are bio-compatible, which makes it suitable for biological and medical applications. PMID:21318081

  18. Pressure-temperature-fluid constraints for the Emmaville-Torrington emerald deposit, New South Wales, Australia: Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loughrey, Lara; Marshall, Dan; Jones, Peter; Millsteed, Paul; Main, Arthur

    2012-06-01

    The Emmaville-Torrington emeralds were first discovered in 1890 in quartz veins hosted within a Permian metasedimentary sequence, consisting of meta-siltstones, slates and quartzites intruded by pegmatite and aplite veins from the Moule Granite. The emerald deposit genesis is consistent with a typical granite-related emerald vein system. Emeralds from these veins display colour zonation alternating between emerald and clear beryl. Two fluid inclusion types are identified: three-phase (brine+vapour+halite) and two-phase (vapour+liquid) fluid inclusions. Fluid inclusion studies indicate the emeralds were precipitated from saline fluids ranging from approximately 33 mass percent NaCl equivalent. Formational pressures and temperatures of 350 to 400 °C and approximately 150 to 250 bars were derived from fluid inclusion and petrographic studies that also indicate emerald and beryl precipitation respectively from the liquid and vapour portions of a two-phase (boiling) system. The distinct colour zonations observed in the emerald from these deposits is the first recorded emerald locality which shows evidence of colour variation as a function of boiling. The primary three-phase and primary two-phase FITs are consistent with alternating chromium-rich `striped' colour banding. Alternating emerald zones with colourless beryl are due to chromium and vanadium partitioning in the liquid portion of the boiling system. The chemical variations observed at Emmaville-Torrington are similar to other colour zoned emeralds from other localities worldwide likely precipitated from a boiling system as well.

  19. Thermodynamic and fluid mechanic analysis of rapid pressurization in a dead-end tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Ian H.

    1989-01-01

    Three models have been applied to very rapid compression of oxygen in a dead-ended tube. Pressures as high as 41 MPa (6000 psi) leading to peak temperatures of 1400 K are predicted. These temperatures are well in excess of the autoignition temperature (750 K) of teflon, a frequently used material for lining hoses employed in oxygen service. These findings are in accord with experiments that have resulted in ignition and combustion of the teflon, leading to the combustion of the stainless steel braiding and catastrophic failure. The system analyzed was representative of a capped off-high-pressure oxygen line, which could be part of a larger system. Pressurization of the larger system would lead to compression in the dead-end line, and possible ignition of the teflon liner. The model consists of a large plenum containing oxygen at the desired pressure (500 to 6000 psi). The plenum is connected via a fast acting valve to a stainless steel tube 2 cm inside diameter. Opening times are on the order of 15 ms. Downstream of the valve is an orifice sized to increase filling times to around 100 ms. The total length from the valve to the dead-end is 150 cm. The distance from the valve to the orifice is 95 cm. The models describe the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the flow, and do not include any combustion phenomena. A purely thermodynamic model assumes filling to be complete upstream of the orifice before any gas passes through the orifice. This simplification is reasonable based on experiment and computer modeling. Results show that peak temperatures as high as 4800 K can result from recompression of the gas after expanding through the orifice. An approximate transient model without an orifice was developed assuming an isentropic compression process. An analytical solution was obtained. Results indicated that fill times can be considerably shorter than valve opening times. The third model was a finite difference, 1-D transient compressible flow model. Results from

  20. Carbonation by fluid-rock interactions at high-pressure conditions: Implications for carbon cycling in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, Francesca; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Beyssac, Olivier; Martinez, Isabelle; Ague, Jay J.; Chaduteau, Carine

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate-bearing lithologies are the main carbon carrier into subduction zones. Their evolution during metamorphism largely controls the fate of carbon, regulating its fluxes between shallow and deep reservoirs. Recent estimates predict that almost all subducted carbon is transferred into the crust and lithospheric mantle during subduction metamorphism via decarbonation and dissolution reactions at high-pressure conditions. Here we report the occurrence of eclogite-facies marbles associated with metasomatic systems in Alpine Corsica (France). The occurrence of these marbles along major fluid-conduits as well as textural, geochemical and isotopic data indicating fluid-mineral reactions are compelling evidence for the precipitation of these carbonate-rich assemblages from carbonic fluids during metamorphism. The discovery of metasomatic marbles brings new insights into the fate of carbonic fluids formed in subducting slabs. We infer that rock carbonation can occur at high-pressure conditions by either vein-injection or chemical replacement mechanisms. This indicates that carbonic fluids produced by decarbonation reactions and carbonate dissolution may not be directly transferred to the mantle wedge, but can interact with slab and mantle-forming rocks. Rock-carbonation by fluid-rock interactions may have an important impact on the residence time of carbon and oxygen in subduction zones and lithospheric mantle reservoirs as well as carbonate isotopic signatures in subduction zones. Furthermore, carbonation may modulate the emission of CO2 at volcanic arcs over geological time scales.

  1. Fluid Shifts Before, During and After Prolonged Space Flight and Their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, Alan; Dulchavsky, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Future human space travel will primarily consist of long duration missions onboard the International Space Station or exploration class missions to Mars, its moons, or nearby asteroids. Current evidence suggests that long duration missions might increase risk of permanent ocular structural and functional changes, possibly due to increased intracranial pressure resulting from a spaceflight-induced cephalad (headward) fluid shift.

  2. Fast circulation of cerebrospinal fluid: an alternative perspective on the protective role of high intracranial pressure in ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wostyn, Peter; De Groot, Veva; Van Dam, Debby; Audenaert, Kurt; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2016-05-01

    As ocular hypertension refers to a condition in which the intraocular pressure is consistently elevated but without development of glaucoma, study of it may provide important clues to factors that may play a protective role in glaucoma. β-amyloid, one of the key histopathological findings in Alzheimer's disease, has been reported to increase by chronic elevation of intraocular pressure in animals with experimentally induced ocular hypertension and to cause retinal ganglion cell death, pointing to similarities in molecular cell death mechanisms between glaucoma and Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, recent studies have reported that intracranial pressure is higher in patients with ocular hypertension compared with controls, giving rise to the idea that elevated intracranial pressure may provide a protective effect for the optic nerve by decreasing the trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference. The speculation that the higher intracranial pressure reported in ocular hypertension patients may protect against glaucoma mainly through a lower trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference remains at least questionable. Here, we present an alternative viewpoint, according to which the protective effect of higher intracranial pressure could be due, at least in part, to a pressure-independent mechanism, namely faster cerebrospinal fluid production leading to increased cerebrospinal fluid turnover with enhanced removal of potentially neurotoxic waste products that accumulate in the optic nerve. This suggests a new hypothesis for glaucoma, which, just like Alzheimer's disease, may be considered then as an imbalance between production and clearance of neurotoxins, including β-amyloid. If confirmed, then strategies to improve cerebrospinal fluid flow are reasonable and could provide a new therapeutic approach for stopping the neurotoxic β-amyloid pathway in glaucoma.

  3. Spectroscopy of cyanine dyes in fluid solution at atmospheric and high pressure: The effect of viscosity on nonradiative processes

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, S.; Sauerwein, B.; Drickamer, H.G.; Schuster, G.B. )

    1994-12-22

    The spectroscopy of cyanine dyes was examined at atmospheric pressure and at high pressure in a series of alcohols and other solvents. Variation of external pressure provides the means to control viscosity over a wide range in one solvent at constant temperature. The findings reveal that the nonradiative relaxation of cyanines in fluid solution can occur when the motion leading to the formation of the cis isomer is stopped completely. Analysis of the viscosity dependence of the nonradiative relaxation rate constant reveals consistent deviation from the Kramers-DSE relation. 33 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Valves Based on Amplified Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Letty, R.; Lhermet, N.; Patient, G.; Claeyssen, F.; Lang, M.

    2004-10-01

    Amplified Piezo Actuators have been developed at CEDRAT TECHNOLOGIES for several years and found several applications in space. Their well-known advantages (rapid response and precise positioning) have been used in valve designs to obtain either rapid or fine proportional valves. A first gas valve is using a small amplified piezo actuator and is further driven with a switched amplifier to get a high frequency modulation. A frequency modulation higher than 400 Hz with a stroke of 100 m has been measured. These properties can also be used for gasoline injectors. A second gas valve is also using an amplified piezo actuator, a linear amplifier, and a servo controller to get an accurate proportional valve dedicated to precise gas flow control in the fields of instrumentation and space. A linear and stable flow control has been demonstrated. The low power consumption of the piezoelectric valve in the space applications is an additional advantage. A stable flow of dry Nitrogen ranging from 0.1 sccm to 200 sccm has been measured with an inlet pressure of 1 bar. These valves have been designed with the help of several modelling tools: finite element procedure for the electro-mechanical part, the contact mechanics between the poppet and the seat, the computational fluid dynamics. The valves have been further measured by using several measuring equipment's, including a laser interferometer, a spectrum analyser to measure the gas flow stability, Thermal vacuum and leak tests have also been performed. A special emphasis is realised on the driving and control aspects of this valve for space applications.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage as influenced by ventricular pressure in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    McComb, J G; Davson, H; Hyman, S; Weiss, M H

    1982-06-01

    Artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) containing radioisotope iodinated (125I) serum albumin (RISA) and either blue dextran or indigo carmine was given to white New Zealand rabbits over 4 hours. In one group it was given by ventriculocisternal perfusion, in one by ventricular infusion, and in one by cisterna magna infusion. Blood was sampled continuously from the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) or intermittently from the systemic arterial circulation. Removal of CSF from the cisterna magna during the ventriculocisternal perfusion kept the intracranial pressure (ICP) at 0 to 5 torr, whereas ventricular or cisterna magna infusion raised the ICP to 20 to 30 torr and 15 to 20 torr, respectively. In the two groups with raised ICP, an increased concentration of RISA was present in the optic nerves, olfactory bulbs, episcleral tissue, and deep cervical lymph nodes; but this was not found in the group with normal ICP. In all three groups, the concentration of RISA in the SSS blood was the same as in the systemic arterial blood. The concentration gradient of RISA across the cerebral cortex was similar in both the ventriculocisternal perfusion and the ventricular infusion groups. With cisterna magna infusion, the concentration of RISA was the same on the cortical surface and less in the ventricles compared with the ventricular infusion. It is concluded that, with elevated ICP, CSF drained via pathways that are less evident under normal pressure. Drainage of CSF was similar irrespective of whether the infusion site was the ventricles or cisterna magna. It did not appear that acute dilatation of the ventricles during ventricular infusion compromised the subarachnoid space over the surface of the hemisphere, as the concentration of RISA on the convexities and in the SSS blood did not significantly differ between the groups. Transcortical bulk transfer of CSF was not evident with raised ICP.

  6. Tumor interstitial fluid pressure as an early-response marker for anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Stephane; Allegrini, Peter R; Becquet, Mike M; McSheehy, Paul Mj

    2009-09-01

    Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV) determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days) or later (6 or 7 days) lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P < or = .005) correlated with late changes in tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development.

  7. Hybrid simulations of magnetic reconnection with kinetic ions and fluid electron pressure anisotropy

    DOE PAGES

    Le, A.; Daughton, W.; Karimabadi, H.; ...

    2016-03-16

    We present the first hybrid simulations with kinetic ions and recently developed equations of state for the electron fluid appropriate for reconnection with a guide field. The equations of state account for the main anisotropy of the electron pressure tensor.Magnetic reconnection is studied in two systems, an initially force-free current sheet and a Harris sheet. The hybrid model with the equations of state is compared to two other models, hybrid simulations with isothermal electrons and fully kinetic simulations. Including the anisotropicequations of state in the hybrid model provides a better match to the fully kinetic model. In agreement with fullymore » kinetic results, the main feature captured is the formation of an electron current sheet that extends several ion inertial lengths. This electron current sheet modifies the Hall magnetic field structure near the X-line, and it is not observed in the standard hybrid model with isotropic electrons. The saturated reconnection rate in this regime nevertheless remains similar in all three models. Here, implications for global modeling are discussed.« less

  8. Hybrid simulations of magnetic reconnection with kinetic ions and fluid electron pressure anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Le, A.; Daughton, W.; Karimabadi, H.; Egedal, J.

    2016-03-16

    We present the first hybrid simulations with kinetic ions and recently developed equations of state for the electron fluid appropriate for reconnection with a guide field. The equations of state account for the main anisotropy of the electron pressure tensor.Magnetic reconnection is studied in two systems, an initially force-free current sheet and a Harris sheet. The hybrid model with the equations of state is compared to two other models, hybrid simulations with isothermal electrons and fully kinetic simulations. Including the anisotropicequations of state in the hybrid model provides a better match to the fully kinetic model. In agreement with fully kinetic results, the main feature captured is the formation of an electron current sheet that extends several ion inertial lengths. This electron current sheet modifies the Hall magnetic field structure near the X-line, and it is not observed in the standard hybrid model with isotropic electrons. The saturated reconnection rate in this regime nevertheless remains similar in all three models. Here, implications for global modeling are discussed.

  9. Modeling the effect of anisotropic pressure on tokamak plasmas normal modes and continuum using fluid approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z. S.; Hole, M. J.; Fitzgerald, M.

    2015-09-01

    Extending the ideal MHD stability code MISHKA, a new code, MISHKA-A, is developed to study the impact of pressure anisotropy on plasma stability. Based on full anisotropic equilibrium and geometry, the code can provide normal mode analysis with three fluid closure models: the single adiabatic model (SA), the double adiabatic model (CGL) and the incompressible model. A study on the plasma continuous spectrum shows that in low beta, large aspect ratio plasma, the main impact of anisotropy lies in the modification of the BAE gap and the sound frequency, if the q profile is conserved. The SA model preserves the BAE gap structure as ideal MHD, while in CGL the lowest frequency branch does not touch zero frequency at the resonant flux surface where m   +   nq   =   0, inducing a gap at very low frequency. Also, the BAE gap frequency with bi-Maxwellian distribution in both model becomes higher if {{p}\\bot} \\gt {{p}\\parallel} with a q profile dependency. As a benchmark of the code, we study the m/n   =   1/1 internal kink mode. Numerical calculation of the marginal stability boundary with bi-Maxwellian distribution shows a good agreement with the generalized incompressible Bussac criterion (Mikhailovskii 1983 Sov. J. Plasma Phys. 9 190): the mode is stabilized(destabilized) if {{p}\\parallel}\\lt {{p}\\bot} ({{p}\\parallel}\\gt{{p}\\bot} ).

  10. Hybrid simulations of magnetic reconnection with kinetic ions and fluid electron pressure anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, A.; Daughton, W.; Karimabadi, H.; Egedal, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present the first hybrid simulations with kinetic ions and recently developed equations of state for the electron fluid appropriate for reconnection with a guide field. The equations of state account for the main anisotropy of the electron pressure tensor. Magnetic reconnection is studied in two systems, an initially force-free current sheet and a Harris sheet. The hybrid model with the equations of state is compared to two other models, hybrid simulations with isothermal electrons and fully kinetic simulations. Including the anisotropic equations of state in the hybrid model provides a better match to the fully kinetic model. In agreement with fully kinetic results, the main feature captured is the formation of an electron current sheet that extends several ion inertial lengths. This electron current sheet modifies the Hall magnetic field structure near the X-line, and it is not observed in the standard hybrid model with isotropic electrons. The saturated reconnection rate in this regime nevertheless remains similar in all three models. Implications for global modeling are discussed.

  11. Vibration-based damage detection for filament wound pressure vessel filled with fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Wu, Z.; Li, H.

    2008-03-01

    Filament wound pressure vessels have been extensively used in industry and engineering. The existing damage detection and health monitoring methods for these vessels, such as X-ray and ultrasonic scan, can not meet the requirement of online damage detection; moreover optical grating fibre can only sense the local damage, but not the damage far away from the location of sensors. Vibration-based damage detection methods have the potential to meet such requirements. There methods are based on the fact that damages in a structure results in a change in structural dynamic characteristics. A damage detection method based on a residual associated with output-only subspace-based modal identification and global or focused chi^2-tests built on that residual has been proposed and successfully experimented on a variety of test cases. The purpose of this work is to describe the damage detection method and apply this method to assess the composite structure filled with fluid. The results of identification and damage detection will be presented.

  12. Radiocurability Is Associated with Interstitial Fluid Pressure in Human Tumor Xenografts1

    PubMed Central

    Rofstad, Einar K; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Brurberg, Kjetil G; Mathiesen, Berit; Galappathi, Kanthi; Simonsen, Trude G

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) has been shown to be an independent prognostic parameter for disease-free survival in cervical carcinoma patients treated with radiation therapy. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The main aims of this study were to investigate whether tumor radiocurability may be associated with IFP and, if so, to identify possible mechanisms. Human melanoma xenografts transplanted intradermally or in window chamber preparations in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as preclinical tumor models. Radiation dose resulting in 50% local tumor control was higher by a factor of 1.19 ± 0.06 in tumors with IFP ≥ 9 mm Hg than in tumors with IFP ≤ 7 mm Hg. Tumor IFP was positively correlated to vessel segment length and vessel tortuosity and was inversely correlated to vessel density. Compared with tumors with low IFP, tumors with high IFP showed high resistance to blood flow, high frequency of Po2 fluctuations, and high fractions of acutely hypoxic cells, whereas the fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells and the fraction of chronically hypoxic cells did not differ between tumors with high and tumors with low IFP. IFP showed a significant correlation to the fraction of acutely hypoxic cells, probably because both parameters were determined primarily by the microvascular resistance to blood flow. Therefore, the observed association between tumor radiocurability and IFP was most likely an indirect consequence of a strong relationship between IFP and the fraction of acutely hypoxic cells. PMID:19881960

  13. The predictive value of cerebrospinal fluid tap-test in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, B P; Carelli, E F; Honorato, D C; Facure, J J

    1997-06-01

    Eighteen patients (mean age of 66.5 years) with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) underwent a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt surgery. Prior to operation a cerebrospinal fluid tap-test (CSF-TT) was performed with measurements of gait pattern and psychometric functions (memory, visuo-motor speed and visuo-constructive skills) before and after the removal of 50 ml CSF by lumbar puncture (LP). Fifteen patients improved and 3 were unchanged after surgery. Short duration of disease, gait disturbance preceding mental deterioration, wide temporal horns and small sulci on CT-scan were associated with good outcome after shunting. There was a good correlation between the results of CSF-TT and shunt surgery (chi 2 = 4.11, phi = 0.48, p < 0.05), with gait test showing highest correlation (r = 0.99, p = 0.01). In conclusion, this version of CSF-TT proved to be an effective test to predict improvement after shunting in patients with NPH.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of effective fluid and rock bulk modulus due to changes in pore pressure, temperature and saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Tuhin; Avseth, Per; Landrø, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Fluid substitution plays a vital role in time-lapse seismic modeling and interpretation. It is, therefore, very important to quantify as exactly as possible the changes in fluid bulk modulus due to changes in reservoir parameters. In this paper, we analyze the sensitivities in effective fluid bulk modulus due to changes in reservoir parameters like saturation, pore-pressure and temperature. The sensitivities are analyzed for two extreme bounds, i.e. the Voigt average and the Reuss average, for various fluid combinations (i.e. oil-water, gas-water and gas-oil). We quantify that the effects of pore-pressure and saturation changes are highest in the case of gas-water combination, while the effect of temperature is highest for oil-gas combination. Our results show that sensitivities vary with the bounds, even for same amount of changes in any reservoir parameter. In 4D rock physics studies, we often neglect the effects of pore-pressure or temperature changes assuming that those effects are negligible compare to the effect due to saturation change. Our analysis shows that pore-pressure and temperature changes can be vital and sometimes higher than the effect of saturation change. We investigate these effects on saturated rock bulk modulus. We first compute frame bulk modulus using the Modified Hashin Shtrikman (MHS) model for carbonate rocks and then perform fluid substitution using the Gassmann equation. We consider upper bound of the MHS as elastic behavior for stiffer rocks and lower bound of the MHS as elastic behavior for softer rocks. We then investigate four various combinations: stiff rock with upper bound (the Voigt bound) as effective fluid modulus, stiff rock with lower bound (Reuss bound) as effective fluid modulus, soft rock with upper bound as effective fluid modulus and soft rock with lower bound as effective fluid modulus. Our results show that the effect of any reservoir parameter change is highest for soft rock and lower bound combination and lowest

  15. High-Pressure Transport Properties Of Fluids: Theory And Data From Levitated Drops At Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth; Ohsaka, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Although the high pressure multicomponent fluid conservation equations have already been derived and approximately validated for binary mixtures by this PI, the validation of the multicomponent theory is hampered by the lack of existing mixing rules for property calculations. Classical gas dynamics theory can provide property mixing-rules at low pressures exclusively. While thermal conductivity and viscosity high-pressure mixing rules have been documented in the literature, there is no such equivalent for the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. The primary goal of this investigation is to extend the low pressure mixing rule theory to high pressures and validate the new theory with experimental data from levitated single drops. The two properties that will be addressed are the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. To validate/determine the property calculations, ground-based experiments from levitated drops are being conducted.

  16. Carotid Atherosclerosis, Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure, and Retinal Vessel Diameters: The Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities in Community Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing Yan; Yang, Xuan; Li, Yang; Xu, Jie; Zhou, Yong; Wang, An Xin; Gao, Xiang; Xu, Liang; Wu, Shou Ling; Wei, Wen Bin; Zhao, Xing Quan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess relationships between carotid artery atherosclerosis and retinal arteriolar and venular diameters. Methods The community-based longitudinal Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community Study (APAC) included a sub-population of the Kailuan study which consisted of 101,510 employees and retirees of a coal mining industry. Based on the Chinese National Census 2010 and excluding individuals with history of cerebrovascular ischemic events, 4004 individuals were included into the APAC. All participants underwent a detailed clinical examination including blood laboratory tests and carotid artery duplex ultrasound examination. The cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) was estimated using the formula: CSFP[mmHg] = 0.44xBody Mass Index[kg/m2]+0.16xDiastolic Blood Pressure[mmHg]–0.18 x Age[Years]–1.91. Results In multivariable analysis (goodness of fit r2:0.12), thicker retinal arteries were associated with a thinner common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) (P = 0.002; standardized regression coefficient beta:-0.06; non-standardized regression coefficient B:-6.92;95% confidence interval (CI):-11.2,-2.61) after adjusting for thicker retinal nerve fiber layer (P<0.001;beta:0.18;B:0.35;95%CI:0.28,0.42), lower diastolic blood pressure (P<0.001;beta:-0.16;B:-0.17;95%CI:-0.21,-0.3), younger age (P<0.001;beta:-0.08; B:-0.16;95%;CI:-0.25,-0.08), and less abdominal circumference (P = 0.003;beta:-0.06;B:-0.11;95%CI:-0.18,-0.03). Thicker retinal vein diameter was associated (r = 0.40) with higher estimated CSFP (P<0.001;beta:0.09;B:0.78;95%CI:0.47,1.08) after adjusting for wider retinal arteries (P<0.001;beta:0.27;B:0.36;95%CI:0.31,0.41), thicker retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (P = 0.03;beta:0.22;B:0.56;95%CI:0.46,0.65) and male gender (P<0.001;beta:-0.08;B:-3.98;95%CI:-5.88,2.09). Conclusions Thinner retinal artery diameter was significantly, however weakly, associated with increased common carotid artery IMT. It suggests that retinal

  17. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  18. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  19. A thermokinetically driven metal-hydride actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kwangmok; Kim, Kwang J.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a novel thermokinetically-driven actuator technology based on the physics of metal hydrides (MH's). A metal hydride absorbs and desorbs hydrogen due to the imposed temperature swing(s). The MH can also work as an effective thermally-driven hydrogen compressor producing more than 5,000 psia net pressure swing. The MH actuation system can be built in a simple structure, exhibits high power, produces soft actuating, and is essentially noiseless. Moreover, it is much more powerful and compact than conventional pneumatic systems that require bulky auxiliary systems. It is our belief that the MH actuators are useful for many emerging industrial, biorobotic, and civil structural applications. In this paper, we report the recent preliminary experimental results for a laboratory-prototyped MH actuation system. In particular, the dynamic response characteristics, enhanced controllability, thermodynamic performances, and reliability of the metal hydride actuator were studied in order to estimate the actuation capability of the MH actuator. A unique design of the MH actuator was created. It encases a so-called "porous metal hydride (PMH)" in the reactor to effectively achieve desirable performance by improving overall thermal conductance.

  20. Fluid-rock interaction and evolution of a high-pressure/low-temperature vein system in eclogite from New Caledonia: insights into intraslab fluid flow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taetz, Stephan; John, Timm; Bröcker, Michael; Spandler, Carl

    2016-11-01

    A complex high-pressure/low-temperature vein system that cross-cuts eclogitic host rocks of the Pouébo Eclogite Melange (northern New Caledonia) records the prograde blueschist-to-eclogite transition and associated formation of garnet-quartz-phengite veins. Geothermobarometry (Grt-Cpx-Ph, Zr-in-rutile) and pseudosection calculations indicate peak metamorphic conditions of ca. 540 °C and 1.9-2.2 GPa. Petrological and geochemical observations as well as pseudosection modelling suggest that the main vein network is formed by dehydration processes that collected internally derived fluids related to the breakdown of hydrous phases (amphibole, chlorite, epidote) during prograde metamorphism. The lower solid volume of the newly formed phases and the associated increase in pore fluid pressure lead to the formation of veins that allowed for accumulation and channelized evacuation of these fluids. Such veins do not show metasomatic alteration selvages because the fluid-rock system had been in chemical equilibrium. A second vein type (transport veins) records the superimposed influx of external fluids with slightly different composition that most likely are related to similar dehydration reactions in other parts of the subducting slab. Due to the source-rock-imposed compositional differences, these fluids are not in equilibrium with the infiltrated rock volume and induce the formation of distinct metasomatic selvages by dissolution-precipitation processes. Mass-balance calculations show that Ca, Na and Li are added to the selvage by the external fluid. LILE and to a lesser extend also HREE are mobilized and removed from the selvage. The LREE are predominantly buffered by newly formed minerals (e.g. epidote). Petrological evidence implies that the studied vein system formed while the sample was still part of a coherent subducting slab. Rb-Sr geochronology indicates that this occurred at 38.2 ± 0.3 Ma. This age is ca. 6 myr younger than the hitherto presumed peak metamorphic

  1. A robust multi-grid pressure-based algorithm for multi-fluid flow at all speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, M.; Moukalled, F.; Sekar, B.

    2003-04-01

    This paper reports on the implementation and testing, within a full non-linear multi-grid environment, of a new pressure-based algorithm for the prediction of multi-fluid flow at all speeds. The algorithm is part of the mass conservation-based algorithms (MCBA) group in which the pressure correction equation is derived from overall mass conservation. The performance of the new method is assessed by solving a series of two-dimensional two-fluid flow test problems varying from turbulent low Mach number to supersonic flows, and from very low to high fluid density ratios. Solutions are generated for several grid sizes using the single grid (SG), the prolongation grid (PG), and the full non-linear multi-grid (FMG) methods. The main outcomes of this study are: (i) a clear demonstration of the ability of the FMG method to tackle the added non-linearity of multi-fluid flows, which is manifested through the performance jump observed when using the non-linear multi-grid approach as compared to the SG and PG methods; (ii) the extension of the FMG method to predict turbulent multi-fluid flows at all speeds. The convergence history plots and CPU-times presented indicate that the FMG method is far more efficient than the PG method and accelerates the convergence rate over the SG method, for the problems solved and the grids used, by a factor reaching a value as high as 15.

  2. Comparative evaluation of central venous pressure and sonographic inferior vena cava variability in assessing fluid responsiveness in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Manjri; Sen, Jyotsna; Goyal, Sandeep; Chaudhry, Dhruva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Fluid infusion, the most critical step in the resuscitation of patients with septic shock, needs preferably continuous invasive hemodynamic monitoring. The study was planned to evaluate the efficacy of ultrasonographically measured inferior vena cava collapsibility index (IVC CI) in comparison to central venous pressure (CVP) in predicting fluid responsiveness in septic shock. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients of septic shock requiring ventilatory support (invasive/noninvasive) were included. Patients with congestive heart failure, raised intra-abdominal pressure, and poor echo window were excluded from the study. They were randomly divided into two groups based on mode of fluid resuscitation – Group I (CVP) and Group II (IVC CI). Primary end-points were mean arterial pressure (MAP) of ≥65 mmHg and CVP >12 mmHg or IVC CI <20% in Groups I and II, respectively. Patients were followed till achievement of end-points or maximum of 6 h. Outcome variables (pulse rate, MAP, urine output, pH, base deficit, and ScvO2 ) were serially measured till the end of the study. Survival at 2 and 4 weeks was used as secondary end-point. Results: Primary end-point was reached in 31 patients (15 in Group I and 16 in Group II). Fluid infusion, by either method, had increased CVP and decreased IVC CI with resultant negative correlation between them (Pearson correlation coefficient –0.626). There was no significant difference in the amount of fluid infused and time to reach end-point in two groups. Comparison in outcome variables at baseline and end-point showed no significant difference including mortality. Conclusion: CVP and IVC CI are negatively correlated with fluid resuscitation, and both methods can be used for resuscitation, with IVC CI being noninferior to CVP. PMID:28149028

  3. Microbial diversity in ultra-high-pressure rocks and fluids from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Project in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Hailiang; Xu, Zhiqin; Zhao, Donggao; Zhang, Chuanlun

    2005-06-01

    Microbial communities in ultra-high-pressure (UHP) rocks and drilling fluids from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Project were characterized. The rocks had a porosity of 1 to 3.5% and a permeability of approximately 0.5 mDarcy. Abundant fluid and gas inclusions were present in the minerals. The rocks contained significant amounts of Fe2O3, FeO, P2O5, and nitrate (3 to 16 ppm). Acridine orange direct counting and phospholipid fatty acid analysis indicated that the total counts in the rocks and the fluids were 5.2 x 10(3) to 2.4 x 10(4) cells/g and 3.5 x 10(8) to 4.2 x 10(9) cells/g, respectively. Enrichment assays resulted in successful growth of thermophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria from the fluids, and some of these bacteria reduced Fe(III) to magnetite. 16S rRNA gene analyses indicated that the rocks were dominated by sequences similar to sequences of Proteobacteria and that most organisms were related to nitrate reducers from a saline, alkaline, cold habitat; however, some phylotypes were either members of a novel lineage or closely related to uncultured clones. The bacterial communities in the fluids were more diverse and included Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, gram-positive bacteria, Planctomycetes, and Candidatus taxa. The archaeal diversity was lower, and most sequences were not related to any known cultivated species. Some archaeal sequences were 90 to 95% similar to sequences recovered from ocean sediments or other subsurface environments. Some archaeal sequences from the drilling fluids were >93% similar to sequences of Sulfolobus solfataricus, and the thermophilic nature was consistent with the in situ temperature. We inferred that the microbes in the UHP rocks reside in fluid and gas inclusions, whereas those in the drilling fluids may be derived from subsurface fluids.

  4. Microbial Diversity in Ultra-High-Pressure Rocks and Fluids from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Project in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gengxin; Dong, Hailiang; Xu, Zhiqin; Zhao, Donggao; Zhang, Chuanlun

    2005-01-01

    Microbial communities in ultra-high-pressure (UHP) rocks and drilling fluids from the Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling Project were characterized. The rocks had a porosity of 1 to 3.5% and a permeability of ∼0.5 mDarcy. Abundant fluid and gas inclusions were present in the minerals. The rocks contained significant amounts of Fe2O3, FeO, P2O5, and nitrate (3 to 16 ppm). Acridine orange direct counting and phospholipid fatty acid analysis indicated that the total counts in the rocks and the fluids were 5.2 × 103 to 2.4 × 104 cells/g and 3.5 × 108 to 4.2 × 109 cells/g, respectively. Enrichment assays resulted in successful growth of thermophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria from the fluids, and some of these bacteria reduced Fe(III) to magnetite. 16S rRNA gene analyses indicated that the rocks were dominated by sequences similar to sequences of Proteobacteria and that most organisms were related to nitrate reducers from a saline, alkaline, cold habitat; however, some phylotypes were either members of a novel lineage or closely related to uncultured clones. The bacterial communities in the fluids were more diverse and included Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, gram-positive bacteria, Planctomycetes, and Candidatus taxa. The archaeal diversity was lower, and most sequences were not related to any known cultivated species. Some archaeal sequences were 90 to 95% similar to sequences recovered from ocean sediments or other subsurface environments. Some archaeal sequences from the drilling fluids were >93% similar to sequences of Sulfolobus solfataricus, and the thermophilic nature was consistent with the in situ temperature. We inferred that the microbes in the UHP rocks reside in fluid and gas inclusions, whereas those in the drilling fluids may be derived from subsurface fluids. PMID:15933024

  5. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  6. In situ multipurpose time-resolved spectrometer for monitoring nanoparticle generation in a high-pressure fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shaoyu; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2012-07-15

    We developed a multipurpose time-resolved spectrometer for studying the dynamics of nanoparticles generated by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) in a high-pressure fluid. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure optical cell and three spectrometers for in situ measurements. The optical cell was designed for experiments at temperatures up to 400 K and pressures up to 30 MPa with fluctuations within {+-}0.1% h{sup -1}. The three spectrometers were used for the following in situ measurements at high pressures: (i) transient absorption spectrum measurements from 350 to 850 nm to investigate the dynamics of nanoparticle generation from nanoseconds to milliseconds after laser irradiation, (ii) absorption spectrum measurements from 220 to 900 nm to observe the time evolution of nanoparticles from seconds to hours after laser ablation, and (iii) dynamic light scattering measurements to track nanoparticles with sizes from 10 nm to 10 {mu}m in the time range from seconds to hours after laser ablation. By combining these three spectrometers, we demonstrate in situ measurements of gold nanoparticles generated by PLA in supercritical fluids. This is the first report of in situ time-resolved measurements of the dynamics of nanoparticles generated in a supercritical fluid.

  7. Ferroelectric Fluid Flow Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An active valve is controlled and driven by external electrical actuation of a ferroelectric actuator to provide for improved passage of the fluid during certain time periods and to provide positive closure of the valve during other time periods. The valve provides improved passage in the direction of flow and positive closure in the direction against the flow. The actuator is a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature, said dome shaped actuator having a rim and an apex. and a dome height measured from a plane through said rim said apex that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and an outside surface of said dome shaped actuator.

  8. Effects of coarse grain size distribution and fine particle content on pore fluid pressure and shear behavior in experimental debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitna, Roland; Palucis, Marisa C.; Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, Kimberly M.; Dietrich, William E.

    2016-02-01

    Debris flows are typically a saturated mixture of poorly sorted particles and interstitial fluid, whose density and flow properties depend strongly on the presence of suspended fine sediment. Recent research suggests that grain size distribution (GSD) influences excess pore pressures (i.e., pressure in excess of predicted hydrostatic pressure), which in turn plays a governing role in debris flow behaviors. We report a series of controlled laboratory experiments in a 4 m diameter vertically rotating drum where the coarse particle size distribution and the content of fine particles were varied independently. We measured basal pore fluid pressures, pore fluid pressure profiles (using novel sensor probes), velocity profiles, and longitudinal profiles of the flow height. Excess pore fluid pressure was significant for mixtures with high fines fraction. Such flows exhibited lower values for their bulk flow resistance (as measured by surface slope of the flow), had damped fluctuations of normalized fluid pressure and normal stress, and had velocity profiles where the shear was concentrated at the base of the flow. These effects were most pronounced in flows with a wide coarse GSD distribution. Sustained excess fluid pressure occurred during flow and after cessation of motion. Various mechanisms may cause dilation and contraction of the flows, and we propose that the sustained excess fluid pressures during flow and once the flow has stopped may arise from hindered particle settling and yield strength of the fluid, resulting in transfer of particle weight to the fluid. Thus, debris flow behavior may be strongly influenced by sustained excess fluid pressures controlled by particle settling rates.

  9. High-pressure migmatites as source of fluids during subduction and crustal thickening: the case of the Ulten Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Roberto; Massonne, Hans-Joachim; Mazza, Sarah; Bondi, Mirella

    2010-05-01

    In subduction and continent collision zones, submersed continental crust will dehydrate and eventually melt at peak pressure-temperature (PT) conditions or during subsequent exhumation, thus forming migmatitic units like those exposed in denuded orogens. If we consider a sialic continental crust containing hydrous phases (micas ± amphibole ± epidote), the melt fraction generated at pressure generally below 4 GPa will be a hydrous granitic magma. Experimental petrology [1] and geochemistry [2] indicate that high-pressure and relatively cool granitic magmas could incorporate as much as 10 or more wt% H2O, depending on PT path, partial melting degree and initial hydrous fluid content (as intergranular free fluid and H2O stored in hydrous minerals) of the source rock. As a consequence, high-pressure migmatites produced during the submersion of continental crust in a subduction or continental collision zone may act as a sink of hydrous fluids as long as the crust is partially molten. Upon cooling and decompression towards subsolidus conditions, the fluid stored in the migmatitic leucosome will be released. These fluids have the potential to remove incompatible elements (e.g., large ion lithophile elements; light rare earth elements) from the crustal reservoir and, eventually in subduction zones, enhance the crystallization of hydrous and carbonated metasomatic phases such as amphibole, phlogopite and carbonates into the adjacent mantle [3]. However, what we direct observe and measure in high-pressure migmatites occurring in orogenic belts is the fluid linked to the actual hydrated phases, the amount and composition of which might have changed due to subsolidus evolution and late fluid influx, unrelated with the precedent geodynamic evolution. In order to estimate the fluid contribution of a crustal unit involved in an orogenic collisional setting, we have modelled the fluid content of the Ulten Zone crust, which records high PT metamorphism accompanied by white mica

  10. Preferential dissolution of SiO2 from enstatite to H2 fluid under high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Hirai, Hisako; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Okada, Taku; Nakano, Satoshi; Yagi, Takehiko

    2016-04-01

    Stability and phase relations of coexisting enstatite and H2 fluid were investigated in the pressure and temperature regions of 3.1-13.9 GPa and 1500-2000 K using laser-heated diamond-anvil cells. XRD measurements showed decomposition of enstatite upon heating to form forsterite, periclase, and coesite/stishovite. In the recovered samples, SiO2 grains were found at the margin of the heating hot spot, suggesting that the SiO2 component dissolved in the H2 fluid during heating, then precipitated when its solubility decreased with decreasing temperature. Raman and infrared spectra of the coexisting fluid phase revealed that SiH4 and H2O molecules formed through the reaction between dissolved SiO2 and H2. In contrast, forsterite and periclase crystals were found within the hot spot, which were assumed to have replaced the initial orthoenstatite crystals without dissolution. Preferential dissolution of SiO2 components of enstatite in H2 fluid, as well as that observed in the forsterite H2 system and the quartz H2 system, implies that H2-rich fluid enhances Mg/Si fractionation between the fluid and solid phases of mantle minerals.

  11. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  12. Spectral element modelling of fault-plane reflections arising from fluid pressure distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haney, M.; Snieder, R.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Hofmann, R.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of fault-plane reflections in seismic images, besides indicating the locations of faults, offers a possible source of information on the properties of these poorly understood zones. To better understand the physical mechanism giving rise to fault-plane reflections in compacting sedimentary basins, we numerically model the full elastic wavefield via the spectral element method (SEM) for several different fault models. Using well log data from the South Eugene Island field, offshore Louisiana, we derive empirical relationships between the elastic parameters (e.g. P-wave velocity and density) and the effective-stress along both normal compaction and unloading paths. These empirical relationships guide the numerical modelling and allow the investigation of how differences in fluid pressure modify the elastic wavefield. We choose to simulate the elastic wave equation via SEM since irregular model geometries can be accommodated and slip boundary conditions at an interface, such as a fault or fracture, are implemented naturally. The method we employ for including a slip interface retains the desirable qualities of SEM in that it is explicit in time and, therefore, does not require the inversion of a large matrix. We performa complete numerical study by forward modelling seismic shot gathers over a faulted earth model using SEM followed by seismic processing of the simulated data. With this procedure, we construct post-stack time-migrated images of the kind that are routinely interpreted in the seismic exploration industry. We dip filter the seismic images to highlight the fault-plane reflections prior to making amplitude maps along the fault plane. With these amplitude maps, we compare the reflectivity from the different fault models to diagnose which physical mechanism contributes most to observed fault reflectivity. To lend physical meaning to the properties of a locally weak fault zone characterized as a slip interface, we propose an equivalent-layer model

  13. Hydrostatically coupled dielectric elastomer actuators for tactile displays and cutaneous stimulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2010-04-01

    Hydrostatic coupling has been recently reported as a means to improve versatility and safety of dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators. Hydrostatically coupled DE actuators rely on an incompressible fluid that mechanically couples a DE-based active part to a passive part interfaced to the load. In this paper, we present ongoing development of bubble-like versions of such transducers, made of silicone and oil. In particular, the paper describes millimeter-scale actuators, currently being developed as soft, light, acoustically silent and cheap devices for two types of applications: tactile displays and cutaneous stimulators. In both cases, the most significant advantages of the proposed technology are represented by high versatility for design (due to the fluid based transmission mechanism), tailorable stiffness perceived by the user (obtained by adjusting the internal fluid pressure), and suitable electrical safety (enabled by both a passive interface with the user and the insulating internal fluid). Millimeter-scale prototypes showed a resonance frequency of about 250 Hz, which represents the value at which Pacinian cutaneous mechanoreceptors exhibit maximum sensitivity; this provides an optimum condition to eventually code tactile information dynamically, either in combination or as an alternative to static driving.

  14. The intra-tumoral relationship between microcirculation, interstitial fluid pressure and liposome accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Shawn; Milosevic, Michael; Tannock, Ian F; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A

    2015-08-10

    The heterogeneous intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes has been linked to both the chaotic tumor microcirculation and to elevated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we explored the relationship between tumor microcirculation, IFP, and the intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes. Measurements of the tumor microcirculation using perfusion imaging, IFP using a novel image-guided robotic needle positioning system, and the intra-tumoral distribution of liposomes using volumetric micro-CT imaging were performed in mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic MDA-MB-231 tumors. Intra-tumoral perfusion and IFP were substantially different between the two tumor implantation sites. Tumor perfusion and not vascular permeability was found to be the primary mediator of the intra-tumoral accumulation of CT-liposomes. A strong relationship was observed between the radial distribution of IFP, metrics of tumor perfusion, and the intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes. Tumors with elevated central IFP that decreased at the periphery had low perfusion and low levels of CT-liposome accumulation that increased towards the periphery. Conversely, tumors with low and radially uniform IFP exhibited higher levels of tumor perfusion and CT-liposome accumulation. Both tumor perfusion and elevated IFP exhibit substantial intra-tumoral heterogeneity and both play an integral role in mediating the intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes through a complex interactive effect. Measuring IFP in the clinical setting remains challenging and these results demonstrate that tumor perfusion imaging alone provides a robust non-invasive method to identify factors that contribute to poor liposome accumulation and may allow for pre-selection of patients that are more likely to respond to nanoparticle therapy.

  15. [Investigation of high pore fluid pressure in the Uinta Basin, Utah]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    High pore fluid pressures, approaching lithostatic, are observed in the deepest sections of the Uinta basin, Utah. The authors analyzed the cause of the anomalous overpressures with a 3-dimensional, numerical model of the evolution of the basin, including compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation as possible mechanisms. The numerical model builds the basin through time, coupling the structural, thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, and includes in situ hydrocarbon generation and migration. They used the evolution model to evaluate overpressure mechanisms and oil migration patterns for different possible conceptual models of the geologic history. Model results suggest that observed overpressures in the Uinta basin are probably caused by ongoing oil generation in strata with specific conditions of permeability, relative permeability, TOC content, and oil viscosity. They conducted a sensitivity analysis that suggests for oil generation to cause overpressures, the necessary conditions are: oil viscosity is {approximately}0.05 cP or higher, intrinsic permeability is {approximately}5 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} or lower, and source rock TOC values are {approximately}0.5% or higher. The authors also analyzed hydrocarbon migration patterns in the basin and how they are affected by the basin`s structural history. Oil migration patterns produced by the model are consistent with published oil production maps: oil moves from the deep Altamont source rocks toward Redwash, the eastern Douglas Creek Arch area, and southward towards the Sunnyside tar-sands and Book Cliffs. Peak oil generation occurs from the time of maximum burial in the mid-Tertiary ({approximately}35 to {approximately}30 Ma). Most differential uplift of the basin`s flanks probably occurs well after this time, and most oil migration to the basin`s southern and eastern flanks occurs prior to uplift of these flanks. Model results show that if the basin`s flanks are uplifted too soon, reduced

  16. Intracranial pressure pulse waveform correlates with aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid stroke volume.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Robert; Baldwin, Kevin; Fuller, Jennifer; Vespa, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Bergsneider, Marvin

    2012-11-01

    This study identifies a novel relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume through the cerebral aqueduct and the characteristic peaks of the intracranial pulse (ICP) waveform. ICP waveform analysis has become much more advanced in recent years; however, clinical practice remains restricted to mean ICP, mainly due to the lack of physiological understanding of the ICP waveform. Therefore, the present study set out to shed some light on the physiological meaning of ICP morphological metrics derived by the morphological clustering and analysis of continuous intracranial pulse (MOCAIP) algorithm by investigating their relationships with a well defined physiological variable, i.e., the stroke volume of CSF through the cerebral aqueduct. Seven patients received both overnight ICP monitoring along with a phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) of the cerebral aqueduct to quantify aqueductal stroke volume (ASV). Waveform morphological analysis of the ICP signal was performed by the MOCAIP algorithm. Following extraction of morphological metrics from the ICP signal, nine temporal ICP metrics and two amplitude-based metrics were compared with the ASV via Spearman's rank correlation. Of the nine temporal metrics correlated with the ASV, only the width of the P2 region (ICP-Wi2) reached significance. Furthermore, both ICP pulse pressure amplitude and mean ICP did not reach significance. In this study, we showed the width of the second peak (ICP-Wi2) of an ICP pulse wave is positively related to the volume of CSF movement through the cerebral aqueduct. This finding is an initial step in bridging the gap between ICP waveform morphology research and clinical practice.

  17. A Study of the Fluid-Dynamic Pressure Fields on Compressor Reed Valves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    nigher *A pressures. The total pressure ol the reservoir wnicn suppiieo the air was measured on either a lovi-incn mercury manometer or a3 -v)-incn... mercury manometer . This was the same manometer which was used to measure the total pressure of the reservoir. A pressure tap ran from this total

  18. Pressure wave propagation in fluid-filled co-axial elastic tubes. Part 2: Mechanisms for the pathogenesis of syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, P W; Berkouk, K; Lucey, A D

    2003-12-01

    Our aim in this paper is to use a simple theoretical model of the intraspinal cerebrospinal-fluid system to investigate mechanisms proposed for the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. The model is based on an inviscid theory for the propagation of pressure waves in co-axial, fluid-filled, elastic tubes. According to this model, the leading edge of a pressure pulse tends to steepen and form an elastic jump, as it propagates up the intraspinal cerebrospinal-fluid system. We show that when an elastic jump is incident on a stenosis of the spinal subarachnoid space, it reflects to form a transient, localized region of high pressure within the spinal cord that for a cough-induced pulse is estimated to be 50 to 70 mm Hg or more above the normal level in the spinal subarachnoid space. We propose this as a new mechanism whereby pressure pulses created by coughing or sneezing can generate syrinxes. We also use the same analysis to investigate Williams' suck mechanism. Our results do not support his concept, nor, in cases where the stenosis is severe, the differential-pressure-propagation mechanism recently proposed by Greitz et al. Our analysis does provide some support for the piston mechanism recently proposed by Oldfield et al. and Heiss et al. For instance, it shows clearly how the spinal cord is compressed by the formation of elastic jumps over part of the cardiac cycle. What appears to be absent for this piston mechanism is any means whereby the elastic jumps can be focused (e.g., by reflecting from a stenosis) to form a transient, localized region of high pressure within the spinal cord. Thus it would seem to offer a mechanism for syrinx progression, but not for its formation.

  19. Performance study of a hydrogen powered metal hydride actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainul Hossain Bhuiya, Md; Kim, Kwang J.

    2016-04-01

    A thermally driven hydrogen powered actuator integrating metal hydride hydrogen storage reactor, which is compact, noiseless, and able to generate smooth actuation, is presented in this article. To test the plausibility of a thermally driven actuator, a conventional piston type actuator was integrated with LaNi5 based hydrogen storage system. Copper encapsulation followed by compaction of particles into pellets, were adopted to improve overall thermal conductivity of the reactor. The operation of the actuator was thoroughly investigated for an array of operating temperature ranges. Temperature swing of the hydride reactor triggering smooth and noiseless actuation over several operating temperature ranges were monitored for quantification of actuator efficiency. Overall, the actuator generated smooth and consistent strokes during repeated cycles of operation. The efficiency of the actuator was found to be as high as 13.36% for operating a temperature range of 20 °C-50 °C. Stress-strain characteristics, actuation hysteresis etc were studied experimentally. Comparison of stress-strain characteristics of the proposed actuator with traditional actuators, artificial muscles and so on was made. The study suggests that design modification and use of high pressure hydride may enhance the performance and broaden the application horizon of the proposed actuator in future.

  20. Flexible dielectric elastomer actuators for wearable human-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzmacher, Christian; Biggs, James; Srinivasan, Mandayam

    2006-03-01

    Wearable dielectric elastomer actuators have the potential to enable new technologies, such as tactile feedback gloves for virtual reality, and to improve existing devices, such as automatic blood pressure cuffs. They are potentially lighter, quieter, thinner, simpler, and cheaper than pneumatic and hydraulic systems now used to make compliant, actuated interfaces with the human body. Achieving good performance without using a rigid frame to prestrain the actuator is a fundamental challenge in using these actuators on body. To answer this challenge, a new type of fiber-prestrained composite actuator was developed. Equations that facilitate design of the actuator are presented, along with FE analysis, material tests, and experimental results from prototypes. Bending stiffness of the actuator material was found to be comparable to textiles used in clothing, confirming wearability. Two roll-to-roll machines are also presented that permit manufacture of this material in bulk as a modular, compact, prestressed composite that can be cut, stacked, and staggered, in order to build up actuators for a range of desired forces and displacements. The electromechanical properties of single- layered actuators manufactured by this method were measured (N=5). At non-damaging voltages, blocking force ranged from 3,7-5,0 gram per centimeter of actuator width, with linear strains of 20,0-30%. Driving the actuators to breakdown produced maximum force of 8,3-10 gram/cm, and actuation strain in excess 30%. Using this actuator, a prototype tactile display was constructed and demonstrated.

  1. Engine having a variable valve actuation system

    DOEpatents

    Hefler, Gregory W.

    2005-10-12

    An engine has a cylinder head having a first surface and a second surface spaced from the first surface. A valve is moveably connected to the cylinder head. A rocker arm is connected to the valve, and a rocker shaft having a first location spaced a maximum distance from the cylinder head is connected to the rocker arm. A support member has and an actuator fluid passage network. The actuator fluid passage network defines a volume. The support member is connected to the cylinder head and is positioned such that a majority of the volume of the actuator fluid passage network is between the first location of the rocker shaft and the second surface of the cylinder head.

  2. Engine having a variable valve actuation system

    DOEpatents

    Hefler, Gregory W.

    2004-10-12

    An engine has a cylinder head having a first surface and a second surface spaced from the first surface. A valve is moveably connected to the cylinder head. A rocker arm is connected to the valve, and a rocker shaft having a first location spaced a maximum distance from the cylinder head is connected to the rocker arm. A support member has and an actuator fluid passage network. The actuator fluid passage network defines a volume. The support member is connected to the cylinder head and is positioned such that a majority of the volume of the actuator fluid passage network is between the first location of the rocker shaft and the second surface of the cylinder head.

  3. The Effect of Pressure Ratio on Unsteady Fluid-Structure Interaction Characteristics of Ball Type Control Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yang; Tu, Shan; Wang, Hongjuan

    Two-way sequential fluid-structure interaction method was used to analyze and discuss the characteristics of unsteady fluid-structure interaction of the complex flow channel of a steam turbine ball type control valve. Research indicates that when the pressure ratio changes as a sine wave, its flow rate occurs a sine wave change, and the maximum flow rate value of 57.46kg•s-1 occurs in the minimum pressure ratio condition. The longitudinal force of the structure domain decreases with the reduction of the pressure ratio, and points to the opposite direction of the flow. The lateral force increases with the decrease of the pressure ratio, and points to the opposite direction of the flow. The maximum value of deformation and force of the structure domain changes consistently with the pressure ratio fluctuation. The maximum value of the structure domain stress is 28.67MPa, which is far less than the yield strength of the structure material, and the maximum deformation value is 3.25um.

  4. Determination of pressure from measured Raman frequency shifts of anhydrite and its application in fluid inclusions and HDAC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xueyin; Mayanovic, Robert A.; Zheng, Haifei

    2016-12-01

    A new geobarometry was derived from the quantified relationships among Raman vibrational frequencies of anhydrite, pressure and temperature, as determined from in-situ micro-Raman spectroscopy of natural anhydrite crystals measured at p-T conditions up to 560 °C and 1400 MPa by using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC). With this geobarometry, the pressure in HDAC experiments and in anhydrite-bearing fluid inclusions can be determined directly from the ν1, 1016, ν3, 1128 and ν3, 1160 Raman frequency shifts of anhydrite at high p-T conditions relative to their values measured at ambient conditions. The pressure can be determined to an accuracy of better than 30 MPa based on the attainable accuracy of ±0.1 cm-1 for the fitted ν1 Raman peak positions, provided the measured spectra are calibrated using the emission peak of an external fluorescent light source. The feasibility and reliability of this geobarometry were verified by rebuilding the p-T history of two fluid inclusions from the ν1 frequency shifts of anhydrite daughter minerals from room to high temperatures, and by measuring the phase-transition pressures of calcite-CaCO3(II)-CaCO3(III) sequence at ambient temperature in a HDAC experiment using anhydrite as a Raman pressure sensor.

  5. Frictional Shear Stress, Pore Fluid Pressure and Wedge Mechanics on the Cascadia Megathrust Timothy Kane, Chris Goldfinger and Chris Romsos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, T.; Goldfinger, C.; Romsos, C.

    2013-12-01

    Although Cascadia is one of the most studied subduction zones in the world, the mechanics of the seismogenic zone remain shrouded by a lack of offshore data quantifying both inter-seismic and co-seismic behavior. We use an analysis of accretionary wedge morphology and overburden-defined frictional shear stress to constrain the range of pore fluid pressures suggested by seismic and geological observations. We also compare this result to the location of the down-dip maximum of inter-plate coupling as inferred from current geodetic and paleoseismic models of the locked zone. Using a new 100m bathymetric mosaic, McCrory et al.'s 2004 model of slab depth, a matrix of typical values for basal pore fluid pressure (70-95% of lithostatic) and rock density (2300-2500 kg/m3), and assuming Byerlee's Law, where μb (coefficient of basal friction) = 0.85, to be valid on the decollement, shear traction on the Cascadia megathust was calculated from the deformation front east to the 450 degree basal isotherm as defined by Spinelli, 2012. On the basis of heat flow and thermal modeling, megathrusts worldwide are predicted to have an average maximum shear stress of 15MPa. Employing pore fluid pressures above hydrostatic but well below lithostatic (λb = 0.7 - 0.86), our analysis resulted in frictional shear stress on the Cascadia megathrust meeting or exceeding 15MPa within 5-10 km of the deformation front, failing to satisfy the upper-slope to outer-shelf location of the down-dip limit of the locked zone and maximum inter-plate coupling as determined by current geodetic models. Basal pore fluid pressures of at least 90% of lithostatic are required over the entire seismogenic zone to satisfy the proposed down-dip limit of the locked zone. This supports high pore fluid pressures in the accretionary wedge, particularly in Washington, as suggested by the presence of landward-vergent thrusts, listric normal faults and near surface methane horizons in recent multi-channel seismic data

  6. Diagnostic system for measuring temperature, pressure, CO2 concentration and H2O concentration in a fluid stream

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, Jr., William P.; Jatana, Gurneesh Singh; Yoo, Ji-Hyung; Parks, II, James E.

    2017-01-10

    A diagnostic system for measuring temperature, pressure, CO.sub.2 concentration and H.sub.2O concentration in a fluid stream is described. The system may include one or more probes that sample the fluid stream spatially, temporally and over ranges of pressure and temperature. Laser light sources are directed down pitch optical cables, through a lens and to a mirror, where the light sources are reflected back, through the lens to catch optical cables. The light travels through the catch optical cables to detectors, which provide electrical signals to a processer. The processer utilizes the signals to calculate CO.sub.2 concentration based on the temperatures derived from H.sub.2O vapor concentration. A probe for sampling CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2O vapor concentrations is also disclosed. Various mechanical features interact together to ensure the pitch and catch optical cables are properly aligned with the lens during assembly and use.

  7. Active Control of F/A-18 Vertical Tail Buffeting using Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Moses, Robert W.; Huttsell, Lawerence J.; Harrand, Vincent J.

    2003-01-01

    Vertical tail buffeting is a serious multidisciplinary problem that limits the performance of twin-tail fighter aircraft. The buffet problem occurs at high angles of attack when the vortical flow breaks down ahead of the vertical tails resulting in unsteady and unbalanced pressure loads on the vertical tails. This paper describes a multidisciplinary computational investigation for buffet load alleviation of full F/A-18 aircraft using distributed piezoelectric actuators. The inboard and outboard surfaces of the vertical tail are equipped with piezoelectric actuators to control the buffet responses in the first bending and torsion modes. The electrodynamics of the smart structure are expressed with a three-dimensional finite element model. A single-input-single-output controller is designed to drive the active piezoelectric actuators. High-fidelity multidisciplinary analysis modules for the fluid dynamics, structure dynamics, electrodynamics of the piezoelectric actuators, fluid-structure interfacing, and grid motion are integrated into a multidisciplinary computing environment that controls the temporal synchronization of the analysis modules. Peak values of the power spectral density of tail tip acceleration are reduced by as much as 22% in the first bending mode and by as much as 82% in the first torsion mode. RMS values of tip acceleration are reduced by as much as 12%.

  8. Nonlinear dynamic modeling for smart material electro-hydraulic actuator development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, John P.; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2013-03-01

    Smart material electro-hydraulic actuators use hydraulic rectification by one-way check valves to amplify the motion of smart materials, such as magnetostrictives and piezoelectrics, in order to create compact, lightweight actuators. A piston pump driven by a smart material is combined with a hydraulic cylinder to form a self-contained, power-by-wire actuator that can be used in place of a conventional hydraulic system without the need for hydraulic lines and a centralized pump. The performance of an experimental actuator driven by a 12.7 mm diameter, 114 mm length Terfenol-D rod is evaluated over a range of applied input frequencies, loads, and currents. The peak performance achieved is 37 W, moving a 220 N load at a rate of 17 cm/s and producing a blocked pressure of 12.5 MPa. Additional tests are conducted to quantify the dynamic behavior of the one-way reed valves using a scanning laser vibrometer to identify the frequency response of the reeds and the effect of the valve seat and fluid mass loading. A lumped-parameter model is developed for the system that includes valve inertia and fluid response nonlinearities, and the model results are compared with the experimental data.

  9. Turbulence significantly increases pressure and fluid shear stress in an aortic aneurysm model under resting and exercise flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Khanafer, Khalil M; Bull, Joseph L; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Berguer, Ramon

    2007-01-01

    The numerical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in use do not take into account the non-Newtonian behavior of blood and the development of local turbulence. This study examines the influence of pulsatile, turbulent, non-Newtonian flow on fluid shear stresses and pressure changes under rest and exercise conditions. We numerically analyzed pulsatile turbulent flow, using simulated physiological rest and exercise waveforms, in axisymmetric-rigid aortic aneurysm models (AAMs). Discretization of governing equations was achieved using a finite element scheme. Maximum turbulence-induced shear stress was found at the distal end of an AAM. In large AAMs (dilated to undilated diameter ratio = 3.33) at peak systolic flow velocity, fluid shear stress during exercise is 70.4% higher than at rest. Our study provides a numerical, noninvasive method for obtaining detailed data on the forces generated by pulsatile turbulent flow in AAAs that are difficult to study in humans and in physical models. Our data suggest that increased flow turbulence results in increased shear stress in aneurysms. While pressure readings are fairly uniform along the length of an aneurysm, the kinetic energy generated by turbulence impacting on the wall of the distal half of the aneurysm increases fluid and wall shear stress at this site. If the increased fluid shear stress results in further dilation and hence further turbulence, wall stress may be a mechanism for aneurysmal growth and eventual rupture.

  10. Speciation of High-Pressure Carbon-Saturated COH Fluids at Buffered fO2 Conditions: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumiati, S.; Tiraboschi, C.; Recchia, S.; Poli, S.

    2014-12-01

    The quantitative assessment of species in COH fluids is crucial in modelling mantle processes. For instance, H2O/CO2 ratio in the fluid phase influences the location of the solidus and of carbonation/decarbonation reactions in peridotitic systems . In the scientific literature, the speciation of COH fluids has been generally assumed on the basis of thermodynamic calculations using equations of state of simple H2O-non-polar gas systems (e.g., H2O-CO2-CH4). Only few authors dealt with the experimental determination of high-pressure COH fluid species at different conditions, using diverse experimental and analytical approaches (e.g., piston cylinder+capsule-piercing+gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry; cold-seal+silica glass capsules+Raman). We performed experiments on COH fluids using a capsule-piercing device coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometry. This type of analyzer ensures superior performances in terms of selectivity of molecules to be detected, high acquisition rates and extended linear response range. Experiments were carried out in a rocking piston cylinder apparatus at pressure of 1 GPa and temperatures from 800 to 900°C. Carbon-saturated fluids were generated through the addition of oxalic acid dihydrate and graphite. Single/double capsules and different packing materials (BN and MgO) were used to evaluate the divergence from the thermodynamic speciation model. Moreover, to assess the effect of solutes on COH fluid speciation we also performed a set of experiments adding synthetic forsterite to the charge. To determine the speciation we assembled a capsule-piercing device that allows to puncture the capsule in a gas-tight vessel at 80°C. The extraction Teflon vessel is composed of a base part, where the capsule is allocated on a steel support, and a top part where a steel drill is mounted. To release the quenched fluids from the capsule, the base part of vessel is hand-tighten to the top part, allowing the steel pointer to pierce the capsule. The

  11. A Magnetic-Fluid Seal for Measurement of Aerodynamic Surface Pressure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-04-01

    A magnetic - fluid sliding seal was designed, fabricated, and tested for application in a special instrumentation arrangement to measure the...spin rates. The effects of certain seal parameters were investigated including: gap distance between stationary and moving components, magnetic ... fluid properties (i.e., magnetization strength and viscosity), and ferrous versus nonferrous moving component material. These tests demonstrated that the

  12. Magentically actuated compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J.; Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A vibration free fluid compressor particularly adapted for Stirling cycle cryogenic refrigeration apparatus comprises a pair of identical opposing ferromagnetic pistons located in a housing and between a gas spring including a sealed volume of a working fluid such as gas under pressure. The gas compresses and expands in accordance with movement of the pistons to generate a compression wave which can be vented to other apparatus, for example, a displacer unit in a Stirling cycle engine. The pistons are urged outwardly due to the pressure of the gas; however, a fixed electromagnetic coil assembly located in the housing adjacent the pistons, is periodically energized to produce a magnetic field which interlinks the pistons in such a fashion that the pistons are mutually attracted to one another. The mass of the pistons, in conjunction with the compressed gas between them, form a naturally resonant system which, when the pistons are electromagnetically energized, produces an oscillating compression wave in the entrapped fluid medium.

  13. Spreading of Non-Newtonian and Newtonian Fluids on a Solid Substrate under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta Choudhury, Moutushi; Chandra, Subrata; Nag, Soma; Das, Shantanu; Tarafdar, Sujata

    2011-09-01

    Strongly non-Newtonian fluids namely, aqueous gels of starch, are shown to exhibit visco-elastic behavior, when subjected to a load. We study arrowroot and potato starch gels. When a droplet of the fluid is sandwiched between two glass plates and compressed, the area of contact between the fluid and plates increases in an oscillatory manner. This is unlike Newtonian fluids, where the area increases monotonically in a similar situation. The periphery moreover, develops an instability, which looks similar to Saffman Taylor fingers. This is not normally seen under compression. The loading history is also found to affect the manner of spreading. We attempt to describe the non-Newtonian nature of the fluid through a visco-elastic model incorporating generalized calculus. This is shown to reproduce qualitatively the oscillatory variation in the surface strain.

  14. Microfluidic device and methods for focusing fluid streams using electroosmotically induced pressures

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Stephen C.; Ramsey, J. Michael

    2010-06-01

    A microfabricated device employing a bridging membrane and methods for electrokinetic transport of a liquid phase biological or chemical material using the same are described. The bridging membrane is deployed in or adjacent to a microchannel and permits either electric current flow or the transport of gas species, while inhibiting the bulk flow of material. The use of bridging membranes in accordance with this invention is applicable to electrokinetically inducing fluid flow to confine a selected material in a region of a microchannel that is not influenced by an electric field. Other structures for inducing fluid flow in accordance with this invention include nanochannel bridging membranes and alternating current fluid pumping devices. Applications of the bridging membranes according to this invention include the separation of species from a sample material, valving of fluids in a microchannel network, mixing of different materials in a microchannel, and the pumping of fluids.

  15. SMA actuators for morphing wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brailovski, V.; Terriault, P.; Georges, T.; Coutu, D.

    An experimental morphing laminar wing was developed to prove the feasibility of aircraft fuel consumption reduction through enhancement of the laminar flow regime over the wing extrados. The morphing wing prototype designed for subsonic cruise flight conditions (Mach 0.2 … 0.3; angle of attack - 1 … +2∘), combines three principal subsystems: (1) flexible extrados, (2) rigid intrados and (3) an actuator group located inside the wing box. The morphing capability of the wing relies on controlled deformation of the wing extrados under the action of shape memory alloys (SMA) actuators. A coupled fluid-structure model of the morphing wing was used to evaluate its mechanical and aerodynamic performances in different flight conditions. A 0.5 m chord and 1 m span prototype of the morphing wing was tested in a subsonic wind tunnel. In this work, SMA actuators for morphing wings were modeled using a coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model and they were windtunnel validated. If the thermo-mechanical model of SMA actuators presented in this work is coupled with the previously developed structureaerodynamic model of the morphing wing, it could serve for the optimization of the entire morphing wing system.

  16. PARAMETER ESTIMATION OF TWO-FLUID CAPILLARY PRESSURE-SATURATION AND PERMEABILITY FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary pressure and permeability functions are crucial to the quantitative description of subsurface flow and transport. Earlier work has demonstrated the feasibility of using the inverse parameter estimation approach in determining these functions if both capillary pressure ...

  17. Coupled pressure and velocity distributions in a pressure-driven flow inside a long pipe with fluid injection through porous walls.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenkel, Alexander L.; Bolshinskiy, Leonid

    2008-04-01

    We are studying steady flows of Newtonian liquids in pipes with porous walls. One end of the pipe is closed; the ambient liquid is injected through the pipe wall under the Darcy-Weisbach law and exits at the open end with a pressure that is kept below the uniform fluid pressure outside the pipe walls. The inside pressure varies with the axial coordinate and is coupled with the varying axial velocity averaged over the cross-section of the pipe. For a long pipe, the Karman-Polhausen averaging of Navier-Stokes equations is used for both laminar and turbulent flow regimes. We obtain a boundary value problem for a nonlinear second-order differential equation governing the velocity distribution and explore numerous flow regimes by numerically solving it. Hence, the pipe pressure is found as a quadratic expression in terms of the velocity derivative. At sufficiently high Reynolds numbers, quite unlike the standard pipe flow with uniform velocity, even the turbulent friction turns out negligible in comparison with the pressure gradient required for accelerating the liquid toward the exit. The inertial approximation allows for an analytic solution. The nonzero-gravity generalization is obtained, and applications to channels with fine-mesh screen walls utilized for the delivery of liquid propellant to the engine at low gravity, are discussed.

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker and Brain Biopsy Findings in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Pyykkö, Okko T.; Lumela, Miikka; Rummukainen, Jaana; Nerg, Ossi; Seppälä, Toni T.; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Koivisto, Anne M.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Puli, Lakshman; Savolainen, Sakari; Soininen, Hilkka; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Hiltunen, Mikko; Zetterberg, Henrik; Leinonen, Ville

    2014-01-01

    Background The significance of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and neuroinflammation in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unknown. Objective To investigate the role of soluble APP (sAPP) and amyloid beta (Aβ) isoforms, proinflammatory cytokines, and biomarkers of neuronal damage in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in relation to brain biopsy Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau (HPτ) findings. Methods The study population comprised 102 patients with possible NPH with cortical brain biopsies, ventricular and lumbar CSF samples, and DNA available. The final clinical diagnoses were: 53 iNPH (91% shunt-responders), 26 AD (10 mixed iNPH+AD), and 23 others. Biopsy samples were immunostained against Aβ and HPτ. CSF levels of AD-related biomarkers (Aβ42, p-tau, total tau), non-AD-related Aβ isoforms (Aβ38, Aβ40), sAPP isoforms (sAPPα, sAPPβ), proinflammatory cytokines (several interleukins (IL), interferon-gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and biomarkers of neuronal damage (neurofilament light and myelin basic protein) were measured. All patients were genotyped for APOE. Results Lumbar CSF levels of sAPPα were lower (p<0.05) in patients with shunt-responsive iNPH compared to non-iNPH patients. sAPPβ showed a similar trend (p = 0.06). CSF sAPP isoform levels showed no association to Aβ or HPτ in the brain biopsy. Quantified Aβ load in the brain biopsy showed a negative correlation with CSF levels of Aβ42 in ventricular (r = −0.295, p = 0.003) and lumbar (r = −0.356, p = 0.01) samples, while the levels of Aβ38 and Aβ40 showed no correlation. CSF levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of neuronal damage did not associate to the brain biopsy findings, diagnosis, or shunt response. Higher lumbar/ventricular CSF IL-8 ratios (p<0.001) were seen in lumbar samples collected after ventriculostomy compared to the samples collected before the procedure

  19. Acetazolamide lowers intracranial pressure and modulates the cerebrospinal fluid secretion pathway in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Uldall, Maria; Botfield, Hannah; Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Sinclair, Alexandra; Jensen, Rigmor

    2017-04-03

    Acetazolamide is one of the most widely used drugs for lowering intracranial pressure (ICP) and is believed to reduce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) secretion via its action on the choroid plexus (CP). In the CP the main driving force for CSF secretion is primarily active transport of Na(+) ions facilitated by the Na/K ATPase. Transmembrane water channels, known as aquaporins (AQP), are also present in the CP and play an important role in the movement of water. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a single dose acetazolamide on the activity of the Na/K ATPase and ICP. Furthermore, we investigated the expression of Na/K ATPase, AQP1 and AQP4 in the CP tissue following acetazolamide treatment. 12 female Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into two groups; one group received 200mg acetazolamide and the other vehicle treatment. All animals were subjected to ICP recordings and the CP tissue was collected for qPCR and western blot analysis. The effect of acetazolamide on the Na/K ATPase activity was evaluated in an in vitro assay of primary CP epithelial cells isolated from rats. Acetazolamide significantly lowered ICP within 10min of injection compared to the vehicle group (P<0.05), reaching a maximum reduction at 55min 66±4% (P<0.00001). Acetazolamide also significantly decreased the activity of the Na/K ATPase in CP epithelial cells compared to vehicle (P=0.0022). Acetazolamide did not change the AQP1, AQP4 or Na/K ATPase mRNA content in the CP tissue. However, we did record an increase in the amount of AQP1 (p=0.0152) and Na/K ATPase (p=0.0411) protein in the membrane fraction of the CP, but not AQP4 (p=0.0649). A single dose of acetazolamide lowers ICP and modulates the CSF secretion pathway in healthy rats - Firstly, by inhibiting the Na/K ATPase to slow the CSF production, secondly, by increasing AQP1 and Na/K ATPase protein in the membrane of the CP epithelial cells.

  20. Self-actuating reactor shutdown system

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Brummond, Willian A; Peterson, Leslie F.

    1988-01-01

    A control system for the automatic or self-actuated shutdown or "scram" of a nuclear reactor. The system is capable of initiating scram insertion by a signal from the plant protection system or by independent action directly sensing reactor conditions of low-flow or over-power. Self-actuation due to a loss of reactor coolant flow results from a decrease of pressure differential between the upper and lower ends of an absorber element. When the force due to this differential falls below the weight of the element, the element will fall by gravitational force to scram the reactor. Self-actuation due to high neutron flux is accomplished via a valve controlled by an electromagnet and a thermionic diode. In a reactor over-power, the diode will be heated to a change of state causing the electromagnet to be shorted thereby actuating the valve which provides the changed flow and pressure conditions required for scramming the absorber element.

  1. Chapter 7: The hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) for Raman spectroscopic studies of geological fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Christian; Chou, I-Ming; Dubessy, J.; Caumon, M.-C.; Rull, F.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC), which is specifically designed for experiments on systems with aqueous fluids to temperatures up to ~1000ºC and pressures up to a few GPa to tens of GPa. This cell permits optical observation of the sample and the in situ determination of properties by ‘photon-in photon-out’ techniques such as Raman spectroscopy. Several methods for pressure measurement are discussed in detail including the Raman spectroscopic pressure sensors a-quartz, berlinite, zircon, cubic boron nitride (c-BN), and 13C-diamond, the fluorescence sensors ruby (α-Al2O3:Cr3+), Sm:YAG (Y3Al5O12:Sm3+) and SrB4O7:Sm2+, and measurements of phase-transition temperatures. Furthermore, we give an overview of published Raman spectroscopic studies of geological fluids to high pressures and temperatures, in which diamond anvil cells were applied.

  2. The Hydrothermal Diamond Anvil Cell (HDAC) for raman spectroscopic studies of geologic fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, Christian; Chou, I-Ming; Dubessy, Jean; Caumon, Marie-Camille; Pérez, Fernando Rull

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC), which is specifically designed for experiments on systems with aqueous fluids to temperatures up to ⬚~1000ºC and pressures up to a few GPa to tens of GPa. This cell permits optical observation of the sample and the in situ determination of properties by ‘photon-in photon-out’ techniques such as Raman spectroscopy. Several methods for pressure measurement are discussed in detail including the Raman spectroscopic pressure sensors a-quartz, berlinite, zircon, cubic boron nitride (c-BN), and 13C-diamond, the fluorescence sensors ruby (α-Al2O3:Cr3+), Sm:YAG (Y3Al5O12:Sm3+) and SrB4O7:Sm2+, and measurements of phase-transition temperatures. Furthermore, we give an overview of published Raman spectroscopic studies of geological fluids to high pressures and temperatures, in which diamond anvil cells were applied.

  3. Diagenesis, compaction, and fluid chemistry modeling of a sandstone near a pressure seal: Lower Tuscaloosa Formation, Gulf Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weedman, S.D.; Brantley, S.L.; Shiraki, R.; Poulson, S.R.

    1996-01-01

    Petrographic, isotopic, and fluid-inclusion evidence from normally and overpressured sandstones of the lower Tuscaloosa Formation (Upper Cretaceous) in the Gulf Coast documents quartz-overgrowth precipitation at 90??C or less, calcite cement precipitation at approximately 100?? and 135??C, and prismatic quartz cement precipitation at about 125??C. Textural evidence suggests that carbonate cement dissolution occurred before the second phases of calcite and quartz precipitation, and was followed by precipitation of grain-rimming chlorite and pore-filling kaolinite. Geochemical calculations demonstrate that present-day lower Tuscaloosa Formation water from 5500 m depth could either dissolve or precipitate calcite cements in model simulations of upward water flow. Calcite dissolution or precipitation depends on PCO2 variability with depth (i.e., whether there is one or two-phase flow) or on the rate of generation of CO2 with depth. Calculations suggest that 105-106 rock volumes of water are required to flow through the section to precipitate 1-10% calcite cement. Compaction analysis suggests that late-stage compaction occurred in normally pressured sandstones after dissolution of carbonate cements, but was hindered in overpressured sandstones despite the presence of high porosity. These results document the inhibition of compaction by overpressured fluids and constrain the timing of pressure seal formation. Modeling results demonstrate that the proposed paragenesis used to constrain timing of pressure seal formation is feasible, and that most of the cement diagenesis occurred before the pressure seal became effective as a permeability barrier.

  4. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  5. Zr complexation in high pressure fluids and silicate melts and implications for the mobilization of HFSE in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louvel, Marion; Sanchez-Valle, Carmen; Malfait, Wim J.; Testemale, Denis; Hazemann, Jean-Louis

    2013-03-01

    Field observations and solubility experiments show evidence for the efficient mobilization of nominally insoluble HFSE (i.e., Ti, Zr, Nb and Hf) by high pressure fluids, probably via complexation with polymerized alkali-silica dissolved species and halogens (F and Cl). Here we investigate the complexation of Zr in subduction-related fluids (aqueous fluids and hydrous haplogranite melts) up to 800 °C and 2.4 GPa using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) in a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and provide evidence for the formation of Zr-O-Si/Na polymeric species in alkali-(alumino)silicate fluids at high pressure. Zr4+ speciation in dilute fluids (2.5 wt% HCl) is dominated by 8-fold-coordinated [Zr(H2O)8]4+ hydrated complexes at room conditions and no evidence for extensive Zr-Cl complexation in the fluid was found up to 420 °C, as confirmed by ab initio XANES calculations of various ZrO8-xClx clusters. The addition of Na and Si dissolved species (from 35 to 60 wt% dissolved Na2Si2O5, NS2) into the fluid favors the formation of alkali-zirconosilicate clusters Zr-O-Si/Na similar to those found in vlasovite (Na2ZrSi4O11), with Zr4+ in octahedral coordination with oxygen (Zr-O distance = 2.09 ± 0.04 Å) and ˜6 Si (Na) second neighbors (Zr-Si/Na distance = 3.66 ± 0.06 Å). This coordination environment also dominates Zr speciation in F-free and F-bearing NS2 and haplogranite glasses and high pressure hydrous haplogranite melts (15.5-33 wt% dissolved H2O) in the investigated pressure-temperature range. The XAS analyses, assisted by ab initio XANES calculations, are not conclusive concerning the extent of Zr-F complexation in hydrous granitic melts. Alkali-zirconosilicate Zr-O-Si/Na clusters such as those identified in this study may explain the enhanced solubility of zircon ZrSiO4 (and other HFSE-bearing minerals) in alkali-aluminosilicate-bearing aqueous fluids produced by dehydration and melting of the slab and provide a favorable mechanism for the

  6. Reappraisal of the intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in patients with the so-called "normal pressure hydrocephalus" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sahuquillo, J; Rubio, E; Codina, A; Molins, A; Guitart, J M; Poca, M A; Chasampi, A

    1991-01-01

    Fifty-four shunt-responsive patients were selected from a prospective protocol directed to study patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Patients with gait disturbances, dementia, non-responsive L-Dopa Parkinsonism, urinary or faecal incontinence and an Evans ratio greater or equal to 0.30 on the CT scan were included in the study. As a part of their work-up all patients underwent intracranial pressure monitoring and hydrodynamic studies using Marmarou's bolus test. According to mean intracranial pressure (ICP) and the percentage of high amplitude B-waves, patients were subdivided in the following categories: 1) Active hydrocephalus (mean ICP above 15 mmHg), which is in fact no tone normal pressure hydrocephalus; 2) Compensated unstable hydrocephalus, when mean ICP was below 15 mmHg and B-waves were present in more than 25% of the total recording time and 3) Compensated stable hydrocephalus when ICP was lower or equal to 15 mmHg and beta waves were present in less than 25% of the total recording time. The majority of the patients in this study (70%) presented continuous high or intermittently raised ICP (active or unstable compensated hydrocephalus group). Mean resistance to outflow of CSF (Rout) was 38.8 mm Hg/ml/min in active hydrocephalus and 23.5 mm Hg/ml/min in the compensated group (Students t-test, p less than 0.05). Higher resistance to outflow was found in patients with obliterated cortical sulci and obliterated Sylvian cisterns in the CT scan. No statistically significant correlation was found when plotting the percentage of beta waves against pressure volume index (PVI), compliance or Rout. An exponential correlation was found when plotting beta waves against the sum of conductance to outflow and compliance calculated by PVI method (r = 0.79). Patients with the so-called normal pressure hydrocephalus syndrome have different ICP and CSF dynamic profiles. Additional studies taking into consideration these differences are necessary

  7. Fluid Shifts Before, During, and After Prolonged Space Flight and their Association with Intracranial Pressure and Visual Impairment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Lee, S.; Platts, S.; Macias, B.; Lui, J.; Ebert, D.; Sargsyan, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Alferova, I.; Yarmanova, E.; Bogomolov, V.

    2013-01-01

    With the conclusion of the Space Shuttle program, NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed in Space Shuttle crewmembers after their short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound changes in vision, some with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds on ophthalmologic examination. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilatation, optic nerve tortuosity, and other findings have been noted in imaging studies. This pattern is referred to as visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been systematically tested. The purpose of this study is to objectively characterize the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate the findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted by crewmember baseline data and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt tests) obtained before flight. Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in astronaut subjects on the ISS during the use of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and respiratory maneuvers to characterize and explain general and individual responses during space flight.

  8. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  9. Analysis of self-pressurization phenomenon of cryogenic fluid storage tank with thermal diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Mansu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2010-09-01

    Self-pressurization phenomenon is one of the most important problems in the storage of cryogenic liquid. Until now, it has been difficult to predict exact pressurization process due to its complex non-equilibrium thermal behavior. This paper analyzes the self-pressurization with the trend of pressurization curves from experiment using liquid nitrogen with various heat leaks and liquid fractions. The trend of pressurization curves are classified on the basis of shape of pressurization curve. The qualitative relation between transient period, heat leak and liquid fractions is suggested. Thermal diffusion model (TDM) considering thermal stratification and thermal equilibrium model (TEM) can properly predict the respective pressurization curves with suitable condition for each model.

  10. Method and Apparatus for Predicting Unsteady Pressure and Flow Rate Distribution in a Fluid Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and apparatus for analyzing steady state and transient flow in a complex fluid network, modeling phase changes, compressibility, mixture thermodynamics, external body forces such as gravity and centrifugal force and conjugate heat transfer. In some embodiments, a graphical user interface provides for the interactive development of a fluid network simulation having nodes and branches. In some embodiments, mass, energy, and specific conservation equations are solved at the nodes, and momentum conservation equations are solved in the branches. In some embodiments, contained herein are data objects for computing thermodynamic and thermophysical properties for fluids. In some embodiments, the systems of equations describing the fluid network are solved by a hybrid numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods.

  11. Experimental Investigation on Airfoil Shock Control by Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Quan; Cheng, Bangqin; Li, Yinghong; Cui, Wei; Jin, Di; Li, Jun

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on airfoil (NACA64—215) shock control is performed by plasma aerodynamic actuation in a supersonic tunnel (Ma = 2). The results of schlieren and pressure measurement show that when plasma aerodynamic actuation is applied, the position moves forward and the intensity of shock at the head of the airfoil weakens. With the increase in actuating voltage, the total pressure measured at the head of the airfoil increases, which means that the shock intensity decreases and the control effect increases. The best actuation effect is caused by upwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, and then downwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, while the control effect of aerodynamic actuation without a magnetic field is the most inconspicuous. The mean intensity of the normal shock at the head of the airfoil is relatively decreased by 16.33%, and the normal shock intensity is relatively reduced by 27.5% when 1000 V actuating voltage and upwind-direction actuation are applied with a magnetic field. This paper theoretically analyzes the Joule heating effect generated by DC discharge and the Lorentz force effect caused by the magnetic field. The discharge characteristics are compared for all kinds of actuation conditions to reveal the mechanism of shock control by plasma aerodynamic actuation.

  12. High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when

  13. Dielectric elastomer actuators with granular coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; Nanni, Massimo; De Rossi, Danilo

    2011-04-01

    So-called 'hydrostatically coupled' dielectric elastomer actuators (HC-DEAs) have recently been shown to offer new opportunities for actuation devices made of electrically responsive elastomeric insulators. HC-DEAs include an incompressible fluid that mechanically couples a dielectric elastomer based active part to a passive part interfaced to the load, so as to enable hydrostatic transmission. Drawing inspiration from that concept, this paper presents a new kind of actuators, analogous to HC-DEAs, except for the fact that the fluid is replaced by fine powder. The related technology, here referred to as 'granularly coupled' DEAs (GC-DEAs), relies entirely on solid-state materials. This permits to avoid drawbacks (such as handling and leakage) inherent to usage of fluids, especially those in liquid phase. The paper presents functionality and actuation performance of bubble-like GC-DEAs, in direct comparison with HC-DEAs. For this purpose, prototype actuators made of two pre-stretched membranes of acrylic elastomer, coupled via talcum powder (for GC-DEA) or silicone grease (for HC-DEA), were manufactured and comparatively tested. As compared to HC-DEAs, GC-DEAs showed a higher maximum stress, the same maximum relative displacement, and nearly the same bandwidth. The paper presents characterization results and discusses advantages and drawbacks of GC-DEAs, in comparison with HC-DEAs.

  14. Quantifying Hydraulic Conductivity and Fluid Pressures in the Alpine Fault Hanging-Wall Using DFDP-2 Data and Numerical Models