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Sample records for actuator disk theory

  1. Semi-actuator disk theory for compressor choke flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micklow, J.; Jeffers, J.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical anaysis predict the unsteady aerodynamic utilizing semi actuator theory environment for a cascade of airfoils harmonically oscillating in choked flow was developed. A normal shock is located in the blade passage, its position depending on the time dependent geometry, and pressure perturbations of the system. In addition to shock dynamics, the model includes the effect of compressibility, interblade phase lag, and an unsteady flow field upstream and downstream of the cascade. Calculated unsteady aerodynamics were compared with isolated airfoil wind tunnel data, and choke flutter onset boundaries were compared with data from testing of an F100 high pressure compressor stage.

  2. Analysis of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial-flow compressor by actuator disk theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical model was developed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial-flow compressors. The analysis is based on two-dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. It is applied to a rotor blade row by considering a cascade of airfoils. The effects of shock waves and flow separation are included in the model. Calculations show that the model predicts the onset, in an unshrouded rotor, of a bending flutter mode that exhibits many of the characteristics of supersonic stall bending flutter. The validity of the analysis for predicting this flutter mode is demonstrated.

  3. Exact actuator disk solutions for non-uniform heavy loading and slipstream contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, John T.

    1998-06-01

    A semi-analytical method has been developed to solve for the inviscid incompressible flow induced by a heavily loaded actuator disk with non-uniform loading. The solution takes the contraction of the slipstream fully into account. The method is an extension of the analytical theory of Conway (1995) for the linearized actuator disk and is exact for an incompressible perfect fluid. The solutions for the velocities and stream function are given as one-dimensional integrals of expressions containing complete elliptic integrals. Any load distribution with bounded radial gradient can be treated. Results are presented here for both contra-rotating and normal propellers. For the special case of a contra-rotating propeller with a parabolic velocity profile in the ultimate wake, the vorticity in the slipstream is shown to be the same as in the analytically tractable spherical vortex of Hill (1894) and the related family of steady vortices explored by Fraenkel (1970, 1972) and Norbury (1973).

  4. Studying Wake Deflection of Wind Turbines in Yaw using Drag Disk Experiments and Actuator Disk Modeling in LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howland, Michael; Bossuyt, Juliaan; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    Recently, there has been a push towards the optimization in the power output of entire large wind farms through the control of individual turbines, as opposed to operating each turbine in a maximum power point tracking manner. In this vane, the wake deflection by wind turbines in yawed conditions has generated considerable interest in recent years. In order to effectively study the wake deflection according to classical actuator disk momentum theory, a 3D printed drag disk model with a coefficient of thrust of approximately 0.75 - 0.85 and a diameter of 3 cm is used, studied under uniform inflow in a wind tunnel with test section of 1 m by 1.3 m, operating with a negligible inlet turbulence level at an inflow velocity of 10 m/s. Mean velocity profile measurements are performed using Pitot probes. Different yaw angles are considered, including 10, 20, and 30 degrees. We confirm earlier results that (e.g.) a 30 degree yaw angle deflects the center of the wake around 1/2 of a rotor diameter when it impinges on a downstream turbine. Detailed comparisons between the experiments and Large Eddy Simulations using actuator disk model for the wind turbines are carried out in order to help validate the CFD model. Work supported by NSF (grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project) and by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no. 306471).

  5. Development of an advanced actuator disk model for Large-Eddy Simulation of wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at improving the fidelity of the wind turbine modelling for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of wind farms, in order to accurately predict the loads, the production, and the wake dynamics. In those simulations, the wind turbines are accounted for through actuator disks. i.e. a body-force term acting over the regularised disk swept by the rotor. These forces are computed using the Blade Element theory to estimate the normal and tangential components (based on the local simulated flow and the blade characteristics). The local velocities are modified using the Glauert tip-loss factor in order to account for the finite number of blades; the computation of this correction is here improved thanks to a local estimation of the effective upstream velocity at every point of the disk. These advanced actuator disks are implemented in a 4th order finite difference LES solver and are compared to a classical Blade Element Momentum method and to high fidelity wake simulations performed using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method in uniform and turbulent flows.

  6. Three-axis lever actuator with flexure hinges for an optical disk system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chang-Soo; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2002-10-01

    A three-axis lever actuator with a flexure hinge has been designed and fabricated. This actuator is driven by electromagnetic force based on a coil-magnet system and can be used as a high precision actuator and, especially as a pickup head actuator in optical disks. High precision and low sensitivity to external vibration are the major advantages of this lever actuator. An analysis model was found and compared to the finite element method. Dynamic characteristics of the three-axis lever actuator were measured. The results are in very close agreement to those predicted by the model and finite element analysis.

  7. Turbulence characteristics in a free wake of an actuator disk: comparisons between a rotating and a non-rotating actuator disk in uniform inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Espinosa, H.; Breton, S.-P.; Masson, C.; Dufresne, L.

    2014-12-01

    An Actuator Disk (AD) model is implemented in the CFD platform OpenFOAM® with the purpose of studying the characteristics of the turbulent flow in the wake of the rotor of a horizontal-axis wind turbine. This AD model is based on the blade-element theory and it employs airfoil data to calculate the distribution of forces over the disk of a conceptual 5 MW offshore wind turbine. A uniform, non-turbulent flow is used as inflow so the turbulence is only produced in the wake of the AD. Computations are performed using Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) to capture the unsteady fluctuations in the flow. Additionally, a classic Smagorinsky Sub-Grid Scale (SGS) technique is employed to model the unfiltered motions. This new AD implementation makes use of a control system to adjust the rotational velocity of the rotor (below rated power) to the local conditions of the wind flow. The preliminary results show that the wake characteristics are influenced by the force distribution on the disk when compared to the wake produced by a uniformly loaded AD. Also, we observe that the simulated rotor reacts correctly to the introduction of the control system, although operating below the optimal power.

  8. Numerical Simulation and Wake Modeling of Wind Turbine Rotor as AN Actuator Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiang; Wang, Tongguang; Zhong, Wei

    Numerical simulations of flow fields around the wind turbine rotor simplified as an actuator disk (AD) with zero thickness have been made to investigate the flow structure and wake development in different operation states. A N-S solver has been used and the energy extracted by the rotor is represented by a discontinuous pressure jump through the actuator disk. Axial pressure and velocity development from far upstream to far downstream is fully described by the simulations, which could never be obtained by the momentum theory. It is showed that there are significant differences in wake development between inviscid and viscous conditions. In inviscid simulations, the axial velocity keeps decreasing along the oncoming flow direction, which is consistent with the momentum theory. In viscous simulations, however, the axial velocity first decreases but then gradually recovers approaching to the undisturbed velocity, due to momentum transport from outer flow to wake flow by viscous shear effect. Based on the numerical analysis, the work of this paper is also focused on wake modeling. A new two-dimensional models based on nonlinear wake development has been developed, which is capable to describe the far wake more accurately.

  9. Enhanced actuation of nanocrystalline diamond microelectromechanical disk resonators with AlN layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Taro; Reusch, Markus; Holc, Katarzyna; Iankov, Dimitre; Zuerbig, Verena; Zukauskaite, Agne; Nebel, Christoph E.; Ambacher, Oliver; Lebedev, Vadim

    2016-04-01

    A great potential of the use of aluminum nitride (AlN) to enhance the actuation of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) microelectromechanical system disk resonators is revealed. A disk resonator with a unimorph (AlN/NCD) structure is fabricated by depositing a c-axis oriented AlN on a capacitive NCD disk resonator. The unimorph resonator is piezoelectrically actuated with flexural whispering gallery modes with a relatively large electrode gap spacing, i.e., the spacing which is greater than 1 μm, although this is not possible for the capacitive NCD disk resonator. This result is explained by a finite element method simulation where the piezoelectric actuation turns out to be more effective than the capacitive actuation when the electrode gap spacing is >0.8 μm. The simulation also shows that the electrode gap spacing required for the capacitive actuation to be more effective than the piezoelectric actuation exponentially decreases when the resonator dimension is scaled down for higher frequency operations. Our study indicates that the use of AlN is promising to decrease impedance levels of NCD disk resonators especially for their higher frequency operations.

  10. Feasibility of using PZT actuators to study the dynamic behavior of a rotating disk due to rotor-stator interaction.

    PubMed

    Presas, Alexandre; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Valentin, David; Seidel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, PZT actuators are used to study the dynamic behavior of a rotating disk structure due to rotor-stator interaction excitation. The disk is studied with two different surrounding fluids-air and water. The study has been performed analytically and validated experimentally. For the theoretical analysis, the natural frequencies and the associated mode shapes of the rotating disk in air and water are obtained with the Kirchhoff-Love thin plate theory coupled with the interaction with the surrounding fluid. A model for the Rotor Stator Interaction that occurs in many rotating disk-like parts of turbomachinery such as compressors, hydraulic runners or alternators is presented. The dynamic behavior of the rotating disk due to this excitation is deduced. For the experimental analysis a test rig has been developed. It consists of a stainless steel disk (r = 198 mm and h = 8 mm) connected to a variable speed motor. Excitation and response are measured from the rotating system. For the rotating excitation four piezoelectric patches have been used. Calibrating the piezoelectric patches in amplitude and phase, different rotating excitation patterns are applied on the rotating disk in air and in water. Results show the feasibility of using PZT to control the response of the disk due to a rotor-stator interaction. PMID:25004151

  11. Feasibility of Using PZT Actuators to Study the Dynamic Behavior of a Rotating Disk due to Rotor-Stator Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Presas, Alexandre; Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Valentin, David; Seidel, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, PZT actuators are used to study the dynamic behavior of a rotating disk structure due to rotor-stator interaction excitation. The disk is studied with two different surrounding fluids—air and water. The study has been performed analytically and validated experimentally. For the theoretical analysis, the natural frequencies and the associated mode shapes of the rotating disk in air and water are obtained with the Kirchhoff-Love thin plate theory coupled with the interaction with the surrounding fluid. A model for the Rotor Stator Interaction that occurs in many rotating disk-like parts of turbomachinery such as compressors, hydraulic runners or alternators is presented. The dynamic behavior of the rotating disk due to this excitation is deduced. For the experimental analysis a test rig has been developed. It consists of a stainless steel disk (r = 198 mm and h = 8 mm) connected to a variable speed motor. Excitation and response are measured from the rotating system. For the rotating excitation four piezoelectric patches have been used. Calibrating the piezoelectric patches in amplitude and phase, different rotating excitation patterns are applied on the rotating disk in air and in water. Results show the feasibility of using PZT to control the response of the disk due to a rotor-stator interaction. PMID:25004151

  12. Theory of Protostellar Disk Fromation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Yun

    2015-08-01

    Disk formation, once thought to be a simple consequence of the conservation of angular momentum during the hydrodynamic core collapse, is far more subtle in magnetized gas. In this case, the rotation can be strongly magnetically braked. Indeed, both analytic arguments and numerical simulations have shown that disk formation is suppressed in strict ideal MHD for the observed level of core magnetization. I will discuss the physical reason for this so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe," and review possible resolutions to this problem that have been proposed so far, including non-ideal MHD effects, misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis, and especially turbulence.

  13. Euler force actuation mechanism for siphon valving in compact disk-like microfluidic chips.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yongbo; Fan, Jianhua; Zhou, Song; Zhou, Teng; Wu, Junfeng; Li, Yin; Liu, Zhenyu; Xuan, Ming; Wu, Yihui

    2014-03-01

    Based on the Euler force induced by the acceleration of compact disk (CD)-like microfluidic chip, this paper presents a novel actuation mechanism for siphon valving. At the preliminary stage of acceleration, the Euler force in the tangential direction of CD-like chip takes the primary place compared with the centrifugal force to function as the actuation of the flow, which fills the siphon and actuates the siphon valving. The Euler force actuation mechanism is demonstrated by the numerical solution of the phase-field based mathematical model for the flow in siphon valve. In addition, experimental validation is implemented in the polymethylmethacrylate-based CD-like microfluidic chip manufactured using CO2 laser engraving technique. To prove the application of the proposed Euler force actuation mechanism, whole blood separation and plasma extraction has been conducted using the Euler force actuated siphon valving. The newly introduced actuation mechanism overcomes the dependence on hydrophilic capillary filling of siphon by avoiding external manipulation or surface treatments of polymeric material. The sacrifice for highly integrated processing in pneumatic pumping technique is also prevented by excluding the volume-occupied compressed air chamber. PMID:24753736

  14. Euler force actuation mechanism for siphon valving in compact disk-like microfluidic chips

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yongbo; Fan, Jianhua; Zhou, Song; Zhou, Teng; Wu, Junfeng; Li, Yin; Liu, Zhenyu; Xuan, Ming; Wu, Yihui

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Euler force induced by the acceleration of compact disk (CD)-like microfluidic chip, this paper presents a novel actuation mechanism for siphon valving. At the preliminary stage of acceleration, the Euler force in the tangential direction of CD-like chip takes the primary place compared with the centrifugal force to function as the actuation of the flow, which fills the siphon and actuates the siphon valving. The Euler force actuation mechanism is demonstrated by the numerical solution of the phase-field based mathematical model for the flow in siphon valve. In addition, experimental validation is implemented in the polymethylmethacrylate-based CD-like microfluidic chip manufactured using CO2 laser engraving technique. To prove the application of the proposed Euler force actuation mechanism, whole blood separation and plasma extraction has been conducted using the Euler force actuated siphon valving. The newly introduced actuation mechanism overcomes the dependence on hydrophilic capillary filling of siphon by avoiding external manipulation or surface treatments of polymeric material. The sacrifice for highly integrated processing in pneumatic pumping technique is also prevented by excluding the volume-occupied compressed air chamber. PMID:24753736

  15. Fabrication of Beam-rotating Actuator for Multiple-beam Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Boung Jun; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kwak, Yoon Keun

    2002-05-01

    Current trends in computer and communication industries are towards increasingly higher resolution images and video processing techniques. However, such sophisticated processing tasks require massive storage systems such as a compact disk read only memory (CD-ROM) and digital versatile disc (DVD). Current demands in the development of such systems are higher data density storage media and an improved data transfer rate. The latter is discussed in this paper. A multiple-beam optical disk drive is presented as a method for improving the effective data transfer rate by increasing the beam spot number formed on an optical disk. The beam-rotating actuator is necessary for positioning the multiple-beam onto more than one track. Ray tracing was also employed for the real system setup. The beam-rotating actuator is made up of piezoelectric material, a high-stiffness wire hinge and a dove prism. The actuator has an approximately 1 kHz resonance frequency and a suitable operational range. The dynamic equation for the actuator is derived for the control of the real system.

  16. Predicting the flow & noise of a rotor in a turbulent boundary layer using an actuator disk -- RANS approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buono, Armand C.

    The numerical method presented in this study attempts to predict the mean, non-uniform flow field upstream of a propeller partially immersed in a thick turbulent boundary layer with an actuator disk using CFD based on RANS in ANSYS FLUENT. Three different configurations, involving an infinitely thin actuator disk in the freestream (Configuration 1), an actuator disk near a wall with a turbulent boundary layer (Configuration 2), and an actuator disk with a hub near a wall with a turbulent boundary layer (Configuration 3), were analyzed for a variety of advance ratios ranging from J = 0.48 to J =1.44. CFD results are shown to be in agreement with previous works and validated with experimental data of reverse flow occurring within the boundary layer above the flat plate upstream of a rotor in the Virginia Tech's Stability Wind Tunnel facility. Results from Configuration 3 will be used in future aero-acoustic computations.

  17. Large eddy simulation of unsteady wind farm behavior using advanced actuator disk models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, Maud; Duponcheel, Matthieu; Winckelmans, Gregoire; Chatelain, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    The present project aims at improving the level of fidelity of unsteady wind farm scale simulations through an effort on the representation and the modeling of the rotors. The chosen tool for the simulations is a Fourth Order Finite Difference code, developed at Universite catholique de Louvain; this solver implements Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches. The wind turbines are modeled as advanced actuator disks: these disks are coupled with the Blade Element Momentum method (BEM method) and also take into account the turbine dynamics and controller. A special effort is made here to reproduce the specific wake behaviors. Wake decay and expansion are indeed initially governed by vortex instabilities. This is an information that cannot be obtained from the BEM calculations. We thus aim at achieving this by matching the large scales of the actuator disk flow to high fidelity wake simulations produced using a Vortex Particle-Mesh method. It is obtained by adding a controlled excitation at the disk. We apply this tool to the investigation of atmospheric turbulence effects on the power production and on the wake behavior at a wind farm level. A turbulent velocity field is then used as inflow boundary condition for the simulations. We gratefully acknowledge the support of GDF Suez for the fellowship of Mrs Maud Moens.

  18. Robust H∞ stabilization of a hard disk drive system with a single-stage actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harno, Hendra G.; Kiin Woon, Raymond Song

    2015-04-01

    This paper considers a robust H∞ control problem for a hard disk drive system with a single stage actuator. The hard disk drive system is modeled as a linear time-invariant uncertain system where its uncertain parameters and high-order dynamics are considered as uncertainties satisfying integral quadratic constraints. The robust H∞ control problem is transformed into a nonlinear optimization problem with a pair of parameterized algebraic Riccati equations as nonconvex constraints. The nonlinear optimization problem is then solved using a differential evolution algorithm to find stabilizing solutions to the Riccati equations. These solutions are used for synthesizing an output feedback robust H∞ controller to stabilize the hard disk drive system with a specified disturbance attenuation level.

  19. Optimization of Sensing and Feedback Control for Vibration/Flutter of Rotating Disk by PZT Actuators via Air Coupled Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tianhong; Xu, Xinsheng; Han, Jianqiang; Lin, Rongming; Ju, Bingfeng; Li, Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT) actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin’s discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations. PMID:22163788

  20. A new distributed sensor and actuator theory for ``Intelligent'' shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, H. S.

    1992-03-01

    An " intelligent" shell is a shell structure with a self-sensation and action/reaction capabilities contributed by built-in sensors, actuators and control electronic systems. In this study, a new intelligent shell structure composed of a conventional elastic shell, a distributed piezoelectric sensor and a distributed piezoelectric actuator is proposed. The distributed sensor provides a self-monitoring capability to sense shell oscillation and the distributed actuator contributes a self-correction (control) capability to counteract the oscillation. A new generic theory for the intelligent shell system is developed. System equations of motion coupling sensing and control effects are derived. From the theory derived, it is concluded that the distributed sensor is (theoretically) capable of sensing all shell vibration modes and the distributed actuator controlling all shell modes. However, the sensing or control effort of each mode could be different. Two feedback control algorithms, namely direct feedback control and Lyapunov control, are proposed in the paper. The generic theory can be simplified to account for other general geometries, such as cylinder, plates, beams, etc. Applications of the theory are also demonstrated.

  1. Generalized Wind Turbine Actuator Disk Parameterization in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model for Real-World Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjanovic, N.; Mirocha, J. D.; Chow, F. K.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we examine the performance of a generalized actuator disk (GAD) model embedded within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model to study wake effects on successive rows of turbines at a North American wind farm. These wake effects are of interest as they can drastically reduce down-wind energy extraction and increase turbulence intensity. The GAD, which is designed for turbulence-resolving simulations, is used within downscaled large-eddy simulations (LES) forced with mesoscale simulations and WRF's grid nesting capability. The GAD represents the effects of thrust and torque created by a wind turbine on the atmosphere within a disk representing the rotor swept area. The lift and drag forces acting on the turbine blades are parameterized using blade-element theory and the aerodynamic properties of the blades. Our implementation permits simulation of turbine wake effects and turbine/airflow interactions within a realistic atmospheric boundary layer flow field, including resolved turbulence, time-evolving mesoscale forcing, and real topography. The GAD includes real-time yaw and pitch control to respond realistically to changing flow conditions. Simulation results are compared to SODAR data from operating wind turbines and an already existing WRF mesoscale turbine drag parameterization to validate the GAD parameterization.

  2. Enhanced laser shutter using a hard disk drive rotary voice-coil actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, R. E.

    2007-02-01

    Rotary voice-coil motors from computer hard disk drives make excellent mechanical shutters for light beams. However, the complexity of the necessary electronic driving circuit can hinder their application. A new design is presented here, using a single integrated circuit originally intended for controlling dc motors. A digital input signal switches a unipolar power supply bidirectionally through the voice coil. Short high-current pulses are generated on the transitions to ensure rapid shutter action, while a low holding current reduces the power requirement and heating of the actuator. The circuit can reverse the current to brake the shutter and reduce the impact at the end of its travel. With a focused laser beam, the shutter achieves rise times below 500 ns. A method for producing variable length pulses is also described, demonstrating durations as short as 700 ns.

  3. Transition state theory and the dynamics of hard disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett-Jones, M.; Dickinson, P. A.; Godfrey, M. J.; Grundy, T.; Moore, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of two- and five-disk systems confined in a square has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations and compared with the predictions of transition state theory. We determine the partition functions Z and Z‡ of transition state theory using a procedure first used by Salsburg and Wood for the pressure. Our simulations show this procedure and transition state theory are in excellent agreement with the simulations. A generalization of the transition state theory to the case of a large number of disks N is made and shown to be in full agreement with simulations of disks moving in a narrow channel. The same procedure for hard spheres in three dimensions leads to the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann formula for their alpha relaxation time.

  4. Inertial force measurement of an actuator arm of a hard disk drive in free oscillation by numerical analysis and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bin; Shu, Dong-Wei; Fujii, Yusaku; Shi, Bao-Jun

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, inertial force of an Actuator Arm of a Hard Disk Drive (HDD) in free oscillation after an impact load is accurately measured by means of a finite element analysis and by carrying out experiments using a modified Levitation Mass Method (LMM). A 3D finite element model of an actuator arm of a HDD is modeled in ANSYS/LS-DYNA using shell elements. An impact load, which is modeled as a half sine force pulse, is applied to a mass, which is attached with the Actuator Arm. The velocity and the inertial force of the mass in free oscillation are obtained from the simulation. In the LMM method, the arm is attached to a mass, i.e. the moving part of an aerostatic linear bearing, and the total force acting on the mass is measured as the inertial force of the mass using an optical interferometer. An impact is applied to the mass with the arm by colliding it to the metal base, and the inertial force of the arm is evaluated during the free oscillation. The velocity and the inertial force of the mass are calculated from the measured time-varying Doppler frequency shift. A good correlation between the experimental and numerical results is achieved. This numerical analysis can be further used to investigate the dynamic response of the actuator arm when it is subjected to different impact load, which is modeled with half sine force pulse with different pulse widths and amplitudes.

  5. Theory of bending waves with applications to disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory of bending waves is surveyed which provides an explanation for the required amplification of the warp in the Milky Way. It also provides for self-generated warps in isolated external galaxies. The shape of observed warps and partly their existence in isolated galaxies are indicative of substantial spheroidal components. The theory also provides a plausible explanation for the bending of the inner disk (<2 kpc) of the Milky Way.

  6. Communication: Fundamental measure theory for hard disks: fluid and solid.

    PubMed

    Roth, Roland; Mecke, Klaus; Oettel, Martin

    2012-02-28

    Two-dimensional hard-particle systems are rather easy to simulate but surprisingly difficult to treat by theory. Despite their importance from both theoretical and experimental points of view, theoretical approaches are usually qualitative or at best semi-quantitative. Here, we present a density functional theory based on the ideas of fundamental measure theory for two-dimensional hard-disk mixtures, which allows for the first time an accurate description of the structure of the dense fluid and the equation of state for the solid phase within the framework of density functional theory. The properties of the solid phase are obtained by freely minimizing the functional. PMID:22380024

  7. Hydrogel core flexible matrix composite (H-FMC) actuators: theory and preliminary modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicker, M. P. M.; Weaver, P. M.; Rossiter, J. M.; Bond, I. P.

    2014-09-01

    The underlying theory of a new actuator concept based on hydrogel core flexible matrix composites (H-FMC) is presented. The key principle that underlines the H-FMC actuator operation is that the three-dimensional swelling of a hydrogel is partially constrained in order to improve the amount of useful work done. The partial constraint is applied to the hydrogel by a flexible matrix composite (FMC) that minimizes the hydrogel's volume expansion while swelling. This constraint serves to maximize the fixed charge density and resulting osmotic pressure, the driving force behind actuation. In addition, for certain FMC fibre orientations the Poisson's ratio of the anisotropic FMC laminate converts previously unused hydrogel swelling in the radial and circumferential directions into useful axial strains. The potential benefit of the H-FMC concept to hydrogel actuator performance is shown through comparison of force-stroke curves and evaluation of improvements in useful actuation work. The model used to achieve this couples chemical and electrical components, represented with the Nernst-Plank and Poisson equations, as well as a linear elastic mechanical material model, encompassing limited geometric nonlinearities. It is found that improvements in useful actuation work in the order of 1500% over bare hydrogel performance are achieved by the H-FMC concept. A parametric study is also undertaken to determine the effect of various FMC design parameters on actuator free strain and blocking stress. A comparison to other actuator concepts is also included.

  8. Development of a Higher Order Laminate Theory for Modeling Composites with Induced Strain Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1996-01-01

    A refined higher order plate theory is developed to investigate the actuation mechanism of piezoelectric materials surface bonded or embedded in composite laminates. The current analysis uses a displacement field which accurately accounts for transverse shear stresses. Some higher order terms are identified by using the conditions that shear stresses vanish at all free surfaces. Therefore, all boundary conditions for displacements and stresses are satisfied in the present theory. The analysis is implemented using the finite element method which provides a convenient means to construct a numerical solution due to the discrete nature of the actuators. The higher order theory is computationally less expensive than a full three dimensional analysis. The theory is also shown to agree well with published experimental results. Numerical examples are presented for composite plates with thicknesses ranging from thin to very thick.

  9. Rate dependent direct inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric micro-actuator used in dual-stage hard disk drive head positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Arifur; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Yao, Kui

    2015-08-01

    The head positioning servo system in hard disk drive is implemented nowadays using a dual-stage actuator—the primary stage consisting of a voice coil motor actuator providing long range motion and the secondary stage controlling the position of the read/write head with fine resolution. Piezoelectric micro-actuator made of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has been a popular choice for the secondary stage. However, PZT micro-actuator exhibits hysteresis—an inherent nonlinear characteristic of piezoelectric material. The advantage expected from using the secondary micro-actuator is somewhat lost by the hysteresis of the micro-actuator that contributes to tracking error. Hysteresis nonlinearity adversely affects the performance and, if not compensated, may cause inaccuracy and oscillation in the response. Compensation of hysteresis is therefore an important aspect for designing head-positioning servo system. This paper presents a new rate dependent model of hysteresis along with rigorous analysis and identification of the model. Parameters of the model are found using particle swarm optimization. Direct inverse of the proposed rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is used as the hysteresis compensator. Effectiveness of the overall solution is underscored through experimental results.

  10. Rate dependent direct inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric micro-actuator used in dual-stage hard disk drive head positioning system.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Arifur; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Yao, Kui

    2015-08-01

    The head positioning servo system in hard disk drive is implemented nowadays using a dual-stage actuator—the primary stage consisting of a voice coil motor actuator providing long range motion and the secondary stage controlling the position of the read/write head with fine resolution. Piezoelectric micro-actuator made of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) has been a popular choice for the secondary stage. However, PZT micro-actuator exhibits hysteresis—an inherent nonlinear characteristic of piezoelectric material. The advantage expected from using the secondary micro-actuator is somewhat lost by the hysteresis of the micro-actuator that contributes to tracking error. Hysteresis nonlinearity adversely affects the performance and, if not compensated, may cause inaccuracy and oscillation in the response. Compensation of hysteresis is therefore an important aspect for designing head-positioning servo system. This paper presents a new rate dependent model of hysteresis along with rigorous analysis and identification of the model. Parameters of the model are found using particle swarm optimization. Direct inverse of the proposed rate-dependent generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is used as the hysteresis compensator. Effectiveness of the overall solution is underscored through experimental results. PMID:26329224

  11. Design of high performance piezo composites actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajid, Abdulhakim A.

    Design of high performance piezo composites actuators are developed. Functionally Graded Microstructure (FGM) piezoelectric actuators are designed to reduce the stress concentration at the middle interface existed in the standard bimorph actuators while maintaining high actuation performance. The FGM piezoelectric laminates are composite materials with electroelastic properties varied through the laminate thickness. The elastic behavior of piezo-laminates actuators is developed using a 2D-elasticity model and a modified classical lamination theory (CLT). The stresses and out-of-plane displacements are obtained for standard and FGM piezoelectric bimorph plates under cylindrical bending generated by an electric field throughout the thickness of the laminate. The analytical model is developed for two different actuator geometries, a rectangular plate actuator and a disk shape actuator. The limitations of CLT are investigated against the 2D-elasticity model for the rectangular plate geometry. The analytical models based on CLT (rectangular and circular) and 2D-elasticity are compared with a model based on Finite Element Method (FEM). The experimental study consists of two FGM actuator systems, the PZT/PZT FGM system and the porous FGM system. The electroelastic properties of each layer in the FGM systems were measured and input in the analytical models to predict the FGM actuator performance. The performance of the FGM actuator is optimized by manipulating the thickness of each layer in the FGM system. The thickness of each layer in the FGM system is made to vary in a linear or non-linear manner to achieve the best performance of the FGM piezoelectric actuator. The analytical and FEM results are found to agree well with the experimental measurements for both rectangular and disk actuators. CLT solutions are found to coincide well with the elasticity solutions for high aspect ratios while the CLT solutions gave poor results compared to the 2D elasticity solutions for

  12. Planet formation in transition disks: Modeling, spectroscopy, and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liskowsky, Joseph Paul

    An important field of modern astronomy is the study of planets. Literally for millennia, careful observers of the night sky have tracked these 'wanderers', with their peculiar motions initiating avenues of inquiry not able to elucidated by a study of the stars alone: we have discovered that the planets (as well as Earth) orbit the sun and that the stars are so far away, even their relative positions do not seem to shift perceptibly when Earth's position moves hundreds of millions of miles. With the advent of the telescope, and subsequent improvements upon it over the course of centuries, accelerating to the dramatically immense telescopes available today and those on the horizon, we have been able to continuously probe farther and in more detail than the previous generation of scientists and telescopes allowed. Now, we are just entering the time when detection of planets outside of our own solar system has become possible, and we have found that planets are extraordinarily common in the galaxy (and by extrapolation, the universe). At the time of this document's composition, there are several thousand such examples of planets around other stars (being dubbed 'exoplanets'). We have discovered that planets are plentiful, but multiple open questions remain which are relevant to this work: How do planets form and, when a planet does form from its circumstellar envelope, what are the important processes that influence its formation? This work adds to the understanding of circumstellar disks, the intermediate stage between a cold collapsing cloud (of gas and dust) and a mature planetary system. Specifically, we study circumstellar disks in an evolved state termed 'transition disks'. This state corresponds to a time period where the dust in the disk has either undergone grain growth—where the microscopic grains have clumped together to form far fewer dust particles of much higher mass, or the inner portion (or an inner annulus) of the disk has lost a large amount of gas

  13. Test and theory for piezoelectric actuator-active vibration control of rotating machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palazzolo, A. B.; Lin, R. R.; Alexander, R. M.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, J.

    1989-01-01

    The application of piezoelectric actuators for active vibration control (AVC) of rotating machinery is examined. Theory is derived and the resulting predictions are shown to agree closely with results of tests performed on an air turbine driven-overhung rotor. The test results show significant reduction in unbalance, transient and sub-synchronous responses. Results from a 30-hour endurance test support the AVD system reliability. Various aspects of the electro-mechanical stability of the control system are also discussed and illustrated. Finally, application of the AVC system to an actual jet engine is discussed.

  14. Thermodynamic perturbation theory for fused hard-sphere and hard-disk chain fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.; Hall, C.K.; Stell, G.

    1995-08-15

    We find that first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT1) which incorporates the reference monomer fluid used in the generalized Flory--{ital AB} (GF--{ital AB}) theory yields an equation of state for fused hard-sphere (FHS) chain fluids that has accuracy comparable to the GF--{ital AB} and GF--dimer--{ital AC} theories. The new TPT1 equation of state is significantly more accurate than other extensions of the TPT1 theory to FHS chain fluids. The TPT1 is also extended to two-dimensional fused hard-disk chain fluids. For the fused hard-disk dimer fluid, the extended TPT1 equation of state is found to be more accurate than the Boublik hard-disk dimer equation of state. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  15. A Hot Big Bang Theory: Magnetic Fields and the Early Evolution of the Protolunar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammie, C. F.; Liao, Wei-Ting; Ricker, P. M.

    2016-09-01

    The leading theory for the formation of Earth’s Moon invokes a collision between a Mars-sized body and the proto-Earth to produce a disk of orbiting material that later condenses to form the Moon. We show that the disk opacity is large, and cooling is therefore inefficient ({t}{cool}{{Ω }}\\gg 1). In this regime, angular momentum transport in the disk leads to steady heating unless α \\lt {({t}{cool}{{Ω }})}-1\\ll 1. Following earlier work by Charnoz and Michaut, and Carballido et al., we show that once the disk is completely vaporized it is well coupled to the magnetic field. We consider a scenario in which turbulence driven by magnetic fields leads to a brief, hot phase where the disk is geometrically thick, with strong turbulent mixing. The disk cools by spreading until it decouples from the field. We point out that approximately half the accretion energy is dissipated in the boundary layer where the disk meets the Earth’s surface. This creates high entropy material close to the Earth, driving convection and mixing. Finally, a hot magnetized disk could drive bipolar outflows that remove mass and angular momentum from the Earth–Moon system.

  16. Stagnation-point ablation of carbonaceous flat disks. I Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1983-01-01

    The process of ablation is calculated for the stagnation region of a flat disk in a radiation-dominated, massive-blowing environment produced in a ballistic range filled with argon. Flow environments are determined by solving the boundary-layer equations while radiative transfer is calculated through a line-by-line spectral computation. The resulting wall heat-transfer rates are coupled with an existing material's response code to determine surface recession and char thickness. The calculation is performed for six 5-cm-diam models made of carbon-phenolic and carbon-carbon composite launched in the Track-G facility at the Arnold Engineering Development Center. Significant surface recessions are predicted to occur for these models due mostly to radiative heating.

  17. Shape memory alloy post buckled precompressed (SMAPBP) actuator concepts and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinn, Thomas; Barrett, Ronald

    2010-04-01

    This paper discusses the modeling, design and performance of SMA actuated Post-Buckled Precompressed (PBP) plates. The paper begins with an outline of past approaches to PBP actuation and control which have mostly been centered on piezoelectric actuators. To skirt problems associated with tensile failure on convex faces of PBP actuators, SMA filaments are used. Because SMA's are far less sensitive to tensile failure, far greater deflections and work outputs are both predicted and experimentally measured. Unlike conventional SMA actuated plates, the total moment generation capability and deflections can be simultaneously amplified, indicating a substantial increase in total work output. Experiments showed that the SMA actuators are capable of tip deflection of up to 45° and that the Post-Buckled Precompressed Mechanism improves tip rotation up to 40% compared to conventional antagonistically actuated SMA plates.

  18. Resonances and circuit theory for the interaction of metallic disks and annuli with an electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Chui, S T; Du, J J; Yau, S T

    2014-11-01

    To understand the nature of the electromagnetic resonances of finite metallic surfaces, we formulate a rigorous and rapidly convergent circuit theory for the interaction of a metallic disk and a metallic annulus with an electromagnetic field. Expressions for the current induced and the resonance condition are derived. A new understanding of the nature of the resonances is obtained. For half of the resonances we find a divergent electric field at the edge of the disk, even though it is smooth in shape. For the disk, we compare with previous results using vector spheroidal wave functions and found good agreement for the resonance condition. Our approach can be generalized to other finite surfaces. PMID:25493895

  19. Implementation of a generalized actuator disk wind turbine model into the weather research and forecasting model for large-eddy simulation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mirocha, J. D.; Kosovic, B.; Aitken, M. L.; Lundquist, J. K.

    2014-01-10

    A generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine parameterization designed for large-eddy simulation (LES) applications was implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. WRF-LES with the GAD model enables numerical investigation of the effects of an operating wind turbine on and interactions with a broad range of atmospheric boundary layer phenomena. Numerical simulations using WRF-LES with the GAD model were compared with measurements obtained from the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS-2011), the goal of which was to measure both the inflow to and wake from a 2.3-MW wind turbine. Data from a meteorological tower and two light-detection and ranging (lidar) systems, one vertically profiling and another operated over a variety of scanning modes, were utilized to obtain forcing for the simulations, and to evaluate characteristics of the simulated wakes. Simulations produced wakes with physically consistent rotation and velocity deficits. Two surface heat flux values of 20 W m–2 and 100 W m–2 were used to examine the sensitivity of the simulated wakes to convective instability. Simulations using the smaller heat flux values showed good agreement with wake deficits observed during TWICS-2011, whereas those using the larger value showed enhanced spreading and more-rapid attenuation. This study demonstrates the utility of actuator models implemented within atmospheric LES to address a range of atmospheric science and engineering applications. In conclusion, validated implementation of the GAD in a numerical weather prediction code such as WRF will enable a wide range of studies related to the interaction of wind turbines with the atmosphere and surface.

  20. Coupling the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and Large Eddy Simulations with Actuator Disk Model: predictions of wind farm power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cartagena, Edgardo Javier; Santoni, Christian; Ciri, Umberto; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    A large-scale wind farm operating under realistic atmospheric conditions is studied by coupling a meso-scale and micro-scale models. For this purpose, the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is coupled with an in-house LES solver for wind farms. The code is based on a finite difference scheme, with a Runge-Kutta, fractional step and the Actuator Disk Model. The WRF model has been configured using seven one-way nested domains where the child domain has a mesh size one third of its parent domain. A horizontal resolution of 70 m is used in the innermost domain. A section from the smallest and finest nested domain, 7.5 diameters upwind of the wind farm is used as inlet boundary condition for the LES code. The wind farm consists in six-turbines aligned with the mean wind direction and streamwise spacing of 10 rotor diameters, (D), and 2.75D in the spanwise direction. Three simulations were performed by varying the velocity fluctuations at the inlet: random perturbations, precursor simulation, and recycling perturbation method. Results are compared with a simulation on the same wind farm with an ideal uniform wind speed to assess the importance of the time varying incoming wind velocity. Numerical simulations were performed at TACC (Grant CTS070066). This work was supported by NSF, (Grant IIA-1243482 WINDINSPIRE).

  1. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    SciTech Connect

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kosovic, Branko; Draxl, Caroline; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of these changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, σu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of σu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while σu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.

  2. Investigating wind turbine impacts on near-wake flow using profiling Lidar data and large-eddy simulations with an actuator disk model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Rajewski, Daniel A.; Marjanovic, Nikola; Lundquist, Julie K.; Kosovic, Branko; Draxl, Caroline; Churchfield, Matthew J.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, wind turbine impacts on the atmospheric flow are investigated using data from the Crop Wind Energy Experiment (CWEX-11) and large-eddy simulations (LESs) utilizing a generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine model. CWEX-11 employed velocity-azimuth display (VAD) data from two Doppler lidar systems to sample vertical profiles of flow parameters across the rotor depth both upstream and in the wake of an operating 1.5 MW wind turbine. Lidar and surface observations obtained during four days of July 2011 are analyzed to characterize the turbine impacts on wind speed and flow variability, and to examine the sensitivity of thesemore » changes to atmospheric stability. Significant velocity deficits (VD) are observed at the downstream location during both convective and stable portions of four diurnal cycles, with large, sustained deficits occurring during stable conditions. Variances of the streamwise velocity component, σu, likewise show large increases downstream during both stable and unstable conditions, with stable conditions supporting sustained small increases of σu , while convective conditions featured both larger magnitudes and increased variability, due to the large coherent structures in the background flow. Two representative case studies, one stable and one convective, are simulated using LES with a GAD model at 6 m resolution to evaluate the compatibility of the simulation framework with validation using vertically profiling lidar data in the near wake region. Virtual lidars were employed to sample the simulated flow field in a manner consistent with the VAD technique. Simulations reasonably reproduced aggregated wake VD characteristics, albeit with smaller magnitudes than observed, while σu values in the wake are more significantly underestimated. The results illuminate the limitations of using a GAD in combination with coarse model resolution in the simulation of near wake physics, and validation thereof using VAD data.« less

  3. Burst-Disk Device Simulates Effect Of Pyrotechnic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James P.; Sexton, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Expendable disks substituted for costly pyrotechnic devices for testing actuators. Burst-disk device produces rush of pressurized gas similar to pyrotechnic device. Designed to reduce cost of testing pyrotechnically driven emergency actuators (parachute-deploying mechanisms in original application).

  4. Active flutter suppression of a lifting surface using piezoelectric actuation and modern control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jae-Hung; Tani, Junji; Qiu, Jinhao

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical and experimental investigation on active flutter suppression of a swept-back cantilevered lifting surface using piezoelectric (PZT) actuation. A finite element method, a panel aerodynamic method, and the minimum state-space realization are involved in the development of the equation of motion in state-space, which is efficiently used for the analysis of the system and design of control laws with a modern control framework. PZT actuators, bonded symmetrically on the plate, are optimally grouped into two equivalent actuator sets using genetic algorithms to enhance controllability. H2- and μ-synthesized control laws are designed and the flutter suppression performance is evaluated via wind tunnel testing. In the μ-synthesis design, a simple parametric uncertainty model is used to take into account the system changes with respect to airflow speed. Both controllers show comparable flutter suppression performance around the flutter point. However, the μ-synthesized controller shows improved behavior over a wide flow speed range.

  5. Thin-disk models in an integrable Weyl-Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Ronaldo S. S.; Letelier, Patricio S.

    2014-01-01

    We construct a class of static, axially symmetric solutions representing razor-thin disks of matter in the Integrable Weyl-Dirac theory proposed in Israelit (Found Phys 29:1303, 1999). The main differences between these solutions and the corresponding general relativistic one are analyzed, focusing on the behavior of physical observables (rotation curves of test particles, density and pressure profiles). We consider the case in which test particles move along Weyl geodesics. The same rotation curve can be obtained from many different solutions of the Weyl-Dirac theory, although some of these solutions present strong qualitative differences with respect to the usual general relativistic model (such as the appearance of a ring-like density profile). In particular, for typical galactic parameters all rotation curves of the Weyl-Dirac model present Keplerian fall-off. As a consequence, we conclude that a more thorough analysis of the problem requires the determination of the gauge function on galactic scales, as well as restrictions on the test-particle behavior under the action of the additional geometrical fields introduced by this theory.

  6. Actuator-valve interface optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    A computer code, Actuator Valve Response (AVR), has been developed to optimize the explosive actuator-valve interface parameters so that the valve plunger velocity is at a maximum when the plunger reaches the valve tubes. The code considers three forces to act on the valve plunger before the plunger reaches the valve tubes. These are the pressure force produced by the actuator, the shear force necessary to shear the seal disks on the actuator and the valve plunger, and the friction force caused by friction between the plunger and the plunger bore. The three forces are modeled by expressions that are explicitly functions of the plunger displacement. A particular actuator-valve combination was analyzed with the computer code AVR with four different combinations of valve plunger seal disk shear strength and initial friction force. (LEW)

  7. Reconfigurable control of aircraft undergoing sensor and actuator failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Gaurav

    2001-07-01

    Significant number of fatal aircraft accidents in recent years have been linked to component failures. With the predicted increase in air traffic these numbers are likely to increase. With reduction of fatal accidents as motivation, this dissertation investigates design of fault tolerant control systems for aircrafts undergoing sensor and/or actuator failures. Given that the nominal controller may perform inadequately in the event of sensors and/or actuator failure, the feasible approach for such a control scheme is to predesign various controllers anticipating these failures and then switching to an appropriate controller when the failure occurs. This is enabled by the available redundancy in sensing and actuation and allows the system to perform adequately even when these failures occur. The predesign of controllers for sensor and actuator failures is considered. Sensor failures are easily accommodated if certain detectability conditions are met. However, the predesign for actuator failures is not trivial as the position at which the actuators fail is not known a priori. It is shown that this problem can be tackled by reducing it to the classical control problem of disturbance decoupling, in which, the functional control enables the steady state output of dynamical system to reject any disturbance due to the failed actuators. For linear systems, conditions for existence of a controller capable of accommodating these failures can be understood in geometric terms and calculations are linked to solvability of coupled matrix equations. Although control design for aircrafts is done using linear techniques, failures can cause excursions into nonlinear regimes due to ensuing changes in the flight conditions. This dissertation also uses the recent results in the nonlinear regulator theory to address actuator failures in nonlinear systems. The utility of design techniques is illustrated using flight control examples with failures. The symbolic computational tools are

  8. The dynamics of particle disks. III - Dense and spinning particle disks. [development of kinetic theory for planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Araki, Suguru

    1991-01-01

    The kinetic theory of planetary rings developed by Araki and Tremaine (1986) and Araki (1988) is extended and refined, with a focus on the implications of finite particle size: (1) nonlocal collisions and (2) finite filling factors. Consideration is given to the derivation of the equations for the local steady state, the low-optical-depth limit, and the steady state at finite filling factors (including the effects of collision inelasticity, spin degrees of freedom, and self-gravity). Numerical results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. The importance of distinguishing effects (1) and (2) at low optical depths is stressed, and the existence of vertical density profiles with layered structures at high filling factors is demonstrated.

  9. Consequences of a dark disk for the Fermi and PAMELA signals in theories with a Sommerfeld enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Cholis, Ilias; Goodenough, Lisa E-mail: lcg261@nyu.edu

    2010-09-01

    Much attention has been given to dark matter explanations of the PAMELA positron fraction and Fermi electronic excesses. For those theories with a TeV-scale WIMP annihilating through a light force-carrier, the associated Sommerfeld enhancement provides a natural explanation of the large boost factor needed to explain the signals, and the light force-carrier naturally gives rise to hard cosmic ray spectra without excess π{sup 0}-gamma rays or anti-protons. The Sommerfeld enhancement of the annihilation rate, which at low relative velocities v{sub rel} scales as 1/v{sub rel}, relies on the comparatively low velocity dispersion of the dark matter particles in the smooth halo. Dark matter substructures in which the velocity dispersion is smaller than in the smooth halo have even larger annihilation rates. N-body simulations containing only dark matter predict the existence of such structures, for example subhalos and caustics, and the effects of these substructures on dark matter indirect detection signals have been studied extensively. The addition of baryons into cosmological simulations of disk-dominated galaxies gives rise to an additional substructure component, a dark disk. The disk has a lower velocity dispersion than the spherical halo component by a factor ∼ 6, so the contributions to dark matter signals from the disk can be more significant in Sommerfeld models than for WIMPs without such low-velocity ehancements. We consider the consequences of a dark disk on the observed signals of e{sup +}e{sup −}, p p-bar and γ-rays as measured by Fermi and PAMELA in models where the WIMP annihilations are into a light boson. We find that both the PAMELA and Fermi results are easily accomodated by scenarios in which a disk signal is included with the standard spherical halo signal. If contributions from the dark disk are important, limits from extrapolations to the center of the galaxy contain significant uncertainties beyond those from the spherical halo profile

  10. Scaling of CVD rotating disk reactors to large sizes and comparison with theory

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.G.; Stall, R.A.; Zawadzki, P.; Evans, G.H.

    1996-09-01

    An important advantage of the rotating disk reactor (RDR) geometry for chemical vapor deposition is the one-dimensional nature of the transport process over a wide range of operating conditions. In this work, we report the use of these scaling laws to design larger RDRs and to determine optimal process conditions. We then compare the experimental results to those predicted by the model. The new systems have disks of 300 and 420 mm diameter, holding 17 and 38, 50 mm wafers, respectively. In general, excellent agreement was obtained when the new systems were run at conditions predicted by the scaling laws. As the disk diameter increases, the model calls for a reduced rotational rate, a lower operating pressure and a main carrier gas flow that increases sublinearly with the disk area. Experimental growths were made with the III-V materials AlGaAs and InGaAlP, on GaAs substrates of 50, 76 and 100 mm diameters. Uniformities and electrical and optical properties similar to those obtained in smaller RDR systems were obtained under conditions predicted by the model. We also discuss the trade-offs involved where one parameter is fixed by process needs, necessitating that others must be adjusted accordingly. It should be stressed that these adjustments are all calculated from the model and are designed to maintain the ideal flow and thermal environments obtained with the smaller systems. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Thin-disk laser with Bessel-like output beam: theory and simulations.

    PubMed

    Aghbolaghi, R; Batebi, S; Sabaghzadeh, J

    2013-02-01

    We have numerically shown that a high-power Bessel-Gauss beam can be generated by a solid-state thin-disk laser using an axicon-based resonator. Ytterbium ions doped in the YAG crystal were utilized in this configuration as an active medium. We obtained the output power, intensity, and phase profiles on the output coupler and the active medium. PMID:23385906

  12. Herniated disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disk. This may place pressure on nearby nerves or the spinal cord. ... Lumbar radiculopathy; Cervical radiculopathy; Herniated intervertebral disk; Prolapsed intervertebral disk; Slipped disk; Ruptured disk; Herniated nucleus pulposus

  13. Theory and numerical simulation of three-dimensional vortices in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Joseph Andrew

    2004-12-01

    We show (via 3D spectral anelastic hydrodynamic simulations) that finite- amplitude perturbations in a stably stratified protoplanetary disk lead to the natural formation of 3D, long-lived, coherent vortices. This is in contrast to previous 3D constant density studies that, showed that perturbations to Keplerian shear always rapidly decay. Our results are also entirely distinct from the numerous 2D studies of vortex dynamics in the midplane of Keplerian disks: We show that vortices in the midplane are linearly unstable with an e - folding time of only a few orbital periods; the nonlinear development of the instability leads to the destruction of vortices in the midplane. In our numerical simulations, a midplane vortex (prior to its destruction) was a source of perturbations: as it oscillated, it excited internal gravity waves which would propagate away from the midplane, break, and create vorticity (a baroclinic effect). The regions of vorticity above and below the midplane would coalesce into new vortices. Whereas the midplane vortex would eventually succumb to the instability, the off-midplane vortices were stable (to infinitesimal and finite-amplitude perturbations) and long-lived. The key ingredient for stable 3D vortices is stable stratification: the vertical component of protostellar gravity vanishes in the midplane, so the gas is unstratified there; off the midplane, the magnitudes of gravity and stratification increase linearly with height. Stable. 3D off-midplane vortices may play two key roles in star and planet formation: in cool, nonmagnetized disks, vortices may transport angular momentum outward so that mass can continue to accrete onto the growing protostar; and vortices rapidly sweep-up and concentrate dust particles, which may help in the formation of planetesimals, the basic "building blocks" of planets, either by increasing the efficiency of binary agglomeration, or by seeding a local gravitational instability.

  14. A DOUBLE OUTBURST FROM IGR J00291+5934: IMPLICATIONS FOR ACCRETION DISK INSTABILITY THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Jacob M.; Galloway, Duncan K.; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2011-01-01

    The accretion-powered millisecond pulsar IGR J00291+5934 underwent two {approx}10 day long outbursts during 2008, separated by 30 days in quiescence. Such a short quiescent period between outbursts has never been seen before from a neutron star X-ray transient. X-ray pulsations at the 599 Hz spin frequency are detected throughout both outbursts. For the first time, we derive a pulse phase model that connects two outbursts, providing a long baseline for spin frequency measurement. Comparison with the frequency measured during the 2004 outburst of this source gives a spin-down during quiescence of -(4 {+-} 1) x 10{sup -15} Hz s{sup -1}, approximately an order of magnitude larger than the long-term spin-down observed in the 401 Hz accretion-powered pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658. If this spin-down is due to magnetic dipole radiation, it requires a 2 x 10{sup 8} G field strength, and its high spin-down luminosity may be detectable with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Alternatively, this large spin-down could be produced by gravitational wave emission from a fractional mass quadrupole moment of Q/I = 1 x 10{sup -9}. The rapid succession of the outbursts also provides a unique test of models for accretion in low-mass X-ray binaries. Disk instability models generally predict that an outburst will leave the accretion disk too depleted to fuel a second outburst after such a brief quiescence. We suggest a modification in which the outburst is shut off by the onset of a propeller effect before the disk is depleted. This model can explain the short quiescence and the unusually slow rise of the light curve of the second 2008 outburst.

  15. Disk relations for tree amplitudes in minimal coupling theory of gauge field and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Xin; Du, Yi-Jian; Ma, Qian

    2010-07-01

    KLT relations on S factorize closed string amplitudes into product of open string tree amplitudes. The field theory limits of KLT factorization relations hold in minimal coupling theory of gauge field and gravity. In this paper, we consider the field theory limits of relations on D. Though the relations on D and KLT factorization relations hold on worldsheets with different topologies, we find the field theory limits of D relations also hold in minimal coupling theory of gauge field and gravity. We use the D relations to give three- and four-point tree amplitudes where gluons are minimally coupled to gravitons. We also give a further discussion on general tree amplitudes in minimal coupling theory of gauge field and gravity. In general, any tree amplitude with M gravitons in addition to N gluons can be given by pure-gluon tree amplitudes with N+2M legs.

  16. Magnetoelectric effect in layered disk-shaped magnetostrictive-piezoelectric structures: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, D. A.; Radchenko, G. S.; Laletin, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the magnetoelectric effect in a disk-shaped magnetostrictive-piezoelectric structure in the electromechanical resonance region are presented. An expression for the magnetoelectric voltage coefficient is derived based on the simultaneous solution of elastodynamic and electrostatic equations separately for magnetostrictive and piezoelectric layers. The conditions at the interface were taken into account based on the premise that the interaction between layers is implemented by shear. It is shown that the inhomogeneity of the voltage and strain distribution over the sample thickness, caused by the interface, leads to a significant contribution to the effect in the case of thick layers. The theoretical and experimental dependences of the frequency characteristic of the effect are presented for the permendur-lead zirconate-titanate-permendur structure. The theoretical calculations are in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Discovery of Small-Scale Spiral Structures in the Disk of SAO 206462 (HD 135344B): Implications for the Physical State of the Disk from Spiral Density Wave Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Currie, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution, H-band, imaging observations, collected with Subaru/HiCIAO, of the scattered light from the transitional disk around SAO 206462 (HD 135344B). Although previous sub-mm imagery suggested the existence of the dust-depleted cavity at r approximates 46 AU, our observations reveal the presence of scattered light components as close as 0".2 (approx 28 AU) from the star. Moreover, we have discovered two small-scale spiral structures lying within 0".5 (approx 70 AU). We present models for the spiral structures using the spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h approx 0.1, which is consistent with previous sub-mm observations. This model can potentially give estimates of the temperature and rotation profiles of the disk based on dynamical processes, independently from sub-mm observations. It also predicts the evolution of the spiral structures, which can be observable on timescales of 10-20 years, providing conclusive tests of the model. While we cannot uniquely identify the origin of these spirals, planets embedded in the disk may be capable of exciting the observed morphology. Assuming that this is the case, we can make predictions on the locations and, possibly, the masses of the unseen planets. Such planets may be detected by future multi-wavelengths observations.

  18. Discovery of Small-Scale Spiral Structures in the Disk of SAO 206462 (HD 135344B)(exp 1): Implications for the Physical State of the Disk from Spiral Density Wave Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muto, T.; Grady, C. A.; Hashimoto, J.; Fukagawa, M.; Hornbeck, J. B.; Sitko, M.; Russell, R.; Werren, C.; Cure, M; Currie, T.; Ohashi, N.; Okamoto, Y.; Momose, M.; Honda, M.; Inutsuka, S.; Takeuchi, T.; Dong, R.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Brandt, T.; Carson, J.; Egner, S.; Feldt, M.; Fukue, T.; Goto, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present high-resolution, H-band, imaging observations, collected with Subaru /HiCIAO, of the scattered light from the transitional disk around SAO 206462 (HD 1353448). Although previous sub-mm imagery suggested the existence of the dust-depleted cavity at r <= 46 AU, our observations reveal the presence of scattered light components as close as O".2 (approx 28 AU) from the star. Moreover , we have discovered two small-scale spiral structures lying within 0".5 (approx 70 AU). We present models for the spiral structures using the spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h approx. 0.1, which is consistent with previous sub-mm observations. This model can potentially give estimates of the temperature and rotation profiles of the disk based on dynamical processes. independently from sub-nun observations. It also predicts the evolution of the spiral structures, which can be observable on timescales of 10-20 years, providing conclusive tests of the model. While we cannot uniquely identify the origin of these spirals, planets embedded in the disk may be capable of exciting the observed morphology. Assuming that this is the case, we can make predictions on the locations and, possibly, the masses of the unseen planets. Such planets may be detected by future multi-wavelengths observations,

  19. DISCOVERY OF SMALL-SCALE SPIRAL STRUCTURES IN THE DISK OF SAO 206462 (HD 135344B): IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PHYSICAL STATE OF THE DISK FROM SPIRAL DENSITY WAVE THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, T.; Takeuchi, T.; Grady, C. A.; Hashimoto, J.; Fukagawa, M.; Hornbeck, J. B.; Sitko, M.; Russell, R.; Werren, C.; Cure, M.; Currie, T.; Ohashi, N.; Okamoto, Y.; Momose, M.; Honda, M.; Inutsuka, S.; Dong, R.; Brandt, T.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; and others

    2012-04-01

    We present high-resolution, H-band imaging observations, collected with Subaru/HiCIAO, of the scattered light from the transitional disk around SAO 206462 (HD 135344B). Although previous sub-mm imagery suggested the existence of a dust-depleted cavity at r {<=} 46 AU, our observations reveal the presence of scattered light components as close as 0.''2 ({approx} 28 AU) from the star. Moreover, we have discovered two small-scale spiral structures lying within 0.''5 ({approx} 70 AU). We present models for the spiral structures using the spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h {approx} 0.1, which is consistent with previous sub-mm observations. This model can potentially give estimates of the temperature and rotation profiles of the disk based on dynamical processes, independently from sub-mm observations. It also predicts the evolution of the spiral structures, which can be observable on timescales of 10-20 years, providing conclusive tests of the model. While we cannot uniquely identify the origin of these spirals, planets embedded in the disk may be capable of exciting the observed morphology. Assuming that this is the case, we can make predictions on the locations and, possibly, the masses of the unseen planets. Such planets may be detected by future multi-wavelength observations.

  20. Actuated atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, Charles (Inventor); Weiler, Jeff (Inventor); Palmer, Randall (Inventor); Appel, Philip (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuated atomizer is adapted for spray cooling or other applications wherein a well-developed, homogeneous and generally conical spray mist is required. The actuated atomizer includes an outer shell formed by an inner ring; an outer ring; an actuator insert and a cap. A nozzle framework is positioned within the actuator insert. A base of the nozzle framework defines swirl inlets, a swirl chamber and a swirl chamber. A nozzle insert defines a center inlet and feed ports. A spool is positioned within the coil housing, and carries the coil windings having a number of turns calculated to result in a magnetic field of sufficient strength to overcome the bias of the spring. A plunger moves in response to the magnetic field of the windings. A stop prevents the pintle from being withdrawn excessively. A pintle, positioned by the plunger, moves between first and second positions. In the first position, the head of the pintle blocks the discharge passage of the nozzle framework, thereby preventing the atomizer from discharging fluid. In the second position, the pintle is withdrawn from the swirl chamber, allowing the atomizer to release atomized fluid. A spring biases the pintle to block the discharge passage. The strength of the spring is overcome, however, by the magnetic field created by the windings positioned on the spool, which withdraws the plunger into the spool and further compresses the spring.

  1. Strong Evidence for the Density-wave Theory of Spiral Structure in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour-Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia; Davis, Benjamin L.; Shields, Douglas W.; Shameer Abdeen, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    The density-wave theory of galactic spiral-arm structure makes a striking prediction that the pitch angle of spiral arms should vary with the wavelength of the galaxy’s image. The reason is that stars are born in the density wave but move out of it as they age. They move ahead of the density wave inside the co-rotation radius, and fall behind outside of it, resulting in a tighter pitch angle at wavelengths that image stars (optical and near-infrared) than those that are associated with star formation (far-infrared and ultraviolet). In this study we combined large sample size with wide range of wavelengths, from the ultraviolet to the infrared to investigate this issue. For each galaxy we used an optical wavelength image (B-band: 445 nm) and images from the Spitzer Space Telescope at two infrared wavelengths (infrared: 3.6 and 8.0 μm) and we measured the pitch angle with the 2DFFT and Spirality codes. We find that the B-band and 3.6 μm images have smaller pitch angles than the infrared 8.0 μm image in all cases, in agreement with the prediction of density-wave theory. We also used images in the ultraviolet from Galaxy Evolution Explorer, whose pitch angles agreed with the measurements made at 8 μm.

  2. Actuator-valve interface optimization. [Explosive actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Burchett, O.L.; Jones, R.L.

    1987-02-01

    The interface of explosive actuator driven valves can be optimized to maximize the velocity of the valve plunger by using the computer code Actuator-Valve Response. Details of the AVR model of the actuator driven valve plunger and the results of optimizing an actuator-valve interface with AVR are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Rotary actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotary actuators and other mechanical devices incorporating shape memory alloys are provided herein. Shape memory alloys are a group of metals which when deformed at temperatures below their martensite temperatures, resume the shapes which they had prior to the deformation if they are heated to temperatures above their austensite temperatures. Actuators in which shape memory alloys are employed include bias spring types, in which springs deform the shape memory alloy (SMA), and differential actuators, which use two SMA members mechanically connected in series. Another type uses concentric cylindrical members. One member is in the form of a sleeve surrounding a cylinder, both being constructed of shape memory alloys. Herein two capstans are mounted on a shaft which is supported in a framework. Each capstan is capable of rotating the shaft. Shape memory wire, as two separate lengths of wire, is wrapped around each capstan to form a winding around that capstan. The winding on one capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a prestretched state. The winding on the other capstan is so wrapped that the wire is in a taut, but not a prestretched, state. Heating one performs work in one direction, thus deforming the other one. When the other SMA is heated the action is reversed.

  4. Torsional actuation with extension-torsion composite coupling and a magnetostrictive actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothwell, Christopher M.; Chandra, Ramesh; Chopra, Inderjit

    1995-04-01

    An analytical-experimental study of using magnetostrictive actuators in conjunction with an extension-torsion coupled composite tube to actuate a rotor blade trailing-edge flap to actively control helicopter vibration is presented. Thin walled beam analysis based on Vlasov theory was used to predict the induced twist and extension in a composite tube with magnetostrictive actuation. The study achieved good correlation between theory and experiment. The Kevlar-epoxy systems showed good correlation between measured and predicted twist values.

  5. Modular droplet actuator drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Paik, Philip (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator drive including a detection apparatus for sensing a property of a droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling the detection apparatus electronically coupled to the detection apparatus; a droplet actuator cartridge connector arranged so that when a droplet actuator cartridge electronically is coupled thereto: the droplet actuator cartridge is aligned with the detection apparatus; and the detection apparatus can sense the property of the droplet on a droplet actuator; circuitry for controlling a droplet actuator coupled to the droplet actuator connector; and the droplet actuator circuitry may be coupled to a processor.

  6. Memory metal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical actuator can be constructed by employing a plurality of memory metal actuator elements in parallel to control the amount of actuating force. In order to facilitate direct control by digital control signals provided by a computer or the like, the actuating elements may vary in stiffness according to a binary relationship. The cooling or reset time of the actuator elements can be reduced by employing Peltier junction cooling assemblies in the actuator.

  7. THE EVOLUTION OF CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS AROUND PLANETS IN WIDE ORBITS: IMPLICATIONS FOR FORMATION THEORY, OBSERVATIONS, AND MOON SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Shabram, Megan; Boley, Aaron C.

    2013-04-10

    Using radiation hydrodynamics simulations, we explore the evolution of circumplanetary disks around wide-orbit proto-gas giants. At large distances from the star ({approx}100 AU), gravitational instability followed by disk fragmentation can form low-mass substellar companions (massive gas giants and/or brown dwarfs) that are likely to host large disks. We examine the initial evolution of these subdisks and their role in regulating the growth of their substellar companions, as well as explore consequences of their interactions with circumstellar material. We find that subdisks that form in the context of GIs evolve quickly from a very massive state. Long-term accretion rates from the subdisk onto the proto-gas giant reach {approx}0.3 Jupiter masses kyr{sup -1}. We also find consistency with previous simulations, demonstrating that subdisks are truncated at {approx}1/3 of the companion's Hill radius and are thick, with (h/r) of {approx}> 0.2. The thickness of subdisks draws to question the use of thin-disk approximations for understanding the behavior of subdisks, and the morphology of subdisks has implications for the formation and extent of satellite systems. These subdisks create heating events in otherwise cold regions of the circumstellar disk and serve as planet formation beacons that can be detected by instruments such as ALMA.

  8. Biomimetic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, Vaclav; Boudova, Lea; Haluzikova, Denisa

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the presentation is to propose an alternative model of mammalian skeletal muscle function, which reflects the simplicity of nature and can be applied in engineering. Van der Waals attractive and repulsive electrostatic forces are assumed to control the design of internal structures and functions of contractile units of the muscles - sarcomere. The role of myosin heads is crucial for the higher order formation. The model of the myosin head lattice is the working model for the sarcomere contraction interpretation. The contraction is interpreted as a calcium induced phase transition of the lattice, which results in relative actin-myosin sliding and/or force generation. The model should provide the engineering science with a simple analogy to technical actuators of high performance.

  9. Size-dependent characteristics of electrostatically actuated fluid-conveying carbon nanotubes based on modified couple stress theory

    PubMed Central

    Rastgoo, Abbas; Ahmadian, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The paper presents the effects of fluid flow on the static and dynamic properties of carbon nanotubes that convey a viscous fluid. The mathematical model is based on the modified couple stress theory. The effects of various fluid parameters and boundary conditions on the pull-in voltages are investigated in detail. The applicability of the proposed system as nanovalves or nanosensors in nanoscale fluidic systems is elaborated. The results confirm that the nanoscale system studied in this paper can be properly applied for these purposes. PMID:24367746

  10. Powerful Electromechanical Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowan, John R.; Myers, William N.

    1994-01-01

    Powerful electromechanical linear actuator designed to replace hydraulic actuator that provides incremental linear movements to large object and holds its position against heavy loads. Electromechanical actuator cleaner and simpler, and needs less maintenance. Two principal innovative features that distinguish new actuator are use of shaft-angle resolver as source of position feedback to electronic control subsystem and antibacklash gearing arrangement.

  11. Herniated Disk

    MedlinePlus

    Your backbone, or spine, is made up of 26 bones called vertebrae. In between them are soft disks filled with a jelly-like substance. These disks cushion the vertebrae and keep them in place. As you age, ...

  12. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  13. High Performance Piezoelectric Actuated Gimbal (HIERAX)

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Tschaggeny; Warren Jones; Eberhard Bamberg

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a 3-axis gimbal whose three rotational axes are actuated by a novel drive system: linear piezoelectric motors whose linear output is converted to rotation by using drive disks. Advantages of this technology are: fast response, high accelerations, dither-free actuation and backlash-free positioning. The gimbal was developed to house a laser range finder for the purpose of tracking and guiding unmanned aerial vehicles during landing maneuvers. The tilt axis was built and the test results indicate excellent performance that meets design specifications.

  14. Superconducting linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Bruce; Hockney, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Special actuators are needed to control the orientation of large structures in space-based precision pointing systems. Electromagnetic actuators that presently exist are too large in size and their bandwidth is too low. Hydraulic fluid actuation also presents problems for many space-based applications. Hydraulic oil can escape in space and contaminate the environment around the spacecraft. A research study was performed that selected an electrically-powered linear actuator that can be used to control the orientation of a large pointed structure. This research surveyed available products, analyzed the capabilities of conventional linear actuators, and designed a first-cut candidate superconducting linear actuator. The study first examined theoretical capabilities of electrical actuators and determined their problems with respect to the application and then determined if any presently available actuators or any modifications to available actuator designs would meet the required performance. The best actuator was then selected based on available design, modified design, or new design for this application. The last task was to proceed with a conceptual design. No commercially-available linear actuator or modification capable of meeting the specifications was found. A conventional moving-coil dc linear actuator would meet the specification, but the back-iron for this actuator would weigh approximately 12,000 lbs. A superconducting field coil, however, eliminates the need for back iron, resulting in an actuator weight of approximately 1000 lbs.

  15. Single-crystal disk drive miniactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanardi, Marco; McKenney, Kevin B.; Rule, John A.; Yoshikawa, Shoko

    2001-08-01

    As hard disk drive areal densities increase at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 60%, disk drives must position the head over increasingly small areas while moving more rapidly to reach the desired position. This results in an increase in vibration disturbance. To meet this demand, many hard disk drive manufactures have created prototype dual-stage actuators employing piezoelectric ceramics for the second stage. These are an attractive means of obtaining higher-bandwidth control due to the low inertia and size of the actuator element. As the technology improves, the next limiting factor will be the amount of displacement obtainable with traditional piezoceramic elements. Under the AXIS (Advanced Crystal Integrated System) Consortium program funded by DARPA, the application of PZN-PT single crystal piezoceramic as a second stage disk drive actuator was studied, based on the fact that the single crystal material provides larger stroke than its traditional PZT counterparts. The transverse (d31) strain of PZN-PT single crystal was measured to be about two times larger than that of PZT-5H ceramic. Both materials were integrated into a disk drive system and compared as second stage actuators. The methodologies used and the servo control techniques applied are also discussed in the paper.

  16. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  17. DISK-SATELLITE INTERACTION IN DISKS WITH DENSITY GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-10-10

    Gravitational coupling between a gaseous disk and an orbiting perturber leads to angular momentum exchange between them that can result in gap opening by planets in protoplanetary disks and clearing of gas by binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) embedded in accretion disks. Understanding the co-evolution of the disk and the orbit of the perturber in these circumstances requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of the torque exerted by the latter on a highly non-uniform disk. Here we explore disk-satellite interaction in disks with gaps in linear approximation both in Fourier and in physical space, explicitly incorporating the disk non-uniformity in the fluid equations. Density gradients strongly displace the positions of Lindblad resonances in the disk (which often occur at multiple locations), and the waveforms of modes excited close to the gap edge get modified compared to the uniform disk case. The spatial distribution of the excitation torque density is found to be quite different from the existing prescriptions: most of the torque is exerted in a rather narrow region near the gap edge where Lindblad resonances accumulate, followed by an exponential falloff with the distance from the perturber. Despite these differences, for a given gap profile, the full integrated torque exerted on the disk agrees with the conventional uniform disk theory prediction at the level of {approx}10%. The nonlinearity of the density wave excited by the perturber is shown to decrease as the wave travels out of the gap, slowing down its nonlinear evolution and damping. Our results suggest that gap opening in protoplanetary disks and gas clearing around SMBH binaries can be more efficient than the existing theories predict. They pave the way for self-consistent calculations of the gap structure and the orbital evolution of the perturber using accurate prescription for the torque density behavior.

  18. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  19. AMSD Cryo Actuator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullette, Mark; Matthews, Gary; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The actuator technology required for AMSD and subsequently NGST are critical in the successful development for future cryogenic systems. Kodak has undertaken an extensive test plan to determine the performance of the force actuators developed under the AMSD program. These actuators are currently in testing at MSFC and are expected to finish this test cycle in early June 2002.

  20. Subminiature hydraulic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.

    1978-01-01

    Subminiature, single-vane rotary actuator for wind-tunnel test-model control-surface actuation systems presents severe torque and system band-pass requirements with stringent space and weight limitations. Actuator has very low leakage of fluid from one side to other, permitting use in precision position servo-systems.

  1. Dual drive actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new class of electromechanical actuators is described. These dual drive actuators were developed for the NASA-JPL Galileo Spacecraft. The dual drive actuators are fully redundant and therefore have high inherent reliability. They can be used for a variety of tasks, and they can be fabricated quickly and economically.

  2. Optical Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, John C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This four-article section focuses on information storage capacity of the optical disk covering the information workstation (uses microcomputer, optical disk, compact disc to provide reference information, information content, work product support); use of laser videodisc technology for dissemination of agricultural information; encoding databases…

  3. Omnidirectional Actuator Handle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moetteli, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed actuator handle comprises two normally concentric rings, cables, and pulleys arranged such that relative displacement of rings from concentricity results in pulling of cable and consequent actuation of associated mechanism. Unlike conventional actuator handles like levers on farm implements, actuated from one or two directions only, proposed handle reached from almost any direction and actuated by pulling or pushing inner ring in any direction with respect to outer ring. Flanges installed on inner ring to cover gap between inner ring and housing to prevent clothing from being caught.

  4. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  5. Magnetic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinson, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic disk recording was invented in 1953 and has undergone intensive development ever since. As a result of this 38 years of development, the cost per byte and the areal density has halved and doubled, respectively every 2 to 2 1/2 years. Today, the cost per byte is lower than 10(exp -6) dollars per byte and area densities exceed 100 x 10(exp 6) bits per square inch. The recent achievements in magnetic disk recording will first be surveyed briefly. Then the principal areas of current technical development will be outlined. Finally, some comments will be made about the future of magnetic disk recording.

  6. Electropneumatic actuator, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, D. P.

    1989-10-01

    The program demonstrated the feasibility of an electropneumatic actuator which can be used in manufacturing applications. The electropneumatic actuator, an alternative to the electric, hydraulic, and pneumatic actuators used in industry, consists of an electrochemical compressor, a power supply, and an actuator. The electrochemical compressor working fluid is hydrogen and a solvent such as water or ammonia. The compressor has no moving parts and runs on low voltage DC. The actuator is a conventional, commercially available unit. Researchers designed, constructed, and tested the electrochemical compressor in conjunction with the actuator, power supply, and computerized control. The one inch actuator can lift a fifty pound weight a distance of ten inches in about 1.5 minutes. The electrochemically powered system is capable of driving its loaded actuator to a prescribed location at a controlled rate. A defined set of design changes will combine the compressor and actuator in the same housing, and will develop two orders of magnitude increased actuator speed at the same or higher force levels.

  7. Design and control of dual servo actuator for near field optical recording system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaehwa; Choi, Young-Man; Lee, Jun-Hee; Yoon, Hyoung-Kil; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2005-12-01

    Near field recording (NFR) has been introduced as a new optical data storage method to realize higher data density beyond the diffraction limit. As the data density increases, the track pitch is remarkably reduced to about 400nm. Thus, more precise actuator is required and we propose a dual servo actuator to improve the accuracy of actuator. The proposed dual servo actuator consists of a coarse actuator and a fine actuator, multisegmented magnet array (MSMA) voice coil motor (VCM) and PMN-PT actuator. In design of VCM actuator, a novel magnetic circuit of VCM with MSMA is proposed. It can generate higher air gap flux density than the magnetic circuit of VCM with the conventional magnet array. In design of fine actuator, the fine actuator including PMN-PT single crystal instead of the conventional PZT is proposed. The displacement gain of PMN-PT fine actuator is 26 nm/V and that of PZT fine actuator is 17 nm/V. The displacement gain is increased by 53 %. To evaluate tracking performance of the manufactured dual servo actuator and to assign the proper role to each actuator, the PQ method is selected. From experiment results, the total bandwidth of the dual servo actuator is increased to 2.5kHz and the resolution is 25 nm. Comparing with the resolution of one servo actuator, 70 nm, we can find that the accuracy of actuator is remarkably improved. And the proposed dual servo actuator shows satisfactory performances to be applied to NFR and it can be applied to other future disk drives.

  8. MEMS fluidic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.; Johnston, Gabriel A.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Galambos, Paul C.; Okandan, Murat

    2007-07-24

    The present invention comprises a novel, lightweight, massively parallel device comprising microelectromechanical (MEMS) fluidic actuators, to reconfigure the profile, of a surface. Each microfluidic actuator comprises an independent bladder that can act as both a sensor and an actuator. A MEMS sensor, and a MEMS valve within each microfluidic actuator, operate cooperatively to monitor the fluid within each bladder, and regulate the flow of the fluid entering and exiting each bladder. When adjacently spaced in a array, microfluidic actuators can create arbitrary surface profiles in response to a change in the operating environment of the surface. In an embodiment of the invention, the profile of an airfoil is controlled by independent extension and contraction of a plurality of actuators, that operate to displace a compliant cover.

  9. Increasing the Number of Replications in Item Response Theory Simulations: Automation through SAS and Disk Operating System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagne, Phill; Furlow, Carolyn; Ross, Terris

    2009-01-01

    In item response theory (IRT) simulation research, it is often necessary to use one software package for data generation and a second software package to conduct the IRT analysis. Because this can substantially slow down the simulation process, it is sometimes offered as a justification for using very few replications. This article provides…

  10. Analysis, design, and testing of a low cost, direct force command linear proof mass actuator for structural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, G. L.; Shelley, Stuart; Jacobson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, the design, analysis, and test of a low cost, linear proof mass actuator for vibration control is presented. The actuator is based on a linear induction coil from a large computer disk drive. Such disk drives are readily available and provide the linear actuator, current feedback amplifier, and power supply for a highly effective, yet inexpensive, experimental laboratory actuator. The device is implemented as a force command input system, and the performance is virtually the same as other, more sophisticated, linear proof mass systems.

  11. Improved Electrohydraulic Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamtil, James

    2004-01-01

    A product line of improved electrohydraulic linear actuators has been developed. These actuators are designed especially for use in actuating valves in rocket-engine test facilities. They are also adaptable to many industrial uses, such as steam turbines, process control valves, dampers, motion control, etc. The advantageous features of the improved electrohydraulic linear actuators are best described with respect to shortcomings of prior electrohydraulic linear actuators that the improved ones are intended to supplant. The flow of hydraulic fluid to the two ports of the actuator cylinder is controlled by a servo valve that is controlled by a signal from a servo amplifier that, in turn, receives an analog position-command signal (a current having a value between 4 and 20 mA) from a supervisory control system of the facility. As the position command changes, the servo valve shifts, causing a greater flow of hydraulic fluid to one side of the cylinder and thereby causing the actuator piston to move to extend or retract a piston rod from the actuator body. A linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) directly linked to the piston provides a position-feedback signal, which is compared with the position-command signal in the servo amplifier. When the position-feedback and position-command signals match, the servo valve moves to its null position, in which it holds the actuator piston at a steady position.

  12. Comprehensive piezoceramic actuator review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chris J.; Washington, Gregory N.

    2002-07-01

    Piezoceramic actuation has become an area of increased interest in the past ten years. Having been used for many years as sensors in such applications as pressure transducers and smoke detectors, piezoceramics are now being used as prime movers in fuel injectors and valve lifters. In an effort to aid the engineering community, this paper will conduct a comprehensive review of several piezoceramic actuators. Classical design parameters will be derived for each actuator such as blocked force and free stroke. In addition, more esoteric entities such as mechanical efficiency and energy density will also be derived. The result will be design metrics of popular piezoceramic actuators containing vital design equations, validated with empirical data. Of the many different configurations of piezoceramic actuators, this paper will investigate the bimorph and unimorph bender. These actuator types are finding increased use in semi-active structural damping, energy harvesting and vibration control. The work in this paper will show experimental verification of various actuator types as well as theoretical derivations. In addition to unimorphs, bimorphs and stack actuators a novel type of unimorph bender, the THUNDER actuator (developed and licensed by NASA) will be included in the review.

  13. Debris Disks and Hidden Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2008-01-01

    When a planet orbits inside a debris disk like the disk around Vega or Beta Pictoris, the planet may be invisible, but the patterns it creates in the disk may give it away. Observing and decoding these patterns may be the only way we can detect exo-Neptunes orbiting more than 20 AU from their stars, and the only way we can spot planets in systems undergoing the late stages of planet formation. Fortunately, every few months, a new image of a debris disk appears with curious structures begging for explanation. I'll describe some new ideas in the theory of these planet-disk interactions and provide a buyers guide to the latest models (and the planets they predict).

  14. Remote control thermal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.; Harrigill, W. T.; Krsek, A.

    1969-01-01

    Thermal actuator makes precise changes in the position of one object with respect to another. Expansion of metal tubes located in the actuator changes the position of the mounting block. Capacitance probe measures the change in position of the block relative to the fixed target plate.

  15. Self-actuated device

    DOEpatents

    Hecht, Samuel L.

    1984-01-01

    A self-actuated device, of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies, in which a gas produced by a neutron induced nuclear reaction gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device.

  16. Control surface actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Gerhard E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A device which actuates aircraft control surfaces is disclosed. The actuator is disposed entirely within the control surface structure. This allows the gap between the wing structural box and the control surface to be reduced. Reducing the size of the gap is especially desirable for wings with high aspect ratio, wherein the volume of the structural box is at a premium.

  17. Quasi-Static Analysis of LaRC THUNDER Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.

    2007-01-01

    An analytic approach is developed to predict the shape and displacement with voltage in the quasi-static limit of LaRC Thunder Actuators. The problem is treated with classical lamination theory and Von Karman non-linear analysis. In the case of classical lamination theory exact analytic solutions are found. It is shown that classical lamination theory is insufficient to describe the physical situation for large actuators but is sufficient for very small actuators. Numerical results are presented for the non-linear analysis and compared with experimental measurements. Snap-through behavior, bifurcation, and stability are presented and discussed.

  18. Size-variable droplet actuation by interdigitated electrowetting electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianfeng; Yu, Yuhua; Li, Jia; Lai, Yongjun; Zhou, Jia

    2012-12-01

    We propose electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) electrodes to actuate size-variable droplets. By using interdigitated fingers and maximizing them in optimized construction, we can control droplets in different sizes with the same electrode array automatically. We both do the theory calculation and experiment verification to study the electrode with rectangular fingers. It is found that the electrode with triangle fingers can actuate droplets as small as 1/36 of that actuated by conventional square electrode array. It can actuate large droplets more efficiently than rectangular fingers. This work provides an approach to achieve multifunctional EWOD devices in the future.

  19. Comparison of Multi Disk Exponential Gas Distribution vs. Single Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Erica; O'Brien, James

    2013-04-01

    In fitting galactic rotation curves to data, most standard theories make use of a single exponential disk approximation of the gas distribution to account for the HI synthesis data observed at various radio telescope facilities. We take a sample of surface brightness profiles from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS), and apply both single disk exponentials and Multi-Disk exponentials, and use these various models to see how the modelling procedure changes the Newtonian prediction of the mass of the galaxy. Since the missing mass problem has not been fully explained in large spiral galaxies, different modelling procedures could account for some of the missing matter.

  20. Fast electrochemical actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, I. V.; Postnikov, A. V.; Svetovoy, V. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lack of fast and strong microactuators is a well-recognized problem in MEMS community. Electrochemical actuators can develop high pressure but they are notoriously slow. Water electrolysis produced by short voltage pulses of alternating polarity can overcome the problem of slow gas termination. Here we demonstrate an actuation regime, for which the gas pressure is relaxed just for 10 μs or so. The actuator consists of a microchamber filled with the electrolyte and covered with a flexible membrane. The membrane bends outward when the pressure in the chamber increases. Fast termination of gas and high pressure developed in the chamber are related to a high density of nanobubbles in the chamber. The physical processes happening in the chamber are discussed so as problems that have to be resolved for practical applications of this actuation regime. The actuator can be used as a driving engine for microfluidics.

  1. Piezoelectrically Actuated Microvalve for Liquid Effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Modifications have been proposed to effect further improvement of the device described in Improved Piezoelectrically Actuated Microvalve (NPO-30158), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 1 (January 2002), page 29. To recapitulate: What is being developed is a prototype of valves for microfluidic systems and other microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The version of the valve reported in the cited previous article included a base (which contained a seat, an inlet, and an outlet), a diaphragm, and a linear actuator. With the exception of the actuator, the parts were micromachined from silicon. The linear actuator consisted of a stack of piezoelectric disks in a rigid housing. To make the diaphragm apply a large sealing force on the inlet and outlet, the piezoelectric stack was compressed into a slightly contracted condition during assembly of the valve. Application of a voltage across the stack caused the stack to contract into an even more compressed condition, lifting the diaphragm away from the seat, thereby creating a narrow channel between the inlet and outlet. The positions of the inlet and outlet, relative to the diaphragm and seat, were such that the inlet flow and pressure contributed to sealing and thus to a desired normally-closed mode of operation.

  2. Electro-Mechanical Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The electro-mechanical actuator, a new electronics technology, is an electronic system that provides the force needed to move valves that control the flow of propellant to the engine. It is proving to be advantageous for the main propulsion system plarned for a second generation reusable launch vehicle. Hydraulic actuators have been used successfully in rocket propulsion systems. However, they can leak when high pressure is exerted on such a fluid-filled hydraulic system. Also, hydraulic systems require significant maintenance and support equipment. The electro-mechanical actuator is proving to be low maintenance and the system weighs less than a hydraulic system. The electronic controller is a separate unit powering the actuator. Each actuator has its own control box. If a problem is detected, it can be replaced by simply removing one defective unit. The hydraulic systems must sustain significant hydraulic pressures in a rocket engine regardless of demand. The electro-mechanical actuator utilizes power only when needed. A goal of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program is to substantially improve safety and reliability while reducing the high cost of space travel. The electro-mechanical actuator was developed by the Propulsion Projects Office of the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  3. Cryogenic Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Cook, William B.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, PMN-PT single crystal piezoelectric stack actuators and flextensional actuators were designed, prototyped and characterized for space optics applications. Single crystal stack actuators with footprint of 10 mm x10 mm and the height of 50 mm were assembled using 10 mm x10mm x0.15mm PMN-PT plates. These actuators showed stroke > 65 - 85 microns at 150 V at room temperature, and > 30 microns stroke at 77 K. Flextensional actuators with dimension of 10mm x 5 mm x 7.6 mm showed stroke of >50 microns at room temperature at driving voltage of 150 V. A flextensional stack actuator with dimension of 10 mm x 5 mm x 47 mm showed stroke of approx. 285 microns at 150 V at room temperature and > 100 microns at 77K under driving of 150 V should be expected. The large cryogenic stroke and high precision of these actuators are promising for cryogenic optics applications.

  4. MEMS Actuated Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Walton, C; Cohn, M

    2005-11-10

    This ongoing work concerns the creation of a deformable mirror by the integration of MEMS actuators with Nanolaminate foils through metal compression boning. These mirrors will use the advantages of these disparate technologies to achieve dense actuation of a high-quality, continuous mirror surface. They will enable advanced adaptive optics systems in large terrestrial telescopes. While MEMS actuators provide very dense actuation with high precision they can not provide large forces typically necessary to deform conventional mirror surfaces. Nanolaminate foils can be fabricated with very high surface quality while their extraordinary mechanical properties enable very thin, flexible foils to survive the rigors of fabrication. Precise metal compression bonding allows the attachment of the fragile MEMS actuators to the thin nanolaminate foils without creating distortions at the bond sites. This paper will describe work in four major areas: (1) modeling and design, (2) bonding development, (3) nanolaminate foil development, (4) producing a prototype. A first-principles analytical model was created and used to determine the design parameters. A method of bonding was determined that is both strong, and minimizes the localized deformation or print through. Work has also been done to produce nanolaminate foils that are sufficiently thin, flexible and flat to be deformed by the MEMS actuators. Finally a prototype was produced by bonding thin, flexible nanolaminate foils to commercially available MEMS actuators.

  5. Ultrasonically Actuated Tools for Abrading Rock Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Rainen, Richard; Askin, Steve; Bickler, Donald; Lewis, Donald; Carson, John; Dawson, Stephen; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu; Peterson, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    An ultrasonic rock-abrasion tool (URAT) was developed using the same principle of ultrasonic/sonic actuation as that of the tools described in two prior NASA Tech Briefs articles: Ultrasonic/ Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors (NPO-20856), Vol. 25, No. 1 (January 2001), page 38 and Ultrasonic/ Sonic Mechanisms for Drilling and Coring (NPO-30291), Vol. 27, No. 9 (September 2003), page 65. Hence, like those tools, the URAT offers the same advantages of low power demand, mechanical simplicity, compactness, and ability to function with very small axial loading (very small contact force between tool and rock). Like a tool described in the second of the cited previous articles, a URAT includes (1) a drive mechanism that comprises a piezoelectric ultrasonic actuator, an amplification horn, and a mass that is free to move axially over a limited range and (2) an abrasion tool bit. A URAT tool bit is a disk that has been machined or otherwise formed to have a large number of teeth and an overall shape chosen to impart the desired shape (which could be flat or curved) to the rock surface to be abraded. In operation, the disk and thus the teeth are vibrated in contact with the rock surface. The concentrated stresses at the tips of the impinging teeth repeatedly induce microfractures and thereby abrade the rock. The motion of the tool induces an ultrasonic transport effect that displaces the cuttings from the abraded area. The figure shows a prototype URAT. A piezoelectric-stack/horn actuator is housed in a cylindrical container. The movement of the actuator and bit with respect to the housing is aided by use of mechanical sliders. A set of springs accommodates the motion of the actuator and bit into or out of the housing through an axial range between 5 and 7 mm. The springs impose an approximately constant force of contact between the tool bit and the rock to be abraded. A dust shield surrounds the bit, serving as a barrier to reduce the migration of rock debris to

  6. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  7. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  8. Magnetically Actuated Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinera, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a magnetically actuated seal in which either a single electromagnet, or multiple electromagnets, are used to control the seal's position. This system can either be an open/ close type of system or an actively controlled system.

  9. Rotary Series Elastic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  10. Rotary series elastic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor); Parsons, Adam H. (Inventor); Griffith, Bryan Kristian (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor); Junkin, Lucien Q. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A rotary actuator assembly is provided for actuation of an upper arm assembly for a dexterous humanoid robot. The upper arm assembly for the humanoid robot includes a plurality of arm support frames each defining an axis. A plurality of rotary actuator assemblies are each mounted to one of the plurality of arm support frames about the respective axes. Each rotary actuator assembly includes a motor mounted about the respective axis, a gear drive rotatably connected to the motor, and a torsion spring. The torsion spring has a spring input that is rotatably connected to an output of the gear drive and a spring output that is connected to an output for the joint.

  11. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  12. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, Sidney E., III

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The linear proof mass actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (mass, upper housing, lower housing, and center support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operating testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  13. Linear Proof Mass Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, S. E., III

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and lessons learned by developing a uniquely designed spaceflight-like actuator. The Linear Proof Mass Actuator (LPMA) was designed to attach to both a large space structure and a ground test model without modification. Previous designs lacked the power to perform in a terrestrial environment while other designs failed to produce the desired accelerations or frequency range for spaceflight applications. Thus, the design for a unique actuator was conceived and developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The basic design consists of four large mechanical parts (Mass, Upper Housing, Lower Housing, and Center Support) and numerous smaller supporting components including an accelerometer, encoder, and four drive motors. Fabrication personnel were included early in the design phase of the LPMA as part of an integrated manufacturing process to alleviate potential difficulties in machining an already challenging design. Operational testing of the LPMA demonstrated that the actuator is capable of various types of load functions.

  14. Laser Initiated Actuator study

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.

    1991-06-27

    The program task was to design and study a laser initiated actuator. The design of the actuator is described, it being comprised of the fiber and body subassemblies. The energy source for all experiments was a Spectra Diode 2200-H2 laser diode. The diode is directly coupled to a 100 micron core, 0.3 numerical aperture fiber optic terminated with an SMA connector. The successful testing results are described and recommendations are made.

  15. Inertial Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Darren

    1995-01-01

    Inertial linear actuators developed to suppress residual accelerations of nominally stationary or steadily moving platforms. Function like long-stroke version of voice coil in conventional loudspeaker, with superimposed linear variable-differential transformer. Basic concept also applicable to suppression of vibrations of terrestrial platforms. For example, laboratory table equipped with such actuators plus suitable vibration sensors and control circuits made to vibrate much less in presence of seismic, vehicular, and other environmental vibrational disturbances.

  16. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  17. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  18. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  19. Hybrid electromechanical actuator and actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ji (Inventor); Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid electromechanical actuator has two different types of electromechanical elements, one that expands in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto and one that contracts in a transverse direction when electric power is applied thereto. The two electromechanical elements are (i) disposed in relation to one another such that the transverse directions thereof are parallel to one another, and (ii) mechanically coupled to one another at least at two opposing edges thereof. Electric power is applied simultaneously to the elements.

  20. Frequency-dependent electrostatic actuation in microfluidic MEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.

    2003-09-01

    Electrostatic actuators exhibit fast response times and are easily integrated into microsystems because they can be fabricated with standard IC micromachining processes and materials. Although electrostatic actuators have been used extensively in 'dry' MEMS, they have received less attention in microfluidic systems probably because of challenges such as electrolysis, anodization, and electrode polarization. Here we demonstrate that ac drive signals can be used to prevent electrode polarization, and thus enable electrostatic actuation in many liquids, at potentials low enough to avoid electrochemistry. We measure the frequency response of an interdigitated silicon comb-drive actuator in liquids spanning a decade of dielectric permittivities and four decades of conductivity, and present a simple theory that predicts the characteristic actuation frequency. The analysis demonstrates the importance of the native oxide on silicon actuator response, and suggests that the actuation frequency can be shifted by controlling the thickness of the oxide. For native silicon devices, actuation is predicted at frequencies less than 10 MHz, in electrolytes of ionic strength up to 100 mmol/L, and thus electrostatic actuation may be feasible in many bioMEMS and other microfluidic applications.

  1. Accommodating Actuator Failures in Flight Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.; Siwakosit, W.; Chung, J.

    1998-01-01

    A technique for the design of flight control systems that can accommodate a set of actuator failures is presented. As employed herein, an actuator failure is defined as any change in the parametric model of the actuator which can adversely affect actuator performance. The technique is based upon the formulation of a fixed feedback topology which ensures at least stability in the presence of the failures in the set. The fixed compensation is obtained from a loop-shaping design procedure similar to Quantitative Feedback Theory and provides stability robustness in the presence of uncertainty in the vehicle dynamics caused by the failures. System adaptation to improve performance after actuator failure(s) occurs through a static gain adjustment in the compensator followed by modification of the system prefilter. Precise identification of the vehicle dynamics is unnecessary. Application to a single-input, single-output design using a simplified model of the longitudinal dynamics of the NASA High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle is discussed. Non-real time simulations of the system including a model of the pilot demonstrate the effectiveness and limitations of the approach.

  2. Non-collinear valve actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A non-collinear valve actuator includes a primary actuating system and a return spring system with each applying forces to a linkage system in order to regulate the flow of a quarter-turn valve. The primary actuating system and return spring system are positioned non-collinearly, which simply means the primary actuating system and return spring system are not in line with each other. By positioning the primary actuating system and return spring system in this manner, the primary actuating system can undergo a larger stroke while the return spring system experiences significantly less displacement. This allows the length of the return spring to be reduced due to the minimization of displacement thereby reducing the weight of the return spring system. By allowing the primary actuating system to undergo longer strokes, the weight of the primary actuating system may also be reduced. Accordingly, the weight of the non-collinear valve actuator is reduced.

  3. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator

  4. Thermally actuated mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sul, Onejae

    This thesis will discuss the generation of controlled sub-micron motions using novel micro actuators. Our research focuses on the development of an arm-type actuator and a free-motion locomotive walking device. Nano-science and nano-technology focuses on the creation of novel functional materials and also at the development of new fabrication techniques incorporating them. In the fields of novel fabrication techniques, manipulations of micron or sub-micron objects by micro actuators have been suggested in the science and engineering societies for mainly two reasons. From a scientific standpoint, new tools enable new prospective sciences, as is evident from the development of the atomic force microscope. From an engineering standpoint, the miniaturization of manipulation tools will require less material and less energy during a material's production. In spite of such importance, progress in the actuator miniaturization is in a primitive state, especially for the micro mobile devices. The thesis will be a key step in pursuit of this goal with an emphasis on generating motions. Our static actuator uses the excellent elastic properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes as a template for a bimorph system. Deflections in response to temperature variations are demonstrated. The mobile device itself is a bimorph system consisting of thin metal films. Control mechanisms for its velocity and steering are discussed. Finally, fundamental limits on the capabilities of the two devices in a more general sense are discussed under via laws of physics.

  5. Photostrictive actuators for photonic control of shallow spherical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hui-Ru; Tzou, Horn-Sen

    2007-10-01

    Photostrictive materials, exhibiting light-induced strain, are of interest for the future generation of wireless remote control photo-actuators. Photostrictive actuators are expected to be used as the driving component in optically controlled flexible structures. In this paper, the photonic control of flexible spherical shells using discrete photostrictive actuators is investigated. This paper presents a coupled opto-piezothermoelastic shell theory that incorporates photovoltaic, pyroelectric and piezoelectric effects, and has the capability to predict the response of a spherical shell driven by the photostrictive actuators. In this study, the effects of actuator location as well as membrane and bending components on the control action have been analyzed. The results obtained indicate that the control forces are mode and location dependent. Analysis also shows that the membrane control action is much more significant than the bending control action.

  6. Torsional Ratcheting Actuating System

    SciTech Connect

    BARNES,STEPHEN MATTHEW; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; RODGERS,M. STEVEN; BITSIE,FERNANDO

    2000-01-24

    A new type of surface micromachined ratcheting actuation system has been developed at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories. The actuator uses a torsional electrostatic comb drive that is coupled to an external ring gear through a ratcheting scheme. The actuator can be operated with a single square wave, has minimal rubbing surfaces, maximizes comb finger density, and can be used for open-loop position control. The prototypes function as intended with a minimum demonstrated operating voltage of 18V. The equations of motion are developed for the torsional electrostatic comb drive. The resonant frequency, voltage vs. displacement and force delivery characteristics are predicted and compared with the fabricated device's performance.

  7. A Laboratory Project on the Theory, Fabrication, and Characterization of a Silicon-on-Insulator Micro-Comb Drive Actuator with Fixed-Fixed Beams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbas, K.; Leseman, Z. C.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory course on the theory, fabrication, and characterization of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices for a multidisciplinary audience of graduate students at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, has been developed. Hands-on experience in the cleanroom has attracted graduate students from across the university's engineering…

  8. Tetherless thermobiochemically actuated microgrippers

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Timothy G.; Randall, Christina L.; Benson, Bryan R.; Bassik, Noy; Stern, George M.; Gracias, David H.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate mass-producible, tetherless microgrippers that can be remotely triggered by temperature and chemicals under biologically relevant conditions. The microgrippers use a self-contained actuation response, obviating the need for external tethers in operation. The grippers can be actuated en masse, even while spatially separated. We used the microgrippers to perform diverse functions, such as picking up a bead on a substrate and the removal of cells from tissue embedded at the end of a capillary (an in vitro biopsy). PMID:19139411

  9. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  10. Hydraulic involute cam actuator

    DOEpatents

    Love, Lonnie J.; Lind, Randall F.

    2011-11-01

    Mechanical joints are provided in which the angle between a first coupled member and a second coupled member may be varied by mechanical actuators. In some embodiments the angle may be varied around a pivot axis in one plane and in some embodiments the angle may be varied around two pivot axes in two orthogonal planes. The joints typically utilize a cam assembly having two lobes with an involute surface. Actuators are configured to push against the lobes to vary the rotation angle between the first and second coupled member.

  11. Conceptual hermetically sealed elbow actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuenscher, H. F.

    1968-01-01

    Electrically or hydraulically powered, hermetically sealed angular or rotary actuator deflects mechanical members over a range of plus or minus 180 degrees. The actuator design provides incremental flexures which keep the local deflection rate within elastic limits.

  12. Low-Shock Pyrotechnic Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Miniature 1-ampere, 1-watt pyrotechnic actuator enclosed in flexible metal bellows. Bellows confines outgassing products, and pyrotechnic shock reduction achieved by action of bellows, gas cushion within device, and minimum use of pyrotechnic material. Actuator inexpensive, compact, and lightweight.

  13. Applications of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelrine, Ron; Sommer-Larsen, Peter; Kornbluh, Roy D.; Heydt, Richard; Kofod, Guggi; Pei, Qibing; Gravesen, Peter

    2001-07-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators, based on the field-induced deformation of elastomeric polymers with compliant electrodes, can produce a large strain response, combined with a fast response time and high electromechanical efficiency. This unique performance, combined with other factors such as low cost, suggests many potential applications, a wide range of which are under investigation. Applications that effectively exploit the properties of dielectric elastomers include artificial muscle actuators for robots; low-cost, lightweight linear actuators; solid- state optical devices; diaphragm actuators for pumps and smart skins; acoustic actuators; and rotary motors. Issues that may ultimately determine the success or failure of the actuation technology for specific applications include the durability of the actuator, the performance of the actuator under load, operating voltage and power requirements, and electronic driving circuitry, to name a few.

  14. Sensor-actuator system for dynamic chloride ion determination.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Derk Balthazar; Abbas, Yawar; Gerrit Bomer, Johan; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2015-08-12

    Chloride is a crucial anion for various analytical applications from biological to environmental applications. In order to measure the chloride ion concentration, a measurement system is needed which can detect this concentration for prolonged times reliably. Chronopotentiometry is a technique which does not need a long term stable reference electrode and is therefore very suitable for prolonged ion concentration measurements. As the used electrode might be fouled by reaction products, this work focuses on a chronopotentiometric approach with a separated sensing electrode (sensor) and actuating electrode (actuator). Both actuation and sensor electrode are made of Ag/AgCl. A constant current is applied to the actuator and will start the reaction between Ag and Cl-, while the resulting Cl- ion concentration change is observed through the sensor, which is placed close to the actuator. The time it takes to locally deplete the Cl- ions is called transition time. Experiments were performed to verify the feasibility of this approach. The performed experiments show that the sensor detects the local concentration changes resulting from the current applied to the actuator. A linear relation between the Cl- ion concentration and the square root of the transition time was observed, just as was predicted by theory. The calibration curves for different chips showed that both a larger sensor and a larger distance between sensor and actuator resulted in a larger time delay between the transition time detected at the actuator and the sensor. PMID:26320957

  15. Angular-Momentum-Compensating Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiktor, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Reactionless actuator developed for instrument-pointing platforms on flexible spacecraft; by eliminating reactions, actuator changes aiming angle of platform without inducing vibrations in spacecraft, eliminateing vibrations in point angle of instrument platform. Actuator used on Earth in such systems as helicopter platforms for television cameras in law enforcement and news telecasts.

  16. Radiative Transfer in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graziani, L.; Aiello, S.; Belleni-Morante, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.

    2008-09-01

    inhomogeneities, vertical and radial, in terms of mineralogical and density changes. Different dust mixture models from Pollack [9], Gail [10] and Henning [11] are implemented and tested. The code solves the RT in the 4 Stokes radiation field formalism providing an accurate radiation flux description and the polarization configuration for UV and X-Ray stellar fluxes in various disk regions (disk surface, disk midplane etc..). The complete model is developed within the context of a classical TTauri protostar and for different dust compositions and different ranges of star luminosity in UV and X -Ray are. The effects on some prebiotic molecules are estimated. References [1]Ehrenfreund, P. & Charnley, S.B. (2000), Ann.Rev.Astr.Astrophys, 38, 427-483. [2]Markwick, A.J. & Charnley, S.B. (2004). in P. Eherenfreund et alt. (eds) "Astrobiology: Future Perspectives", Kluwer, 33-66. [3] Chiang, E. I. & Goldreich, P. (1997), ApJ, 490, 368 [4] D'Alessio, P., Canto, J., Calvet, N., & Lizano, S. (1998), ApJ, 500, 411. [5] Bjorkman, J. E. & Wood, K. 2001, ApJ, 554, 615. [6] Dullemond C. P. & A.Natta 2003, A&A 405, 597-605. [7] B. Davison & J. B. Sykes: Neutron Transport theory, Oxford Press 1958. [8] D'Alessio P. et al (2007), Chondrites and the Protoplanetary Disk, ASPConference Series,Vol.341. [9] J.B.Pollack et al. (1994), ApJ,421:615-639. [10] H.P.Gail, (2001), A&A, v.378 [11] T.Henning & R.Stognienko.(1996), ApJ, 311.

  17. Electromechanical flight control actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of using an electromechanical actuator (EMA) as the primary flight control equipment in aerospace flight is examined. The EMA motor design is presented utilizing improved permanent magnet materials. The necessary equipment to complete a single channel EMA using the single channel power electronics breadboard is reported. The design and development of an improved rotor position sensor/tachometer is investigated.

  18. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing. 49 figs.

  19. Bistable microelectromechanical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    1999-01-01

    A bistable microelectromechanical (MEM) actuator is formed on a substrate and includes a stressed membrane of generally rectangular shape that upon release assumes a curvilinear cross-sectional shape due to attachment at a midpoint to a resilient member and at opposing edges to a pair of elongate supports. The stressed membrane can be electrostatically switched between a pair of mechanical states having mirror-image symmetry, with the MEM actuator remaining in a quiescent state after a programming voltage is removed. The bistable MEM actuator according to various embodiments of the present invention can be used to form a nonvolatile memory element, an optical modulator (with a pair of mirrors supported above the membrane and moving in synchronism as the membrane is switched), a switchable mirror (with a single mirror supported above the membrane at the midpoint thereof) and a latching relay (with a pair of contacts that open and close as the membrane is switched). Arrays of bistable MEM actuators can be formed for applications including nonvolatile memories, optical displays and optical computing.

  20. Actuators Acting without Actin.

    PubMed

    Geitmann, Anja

    2016-06-30

    Plant actuators move organs, allowing the plant to respond to environmental cues or perform other mechanical tasks. In Cardamine hursuta the dispersal of seeds is accomplished by explosive opening of the fruit. The biomechanical mechanism relies on a complex interplay between turgor regulation and cell wall mechanical properties. PMID:27368097

  1. "Mighty Worm" Piezoelectric Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamford, Robert M.; Wada, Ben K.; Moore, Donald M.

    1994-01-01

    "Mighty Worm" piezoelectric actuator used as adjustable-length structural member, active vibrator or vibration suppressor, and acts as simple (fixed-length) structural member when inactive. Load force not applied to piezoelectric element in simple-structural-member mode. Piezoelectric element removed from load path when not in use.

  2. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  3. The Earliest Stage of Planet Formation: Disk-Planet Interactions in Protoplanetary Disks and Observations of Transitional Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing; Rafikov, R.; Stone, J. M.; Hartmann, L. W.; SEEDS Team

    2013-01-01

    I will first talk about numerical simulations of disk-planet interactions in protoplanetary disks. Particularly, I’ll discuss the damping of the density waves excited by planets due to the nonlinearity in their propagation, which can result in gap opening in a low viscosity disk by low mass planets. I'll also discuss the effects of various numerical algorithms and parameters in simulations of disk-planet interaction, and address the question of how to produce correct simulations. Then I’ll move on to recent Subaru observations of transitional disks, which are protoplanetary disks with central depleted regions (cavities). Several ideas on the formation of transitional disks have been proposed, including gaps opened by planet(s). Recently, Subaru directly imaged a number of such disks at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths (the SEEDS project) with high spatial resolution and small inner working angles. Using radiative transfer simulations, we study the structure of transitional disks by modeling the NIR images, the SED, and the sub-mm observations from literature (whenever available) simultaneously. We obtain physical disk+cavity structures, and constrain the spatial distribution of the dust grains, particularly inside the cavity and at the cavity edge. Interestingly, we find that in some cases cavities are not present in the scattered light. In such cases we present a new transitional disk model to simultaneously account for all observations. Decoupling between the sub-um-sized and mm-sized grains inside the cavity is required, which may necessitate the dust filtration mechanism. For another group of transitional disks in which Subaru does reveal the cavities at NIR, we focus on whether grains at different sizes have the same spatial distribution or not. We use our modeling results to constrain transitional disk formation theories, particularly to comment on their possible planets origin.

  4. ACCRETION DISK TEMPERATURES OF QSOs: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE EMISSION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bonning, E. W.; Shields, G. A.; Stevens, A. C.; Salviander, S. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: triples@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2013-06-10

    We compare QSO emission-line spectra to predictions based on theoretical ionizing continua of accretion disks. The observed line intensities do not show the expected trend of higher ionization with theoretical accretion disk temperature as predicted from the black hole mass and accretion rate. Consistent with earlier studies, this suggests that the inner disk does not reach temperatures as high as expected from standard disk theory. Modified radial temperature profiles, taking account of winds or advection in the inner disk, achieve better agreement with observation. The emission lines of radio-detected and radio-undetected sources show different trends as a function of the theoretically predicted disk temperature.

  5. Dielectric Actuation of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofan

    Dielectric polymers are widely used in a plurality of applications, such as electrical insulation, dielectric capacitors, and electromechanical actuators. Dielectric polymers with large strain deformations under an electric field are named dielectric elastomers (DE), because of their relative low modulus, high elongation at break, and outstanding resilience. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are superior to traditional transducers as a muscle-like technology: large strains, high energy densities, high coupling efficiency, quiet operation, and light weight. One focus of this dissertation is on the design of DE materials with high performance and easy processing. UV radiation curing of reactive species is studied as a generic synthesis methodology to provide a platform for material scientists to customize their own DE materials. Oligomers/monomers, crosslinkers, and other additives are mixed and cured at appropriate ratios to control the stress-strain response, suppress electromechanical instability of the resulting polymers, and provide stable actuation strains larger than 100% and energy densities higher than 1 J/g. The processing is largely simplified in the new material system by removal of the prestretching step. Multilayer stack actuators with 11% linear strain are demonstrated in a procedure fully compatible with industrial production. A multifunctional DE derivative material, bistable electroactive polymer (BSEP), is invented enabling repeatable rigid-to-rigid deformation without bulky external structures. Bistable actuation allows the polymer actuator to have two distinct states that can support external load without device failure. Plasticizers are used to lower the glass transition temperature to 45 °C. Interpenetrating polymer network structure is established inside the BSEP to suppress electromechanical instability, providing a breakdown field of 194 MV/m and a stable bistable strain as large as 228% with a 97% strain fixity. The application of BSEP

  6. Piezoelectric actuation of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieven, Nicholas A. J.

    2001-07-01

    The work presented in this paper is concerned with the application of embedded piezo-electric actuators in model helicopter rotor blades. The paper outlines techniques to define the optimal location of actuators to excite particular modes of vibration whilst the blade is rotating. Using composite blades the distribution of strain energy is defined using a Finite Element model with imposed rotor-dynamic and aerodynamics loads. The loads are specified through strip theory to determine the position of maximum bending moment and thus the optimal location of the embedded actuators. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated on a 1/4 scale fixed cyclic pitch rotor head. Measurement of the blade displacement is achieved by using strain gauges. In addition a redundant piezo-electric actuator is used to measure the blades' response characteristics. The addition of piezo-electric devices in this application has been shown to exhibit adverse aeroelastic effects, such as counter mass balancing and increased drag. Methods to minimise these effects are suggested. The outcome of the paper is a method for defining the location and orientation of piezo-electric devices in rotor-dynamic applications.

  7. Application of photothermal effect to manufacture ultrasonic actuators (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu-yi; Cheng, Li-ping; Shui, Xiu-ji; Yu, Jiong; Dong, Shu-xiang

    2003-01-01

    Photothermal (PT) effect has been applied to manufacture disks [A. C. Tam, a lecture at the Institute of Acoustics, Nanjing University, People's Republic of China (1996)] and magnetic head sliders for disk drives [A. C. Tam, C. C. Poon, and L. Crawforth, Analyt. Sci. 17, s 419 (2001)]. Now we apply the PT effect to manufacture ultrasonic motors (actuators). Recently, the ultrasonic actuators with different ultrasonic modes, such as Rayleigh (surface acoustic) mode, Lamb (plate) mode, etc., have been developed. We have designed and fabricated two rotary motors driven by surface acoustic wave (SAW) with different frequencies, but lower than 30 MHz [L. P. Cheng, G. M. Zhang, S. Y. Zhang, J. Yu, and X. J. Shui, Ultrasonics 39, 591 (2002)]. On the SAW motors (actuators), two Rayleigh wave beams were generated and propagating along the surface of a 128° YK-LiNbO3 substrate in opposite directions with each other as a stator, and a plastic disk with balls distributed along the circle of the disk was as a rotor. For miniaturizing the rotary SAW motors, and increasing the rotation velocity, the SAW frequency must be increased. Then we improve the manufacturing technology of the mechanical structure by PT effect instead of the conventional mechanical processes of the stator and rotor of the motor. A new type of rotary SAW motor (actuator) has been fabricated, in which both SAW beams with opposite propagating directions are excited by two pairs of interdigital transducers with the frequency between 30-50 MHz. In the surface of the stator (128° YX-LiNbO3 substrate), a hole with the depth about 500 μm is impinged by a focused pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam (PT effect) between two SAW propagating ways on the 128° YX-LiNbO3 substrate for fixing the axis of the motor, with the frequency between 30-50 MHz. In the bottom of the rotor (plastic disk), a lot of crown (flange) blocks with the high of 20-30 μm and the diameter of also 20-30 μm can be made by the focused pulsed Nd

  8. A small-gap electrostatic micro-actuator for large deflections

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Holger; Schenk, Harald; Kaiser, Bert; Langa, Sergiu; Gaudet, Matthieu; Schimmanz, Klaus; Stolz, Michael; Lenz, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Common quasi-static electrostatic micro actuators have significant limitations in deflection due to electrode separation and unstable drive regions. State-of-the-art electrostatic actuators achieve maximum deflections of approximately one third of the electrode separation. Large electrode separation and high driving voltages are normally required to achieve large actuator movements. Here we report on an electrostatic actuator class, fabricated in a CMOS-compatible process, which allows high deflections with small electrode separation. The concept presented makes the huge electrostatic forces within nanometre small electrode separation accessible for large deflections. Electrostatic actuations that are larger than the electrode separation were measured. An analytical theory is compared with measurement and simulation results and enables closer understanding of these actuators. The scaling behaviour discussed indicates significant future improvement on actuator deflection. The presented driving concept enables the investigation and development of novel micro systems with a high potential for improved device and system performance. PMID:26655557

  9. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2015-09-01

    Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies) that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV) wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness), the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution), a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014). 2nd Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  10. Star-Disk Coupling Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, F. H.

    2002-05-01

    We attempt to clarify the confusion concerning angular-momentum coupling mechanisms when closed and open magnetic fields originating from a young star thread through a surrounding disk. We argue that the traditional Ghosh & Lamb description represents only a transient behavior that does not account for important longer-term effects that arise because of accretion and if the disk is highly, but imperfectly, electrically conducting. In the latter case, we argue that the steady-state response of the system is to form a funnel-flow/x-wind geometry. We describe approximate, self-consistent, calculations of the gas flow for the case when the unperturbed magnetic-field configuration of the star would have been a pure dipole in the absence of the disk. We show that the disk-star interactions considerably modifies the actual magnetospheric structure of the system. We also show calculations where we drop the assumption that the unperturbed magnetosphere is a pure dipole. As long as the radius of the inner edge of the disk is a few or more times the radius of the star, we find that the properties of the x-wind are little changed by the relaxation of the dipole assumption. However, the size and geometry of the hot spots where the funnel flow impacts the star can be greatly affected by the exact mixture of multipoles chosen to model the magnetic fields on the stellar surface. The crucial invariant in our theory is the amount of trapped flux required to truncate a disk of a certain accretion rate before the flow reaches the equator of a star of given mass. We present empirical evidence that trapped flux is indeed the relevant concept for the explanation of the hot-spot properties of T Tauri stars. We close with a qualitative discussion of the limits of the validity of the concept of disk locking. This research is supported in part by grants from NASA and the National Science Foundation.

  11. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  12. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  13. Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Monica (Compiler); Sharkey, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the NASA Electrical Actuation Technology Bridging (ELA-TB) Workshop held in Huntsville, Alabama, September 29-October 1, 1992. The workshop was sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Systems Development and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The workshop addressed key technologies bridging the entire field of electrical actuation including systems methodology, control electronics, power source systems, reliability, maintainability, and vehicle health management with special emphasis on thrust vector control (TVC) applications on NASA launch vehicles. Speakers were drawn primarily from industry with participation from universities and government. In addition, prototype hardware demonstrations were held at the MSFC Propulsion Laboratory each afternoon. Splinter sessions held on the final day afforded the opportunity to discuss key issues and to provide overall recommendations. Presentations are included in this document.

  14. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, Milton A.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Lee, Abraham P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1997-01-01

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The "micro" size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed.

  15. Microfabricated therapeutic actuator mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Lee, A.P.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    1997-07-08

    Electromechanical microstructures (microgrippers), either integrated circuit (IC) silicon-based or precision machined, to extend and improve the application of catheter-based interventional therapies for the repair of aneurysms in the brain or other interventional clinical therapies. These micromechanisms can be specifically applied to release platinum coils or other materials into bulging portions of the blood vessels also known as aneurysms. The ``micro`` size of the release mechanism is necessary since the brain vessels are the smallest in the body. Through a catheter more than one meter long, the micromechanism located at one end of the catheter can be manipulated from the other end thereof. The microgripper (micromechanism) of the invention will also find applications in non-medical areas where a remotely actuated microgripper or similar actuator would be useful or where micro-assembling is needed. 22 figs.

  16. Scissor thrust valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    DeWall, Kevin G.; Watkins, John C; Nitzel, Michael E.

    2006-08-29

    Apparatus for actuating a valve includes a support frame and at least one valve driving linkage arm, one end of which is rotatably connected to a valve stem of the valve and the other end of which is rotatably connected to a screw block. A motor connected to the frame is operatively connected to a motor driven shaft which is in threaded screw driving relationship with the screw block. The motor rotates the motor driven shaft which drives translational movement of the screw block which drives rotatable movement of the valve driving linkage arm which drives translational movement of the valve stem. The valve actuator may further include a sensory control element disposed in operative relationship with the valve stem, the sensory control element being adapted to provide control over the position of the valve stem by at least sensing the travel and/or position of the valve stem.

  17. Generation of droplets to serpentine threads on a rotating compact-disk platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Shantimoy; Joshi, Sumit; Chaudhary, Kaustav; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-12-01

    We generate stable monodisperse droplets of nano-liter volumes and long serpentine liquid threads in a single, simple "Y"-shaped microchannel mounted on a rotationally actuated lab-on-a-compact-disk platform. Exploitation of Coriolis force offers versatile modus operandi of the present setup, without involving any design complications. Based on the fundamental understanding and subsequent analysis, we present scaling theories consistent with the experimental observations. We also outline specific applications of this technique, in the biological as well as in the physical domain, including digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR), controlled release of medical components, digital counting of colony forming units, hydrogel engineering, optical sensors and scaffolds for living tissues, to name a few.

  18. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  19. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  20. Passively actuated valve

    SciTech Connect

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  1. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  2. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  3. Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.; Fulcher, Clay W. G.

    2012-07-31

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

  4. Cylindrical Piezoelectric Fiber Composite Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of piezoelectric devices has become widespread since Pierre and Jacques Curie discovered the piezoelectric effect in 1880. Examples of current applications of piezoelectric devices include ultrasonic transducers, micro-positioning devices, buzzers, strain sensors, and clocks. The invention of such lightweight, relatively inexpensive piezoceramic-fiber-composite actuators as macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators has made it possible to obtain strains and displacements greater than those that could be generated by prior actuators based on monolithic piezoceramic sheet materials. MFC actuators are flat, flexible actuators designed for bonding to structures to apply or detect strains. Bonding multiple layers of MFC actuators together could increase force capability, but not strain or displacement capability. Cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite (CPFC) actuators have been invented as alternatives to MFC actuators for applications in which greater forces and/or strains or displacements may be required. In essence, a CPFC actuator is an MFC or other piezoceramic fiber composite actuator fabricated in a cylindrical instead of its conventional flat shape. Cylindrical is used here in the general sense, encompassing shapes that can have circular, elliptical, rectangular or other cross-sectional shapes in the planes perpendicular to their longitudinal axes.

  5. Contribution of crosstalk to the uncertainty of electrostatic actuator calibrations.

    PubMed

    Shams, Qamar A; Soto, Hector L; Zuckerwar, Allan J

    2009-09-01

    Crosstalk in electrostatic actuator calibrations is defined as the ratio of the microphone response to the actuator excitation voltage at a given frequency with the actuator polarization voltage turned off to the response, at the excitation frequency, with the polarization voltage turned on. It consequently contributes to the uncertainty of electrostatic actuator calibrations. Two sources of crosstalk are analyzed: the first attributed to the stray capacitance between the actuator electrode and the microphone backplate, and the second to the ground resistance appearing as a common element in the actuator excitation and microphone input loops. Measurements conducted on 1/4, 1/2, and 1 in. air condenser microphones reveal that the crosstalk has no frequency dependence up to the membrane resonance frequency and that the level of crosstalk lies at about -60 dB for all three microphones-conclusions that are consistent with theory. The measurements support the stray capacitance model. The contribution of crosstalk to the measurement standard uncertainty of an electrostatic actuator calibration is therewith 0.01 dB. PMID:19739723

  6. Enhancement of Optical Adaptive Sensing by Using a Dual-Stage Seesaw-Swivel Actuator with a Tunable Vibration Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Po-Chien; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Stone

    2011-01-01

    Technological obstacles to the use of rotary-type swing arm actuators to actuate optical pickup modules in small-form-factor (SFF) disk drives stem from a hinge’s skewed actuation, subsequently inducing off-axis aberrations and deteriorating optical quality. This work describes a dual-stage seesaw-swivel actuator for optical pickup actuation. A triple-layered bimorph bender made of piezoelectric materials (PZTs) is connected to the suspension of the pickup head, while the tunable vibration absorber (TVA) unit is mounted on the seesaw swing arm to offer a balanced force to reduce vibrations in a focusing direction. Both PZT and TVA are designed to satisfy stable focusing operation operational requirements and compensate for the tilt angle or deformation of a disc. Finally, simulation results verify the performance of the dual-stage seesaw-swivel actuator, along with experimental procedures and parametric design optimization confirming the effectiveness of the proposed system. PMID:22163877

  7. Aircraft Interior Noise Control Using Distributed Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Jian Q.

    1996-01-01

    Developing a control system that can reduce the noise and structural vibration at the same time is an important task. This talk presents one possible technical approach for accomplishing this task. The target application of the research is for aircraft interior noise control. The emphasis of the present approach is not on control strategies, but rather on the design of actuators for the control system. In the talk, a theory of distributed piezoelectric actuators is introduced. A uniform cylindrical shell is taken as a simplified model of fuselage structures to illustrate the effectiveness of the design theory. The actuators developed are such that they can reduce the tonal structural vibration and interior noise in a wide range of frequencies. Extensive computer simulations have been done to study various aspects of the design theory. Experiments have also been conducted and the test results strongly support the theoretical development.

  8. Telescoping cylindrical piezoelectric fiber composite actuator assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G. (Inventor); Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox Chattin, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A telescoping actuator assembly includes a plurality of cylindrical actuators in a concentric arrangement. Each cylindrical actuator is at least one piezoelectric fiber composite actuator having a plurality of piezoelectric fibers extending parallel to one another and to the concentric arrangement's longitudinal axis. Each cylindrical actuator is coupled to concentrically-adjacent ones of the cylindrical actuators such that the plurality of cylindrical actuators can experience telescopic movement. An electrical energy source coupled to the cylindrical actuators applies actuation energy thereto to generate the telescopic movement.

  9. Cellular Pressure-Actuated Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    A modification of a pressure-actuated joint has been proposed to improve its pressure actuation in such a manner as to reduce the potential for leakage of the pressurizing fluid. The specific joint for which the modification is proposed is a field joint in a reusable solid-fuel rocket motor (RSRM), in which the pressurizing fluid is a mixture of hot combustion gases. The proposed modification could also be applicable to other pressure-actuated joints of similar configuration.

  10. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  11. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  12. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  13. Observational constraints on black hole accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.

    1994-01-01

    We review the empirical constraints on accretion disk models of stellar-mass black holes based on recent multiwavelength observational results. In addition to time-averaged emission spectra, the time evolutions of the intensity and spectrum provide critical information about the structure, stability, and dynamics of the disk. Using the basic thermal Keplerian disk paradigm, we consider in particular generalizations of the standard optically thin disk models needed to accommodate the extremely rich variety of dynamical phenomena exhibited by black hole candidates ranging from flares of electron-positron annihilations and quasiperiodic oscillations in the X-ray intensity to X-ray novae activity. These in turn provide probes of the disk structure and global geometry. The goal is to construct a single unified framework to interpret a large variety of black hole phenomena. This paper will concentrate on the interface between basic theory and observational data modeling.

  14. Optical Disk Testing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, Basil H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the basics of an optical disk testing system used to test 12 inch, write once, Alcatel Thomson Gigadisk (ATG) media that are used at the Library of Congress in a pilot document storage and retrieval system. Since very little is known regarding the longevity of optical disk media and the fact that disk manufacturers are still refining processing techniques, any conclusions regarding error patterns, failure modes, or longevity may be superceded by a new "batch" of disks. Therefore, this paper focuses on the development of procedures for testing disks that can be used as the write once optical disk technology continues to advance.

  15. Inlet flow distortion in turbomachinery. I - Comparison of theory and experiment in a transonic fan stage. II - A parameter study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, B. S.; Matwey, M. D.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, a semi-actuator-disk theory is reviewed that was developed previously for the distorted inflow to a single-stage axial-flow compressor. Flow distortion occurs far upstream; it may be a distortion in stagnation temperature, stagnation pressure, or both. Losses, quasi-steady deviation angles, and reference incidence correlations are included in the analysis, and both subsonic and transonic relative Mach numbers are considered. The theory is compared with measurements made in a transonic fan stage, and a parameter study is carried out to determine the influence of solidity on the attenuation of distortions in stagnation pressure and stagnation temperature.

  16. Circumstellar Dust Disks around Stars with Known Planetary Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, D. E.; Brown, R. H.; Rivkin, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    We have searched six stars with known radial velocity planetary companions for circumstellar disks. Disks are expected around stars with planetary systems that accreted from regular protoplanetary disks, and remnant disks are expected to be similar to our solar system's Kuiper Belt. To date, we have detected circumstellar disks around three such stars: 55 Cnc, ρ CrB, and HD 210277. All these systems now resemble mature planetary systems with Jupiter-mass companions and Kuiper Belt-like disks. Our previous detection of the 55 Cnc disk (Trilling & Brown) is included here to place that disk in the context of the other two newly detected disks. Measuring the inclinations of the disks and assuming the disks are coplanar with the planets' orbits determines the masses of the planets around these three stars to be 1.9+1.1-0.4 MJ, 1.5+0.2-0.1 MJ, and 2.2+0.6-0.2 MJ, respectively (1 MJ is one Jupiter mass). We also report nondetections for three stars--51 Peg, υ And, and Gl876--that are known to have radial velocity companions. A number of possibilities exist to explain nondetections of disks, from the absence of a disk to limits on disk mass, radial extent, or inclination. We may also be looking through a disk's central hole, especially for the nearby star Gl876. The radial brightness profiles of each of the observed disks follow a power law with index ~-5, including a power of -2 from the stellar flux drop off, similar to the suggested value for our solar system's Kuiper Belt. This likely suggests that uniform physical processes govern the Kuiper Belt's population out to at least 100 AU, and may be ubiquitous among disks. Last, we discuss how disk characterizations can lead us toward refining theories of planetary system formation.

  17. Strain actuated aeroelastic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarus, Kenneth B.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on strain actuated aeroelastic control are presented. Topics covered include: structural and aerodynamic modeling; control law design methodology; system block diagram; adaptive wing test article; bench-top experiments; bench-top disturbance rejection: open and closed loop response; bench-top disturbance rejection: state cost versus control cost; wind tunnel experiments; wind tunnel gust alleviation: open and closed loop response at 60 mph; wind tunnel gust alleviation: state cost versus control cost at 60 mph; wind tunnel command following: open and closed loop error at 60 mph; wind tunnel flutter suppression: open loop flutter speed; and wind tunnel flutter suppression: closed loop state cost curves.

  18. Compact valve actuation mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A valve actuation device. The device may include a free floating valve bridge movably supported within a cavity in the engine housing. The bridge may be provided with a cavity and an orifice arrangement for pumping gases entrained with lubricating fluid toward the piston stems as the bridge reciprocates back and forth. The device may also include a rocker arm that has a U-shaped cross-sectional shape for receiving at least a portion of the valve bridge, valve stem valve spring and spring retainer therein. The rocker arm may be provided with lubrication passages for directing lubrication to the point wherein it is pivotally affixed to the engine housing.

  19. Lead screw linear actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A linear actuator which can apply high forces is described, which includes a reciprocating rod having a threaded portion engaged by a nut that is directly coupled to the rotor of an electric motor. The nut is connected to the rotor in a manner that minimizes loading on the rotor, by the use of a coupling that transmits torque to the nut but permits it to shift axially and radially with respect to the rotor. The nut has a threaded hydrostatic bearing for engaging the threaded rod portion, with an oilcarrying groove in the nut being interrupted.

  20. Piezoelectric actuated gimbal

    DOEpatents

    Tschaggeny, Charles W.; Jones, Warren F.; Bamberg, Eberhard

    2011-09-13

    A gimbal is described and which includes a fixed base member defining an axis of rotation; a second member concentrically oriented relative to the axis of rotation; a linear actuator oriented in immediate, adjoining force transmitting relation relative to the base member or to the second member, and which applies force along a linear axis which is tangential to the axis of rotation so as to cause the second member to rotate coaxially relative to the fixed base member; and an object of interest mounted to the second member such that the object of interest is selectively moved relative to the base member about the axis of rotation.

  1. Robotic Arm Actuated by Electroactie Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Xue, T.; Shaninpoor, M.; Simpson, J. O.; Smith, J.

    1998-01-01

    Actuators are used for many planetary and space applications. To meet the NASA goal to reduce the actuators size, mass, cost and power consumption, electroactie polymers (EAP) are being developed to induce large bending and longitudinal actuation strains.

  2. Accretion disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    Accretion disk electrodynamic phenomena are separable into two classes: (1) disks and coronas with turbulent magnetic fields; (2) disks and black holes which are connected to a large-scale external magnetic field. Turbulent fields may originate in an alpha-omega dynamo, provide anomalous viscous transport, and sustain an active corona by magnetic buoyancy. The large-scale field can extract energy and angular momentum from the disk and black hole, and be dynamically configured into a collimated relativistic jet.

  3. Mixed-Modal Disk Gas Squeeze Film Theoretical and Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanzhong; Wei, Bin

    2013-09-01

    In order to investigate the gas squeeze film characteristics with mixed-modal disk excitation, an actuator with piezo-electric components is designed. Experiments show that different modal shapes of the disk are excited along with the changes of the actuator excitation frequency. The amplitude of the modal shape can reach the same order of magnitude as the squeeze film thickness, so the modal effects on the squeeze film characteristics cannot be ignored. In this paper, the simulating and fitting of the exciting disk modal shapes were finished by ANSYS and MATLAB. The actual film thickness equation was amended by the modal shape fitting curve. The gas film characteristic can be obtained by solving the Reynolds equation which is coupled with film thickness and motion equation. In this study, finite element simulation and differential numerical calculation results provided a good guidance to the piezoelectric actuator design.

  4. Actuator operated microvalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An actuator operated microvalve and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The microvalve comprises a SiC housing which includes a first lower portion and a second upper portion. The lower portion of the SiC housing includes a passageway therethrough, a microvalve seat, and a moveable SiC diaphragm. The SiC diaphragm includes a centrally located boss and radially extending corrugations which may be sinusoidally shaped. The boss of the SiC diaphragm moves and modulates in a range of positions between a closed position wherein the boss interengages said microvalve seat prohibiting communication of fluid through the passageway and a fully open position when the boss is spaced apart from the seat at its maximum permitting communication of fluid through said passageway. The actuator includes a SiC top plate affixed to the boss of the diaphragm and a first electrode and the second upper portion of the SiC housing further includes a second electrode.

  5. Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Thomas; Semenov, Dmitry

    2013-12-01

    This comprehensive review summarizes our current understanding of the evolution of gas, solids and molecular ices in protoplanetary disks. Key findings related to disk physics and chemistry, both observationally and theoretically, are highlighted. We discuss which molecular probes are used to derive gas temperature, density, ionization state, kinematics, deuterium fractionation, and study organic matter in protoplanetary disks.

  6. Optical Disk Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, George L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This special feature focuses on recent developments in optical disk technology. Nine articles discuss current trends, large scale image processing, data structures for optical disks, the use of computer simulators to create optical disks, videodisk use in training, interactive audio video systems, impacts on federal information policy, and…

  7. Understanding Floppy Disks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Pamela

    1980-01-01

    The author describes the floppy disk with an analogy to the phonograph record, and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and capabilities of hard-sectored and soft-sectored floppy disks. She concludes that, at present, the floppy disk will continue to be the primary choice of personal computer manufacturers and their customers. (KC)

  8. Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Redding, David; Lowman, Andrew; Cohen, David; Ohara, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts the planned Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope (AHMT), which is intended to demonstrate a new approach to the design and construction of wide-aperture spaceborne telescopes for astronomy and Earth science. This technology is also appropriate for Earth-based telescopes. The new approach can be broadly summarized as using advanced lightweight mirrors that can be manufactured rapidly at relatively low cost. More specifically, it is planned to use precise replicated metallic nanolaminate mirrors to obtain the required high-quality optical finishes. Lightweight, dimensionally stable silicon carbide (SiC) structures will support the nanolaminate mirrors in the required surface figures. To enable diffraction- limited telescope performance, errors in surface figures will be corrected by use of mirror-shape-control actuators that will be energized, as needed, by a wave-front-sensing and control system. The concepts of nanolaminate materials and mirrors made from nanolaminate materials were discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Nanolaminates constitute a relatively new class of materials that can approach theoretical limits of stiffness and strength. Nanolaminate mirrors are synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition of metallic alloys and/or compounds on optically precise master surfaces to obtain optical-quality reflector surfaces backed by thin shell structures. As an integral part of the deposition process, a layer of gold that will constitute the reflective surface layer is deposited first, eliminating the need for a subsequent and separate reflective-coating process. The crystallographic textures of the nanolaminate will be controlled to optimize the performance of the mirror. The entire deposition process for making a nanolaminate mirror takes less than 100 hours, regardless of the mirror diameter. Each nanolaminate mirror will be bonded to its lightweight SiC supporting structure. The lightweight nanolaminate mirrors and Si

  9. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  10. Quasi-Static Analysis of Round LaRC THUNDER Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.

    2007-01-01

    An analytic approach is developed to predict the shape and displacement with voltage in the quasi-static limit of round LaRC Thunder Actuators. The problem is treated with classical lamination theory and Von Karman non-linear analysis. In the case of classical lamination theory exact analytic solutions are found. It is shown that classical lamination theory is insufficient to describe the physical situation for large actuators but is sufficient for very small actuators. Numerical results are presented for the non-linear analysis and compared with experimental measurements. Snap-through behavior, bifurcation, and stability are presented and discussed.

  11. Disk-loss and disk-renewal phases in classical Be stars. II. Contrasting with stable and variable disks

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, Zachary H.; Wisniewski, John P.; Bjorkman, Karen S.; Bjorkman, Jon E.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Haubois, Xavier; Mota, Bruno C.; Carciofi, Alex C. E-mail: karen.bjorkman@utoledo.edu E-mail: meade@astro.wisc.edu E-mail: carciofi@usp.br

    2014-05-10

    Recent observational and theoretical studies of classical Be stars have established the utility of polarization color diagrams (PCDs) in helping to constrain the time-dependent mass decretion rates of these systems. We expand on our pilot observational study of this phenomenon, and report the detailed analysis of a long-term (1989-2004) spectropolarimetric survey of nine additional classical Be stars, including systems exhibiting evidence of partial disk-loss/disk-growth episodes as well as systems exhibiting long-term stable disks. After carefully characterizing and removing the interstellar polarization along the line of sight to each of these targets, we analyze their intrinsic polarization behavior. We find that many steady-state Be disks pause at the top of the PCD, as predicted by theory. We also observe sharp declines in the Balmer jump polarization for later spectral type, near edge-on steady-state disks, again as recently predicted by theory, likely caused when the base density of the disk is very high, and the outer region of the edge-on disk starts to self absorb a significant number of Balmer jump photons. The intrinsic V-band polarization and polarization position angle of γ Cas exhibits variations that seem to phase with the orbital period of a known one-armed density structure in this disk, similar to the theoretical predictions of Halonen and Jones. We also observe stochastic jumps in the intrinsic polarization across the Balmer jump of several known Be+sdO systems, and speculate that the thermal inflation of part of the outer region of these disks could be responsible for producing this observational phenomenon. Finally, we estimate the base densities of this sample of stars to be between ≈8 × 10{sup –11} and ≈4 × 10{sup –12} g cm{sup –3} during quasi steady state periods given there maximum observed polarization.

  12. A Completely New Type of Actuator -or- This Ain't Your Grandfather's Internal Combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Brian W.; Hawkins, Gary F.; Hess, Peter A.; Moore, Teresa A.; Fournier, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    A completely new type of actuator - one that is proposed for use in a variety of environments from sea to land to air to space - has been designed, patented, built, and tested. The actuator is loosely based on the principle of the internal combustion engine, except that it is a completely closed system, only requiring electrical input, and the working fuel is water. This paper outlines the theory behind the electrolysis- and ignition-based cycle upon which the actuator operates and describes the performance capability test apparatus and results for the actuator. A mechanism application that harnessed the unit s power to twist a scaled rotor blade is also highlighted.

  13. Numerical investigation of airflow inside a 1-in hard disk drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriadi, M. A.; Tan, C. S.; Zhang, Q. D.; Yip, T. H.; Sundaravadivelu, K.

    2006-08-01

    The increasing application of the hard disk drive in consumer electronic devices has pushed the usage of the small form factor hard drives. At the same time, the data storage industry continues to enhance the capacity and performance of computer hard disk drive. The concerns of track mis-registration caused by various runout still remain with the form factor change. The objective of the current study is to numerically investigate the airflow characteristic inside a 1 in hard disk drive. The simulation model is constructed based on the currently available 1-in micro-drive in the market, with 3600 rpm disk rotation speed, thus the flow Reynolds number based on the disk tip radius is around 4.8×10 3. Two models with different actuator arm positions (outside and middle-disk) were studied. The simulation results show that the standard k-epsilon model used allows us to extract similar information and understanding as that from more developed numerical model. Good agreement in normalized velocity magnitude and flow pattern is observed between the numerical and experimental results. At different actuator arm positions, streamlines and velocity vectors plots show the effect of the actuator arm position to the flow pattern, especially around the arm. This arm position also affects the radial and tangential shear stress values over the disk, which may help to estimate the wind loss and power consumption.

  14. Floppy disk utility user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    A floppy disk utility program is described which transfers programs between files on a hard disk and floppy disk. It also copies the data on one floppy disk onto another floppy disk and compares the data. The program operates on the Data General NOVA-4X under the Real Time Disk Operating System. Sample operations are given.

  15. Floppy disk utility user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akers, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The Floppy Disk Utility Program transfers programs between files on the hard disk and floppy disk. It also copies the data on one floppy disk onto another floppy disk and compares the data. The program operates on the Data General NOVA-4X under the Real Time Disk Operating System (RDOS).

  16. Theory of low frequency noise transmission through turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matta, R. K.; Mani, R.

    1979-01-01

    Improvements of the existing theory of low frequency noise transmission through turbines and development of a working prediction tool are described. The existing actuator-disk model and a new finite-chord model were utilized in an analytical study. The interactive effect of adjacent blade rows, higher order spinning modes, blade-passage shocks, and duct area variations were considered separately. The improved theory was validated using the data acquired in an earlier NASA program. Computer programs incorporating the improved theory were produced for transmission loss prediction purposes. The programs were exercised parametrically and charts constructed to define approximately the low frequency noise transfer through turbines. The loss through the exhaust nozzle and flow(s) was also considered.

  17. Analysis of the actuation properties of charged multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahyarov, Elshad; Löwen, Hartmut; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Combining elasticity theory with electrostatics, we calculate the actuation response of a charged multilayer film, which is composed of consecutively stacked piezoelectric and polymeric elastomer layers, with respect to an applied voltage. Depending on the individual material properties and polarity of the applied voltage, we show that the composite multilayer can exhibit actuation properties which are considerably better than the response of the individual constituents. It is also shown that there is a window for applied voltages within which the thickness of the composite film expands, a condition that cannot be achieved in single layer films. In particular, we apply and evaluate our theory for various piezoelectric and dielectric elastomers. The results obtained will be helpful to develop tailored composite materials with specific actuation characteristics.

  18. Electromechanical deformation of conical dielectric elastomer actuator with hydrogel electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Sun, Wenjie; Chen, Hualing; Liu, Lei; Li, Bo; Li, Dichen

    2016-03-01

    A conical Dielectric Elastomer Actuator (DEA) undergoes large actuation strain in longitudinal direction when subject to a voltage across the membrane. The conical DEA is modeled using continuum mechanics and multilayered material thermodynamic theories which can consider not only the inhomogeneous deformation of the DEA but also the effect of elastomeric electrodes on the DEA. Hydrogels with lithium chloride electrolyte are synthesized and introduced as electrodes. The theory coincides well with the experimental results and succeeds in predicting the occurrence of loss of tension. At a low level of pre-stretch λp=2 , electric breakdown always occurs before the loss of tension, independent of shear modulus of hydrogels. When the pre-stretch increases to 4, the dominating failure mode changes from electric breakdown to loss of tension. At μGE L=6 kPa , loss of tension and electric breakdown almost happen simultaneously and the maximum actuation strain occurs at λp=4 .

  19. Photoevaporation and Disk Dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorti, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks are depleted of their mass on short timescales by viscous accretion, which removes both gas and solids, and by photoevaporation which removes mainly gas. Photoevaporation may facilitate planetesimal formation by lowering the gas/dust mass ratio in disks. Disk dispersal sets constraints on planet formation timescales, and by controlling the availability of gas determines the type of planets that form in the disk. Photoevaporative wind mass loss rates are theoretically estimated to range from ~ 10-10 to 10-8 M ⊙, and disk lifetimes are typically ~ few Myr.

  20. Active optics with a minimum number of actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2014-06-01

    Optics for astronomy implies powerful developments of active and adaptive optics methods applied to instrumentation from X-rays to the near infrared for the design of telescopes, spectrographs, and coronagraph planet finders. This presentation particularly emphasizes the development of active optics methods. Highly accurate and remarkably smooth surfaces from active optics methods allow new optical systems that use highly aspheric and non-axisymmetric - freeform - surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance required for a deformable optical surface, elasticity theory analysis is carried out either with small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, or the weakly conical shell theory. A mirror thickness distribution is then determined as a function of associated bending actuators and boundary conditions. For a given optical shape to generate, one searches for optical solutions with a minimum number of actuators.

  1. Design of a slim-type optical pick-up actuator using PMN-PT bimorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Byeongsik; Jung, Jung-Sub; Lee, Seung-Yop

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, a new optical pick-up actuator is proposed using PMN-PT (lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate) bimorphs for slim and small form factor optical disk drives. We suggest a novel structure enabling both tracking and focusing motions by changing the moving directions of the two parallel bimorphs. A cymbal-type flextensional structure is used as a displacement amplifier in order to meet the stroke requirement for optical pick-up actuators. We have performed the theoretical analyses for the bimorph actuator and displacement amplifier to predict the resultant force and displacement. The proposed actuator based on PMN-PT bimorphs and displacement amplifier has been manufactured, and the experimental results are compared to the analytical predictions. Experimental results agree well with the analytical predictions, showing that the cymbal structure amplifies the displacement twice and the focusing stroke is 52 µm at 10 V.

  2. T-Slide Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John

    2009-01-01

    T-slide linear actuators use gear bearing differential epicyclical transmissions (GBDETs) to directly drive a linear rack, which, in turn, performs the actuation. Conventional systems use a rotary power source in conjunction with a nut and screw to provide linear motion. Non-back-drive properties of GBDETs make the new actuator more direct and simpler. Versions of this approach will serve as a long-stroke, ultra-precision, position actuator for NASA science instruments, and as a rugged, linear actuator for NASA deployment duties. The T slide can operate effectively in the presence of side forces and torques. Versions of the actuator can perform ultra-precision positioning. A basic T-slide actuator is a long-stroke, rack-and-pinion linear actuator that, typically, consists of a T-slide, several idlers, a transmission to drive the slide (powered by an electric motor) and a housing that holds the entire assembly. The actuator is driven by gear action on its top surface, and is guided and constrained by gear-bearing idlers on its other two parallel surfaces. The geometry, implemented with gear-bearing technology, is particularly effective. An electronic motor operating through a GBDET can directly drive the T slide against large loads, as a rack and pinion linear actuator, with no break and no danger of back driving. The actuator drives the slide into position and stops. The slide holes position with power off and no brake, regardless of load. With the T slide configuration, this GBDET has an entire T-gear surface on which to operate. The GB idlers coupling the other two T slide parallel surfaces to their housing counterpart surfaces provide constraints in five degrees-of-freedom and rolling friction in the direction of actuation. Multiple GB idlers provide roller bearing strength sufficient to support efficient, rolling friction movement, even in the presence of large, resisting forces. T-slide actuators can be controlled using the combination of an off

  3. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  4. Bio-inspired aquatic robotics by untethered piezohydroelastic actuation.

    PubMed

    Cen, L; Erturk, A

    2013-03-01

    This paper investigates fish-like aquatic robotics using flexible bimorphs made of macro-fiber composite (MFC) piezoelectric laminates for carangiform locomotion. In addition to noiseless and efficient actuation over a range of frequencies, geometric scalability, and simple design, bimorph propulsors made of MFCs offer a balance between the actuation force and velocity response for performance enhancement in bio-inspired swimming. The experimental component of the presented work focuses on the characterization of an elastically constrained MFC bimorph propulsor for thrust generation in quiescent water as well as the development of a robotic fish prototype combining a microcontroller and a printed-circuit-board amplifier to generate high actuation voltage for untethered locomotion. From the theoretical standpoint, a distributed-parameter electroelastic model including the hydrodynamic effects and actuator dynamics is coupled with the elongated-body theory for predicting the mean thrust in quiescent water. In-air and underwater experiments are performed to verify the incorporation of hydrodynamic effects in the linear actuation regime. For electroelastically nonlinear actuation levels, experimentally obtained underwater vibration response is coupled with the elongated-body theory to predict the thrust output. The measured mean thrust levels in quiescent water (on the order of ∼10 mN) compare favorably with thrust levels of biological fish. An untethered robotic fish prototype that employs a single bimorph fin (caudal fin) for straight swimming and turning motions is developed and tested in free locomotion. A swimming speed of 0.3 body-length/second (7.5 cm s⁻¹ swimming speed for 24.3 cm body length) is achieved at 5 Hz for a non-optimized main body-propulsor bimorph combination under a moderate actuation voltage level. PMID:23348365

  5. Pneumatic actuator with hydraulic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Hobart R., Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The present invention provides a pneumatically powered actuator having hydraulic control for both locking and controlling the velocity of an output rod without any sponginess. The invention includes a double-acting pneumatic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and a control rod connected to the piston. The double-acting pneumatic actuator is mounted to a frame. A first double-acting hydraulic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and a follower rod mounted to the piston is mounted to the frame such that the follower rod is fixedly connected to the control rod. The maximum translation of the piston within the bore of the first double-acting hydraulic actuator provides a volumetric displacement V1. The present invention also includes a second double-acting hydraulic actuator having a bore, a piston slidably engaged within the bore, and an output rod mounted to the piston. The maximum translation of the piston within the bore of the second double-acting hydraulic actuator provides a volumetric displacement V2, where V2=V1. A pair of fluid ports in each of the first and second double-acting hydraulic cylinders are operably connected by fluid conduits, one of which includes a valve circuit which may be used to control the velocity of the output rod or to lock the output rod in a static position by regulating the flow of hydraulic fluid between the double-acting cylinders.

  6. Halbach array type focusing actuator for small and thin optical data storage device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Q.; Park, Kang-Ho; Paek, Mun Chul

    2004-09-01

    The small form factor optical data storage devices are developing rapidly nowadays. Since it is designed for portable and compatibility with flesh memory, its components such as disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within 5 mm. The thickness of focusing actuator is within 2 mm and the total working range is +/-100um, with the resolution of less than 1μm. Since the thickness is limited tightly, it is hard to place the yoke that closes the magnetic circuit and hard to make strong flux density without yoke. Therefore, Halbach array is adopted to increase the magnetic flux of one side without yoke. The proposed Halbach array type focusing actuator has the advantage of thin actuation structure with sacrificing less flex density than conventional magnetic array. The optical head unit is moved on the swing arm type tracking actuator. Focusing coil is attached to swing arm, and Halbach magnet array is positioned at the bottom of deck along the tracking line, and focusing actuator exerts force by the Fleming's left hand rule. The dynamics, working range, control resolution of focusing actuator are analyzed and performed.

  7. Numerical experiments on the stability of preplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P. M.; Smith, B. F.; Reynolds, R. T.; Miller, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Gravitational stability of gaseous protostellar disks is relevant to theories of planetary formation. Stable gas disks favor formation of planetesimals by the accumulation of solid material; unstable disks allow the possibility of direct condensation of gaseous protoplanets. This paper presents the results of numerical experiments designed to test the stability of thin disks against large-scale, self-gravitational disruption. It is found that a disk as massive as 1 solar mass, surrounding a 1 solar mass protostar, can be stable against long-wavelength gravitational disruption if its temperature is about 300 K or greater. Stability of a cooler disk requires that it be less massive, but even at 100 K a stable disk can have an appreciable fraction (about 1/3) of a solar mass.

  8. Electromechanical Simulation of Actively Controlled Rotordynamic Systems with Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Reng Rong; Palazzolo, A. B.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, G.

    1991-01-01

    Theories and tests for incorporating piezoelectric pushers as actuator devices for active vibration control are discussed. It started from a simple model with the assumption of ideal pusher characteristics and progressed to electromechanical models with nonideal pushers. Effects on system stability due to the nonideal characteristics of piezoelectric pushers and other elements in the control loop were investigated.

  9. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Segalman, Daniel J.; Witkowski, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  10. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  11. Gear-Driven Turnbuckle Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Ricky N.

    2010-01-01

    This actuator design allows the extension and contraction of turnbuckle assemblies. It can be operated manually or remotely, and is extremely compact. It is ideal for turnbuckles that are hard to reach by conventional tools. The tool assembly design solves the problem of making accurate adjustments to the variable geometry guide vanes without having to remove and reinstall the actuator system back on the engine. The actuator does this easily by adjusting the length of the turnbuckles while they are still attached to the engine.

  12. Stability of general-relativistic accretion disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobkin, Oleg; Abdikamalov, Ernazar B.; Schnetter, Erik; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Zink, Burkhard

    2011-02-01

    Self-gravitating relativistic disks around black holes can form as transient structures in a number of astrophysical scenarios such as binary neutron star and black hole-neutron star coalescences, as well as the core collapse of massive stars. We explore the stability of such disks against runaway and nonaxisymmetric instabilities using three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations in full general relativity using the Thor code. We model the disk matter using the ideal fluid approximation with a Γ-law equation of state with Γ=4/3. We explore three disk models around nonrotating black holes with disk-to-black hole mass ratios of 0.24, 0.17, and 0.11. Because of metric blending in our initial data, all of our initial models contain an initial axisymmetric perturbation which induces radial disk oscillations. Despite these oscillations, our models do not develop the runaway instability during the first several orbital periods. Instead, all of the models develop unstable nonaxisymmetric modes on a dynamical time scale. We observe two distinct types of instabilities: the Papaloizou-Pringle and the so-called intermediate type instabilities. The development of the nonaxisymmetric mode with azimuthal number m=1 is accompanied by an outspiraling motion of the black hole, which significantly amplifies the growth rate of the m=1 mode in some cases. Overall, our simulations show that the properties of the unstable nonaxisymmetric modes in our disk models are qualitatively similar to those in the Newtonian theory.

  13. Stability of general-relativistic accretion disks

    SciTech Connect

    Korobkin, Oleg; Abdikamalov, Ernazar B.; Schnetter, Erik; Stergioulas, Nikolaos; Zink, Burkhard

    2011-02-15

    Self-gravitating relativistic disks around black holes can form as transient structures in a number of astrophysical scenarios such as binary neutron star and black hole-neutron star coalescences, as well as the core collapse of massive stars. We explore the stability of such disks against runaway and nonaxisymmetric instabilities using three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations in full general relativity using the Thor code. We model the disk matter using the ideal fluid approximation with a {Gamma}-law equation of state with {Gamma}=4/3. We explore three disk models around nonrotating black holes with disk-to-black hole mass ratios of 0.24, 0.17, and 0.11. Because of metric blending in our initial data, all of our initial models contain an initial axisymmetric perturbation which induces radial disk oscillations. Despite these oscillations, our models do not develop the runaway instability during the first several orbital periods. Instead, all of the models develop unstable nonaxisymmetric modes on a dynamical time scale. We observe two distinct types of instabilities: the Papaloizou-Pringle and the so-called intermediate type instabilities. The development of the nonaxisymmetric mode with azimuthal number m=1 is accompanied by an outspiraling motion of the black hole, which significantly amplifies the growth rate of the m=1 mode in some cases. Overall, our simulations show that the properties of the unstable nonaxisymmetric modes in our disk models are qualitatively similar to those in the Newtonian theory.

  14. Dynamics of acoustically levitated disk samples.

    PubMed

    Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2004-10-01

    The acoustic levitation force on disk samples and the dynamics of large water drops in a planar standing wave are studied by solving the acoustic scattering problem through incorporating the boundary element method. The dependence of levitation force amplitude on the equivalent radius R of disks deviates seriously from the R3 law predicted by King's theory, and a larger force can be obtained for thin disks. When the disk aspect ratio gamma is larger than a critical value gamma(*) ( approximately 1.9 ) and the disk radius a is smaller than the critical value a(*) (gamma) , the levitation force per unit volume of the sample will increase with the enlargement of the disk. The acoustic levitation force on thin-disk samples ( gamma

  15. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  16. Variable Valve Actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Gutterman; A. J. Lasley

    2008-08-31

    Many approaches exist to enable advanced mode, low temperature combustion systems for diesel engines - such as premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI), Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) or other HCCI-like combustion modes. The fuel properties and the quantity, distribution and temperature profile of air, fuel and residual fraction in the cylinder can have a marked effect on the heat release rate and combustion phasing. Figure 1 shows that a systems approach is required for HCCI-like combustion. While the exact requirements remain unclear (and will vary depending on fuel, engine size and application), some form of substantially variable valve actuation is a likely element in such a system. Variable valve actuation, for both intake and exhaust valve events, is a potent tool for controlling the parameters that are critical to HCCI-like combustion and expanding its operational range. Additionally, VVA can be used to optimize the combustion process as well as exhaust temperatures and impact the after treatment system requirements and its associated cost. Delphi Corporation has major manufacturing and product development and applied R&D expertise in the valve train area. Historical R&D experience includes the development of fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train on research engines as well as several generations of mechanical VVA for gasoline systems. This experience has enabled us to evaluate various implementations and determine the strengths and weaknesses of each. While a fully variable electro-hydraulic valve train system might be the 'ideal' solution technically for maximum flexibility in the timing and control of the valve events, its complexity, associated costs, and high power consumption make its implementation on low cost high volume applications unlikely. Conversely, a simple mechanical system might be a low cost solution but not deliver the flexibility required for HCCI operation. After modeling more than 200 variations of the

  17. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  18. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A.; Eide, S.A.

    1993-04-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  19. Firewater system inadvertent actuation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.A. ); Eide, S.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some recommended generic values for fire protection system inadvertent actuation frequencies. The frequencies are based on actual data from Department of Energy and commercial reactor plant facilities.

  20. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    bulges because the latter retain a `memory' of their disky origin. That is, they have one or more characteristics of disks: (1) flatter shapes than those of classical bulges, (2) correspondingly large ratios of ordered to random velocities, (3) small velocity dispersions with respect to the Faber-Jackson correlation between velocity dispersion and bulge luminosity, (4) spiral structure or nuclear bars in the `bulge' part of the light profile, (5) nearly exponential brightness profiles and (6) starbursts. So the cleanest examples of pseudobulges are recognisable. However, pseudo and classical bulges can coexist in the same galaxy. I review two important implications of secular evolution: (1) The existence of pseudobulges highlights a problem with our theory of galaxy formation by hierarchical clustering. We cannot explain galaxies that are completely bulgeless. Galaxy mergers are expected to happen often enough so that every giant galaxy should have a classical bulge. But we observe that bulgeless giant galaxies are common in field environments. We now realise that many dense centres of galaxies that we used to think are bulges were not made by mergers; they were grown out of disks. So the challenge gets more difficult. This is the biggest problem faced by our theory of galaxy formation. (2) Pseudobulges are observed to contain supermassive black holes (BHs), but they do not show the well-known, tight correlations between BH mass and the mass and velocity dispersion of the host bulge. This leads to the suggestion that there are two fundamentally different BH feeding processes. Rapid global inward gas transport in galaxy mergers leads to giant BHs that correlate with host ellipticals and classical bulges, whereas local and more stochastic feeding of small BHs in largely bulgeless galaxies evidently involves too little energy feedback to result in BH-host coevolution. It is an important success of the secular evolution picture that morphological differences can be used to

  1. Modeling liquid crystal elastomers: actuators, pumps, and robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinger, Robin L. B.; Mbanga, Badel L.; Selinger, Jonathan V.

    2008-02-01

    We model the dynamics of shape evolution of liquid crystal elastomers (LCE) in three dimensions using finite element elastodynamics. The model predicts the macroscopic mechanical response induced by changes in nematic order, e.g. by heating or cooling through the isotropic/nematic transition or, in azo-doped materials, by exposure to light. We model the performance of LCE actuator devices including multicomponent actuators, peristaltic pumps and self-propelled robots. The goal of this work is to build a bridge between basic soft matter theory and practical materials engineering/device design. Supported by NSF-DMR-0605889.

  2. Sensors, actuators, and smart materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiler-McKinstry, S.; Newnham, R. E.

    1993-04-01

    Electroceramic materials are presently noted to have a wide array of sensing and actuating functions which can be incorporated into smart-material designs. The sensor types extend to temperature, piezoelectricity and piezoresistivity, and the presence of oxygen. Attention is given to the prospects for developing composite smart materials that encompass various sensing and actuating functions; these may ultimately reach a level of complexity and sophistication that may be termed 'biomimetric' in its approximation to the functions of the living tissues of organisms.

  3. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  4. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  5. Ripples in disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, F.; Seitzer, P.

    1988-05-01

    Evidence is presented that ripples occur not only in ellipticals but also in disk galaxies of Hubble types S0, S0/Sa, and Sa, and probably even in the Sbc galaxy NGC 3310. It is argued that the ripples cannot usually have resulted from transient spiral waves or other forced vibrations in existing disks, but instead consist of extraneous sheetlike matter. The frequent presence of major disk-shaped companions suggests that ripple material may be acquired not only through wholesale mergers but also through mass transfer from neighbor galaxies. The implications of ripples in early-type disk galaxies are addressed. 40 references.

  6. Glass rupture disk

    DOEpatents

    Glass, S. Jill; Nicolaysen, Scott D.; Beauchamp, Edwin K.

    2002-01-01

    A frangible rupture disk and mounting apparatus for use in blocking fluid flow, generally in a fluid conducting conduit such as a well casing, a well tubing string or other conduits within subterranean boreholes. The disk can also be utilized in above-surface pipes or tanks where temporary and controllable fluid blockage is required. The frangible rupture disk is made from a pre-stressed glass with controllable rupture properties wherein the strength distribution has a standard deviation less than approximately 5% from the mean strength. The frangible rupture disk has controllable operating pressures and rupture pressures.

  7. Planet Masses from Disk Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    Young, forming planets can generate immense spiral structures within their protoplanetary disks. A recent study has shown that observations of these spiral structures may allow astronomers to measure the mass of the planets that create them.Spirals From WavesSnapshots of the surface density of a protoplanetary disk in a 2D simulation, 3D simulation, and synthesized scattered-light image. Click for a closer look! [Fung Dong, 2015]Recent studies have shown that a single planet, if it is massive enough, can excite multiple density waves within a protoplanetary disk as it orbits. These density waves can then interfere to produce a multiple-armed spiral structure in the disk inside of the planets orbit a structure which can potentially be observed in scattered-light images of the disk.But what do these arms look like, and what factors determine their structure? In a recently published study, Jeffrey Fung and Ruobing Dong, two researchers at the University of California at Berkeley, have modeled the spiral arms in an effort to answer these questions.Arms Provide AnswersA useful parameter for describing the structure is the azimuthal separation (sep) between the primary and secondary spiral arms. If you draw a circle within the disk and measure the angle between the two points where the primary and secondary arms cross it, thats sep.Azimuthal separation of the primary and secondary spiral arms, as a function of the planet-to-star mass ratio q. The different curves represent different disk aspect ratios. [Fung Dong, 2015]The authors find thatsep stays roughly constant for different radii, but its strongly dependent on the planets mass: for larger planets, sep increases. They discover that sep scales as a power of the planet mass for companions between Neptune mass and 16 Jupiter masses, orbiting around a solar-mass star. For larger, brown-dwarf-size companions, sep is a constant 180.If this new theory is confirmed, it could have very interesting implications for

  8. Angular Momentum Transport in Quasi-Keplerian Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Prasad; Pujari, B. S.; Becker, Peter A.

    2004-03-01

    We reexamine arguments advanced by Hayashi & Matsuda (2001), who claim that several simple, physically motivated derivations based on mean free path theory for calculating the viscous torque in a quasi-Keplerian accretion disk yield results that are inconsistent with the generally accepted model. If correct, the ideas proposed by Hayashi & Matsudawould radically alter our understanding of the nature of the angular momentum transport in the disk, which is a central feature of accretion disk theory. However, in this paper we point out several fallacies in their arguments and show that there indeed exists a simple derivation based on mean free path theory that yields an expression for the viscous torque that is proportional to the radial derivative of the angular velocity in the accretion disk, as expected. The derivation is based on the analysis of the epicyclic motion of gas parcels in adjacent eddies in the disk.

  9. Fail-safe electric actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.J.

    1988-07-19

    In combination with a control mechanism characterized by the ability to be moved from inoperative to operative position and back, a fail-safe actuator device for automatically returning the control mechanism to inoperative position when interruption of electric power occurs is described which comprises: a fluid-driven vaned torque actuator: electric-motor-driven fluid power means for operating the torque actuator; electrically operated valve means for controlling the power fluid flow between the torque actuator and the fluid power generating means; at least one shaft projecting from the torque actuator; coupling means for operatively connecting the shaft to the control mechanism to be operated by the failsafe actuator device; reversible means for storing energy, the reversible means being operatively connected to the shaft; a limit-switch operating cam mounted on and rotable with the shaft; a limit switch positioned for activation by the limit-switch operating cam; and electric circuitry means for interconnecting the motordriven fluid power generating means, the valve means, and the limit switch.

  10. Thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper reports design and characterization testing of thermally actuated piston micromirror arrays. The micromirrors were fabricated in the DARPA-sponsored MUMPs polysilicon surface micromachining process. The power averaging characteristic of thermal actuation is exploited in a novel line addressing scheme which reduces wiring for an n2 array to 2n wires. Mirror deflections were measured with a microscope laser interferometer system equipped with a vacuum chamber. Data presented includes device uniformity, frequency response, and deflection versus drive power for varied ambient pressure. Initial test results confirm that thermally actuated piston micromirrors offer several advantages over more common electrostatic designs. Thermally actuated micromirrors offer greater deflections at drive voltages compatible with CMOS circuitry. Measured thermal piston micromirror deflection versus drive voltage is nonlinear, but does not exhibit the 'snap through instability' characteristic of electrostatic devices. Operation of thermally actuated devices in rarefied ambient significantly decreases power dissipation. For a given deflection range, the power reduction facilitated by vacuum operation makes large arrays feasible. Frequency response of thermally actuated devices is limited by the ability of the device to dissipate heat, but operation at 1 kHz rates is feasible.

  11. Explosive actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Kenneth G.

    1983-01-01

    1. A device of the character described comprising the combination of a housing having an elongate bore and including a shoulder extending inwardly into said bore, a single elongate movable plunger disposed in said bore including an outwardly extending flange adjacent one end thereof overlying said shoulder, normally open conduit means having an inlet and an outlet perpendicularly piercing said housing intermediate said shoulder and said flange and including an intermediate portion intersecting and normally openly communicating with said bore at said shoulder, normally closed conduit means piercing said housing and intersecting said bore at a location spaced from said normally open conduit means, said elongate plunger including a shearing edge adjacent the other end thereof normally disposed intermediate both of said conduit means and overlying a portion of said normally closed conduit means, a deformable member carried by said plunger intermediate said flange and said shoulder and normally spaced from and overlying the intermediate portion of said normally open conduit means, and means on the housing communicating with the bore to retain an explosive actuator for moving said plunger to force the deformable member against the shoulder and extrude a portion of the deformable member out of said bore into portions of the normally open conduit means for plugging the same and to effect the opening of said normally closed conduit means by the plunger shearing edge substantially concomitantly with the plugging of the normally open conduit means.

  12. Nanotube Nano-actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennifer, Sippel; Arnason, Steve; Baughman, Ray; Rinzler, Andrew

    2002-03-01

    In 1999 it was found that a thin sheet of single wall carbon nanotubes (buckypaper) can act as an electromechanical transducer (an actuator), converting an applied voltage into a dimensional change, with the potential to do work.[1] The mechanism proposed for the effect is quite fundamental, relying on modification of the nearest neighbor carbon-carbon distance due to charge injected into the nanotube pi-orbital system. Because the experiment relied on buckypaper, which possesses nanoscale pores (where gas generation might also account for dimensional changes), as well as creep (where ropes sliding against one another make it difficult to determine the magnitude of the effect in the fundamental unit), the demonstration was less than ideal. Using an atomic force microscope for detection, we have now performed corresponding measurements on individual ropes of nanotubes tethered across micromachined trenches in silicon substrates. The experiment and results will be described. 1. R. H. Baughman, C. X. Cui, A. A. Zakhidov, Z. Iqbal, J. N. Barisci, G. M. Spinks, G. G. Wallace, A. Mazzoldi, D DeRossi, A. G. Rinzler, O. Jaschinski, S. Roth, M. Kertesz, Science, 284, 1340 (1999).

  13. Quick actuating closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, III, Dorsey E. (Inventor); Updike, deceased, Benjamin T. (Inventor); Allred, Johnny W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quick actuating closure for a pressure vessel 80 in which a wedge ring 30 with a conical outer surface 31 is moved forward to force shear blocks 40, with conical inner surfaces 41, radially outward to lock an end closure plug 70 within an opening 81 in the pressure vessel 80. A seal ring 60 and a preload ramp 50 sit between the shear blocks 40 and the end closure plug 70 to provide a backup sealing capability. Conical surfaces 44 and 55 of the preload ramp 50 and the shear blocks 40 interact to force the seal ring 60 into shoulders 73 and 85 in the end closure plug 70 and opening 81 to form a tight seal. The end closure plug 70 is unlocked by moving the wedge ring 30 rearward, which causes T-bars 32 of the wedge ring 30 riding within T -slots 42 of the shear blocks 40 to force them radially inward. The end closure plug 70 is then removed, allowing access to the interior of the pressure vessel 80.

  14. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Mahrholz, T.; Wierach, P.; Sinapius, M.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750-2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs.

  15. Multiple switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Edward T.

    1976-01-06

    The present invention relates to switches and switch actuating devices to be operated for purposes of arming a bomb or other missile as it is dropped or released from an aircraft. The particular bomb or missile in which this invention is applied is one in which there is a plurality of circuits which are to be armed by the closing of switches upon dropping or releasing of the bomb. The operation of the switches to closed position is normally accomplished by means of a pull-out wire; that is, a wire which is withdrawn from the bomb or missile at the time of release of the bomb, one end of the wire being attached to the aircraft. The conditions to be met are that the arming switches must be positively and surely maintained in open position until the bomb is released and the arming action is effected. The action of the pull-out wire in achieving the arming action must be sure and positive with minimum danger of malfunctioning, jamming or binding.

  16. Lifting surface theory of axial compressor blade rows. I - Subsonic compressor. II - Transonic compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okurounmu, O.; Mccune, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    A linearized three-dimensional lifting surface theory is considered, taking into account relations to axisymmetric 'through-flow' or actuator disk theories, general results for flow within the blade row, relations to two-dimensional cascade theory, and finite blade and wake effects. Numerical results are presented, giving attention to the problem of wakeless flow and of wake flow. Expressions for wake functions are given in an appendix. The lifting line velocity potential employed by Namba (1972) is used as a starting point in the discussion of the lifting surface theory. A study of subsonic conditions is supplemented by an investigation of a transonic compresso, taking into account the general three-dimensional solution, induced velocities, and the acoustic pressure field.

  17. Accretion disk viscosity and internal waves in disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min

    1992-01-01

    Recently, Vishniac, Jin and Diamond suggested that internal waves in accretion disks play a critical role in generating magnetic fields, and consequently are indirectly responsible for angular momentum transfer in thin, conducting, and non-self-gravitational disk systems. A project in which we will construct a quantitative model of the internal wave spectrum in accretion disks is started. It includes two aspects of work. The physical properties of the waves in a thin, non-self-gravitational, and non-magnetized accretion disk with realistic vertical structure is cataloged and examined. Besides the low frequency internal waves discovered by Vishniac and Diamond, it was found that sound waves with low frequency and low axisymmetry (with small absolute value of m) are capable of a driving dynamo because they are (1) well confined in a layer with thickness 2(absolute value of m)H where H is the disk scale height; (2) highly dispersive so they may survive the strong dissipation caused by the coherent nonlinear interaction their high frequency partners experience; and (3) elliptically polarized because they are confined in the z-direction. As a first step towards constructing a quantitative theory of this dynamo effect, a framework of calculating resonant nonlinear interaction among waves in disk is established. We are developing a numerical code which will compute the steady spectrum of the wave field in this framework. For simplicity, we only include the low frequency internal waves suggested by Vishniac and Diamond in the present stage. In the vicinity of the static state, the time step whose length is determined by the evolution of the modes with the largest amplitudes is too large for the modes with smaller amplitudes and overshooting occurs. Through nonlinear coupling, this overshooting is amplified and appears as a numerical instability affecting the evolution of the large amplitude modes. Shorter time steps may delay the appearance of the instability but not cure

  18. Magnetic Actuators and Suspension for Space Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knospe, Carl R.; Allaire, Paul E.; Lewis, David W.

    1993-01-01

    The research on microgravity vibration isolation performed at the University of Virginia is summarized. This research on microgravity vibration isolation was focused in three areas: (1) the development of new actuators for use in microgravity isolation; (2) the design of controllers for multiple-degree-of-freedom active isolation; and (3) the construction of a single-degree-of-freedom test rig with umbilicals. Described are the design and testing of a large stroke linear actuator; the conceptual design and analysis of a redundant coarse-fine six-degree-of-freedom actuator; an investigation of the control issues of active microgravity isolation; a methodology for the design of multiple-degree-of-freedom isolation control systems using modern control theory; and the design and testing of a single-degree-of-freedom test rig with umbilicals.

  19. A planar nano-positioner driven by shear piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Li, H.; Du, Z.

    2016-08-01

    A planar nano-positioner driven by the shear piezoelectric actuators is proposed in this paper based on inertial sliding theory. The performance of the nano-positioner actuated by different driving signals is analyzed and discussed, e.g. the resolution and the average velocity which depend on the frequency, the amplitude and the wave form of the driving curves. Based on the proposed design, a prototype system of the nano-positioner is developed by using a capacitive sensor as the measurement device. The experiment results show that the proposed nano-positioner is capable of outputting two-dimensional motions within an area of 10 mm × 10 mm at a maximum speed of 0.25 mm/s. The corresponding resolution can be as small as 21 nm. The methodology outlined in this paper can be employed and extended to shear piezoelectric actuators involved in high precision positioning systems.

  20. Analytical and experimental investigation of flutter suppression by piezoelectric actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research was to analytically and experimentally study the capabilities of piezoelectric plate actuators for suppressing flutter. Piezoelectric materials are characterized by their ability to produce voltage when subjected to a mechanical strain. The converse piezoelectric effect can be utilized to actuate a structure by applying a voltage. For this investigation, a two-degree-of-freedom wind tunnel model was designed, analyzed, and tested. The model consisted of a rigid wing and a flexible mount system that permitted a translational and a rotational degree of freedom. The model was designed such that flutter was encountered within the testing envelope of the wind tunnel. Actuators made of piezoelectric material were affixed to leaf springs of the mount system. Command signals, applied to the piezoelectric actuators, exerted control over the damping and stiffness properties. A mathematical aeroservoelastic model was constructed by using finite element methods, laminated plate theory, and aeroelastic analysis tools. Plant characteristics were determined from this model and verified by open loop experimental tests. A flutter suppression control law was designed and implemented on a digital control computer. Closed loop flutter testing was conducted. The experimental results represent the first time that adaptive materials have been used to actively suppress flutter. They demonstrate that small, carefully placed actuating plates can be used effectively to control aeroelastic response.

  1. The Milky Way disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, G.

    2015-08-01

    This review summarises the invited presentation I gave on the Milky Way disc. The idea underneath was to touch those topics that can be considered hot nowadays in the Galactic disk research: the reality of the thick disk, the spiral structure of the Milky Way, and the properties of the outer Galactic disk. A lot of work has been done in recent years on these topics, but a coherent and clear picture is still missing. Detailed studies with high quality spectroscopic data seem to support a dual Galactic disk, with a clear separation into a thin and a thick component. Much confusion and very discrepant ideas still exist concerning the spiral structure of the Milky Way. Our location in the disk makes it impossible to observe it, and we can only infer it. This process of inference is still far from being mature, and depends a lot on the selected tracers, the adopted models and their limitations, which in many cases are neither properly accounted for, nor pondered enough. Finally, there are very different opinions on the size (scale length, truncation radius) of the Galactic disk, and on the interpretation of the observed outer disk stellar populations in terms either of external entities (Monoceros, Triangulus-Andromeda, Canis Major), or as manifestations of genuine disk properties (e.g., warp and flare).

  2. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  3. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  4. Electrifying the disk: a modular rotating platform for wireless power and data transmission for Lab on a disk application.

    PubMed

    Höfflin, Jens; Torres Delgado, Saraí M; Suárez Sandoval, Fralett; Korvink, Jan G; Mager, Dario

    2015-06-21

    We present a design for wireless power transfer, via inductively coupled coils, to a spinning disk. The rectified and stabilised power feeds an Arduino-compatible microcontroller (μC) on the disc, which in turn drives and monitors various sensors and actuators. The platform, which has been conceived to flexibly prototype such systems, demonstrates the feasibility of a wireless power supply and the use of a μC circuit, for example for Lab-on-a-disk applications, thereby eliminating the need for cumbersome slip rings or batteries, and adding a cogent and new degree of freedom to the setup. The large number of sensors and actuators included demonstrate that a wide range of physical parameters can be easily monitored and altered. All devices are connected to the μC via an I(2)C bus, therefore can be easily exchanged or augmented by other devices in order to perform a specific task on the disk. The wireless power supply takes up little additional physical space and should work in conjunction with most existing Lab-on-a-disk platforms as a straightforward add-on, since it does not require modification of the rotation axis and can be readily adapted to specific geometrical requirements. PMID:25968976

  5. Cryogenic actuator for subnanometer positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bree, B. v.; Janssen, H.; Paalvast, S.; Albers, R.

    2012-09-01

    This paper discusses the development, realization, and qualification of a positioning actuator concept specifically for cryogenic environments. Originally developed for quantum physics research, the actuator also has many applications in astronomic cryogenic instruments to position optical elements with nanometer level accuracy and stability. Typical applications include the correction of thermally induced position errors of optical components after cooling down from ambient to cryogenic temperatures or sample positioning in microscopes. The actuator is nicknamed the ‘PiezoKnob’ because it is piezo based and it is compatible with the typical manipulator knob often found in standard systems for optical benches, such as linear stages or tip/tilt lens holders. Actuation with high stiffness piezo elements enables the Piezoknob to deliver forces up to 50 Newton which allows relatively stiff guiding mechanisms or large pre-loads. The PiezoKnob has been qualified at 77 Kelvin and was shown to work down to 2 Kelvin. As part of the qualification program, the custom developed driving electronics and set point profile have been fine-tuned, by combing measurements with predictions from a dynamic model, thus maximizing efficiency and minimizing power dissipation. Furthermore, the actuator holds its position without power and thanks to its mechanical layout it is absolutely insensitive to drift of the piezo elements or the driving electronics.

  6. Temperature-memory polymer actuators

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Marc; Kratz, Karl; Noechel, Ulrich; Sauter, Tilman; Lendlein, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Reading out the temperature-memory of polymers, which is their ability to remember the temperature where they were deformed recently, is thus far unavoidably linked to erasing this memory effect. Here temperature-memory polymer actuators (TMPAs) based on cross-linked copolymer networks exhibiting a broad melting temperature range (ΔTm) are presented, which are capable of a long-term temperature-memory enabling more than 250 cyclic thermally controlled actuations with almost constant performance. The characteristic actuation temperatures Tacts of TMPAs can be adjusted by a purely physical process, guiding a directed crystallization in a temperature range of up to 40 °C by variation of the parameter Tsep in a nearly linear correlation. The temperature Tsep divides ΔTm into an upper Tm range (T > Tsep) forming a reshapeable actuation geometry that determines the skeleton and a lower Tm range (T < Tsep) that enables the temperature-controlled bidirectional actuation by crystallization-induced elongation and melting-induced contraction. The macroscopic bidirectional shape changes in TMPAs could be correlated with changes in the nanostructure of the crystallizable domains as a result of in situ X-ray investigations. Potential applications of TMPAs include heat engines with adjustable rotation rate and active building facades with self-regulating sun protectors. PMID:23836673

  7. The LDCM actuator for vibration suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Eric N.; Lindner, Douglas K.

    1988-01-01

    A linear dc motor (LDCM) has been proposed as an actuator for the COFS I mast and the COFS program ground test Mini-Mast. The basic principles of operation of the LDCM as an actuator for vibration suppression in large flexible structures are reviewed. Because of force and stroke limitations, control loops are required to stabilize the actuator, which results in a non-standard actuator-plant configuration. A simulation model that includes LDCM actuator control loops and a finite element model of the Mast is described, with simulation results showing the excitation capability of the actuator.

  8. Halbach-Magnet-Array-Based Focusing Actuator for Small-Form-Factor Optical Storage Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung‑Q; Park, Kang‑Ho; Paek, Mun‑Cheal; Kang, Kwang‑Yong

    2006-02-01

    Small-form-factor optical data storage devices are being developed rapidly nowadays. In the case of a CF-II-type optical data storage device (43×36×5 mm3), its components such as the disk, head, focusing actuator, and spindle motor should be assembled within a 5 mm thickness. Since the thickness specification is tight, each component should be designed to have a small thickness. In this paper, a Halbach magnet array is proposed for the focusing actuator. The proposed Halbach magnet array has the advantage of a thin actuation structure without sacrificing flux densities due to its special magnet array feature that increases the magnetic flux on one side without using a yoke. By finite element method (FEM) analysis, flux density, actuation force and actuator thickness are compared with those of conventional methods. Each dimension of the array is obtained to achieve higher performances. Finally, the working range and the resolution of the focusing actuator are experimentally obtained to verify the feasibility of the proposed idea.

  9. Subleading soft factor for string disk amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Burkhard U. W.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the behavior of superstring disk scattering amplitudes in the presence of a soft external momentum at finite string tension. We prove that there are no α'-corrections to the field theory form of the subleading soft factor S (1). At the end of this work, we also comment on the possibility to find the corresponding subleading soft factors in closed string theory using our result and the KLT relations.

  10. Electromechanical propellant control system actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill; Weir, Rae Ann

    1990-01-01

    New control mechanism technologies are currently being sought to provide alternatives to hydraulic actuation systems. The Propulsion Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is involved in the development of electromechanical actuators (EMA's) for this purpose. Through this effort, an in-house designed electromechanical propellant valve actuator has been assembled and is presently being evaluated. This evaluation will allow performance comparisons between EMA and hydraulics systems. The in-house design consists of the following hardware: a three-phase brushless motor, a harmonic drive, and an output spline which will mate with current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) propellant control valves. A resolver and associated electronics supply position feedback for the EMA. System control is provided by a solid-state electronic controller and power supply. Frequency response testing has been performed with further testing planned as hardware and test facilities become available.

  11. A Parylene Bellows Electrochemical Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Po-Ying; Sheybani, Roya; Gutierrez, Christian A.; Kuo, Jonathan T. W.; Meng, Ellis

    2011-01-01

    We present the first electrochemical actuator with Parylene bellows for large-deflection operation. The bellows diaphragm was fabricated using a polyethylene-glycol-based sacrificial molding technique followed by coating in Parylene C. Bellows were mechanically characterized and integrated with a pair of interdigitated electrodes to form an electrochemical actuator that is suitable for low-power pumping of fluids. Pump performance (gas generation rate and pump efficiency) was optimized through a careful examination of geometrical factors. Overall, a maximum pump efficiency of 90% was achieved in the case of electroplated electrodes, and a deflection of over 1.5 mm was demonstrated. Real-time wireless operation was achieved. The complete fabrication process and the materials used in this actuator are bio-compatible, which makes it suitable for biological and medical applications. PMID:21318081

  12. Dynamics of Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Benz, Willy; Adams, Fred C.; Arnett, David

    1998-07-01

    We present a series of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of massive disks around protostars. We simulate the same physical problem using both a Piecewise Parabolic Method (PPM) code and a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) code and analyze their differences. The disks studied here range in mass from 0.05M* to 1.0M* and in initial minimum Toomre Q value from 1.1 to 3.0. We adopt simple power laws for the initial density and temperature in the disk with an isothermal (γ = 1) equation of state. The disks are locally isothermal. We allow the central star to move freely in response to growing perturbations. The simulations using each code are compared to discover differences due to error in the methods used. For this problem, the strengths of the codes overlap only in a limited fashion, but similarities exist in their predictions, including spiral arm pattern speeds and morphological features. Our results represent limiting cases (i.e., systems evolved isothermally) rather than true physical systems. Disks become active from the inner regions outward. From the earliest times, their evolution is a strongly dynamic process rather than a smooth progression toward eventual nonlinear behavior. Processes that occur in both the extreme inner and outer radial regions affect the growth of instabilities over the entire disk. Effects important for the global morphology of the system can originate at quite small distances from the star. We calculate approximate growth rates for the spiral patterns; the one-armed (m = 1) spiral arm is not the fastest growing pattern of most disks. Nonetheless, it plays a significant role because of factors that can excite it more quickly than other patterns. A marked change in the character of spiral structure occurs with varying disk mass. Low-mass disks form filamentary spiral structures with many arms while high-mass disks form grand design spiral structures with few arms. In our SPH simulations, disks with initial minimum Q = 1.5 or

  13. Fast-acting valve actuator

    DOEpatents

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  14. Electrostatically actuatable light modulating device

    DOEpatents

    Koehler, Dale R.

    1991-01-01

    The electrostatically actuatable light modulator utilizes an opaque substrate plate patterned with an array of aperture cells, the cells comprised of physically positionable dielectric shutters and electrostatic actuators. With incorporation of a light source and a viewing screen, a projection display system is effected. Inclusion of a color filter array aligned with the aperture cells accomplishes a color display. The system is realized in terms of a silicon based manufacturing technology allowing fabrication of a high resolution capability in a physically small device which with the utilization of included magnification optics allows both large and small projection displays.

  15. Method and apparatus for actuating vehicle transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Ishihara, M.; Uriuhara, M.

    1988-11-15

    This patent describes a method of actuating a vehicle parallel-gear transmission having gears and an internal lever for moving shift blocks connected with shift rods and shift forks for changing gear ratios of the transmission, a hydraulically controlled select actuator operatively connected to the internal lever for moving the internal lever in a select direction, a hydraulically controlled shift actuator operatively connected to the internal lever for moving the internal lever in a shift direction substantially normal to the select direction, a hydraulically controlled clutch actuator for connecting and disconnecting a clutch of the transmission, and a common fluid discharge passage connected to fluid discharge ports of the select and shift actuators and a fluid discharge port of the clutch actuator, the select and shift actuators being alternately actuatable to effect a gear changing operation.

  16. Miniature linear-to-rotary motion actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorokach, Michael R., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A miniature hydraulic actuation system capable of converting linear actuator motion to control surface rotary motion has been designed for application to active controls on dynamic wind tunnel models. Due to space constraints and the torque requirements of an oscillating control surface at frequencies up to 50 Hertz, a new actuation system was developed to meet research objectives. This new actuation system was designed and developed to overcome the output torque limitations and fluid loss/sealing difficulties associated with an existing vane type actuator. Static control surface deflections and dynamic control surface oscillations through a given angle are provided by the actuation system. The actuator design has been incorporated into a transonic flutter model with an active trailing edge flap and two active spoilers. The model is scheduled for testing in the LaRC 16 Foot Transonic Dynamics Tunnel during Summer 1993. This paper will discuss the actuation system, its design, development difficulties, test results, and application to aerospace vehicles.

  17. New electrode materials for dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Lam, Tuling; Biggs, James; Hu, Liangbing; Yu, Zhibin; Ha, Soonmok; Xi, Dongjuan; Senesky, Matthew K.; Grüner, George; Pei, Qibing

    2007-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators exert strain due to an applied electric field. With advantageous properties such as high efficiency and their light weight, these actuators are attractive for a variety of applications ranging from biomimetic robots, medical prosthetics to conventional pumps and valves. The performance and reliability however, are limited by dielectric breakdown which occurs primarily from localized defects inherently present in the polymer film during actuation. These defects lead to electric arcing, causing a short circuit that shuts down the entire actuator and can lead to actuator failure at fields significantly lower than the intrinsic strength of the material. This limitation is particularly a problem in actuators using large-area films. Our recent studies have shown that the gap between the strength of the intrinsic material and the strength of large-area actuators can be reduced by electrically isolating defects in the dielectric film. As a result, the performance and reliability of dielectric elastomers actuators can be substantially improved.

  18. Electrodynamic actuators for rocket engine valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiet, O.; Doshi, D.

    1972-01-01

    Actuators, employed in acoustic loudspeakers, operate liquid rocket engine valves by replacing light paper cones with flexible metal diaphragms. Comparative analysis indicates better response time than solenoid actuators, and improved service life and reliability.

  19. New Approach to Diagnosing Properties of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we suggest that subjecting the observationally derived properties of protoplanetary disks to the evolutionary interpretation yields new insights into the working of those disks, and offers valuable constraints on their models. We propose that the global properties of individual disks, such as their accretion rates and disk masses, sorted by the mass of the central star, can be indexed by the age of the star to simulate the evolution of a single disk. Using data from published surveys of T Tauri stars, we show that accretion rate data, and disk mass data for the lowest mass stars, form well-defined evolutionary tracks. The higher mass stars show a definitive negative correlation between accretion rates and star ages. We use the time-dependent alpha-disk model of the viscous protoplanetary disk to link the theory to observations. The data are consistent with the standard theoretical paradigm, but not with the layered accretion model. The best fits to the data are obtained for the standard models that start with disks that are about one-third of the mass of the central star and have their angular momenta, j, and alpha-coefficients linked by the relationship j varies as Solar mass(exp 3/2)alpha(exp 1/3). The proportionality constant in this relationship, when derived from the accretion rate data, differs from the constant derived from the disk mass data. We argue that the accretion rate data are more reliable. Taking into account typical values of the specific angular momentum of disk-forming matter, we obtain alpha is greater than or equal to 10(exp -2). A complete time-dependent standard disk model, built on the parameters determined from the best-fit procedure, is presented. Such a model constitutes a good point of departure for various theoretical studies aimed at the issue of formation of planetary systems and the character of protoplanetary disks.

  20. Nanoscale heat transfer in the head-disk interface for heat assisted magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haoyu; Xiong, Shaomin; Canchi, Sripathi; Schreck, Erhard; Bogy, David

    2016-02-01

    Laser heating has been introduced in heat-assisted magnetic recording in order to reduce the magnetic coercivity and enable data writing. However, the heat flow inside a couple of nanometers head-disk gap is still not well understood. An experimental stage was built for studying heat transfer in the head-disk interface (HDI) and the heat-induced instability of the HDI. A laser heating system is included to produce a heated spot on the disk at the position of the slider. A floating air bearing slider is implemented in the stage for sensing the temperature change of the slider due to the heat transfer from the disk by the use of an embedded contact sensor, and the gap between the two surfaces is controlled by the use of a thermal fly-height control actuator. By using this system, we explore the dependency of the heat transfer on the gap spacing as well as the disk temperature.

  1. Self-Powered Kinetic Energy Harvesters for Seek-Induced Vibrations in Hard Disk Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jen-Yuan (James; Gutierrez, Mike

    Energy harvesters with battery charging circuitry, which collect wasted kinetic energy from a magnetic disk drive's rotary actuator seek operations and flexible cable vibrations, are proposed, prototyped and presented in this paper. Depending on a disk drive's form factor and seek format, it is suggested by the present study that the harvested energy can be optimized by tuning the harvester's natural frequencies to major frequency content in the rotary actuator's excitation. It is demonstrated in this study that with prototype energy harvester systems, one can easily light up a regular LED. The work presented in this paper has implications in energy saving and recycling wasted mechanical energy for other low-power electronic applications in magnetic disk drive storage devices.

  2. Distributed structural control using multilayered piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudney, Harley H.; Inman, Daniel J.; Oshman, Yaakov

    1990-01-01

    A method of segmenting piezoelectric sensors and actuators is proposed which can preclude the currently experienced cancelation of sensor signals, or the reduction of actuator effectiveness, due to the integration of the property undergoing measurement or control. The segmentation method is demonstrated by a model developed for beam structures, to which multiple layers of piezoelectric materials are attached. A numerical study is undertaken of increasing active and passive damping of a beam using the segmented sensors and actuators over unsegmented sensors and actuators.

  3. Piezoelectric Actuators On A Cold Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Chin-Po; Garba, John A.; Glaser, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental system for active suppression of vibrations of cold finger includes three piezoelectric actuators bonded to outer surface. Actuators used to suppress longitudinal and lateral vibrations of upper end of cold finger by applying opposing vibrations. Cold finger in question is part of a cryogenic system associated with an infrared imaging detector. When fully developed, system would be feedback sensor/control/actuator system automatically adapting to changing vibrational environment and suppresses pressure-induced vibrations by imposing compensatory vibrations via actuators.

  4. Encounters with Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Clayton H.

    1992-12-01

    A numerical study of encounters between stars with circumstellar disks has bee completed. Cross sections and rates for disk tilt, disk disruption, and binary formation are estimated using a large data base of encounter simulations. The consequences of these results for star-forming regions and our solar system are discussed. A numerical code is developed which is capable of evolving a mixture of stars and gas in three dimensions. The algorithm is based on the method of smoothed-particle hydrodynamics combined with the heirarchical tree method of computing gravitational forces. The code is tested by simulating the collision between two sheets of gas and the radial pulsations of a polytropic gas sphere. A protostellar-disk model is developed based on simple assumptions. Test encounters are performed to determine the sensitivity of measured quantities on algorithm parameters, such as the gravitational tolerance and viscosity. It is shown that the solar system could have had an encounter shortly after its formation of sufficient strength to generate the observed obliquity yet retain enough mass and radial extent to form the planetary system. For the Orion B clusters as a whole, it is estimated that during a one-million-year period of time a few percent of the stars will experience an enoucnter that results in a disk tilt of 7 degrees or greater. For the central regions of NGC 2024 and the Trapezium cluster values of 24% and 39% are obtained, respectively. Encounters between equal-mass stars with periastra of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 disk radii will retain on average about 15%, 40%, 55%, and 75% of the disk mass, respectively. For encounters that do not penetrate the disk a minimum of 15% of the mass is retained. Even in dense environments the characteristic lifetime of a disk due to disruptive encounters can be many millions of years. On average, an encounter that penetrates the disk will dissipate an amount of orbital energy equal to approximately 50% of the initial

  5. Gas in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2008-01-01

    Gas makes up the bulk of the mass in a protoplanetary disk, but it is much more difficult to observe than the smaller dust component. The l ifetime of gas in a disk has far-reaching consequences. including lim iting the time available for giant planet formation and controlling t he migration of planetary bodies of all sizes, from Jupiters to meter-sized planetesimals. Here I will discuss what is known about the gas component of protoplanetary disks, highlighting recent results from i nfrared studies with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Exciting upcoming o pportunities for gas studies will also be discussed. In particular, the first large far-IR survey of gas tracers from young disks will be p erformed using the Herschel Space Observatory, as part of the "Gas in Protoplanetary Systems" (GASPS) Open Time Key Project.

  6. Gas in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2008-01-01

    Gas makes up the bulk of the mass in a protoplanetary disk, but it is much more difficult to observe than the smaller dust component. The lifetime of gas in a disk has far-reaching consequences, including limiting the time available for giant planet formation and controlling the migration of planetary bodies of all sizes, from Jupiters to meter-sized planetesimals. Here I will discuss what is known about the gas component of protoplanetary disks, highlighting recent results from infrared studies with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Exciting upcoming opportunities for gas studies will also be discussed. In particular, the first large far-IR survey of gas tracers from young disks will be performed using the Herschel Space Observatory, as part of the 'Gas in Protoplanetary Systems' (GASPS) Open Time Key Project.

  7. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  8. DIAGNOSING CIRCUMSTELLAR DEBRIS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    2010-08-20

    A numerical model of a circumstellar debris disk is developed and applied to observations of the circumstellar dust orbiting {beta} Pictoris. The model accounts for the rates at which dust is produced by collisions among unseen planetesimals, and the rate at which dust grains are destroyed due to collisions. The model also accounts for the effects of radiation pressure, which is the dominant perturbation on the disk's smaller but abundant dust grains. Solving the resulting system of rate equations then provides the dust abundances versus grain size and dust abundances over time. Those solutions also provide the dust grains' collisional lifetime versus grain size, and the debris disk's optical depth and surface brightness versus distance from the star. Comparison to observations then yields estimates of the unseen planetesimal disk's radius, and the rate at which the disk sheds mass due to planetesimal grinding. The model can also be used to measure or else constrain the dust grain's physical and optical properties, such as the dust grains' strength, their light-scattering asymmetry parameter, and the grains' efficiency of light scattering Q{sub s}. The model is then applied to optical observations of the edge-on dust disk orbiting {beta} Pictoris, and good agreement is achieved when the unseen planetesimal disk is broad, with 75 {approx}< r {approx}< 150 AU. If it is assumed that the dust grains are bright like Saturn's icy rings (Q{sub s} = 0.7), then the cross section of dust in the disk is A{sub d} {approx_equal} 2 x 10{sup 20} km{sup 2} and its mass is M{sub d} {approx_equal} 11 lunar masses. In this case, the planetesimal disk's dust-production rate is quite heavy, M-dot {sub d{approx}}9 M {sub +} Myr{sup -1}, implying that there is or was a substantial amount of planetesimal mass there, at least 110 Earth masses. If the dust grains are darker than assumed, then the planetesimal disk's mass-loss rate and its total mass are heavier. In fact, the apparent dearth

  9. Planet Forming Protostellar Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubow, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    The project achieved many of its objectives. The main area of investigation was the interaction of young binary stars with surrounding protostellar disks. A secondary objective was the interaction of young planets with their central stars and surrounding disks. The grant funds were used to support visits by coinvestigators and visitors: Pawel Artymowicz, James Pringle, and Gordon Ogilvie. Funds were also used to support travel to meetings by Lubow and to provide partial salary support.

  10. Protostars and Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The research concentrated on high angular resolution (arc-second scale) studies of molecular cloud cores associated with very young star formation. New ways to study disks and protoplanetary systems were explored. Findings from the areas studied are briefly summarized: (1) molecular clouds; (2) gravitational contraction; (3) jets, winds, and outflows; (4) Circumstellar Disks (5) Extrasolar Planetary Systems. A bibliography of publications and submitted papers produced during the grant period is included.

  11. Inflated Soft Actuators with Reversible Stable Deformations.

    PubMed

    Hines, Lindsey; Petersen, Kirstin; Sitti, Metin

    2016-05-01

    Most soft robotic systems are currently dependent on bulky compressors or pumps. A soft actuation method is presented combining hyperelastic membranes and dielectric elastomer actuators to switch between stable deformations of sealed chambers. This method is capable of large repeatable deformations, and has a number of stable states proportional to the number of actuatable membranes in the chamber. PMID:27008455

  12. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  13. Disk Precession in Pleione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, R.

    2007-03-01

    From the polarimetric observation of Pleione, we found that the intrinsic polarization angle varied from 60° to 130° in 1974-2003. The Hα profile also changed dramatically from the edge-on type (shell-line profile) to the surface-on type (wine-bottle profile). These facts clearly indicate the spatial motion of the disk axis. We interpret these variations in terms of the disk precession, caused by the secondary of this spectroscopic binary with a period of 218d. We performed the χ^2 minimization for the polarization angle, assuming uniform precession with an imposed condition that the shell maximum occurred at edge-on view. The resulting precession angle is 59° with a period of 81 years. Then, we can describe chronologically the spatial motion of disk axis. We also derived the Hα disk radius from the peak separation, assuming the Keplerian disk. The precession of the disk gives natural explanation of the mysterious long-term spectroscopic behaviors of this star.

  14. Young Planetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecavelier Des Etangs, A.

    2007-07-01

    The present review focuses on UV observations of young planetary disks and consequently mostly on the gaseous content of those disks. Few examples are taken to illustrate the capability of the UV observatories to scrutinize in detail the gas content of low density circumstellar disks if they are seen edge-on or nearly edge-on. For instance, in the case of HD100546, FUSE observations re- vealed signatures of outflow and infall in the disk caused by interaction of the stellar magnetosphere with the circumstellar disk. Observations of numerous absorption lines from H2 around young stars give constrains on the gas temper- ature and density, and physical size of the absorbing layer. In the case of T-Tauri stars and one brown dwarf, emissions from exited H2 have been detected. In the case of Beta Pictoris, the observation of CO in the UV and search for H2 with FUSE demonstrated that the evaporation of frozen bodies like comets must produce the CO seen in the disk. Extensive observations of spectral variability of Beta Pictoris are now interpreted by extrasolar comets evaporating in the vicinity of the central star of this young planetary system.

  15. Shape memory actuated release devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bernie F.; Clark, Cary R.; Weems, Weyman

    1996-05-01

    Spacecraft require a variety of separation and release devices to accomplish mission related functions. Current off-the-shelf devices such as pyrotechnics, gas-discharge systems, paraffin wax actuators, and other electro-mechanical devices may not be able to meet future design needs. The use of pyrotechnics on advanced lightweight spacecraft, for example, will expose fragile sensors and electronics to high shock levels and sensitive optics might be subject to contamination. Other areas of consideration include reliability, safety, and cost reduction. Shape memory alloys (SMA) are one class of actuator material that provides a solution to these design problems. SMA's utilize a thermally activated reversible phase transformation to recover their original heat treated shape (up to 8% strain) or to generate high recovery stresses (> 700 Mpa) when heated above a critical transition temperature. NiTiCu alloy actuators have been fabricated to provide synchronized, shockless separation within release mechanisms. In addition, a shape memory damper has been incorporated to absorb the elastic energy of the preload bolt and to electrically reset the device during ground testing. Direct resistive heating of the SMA actuators was accomplished using a programmable electric control system. Release times less than 40 msec have been determined using 90 watt-sec of power. Accelerometer data indicate less than 500 g's of shock were generated using a bolt preload of 1350 kgs.

  16. Electro-active paper actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Seo, Yung B.

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, the actuation mechanism of electro-active paper (EAPap) actuators is addressed and the potential of the actuators is demonstrated. EAPap is a paper that produces large displacement with small force under an electrical excitation. EAPap is made with a chemically treated paper by constructing thin electrodes on both sides of the paper. When electrical voltage is applied on the electrodes the EAPap produces bending displacement. However, the displacement output has been unstable and degraded with timescale. To improve the bending performance of EAPap, different paper fibers - softwood, hardwood, bacteria cellulose, cellophane, carbon mixture paper, electrolyte containing paper and Korean traditional paper, in conjunction with additive chemicals, were tested. Two attempts were made to construct the electrodes: the direct use of aluminum foil and the gold sputtering technique. It was found that a cellophane paper exhibits a remarkable bending performance. When 2 MV m-1 excitation voltage was applied to the paper actuator, more than 3 mm tip displacement was observed from the 30 mm long paper beam. This is quite a low excitation voltage compared with that of other EAPs. Details of the experiments and results are addressed.

  17. Multilayer Piezoelectric Stack Actuator Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Jones, Christopher M.; Aldrich, Jack B.; Blodget, Chad; Bao, Xioaqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2008-01-01

    Future NASA missions are increasingly seeking to use actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of fractions of a nanometer. For this purpose, multilayer piezoelectric stacks are being considered as actuators for driving these precision mechanisms. In this study, sets of commercial PZT stacks were tested in various AC and DC conditions at both nominal and extreme temperatures and voltages. AC signal testing included impedance, capacitance and dielectric loss factor of each actuator as a function of the small-signal driving sinusoidal frequency, and the ambient temperature. DC signal testing includes leakage current and displacement as a function of the applied DC voltage. The applied DC voltage was increased to over eight times the manufacturers' specifications to investigate the correlation between leakage current and breakdown voltage. Resonance characterization as a function of temperature was done over a temperature range of -180C to +200C which generally exceeded the manufacturers' specifications. In order to study the lifetime performance of these stacks, five actuators from one manufacturer were driven by a 60volt, 2 kHz sine-wave for ten billion cycles. The tests were performed using a Lab-View controlled automated data acquisition system that monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The measurements included the displacement, impedance, capacitance and leakage current and the analysis of the experimental results will be presented.

  18. Status of Electrical Actuator Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Taylor, Linda M.; Hansen, Irving G.

    1996-01-01

    An ever increasing number of actuation functions historically performed by hydraulics or pneumatics are being accomplished by electric actuation. If 'end to end' systems are considered, electric actuators (EA's) are potentially lighter and more efficient. In general, system redundancies may be more easily implemented and operationally monitored. Typically, electrical components exhibit longer mean times to failure and projected lifetime costs of EA's are potentially much lower than those of other options. EA's have certain characteristics which must be considered in their application. The actual mechanical loadings must be established, for the more easily controlled EA may be operated much closer to its full capabilities. At higher rates of motion, EA's are operating as constant power devices. Therefore, it may be possible to start a movement that can not be stopped. The incorporation of high power electronics into remote locations introduces new concerns of EMI and thermal control. It is the management of these and other characteristics that forms the engineering design challenges. Work is currently in progress on EA's for aircraft and expendable launch vehicles. These applications span from ten to 40+ horsepower. The systematics and status of these actuators will be reported along with current technical trends in this area.

  19. Smart patch piezoceramic actuator issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven F.; Denoyer, Keith K.; Yost, Brad

    1993-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is undertaking the challenge of finding new and innovative ways to integrate sensing, actuation, and the supporting control and power electronics into a compact self-contained unit to provide vibration suppression for a host structure. This self-contained unit is commonly referred to as a smart patch. The interfaces to the smart patch will be limited to standard spacecraft power and possibly a communications line. The effort to develop a smart patch involves both contractual and inhouse programs which are currently focused on miniaturization of the electronics associated with vibrational control using piezoceramic sensors and actuators. This paper is comprised of two distinct parts. The first part examines issues associated with bonding piezoceramic actuators to a host structure. Experimental data from several specimens with varying flexural stiffness are compared to predictions from two piezoelectric/substructure coupling models, the Blocked Force Model and the Uniform Strain Model with Perfect Bonding. The second part of the paper highlights a demonstration article smart patch created using the insights gained from inhouse efforts at the Phillips Laboratory. This demonstration article has self contained electronics on the same order of size as the actuator powered by a voltage differential of approximately 32 volts. This voltage is provided by four rechargeable 8 volt batteries.

  20. Ball Aerospace Actuator Cryogenic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Lana; Lightsey, Paul; Quigley, Phil; Rutkowski, Joel; Russell, J. Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ambient testing characterizing step size and repeatability for the Ball Aerospace Cryogenic Nano-Positioner actuators for the AMSD (Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator) program has been completed and are presented. Current cryogenic testing is underway. Earlier cryogenic test results for a pre-cursor engineering model are presented.

  1. Smart patch piezoceramic actuator issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Steven F.; Denoyer, Keith K.; Yost, Brad

    1993-02-01

    The Phillips Laboratory is undertaking the challenge of finding new and innovative ways to integrate sensing, actuation, and the supporting control and power electronics into a compact self-contained unit to provide vibration suppression for a host structure. This self-contained unit is commonly referred to as a smart patch. The interfaces to the smart patch will be limited to standard spacecraft power and possibly a communications line. The effort to develop a smart patch involves both contractual and inhouse programs which are currently focused on miniaturization of the electronics associated with vibrational control using piezoceramic sensors and actuators. This paper is comprised of two distinct parts. The first part examines issues associated with bonding piezoceramic actuators to a host structure. Experimental data from several specimens with varying flexural stiffness are compared to predictions from two piezoelectric/substructure coupling models, the Blocked Force Model and the Uniform Strain Model with Perfect Bonding. The second part of the paper highlights a demonstration article smart patch created using the insights gained from inhouse efforts at the Phillips Laboratory. This demonstration article has self contained electronics on the same order of size as the actuator powered by a voltage differential of approximately 32 volts. This voltage is provided by four rechargeable 8 volt batteries.

  2. Active vibration control of a flexible cantilever beam using shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kagawa, Y.

    2010-08-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of using shape memory alloys (SMAs) as actuators to control the vibration of a flexible cantilever beam. In a tendon mechanism, SMAs are controlled in a push-pull fashion based on H-infinity theory and taking into account the uncertainty in the actuator performance. Using this mechanism, the four vibrational modes (three bending and one torsional) of the cantilever beam can be simultaneously damped. To control bending and torsional vibrational modes of a flexible beam, we install SMAs obliquely in a beam-SMA structure, then measure and theoretically model the properties of an actuator consisting of an SMA and a spring. Using the properties of the actuator, we introduce the state equations based on the dynamic model of the proposed beam-SMA structure and design the active control system according to H-infinity theory. Finally, we experimentally verify the functioning of the system.

  3. Piezoelectrically actuated insect scale flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sujoy; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2010-04-01

    An energy method is used in order to derive the non-linear equations of motion of a smart flapping wing. Flapping wing is actuated from the root by a PZT unimorph in the piezofan configuration. Dynamic characteristics of the wing, having the same size as dragonfly Aeshna Multicolor, are analyzed using numerical simulations. It is shown that flapping angle variations of the smart flapping wing are similar to the actual dragonfly wing for a specific feasible voltage. An unsteady aerodynamic model based on modified strip theory is used to obtain the aerodynamic forces. It is found that the smart wing generates sufficient lift to support its own weight and carry a small payload. It is therefore a potential candidate for flapping wing of micro air vehicles.

  4. Piezoelectric multilayer actuator life test.

    PubMed

    Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Jones, Christopher M; Aldrich, Jack B; Blodget, Chad J; Moore, James D; Carson, John W; Goullioud, Renaud

    2011-04-01

    Potential NASA optical missions such as the Space Interferometer Mission require actuators for precision positioning to accuracies of the order of nanometers. Commercially available multilayer piezoelectric stack actuators are being considered for driving these precision mirror positioning mechanisms. These mechanisms have potential mission operational requirements that exceed 5 years for one mission life. To test the feasibility of using these commercial actuators for these applications and to determine their reliability and the redundancy requirements, a life test study was undertaken. The nominal actuator requirements for the most critical actuators on the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) in terms of number of cycles was estimated from the Modulation Optics Mechanism (MOM) and Pathlength control Optics Mechanism (POM) and these requirements were used to define the study. At a nominal drive frequency of 250 Hz, one mission life is calculated to be 40 billion cycles. In this study, a set of commercial PZT stacks configured in a potential flight actuator configuration (pre-stressed to 18 MPa and bonded in flexures) were tested for up to 100 billion cycles. Each test flexure allowed for two sets of primary and redundant stacks to be mechanically connected in series. The tests were controlled using an automated software control and data acquisition system that set up the test parameters and monitored the waveform of the stack electrical current and voltage. The samples were driven between 0 and 20 V at 2000 Hz to accelerate the life test and mimic the voltage amplitude that is expected to be applied to the stacks during operation. During the life test, 10 primary stacks were driven and 10 redundant stacks, mechanically in series with the driven stacks, were open-circuited. The stroke determined from a strain gauge, the temperature and humidity in the chamber, and the temperature of each individual stack were recorded. Other properties of the stacks, including the

  5. Fast, Capacious Disk Memory Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Ronald M.

    1990-01-01

    Device for recording digital data on, and playing back data from, memory disks has high recording or playback rate and utilizes available recording area more fully. Two disks, each with own reading/writing head, used to record data at same time. Head on disk A operates on one of tracks numbered from outside in; head on disk B operates on track of same number in sequence from inside out. Underlying concept of device applicable to magnetic or optical disks.

  6. Rectangular shape distributed piezoelectric actuator: analytical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bohua; Qiu, Yan

    2004-04-01

    This paper is focused on the development of distributed piezoelectric actuators (DPAs) with rectangular shapes by using PZT materials. Analytical models of rectangular shape DPAs have been constructed in order to analyse and test the performance of DPA products. Firstly, based on the theory of electromagnetics, DPAs have been considered as a type of capacitor. The charge distributed density on the interdigitated electrodes (IDEs), which has been applied in the actuators, and the capacitance of the DPAs have been calculated. The accurate distribution and intensity of electrical field in DPA element have also been calculated completely. Secondly, based on the piezoelectric constitutive relations and the compound plates theory, models for mechanical strain and stress fields of DPAs have been developed, and the performances of rectangular shape DPAs have been discussed. Finally, on the basis of the models that have been developed in this paper, an improved design of a rectangular shape DPA has been discussed and summed up. Due to the minimum hypotheses that have been used during the processes of calculation, the characteristics of this paper are that the accurate distribution and intensity of electrical fields in DPAs have been concluded. The proposed accurate calculations have not been seen in the literature, and can be used in DPA design and manufacture processes in order to improve mechanical performance and reduce the cost of DPA products in further applications. In this paper, all the processes of analysis and calculation have been done by MATLAB and MathCAD. The FEM results used for comparison were obtained using the ABAQUS program.

  7. Warped Disks and Inclined Rings around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casertano, Stefano; Sackett, Penny D.; Briggs, Franklin H.

    2006-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Workshop participants; Group photograph; 1. The intergalactic HI supply F. Briggs; 2. Neutral gas infall into NGC 628 J. Kamphuis and F. Briggs; 3. VLA HI observations of the radio galaxy Centaurus A J. M. van der Hulst, J. H. van Gorkom, A. D. Haschick and A. D. Tubbs; 4. A geometric model for the dust-band of Centaurus A R. A. Nicholson, K. Taylor and J. Bland; 5. The circumgalactic ring of gas in Leo S. E. Schneider; 6. Using gas kinematics to measure M/L in elliptical galaxies T. de Zeeuw; 7. Velocity fields of disks in triaxial potentials P. J. Teuben; 8. Modeling the atomic gas in NGC 4278 J. F. Lees; 9. A few statistics from the catalog of polar-ring galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 10. Dynamics of polar rings L. S. Sparke; 11. Mergers and the structure of disk galaxies L. Hernquist; 12. Formation of polar rings H.-W. Rix and N. Katz; 13. Gas-dynamical models of settling disks D. Christodoulou and J. E. Tohline; 14. Evolutionary processes affecting galactic accretion disks T. Steiman-Cameron; 15. Particle simulations of polar rings T. Quinn; 16. A bending instability in prolate stellar systems D. Merritt; 17. The Milky Way: lopsided or barred? K. Kuijken; 18. Merger origin of starburst galaxies L. Hernquist; 19. Warped and flaring HI disks A. Bosma; 20. Behaviour of warps in extended disks F. Briggs and J. Kamphuis; 21. Observational constraints for the explanation of warps E. Battaner, E. Florido, M.-L. Sanchez-Saavedra and M. Prieto; 22. Warps in S0s: observations versus theories G. Galletta; 23. Warps and bulges J. Pitesky; 24. Time evolution of galactic warps P. Hofner and L. S. Sparke; 25. Are warps normal modes? S. Casertano; 26. Disk warping in a slewing potential E. C. Ostriker; 27. Concluding discussion Moderator: K. C. Freeman; Name index; Object index; Subject index.

  8. Warped Disks and Inclined Rings around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casertano, Stefano; Sackett, Penny D.; Briggs, Franklin H.

    1991-05-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; Workshop participants; Group photograph; 1. The intergalactic HI supply F. Briggs; 2. Neutral gas infall into NGC 628 J. Kamphuis and F. Briggs; 3. VLA HI observations of the radio galaxy Centaurus A J. M. van der Hulst, J. H. van Gorkom, A. D. Haschick and A. D. Tubbs; 4. A geometric model for the dust-band of Centaurus A R. A. Nicholson, K. Taylor and J. Bland; 5. The circumgalactic ring of gas in Leo S. E. Schneider; 6. Using gas kinematics to measure M/L in elliptical galaxies T. de Zeeuw; 7. Velocity fields of disks in triaxial potentials P. J. Teuben; 8. Modeling the atomic gas in NGC 4278 J. F. Lees; 9. A few statistics from the catalog of polar-ring galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 10. Dynamics of polar rings L. S. Sparke; 11. Mergers and the structure of disk galaxies L. Hernquist; 12. Formation of polar rings H.-W. Rix and N. Katz; 13. Gas-dynamical models of settling disks D. Christodoulou and J. E. Tohline; 14. Evolutionary processes affecting galactic accretion disks T. Steiman-Cameron; 15. Particle simulations of polar rings T. Quinn; 16. A bending instability in prolate stellar systems D. Merritt; 17. The Milky Way: lopsided or barred? K. Kuijken; 18. Merger origin of starburst galaxies L. Hernquist; 19. Warped and flaring HI disks A. Bosma; 20. Behaviour of warps in extended disks F. Briggs and J. Kamphuis; 21. Observational constraints for the explanation of warps E. Battaner, E. Florido, M.-L. Sanchez-Saavedra and M. Prieto; 22. Warps in S0s: observations versus theories G. Galletta; 23. Warps and bulges J. Pitesky; 24. Time evolution of galactic warps P. Hofner and L. S. Sparke; 25. Are warps normal modes? S. Casertano; 26. Disk warping in a slewing potential E. C. Ostriker; 27. Concluding discussion Moderator: K. C. Freeman; Name index; Object index; Subject index.

  9. Vibration and flutter of mistuned bladed-disk assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, K. R. V.; Kielb, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model for investigating vibration and flutter of mistuned bladed disk assemblies is presented. This model accounts for elastic, inertial and aerodynamic coupling between bending and torsional motions of each individual blade, elastic and inertial couplings between the blades and the disk, and aerodynamic coupling among the blades. The disk was modeled as a circular plate with constant thickness and each blade was represented by a twisted, slender, straight, nonuniform, elastic beam with a symmetric cross section. The elastic axis, inertia axis, and the tension axis were taken to be noncoincident and the structural warping of the section was explicitly considered. The blade aerodynamic loading in the subsonic and supersonic flow regimes was obtained from two-dimensional unsteady, cascade theories. All the possible standing wave modes of the disk and traveling wave modes of the blades were included. The equations of motion were derived by using the energy method in conjunction with the assumed mode shapes for the disk and the blades. Continuities of displacement and slope at the blade-disk junction were maintained. The equations were solved to investigate the effects of blade-disk coupling and blade frequency mistuning on vibration and flutter. Results showed that the flexibility of practical disks such as those used for current generation turbofans did not have a significant influence on either the tuned or mistuned flutter characteristics. However, the disk flexibility may have a strong influence on some of the system frequencies and on forced response.

  10. Composite flight-control actuator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bott, Richard; Ching, Fred

    1992-01-01

    The composite actuator is 'jam resistant', satisfying a survivability requirement for the Navy. Typically, the push-pull force needed to drive through the wound area of the composite actuator is 73 percent less than that of an all-metal actuator. In addition to improving the aircraft's combat survivability, significant weight savings were realized. The current design of the survivable, composite actuator cylinder is 36 percent lighter than that of the production steel cylinder, which equates to a 15 percent overall actuator weight savings.

  11. Dust in circumstellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodmann, Jens

    2006-02-01

    This thesis presents observational and theoretical studies of the size and spatial distribution of dust particles in circumstellar disks. Using millimetre interferometric observations of optically thick disks around T Tauri stars, I provide conclusive evidence for the presence of millimetre- to centimetre-sized dust aggregates. These findings demonstrate that dust grain growth to pebble-sized dust particles is completed within less than 1 Myr in the outer disks around low-mass pre-main-sequence stars. The modelling of the infrared spectral energy distributions of several solar-type main-sequence stars and their associated circumstellar debris disks reveals the ubiquity of inner gaps devoid of substantial amounts of dust among Vega-type infrared excess sources. It is argued that the absence of circumstellar material in the inner disks is most likely the result of the gravitational influence of a large planet and/or a lack of dust-producing minor bodies in the dust-free region. Finally, I describe a numerical model to simulate the dynamical evolution of dust particles in debris disks, taking into account the gravitational perturbations by planets, photon radiation pressure, and dissipative drag forces due to the Poynting-Robertson effect and stellar wind. The validity of the code it established by several tests and comparison to semi-analytic approximations. The debris disk model is applied to simulate the main structural features of a ring of circumstellar material around the main-sequence star HD 181327. The best agreement between model and observation is achieved for dust grains a few tens of microns in size locked in the 1:1 resonance with a Jupiter-mass planet (or above) on a circular orbit.

  12. Thin Disk Accretion in the Magnetically-Arrested State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avara, Mark J.; McKinney, Jonathan; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Shakura-Sunyaev thin disk theory is fundamental to black hole astrophysics. Though applications of the theory are wide-spread and powerful tools for explaining observations, such as Soltan's argument using quasar power, broadened iron line measurements, continuum fitting, and recently reverberation mapping, a significant large-scale magnetic field causes substantial deviations from standard thin disk behavior. We have used fully 3D general relativistic MHD simulations with cooling to explore the thin (H/R~0.1) magnetically arrested disk (MAD) state and quantify these deviations. This work demonstrates that accumulation of large-scale magnetic flux into the MAD state is possible, and then extends prior numerical studies of thicker disks, allowing us to measure how jet power scales with the disk state, providing a natural explanation of phenomena like jet quenching in the high-soft state of X-ray binaries. We have also simulated thin MAD disks with a misaligned black hole spin axis in order to understand further deviations from thin disk theory that may significantly affect observations.

  13. On the Gravitational Stability of Gravito-turbulent Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min-Kai; Kratter, Kaitlin M.

    2016-06-01

    Low mass, self-gravitating accretion disks admit quasi-steady, “gravito-turbulent” states in which cooling balances turbulent viscous heating. However, numerical simulations show that gravito-turbulence cannot be sustained beyond dynamical timescales when the cooling rate or corresponding turbulent viscosity is too large. The result is disk fragmentation. We motivate and quantify an interpretation of disk fragmentation as the inability to maintain gravito-turbulence due to formal secondary instabilities driven by: (1) cooling, which reduces pressure support; and/or (2) viscosity, which reduces rotational support. We analyze the axisymmetric gravitational stability of viscous, non-adiabatic accretion disks with internal heating, external irradiation, and cooling in the shearing box approximation. We consider parameterized cooling functions in 2D and 3D disks, as well as radiative diffusion in 3D. We show that generally there is no critical cooling rate/viscosity below which the disk is formally stable, although interesting limits appear for unstable modes with lengthscales on the order of the disk thickness. We apply this new linear theory to protoplanetary disks subject to gravito-turbulence modeled as an effective viscosity, and cooling regulated by dust opacity. We find that viscosity renders the disk beyond ∼60 au dynamically unstable on radial lengthscales a few times the local disk thickness. This is coincident with the empirical condition for disk fragmentation based on a maximum sustainable stress. We suggest turbulent stresses can play an active role in realistic disk fragmentation by removing rotational stabilization against self-gravity, and that the observed transition in behavior from gravito-turbulent to fragmenting may reflect instability of the gravito-turbulent state itself.

  14. Thermal stability of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shuang-Liang; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2014-05-01

    The absence of thermal instability in the high/soft state of black hole X-ray binaries, in disagreement with the standard thin disk theory, has been a long-standing riddle for theoretical astronomers. We have tried to resolve this question by studying the thermal stability of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds in the M-dot −Σ plane. It is found that disk winds can greatly decrease the disk temperature and thus help the disk become more stable at a given accretion rate. The critical accretion rate, M-dot {sub crit}, corresponding to the thermal instability threshold, is significantly increased in the presence of disk winds. For α = 0.01 and B {sub φ} = 10B {sub p}, the disk is quite stable even for a very weak initial poloidal magnetic field [β{sub p,0}∼2000,β{sub p}=(P{sub gas}+P{sub rad})/(B{sub p}{sup 2}/8π)]. However, when B {sub φ} = B {sub p} or B {sub φ} = 0.1B {sub p}, a somewhat stronger (but still weak) field (β{sub p,} {sub 0} ∼ 200 or β{sub p,} {sub 0} ∼ 20) is required to make the disk stable. Nevertheless, despite the great increase of M-dot {sub crit}, the luminosity threshold, corresponding to instability, remains almost constant or decreases slowly with increasing M-dot {sub crit} due to decreased gas temperature. The advection and diffusion timescales of the large-scale magnetic field threading the disk are also investigated in this work. We find that the advection timescale can be smaller than the diffusion timescale in a disk with winds, because the disk winds take away most of the gravitational energy released in the disk, resulting in the decrease of the magnetic diffusivity η and the increase of the diffusion timescale.

  15. Mars Science Laboratory Rover Actuator Thermal Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Keith S.; Liu, Yuanming; Lee, Chern-Jiin; Hendricks, Steven

    2010-01-01

    NASA will launch a 900 kg rover, part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, to Mars in October of 2011. The MSL rover is scheduled to land on Mars in August of 2012. The rover employs 31, electric-motor driven actuators to perform a variety of engineering and science functions including: mobility, camera pointing, telecommunications antenna steering, soil and rock sample acquisition and sample processing. This paper describes the MSL rover actuator thermal design. The actuators have stainless steel housings and planetary gearboxes that are lubricated with a "wet" lubricant. The lubricant viscosity increases with decreasing temperature. Warm-up heaters are required to bring the actuators up to temperature (above -55 C) prior to use in the cold wintertime environment of Mars (when ambient atmosphere temperatures are as cold as -113 C). Analytical thermal models of all 31 MSL actuators have been developed. The actuators have been analyzed and warm-up heaters have been designed to improve actuator performance in cold environments. Thermal hardware for the actuators has been specified, procured and installed. This paper presents actuator thermal analysis predicts, and describes the actuator thermal hardware and its operation. In addition, warm-up heater testing and thermal model correlation efforts for the Remote Sensing Mast (RSM) elevation actuator are discussed.

  16. Induced strain actuation of composite beams and rotor blades with embedded piezoceramic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Chopra, Inderjit

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a dynamically scaled (Froude scale) helicopter rotor blade with embedded piezoceramic elements as sensors and actuators to control blade vibrations. A 6-ft-diameter two-bladed bearingless rotor model was built, where each blade is embedded with banks of piezoelectric actuators at +/- 45-degree angles with respect to the beam axis on the top and bottom surfaces. A twist distribution along the blade span is achieved through in-phase excitation of the top and bottom actuators at equal potentials, while a bending distribution is achieved through out-of-phase excitation. In order to fix design variables and to optimize blade performance, a uniform strain beam theory is formulated to analytically predict the static bending and torsional response of composite rectangular beams with embedded piezoelectric actuators. Parameters such as bond thicknesses, actuator skew angle, and actuator spacing are investigated by experiments and then validated by theory. The static bending and torsional response of the rotor blades is experimentally measured and correlated with theory. Dynamic torsional and bending responses are experimentally determined for frequencies from 2-120 HZ to assess the viability of a vibration reduction system based on piezoactuation of blade twist. Although the magnitudes of blade twist attained in this experiment were small, it is expected that future models can be built with improved performance.

  17. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    bulges because the latter retain a `memory' of their disky origin. That is, they have one or more characteristics of disks: (1) flatter shapes than those of classical bulges, (2) correspondingly large ratios of ordered to random velocities, (3) small velocity dispersions with respect to the Faber-Jackson correlation between velocity dispersion and bulge luminosity, (4) spiral structure or nuclear bars in the `bulge' part of the light profile, (5) nearly exponential brightness profiles and (6) starbursts. So the cleanest examples of pseudobulges are recognisable. However, pseudo and classical bulges can coexist in the same galaxy. I review two important implications of secular evolution: (1) The existence of pseudobulges highlights a problem with our theory of galaxy formation by hierarchical clustering. We cannot explain galaxies that are completely bulgeless. Galaxy mergers are expected to happen often enough so that every giant galaxy should have a classical bulge. But we observe that bulgeless giant galaxies are common in field environments. We now realise that many dense centres of galaxies that we used to think are bulges were not made by mergers; they were grown out of disks. So the challenge gets more difficult. This is the biggest problem faced by our theory of galaxy formation. (2) Pseudobulges are observed to contain supermassive black holes (BHs), but they do not show the well-known, tight correlations between BH mass and the mass and velocity dispersion of the host bulge. This leads to the suggestion that there are two fundamentally different BH feeding processes. Rapid global inward gas transport in galaxy mergers leads to giant BHs that correlate with host ellipticals and classical bulges, whereas local and more stochastic feeding of small BHs in largely bulgeless galaxies evidently involves too little energy feedback to result in BH-host coevolution. It is an important success of the secular evolution picture that morphological differences can be used to

  18. Development of micro inchworm robot actuated by electrostrictive polymer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sunghwi; Ryew, Sungmoo; Jeon, Jaewook; Kim, Hunmo; Nam, Jaedo; Choi, Hyoukryeol

    2001-07-01

    In previous works, the possibility of the electrostrictive polymer as the actuator use has been proved. In this paper we address an actual design of an actuator and an inchworm type robotic mechanism using the electrostrictive polymer. The robot will be developed to move horizontally, vertically with steering capability, aiming for navigation in small tubular structures such as flexible pipes but now in this stage a simple bellows type robot capable of accomplishing the linear movement like that of an inchworm is introduced. The issues about the mechanism design of the prototype, which has already been developed and under the consideration of reduction in size, are discussed and preliminary results of experiments are given.

  19. Fast-flap Actuation for Attenuating Gust Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol, Michael; Granlund`, Kenneth; Medina, Albert

    2015-11-01

    Airfoil flow control actuators can respond at perhaps O(10E-3) convective-times, but the flowfield response requires typically 2-4 convective times, and initial force-transients can be negative. A conventional trailing-edge mechanical flap is ``slow'' to deflect in flight applications, of questionable efficacy in separated flows, and is plagued by a response nonlinear with deflection angle. We consider a half-chord airfoil flap actuated O(10) times faster than one convective time, taking advantage of scaling-effects in a water tunnel. The motivation is recent work on accelerating flat plates at high incidence, where despite zero bound-circulation, the lift transient follows Wagner's solution. Force-measurements for high-rate large-incidence flap deflection show similar trends, and offer promise in cancelling lift-transients from gusts (modeled by plunging or surging the airfoil). Parameter-studies of rate, amplitude and initial incidence suggest first-order-system relaxation to steady-state, with a time constant commensurate with 1-3 convective times, no negative transients and no discernible lag. Rapid flap actuation induces entrainment that augments the flow's propensity to attach/reattach, perhaps paradoxically comporting with theory better, the faster the actuation.

  20. Model for bending actuators that use electrostrictive graft elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Su, Ji; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2001-07-01

    Recently, it was reported that an electrostrictive graft elastomer exhibits large electric field-induced strain (4%). Combined with its high mechanical modulus, the elastomer can offer very promising electromechanical properties, in terms of output mechanical energy density, for an electroactive polymeric material. Therefore, it has been considered as one of the candidates that can be used in high performance, low mass actuation devices in many aerospace applications. Various bi-layer-based bending actuators have been designed and fabricated. An analytic model based on beam theory in the strength of materials has been derived for the transverse deflection, or curvature, and the longitudinal strain of the bi-layer beam. The curvature and strain are functions of the applied voltage and the thickness, width, and Young's modulus of the active and passive layers. The model can be used to optimize the performance of electrostrictive graft elastomer-based actuators to meet the requirements of various applications. In this presentation, optimization and sensitivity studies are applied to the bending performance of such actuators.

  1. Model For Bending Actuators That Use Electrostrictive Graft Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costen, Robert C.; Su, Ji; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, it was reported that an electrostrictive graft elastomer exhibits large electric field-induced strain (4%). Combined with its high mechanical modulus, the elastomer can offer very promising electromechanical properties, in terms of output mechanical energy density, for an electroactive polymeric material. Therefore, it has been considered as one of the candidates that can be used in high performance, low mass actuation devices in many aerospace applications. Various bilayer- based bending actuators have been designed and fabricated. An analytic model based on beam theory in the strength of materials has been derived for the transverse deflection, or curvature, and the longitudinal strain of the bi-layer beam. The curvature and strain are functions of the applied voltage and the thickness, width, and Young s modulus of the active and passive layers. The model can be used to optimize the performance of electrostrictive graft elastomer-based actuators to meet the requirements of various applications. In this presentation, optimization and sensitivity studies are applied to the bending performance of such actuators.

  2. Space Shuttle Rudder Speed Brake Actuator-A Case Study Probabilistic Fatigue Life and Reliability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Savage, Michael; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Space Shuttle fleet was originally intended to have a life of 100 flights for each vehicle, lasting over a 10-year period, with minimal scheduled maintenance or inspection. The first space shuttle flight was that of the Space Shuttle Columbia (OV-102), launched April 12, 1981. The disaster that destroyed Columbia occurred on its 28th flight, February 1, 2003, nearly 22 years after its first launch. In order to minimize risk of losing another Space Shuttle, a probabilistic life and reliability analysis was conducted for the Space Shuttle rudder/speed brake actuators to determine the number of flights the actuators could sustain. A life and reliability assessment of the actuator gears was performed in two stages: a contact stress fatigue model and a gear tooth bending fatigue model. For the contact stress analysis, the Lundberg-Palmgren bearing life theory was expanded to include gear-surface pitting for the actuator as a system. The mission spectrum of the Space Shuttle rudder/speed brake actuator was combined into equivalent effective hinge moment loads including an actuator input preload for the contact stress fatigue and tooth bending fatigue models. Gear system reliabilities are reported for both models and their combination. Reliability of the actuator bearings was analyzed separately, based on data provided by the actuator manufacturer. As a result of the analysis, the reliability of one half of a single actuator was calculated to be 98.6 percent for 12 flights. Accordingly, each actuator was subsequently limited to 12 flights before removal from service in the Space Shuttle.

  3. Novel applications of plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Arzu Ceren

    The current study investigates the effectiveness of two different dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator configurations, a 3-D annular geometry for use in micro thrusters and internal duct aerodynamics and a jet vectoring actuator that acts as a vortex generator and flow control device. The first configuration consists of a closed circumferential arrangement which yields a body force when a voltage difference is applied across the inner and outer electrodes separated by a dielectric. The primary flow is driven by this zero-net mass flux jet at the wall that then entrains fluid in the core of the duct. PIV experiments in both quiescent flow and freestream are conducted on tubes of different diameters while varying parameters such as the modulation frequency, duty cycle and tunnel speed. The values of the induced velocities increase with the forcing frequency and duty cycle although there is a peak value for the forcing frequency after which the velocity and thrust decrease for each thruster. The velocities and thrust increase as the inner diameter of the tubes are increased while the velocity profiles show a great difference with the (l/di) ratio; recirculation occurs after going below a critical value. Experiments in the wind tunnel illustrate that the jet exit characteristics significantly change upon actuation in freestream flow but the effect tends to diminish with increasing inner diameters and tunnel speeds. Using staged arrays of these thrusters result in higher velocities while operating at both in phase and out of phase. The jet vectoring configuration consists of a single embedded electrode separated from two exposed electrodes on either side by the dielectric. The embedded electrode is grounded while the exposed electrodes are driven with a high frequency high voltage input signal. PIV measurements of the actuator in a freestream show that vectoring the jet yields stronger vortices than a linear configuration and increasing the difference between

  4. Photoprocesses in protoplanetary disks.

    PubMed

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Jonkheid, Bastiaan; van Hemert, Marc C

    2006-01-01

    Circumstellar disks are exposed to intense ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the young star. In the inner disks, the UV radiation can be enhanced by more than seven orders of magnitude compared with the average interstellar radiation field, resulting in a physical and chemical structure that resembles that of a dense photon-dominated region (PDR). This intense UV field affects the chemistry, the vertical structure of the disk, and the gas temperature, especially in the surface layers. The parameters which make disks different from more traditional PDRs are discussed, including the shape of the UV radiation field, grain growth, the absence of PAHs, the gas/dust ratio and the presence of inner holes. Illustrative infrared spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope are shown. New photodissociation cross sections for selected species, including simple ions, are presented. Also, a summary of cross sections at the Lyman alpha 1216 A line, known to be strong for some T Tauri stars, is made. Photodissociation and ionization rates are computed for different radiation fields with color temperatures ranging from 30000 to 4000 K and grain sizes up to a few microm. The importance of a proper treatment of the photoprocesses is illustrated for the transitional disk toward HD 141569A which includes grain growth. PMID:17191450

  5. PLANETESIMAL DISK MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Keeton, Charles R. E-mail: keeton@physics.rutgers.ed

    2009-12-10

    Motivated by debris disk studies, we investigate the gravitational microlensing of background starlight by a planetesimal disk around a foreground star. We use dynamical survival models to construct a plausible example of a planetesimal disk and study its microlensing properties using established ideas of microlensing by small bodies. When a solar-type source star passes behind a planetesimal disk, the microlensing light curve may exhibit short-term, low-amplitude residuals caused by planetesimals several orders of magnitude below Earth mass. The minimum planetesimal mass probed depends on the photometric sensitivity and the size of the source star, and is lower when the planetesimal lens is located closer to us. Planetesimal lenses may be found more nearby than stellar lenses because the steepness of the planetesimal mass distribution changes how the microlensing signal depends on the lens/source distance ratio. Microlensing searches for planetesimals require essentially continuous monitoring programs that are already feasible and can potentially set constraints on models of debris disks, the progeny of the supposed extrasolar analogues of Kuiper Belts.

  6. Efficient Hybrid Actuation Using Solid-State Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leo, Donald J.; Cudney, Harley H.; Horner, Garnett (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Piezohydraulic actuation is the use of fluid to rectify the motion of a piezoelectric actuator for the purpose of overcoming the small stroke limitations of the material. In this work we study a closed piezohydraulic circuit that utilizes active valves to rectify the motion of a hydraulic end affector. A linear, lumped parameter model of the system is developed and correlated with experiments. Results demonstrate that the model accurately predicts the filtering of the piezoelectric motion caused by hydraulic compliance. Accurate results are also obtained for predicting the unidirectional motion of the cylinder when the active valves are phased with respect to the piezoelectric actuator. A time delay associated with the mechanical response of the valves is incorporated into the model to reflect the finite time required to open or close the valves. This time delay is found to be the primary limiting factor in achieving higher speed and greater power from the piezohydraulic unit. Experiments on the piezohydraulic unit demonstrate that blocked forces on the order of 100 N and unloaded velocities of 180 micrometers/sec are achieved.

  7. Light-Driven Polymeric Bimorph Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Gregory; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are being developed as alternatives to prior electrically and optically driven actuators in advanced, highly miniaturized devices and systems exemplified by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro-electro-optical-mechanical systems (MEOMS), and sensor and actuator arrays in smart structures. These light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are intended to satisfy a need for actuators that (1) in comparison with the prior actuators, are simpler and less power-hungry; (2) can be driven by low-power visible or mid-infrared light delivered through conventional optic fibers; and (3) are suitable for integration with optical sensors and multiple actuators of the same or different type. The immediate predecessors of the present light-driven polymeric bimorph actuators are bimorph actuators that exploit a photorestrictive effect in lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics. The disadvantages of the PLZT-based actuators are that (1) it is difficult to shape the PLZT ceramics, which are hard and brittle; (2) for actuation, it is necessary to use ultraviolet light (wavelengths < 380 nm), which must be generated by use of high-power, high-pressure arc lamps or lasers; (3) it is difficult to deliver sufficient ultraviolet light through conventional optical fibers because of significant losses in the fibers; (4) the response times of the PLZT actuators are of the order of several seconds unacceptably long for typical applications; and (5) the maximum mechanical displacements of the PLZT-based actuators are limited to those characterized by low strains beyond which PLZT ceramics disintegrate because of their brittleness. The basic element of a light-driven bimorph actuator of the present developmental type is a cantilever beam comprising two layers, at least one of which is a polymer that exhibits a photomechanical effect (see figure). The dominant mechanism of the photomechanical effect is a photothermal one: absorption of

  8. The Chemistry of Nearby Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.

    2016-01-01

    The gas and dust rich disks around young stars are the formation sites of planets. Observations of molecular trace species have great potential as probes of the disk structures and volatile compositions that together regulate planet formation. The disk around young star TW Hya has become a template for disk molecular studies due to a combination of proximity, a simple face-on geometry and richness in volatiles. It is unclear, however, how typical the chemistry of the TW disk is. In this proceeding, we review lessons learnt from exploring the TW Hya disk chemistry, focusing on the CO snowline, and on deuterium fractionation chemistry. We compare these results with new ALMA observations toward more distant, younger disks. We find that while all disks have some chemical structures in common, there are also substantial differences between the disks, which may be due to different initial conditions, structural or chemical evolutionary stages, or a combination of all three.

  9. How The Inner Disk Communicates to the Outer Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Miwa

    2009-08-01

    We investigated how evolution in the outer disk has an influence on the inner disk of a protoplanetary disk system. Thanks to two-layer models that give the theoretical platform of disk geometry, we now have a good handle on how dust evolves in outer protoplanetary disks (>10 AU). It has long been thought that the outer and inner disks dissipate on roughly the same time scale as sub-mm observations of nearby T Tauri systems has suggested. However, new high spatial resolution observations point toward the dissipation of an inner disk as not being a simple extension of the outer disk. We performed preliminary tests of the differential disk evolution in gas and dust in the inner disks of Herbig Ae/Be stars using the CO vibrational band as the gas probe. The line luminosity of CO v = 1-0 P(30) has a reasonable correlation with the near-infrared excess over the stellar photosphere. It guarantees that the CO vibration band is a secure probe of the inner disk, as is expected from its high critical density, high excitation temperature, and kinematics. On the other hand, the line luminosity of P(30) does not show a clear trend either with far-infrared color, near-infrared/far-infrared-color, or the type of the spectral energy distribution (SED) (I/II). The inner disks (<1 AU) of Herbig Ae/Be stars of our sample are influenced little by the geometry of the outer disks.

  10. Chemistry in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    In this lecture I discuss recent progress in the understanding of the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks that resemble our Solar system during the first ten million years. At the verge of planet formation, strong variations of temperature, density, and radiation intensities in these disks lead to a layered chemical structure. In hot, dilute and heavily irradiated atmosphere only simple radicals, atoms, and atomic ions can survive, formed and destroyed by gas-phase processes. Beneath the atmosphere a partly UV-shielded, warm molecular layer is located, where high-energy radiation drives rich chemistry, both in the gas phase and on dust surfaces. In a cold, dense, dark disk midplane many molecules are frozen out, forming thick icy mantles where surface chemistry is active and where complex (organic) species are synthesized.

  11. Packings of soft disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziherl, Primoz; Vidmar, Marija

    2011-03-01

    We explore the stability of 2D ordered structures formed by soft disks treated as isotropic solid bodies. Using a variational model, we compute the equilibrium shapes and the elastic energy of disks in regular columnar, honeycomb, square, and hexagonal lattice. The results reproduce the Hertzian interaction in the regime of small deformations. The phase diagram of elastic disks is characterized by broad regions of phase coexistence; its main feature is that the coordination number of the stable phases decreases with density. These results may provide an insight into structure of the non-close-packed lattices observed in certain nanocolloidal systems. This work was supported by Slovenian Research Agency (grant No. P1-0055) and by EU through ITN COMPLOIDS (grant FP7-People-ITN-2008 No. 234810).

  12. Premixed direct injection disk

    SciTech Connect

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  13. Supersized Disk (Artist's Concept)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated ImageData Graph

    This illustration compares the size of a gargantuan star and its surrounding dusty disk (top) to that of our solar system. Monstrous disks like this one were discovered around two 'hypergiant' stars by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Astronomers believe these disks might contain the early 'seeds' of planets, or possibly leftover debris from planets that already formed.

    The hypergiant stars, called R 66 and R 126, are located about 170,000 light-years away in our Milky Way's nearest neighbor galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. The stars are about 100 times wider than the sun, or big enough to encompass an orbit equivalent to Earth's. The plump stars are heavy, at 30 and 70 times the mass of the sun, respectively. They are the most massive stars known to sport disks.

    The disks themselves are also bloated, with masses equal to several Jupiters. The disks begin at a distance approximately 120 times greater than that between Earth and the sun, or 120 astronomical units, and terminate at a distance of about 2,500 astronomical units.

    Hypergiant stars are the puffed-up, aging descendants of the most massive class of stars, called 'O' stars. The stars are so massive that their cores ultimately collapse under their own weight, triggering incredible explosions called supernovae. If any planets circled near the stars during one of these blasts, they would most likely be destroyed.

    The orbital distances in this picture are plotted on a logarithmic scale. This means that a given distance shown here represents proportionally larger actual distances as you move to the right. The sun and planets in our solar system have been scaled up in size for better viewing. Little Dust Grains in Giant Stellar Disks The graph above of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the composition of a monstrous disk of what may be planet-forming dust circling the colossal 'hypergiant' star

  14. Compton heated winds and coronae above accretion disks. I Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, M. C.; Mckee, C. F.; Shields, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    X rays emitted in the inner part of an accretion disk system can heat the surface of the disk farther out, producing a corona and possibly driving off a strong wind. The dynamics of Compton-heated coronae and winds are analyzed using an approximate two-dimensional technique to estimate the mass loss rate as a function of distance from the source of X rays. The findings have important dynamical implications for accretion disks in quasars, active galactic nuclei, X ray binaries, and cataclysmic variables. These include: mass loss from the disk possibly comparable with or exceeding the net accretion rate onto the central compact object, which may lead to unstable accretion; sufficient angular momentum loss in some cases to truncate the disk in a semidetached binary at a smaller radius than that predicted by tidal truncation theories; and combined static plus ram pressure in the wind adequate to confine line-emitting clouds in quasars and Seyfert galaxies.

  15. Piezoelectric aluminum nitride nanoelectromechanical actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Nipun; Wabiszewski, Graham E.; Mahameed, Rashed; Felmetsger, Valery V.; Tanner, Shawn M.; Carpick, Robert W.; Piazza, Gianluca

    2009-08-01

    This letter reports the implementation of ultrathin (100 nm) aluminum nitride (AlN) piezoelectric layers for the fabrication of vertically deflecting nanoactuators. The films exhibit an average piezoelectric coefficient (d31˜-1.9 pC/N), which is comparable to its microscale counterpart. This allows vertical deflections as large as 40 nm from 18 μm long and 350 nm thick multilayer cantilever bimorph beams with 2 V actuation. Furthermore, in-plane stress and stress gradients have been simultaneously controlled. The films exhibit leakage currents lower than 2 nA/cm2 at 1 V, and have an average relative dielectric constant of approximately 9.2 (as in thicker films). These material characteristics and actuation results make the AlN nanofilms ideal candidates for the realization of nanoelectromechanical switches for low power logic applications.

  16. Hydraulically amplified PZT mems actuator

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-11-02

    A hydraulically amplified microelectromechanical systems actuator. A piece of piezoelectric material or stacked piezo bimorph is bonded or deposited as a thin film. The piece is operatively connected to a primary membrane. A reservoir is operatively connected to the primary membrane. The reservoir contains a fluid. A membrane is operatively connected to the reservoir. In operation, energizing the piezoelectric material causing the piezoelectric material to bow. Bowing of the piezoelectric material causes movement of the primary membrane. Movement of the primary membrane results in a force in being transmitted to the liquid in the reservoir. The force in the liquid causes movement of the membrane. Movement of the membrane results in an operating actuator.

  17. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana; Charles P.

    2006-10-10

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  18. Impact micro-positioning actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuerden, Brian (Inventor); Angel, J. Roger P. (Inventor); Burge, James H. (Inventor); DeRigne, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An impact micro-positioning actuator. In one aspect of the invention, a threaded shaft is threadably received in a nut and the nut is impacted by an impacting device, causing the nut first to rotate relative to the shaft by slipping as a result of shaft inertia and subsequently to stick to the shaft as a result of the frictional force therebetween. The nut is returned to its initial position by a return force provided by a return mechanism after impact. The micro-positioning actuator is further improved by controlling at least one and preferably all of the following: the friction, the impact provided by the impacting device, the return force provided by the return mechanism, and the inertia of the shaft. In another aspect of the invention, a threaded shaft is threadably received in a nut and the shaft is impacted by an impacting device, causing the shaft to rotate relative to the nut.

  19. Induced strain actuation of composite beams and rotor blades with embedded piezoceramic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Chopra, Inderjit

    1996-02-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a dynamically-scaled (Froude scale) helicopter rotor blade with embedded piezoceramic elements as sensors and actuators to control blade vibrations. A 6 ft diameter 2-bladed bearingless rotor model was built where each blade is embedded with banks of piezoelectric actuators at 0964-1726/5/1/005/img1 degree angles with respect to the beam axis on the top and bottom surfaces. A twist distribution along the blade span is achieved through in-phase excitation of the top and bottom actuators at equal potentials, while a bending distribution is achieved through out-of-phase excitation. In order to fix design variables and to optimize blade performance, a uniform strain beam theory is formulated to analytically predict the static bending and torsional response of composite rectangular beams with embedded piezoelectric actuators. Parameters such as bond thicknesses, actuator skew angle and actuator spacing are investigated by experiments and then validated by theory. The static bending and torsional response of the rotor blades is experimentally measured and correlated with theory. Dynamic torsional and bending responses are experimentally determined for frequencies from 2 - 120 Hz to assess the viability of a vibration reduction system based on piezo-actuation of blade twist. To assess the performance of the piezo-actuators in rotation, hover tests were conducted where accelerometers embedded in the blades were used to resolve the tip twist amplitudes. Although the magnitudes of blade twist attained in this experiment were small, it is expected that future models can be built with improved performance.

  20. Observations of Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ménard, F.

    2004-12-01

    Accretion disks are pivotal elements in the formation and early evolution of solar-like stars. On top of supplying the raw material, their internal conditions also regulate the formation of planets. Their study therefore holds the key to solve the mystery of the formation of our Solar System. This chapter focuses on observational studies of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence solar-like stars. The direct measurement of disk parameters poses an obvious challenge: at the distance of typical star forming regions (e.g., ˜140pc for Taurus), a planetary system like ours (with diameter ≃ 50AU out to Pluto, but excluding the Kuiper belt) subtends only 0.35". Yet its surface brightness is low in comparison to the bright central star and high angular and high contrast imaging techniques are required if one hopes to resolve and measure these protoplanetary disks. Fortunately, capable instruments providing 0.1" resolution or better and high contrast have been available for just about 10 years now. They are covering a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum, from the UV/Optical with HST and the near-infrared from ground-based adaptive optics systems, to the millimetric range with long-baseline radio interferometers. It is therefore not surprising that our knowledge of the structure of the disks surrounding low-mass stars has made a gigantic leap forward in the last decade. In the following pages I will attempt to give an overview of the structural and physical parameters of protoplanetary disks that can be estimated today from direct observations.

  1. Actuator device for artificial leg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An actuator device is described for moving an artificial leg of a person having a prosthesis replacing an entire leg and hip joint. The device includes a first articulated hip joint assembly carried by the natural leg and a second articulated hip joint assembly carried by the prosthesis whereby energy from the movement of the natural leg is transferred by a compressible fluid from the first hip joint assembly to the second hip joint assembly for moving the artificial leg.

  2. MPP disk subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    A disk subsystem for the Massively Parallel processor (MPP) is designed to the block diagram level. The subsystem is capable of storing 4,992 megabytes of data, expandable to 39,936 megabytes. The subsystem is capable of transferring data to the MPP Staging Memory at a rate of 25 megabytes/second, expandable to 100 megabytes/second. A lower cost disk subsystem is also presented. This alternate subsystem is capable of storing 3,744 megabytes with a transfer rate of 10.6 megabyte/second.

  3. Enhancing the force capability of permanent magnet latching actuators for electromechanical valve actuation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rens, J.; Clark, R. E.; Jewell, G. W.; Howe, D.

    2005-05-01

    This article introduces a topology of parallel-polarized permanent magnet latching actuator for use in electromagnetic valve actuation systems for internal combustion engines. The actuator has a number of advantages over reluctance actuators, commonly employed in such systems, in terms of reduced starting currents and fail-safe capability. The influence of a number of design features on actuator performance, such as tooth tapering, additional magnets to improve the main magnet flux path and prevent the onset of saturation, and mechanical clearances required to protect the permanent magnet from shock loads are investigated. The design study findings are verified by measurements on a prototype actuator.

  4. Actuators for a space manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, W.; Brunson, P.

    1987-01-01

    The robotic manipulator can be decomposed into distinct subsytems. One particular area of interest of mechanical subsystems is electromechanical actuators (or drives). A drive is defined as a motor with an appropriate transmission. An overview is given of existing, as well as state-of-the-art drive systems. The scope is limited to space applications. A design philosophy and adequate requirements are the initial steps in designing a space-qualified actuator. The focus is on the d-c motor in conjunction with several types of transmissions (harmonic, tendon, traction, and gear systems). The various transmissions will be evaluated and key performance parameters will be addressed in detail. Included in the assessment is a shuttle RMS joint and a MSFC drive of the Prototype Manipulator Arm. Compound joints are also investigated. Space imposes a set of requirements for designing a high-performance drive assembly. Its inaccessibility and cryogenic conditions warrant special considerations. Some guidelines concerning these conditions are present. The goal is to gain a better understanding in designing a space actuator.

  5. Design, development, and testing of a transonic missile fin employing PBP/DEAS actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ron; Vos, Roelof

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a new class of flight control actuators using Post-Buckled Precompressed (PBP) piezoelectric elements mounted within a transonic missile fin. These actuators are designed to produce significantly higher deflection and force levels than conventional piezoelectric actuator elements. Classical laminate plate theory (CLPT) models are shown to work very well in capturing the behavior of the free, unloaded elements. A new high transverse deflection model which employs nonlinear structural relations is shown to successfully predict the performance of the PBP actuators as they are exposed to higher and higher levels of axial force, which induces post buckling deflections. A 6" (15.2cm) square rounded diamond transonic fin was made with integral PBP actuator elements. Quasi-static bench testing showed deflection levels in excess of +/-7° at rates exceeding 21 Hz. The new solid state PBP actuator was shown to reduce the part count with respect to conventional servoactuators by an order of magnitude. Power consumption dropped from 24W to 1.3W, slop went from 1.6° to 0.02° and peak current draw went from 5A to 18mA. The PBP actuator was wind tunnel tested and shown to possess no flutter, divergence or adverse aeroelastic coupling characteristics.

  6. Compositional Effects on Electromechanical Degradation of RAINBOW Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dausch, David E.; Wise, Stephanie A.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of ceramic composition on the electromechanical displacement degradation of RAINBOW (Reduced and Internally Biased Oxide Wafer) actuators was investigated. RAINBOWs were fabricated from commercially available PZT-5H and PZT-5A piezoelectric disks as well as from tape cast PLZT piezoelectric 7/65/35 and electrostrictive 9/65/35 compositions. Displacement properties were measured at low electric fields (10 to 13 kV/cm) under loads of 0 to 500 g, and displacement degradation as a function of time was observed over 107 cycles. The PZT-5A and PLZT 9/65/35 compositions exhibited minimal decrease in displacement when load was applied. Furthermore, these compositions retained approximately 65 percent of their initial displacement after 10(exp 7) cycles under a load of 300 g. PZT-5H and PLZT 7/65/35 degraded completely under these conditions.

  7. Gait planning for a quadruped robot with one faulty actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xianbao; Gao, Feng; Qi, Chenkun; Tian, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Fault tolerance is essential for quadruped robots when they work in remote areas or hazardous environments. Many fault-tolerant gaits planning method proposed in the past decade constrained more degrees of freedom(DOFs) of a robot than necessary. Thus a novel method to realize the fault-tolerant walking is proposed. The mobility of the robot is analyzed first by using the screw theory. The result shows that the translation of the center of body(CoB) can be kept with one faulty actuator if the rotations of the body are controlled. Thus the DOFs of the robot body are divided into two parts: the translation of the CoB and the rotation of the body. The kinematic model of the whole robot is built, the algorithm is developed to actively control the body orientations at the velocity level so that the planned CoB trajectory can be realized in spite of the constraint of the faulty actuator. This gait has a similar generation sequence with the normal gait and can be applied to the robot at any position. Simulations and experiments of the fault-tolerant gait with one faulty actuator are carried out. The CoB errors and the body rotation angles are measured. Comparing to the traditional fault-tolerant gait they can be reduced by at least 50%. A fault-tolerant gait planning algorithm is presented, which not only realizes the walking of a quadruped robot with a faulty actuator, but also efficiently improves the walking performances by taking full advantage of the remaining operational actuators according to the results of the simulations and experiments.

  8. GIANT PLANET FORMATION BY DISK INSTABILITY IN LOW MASS DISKS?

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.

    2010-12-20

    Forming giant planets by disk instability requires a gaseous disk that is massive enough to become gravitationally unstable and able to cool fast enough for self-gravitating clumps to form and survive. Models with simplified disk cooling have shown the critical importance of the ratio of the cooling to the orbital timescales. Uncertainties about the proper value of this ratio can be sidestepped by including radiative transfer. Three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics models of a disk with a mass of 0.043 M{sub sun} from 4 to 20 AU in orbit around a 1 M{sub sun} protostar show that disk instabilities are considerably less successful in producing self-gravitating clumps than in a disk with twice this mass. The results are sensitive to the assumed initial outer disk (T{sub o}) temperatures. Models with T{sub o} = 20 K are able to form a single self-gravitating clump, whereas models with T{sub o} = 25 K form clumps that are not quite self-gravitating. These models imply that disk instability requires a disk with a mass of at least {approx}0.043 M{sub sun} inside 20 AU in order to form giant planets around solar-mass protostars with realistic disk cooling rates and outer-disk temperatures. Lower mass disks around solar-mass protostars must rely upon core accretion to form inner giant planets.

  9. The Impact of Dust Evolution and Photoevaporation on Disk Dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2015-05-01

    Protoplanetary disks are dispersed by viscous evolution and photoevaporation in a few million years; in the interim small, sub-micron-sized dust grains must grow and form planets. The time-varying abundance of small grains in an evolving disk directly affects gas heating by far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons, while dust evolution affects photoevaporation by changing the disk opacity and resulting penetration of FUV photons in the disk. Photoevaporative flows, in turn, selectively carry small dust grains, leaving the larger particles—which decouple, from the gas—behind in the disk. We study these effects by investigating the evolution of a disk subject to viscosity, photoevaporation by EUV, FUV, and X-rays, dust evolution, and radial drift using a one-dimensional (1D) multi-fluid approach (gas + different dust grain sizes) to solve for the evolving surface density distributions. The 1D evolution is augmented by 1+1D models constructed at each epoch to obtain the instantaneous disk structure and determine photoevaporation rates. The implementation of a dust coagulation/fragmentation model results in a marginal decrease in disk lifetimes when compared to models with no dust evolution; the disk lifetime is thus found to be relatively insensitive to the evolving dust opacity. We find that photoevaporation can cause significant reductions in the gas/dust mass ratio in the planet-forming regions of the disk as it evolves, and may result in a corresponding increase in heavy element abundances relative to hydrogen. We discuss implications for theories of planetesimal formation and giant planet formation, including the formation of gas-poor giants. After gas disk dispersal, ˜ 3× {{10}-4} M ⊙ of mass in solids typically remain, comparable to the solids inventory of our solar system.

  10. Equilibrium Initialization and Stability of Three-Dimensional Gas Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiang-Hsu; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Bosch, Frank C.van den; Fuchs, Burkhard; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    We present a new systematic way of setting up galactic gas disks based on the assumption of detailed hydrodynamic equilibrium. To do this, we need to specify the density distribution and the velocity field which supports the disk. We first show that the required circular velocity has no dependence on the height above or below the midplane so long as the gas pressure is a function of density only. The assumption of disks being very thin enables us to decouple the vertical structure from the radial direction. Based on that, the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium together with the reduced Poisson equation leads to two sets of second-order non-linear differential equation, which are easily integrated to set-up a stable disk. We call one approach 'density method' and the other one 'potential method'. Gas disks in detailed balance are especially suitable for investigating the onset of the gravitational instability. We revisit the question of global, axisymmetric instability using fully three-dimensional disk simulations. The impact of disk thickness on the disk instability and the formation of spontaneously induced spirals is studied systematically with or without the presence of the stellar potential. In our models, the numerical results show that the threshold value for disk instability is shifted from unity to 0.69 for self-gravitating thick disks and to 0.75 for combined stellar and gas thick disks. The simulations also show that self-induced spirals occur in the correct regions and with the right numbers as predicted by the analytic theory.

  11. Evolution of protoplanetary disks with dynamo magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1994-01-01

    The notion that planetary systems are formed within dusty disks is certainly not a new one; the modern planet formation paradigm is based on suggestions made by Laplace more than 200 years ago. More recently, the foundations of accretion disk theory where initially developed with this problem in mind, and in the last decade astronomical observations have indicated that many young stars have disks around them. Such observations support the generally accepted model of a viscous Keplerian accretion disk for the early stages of planetary system formation. However, one of the major uncertainties remaining in understanding the dynamical evolution of protoplanetary disks is the mechanism responsible for the transport of angular momentum and subsequent mass accretion through the disk. This is a fundamental piece of the planetary system genesis problem since such mechanisms will determine the environment in which planets are formed. Among the mechanisms suggested for this effect is the Maxwell stress associated with a magnetic field treading the disk. Due to the low internal temperatures through most of the disk, even the question of the existence of a magnetic field must be seriously studied before including magnetic effects in the disk dynamics. On the other hand, from meteoritic evidence it is believed that magnetic fields of significant magnitude existed in the earliest, PP-disk-like, stage of our own solar system's evolution. Hence, the hypothesis that PP disks are magnetized is not made solely on the basis of theory. Previous studies have addressed the problem of the existence of a magnetic field in a steady-state disk and have found that the low conductivity results in a fast diffusion of the magnetic field on timescales much shorter than the evolutionary timescale. Hence the only way for a magnetic field to exist in PP disks for a considerable portion of their lifetimes is for it to be continuously regenerated. In the present work, we present results on the self

  12. Hydrodynamic responses of a thin floating disk to regular waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiew, L. J.; Bennetts, L. G.; Meylan, M. H.; French, B. J.; Thomas, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The surge, heave and pitch motions of two solitary, thin, floating disks, extracted from laboratory wave basin experiments are presented. The motions are forced by regular incident waves, for a range of wave amplitudes and frequencies. One disk has a barrier attached to its edge to stop the incident waves from washing across its upper surface. It is shown that the motions of the disk without the barrier are smaller than those of the disk with the barrier. Moreover, it is shown that the amplitudes of the motions, relative to the incident amplitude, decrease with increasing incident wave amplitude for the disk without a barrier and for short incident wavelengths. Two theoretical models of the disk motions are considered. One is based on slope-sliding theory and the other on combined linear potential-flow and thin-plate theories. The models are shown to have almost the same form in the long-wavelength regime. The potential-flow/thin-plate model is shown to capture the experimentally measured disk motions with reasonable accuracy.

  13. Plasmofluidic Disk Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min-Suk; Ku, Bonwoo; Kim, Yonghan

    2016-01-01

    Waveguide-coupled silicon ring or disk resonators have been used for optical signal processing and sensing. Large-scale integration of optical devices demands continuous reduction in their footprints, and ultimately they need to be replaced by silicon-based plasmonic resonators. However, few waveguide-coupled silicon-based plasmonic resonators have been realized until now. Moreover, fluid cannot interact effectively with them since their resonance modes are strongly confined in solid regions. To solve this problem, this paper reports realized plasmofluidic disk resonators (PDRs). The PDR consists of a submicrometer radius silicon disk and metal laterally surrounding the disk with a 30-nm-wide channel in between. The channel is filled with fluid, and the resonance mode of the PDR is strongly confined in the fluid. The PDR coupled to a metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal waveguide is implemented by using standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. If the refractive index of the fluid increases by 0.141, the transmission spectrum of the waveguide coupled to the PDR of radius 0.9 μm red-shifts by 30 nm. The PDR can be used as a refractive index sensor requiring a very small amount of analyte. Plus, the PDR filled with liquid crystal may be an ultracompact intensity modulator which is effectively controlled by small driving voltage. PMID:26979929

  14. Accretion disk coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, N. E.; Holt, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations of partial X-ray eclipses from 4U1822-37 have shown that the central X-ray source in this system is diffused by a large Compton-thick accretion disk corona (ADC). Another binary, 4U2129-47, also displays a partial eclipse and contains an ADC. The possible origin of an ADC is discussed and a simple hydrostatic evaporated ADC model is developed which, when applied to 4U1822-37, 4U2129+47 and Cyg X-3, can explain their temporal and spectral properties. The quasi-sinusoidal modulation of all three sources can be reconciled with the partial occultation of the ADC by a bulge at the edge of the accretion disk which is caused by the inflowing material. The height of this bulge is an order of magnitude larger than the hydrostatic disk height and is the result of turbulence in the outer region of the disk. The spectral properties of all three sources can be understood in terms of Compton scattering of the original source spectrum by the ADC. Spectral variations with epoch in Cyg X-3 are probably caused by changes in the optical depth of the corona. A consequence of our model is that any accreting neutron star X-ray source in a semi-detached binary system which is close to its Eddington limit most likely contains an optically thick ADC.

  15. Solar disk sextant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S.; Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Minott, P.; Endal, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of an instrument, called the solar disk sextant, to be used in space to measure the shape and the size of the sun and their variations. The instrumental parameters required to produce sufficient sensitivity to address the problems of solar oblateness, solar pulsations, and global size changes of climatic importance are given.

  16. Plasmofluidic Disk Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Min-Suk; Ku, Bonwoo; Kim, Yonghan

    2016-03-01

    Waveguide-coupled silicon ring or disk resonators have been used for optical signal processing and sensing. Large-scale integration of optical devices demands continuous reduction in their footprints, and ultimately they need to be replaced by silicon-based plasmonic resonators. However, few waveguide-coupled silicon-based plasmonic resonators have been realized until now. Moreover, fluid cannot interact effectively with them since their resonance modes are strongly confined in solid regions. To solve this problem, this paper reports realized plasmofluidic disk resonators (PDRs). The PDR consists of a submicrometer radius silicon disk and metal laterally surrounding the disk with a 30-nm-wide channel in between. The channel is filled with fluid, and the resonance mode of the PDR is strongly confined in the fluid. The PDR coupled to a metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal waveguide is implemented by using standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. If the refractive index of the fluid increases by 0.141, the transmission spectrum of the waveguide coupled to the PDR of radius 0.9 μm red-shifts by 30 nm. The PDR can be used as a refractive index sensor requiring a very small amount of analyte. Plus, the PDR filled with liquid crystal may be an ultracompact intensity modulator which is effectively controlled by small driving voltage.

  17. Herniated disk repair (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... one of the most common causes of lower back pain. The mainstay of treatment for herniated disks is an initial period of rest with pain and anti-inflammatory medications followed by physical therapy. If pain and symptoms persist, surgery to remove ...

  18. POLAR DISK GALAXY FOUND IN WALL BETWEEN VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Stanonik, K.; Van Gorkom, J. H.; Platen, E.; Van de Weygaert, R.; Van der Hulst, J. M.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    2009-05-01

    We have found an isolated polar disk galaxy in what appears to be a cosmological wall situated between two voids. This void galaxy is unique as its polar disk was discovered serendipitously in an H I survey of SDSS void galaxies, with no optical counterpart to the H I polar disk. Yet the H I mass in the disk is comparable to the stellar mass in the galaxy. This suggests slow accretion of the H I material at a relatively recent time. There is also a hint of a warp in the outer parts of the H I disk. The central, stellar disk appears relatively blue, with faint near-UV emission, and is oriented (roughly) parallel to the surrounding wall, implying gas accretion from the voids. The considerable gas mass and apparent lack of stars in the polar disk, coupled with the general underdensity of the environment, supports recent theories of cold flow accretion as an alternate formation mechanism for polar disk galaxies.

  19. Testing the correlation between low mass planets and debris disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalas, Paul

    2014-10-01

    The number of dusty debris disks has increased across all spectral types through recent infrared surveys. This has provided greater overlap with stars known to host extrasolar planets via RV surveys. New studies have therefore investigated how the different properties of host stars, exoplanets, and debris disks may be correlated, with the objective of giving empirical support to competing theories of planet formation and evolution. One such emerging correlation is that stars with only low mass planets are more likely to host prominent debris disks than stars that have at least one giant planet. If true, then M dwarfs should have abundant debris disks given that they more frequently have low mass planetary systems. However, the information needed to critically test these ideas is lacking. For most systems, the presence of an outer planet with >30 Earth masses has not been observationally tested, nor are there many M dwarf debris disks available for detailed scrutiny. Here we propose to use STIS coronagraphy to image for the first time the debris disks around three nearby stars in optical scattered light. Searching for sharp dust belt structures indirectly tests for the existence of outer planets that are otherwise undetectable by RV or adaptive optics planet searches. Moreover, two of our target stars are the most recently discovered M dwarf debris disks, both closer to the Sun than AU Mic. The scattered light observations of these two targets would present a major advance in characterizing how M dwarf debris disks co-evolve with planets under different stellar environments.

  20. Magnetic bearings for a spaceflight optical disk recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockney, Richard; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hawkey, Timothy

    1991-01-01

    The development and testing of a magnetic bearing system for the translator of the read/write head in a magneto-optic disk drive are discussed. The asymmetrical three-pole actuators with permanent magnet bias support the optical head, and its tracking and focusing servos, through their radial excursion above the disk. The specifications for the magnetic bearing are presented, along with the configuration of the magnetic hardware. Development of a five degree of freedom collision model is examined which allowed assessment of the system response during large scale transients. Experimental findings and the results of performance testing are presented, including the roll-off of current-to-force due to eddy current loss in the magnetic materials.

  1. Microwave Power for Smart Membrane Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Song, Kyo D.; Golembiewski, Walter T.; Chu, Sang-Hyon; King, Glen C.

    2002-01-01

    The concept of microwave-driven smart membrane actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wired control circuitry. A large, ultra-light space structure, such as solar sails and Gossamer spacecrafts, requires a distribution of power into individual membrane actuators to control them in an effective way. A patch rectenna array with a high voltage output was developed to drive smart membrane actuators. Networked patch rectenna array receives and converts microwave power into a DC power for an array of smart actuators. To use microwave power effectively, the concept of a power allocation and distribution (PAD) circuit is developed and tested for networking a rectenna/actuator patch array. For the future development, the PAD circuit could be imbedded into a single embodiment of rectenna and actuator array with the thin-film microcircuit embodiment. Preliminary design and fabrication of PAD circuitry that consists of a sixteen nodal elements were made for laboratory testing.

  2. Plasma actuators for bluff body flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Alexey V.

    The aerodynamic plasma actuators have shown to be efficient flow control devices in various applications. In this study the results of flow control experiments utilizing single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators to control flow separation and unsteady vortex shedding from a circular cylinder in cross-flow are reported. This work is motivated by the need to reduce landing gear noise for commercial transport aircraft via an effective streamlining created by the actuators. The experiments are performed at Re D = 20,000...164,000. Circular cylinders in cross-flow are chosen for study since they represent a generic flow geometry that is similar in all essential aspects to a landing gear oleo or strut. The minimization of the unsteady flow separation from the models and associated large-scale wake vorticity by using actuators reduces the radiated aerodynamic noise. Using either steady or unsteady actuation at ReD = 25,000, Karman shedding is totally eliminated, turbulence levels in the wake decrease significantly and near-field sound pressure levels are reduced by 13.3 dB. Unsteady actuation at an excitation frequency of St D = 1 is found to be most effective. The unsteady actuation also has the advantage that total suppression of shedding is achieved for a duty cycle of only 25%. However, since unsteady actuation is associated with an unsteady body force and produces a tone at the actuation frequency, steady actuation is more suitable for noise control applications. Two actuation strategies are used at ReD = 82,000: spanwise and streamwise oriented actuators. Near field microphone measurements in an anechoic wind tunnel and detailed study of the near wake using LDA are presented in the study. Both spanwise and streamwise actuators give nearly the same noise reduction level of 11.2 dB and 14.2 dB, respectively, and similar changes in the wake velocity profiles. The contribution of the actuator induced noise is found to be small compared to the natural shedding

  3. Silkworm protein: its possibility as an actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyoung-Joon; Myung, Seung Jun; Kim, Heung Soo; Jung, Woochul; Kim, Jaehwan

    2006-03-01

    The possibility of silkworm (Bombyx mori) protein as a base material of biomimetic actuator was investigated in this paper. Silkworm films were prepared from high concentrations of regenerated fibroin in aqueous solution. Films with thickness of about 100 μm were prepared for coating electrodes. The cast silk films were coated by very thin gold electrode on both sides of the film. Tensile test of cast film showed bi-modal trend, which is typical stress-strain relation of polymeric film. As the test of a possible biomimetic actuator, silkworm film actuator provides bending deformations according to the magnitude and frequency of the applied electric filed. Although the present bending deformation of silkworm film actuator is smaller than that of Electro-Active Paper actuator, it provides the possibility of biomimetic actuator.

  4. Missile flight control using active flexspar actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ronald M.; Gross, R. Steven; Brozoski, Fred

    1995-05-01

    A new type of subsonic missile flight control surface using piezoelectric flexspar actuators is presented. The flexspar design uses an aerodynamic shell which is pivoted at the quarter-chord about a graphite main spar. The shell is pitched up and down by a piezoelectric bender element which is rigidly attached to a base mount and allowed to rotate freely at the tip. The element curvature, shell pitch deflection and torsional stiffness are modeled using laminated plate theory. A one-third scale TOW 2B missile model was used as a demonstration platform. A static wing of the missile was replaced with an active flexspar wing. The 1' X 2.7' active flight control surface was powered by a bi-morph bender with 5-mil PZT-5H sheets. Bench and wind tunnel testing showed good correlation between theory and experiment and static pitch deflections in excess of +/- 14 degree(s). A natural frequency of 78.5 rad/s with a break frequency of 157 rad/s was measured. Wind tunnel tests revealed no flutter or divergence tendencies. Maximum changes in lift coefficient were measured at (Delta) CL equals +/- .73 which indicates that terminal and initial missile load factors may be increased by approximately 3.1 and 12.6 g's respectively, leading to a greatly reduced turn radius of only 2,400 ft.

  5. Vibration of cantilever piezolaminated beam with extension and shear mode piezo actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Wankhade, Rajan L.

    2015-04-01

    Vibration of piezolaminated beams with extension and shear mode piezo actuators subjected to electromechanical loading is studied. A finite element eight node isoparametric element is adopted in the formulation with higher order shear deformation theory. Constitutive law for piezoelectric is considered. In case of the extension actuation mechanism, top and bottom layers of beam are of PZT-5A piezoelectric material and the central core is of Aluminum. Whereas, in case of shear actuation mechanism, top and bottom layers are of Aluminum and the central core is provided with a small patch of PZT-5A piezoelectric material and the rest of the core is a rigid foam material. Frequencies obtained by using present methodology are presented for both extension as well as shear actuation mechanism of piezoelectric material

  6. A Nonlinear Physics-Based Optimal Control Method for Magnetostrictive Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ralph C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses the development of a nonlinear optimal control methodology for magnetostrictive actuators. At moderate to high drive levels, the output from these actuators is highly nonlinear and contains significant magnetic and magnetomechanical hysteresis. These dynamics must be accommodated by models and control laws to utilize the full capabilities of the actuators. A characterization based upon ferromagnetic mean field theory provides a model which accurately quantifies both transient and steady state actuator dynamics under a variety of operating conditions. The control method consists of a linear perturbation feedback law used in combination with an optimal open loop nonlinear control. The nonlinear control incorporates the hysteresis and nonlinearities inherent to the transducer and can be computed offline. The feedback control is constructed through linearization of the perturbed system about the optimal system and is efficient for online implementation. As demonstrated through numerical examples, the combined hybrid control is robust and can be readily implemented in linear PDE-based structural models.

  7. Displacement Models for THUNDER Actuators having General Loads and Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieman, Robert; Smith, Ralph C.; Kackley, Tyson; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Bernd, Jeff; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes techniques for quantifying the displacements generated in THUNDER actuators in response to applied voltages for a variety of boundary conditions and exogenous loads. The PDE (partial differential equations) models for the actuators are constructed in two steps. In the first, previously developed theory quantifying thermal and electrostatic strains is employed to model the actuator shapes which result from the manufacturing process and subsequent repoling. Newtonian principles are then employed to develop PDE models which quantify displacements in the actuator due to voltage inputs to the piezoceramic patch. For this analysis, drive levels are assumed to be moderate so that linear piezoelectric relations can be employed. Finite element methods for discretizing the models are developed and the performance of the discretized models are illustrated through comparison with experimental data.

  8. Actuation fluid adapter for hydraulically-actuated electronically-controlled fuel injector and engine using same

    DOEpatents

    Keyster, Eric S.; Merchant, Jack A.

    2002-01-01

    A fuel injector adapter consists of a block defining a pressure communication passage therethrough and an actuation fluid passage. The actuation fluid passage includes three separate branches that open through an outer surface of the block at three separate locations.

  9. MRI-powered Actuators for Robotic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vartholomeos, Panagiotis; Qin, Lei; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel actuation technology for robotically assisted MRI-guided interventional procedures. Compact and wireless, the actuators are both powered and controlled by the MRI scanner. The design concept and performance limits are described and derived analytically. Simulation and experiments in a clinical MR scanner are used to validate the analysis and to demonstrate the capability of the approach for needle biopsies. The concepts of actuator locking mechanisms and multi-axis control are also introduced. PMID:22287082

  10. Fluidic self-actuating control assembly

    DOEpatents

    Grantz, Alan L.

    1979-01-01

    A fluidic self-actuating control assembly for use in a reactor wherein no external control inputs are required to actuate (scram) the system. The assembly is constructed to scram upon sensing either a sudden depressurization of reactor inlet flow or a sudden increase in core neutron flux. A fluidic control system senses abnormal flow or neutron flux transients and actuates the system, whereupon assembly coolant flow reverses, forcing absorber balls into the reactor core region.

  11. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1995-01-01

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  12. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1995-07-11

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor is disclosed including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 37 figs.

  13. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taoming; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype. PMID:25328804

  14. Three Dimensional Modeling of an MRI Actuated Steerable Catheter System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taoming; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the three dimensional kinematic modeling of a novel steerable robotic ablation catheter system. The catheter, embedded with a set of current-carrying micro-coils, is actuated by the magnetic forces generated by the magnetic field of the MRI scanner. This paper develops a 3D model of the MRI actuated steerable catheter system by using finite differences approach. For each finite segment, a quasi-static torque-deflection equilibrium equation is calculated using beam theory. By using the deflection displacements and torsion angles, the kinematic modeling of the catheter system is derived. The proposed models are evaluated by comparing the simulation results of the proposed model with the experimental results of a proof-of-concept prototype. PMID:25328804

  15. Moisture-driven actuators inspired by motility of plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Beomjune; Lee, Minhee; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    We report design and fabrication of moisture-driven actuators mimicking pine cones, wild wheats and seeds of Erodium cicutarium, which can bend and even helically coil with variation of environmental humidity. The actuators adopt a bilayer configuration, one of whose layers is hygroscopically active while the other is inactive. In order to enhance the degree and speed of deformation which critically depends on moisture-responsivity of the active layer, nanofibers of hydrogel are directionally deposited on the inactive layer via electrospinning. As a result, several designs of soft robots are demonstrated which are capable of locomotion by harvesting environmental humidity energy. The dynamics of the robots are analyzed by coupling moisture diffusion kinetics and elastic theory of multi-layer bending. The theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, to lead to the optimal design to maximize the locomotion speed measured by travel distance normalized by body length per unit time.

  16. Lightweight in-plane actuated deformable mirrors for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Michael J.

    This research focused on lightweight, in-plane actuated, deformable mirrors, with the ultimate goal of developing a 20-meter or larger diameter light gathering aperture for space telescopes. Membrane optics is the study of these structures which may be stowed compactly and unfurled in orbit. This effort comprised four research areas: modelling, analytical solutions, surface control strategy, and scaling. Initially, experimental results were compared to theory using a 0.127 meter diameter deformable mirror testbed. The mirror was modelled using finite elements with MSC.Nastran software, where a boundary tension field was determined using laser vibrometer data. A non-linear solution technique was used to incorporate the membrane stiffening from the applied tension. Statically obtained actuator influence functions were compared to experimentally achieved data, and then a least squares approach was used as the basis for creating a quasi-static control algorithm. Experimental simultaneous tracking of Zernike tip, tilt, and defocus modes was successfully demonstrated. The analytical solutions to plate-membrane and beam-string ordinary differential equation representing the deformable mirror equations were developed. A simplified approach to modelling the axisymmetric cases was also presented. Significantly, it was shown both analytically and through numerical analysis that static actuation for a mirror with a discrete electrode pattern and a high tension-to-stiffness ratio was simply a localized piston displacement in the region of the actuator. Next, a novel static control strategy, the Modal Transformation Method, was developed for membrane mirrors. The method was implemented in finite element simulation, and shows the capability of the in-plane actuated mirror to form Zernike surfaces within an interior, or clear aperture, region using a number of statically-actuated structural modes. Lastly, the scaling problem for membrane optics was addressed. Linear modelling was

  17. Actuator selection for variable camber foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, John D.

    2004-07-01

    A number of polymer based actuator technologies have emerged over the past decade. How do these compare with traditional actuators and are there applications for which they are appropriate? Some of the answers to these questions are provided by outlining the rationale for employing an electroactive polymer to control hydrodynamic surfaces. The surfaces are sections of propeller blades whose trailing edges are deflected in order to change camber. The objective is to insert the actuators into the blades. High work per unit volume is required of the actuators. The ideal actuator technologies also feature relatively large strains in order to deflect the trailing edges with minimal mechanical amplification. It is argued that the high work densities, flexibility in shaping and the ability to hold a force without expending energy (catch state) provide electroactive polymers with advantages over electromagnetic actuators, which also lack the torque to directly drive the blade deflection. Candidate actuators are compared, including electroactive polymers, shape memory alloys, magnetostrictives and traditional piezoceramics. Selections are made on the bases of work density, strain, existence of a catch state, drive voltage and cost. It is suggested that conducting polymer actuators are best suited for the variable camber application. It is also argued that in general electroactive polymers are well-suited for applications in which actuator volume or mass are very limited, catch states are desired, cycle life is moderate to low, or noise cannot be tolerated. Some electroactive polymers also feature low voltage operation, and may be biocompatible.

  18. Bucky gel actuators optimization towards haptic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubak, Grzegorz; Ansaldo, Alberto; Ceseracciu, Luca; Hata, Kenji; Ricci, Davide

    2014-03-01

    An ideal plastic actuator for haptic applications should generate a relatively large displacement (minimum 0.2-0.6 mm, force (~50 mN/cm2) and a fast actuation response to the applied voltage. Although many different types of flexible, plastic actuators based on electroactive polymers (EAP) are currently under investigation, the ionic EAPs are the only ones that can be operated at low voltage. This property makes them suitable for applications that require inherently safe actuators. Among the ionic EAPs, bucky gel based actuators are very promising. Bucky gel is a physical gel made by grounding imidazolium ionic liquids with carbon nanotubes, which can then be incorporated in a polymeric composite matrix to prepare the active electrode layers of linear and bending actuators. Anyhow, many conflicting factors have to be balanced to obtain required performance. In order to produce high force a large stiffness is preferable but this limits the displacement. Moreover, the bigger the active electrode the larger the force. However the thicker an actuator is, the slower the charging process becomes (it is diffusion limited). In order to increase the charging speed a thin electrolyte would be desirable, but this increases the probability of pinholes and device failure. In this paper we will present how different approaches in electrolyte and electrode preparation influence actuator performance and properties taking particularly into account the device ionic conductivity (which influences the charging speed) and the electrode surface resistance (which influences both the recruitment of the whole actuator length and its speed).

  19. The Mariner Mars 1971 gimbal actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1971-01-01

    The actuator that will point the gimbaled engine, thus performing the autopilot actuation function for the Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft, is described. The gimbaled engine has two axes of freedom, providing two-axis control to the spacecraft. Motion for the two axes is provided by identical and interchangeable actuators-gearless electromechanical linear servomechanisms. Each actuator is designed to have a long service life in the space environment and to be able to function at speeds ranging from hours per cycle to cycles per second.

  20. Two position optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a two position optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to hold an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, in a first position. A non-powered means drives the actuation arm to a second position, when the powered means ceases to receive power. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive, reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm from the first to second position.

  1. Bi-stable optical element actuator device

    DOEpatents

    Holdener, Fred R.; Boyd, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a bistable optical element actuator device utilizing a powered means to move an actuation arm, to which an optical element is attached, between two stable positions. A non-powered means holds the actuation arm in either of the two stable positions. The optical element may be a electromagnetic (EM) radiation or particle source, an instrument, or EM radiation or particle transmissive reflective or absorptive elements. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition the actuation arm between the two stable positions.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic Origin of Jets from Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    A review is made of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory and simulation of outflows from disks for different distributions of magnetic field threading the disk. In one limit of a relatively weak, initially diverging magnetic field, both thermal and magnetic pressure gradients act to drive matter to an outflow, while a toroidal magnetic field develops which strongly collimates the outflow. The collimation greatly reduces the field divergence and the mass outflow rate decreases after an initial peak. In a second limit of a strong magnetic field, the initial field configuration was taken with the field strength on the disk decreasing outwards to small values so that collimation was reduced. As a result, a family of stationary solutions was discovered where matter is driven mainly by the strong magnetic pressure gradient force. The collimation in this case depends on the pressure of an external medium. These flows are qualitatively similar to the analytic solutions for magnetically driven outflows. The problem of the opening of a closed field line configuration linking a magnetized star and an accretion disk is also discussed.

  3. The Evolution of Inner Disk Gas in Transition Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, K.; France, K.; Alexander, R. D.; McJunkin, M.; Schneider, P. C.

    2015-10-01

    Investigating the molecular gas in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) provides insight into how the molecular disk environment changes during the transition from primordial to debris disk systems. We conduct a small survey of molecular hydrogen (H2) fluorescent emission, using 14 well-studied Classical T Tauri stars at two distinct dust disk evolutionary stages, to explore how the structure of the inner molecular disk changes as the optically thick warm dust dissipates. We simulate the observed Hi-Lyman α-pumped H2 disk fluorescence by creating a 2D radiative transfer model that describes the radial distributions of H2 emission in the disk atmosphere and compare these to observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the radial distributions that best describe the observed H2 FUV emission arising in primordial disk targets (full dust disk) are demonstrably different than those of transition disks (little-to-no warm dust observed). For each best-fit model, we estimate inner and outer disk emission boundaries (rin and rout), describing where the bulk of the observed H2 emission arises in each disk, and we examine correlations between these and several observational disk evolution indicators, such as n13-31, rin, CO, and the mass accretion rate. We find strong, positive correlations between the H2 radial distributions and the slope of the dust spectral energy distribution, implying the behavior of the molecular disk atmosphere changes as the inner dust clears in evolving PPDs. Overall, we find that H2 inner radii are ˜4 times larger in transition systems, while the bulk of the H2 emission originates inside the dust gap radius for all transitional sources.

  4. Surface micromachined sensors and actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.

    1995-08-01

    A description of a three-level mechanical polysilicon surface-micromachining technology including a discussion of the advantages of this level of process complexity is presented. This technology is capable of forming mechanical elements ranging from simple cantilevered beams to complex, interconnected, interactive, microactuated micromechanisms. The inclusion of a third deposited layer of mechanical polysilicon greatly extends the degree of complexity available for micromechanism design. Additional features of the Sandia three-level process include the use of Chemical-Mechanical Polishing (CMP) for planarization, and the integration of micromechanics with the Sandia CMOS circuit process. The latter effort includes a CMOS-first, tungsten metallization process to allow the CMOS electronics to withstand high-temperature micromechanical processing. Alternatively, a novel micromechanics-first approach wherein the micromechanical devices are processed first in a well below the surface of the CMOS starting material followed by the standard, aluminum metallization CMOS process is also being pursued. Following the description of the polysilicon surface micromachining are examples of the major sensor and actuator projects based on this technology at the Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) at Sandia National Laboratories. Efforts at the MDL are concentrated in the technology of surface micromachining due to the availability of and compatibility with standard CMOS processes. The primary sensors discussed are a silicon nitride membrane pressure sensor, hot polysilicon filaments for calorimetric gas sensing, and a smart hydrogen sensor. Examples of actuation mechanisms coupled to external devices are also presented. These actuators utilize the three-level process (plus an additional passive level) and employ either surface tension or electrostatic forces.

  5. Studies of Circumstellar Disk Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a comprehensive global picture of the physical conditions in, and evolutionary timescales of, pre-main sequence accretion disks. The results of this work will help constrain the initial conditions for planet formation. To this end we are developing much larger samples of 3-10 Myr-old stars to provide better empirical constraints on protoplanetary disk evolution; measuring disk accretion rates in these systems; and constructing detailed model disk structures consistent with observations to infer physical conditions such as grain growth in protoplanetary disks.

  6. Characterization, fabrication, and analysis of soft dielectric elastomer actuators capable of complex 3D deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, William

    framework would aid in designing and optimizing the dielectric elastomer actuator configurations for 3D prescribed deformation configuration. Finally, inspired by the membrane textures of bat wings, a study of utilizing fiber reinforcement on dielectric elastomer actuators were conducted for the mechanical and the coupled electromechanical characteristics. Woven fibers were employed on the surface of actuator membrane with different pre-deformed configurations. Experimentally, actuator stiffness changes were measured for up to four orders of magnitude. The orientation of embedded fibers controlled the level and the triggered phase of stiffness changes. A trade-off between the actuator stiffness and stroke could be controlled during the fabrication stage by the fiber orientation and the prestretch level of the base elastomer membrane. A simplified model using small-strain composite laminate theory was developed and accurately predicted the composite actuator stiffness. Additionally, compliant edge stiffeners were found had to present a marked overall effect on actuator electromechanical response. The developed simplified analytical solutions using Timoshenko-bimaterial laminate solution and composite laminate theory, as well as the developed finite element framework can be utilized in addressing more complex 3D deformation patterns and their electromechanical response.

  7. UNSTABLE PLANETARY SYSTEMS EMERGING OUT OF GAS DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Soko; Thommes, Edward W.; Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2010-05-01

    The discovery of over 400 extrasolar planets allows us to statistically test our understanding of the formation and dynamics of planetary systems via numerical simulations. Traditional N-body simulations of multiple-planet systems without gas disks have successfully reproduced the eccentricity (e) distribution of the observed systems by assuming that the planetary systems are relatively closely packed when the gas disk dissipates, so that they become dynamically unstable within the stellar lifetime. However, such studies cannot explain the small semimajor axes a of extrasolar planetary systems, if planets are formed, as the standard planet formation theory suggests, beyond the ice line. In this paper, we numerically study the evolution of three-planet systems in dissipating gas disks, and constrain the initial conditions that reproduce the observed a and e distributions simultaneously. We adopt initial conditions that are motivated by the standard planet formation theory, and self-consistently simulate the disk evolution and planet migration, by using a hybrid N-body and one-dimensional gas disk code. We also take into account eccentricity damping, and investigate the effect of saturation of corotation resonances on the evolution of planetary systems. We find that the a distribution is largely determined in a gas disk, while the e distribution is determined after the disk dissipation. We also find that there may be an optimum disk mass which leads to the observed a-e distribution. Our simulations generate a larger fraction of planetary systems trapped in mean-motion resonances (MMRs) than the observations, indicating that the disk's perturbation to the planetary orbits may be important to explain the observed rate of MMRs. We also find a much lower occurrence of planets on retrograde orbits than the current observations of close-in planets suggest.

  8. Magnetic actuator intended for left ventricular assist system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saotome, H.; Okada, T.

    2006-04-01

    With the goal of developing an artificial heart, the authors fabricated a prototype pump employing a linear motion magnetic actuator, and carried out performance tests. The actuator is composed of two disk-shaped Nd-Fe-B magnets having a diameter of 80 mm and a thickness of 7 mm. The disks are magnetized in the direction normal to the circular surface, and are formed by semicircular pieces; one semicircle serves as a N pole and the other as a S pole. The magnets face each other in the actuator. One magnet is limited to spin around its axis while the second magnet is limited to move in linear motion along its axis. In this way, the circumferential rotation of one of the magnets produces reciprocating forces on the other magnet, causing it to move back and forth. This coupled action produces a pumping motion. Because the two magnets are magnetically coupled without any mechanical contact, the rotating magnet does not have to be implanted and should be placed outside the body. The rotating magnet is driven by a motor. The motor power is magnetically conveyed, via the rotating magnet, to the implanted linear motion magnet through the skin. The proposed system yields no problems with infection that would otherwise require careful treatment in a system employing a tube penetrating the skin for power transmission. Comparison of the proposed system with another system using a transcutaneous transformer shows that our system has good potential to occupy a smaller space in the body, because it obviates implantation of a secondary part of the transformer, a power supply, and armature windings. The dimensions of the trial pump are designed in accordance with the fluid mechanical specifications of a human left ventricle, by computing magnetic fields that provide the magnetic forces on the magnets. The output power of the trial pump, 1.0 W at 87 beats/min, is experimentally obtained under the pressure and flow conditions of water, 100 mm Hg and 4.5 l/min.

  9. Brown dwarf disks with ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, L.; Isella, A.; Testi, L.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Natta, A.; Scholz, A.

    2014-08-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array continuum and spectral line data at 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm for three disks surrounding young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in the Taurus star forming region. Dust thermal emission is detected and spatially resolved for all the three disks, while CO(J = 3-2) emission is seen in two disks. We analyze the continuum visibilities and constrain the disks' physical structure in dust. The results of our analysis show that the disks are relatively large; the smallest one has an outer radius of about 70 AU. The inferred disk radii, radial profiles of the dust surface density, and disk to central object mass ratios lie within the ranges found for disks around more massive young stars. We derive from our observations the wavelength dependence of the millimeter dust opacity. In all the three disks, data are consistent with the presence of grains with at least millimeter sizes, as also found for disks around young stars, and confirm that the early stages of the solid growth toward planetesimals occur also around very low-mass objects. We discuss the implications of our findings on models of solids evolution in protoplanetary disks, the main mechanisms proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars, as well as the potential of finding rocky and giant planets around very low-mass objects.

  10. Dielectric elastomer actuators for adaptive photonic microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Marcus; Schröder, Henning; Marx, Sebastian; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-03-01

    Various applications in the field of photonic microsystems for Dielectric Elastomer Actuators (DEA) were shown with this research. DEA belong to the class of Electro Active Polymers (EAP) and have the potential to substitute common technologies like piezoelectric actuators. DEAs offers several advantages like compact and variable shapes, large actuation ranges and cost efficient production processes that have to be emphasized. For the market of adaptive photonic microsystems especially area actuators are very suitable. They can be used e.g. as tuneable lens, mirror or grating component and tool for optical fiber alignment. These area actuators have a similar structure like a capacitor. They consist of three layers, two electrode layers on top and bottom and one dielectric layer in the center. The dielectric layer is made of a deformable and prestretched elastomer film. When applying a voltage between both electrode layers the thickness of the dielectric film is compressed and the actuator is displaced in the plane. The use of material compositions like a polymer matrix with graphite, carbon nano particles or carbon nano tubes as well as thin metal films for the electrodes were studied. The paper presents results on suitable dielectric and electrode materials, actuator geometries and respective adaptive photonic components. The manufacturing process of area actuators is described in detail. As a basic size of the area actuators (20 × 20) mm2 were chosen. Onto the produced area actuators polymer lenses or mirrors were assembled. The deflection of the optical beam path is calculated with optical simulations and measured at the prepared adaptive optical components. Static actuations of about +/-15 μm are achieved when applying a voltage of 200 V. Also the function of a tuneable beam splitter is demonstrated to show further applications.

  11. Dark-disk universe.

    PubMed

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-05-24

    We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component double-disk dark matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas. PMID:23745856

  12. Flow between contrarotating disks

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, X.; Kilic, M.; Owen, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    The paper describes a combined experimental and computational study of laminar and turbulent flow between contrarotating disks. Laminar computations produce Batchelor-type flow: radial outflow occurs in boundary layers on the disks and inflow is confined to a thin shear layer in the midplane; between the boundary layers and the shear layer, two contrarotating cores of fluid are formed. Turbulent computations (using a low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model) and LDA measurements provide no evidence for Batchelor-type flow, even for rotational Reynolds numbers as low as 2.2 {times} 10{sup 4}. While separate boundary layers are formed on the disks, radial inflow occurs in a single interior core that extends between the two boundary layers; in the core, rotational effects are weak. Although the flow in the core was always found to be turbulent, the flow in the boundary layers could remain laminar for rotational Reynolds numbers up to 1.2 {times} 10{sup 5}. For the case of a superposed outflow, there is a source region in which the radial component of velocity is everywhere positive; radially outward of this region, the flow is similar to that described above. Although the turbulence model exhibited premature transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the boundary layers, agreement between the computed and measured radial and tangential components of velocity was mainly good over a wide range of nondimensional flow rates and rotational Reynolds numbers.

  13. NASA pyrotechnically actuated systems program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1993-01-01

    The Office of Safety and Mission Quality initiated a Pyrotechnically Actuated Systems (PAS) Program in FY-92 to address problems experienced with pyrotechnically actuated systems and devices used both on the ground and in flight. The PAS Program will provide the technical basis for NASA's projects to incorporate new technological developments in operational systems. The program will accomplish that objective by developing/testing current and new hardware designs for flight applications and by providing a pyrotechnic data base. This marks the first applied pyrotechnic technology program funded by NASA to address pyrotechnic issues. The PAS Program has been structured to address the results of a survey of pyrotechnic device and system problems with the goal of alleviating or minimizing their risks. Major program initiatives include the development of a Laser Initiated Ordnance System, a pyrotechnic systems data base, NASA Standard Initiator model, a NASA Standard Linear Separation System and a NASA Standard Gas Generator. The PAS Program sponsors annual aerospace pyrotechnic systems workshops.

  14. A thermopneumatically actuated bistable microvalve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bocong; Wang, Boxiong; Schomburg, Werner Karl

    2010-09-01

    A bistable polymer microvalve with a thermopneumatic actuator has been developed. The microvalve was fabricated by micro milling of a polymer combined with sputtering and photolithography. The valve comprises two 2/2-way valves which are alternately switched such that they can be connected to serve as a 3/2-way valve. Two permanent magnets work with a movable soft magnet to keep the valve in its current state, resulting in bistable switching with a minimum energy of 320 mJ. An air flow rate of 1.36 L min-1 is achieved at 20 °C with a pressure difference of 200 kPa. No leakage is observed up to a differential pressure of 350 kPa. Flowing and switching performances were also tested at different temperatures. Sealing the flow channels from the actuator chamber makes the valve less sensitive to the temperature and other properties of the fluid to be switched. An initial gap between the valve seat and the silicone sealing membrane at least reduces the sticking problem. Switching time is found to be significantly influenced by the thickness of the heating membrane. With an 8 µm thick heating membrane, a response time of 10 ms can be achieved.

  15. Optimization of Actuating Origami Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskohl, Philip; Fuchi, Kazuko; Bazzan, Giorgio; Joo, James; Gregory, Reich; Vaia, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Origami structures morph between 2D and 3D conformations along predetermined fold lines that efficiently program the form, function and mobility of the structure. By leveraging design concepts from action origami, a subset of origami art focused on kinematic mechanisms, reversible folding patterns for applications such as solar array packaging, tunable antennae, and deployable sensing platforms may be designed. However, the enormity of the design space and the need to identify the requisite actuation forces within the structure places a severe limitation on design strategies based on intuition and geometry alone. The present work proposes a topology optimization method, using truss and frame element analysis, to distribute foldline mechanical properties within a reference crease pattern. Known actuating patterns are placed within a reference grid and the optimizer adjusts the fold stiffness of the network to optimally connect them. Design objectives may include a target motion, stress level, or mechanical energy distribution. Results include the validation of known action origami structures and their optimal connectivity within a larger network. This design suite offers an important step toward systematic incorporation of origami design concepts into new, novel and reconfigurable engineering devices. This research is supported under the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) funding, LRIR 13RQ02COR.

  16. Silicon Membrane Mirrors with Electrostatic Shape Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Efforts are under way to develop deformable mirrors equipped with microscopic electrostatic actuators that would be used to maintain their reflective surfaces in precise shapes required for their intended applications. Unlike actuators that depend on properties of materials (e.g., piezoelectric and electrostrictive actuators), electrostatic actuators are effective over a wide temperature range. A mirror of the present type would be denoted a MEMSDM (for microelectromechanical system deformable mirror). The reflective surface of such a mirror would be formed on a single-crystal silicon membrane that would be attached by posts to a silicon actuator membrane that would, in turn, be attached by posts to a rigid silicon base (see figure). The actuator membrane would serve as the upper electrode of a capacitor. Multiple lower electrodes, each occupying a conveniently small fraction of the total area, would be formed on an electrically insulating oxide layer on the base, thereby defining a multiplicity of actuator pixels. The actuator membrane would be corrugated in a pattern that would impart mechanical compliance needed for relaxation of operational and fabrication-induced stresses and to minimize the degree of nonlinearity of deformations. The compliance afforded by the corrugations would also help to minimize the undesired coupling of deformations between adjacent pixels (a practical goal being to keep the influence coefficient between adjacent pixels below 10 percent).

  17. Improvements In Ball-Screw Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskenderian, Theodore; Joffe, Benjamin; Summers, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Report describes modifications of design of type of ball-screw linear actuator driven by dc motor, with linear-displacement feedback via linear variable-differential transformer (LVDT). Actuators used to position spacecraft engines to direct thrust. Modifications directed toward ensuring reliable and predictable operation during planned 12-year cruise and interval of hard use at end of cruise.

  18. Integrated piezoelectric actuators in deep drawing tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugebauer, R.; Mainda, P.; Drossel, W.-G.; Kerschner, M.; Wolf, K.

    2011-04-01

    The production of car body panels are defective in succession of process fluctuations. Thus the produced car body panel can be precise or damaged. To reduce the error rate, an intelligent deep drawing tool was developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU in cooperation with Audi and Volkswagen. Mechatronic components in a closed-loop control is the main differentiating factor between an intelligent and a conventional deep drawing tool. In correlation with sensors for process monitoring, the intelligent tool consists of piezoelectric actuators to actuate the deep drawing process. By enabling the usage of sensors and actuators at the die, the forming tool transform to a smart structure. The interface between sensors and actuators will be realized with a closed-loop control. The content of this research will present the experimental results with the piezoelectric actuator. For the analysis a production-oriented forming tool with all automotive requirements were used. The disposed actuators are monolithic multilayer actuators of the piezo injector system. In order to achieve required force, the actuators are combined in a cluster. The cluster is redundant and economical. In addition to the detailed assembly structures, this research will highlight intensive analysis with the intelligent deep drawing tool.

  19. Optimal Design of Rotary-Type Voice Coil Motor Using Multisegmented Magnet Array for Small Form Factor Optical Disk Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaehwa; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2007-05-01

    For a small form factor optical disk drive (SFFODD), a high-performance actuator satisfying the requirements for small size, high speed, and low-power consumption simultaneously is required. In this paper, we propose a rotary-type voice coil motor (VCM) using a multisegmented magnet array (MSMA) for the SFFODD. The VCM is designed to move the entire system including miniaturized optical components, which are necessary in reading and writing data. To increase the actuating force of the VCM, the MSMA, a novel magnetic circuit, is adopted because it can provide a higher flux density than a conventional magnet array in the rotary-type VCM. To obtain the best performance from the VCM in the limit of actuator size, design optimization is performed. The manufactured actuator with optimally designed parameters is described and the potential performance of track seeking is evaluated and presented.

  20. Actuator lifetime predictions for Ni60Ti40 shape memory alloy plate actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Robert; Ottmers, Cade; Hewling, Brett; Lagoudas, Dimitris

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs), due to their ability to repeatedly recover substantial deformations under applied mechanical loading, have the potential to impact the aerospace, automotive, biomedical, and energy industries as weight and volume saving replacements for conventional actuators. While numerous applications of SMA actuators have been flight tested and can be found in industrial applications, these actuators are generally limited to non-critical components, are not widely implemented and frequently one-off designs, and are generally overdesigned due to a lack of understanding of the effect of the loading path on the fatigue life and the lack of an accurate method of predicting actuator lifetimes. Previous efforts have been effective at predicting actuator lifetimes for isobaric dogbone test specimens. This study builds on previous work and investigates the actuation fatigue response of plate actuators with various stress concentrations through the use of digital image correlation and finite element simulations.

  1. Synthesis of branched chains with actuation redundancy for eliminating interior singularities of 3T1R parallel mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shihua; Liu, Yanmin; Cui, Hongliu; Niu, Yunzhan; Zhao, Yanzhi

    2016-03-01

    Although it is common to eliminate the singularity of parallel mechanism by adding the branched chain with actuation redundancy, there is no theory and method for the configuration synthesis of the branched chain with actuation redundancy in parallel mechanism. Branched chains with actuation redundancy are synthesized for eliminating interior singularity of 3-translational and 1- rotational(3T1R) parallel mechanisms. Guided by the discriminance method of hybrid screw group according to Grassmann line geometry, all the possibilities are listed for the occurrence of interior singularities in 3T1R parallel mechanism. Based on the linear relevance of screw system and the principles of eliminating parallel mechanism singularity with actuation redundancy, different types of branched chains with actuation redundancy are synthesized systematically to indicate the layout and the number of the branched chainsinterior with actuation redundancy. A general method is proposed for the configuration synthesis of the branched chains with actuation redundancy of the redundant parallel mechanism, and it builds a solid foundation for the subsequent performance optimization of the redundant actuation parallel mechanism.

  2. Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Actuation of Mechanisms and Robotic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Leary, S.; Harrison, J.; Smith, J.

    1999-01-01

    Actuators are responsible to the operative capability of manipulation systems and robots. In recent years, electroactive polymers (EAP) have emerged as potential alternative to conventional actuators.

  3. DVD - digital versatile disks

    SciTech Connect

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    An international standard has emerged for the first true multimedia format. Digital Versatile Disk (by its official name), you may know it as Digital Video Disks. DVD has applications in movies, music, games, information CD-ROMS, and many other areas where massive amounts of digital information is needed. Did I say massive amounts of data? Would you believe over 17 gigabytes on a single piece of plastic the size of an audio-CD? That`s the promise, at least, by the group of nine electronics manufacturers who have agreed to the format specification, and who hope to make this goal a reality by 1998. In this major agreement, which didn`t come easily, the manufacturers will combine Sony and Phillip`s one side double-layer NMCD format with Toshiba and Matsushita`s double sided Super-Density disk. By Spring of this year, they plan to market the first 4.7 gigabyte units. The question is: Will DVD take off? Some believe that read-only disks recorded with movies will be about as popular as video laser disks. They say that until the eraseable/writable DVD arrives, the consumer will most likely not buy it. Also, DVD has a good market for replacement of CD- Roms. Back in the early 80`s, the international committee deciding the format of the audio compact disk decided its length would be 73 minutes. This, they declared, would allow Beethoven`s 9th Symphony to be contained entirely on a single CD. Similarly, today it was agreed that playback length of a single sided, single layer DVD would be 133 minutes, long enough to hold 94% of all feature-length movies. Further, audio can be in Dolby`s AC-3 stereo or 5.1 tracks of surround sound, better than CD-quality audio (16-bits at 48kHz). In addition, there are three to five language tracks, copy protection and parental ``locks`` for R rated movies. DVD will be backwards compatible with current CD-ROM and audio CD formats. Added versatility comes by way of multiple aspect rations: 4:3 pan-scan, 4:3 letterbox, and 16:9 widescreen. MPEG

  4. Conducting IPN actuators for biomimetic vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festin, Nicolas; Plesse, Cedric; Chevrot, Claude; Teyssié, Dominique; Pirim, Patrick; Vidal, Frederic

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, many studies on electroactive polymer (EAP) actuators have been reported. One promising technology is the elaboration of electronic conducting polymers based actuators with Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (IPNs) architecture. Their many advantageous properties as low working voltage, light weight and high lifetime (several million cycles) make them very attractive for various applications including robotics. Our laboratory recently synthesized new conducting IPN actuators based on high molecular Nitrile Butadiene Rubber, poly(ethylene oxide) derivative and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxithiophene). The presence of the elastomer greatly improves the actuator performances such as mechanical resistance and output force. In this article we present the IPN and actuator synthesis, characterizations and design allowing their integration in a biomimetic vision system.

  5. Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning

    DOEpatents

    Swift, C.D.; Bergum, J.W.

    1994-10-25

    An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated. 3 figs.

  6. Lead magnesium niobate actuator for micropositioning

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Charles D.; Bergum, John W.

    1994-01-01

    An improved lead magnesium niobate actuator is disclosed comprising a cylindrical lead magnesium niobate crystal stack mounted in a cylindrical casing wherein a bias means, such as one or more belleville washers, is located between one end of the crystal stack and a partially closed end of the casing; and adjustment means are provided which bear against the opposite end of the crystal stack, whereby an adjustable compressive force is constantly applied against the crystal stack, whether the crystal stack is actuated in an extended position, or is in an unactuated contracted position. In a preferred embodiment, cooling ports are provided for the circulation of coolant in the actuator to cool the crystal stack, and provision is made for removal and replacement of the crystal stack without disconnecting the actuator from the external device being actuated.

  7. Piezoelectric Actuator/Sensor Technology at Rockwell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neurgaonkar, Ratnakar R.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the state-of-the art of piezoelectric materials based on perovskite and tungsten bronze families for sensor, actuator and smart structure applications. The microstructural defects in these materials have been eliminated to a large extent and the resulting materials exhibit exceedingly high performance for various applications. The performance of Rockwell actuators/sensors is at least 3 times better than commercially available products. These high performance actuators are being incorporated into various applications including, DOD, NASA and commercial. The multilayer actuator stacks fabricated from our piezoceramics are advantageous for sensing and high capacitance applications. In this presentation, we will describe the use of our high performance piezo-ceramics for actuators and sensors, including multilayer stacks and composite structures.

  8. Electrostatic micromembrane actuator arrays as motion generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. T.; Hui, J.; Young, M.; Kayatta, P.; Wong, J.; Kennith, D.; Zhe, J.; Warde, C.

    2004-05-01

    A rigid-body motion generator based on an array of micromembrane actuators is described. Unlike previous microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) techniques, the architecture employs a large number (typically greater than 1000) of micron-sized (10-200 μm) membrane actuators to simultaneously generate the displacement of a large rigid body, such as a conventional optical mirror. For optical applications, the approach provides optical design freedom of MEMS mirrors by enabling large-aperture mirrors to be driven electrostatically by MEMS actuators. The micromembrane actuator arrays have been built using a stacked architecture similar to that employed in the Multiuser MEMS Process (MUMPS), and the motion transfer from the arrayed micron-sized actuators to macro-sized components was demonstrated.

  9. MEMS Electrostatic Actuation in Conducting Biological Media

    PubMed Central

    Mukundan, Vikram; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2009-01-01

    We present design and experimental implementation of electrostatic comb-drive actuators in solutions of high conductivity relevant for biological cells. The actuators are operated in the frequency range 1–10 MHz in ionic and biological cell culture media, with ionic strengths up to 150 mMoles/L. Typical displacement is 3.5 μm at an applied peak-to-peak signal of 5V. Two different actuation schemes are presented and tested for performance at high frequency. A differential drive design is demonstrated to overcome the attenuation due to losses in parasitic impedances. The frequency dependence of the electrostatic force has been characterized in media of different ionic strengths. Circuit models for the electric double layer phenomena are used to understand and predict the actuator behavior. The actuator is integrated into a planar force sensing system to measure the stiffness of cells cultured on suspended structures. PMID:20161046

  10. Genetic Algorithm Approaches for Actuator Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossley, William A.

    2000-01-01

    This research investigated genetic algorithm approaches for smart actuator placement to provide aircraft maneuverability without requiring hinged flaps or other control surfaces. The effort supported goals of the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization focus efforts in NASA's Aircraft au program. This work helped to properly identify various aspects of the genetic algorithm operators and parameters that allow for placement of discrete control actuators/effectors. An improved problem definition, including better definition of the objective function and constraints, resulted from this research effort. The work conducted for this research used a geometrically simple wing model; however, an increasing number of potential actuator placement locations were incorporated to illustrate the ability of the GA to determine promising actuator placement arrangements. This effort's major result is a useful genetic algorithm-based approach to assist in the discrete actuator/effector placement problem.

  11. ACCRETION OUTBURSTS IN CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, S. H.; Martin, R. G.

    2012-04-20

    We describe a model for the long-term evolution of a circumplanetary disk that is fed mass from a circumstellar disk and contains regions of low turbulence (dead zones). We show that such disks can be subject to accretion-driven outbursts, analogous to outbursts previously modeled in the context of circumstellar disks to explain FU Ori phenomena. Circumplanetary disks around a proto-Jupiter can undergo outbursts for infall accretion rates onto the disks in the range M-dot{sub infall} approx. 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, typical of accretion rates in the T Tauri phase. During outbursts, the accretion rate and disk luminosity increases by several orders of magnitude. Most of the planet mass growth during planetary gas accretion may occur via disk outbursts involving gas that is considerably hotter than predicted by steady state models. For low infall accretion rates M-dot{sub infall} {approx}< 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} that occur in late stages of disk accretion, disk outbursts are unlikely to occur, even if dead zones are present. Such conditions are favorable for the formation of icy satellites.

  12. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  13. DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF VISCOUS DISKS AROUND Be STARS. I. PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Haubois, X.; Carciofi, A. C.; Rivinius, Th.; Okazaki, A. T.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    2012-09-10

    Be stars possess gaseous circumstellar disks that modify in many ways the spectrum of the central B star. Furthermore, they exhibit variability at several timescales and for a large number of observables. Putting the pieces together of this dynamical behavior is not an easy task and requires a detailed understanding of the physical processes that control the temporal evolution of the observables. There is an increasing body of evidence that suggests that Be disks are well described by standard {alpha}-disk theory. This paper is the first of a series that aims at studying the possibility of inferring several disk and stellar parameters through the follow-up of various observables. Here we study the temporal evolution of the disk density for different dynamical scenarios, including the disk build-up as a result of a long and steady mass injection from the star, the disk dissipation that occurs after mass injection is turned off, as well as scenarios in which active periods are followed by periods of quiescence. For those scenarios, we investigate the temporal evolution of continuum photometric observables using a three-dimensional non-LTE radiative transfer code. We show that light curves for different wavelengths are specific of a mass loss history, inclination angle, and {alpha} viscosity parameter. The diagnostic potential of those light curves is also discussed.

  14. Observations of Water Ice Distribution in the HD169142 Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Icy grains play an important role on planetesimal/planet formation and related matters. Therefore, to reveal ice dust distribution within a protoplanetary disk is an important work for understanding planet formation. However, observations of icy grain IN THE DISK are scarce due to various observational limitations. Here we propose observations to trace the icy grains by making K, H_2O ice, and L' imaging photometric observations of disk scattered light to derive H_2O ice dust distribution in a disk surface via 3.1 mu m absorption. For the moment, only Gemini/NICI is capable of such observations. We have already demonstrated the effectiveness of such observing method toward Herbig Fe star HD142527. Since some theoretical studies suggest that there are no ice grains at the surface of the disk around A/B stars due to intense UV irradiation, we propose to observe disks around Herbig Ae star HD169142. When we fail to detect the ice feature, it supports the theoretical prediction that photodesorption is important. While the ice feature is detected, it requires reconsideration of the theories and provides an important constraint for the disk chemistry.

  15. Type I planet migration in nearly laminar disks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Lubow, S H; Lin, D

    2008-01-01

    We describe two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the migration of low-mass planets ({<=}30 M{sub {circle_plus}}) in nearly laminar disks (viscosity parameter {alpha} < 10{sup -3}) over timescales of several thousand orbit periods. We consider disk masses of 1, 2, and 5 times the minimum mass solar nebula, disk thickness parameters of H/r = 0.035 and 0.05, and a variety of {alpha} values and planet masses. Disk self-gravity is fully included. Previous analytic work has suggested that Type I planet migration can be halted in disks of sufficiently low turbulent viscosity, for {alpha} {approx} 10{sup -4}. The halting is due to a feedback effect of breaking density waves that results in a slight mass redistribution and consequently an increased outward torque contribution. The simulations confirm the existence of a critical mass (M{sub {alpha}} {approx} 10M{sub {circle_plus}}) beyond which migration halts in nearly laminar disks. For {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -3}, density feedback effects are washed out and Type I migration persists. The critical masses are in good agreement with the analytic model of Rafikov. In addition, for {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -4} steep density gradients produce a vortex instability, resulting in a small time-varying eccentricity in the planet's orbit and a slight outward migration. Migration in nearly laminar disks may be sufficiently slow to reconcile the timescales of migration theory with those of giant planet formation in the core accretion model.

  16. Studies of Disks Around the Sun and Other Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We are conducting research designed to enhance our understanding of the evolution and detectability of comet clouds and disks. This area holds promise for also improving our understanding of outer solar system formation, the bombardment history of the planets, the transport of volatiles and organics from the outer solar system to the inner planets, and to the ultimate fate of comet clouds around the Sun and other stars. According to 'standard' theory, both the Kuiper Disk and the Oort Cloud are (at least in part) natural products of the planetary accumulation stage of solar system formation. One expects such assemblages to be a common attribute of other solar systems. Therefore, searches for comet disks and clouds orbiting other stars offer a new method for inferring the presence of planetary systems. This two-element program consists modeling collisions in the Kuiper Disk and the dust disks around other stars. The modeling effort focuses on moving from our simple, first-generation, Kuiper disk collision rate model, to a time-dependent, second-generation model that incorporates physical collisions, velocity evolution, dynamical erosion, and various dust transport mechanisms. This second generation model will be used to study the evolution of surface mass density and the object-size spectrum in the disk. The observational effort focuses on obtaining submm/mm-wave flux density measurements of 25-30 IR excess stars in order to better constrain the masses, spatial extents and structure of their dust ensembles.

  17. PLANETESIMALS IN DEBRIS DISKS OF SUN-LIKE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, Andrew; Wu Yanqin

    2011-09-20

    Observations of dusty debris disks can be used to test theories of planetesimal coagulation. Planetesimals of sizes up to a couple of thousand kilometers are embedded in these disks and their mutual collisions generate the small dust grains that are observed. The dust luminosities, when combined with information on the dust spatial extent and the system age, can be used to infer initial masses in the planetesimal belts. Carrying out such a procedure for a sample of debris disks around Sun-like stars, we reach the following two conclusions. First, if we assume that colliding planetesimals satisfy a primordial size spectrum of the form dn/ds{proportional_to}s{sup -q}, observed disks strongly favor a value of q between 3.5 and 4, while both current theoretical expectations and statistics of Kuiper belt objects favor a somewhat larger value. Second, number densities of planetesimals are two to three orders of magnitude higher in detected disks than in the Kuiper belt, for comparably sized objects. This is a surprise for the coagulation models. It would require a similar increase in the disk surface density over that of the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula, which is unreasonable. Both of our conclusions are driven by the need to explain the presence of bright debris disks at a few gigayears of age.

  18. Vibration analysis of magnetostrictive thin-film composite cantilever actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Shang, Xinchun

    2016-09-01

    The transverse vibration of a composed cantilever beam with magnetostrictive layer is analyzed, which is employed to simulate dynamic response of an actuator. The high-order shear deformation theory of beam and the coupling magnetoelastic constitutive relationship are introduced to construct the governing equations, all interface conditions between magnetostrictive film and elastic substrate as well as the free stress condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the beam can be satisfied. In order to demonstrate validity of the presented mathematical modeling, the verification examples are also given. Furthermore, the effect of geometry and material parameters on dynamic characteristics of magnetostrictive cantilever beam, such as the nature frequency and amplitude, is discussed. Moreover, through computing the magneto-mechanical coupling factor of the beam structure, the variation tendency curves of the factor along with different parameters and frequencies of magnetostrictive cantilever beam actuator have been presented. These numerical results should be useful for the design of beam-type with magnetostrictive thin-film actuators.

  19. Theory of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The involvement of accretion disks around supermassive black holes in the theory of active galactic nuclei (AGN) is discussed. The physics of thin and thick accretion disks is discussed and the partition between thermal and nonthermal energy production in supermassive disks is seen as uncertain. The thermal limit cycle may operate in supermassive disks (Shields, 1985), with accumulation of gas in the disk for periods of 10 to the 4th to 10 to the 7th years, punctuated by briefer outbursts during which the mass is rapidly transferred to smaller radii. An extended X-ray source in AGN is consistent with observations (Tennant and Mushotsky, 1983), and a large wind mass loss rate exceeding the central accretion rate means that only a fraction of the mass entering the disk will reach the central object; the rest being lost to the wind. Controversy in the relationship between the broad lines and the disk is also discussed.

  20. Higher order diffractions from a circular disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsland, Diane P.; Balanis, Constantine A.; Brumley, Stephen A.

    1987-01-01

    The backscattering from a circular disk is analyzed using the geometrical theory of diffraction. First-, second-, and third-order diffractions are included in the hard polarization analysis, while first-, second-, and third-order slope diffractions are included for soft polarization. Improvements in the prediction of the monostatic radar cross section over previous works are noted. For hard polarization, an excellent agreement is exhibited between experimental and theoretical results, while a very good agreement is noted for soft polarization. To further improve the soft polarization results for wide angles, a model for the creeping wave or circulating current on the edge of the disk is obtained and used to find an additional component of the backscattered field. The addition of this component significantly improves the results for wide angles, leading to excellent agreement for soft polarization also. An axial-caustic correction method using equivalent currents is also included in the analysis.

  1. Analysis of the deformational behaviour of a bimorph configuration with piezoelectric actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckert, Wieland; Pfundtner, Goesta

    2002-08-01

    The stimulation of controlled deformation in lightweight constructions by means of actuator units as an integrated part of the structure currently represents an attractive subject in engineering. A common design uses a piezoelectric film that is bonded to a shell component by an adhesive layer and induces a bending deformation in the structure. A simplified beam design has been used as a test set-up to characterize the actuator performance of a given system under practical conditions. The bimorph configuration consists of an actuator unit, the bonding adhesive and the substrate material from which the lateral bending deflection of the free end, induced by actuation of the piezoelectric film, is measured. An improved theoretical approach is presented that combines a comprehensive composite theory analysis of the bending with a detailed analytical approach for the gradual stress transfer from the edges of the piezoceramic induced by a deformational misfit between the layers. The results are validated by a finite element analysis of the system. They reveal a substantial influence of the assumptions for the transverse (width direction) state of deformation for which free bending appears to be the most realistic for the test geometry. The study is completed by an experimental analysis that investigates the influence of adhesive stiffness and layer thickness on the actuator performance of a system consisting of a steel substrate and a carbon fibre reinforced substrate and a prototypic PZT actuator module. The results are correlated to the model providing a confirmation of the essential trends.

  2. Analytical development of single crystal Macro Fiber Composite actuators for active twist rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae-Sang; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2005-08-01

    A Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) is a piezoelectric fiber composite which has an interdigitated electrode, rectangular cross-section and unidirectional polycrystalline piezoceramic (PZT) fibers embedded in the polymer matrix. A MFC actuator has much higher actuation performance and flexibility than a monolithic piezoceramic actuator. Moreover, the single crystal piezoelectric material exhibits much higher induced strain levels, energy density and coupling than those of polycrystalline piezoceramic materials. Thus, the performance of an MFC can be improved by using single crystal piezoelectric fiber instead of polycrystalline piezoceramic fiber. This study investigates the analytical modeling, material properties and actuation performance of an MFC using single crystal piezoelectric material (single crystal MFC). For single crystal MFC, the mechanical properties are calculated by the classical lamination theory, and the uniform fields model (UFM) is adopted to predict piezoelectric strain constants. In addition, the actuation performance of the single crystal MFC with the active twist rotor blade is studied. The material properties and actuation performance of single crystal MFC are compared with those of standard MFC.

  3. Resolving the inner disk of UX Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreplin, A.; Madlener, D.; Chen, L.; Weigelt, G.; Kraus, S.; Grinin, V.; Tambovtseva, L.; Kishimoto, M.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: The cause of the UX Ori variability in some Herbig Ae/Be stars is still a matter of debate. Detailed studies of the circumstellar environment of UX Ori objects (UXORs) are required to test the hypothesis that the observed drop in photometry might be related to obscuration events. Methods: Using near- and mid-infrared interferometric AMBER and MIDI observations, we resolved the inner circumstellar disk region around UX Ori. Results: We fitted the K-, H-, and N-band visibilities and the spectral energy distribution (SED) of UX Ori with geometric and parametric disk models. The best-fit K-band geometric model consists of an inclined ring and a halo component. We obtained a ring-fit radius of 0.45 ± 0.07 AU (at a distance of 460 pc), an inclination of 55.6 ± 2.4°, a position angle of the system axis of 127.5 ± 24.5°, and a flux contribution of the over-resolved halo component to the total near-infrared excess of 16.8 ± 4.1%. The best-fit N-band model consists of an elongated Gaussian with a HWHM ~ 5 AU of the semi-major axis and an axis ration of a/b ~ 3.4 (corresponding to an inclination of ~72°). With a parametric disk model, we fitted all near- and mid-infrared visibilities and the SED simultaneously. The model disk starts at an inner radius of 0.46 ± 0.06 AU with an inner rim temperature of 1498 ± 70 K. The disk is seen under an nearly edge-on inclination of 70 ± 5°. This supports any theories that require high-inclination angles to explain obscuration events in the line of sight to the observer, for example, in UX Ori objects where orbiting dust clouds in the disk or disk atmosphere can obscure the central star. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory under program IDs: 090.C-0769, 074.C-0552.

  4. The potentialographical problem and the conception of gravitating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheryakov, G. A.

    Two approaches to the Potentialographical Problem (PP) for solving the problems of convenient analytical representation of external potential planet gravitation are presented. The first one corresponds to known methods of solution of direct PP. The second is a constructive one; it presents inverse PP, which is a new kind of inverse problems of potential theory. The inverse PP in which a known potential of the planet is represented as sums of potentials of the simple and double layers, situated on the given surface in the interior of the planet is presented. The density and moments of these layers are sought. A particular case of this problem, when layers are supposed to be in the equatorial plane, brings about the conception of gravitating disks CGD. According to CGD potential of planet is represented as the sum of three potentials of the plane circular one centered disks: focal disks - FD, material, massless MMD and kipole disk - DD.

  5. Spooled packaging of shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, John A.

    A vast cross-section of transportation, manufacturing, consumer product, and medical technologies rely heavily on actuation. Accordingly, progress in these industries is often strongly coupled to the advancement of actuation technologies. As the field of actuation continues to evolve, smart materials show significant promise for satisfying the growing needs of industry. In particular, shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators present an opportunity for low-cost, high performance actuation, but until now, they have been limited or restricted from use in many otherwise suitable applications by the difficulty in packaging the SMA wires within tight or unusually shaped form constraints. To address this packaging problem, SMA wires can be spool-packaged by wrapping around mandrels to make the actuator more compact or by redirecting around multiple mandrels to customize SMA wire pathways to unusual form factors. The goal of this dissertation is to develop the scientific knowledge base for spooled packaging of low-cost SMA wire actuators that enables high, predictable performance within compact, customizable form factors. In developing the scientific knowledge base, this dissertation defines a systematic general representation of single and multiple mandrel spool-packaged SMA actuators and provides tools for their analysis, understanding, and synthesis. A quasi-static analytical model distills the underlying mechanics down to the three effects of friction, bending, and binding, which enables prediction of the behavior of generic spool-packaged SMA actuators with specifiable geometric, loading, frictional, and SMA material parameters. An extensive experimental and simulation-based parameter study establishes the necessary understanding of how primary design tradeoffs between performance, packaging, and cost are governed by the underlying mechanics of spooled actuators. A design methodology outlines a systematic approach to synthesizing high performance SMA wire actuators

  6. Lost-motion valve actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, W.J. III; Ringgenberg, P.D.

    1987-04-07

    A lost-motion valve actuator is described for a bore closure valve employed in a well bore, comprising: operating connector means adapted to move the bore closure valve between open and closed positions through longitudinal movement of the operating connector means. The operating connector means comprises an operating connector and a connector insert defining a recess therebetween; locking dog means comprising at least one locking dog received in the recess and spring biasing means adapted to urge at least one locking dog radially inwardly; and mandrel means slidably received within the operating connector means and including dog slot means associated therewith. The dog slot means comprises an annular slot on the exterior of the mandrel means adapted to lockingly receive at least one inwardly biased locking dog when proximate thereto, whereby longitudinal movement of the mandrel means is transmitted to the operating connector means.

  7. Magnetic actuation of hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state. PMID:22163368

  8. Magnetic actuation of hair cells.

    PubMed

    Rowland, David; Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2011-11-01

    The bullfrog sacculus contains mechanically sensitive hair cells whose stereociliary bundles oscillate spontaneously when decoupled from the overlying membrane. Steady-state offsets on the resting position of a hair bundle can suppress or modulate this native motility. To probe the dynamics of spontaneous oscillation in the proximity of the critical point, we describe here a method for mechanical actuation that avoids loading the bundles or contributing to the viscous drag. Magnetite beads were attached to the tips of the stereocilia, and a magnetic probe was used to impose deflections. This technique allowed us to observe the transition from multi-mode to single-mode state in freely oscillating bundles, as well as the crossover from the oscillatory to the quiescent state. PMID:22163368

  9. Droplet actuator analyzer with cartridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Gregory F. (Inventor); Sturmer, Ryan A. (Inventor); Paik, Philip Y. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Vijay (Inventor); Pollack, Michael G. (Inventor); Pamula, Vamsee K. (Inventor); Brafford, Keith R. (Inventor); West, Richard M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A droplet actuator with cartridge is provided. According to one embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes an analyzer unit comprising electronic or optical receiving means, a cartridge comprising self-contained droplet handling capabilities, and a wherein the cartridge is coupled to the analyzer unit by a means which aligns electronic and/or optical outputs from the cartridge with electronic or optical receiving means on the analyzer unit. According to another embodiment, a sample analyzer is provided and includes a sample analyzer comprising a cartridge coupled thereto and a means of electrical interface and/or optical interface between the cartridge and the analyzer, whereby electrical signals and/or optical signals may be transmitted from the cartridge to the analyzer.

  10. Pressure-actuated joint system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided that includes first and second case segments mated with one another. First and second annular rubber layers are disposed inboard of the first and second case segments, respectively. The second annular rubber layer has a slot extending from the radial inner surface across a portion of its thickness to define a main body portion and a flexible portion. The flexible portion has an interfacing surface portion abutting against an interfacing surface portion of the first annular rubber layer to follow movement of the first annular rubber layer during operation of the pressure vessel. The slot receives pressurized gas and establishes a pressure-actuated joint between the interfacing surface portions. At least one of the interfacing surface portions has a plurality of enclosed and sealed recesses formed therein.

  11. LQR Control of Shell Vibrations Via Piezoceramic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delRosario, R. C. H.; Smith, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    A model-based Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) method for controlling vibrations in cylindrical shells is presented. Surface-mounted piezo-ceramic patches are employed as actuators which leads to unbounded control input operators. Modified Donnell-Mushtari shell equations incorporating strong or Kelvin-Voigt damping are used to model the system. The model is then abstractly formulated in terms of sesquilinear forms. This provides a framework amenable for proving model well-posedness and convergence of LQR gains using analytic semigroup results combined with LQR theory for unbounded input operators. Finally, numerical examples demonstrating the effectiveness of the method are presented.

  12. Missile flight control using active flexspar actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ron; Gross, R. Steven; Brozoski, Fred

    1996-04-01

    A new type of subsonic missile flight control surface using piezoelectric flexspar actuators is presented. The flexspar design uses an aerodynamic shell which is pivoted at the quarter-chord about a graphite main spar. The shell is pitched up and down by a piezoelectric bender element which is rigidly attached to a base mount and allowed to rotate freely at the tip. The element curvature, shell pitch deflection and torsional stiffness are modeled using laminated plate theory. A one-third scale TOW 2B missile model was used as a demonstration platform. A static wing of the missile was replaced with an active flexspar wing. The 1 in 0964-1726/5/2/002/img1 2.7 in active flight control surface was powered by a bimorph bender with 5 mil PZT-5H sheets. Bench and wind tunnel testing showed good correlation between theory and experiment and static pitch deflections in excess of 0964-1726/5/2/002/img2. A natural frequency of 78.5 rad 0964-1726/5/2/002/img3 with a break frequency of 157 rad 0964-1726/5/2/002/img3 was measured. Wind tunnel tests revealed no flutter or divergence tendencies. Maximum changes in lift coefficient were measured at 0964-1726/5/2/002/img5 which indicates that terminal and initial missile load factors may be increased by approximately 3.1 and 12.6 g respectively, leading to a greatly reduced turn radius of only 2400 ft.

  13. Out-of-Plane Translational PZT Bimorph Actuator with Archimedes’ Spiral Actuating Tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenye; Liu, Sanwei; Livermore, Carol

    2015-12-01

    The design, finite element analysis (FEA), and experimental characterization of a MEMS out-of-plane (vertical) translational lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) bimorph actuator supported on Archimedes’ spiral tethers are presented. Two types of bimorph actuators with different electrode patterns (with spiral tethers half actuated or fully actuated) are designed and fabricated. Both designs are fabricated by commercial processes and are compatible with integration into more complex MEMS systems. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to analyze and predict the displacements of both types of actuators. The deflections of both fully- actuated and half-actuated devices were measured experimentally to validate the design. At an applied voltage of 110V, the out-of-plane deflections of the actuators with half-actuated and fully-actuated tethers were measured at about 17 μm and 29 μm respectively, in good agreement with FEA predictions of 17.1 μm and 25.8 μm. The corresponding blocking forces are predicted as 10 mN and 17 mN by FEA.

  14. Enhanced Actuation Performance and Reduced Heat Generation in Shear-Bending Mode Actuator at High Temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianguo; Liu, Guoxi; Cheng, Jinrong; Dong, Shuxiang

    2016-08-01

    The actuation performance, strain hysteresis, and heat generation of the shear-bending mode actuators based on soft and hard BiScO3-PbTiO3 (BS-PT) ceramics were investigated under different thermal (from room temperature to 300 °C) and electrical loadings (from 2 to 10 kV/cm and from 1 to 1000 Hz). The actuator based on both soft and hard BS-PT ceramics worked stably at the temperature as high as 300 °C. The maximum working temperature of this shear-bending actuators is 150 °C higher than those of the traditional piezoelectric actuators based on commercial Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 materials. Furthermore, although the piezoelectric properties of soft-type ceramics based on BS-PT ceramics were superior to those of hard ceramics, the maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was larger than that fabricated by soft ceramics at high temperature. The maximum displacement of the actuator based on hard ceramics was [Formula: see text] under an applied electric field of 10 kV/cm at 300 °C. The strain hysteresis and heat generation of the actuator based on hard ceramics was smaller than those of the actuator based on soft ceramics in the wide temperature range. These results indicated that the shear-bending actuator based on hard piezoelectric ceramics was more suitable for high-temperature piezoelectric applications. PMID:27214895

  15. Ringed Accretion Disks: Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the possibility that several instability points may be formed, due to the Paczyński mechanism of violation of mechanical equilibrium, in the orbiting matter around a supermassive Kerr black hole. We consider a recently proposed model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several tori (rings) that can be corotating or counter-rotating relative to the Kerr attractor due to the history of the accretion process. Each torus is governed by the general relativistic hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. We prove that the number of the instability points is generally limited and depends on the dimensionless spin of the rotating attractor.

  16. Supermassive disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, L. M.; Galletta, G.; Saglia, R. P.; Zeilinger, W. W.

    1991-03-01

    In order to investigate the properties of supermassive disk galaxies (SDGs), an extensive optical survey of SDG candidates in the Southern Hemisphere was performed with the 2.2-m ESO/MPI telescope at La Silla. The question of whether SDGs have in general an unusually high content of dark matter in the inner regions or, perhaps, an unusual stellar population is addressed. It is suggested that SDGs are formed as the result of a series of accretion events, possibly induced also by the progressive deepening of the galaxy potential well.

  17. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized. PMID:8817752

  18. Bi-directional series-parallel elastic actuator and overlap of the actuation layers.

    PubMed

    Furnémont, Raphaël; Mathijssen, Glenn; Verstraten, Tom; Lefeber, Dirk; Vanderborght, Bram

    2016-02-01

    Several robotics applications require high torque-to-weight ratio and energy efficient actuators. Progress in that direction was made by introducing compliant elements into the actuation. A large variety of actuators were developed such as series elastic actuators (SEAs), variable stiffness actuators and parallel elastic actuators (PEAs). SEAs can reduce the peak power while PEAs can reduce the torque requirement on the motor. Nonetheless, these actuators still cannot meet performances close to humans. To combine both advantages, the series parallel elastic actuator (SPEA) was developed. The principle is inspired from biological muscles. Muscles are composed of motor units, placed in parallel, which are variably recruited as the required effort increases. This biological principle is exploited in the SPEA, where springs (layers), placed in parallel, can be recruited one by one. This recruitment is performed by an intermittent mechanism. This paper presents the development of a SPEA using the MACCEPA principle with a self-closing mechanism. This actuator can deliver a bi-directional output torque, variable stiffness and reduced friction. The load on the motor can also be reduced, leading to a lower power consumption. The variable recruitment of the parallel springs can also be tuned in order to further decrease the consumption of the actuator for a given task. First, an explanation of the concept and a brief description of the prior work done will be given. Next, the design and the model of one of the layers will be presented. The working principle of the full actuator will then be given. At the end of this paper, experiments showing the electric consumption of the actuator will display the advantage of the SPEA over an equivalent stiff actuator. PMID:26813145

  19. Optical disk media research discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, J.; Gan, F.

    1986-03-01

    A review of the current status of the research and development on various optical disk media is presented. It is noted that research around the world on the media for the nonerasable optical disk is almost over, and that the nonerasable optical disk has been successfully used for CD, LD player and DRAW devices. On the other hand, great efforts are now being made to search the more suitable media for erasable optical disks. Extensive experiments on various material systems including optical characteristic change, phase transition and magneto-optical recording media are under way. It is expected that fruitful results will appear in the next 2 or 3 years.

  20. Gravitational Instability in Planetesimal Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, Bryce T.; Lithwick, Yoram; Pan, Margaret; Rein, Hanno; Wu, Yanqin

    2014-11-01

    Gravitational instability (GI) has been proposed as a method of forming giant gas planets enhanced by disk thermodynamics in a protoplanetary disk (Boss, 1997, Science 276; Durisen et al., 2007, Protostars and Planets V) and as a method of forming planetesimals through the focusing of boulders by the interaction between solids and gases in a turbulent circumstellar disk (Johansen et al., 2007, Nature 448; Youdin & Goodman, 2005, Astrophys. J. 620). GI is mediated through a gaseous circumstellar disk in each each of these scenarios. We explore the possibility of GI occurring in a planetesimal disk devoid of gas. In this regime, mutual collisions between planetesimals are required to dissipate their orbital shear and velocity dispersion enough for collapse to occur as described by the Toomre stability criterion (Toomre, 1964, Astrophys. J. 139; Toomre, 1981, Structure and Evolution of Normal Galaxies). How frequent must collisions be between planetesimals in a gravitationally stable planetesimal disk for GI to occur? Are there collisional rates where GI is postponed indefinitely in an equilibrium state between gravitational stirring and collisional cooling? We present 3D shearing sheet simulations using the REBOUND N-body code with the symplectic epicyclic integrator (Rein & Liu, 2011, A&A 537; Rein & Tremaine, 2011, MNRAS 415) in which the candidate collision rates are within a few orders of magnitude of the disk dynamical lifetime. Our simulations suggest that collisions rate directly controls disk cooling. The shape of the disk cooling curve is independent of the collision rate when scaled to the collision time.

  1. Optimal shape control of a beam using piezoelectric actuators with low control voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Zhang, X. N.; Xie, S. L.

    2009-09-01

    This paper deals with the shape control of a cantilever beam structure by using laminated piezoelectric actuators (LPAs) with a low control voltage. The shape control equation of the cantilever beam partially covered with LPAs is derived based on the constitutive relations of the elastic material and piezoelectric material and shear deformation beam theory (Timoshenko theory). The actuating forces produced by the LPAs are formulated as well. It reveals how the actuating forces depend on the number of piezoelectric layers, the thickness of piezoelectric layers and the position of the actuators. The driving voltages of the LPAs are then determined by a genetic optimization algorithm. The shape control of the cantilever beam from applying the optimal voltage to the LPAs is simulated. The simulation results show that an LPA of large layer number is able to diminish effectively the pre-deflection of the beam under a low control voltage. The voltage applied to the LPA of five layers was almost five times smaller than that of one layer. In addition, increasing the number of LPA layers can significantly improve the control performance as the acting forces of the LPA are a quadratic function of the LPA layer number. The L2 norm of the displacement array of all nodes is diminished about 30% after optimization. Also with the same low control voltage, the LPA can obtain a better control performance than the conventional single layer piezoelectric actuator.

  2. Magnetic suspension characteristics of electromagnetic actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Dantam K.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1993-01-01

    Electromagnetic actuators that use a current-carrying coil (which is placed in a magnetic field) to generate mechanical force are conceptually attractive components for active control of rotating shafts. In one concept that is being tested in the laboratory, the control forces from such actuators are applied on the flexibly supported bearing housings of the rotor. Development of this concept into a practical reality requires a clear and thorough understanding of the role of electromechanical parameters of these actuators in delivering the right amount of control force at the right phase into the rotor. The electromechanical parameters of the actuators investigated are the mass of the armature, stiffness of its suspension, electrical resistance, and inductance of the coils. Improper selection of these parameters can result in degradation in their performance, leading to mistuning between the actuator and the rotor. Through a simple analysis, it is shown that use of such mistuned actuators could result in sharp fluctuations in the phase of the control force delivered into the rotor around the critical speeds. These sharp fluctuations in phase, called 'Phase Glitches', are undesirable. Hence, future designs of controllers should take into account the undesirable mistuning effects between the actuator and the rotor caused by the phase glitches.

  3. Dielectric elastomer actuators with hydrostatic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; Frediani, Gabriele; De Rossi, Danilo

    2009-03-01

    The rapidly growing adoption of dielectric elastomer (DE) actuators as a high performance EAP technology for many kinds of new applications continuously opens new technical challenges, in order to take always the most from each adopted device and actuating configuration. This paper presents a new type of DE actuators, which show attractive potentialities for specific application needs. The concept here proposed adopts an incompressible fluid to mechanically couple active and passive parts. The active parts work according to the DE actuation principle, while the passive parts represent the end effector, in contact with the load. The fluid is used to transfer actuation hydrostatically from an active to a passive part and, then, to the load. This can provide specific advantages, including improved safety and less stringent design constraints for the architecture of the actuator, especially for soft end effectors. Such a simple concept can be readily implemented according to different shapes and intended functionalities of the resulting actuators. The paper describes the structure and the performance of the first prototype devices developed so far.

  4. Thermostatic Valves Containing Silicone-Oil Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana C.; Bame, David P.; Karlmann, Paul B.; Prina, Mauro; Young, William; Fisher, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Flow-splitting and flow-mixing thermally actuated spool valves have been developed for controlling flows of a heat-transfer fluid in a temperature-regulation system aboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. Valves like these could also be useful in terrestrial temperature-regulation systems, including automobile air-conditioning systems and general refrigeration systems. These valves are required to provide smoother actuation over a wider temperature range than the flow-splitting, thermally actuated spool valves used in the Mars Explorer Rover (MER). Also, whereas the MER valves are unstable (tending to oscillate) in certain transition temperature ranges, these valves are required not to oscillate. The MER valves are actuated by thermal expansion of a wax against spring-loaded piston rods (as in common automotive thermostats). The MSL valves contain similar actuators that utilize thermal expansion of a silicone oil, because silicone-oil actuators were found to afford greater and more nearly linear displacements, needed for smoother actuation, over the required wider temperature range. The MSL valves also feature improved spool designs that reflect greater understanding of fluid dynamics, consideration of pressure drops in valves, and a requirement for balancing of pressures in different flow branches.

  5. Active Damping Using Distributed Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Quinones, Juan D.; Wier, Nathan C.

    2010-01-01

    A helicopter structure experiences substantial high-frequency mechanical excitation from powertrain components such as gearboxes and drive shafts. The resulting structure-borne vibration excites the windows which then radiate sound into the passenger cabin. In many cases the radiated sound power can be reduced by adding damping. This can be accomplished using passive or active approaches. Passive treatments such as constrained layer damping tend to reduce window transparency. Therefore this paper focuses on an active approach utilizing compact decentralized control units distributed around the perimeter of the window. Each control unit consists of a triangularly shaped piezoelectric actuator, a miniature accelerometer, and analog electronics. Earlier work has shown that this type of system can increase damping up to approximately 1 kHz. However at higher frequencies the mismatch between the distributed actuator and the point sensor caused control spillover. This paper describes new anisotropic actuators that can be used to improve the bandwidth of the control system. The anisotropic actuators are composed of piezoelectric material sandwiched between interdigitated electrodes, which enables the application of the electric field in a preferred in-plane direction. When shaped correctly the anisotropic actuators outperform traditional isotropic actuators by reducing the mismatch between the distributed actuator and point sensor at high frequencies. Testing performed on a Plexiglas panel, representative of a helicopter window, shows that the control units can increase damping at low frequencies. However high frequency performance was still limited due to the flexible boundary conditions present on the test structure.

  6. Elastomeric actuator devices for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Jolesz, Ferenc A. (Inventor); Kacher, Daniel F. (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed to devices and systems used in magnetic imaging environments that include an actuator device having an elastomeric dielectric film with at least two electrodes, and a frame attached to the actuator device. The frame can have a plurality of configurations including, such as, for example, at least two members that can be, but not limited to, curved beams, rods, plates, or parallel beams. These rigid members can be coupled to flexible members such as, for example, links wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. The frame preferably provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The linear actuation force characteristic is defined as .+-.20% and preferably 10% over a displacement range. The actuator further includes a passive element disposed between the flexible members to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. The preferred embodiment actuator includes one or more layers of the elastomeric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of many elastomeric materials such as, for example, but not limited to, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  7. Characterization of piezoelectric macrofiber composite actuated winglets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, T. K.; Oates, W. S.; Kumar, R.

    2015-06-01

    The present study primarily focuses on the design, development, and structural characterization of an oscillating winglet actuated using a piezoelectric macrofiber composite (MFC). The primary objective is to study the effect of controlled wingtip oscillations on the evolution of wingtip vortices, with a goal of weakening these potentially harmful tip vortices by introducing controlled instabilities through both spatial and temporal perturbations producible through winglet oscillations. MFC-actuated winglets have been characterized under different input excitation and pressure-loading conditions. The winglet oscillations show bimodal behavior for both structural and actuation modes of resonance. The oscillatory amplitude at these actuation modes increases linearly with the magnitude of excitation. During wind-tunnel tests, fluid-structure interactions led to structural vibrations of the wing. The effect of these vibrations on the overall winglet oscillations decreased when the strength of actuation increased. At high input excitation, the actuated winglet was capable of generating controlled oscillations. As a proof of concept, the current study has demonstrated that microfiber composite-actuated winglets produce sufficient displacements to alter the development of the wingtip vortex.

  8. V2O5 nanofibre sheet actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Gang; Schmid, Michael; Chiu, Po-Wen; Minett, Andrew; Fraysse, Jerôme; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Roth, Siegmar; Kozlov, Mikhail; Muñoz, Edgar; Baughman, Ray H.

    2003-05-01

    Vanadium oxides, such as V2O5, are promising for lithium-ion batteries, catalysis, electrochromic devices and sensors. Vanadium oxides were proposed more than a decade ago for another redox-dependent application: the direct conversion of electrical energy to mechanical energy in actuators (artificial muscles). Although related conducting polymer and carbon nanotube actuators have been demonstrated, electromechanical actuators based on vanadium oxides have not be realized. V2O5 nanofibres and nanotubes provide the potential advantages of low-cost synthesis by sol-gel routes and high charging capacity and long cycle life. Here, we demonstrate electromechanical actuation for obtained high modulus V2O5 sheets comprising entangled V2O5 nanofibres. The high surface area of these V2O5 sheets facilitates electrochemical charge injection and intercalation that causes the electromechanical actuation. We show that the V2O5 sheets provide high Young's modulus, high actuator-generated stress, and high actuator stroke at low applied voltage.

  9. Advanced piezoelectric single crystal based actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Smith, Edward; Dong, Shuxiang; Viehland, Dwight; Moore, Jim, Jr.; Patrick, Brian

    2005-05-01

    TRS is developing new actuators based on single crystal piezoelectric materials such as Pb(Zn1/3Nb2/3)1-xTixO3 (PZN-PT) and Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)x-1TixO3 (PMN-PT) which exhibit very high piezoelectric coefficients (d33 = 1800-2200 pC/N) and electromechanical coupling factors (k33 > 0.9), respectively, for a variety of applications, including active vibration damping, active flow control, high precision positioning, ultrasonic motors, deformable mirrors, and adaptive optics. The d32 cut crystal plate actuators showed d32 ~ -1600 pC/N, inter-digital electroded (IDE) plate actuators showed effective d33 ~ 1100 pC/N. Single crystal stack actuators with stroke of 10 μm-100 μm were developed and tested at both room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Flextensional single crystal piezoelectric actuators with either stack driver or plate driver were developed with stroke 70 μm - > 250 μm. For large stroke cryogenic actuation (> 1mm), a single crystal piezomotor was developed and tested at temperature of 77 K-300K and stroke of > 10mm and step resolution of 20 nm were achieved. In order to demonstrate the significance of developed single crystal actuators, modeling on single crystal piezoelectric deformable mirrors and helicopter flap control using single crystal actuators were conducted and the modeling results show that more than 20 wavelength wavefront error could be corrected by using the single crystal deformable mirrors and +/- 5.8 ° flap deflection will be obtained for a 36" flap using single crystal stack actuators.

  10. Deflection of cross-ply composite laminates induced by piezoelectric actuators.

    PubMed

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Lin, Chi-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The coupling effects between the mechanical and electric properties of piezoelectric materials have drawn significant attention for their potential applications as sensors and actuators. In this investigation, two piezoelectric actuators are symmetrically surface bonded on a cross-ply composite laminate. Electric voltages with the same amplitude and opposite sign are applied to the two symmetric piezoelectric actuators, resulting in the bending effect on the laminated plate. The bending moment is derived by using the classical laminate theory and piezoelectricity. The analytical solution of the flexural displacement of the simply supported composite plate subjected to the bending moment is solved by using the plate theory. The analytical solution is compared with the finite element solution to show the validation of present approach. The effects of the size and location of the piezoelectric actuators on the response of the composite laminate are presented through a parametric study. A simple model incorporating the classical laminate theory and plate theory is presented to predict the deformed shape of the simply supported laminate plate. PMID:22315564

  11. Deflection of Cross-Ply Composite Laminates Induced by Piezoelectric Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Her, Shiuh-Chuan; Lin, Chi-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    The coupling effects between the mechanical and electric properties of piezoelectric materials have drawn significant attention for their potential applications as sensors and actuators. In this investigation, two piezoelectric actuators are symmetrically surface bonded on a cross-ply composite laminate. Electric voltages with the same amplitude and opposite sign are applied to the two symmetric piezoelectric actuators, resulting in the bending effect on the laminated plate. The bending moment is derived by using the classical laminate theory and piezoelectricity. The analytical solution of the flexural displacement of the simply supported composite plate subjected to the bending moment is solved by using the plate theory. The analytical solution is compared with the finite element solution to show the validation of present approach. The effects of the size and location of the piezoelectric actuators on the response of the composite laminate are presented through a parametric study. A simple model incorporating the classical laminate theory and plate theory is presented to predict the deformed shape of the simply supported laminate plate. PMID:22315564

  12. Patterned magnetic traps for magnetophoretic assembly and actuation of microrotor pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henighan, T.; Giglio, D.; Chen, A.; Vieira, G.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate a microscopic magnetic rotor pump for fluidic channels whose components are assembled in situ and powered by weak external magnetic fields (<150 Oe). A platform of patterned Permalloy microdisks and microcavities provided for the transport, trapping, and rotation of the superparamagnetic spherical microrotors. Parallel actuation of several rotors without direct physical link to external energy sources, tunable rotation speeds, and reversible drive torques offers significant advantages over macroscopic techniques to control flow within microfluidic devices. The effectiveness of trapping and transporting magnetic nanoparticles by the disks illustrate scalability to smaller, submicrometer sized devices.

  13. Actuator Exerts Tensile Or Compressive Axial Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozzi, John; Richards, Cuyler H.

    1994-01-01

    Compact, manually operated mechanical actuator applies controlled, limited tensile or compressive axial force. Designed to apply loads to bearings during wear tests in clean room. Intended to replace hydraulic actuator. Actuator rests on stand and imparts axial force to part attached to clevis inside or below stand. Technician turns control screw at one end of lever. Depending on direction of rotation of control screw, its end of lever driven downward (for compression) or upward (for tension). Lever pivots about clevis pin at end opposite of control screw; motion drives downward or upward link attached via shearpin at middle of lever. Link drives coupling and, through it, clevis attached to part loaded.

  14. Membrane Mirrors With Bimorph Shape Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Deformable mirrors of a proposed type would be equipped with relatively-large-stroke microscopic piezoelectric actuators that would be used to maintain their reflective surfaces in precise shapes. These mirrors would be members of the class of MEMS-DM (for microelectromechanical system deformable mirror) devices, which offer potential for a precise optical control in adaptive-optics applications in such diverse fields as astronomy and vision science. The proposed mirror would be fabricated, in part, by use of a membrane-transfer technique. The actuator design would contain bimorph-type piezoelectric actuators.

  15. Diagnostics for characterisation of plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsonis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    The popularity of plasma actuators as flow control devices has sparked a flurry of diagnostic efforts towards their characterisation. This review article presents an overview of experimental investigations employing diagnostic techniques specifically aimed at AC dielectric barrier discharge, DC corona and nanosecond pulse plasma actuators. Mechanical, thermal and electrical characterisation techniques are treated. Various techniques for the measurement of induced velocity, body force, heating effects, voltage, current, power and discharge morphology are presented and common issues and challenges are described. The final part of this report addresses the effect of ambient conditions on the performance of plasma actuators.

  16. Optimization Strategies for Sensor and Actuator Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of actuator and sensor placement problems from a wide range of engineering disciplines and a variety of applications. Combinatorial optimization methods are recommended as a means for identifying sets of actuators and sensors that maximize performance. Several sample applications from NASA Langley Research Center, such as active structural acoustic control, are covered in detail. Laboratory and flight tests of these applications indicate that actuator and sensor placement methods are effective and important. Lessons learned in solving these optimization problems can guide future research.

  17. Microcantilever actuation via periodic internal heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jungchul; King, William P.

    2007-12-15

    This paper reports electrothermal actuation of silicon microcantilevers having integrated resistive heaters. Periodic electrical excitation induced periodic resistive heating in the cantilever, while the cantilever deflection was monitored with a photodetector. Excitation was either at the cantilever resonant frequency, f{sub 0}, f{sub 0}/2, or f{sub 0}/3. When the time averaged maximum cantilever temperature was 174 deg. C, the cantilever out-of-plane actuation amplitude was 484 nm near the cantilever resonance frequency of 24.9 kHz. This actuation was sufficiently large to operate the cantilever in intermittent contact mode and scan a calibration grating of height of 20 nm.

  18. Refreshable Braille Displays Using EAP Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2010-01-01

    Refreshable Braille can help visually impaired persons benefit from the growing advances in computer technology. The development of such displays in a full screen form is a great challenge due to the need to pack many actuators in small area without interferences. In recent years, various displays using actuators such as piezoelectric stacks have become available in commercial form but most of them are limited to one line Braille code. Researchers in the field of electroactive polymers (EAP) investigated methods of using these materials to form full screen displays. This manuscript reviews the state of the art of producing refreshable Braille displays using EAP-based actuators..

  19. Misfire tolerant combustion-powered actuation

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Marron, Lisa C.; Kuehl, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a combustion-powered actuator that is suitable for intermittent actuation, that is suitable for use with atmospheric pressure carburetion, and that requires little electrical energy input. The present invention uses energy from expansion of pressurized fuel to effectively purge a combustion chamber, and to achieve atmospheric pressure carburetion. Each purge-fill-power cycle can be independent, allowing the actuator to readily tolerate misfires. The present invention is suitable for use with linear and rotary operation combustion chambers, and is suitable for use in a wide variety of applications.

  20. A Model of the THUNDER Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Alan R. D.

    1997-01-01

    A THUNDER actuator is a composite of three thin layers, a metal base, a piezoelectric wafer and a metal top cover, bonded together under pressure and at high temperature with the LaRC SI polyimid adhesive. When a voltage is applied between the metal layers across the PZT the actuator will bend and can generate a force. This document develops and describes an analytical model the transduction properties of THUNDER actuators. The model development is divided into three sections. First, a static model is described that relates internal stresses and strains and external displacements to the thermal pre-stress and applied voltage. Second, a dynamic energy based model is described that allows calculation of the resonance frequencies, developed force and electrical input impedance. Finally, a fully coupled electro-mechanical transducer model is described. The model development proceeds by assuming that both the thermal pre-stress and the piezoelectric actuation cause the actuator to deform in a pure bend in a single plane. It is useful to think of this as a two step process, the actuator is held flat, differential stresses induce a bending moment, the actuator is released and it bends. The thermal pre-stress is caused by the different amounts that the constituent layers shrink due to their different coefficients of thermal expansion. The adhesive between layers sets at a high temperature and as the actuator cools, the metal layers shrink more than the PZT. The PZT layer is put into compression while the metal layers are in tension. The piezoelectric actuation has a similar effect. An applied voltage causes the PZT layer to strain, which in turn strains the two metal layers. If the PZT layer expands it will put the metal layers into tension and PZT layer into compression. In both cases, if shear force effects are neglected, the actuator assembly will experience a uniform in-plane strain. As the materials each have a different elastic modulus, different stresses will

  1. Peristaltic pump made of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Peter; Matysek, Marc; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2009-03-01

    The functional principle of peristaltic motion is inspired by the pattern in which hollow organs move. The technology of dielectric elastomer actuators provides the possibility to design a very compact peristaltic pump. The geometries of the whole pump and the actuator elements have been determined by numerical simulations of the mechanical behaviour and the fluid dynamics. With eight independent actuators the pumping channel is self-sealing and there is no need for any valves. The first generation of this pump is able to generate flow rates up to 0.36 μl/min.

  2. Bluff Body Flow Control Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Flint

    2005-11-01

    In this study, the use of single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for the control of bluff body flow separation is investigated. In particular, surface mounted plasma actuators are used to reduce both drag and unsteady vortex shedding from circular cylinders in cross-flow. It is demonstrated that the plasma-induced surface blowing gives rise to a local Coanda effect that promotes the maintenance of flow attachment. Large reductions in vortex shedding and drag are demonstrated for Reynolds numbers ˜ 10^410^5. Both steady and unsteady plasma-induced surface blowing is explored. Results are presented from experiments involving both two and four surface mounted actuators.

  3. Recent Developments in NASA Piezocomposite Actuator Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William K.; Inman, Daniel J.; High, James W.; Williams, R. Brett

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of recent progress in the development of the NASA Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) piezocomposite actuator device. This will include a brief history of the development of the MFC, a description of the standard manufacturing process used to fabricate MFC actuators, and a summary of ongoing MFC electromechanical characterization testing. In addition, we describe the development of a prototype single-crystal piezoelectric MFC device, and compare its performance with MFC actuator specimens utilizing conventional piezoceramic materials.

  4. Hydraulic Actuator System for Rotor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Heinz; Althaus, Josef

    1991-01-01

    In the last ten years, several different types of actuators were developed and fabricated for active control of rotors. A special hydraulic actuator system capable of generating high forces to rotating shafts via conventional bearings is addressed. The actively controlled hydraulic force actuator features an electrohydraulic servo valve which can produce amplitudes and forces at high frequencies necessary for influencing rotor vibrations. The mathematical description will be given in detail. The experimental results verify the theoretical model. Simulations already indicate the usefulness of this compact device for application to a real rotor system.

  5. [Disk calcifications in children].

    PubMed

    Schmit, P; Fauré, C; Denarnaud, L

    1985-05-01

    It is not unusual for intervertebral disk calcifications to be detected in pediatric practice, the 150 or so cases reported in the literature probably representing only a small proportion of lesions actually diagnosed. Case reports of 33 children with intervertebral disk calcifications were analyzed. In the majority of these patients (31 of 33) a diagnosis of "idiopathic" calcifications had been made, the cervical localization of the lesions being related to repeated ORL infections and/or trauma. A pre-existing pathologic factor was found in two cases (one child with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis treated by corticoids and one child with Williams and Van Beuren's syndrome). An uncomplicated course was noted in 31 cases, the symptomatology (pain, spinal stiffness and febricula) improving after several days. Complications developed in two cases: one child had very disabling dysphagia due to an anteriorly protruding cervical herniated disc and surgery was necessary; the other child developed cervicobrachial neuralgia due to herniated disc protrusion into the cervical spinal canal, but symptoms regressed within several days although calcifications persisted unaltered. These findings and the course of the rare complications documented in the literature suggest the need for the most conservative treatment possible in cases of disc calcifications in children. PMID:4032343

  6. Disk storage at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascetti, L.; Cano, E.; Chan, B.; Espinal, X.; Fiorot, A.; González Labrador, H.; Iven, J.; Lamanna, M.; Lo Presti, G.; Mościcki, JT; Peters, AJ; Ponce, S.; Rousseau, H.; van der Ster, D.

    2015-12-01

    CERN IT DSS operates the main storage resources for data taking and physics analysis mainly via three system: AFS, CASTOR and EOS. The total usable space available on disk for users is about 100 PB (with relative ratios 1:20:120). EOS actively uses the two CERN Tier0 centres (Meyrin and Wigner) with 50:50 ratio. IT DSS also provide sizeable on-demand resources for IT services most notably OpenStack and NFS-based clients: this is provided by a Ceph infrastructure (3 PB) and few proprietary servers (NetApp). We will describe our operational experience and recent changes to these systems with special emphasis to the present usages for LHC data taking, the convergence to commodity hardware (nodes with 200-TB each with optional SSD) shared across all services. We also describe our experience in coupling commodity and home-grown solution (e.g. CERNBox integration in EOS, Ceph disk pools for AFS, CASTOR and NFS) and finally the future evolution of these systems for WLCG and beyond.

  7. Disk MHD generator study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Retallick, F. D.

    1980-01-01

    Directly-fired, separately-fired, and oxygen-augmented MHD power plants incorporating a disk geometry for the MHD generator were studied. The base parameters defined for four near-optimum-performance MHD steam power systems of various types are presented. The finally selected systems consisted of (1) two directly fired cases, one at 1920 K (2996F) preheat and the other at 1650 K (2500 F) preheat, (2) a separately-fired case where the air is preheated to the same level as the higher temperature directly-fired cases, and (3) an oxygen augmented case with the same generator inlet temperature of 2839 (4650F) as the high temperature directly-fired and separately-fired cases. Supersonic Mach numbers at the generator inlet, gas inlet swirl, and constant Hall field operation were specified based on disk generator optimization. System pressures were based on optimization of MHD net power. Supercritical reheat stream plants were used in all cases. Open and closed cycle component costs are summarized and compared.

  8. Post-buckled precompressed (PBP) elements: a new class of flight control actuators enhancing high-speed autonomous VTOL MAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ronald; McMurtry, Ross; Vos, Roelof; Tiso, Paolo; Breuker, Roeland D.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes a new class of flight control actuators using Post-Buckled Precompressed (PBP) piezoelectric elements. These actuators are designed to produce significantly higher deflection and force levels than conventional piezoelectric actuator elements. Classical laminate plate theory (CLPT) models are shown to work very well in capturing the behavior of the free, unloaded elements. A new high transverse deflection model which employs nonlinear structural relations is shown to successfully predict the performance of the PBP actuators as they are exposed to higher and higher levels of axial force, which induces post buckling deflections. A proof-of-concept empennage assembly and actuator were fabricated using the principles of PBP actuation. A single grid-fin flight control effector was driven by a 3.5" (88.9mm) long piezoceramic bimorph PBP actuator. By using the PBP configuration, deflections were controllably magnified 4.5 times with excellent correlation between theory and experiment. Quasi-static bench testing showed deflection levels in excess of +/-6° at rates exceeding 15 Hz. The new solid state PBP actuator was shown to reduce the part count with respect to conventional servoactuators by an order of magnitude. Power consumption dropped from 24W to 100mW, weight was cut from 108g to 14g, slop went from 1.6° to 0.02° and current draw went from 5A to 1.4mA. The result was that the XQ-138 subscale UAV family experienced nearly a 4% reduction in operating empty weight via the switch from conventional to PBP actuators while in every other measure, gross performance was significantly enhanced.

  9. A twisted disk equation that describes warped galaxy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, K.

    1994-01-01

    Warped H1 gas layers in the outer regions of spiral galaxies usually display a noticeably twisted structure. This structure is thought to arise primarily as a result of differential precession in the H1 disk as it settles toward a 'preferred orientation' in an underlying dark halo potential well that is not spherically symmetric. In an attempt to better understand the structure and evolution of these twisted, warped disk structures, we have utilized the 'twist-equation' formalism. Specifically, we have generalized the twist equation to allow the treatment of non-Keplerian disks and from it have derived the steady-state structure of twisted disks that develop from free precession in a nonspherical, logarithmic halo potential. This generalized equation can also be used to examine the time-evolutionary behavior of warped galaxy disks.

  10. Choosing Actuators for Automatic Control Systems of Thermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunov, A. I.; Serdyukov, O. V.

    2015-03-15

    Two types of actuators for automatic control systems of thermal power plants are analyzed: (i) pulse-controlled actuator and (ii) analog-controlled actuator with positioning function. The actuators are compared in terms of control circuit, control accuracy, reliability, and cost.

  11. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DISK-PLANET TORQUES IN A LOCALLY ISOTHERMAL DISK

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, Gennaro; Lubow, Stephen H. E-mail: lubow@stsci.ed

    2010-11-20

    We determine an expression for the Type I planet migration torque involving a locally isothermal disk, with moderate turbulent viscosity (5 x 10{sup -4} {approx}< {alpha} {approx}< 0.05), based on three-dimensional nonlinear hydrodynamical simulations. The radial gradients (in a dimensionless logarithmic form) of density and temperature are assumed to be constant near the planet. We find that the torque is roughly equally sensitive to the surface density and temperature radial gradients. Both gradients contribute to inward migration when they are negative. Our results indicate that two-dimensional calculations with a smoothed planet potential, used to account for the effects of the third dimension, do not accurately determine the effects of density and temperature gradients on the three-dimensional torque. The results suggest that substantially slowing or stopping planet migration by means of changes in disk opacity or shadowing is difficult and appears unlikely for a disk that is locally isothermal. The scalings of the torque and torque density with planet mass and gas sound speed follow the expectations of linear theory. We also determine an improved formula for the torque density distribution that can be used in one-dimensional long-term evolution studies of planets embedded in locally isothermal disks. This formula can be also applied in the presence of mildly varying radial gradients and of planets that open gaps. We illustrate its use in the case of migrating super-Earths and determine some conditions sufficient for survival.

  12. Transitional Disks Associated with Intermediate-Mass Stars: Results of the SEEDS YSO Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C.; Fukagawa, M.; Maruta, Y.; Ohta, Y.; Wisniewski, J.; Hashimoto, J.; Okamoto, Y.; Momose, M.; Currie, T.; McElwain, M.; Muto, T.; Kotani, T.; Kusakabe, N. B.; Follette, K.; Bonnefoy, M.; Feldt, M.; Sitko, M.; Takami, M.; Karr, J.; Tamura, M.

    2014-01-01

    where only half of the disk is seen in scattered light at H. We will discuss our survey results in terms of spiral arm theory, dust trapping vortices, and systematic differences in the relative scale height of these disks compared to those around Solar-mass stars. For the disks with spiral arms we discuss the planet-hosting potential, and limits on where giant planets can be located. We also discuss the implications for imaging with extreme adaptive optics instruments. Grady is supported under NSF AST 1008440 and through the NASA Origins of Solar Systems program on NNG13PB64P. JPW is supported NSF AST 100314. 0) in marked contrast to protoplanetary disks, transitional disks exhibit wide range of structural features1) arm visibility correlated with relative scale height in disk2) asymmetric and possibly variable shadowing of outer portions some transitional disks3) confirm pre-transitional disk nature of Oph IRS 48, MWC 758, HD 169142, etc.

  13. Electromechanical characteristic analysis of a dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yinlong; Zhou, Hongpin; Wang, Huaming

    2015-10-01

    To assist in the design and optimization of dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) actuators, an analytical model for the electromechanical response of cone DEAP actuators is developed. Using the Yeoh form strain energy potential and the Maxwell stress tensor, the constitutive relationship of the DEAP that accounts for the electromechanical coupling behavior is deduced. The equilibrium equations of DEAP actuators with a cone configuration are derived and an analytical model is then proposed. With this model, the actuation characteristics of the DEAP actuator, including actuation displacement, force output and efficiency can be calculated. Additionally, the principal stresses and principal stretch ratio of the membrane under different actuation voltages can be determined, along with the wrinkling failure mode of DEAP actuators. The experimental results for the DEAP actuator matched the numerical results determined using the proposed model. As such, the proposed work is beneficial as a guide for the design optimization of DEAP actuators.

  14. Scattering from Thin Dielectric Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.; Schneider, A.; Lang, R. H.; Carter, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    A solution was obtained for scattering from thin dielectric disks by approximating the currents induced inside the disk with the currents which would exist inside a dielectric slab of the same thickness, orientation and dielectric properties. This approximation reduces to an electrostatic approximation when the disk thickness, T, is small compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation and the approximation yields a conventional physical optics solution when the dimension, A, characteristic of the geometrical cross section of the disk (e.g., the diameter of a circular disk) is large compared to wavelength. When the ratio A/T is sufficiently large the disk will always be in one or the other of these regimes (T lambda or kA1. Consequently, when A/T is large this solution provides a conventional approximation for the scattered fields which can be applied at all frequencies. As a check on this conclusion, a comparison was made between the theoretical and measured radar cross section of thin dielectric disks. Agreement was found for thin disks with both large and small values of kA.

  15. Selected Papers on Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. R.; Cassen, P. M.; Wasson, J. T.; Woolum, D. S.; Klahr, H. H.; Henning, Th.

    2004-01-01

    Three papers present studies of thermal balances, dynamics, and electromagnetic spectra of protoplanetary disks, which comprise gas and dust orbiting young stars. One paper addresses the reprocessing, in a disk, of photons that originate in the disk itself in addition to photons that originate in the stellar object at the center. The shape of the disk is found to strongly affect the redistribution of energy. Another of the three papers reviews an increase in the optical luminosity of the young star FU Orionis. The increase began in the year 1936 and similar increases have since been observed in other stars. The paper summarizes astronomical, meteoric, and theoretical evidence that these increases are caused by increases in mass fluxes through the inner portions of the protoplanetary disks of these stars. The remaining paper presents a mathematical-modeling study of the structures of protostellar accretion disks, with emphasis on limits on disk flaring. Among the conclusions reached in the study are that (1) the radius at which a disk becomes shadowed from its central stellar object depends on radial mass flow and (2) most planet formation has occurred in environments unheated by stellar radiation.

  16. Disk Dispersal Around Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David

    2004-01-01

    We first review the evidence pertaining to the lifetimes of planet-forming disks of gas and dust around young stars and discuss possible disk dispersal mechanisms: 1) viscous accretion of material onto the central source, 2) close stellar encounters, 3) stellar winds, and 4) photoevaporation caused by the heating of the disk surface by ultraviolet radiation. Photoevaporation is likely the most important dispersal mechanism for the outer regions of disks, and this talk focuses on the evaporation caused by the presence of a nearby, luminous star rather than the central star itself. We also focus on disks around low-mass stars like the Sun rather than high-mass stars, which we have treated previously. Stars often form in clusters and the ultraviolet flux from the most luminous star in the cluster can have a dramatic effect on the disk orbiting a nearby low-mass star. We apply our theoretical models to the evaporating protoplanetary disks (or "proplyds") in the Trapezium cluster in Orion, to the formation of gas giant planets like Jupiter around Sun-like stars in the Galaxy, and to the formation of Kuiper belts around low mass stars. We find a possible explanation for the differences between Neptune and Jupiter, and make a prediction concerning recent searches for giant planets in large clusters. We discuss recent models of the infrared spectra from gaseous disks around young stars.

  17. Ringed Accretion Disks: Equilibrium Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  18. Study of Unsteady Flow Actuation Produced by Surface Plasma Actuator on 2-D Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Minh Khang; Shin, Jichul

    2014-10-01

    Effect of flow actuation driven by low current continuous or pulsed DC surface glow discharge plasma actuator is studied. Schlieren image of induced flow on flat plate taken at a high repetition rate reveals that the actuation is mostly initiated near the cathode. Assuming that the actuation is mostly achieved by ions in the cathode sheath region, numerical model for the source of flow actuation is obtained by analytical estimation of ion pressure force created in DC plasma sheath near the cathode and added in momentum equation as a body force term. Modeled plasma flow actuator is simulated with NACA0012 airfoil oscillating over a certain range of angle of attack (AoA) at specific reduced frequencies of airfoil. By changing actuation authority according to the change in AoA, stabilization of unsteady flow field is improved and hence steady aerodynamic performance can be maintained. Computational result shows that plasma actuation is only effective in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of separated flow. It turns out that plasma pulse frequency should be tuned for optimal performance depending on phase angle and rotating speed. The actuation authority can be parameterized by a ratio between plasma pulse frequency and reduced frequency.

  19. Serpentine Robot Arm Contains Electromagnetic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moya, Israel A.; Studer, Philip A.

    1994-01-01

    Identical modules assembled into flexible robot arm configured in serpentlike fashion to manipulate objects while avoiding obstacles. Each module includes integral electromagnetic actuators energized selectively to produce variety of motions, stationary configurations, and combinations thereof.

  20. Surface chemistry driven actuation in nanoporous gold

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Wittstock, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Biener, M M; Zielasek, V; Kramer, D; Viswanath, R N; Weissmuller, J; Baumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2008-04-14

    Although actuation in biological systems is exclusively powered by chemical energy, this concept has not been realized in man-made actuator technologies, as these rely on generating heat or electricity first. Here, we demonstrate that surface-chemistry driven actuation can be realized in high surface area materials such as nanoporous gold. For example, we achieve reversible strain amplitudes in the order of a few tenths of a percent by alternating exposure of nanoporous Au to ozone and carbon monoxide. The effect can be explained by adsorbate-induced changes of the surface stress, and can be used to convert chemical energy directly into a mechanical response thus opening the door to surface-chemistry driven actuator and sensor technologies.

  1. Electromechanically active polymer blends for actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ji; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Leary, Sean P.

    2000-06-01

    Actuator mechanisms that are lightweight, durable, and efficient are needed to support telerobotic requirements, for future NASA missions. In this work, we present a series of electromechanically active polymer blends that can potentially be used as actuators for a variety of applications. This polymer blend combines an electrostrictive graft-elastomer with a ferroelectric poly (vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) polymer. Mechanical and piezoelectric properties of the blends as a function of temperature, frequency and relative composition of the two constituents in the blends have been studied. Electric field induced strain response of the blend films has also been studied as a function of the relative composition. A bending actuator device was developed incorporating the use of the polymer blend materials. The results and the possible effects of the combination of piezoelectricity and electrostriction in a material system are presented and discussed. This type of analysis may enable the design of blend compositions with optimal strain, mechanical, and dielectric properties for specific actuator applications.

  2. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Materials and Actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lenore Rasmussen, David Schramm, Paul Rasmussen, Kevin Mullaly, Ras Labs, LLC, Intelligent Materials for Prosthetics & Automation, Lewis D. Meixler, Daniel Pearlman and Alice Kirk

    2011-05-23

    Ras Labs produces contractile electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple, and contract (new development) with low electric input. In addition, Ras Labs produces EAP materials that quickly contract and expand, repeatedly, by reversing the polarity of the electric input, which can be cycled. This phenomenon was explored using molecular modeling, followed by experimentation. Applied voltage step functions were also investigated. High voltage steps followed by low voltage steps produced a larger contraction followed by a smaller contraction. Actuator control by simply adjusting the electric input is extremely useful for biomimetic applications. Muscles are able to partially contract. If muscles could only completely contract, nobody could hold an egg, for example, without breaking it. A combination of high and low voltage step functions could produce gross motor function and fine manipulation within the same actuator unit. Plasma treated electrodes with various geometries were investigated as a means of providing for more durable actuation.

  3. Research on Plasma Synthetic Jet Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, X. K.; Nie, W. S.; Hou, Z. Y.

    2011-09-01

    Circular dielectric barrier surface discharge (DBDs) actuator is a new concept of zero mass synthetic jet actuator. The characteristic of discharge and flow control effect of annular-circular plasma synthetic jet actuator has been studied by means of of numerical simulation and experiment. The discharge current density, electron density, electrostatic body force density and flowfield have been obtained. The results show annular-circular actuator can produce normal jet whose velocity will be greater than 2.0 m/s. The jet will excite circumfluence. In order to insure the discharge is generated in the exposed electrode annular and produce centripetal and normal electrostatic body force, the width and annular diameter of exposed electrode must be big enough, or an opposite phase drove voltage potential should be applied between the two electrodes.

  4. Considerations for contractile electroactive materials and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Schramm, David; Rasmussen, Paul; Mullally, Kevin; Meixler, Lewis D.; Pearlman, Daniel; Kirk, Alice

    2011-04-01

    Ras Labs produces contractile electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple, and contract (new development) with low electric input. In addition, Ras Labs produces EAP materials that quickly contract and expand, repeatedly, by reversing the polarity of the electric input, which can be cycled. This phenomenon was explored using molecular modeling, followed by experimentation. Applied voltage step functions were also investigated. High voltage steps followed by low voltage steps produced a larger contraction followed by a smaller contraction. Actuator control by simply adjusting the electric input is extremely useful for biomimetic applications. Muscles are able to partially contract. If muscles could only completely contract, nobody could hold an egg, for example, without breaking it. A combination of high and low voltage step functions could produce gross motor function and fine manipulation within the same actuator unit. Plasma treated electrodes with various geometries were investigated as a means of providing for more durable actuation.

  5. Tension Stiffened and Tendon Actuated Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R. (Inventor); Dorsey, John T. (Inventor); Ganoe, George G. (Inventor); King, Bruce D. (Inventor); Jones, Thomas C. (Inventor); Mercer, Charles D. (Inventor); Corbin, Cole K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A tension stiffened and tendon actuated manipulator is provided performing robotic-like movements when acquiring a payload. The manipulator design can be adapted for use in-space, lunar or other planetary installations as it is readily configurable for acquiring and precisely manipulating a payload in both a zero-g environment and in an environment with a gravity field. The manipulator includes a plurality of link arms, a hinge connecting adjacent link arms together to allow the adjacent link arms to rotate relative to each other and a cable actuation and tensioning system provided between adjacent link arms. The cable actuation and tensioning system includes a spreader arm and a plurality of driven and non-driven elements attached to the link arms and the spreader arm. At least one cable is routed around the driven and non-driven elements for actuating the hinge.

  6. Sensors and actuators inherent in biological species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taya, Minoru; Stahlberg, Rainer; Li, Fanghong; Zhao, Ying Joyce

    2007-04-01

    This paper addresses examples of sensing and active mechanisms inherent in some biological species where both plants and animals cases are discussed: mechanosensors and actuators in Venus Fly Trap and cucumber tendrils, chemosensors in insects, two cases of interactions between different kingdoms, (i) cotton plant smart defense system and (ii) bird-of-paradise flower and hamming bird interaction. All these cases lead us to recognize how energy-efficient and flexible the biological sensors and actuators are. This review reveals the importance of integration of sensing and actuation functions into an autonomous system if we make biomimetic design of a set of new autonomous systems which can sense and actuate under a number of different stimuli and threats.

  7. Actuators Based on Liquid Crystalline Elastomer Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongrui; Li, Chensha; Huang, Xuezhen

    2013-01-01

    Liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) exhibit a number of remarkable physical effects, including the unique, high-stroke reversible mechanical actuation when triggered by external stimuli. This article reviews some recent exciting developments in the field of LCEs materials with an emphasis on their utilization in actuator applications. Such applications include artificial muscles, industrial manufacturing, health and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). With suitable synthetic and preparation pathways and well-controlled actuation stimuli, such as heat, light, electric and magnetic field, excellent physical properties of LCE materials can be realized. By comparing the actuating properties of different systems, general relationships between the structure and the property of LCEs are discussed. How these materials can be turned into usable devices using interdisciplinary techniques is also described. PMID:23648966

  8. Nylon-muscle-actuated robotic finger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lianjun; Jung de Andrade, Monica; Rome, Richard S.; Haines, Carter; Lima, Marcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Tadesse, Yonas

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental analysis of novel artificial muscles, made of twisted and coiled nylon fibers, for powering a biomimetic robotic hand. The design is based on circulating hot and cold water to actuate the artificial muscles and obtain fast finger movements. The actuation system consists of a spring and a coiled muscle within a compliant silicone tube. The silicone tube provides a watertight, expansible compartment within which the coiled muscle contracts when heated and expands when cooled. The fabrication and characterization of the actuating system are discussed in detail. The performance of the coiled muscle fiber in embedded conditions and the related characteristics of the actuated robotic finger are described.

  9. Self-actuating reactor shutdown system

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Brummond, Willian A; Peterson, Leslie F.

    1988-01-01

    A control system for the automatic or self-actuated shutdown or "scram" of a nuclear reactor. The system is capable of initiating scram insertion by a signal from the plant protection system or by independent action directly sensing reactor conditions of low-flow or over-power. Self-actuation due to a loss of reactor coolant flow results from a decrease of pressure differential between the upper and lower ends of an absorber element. When the force due to this differential falls below the weight of the element, the element will fall by gravitational force to scram the reactor. Self-actuation due to high neutron flux is accomplished via a valve controlled by an electromagnet and a thermionic diode. In a reactor over-power, the diode will be heated to a change of state causing the electromagnet to be shorted thereby actuating the valve which provides the changed flow and pressure conditions required for scramming the absorber element.

  10. Mirrors Containing Biomimetic Shape-Control Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart

    2003-01-01

    Curved mirrors of a proposed type would comprise lightweight sheets or films containing integral, biologically inspired actuators for controlling their surface figures. These mirrors could be useful in such applications as collection of solar energy, focusing of radio beams, and (provided sufficient precision could be achieved) imaging. These mirrors were originally intended for use in outer space, but it should also be possible to develop terrestrial versions. Several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles have described a variety of approaches to the design of curved, lightweight mirrors containing integral shape-control actuators. The primary distinction between the present approach and the prior approaches lies in the actuator design concept, which involves shapes and movements reminiscent of those of a variety of small, multi-armed animals. The shape and movement of an actuator of this type can also be characterized as reminiscent of that of an umbrella. This concept can be further characterized as a derivative of that of multifinger grippers, the fingers of which are bimorph bending actuators (see Figure 1). The fingers of such actuators can be strips containing any of a variety of materials that have been investigated for use as actuators, including such electroactive polymers as ionomeric polymer/metal composites (IPMCs), ferroelectric polymers, and grafted elastomers. A mirror according to this proposal would be made from a sheet of one of the actuator composites mentioned above. The design would involve many variables, including the pre-curvature and stiffness of the mirror sheet, the required precision of figure control, the required range of variation in focal length (see Figure 2), the required precision of figure control for imaging or non-imaging use, the bending and twisting moments needed to effect the required deformations, and voltage-tomoment coefficients of the actuators, and the voltages accordingly required for actuation. A typical design would call

  11. Tracing characteristic perturbations resulting from Planet-Disk and Binary-Disk interaction in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruge, Jan Philipp; Wolf, Sebastian; Uribe, Ana; Demidova, Tatiana; Klahr, Hubert; Grinin, Vladimir

    2013-07-01

    The perturbation by an additional, gravitating component (planet, binary star) within a protoplanetary disk induces characteristic large-scale structures in the disk density profile. We investigate the observability of these perturbations. On the basis of a large number of (M)HD and SPH simulations, we calculate synthetic scattered and polarized light images as well as thermal re-emission maps of these models and predict the observational results for different instruments from the optical to the (sub)mm wavelength range with a special focus on ALMA. In the first study (A) (Ruge et al., 2013a,c) we investigate the observability of the planet-disk interaction for different star-disk-planet configurations. We predict that ALMA is able to observe planet-induced gaps around stars of various types and for a large range of disk masses. Besides this, we find that ALMA can trace small, local perturbations indicating zonal flows in the disk. The detectability of gaps in scattered light is limited to a range of total disk masses between 1e-4 M_sun and 1e-6 M_sun. Gap detections in both wavelength ranges are feasible for M_disk ~ 1e-4 M_sun. In our second study (B) (Ruge et al. 2013b) we investigate the observability of perturbations in young circumbinary disks for several orbital elements of the binary system. We find that ALMA will allow one to trace characteristic AU-sized spiral arm features in disks in face-on orientation and also to detect binary-induced perturbations in the edge-on brightness profiles. We find that the technique of differential polarimetry offers the potential for significantly clearer detections of these disk structures than imaging in scattered light alone.

  12. Observations of Disks Around Pre--Main-Sequence Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Eric L. N.

    1996-08-01

    factor of four lower than from the spectroscopic binary. Since UZ Tau E and W have similar stellar masses, luminosities, and ages, we conclude that the mass of dust and gas associated with UZ Tau W is reduced solely by the influence of a companion with a separation comparable to a typical disk radius. The disk emission from UZ Tau E is similar to that from single T Tauri stars. In a 1 arcsec-resolution aperture synthesis map, CO (2 --> 1) emission is elongated with a size of 300 AU; a disk model fit to the continuum spectral energy distribution yields a disk mass of 0.06 Modot, larger than the ``minimum mass solar nebula''. In contrast, no CO emission is detected from UZ Tau W, and its 1.3 mm continuum emission is unresolved in a 1 arcsec (FWHM) beam (corresponding to a 70 AU radius). The small extent of the emission and dynamical considerations imply that the 50 AU binary cannot be surrounded by any appreciable circumbinary disk; its mm-wave emission is from circumstellar disks around one or both components with masses in the range of 0.002--0.04 Modot. Finally, we present a study of disk clearing by pre--main-sequence binaries with separations less than 1 AU null. Several binaries have spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with little or no infrared excess at λ = 1--5 microns, requiring that their inner disks be optically thin. In each case the inferred size of the cleared region is comparable to a few times the binary semimajor axis as predicted by theories of binary-disk interactions. Other binaries show large near- and mid-infrared excesses, with little evidence of cleared regions in their disks. The infrared excesses in these binaries can be reproduced by a model in which a gap is cleared by the binary but is partially filled with very low-surface-density dust; this hot, optically-thin dust also reproduces the 9.8 micron silicate emission features observed in two of these systems. Thus, all binaries studied show SEDs which are consistent with the presence of

  13. Handbook of actuators and edge alignment sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D A

    1992-11-01

    This actuator and sensor handbook was developed during a cooperative project between the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, the SDI-Directed Energy Program and LLNL. The common purpose of the joint effort was to develop precision actuators and sensors for the NASA initiated SpacE Laser ENE-rgy Program (SELENE). The purpose of the SELENE Program is to develop a highly cost effective segmented adaptive optics system for beaming laser power directly to spacecraft in earth orbit.

  14. Redundancy of hydraulic flight control actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenoweth, C. C.; Ryder, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The constraint of requiring airplanes to have inherent aerodynamic stability can be removed by using active control systems. The resulting airplane requires control system reliability approaching that of the basic airframe. Redundant control actuators can be used to achieve the required reliability, but create mechanization and operational problems. Of numerous candidate systems, two different approaches to solving the problems associated with redundant actuators which appear the most likely to be used in advanced airplane control systems are described.

  15. Unusual and Superfast Temperature-Triggered Actuators.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaohua; Liu, Fangyao; Lerch, Arne; Ionov, Leonid; Agarwal, Seema

    2015-09-01

    A superfast actuator based on a bilayer fibrous mat shows folding/unfolding and the formation of 3D structures in a fraction of a second. The actuation is reversible for many cycles without losing its form and size, with unfolding at room temperature and folding above 35 °C. The system is promising for making 3D bioscaffolds, electrodes, and micro-/macroactuators. PMID:26186175

  16. Electromechanical flight control actuator, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An electromechanical actuator was developed that will follow a proportional control command with minimum wasted energy to demonstrate the feasibility of meeting space vehicle actuator requirements using advanced electromechanical concepts. The approach was restricted to a four-channel redundant configuration. Each channel has independent drive and control electronics, a brushless electric motor with brake, and velocity and position feedback transducers. A differential gearbox sums the output velocities of the motors. Normally, two motors are active and the other two are braked.

  17. Digital flight control actuation system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossing, R.; Hupp, R.

    1974-01-01

    Flight control actuators and feedback sensors suitable for use in a redundant digital flight control system were examined. The most appropriate design approach for an advanced digital flight control actuation system for development and use in a fly-by-wire system was selected. The concept which was selected consisted of a PM torque motor direct drive. The selected system is compatible with concurrent and independent development efforts on the computer system and the control law mechanizations.

  18. Design and application of shape memory actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertmann, M.; Vergani, G.

    2008-05-01

    The use of shape memory alloys in actuators allows the development of robust, simple and lightweight elements for application in a multitude of different industries. Over the years, the intermetallic compound Nickel-Titanium (NiTi or Nitinol) together with its ternary and quaternary derivates has gained general acceptance as a standard alloy. Even though as many as 99% of all shape memory actuator applications make use of Nitinol there are certain properties of this alloy system which require further research in order to find improvements and new markets: • Lack of higher transformation temperatures in the available alloys in order to open the field of automotive applications (Mf temperature > 80 °C) • Non-linearity in the electrical resistivity in order to improve the controllability of the actuator, • Wide hysteresis in the temperature-vs.-strain behaviour, which has a signi-ficant effect on both, the dynamics of the actuator and its controllability. Hence, there is a constant strive in the field towards an improvement of the related properties. However, these improvements are not always just alloy composition related. There is also a tremendous potential in the thermomechanical treatment of the material and in the design of the actuator. Significant improvement steps are already possible if the usage of the existent materials is optimized for the projected application and if the actuator system is designed in the most efficient way. This paper provides an overview about existent designs, applications and alloys for use in actuators, as well as examples of new shape memory actuator application with improved performance. It also gives an overview about general design rules and reflects about the strengths of the material and the related opportunities for its application.

  19. Microelectromechanical Systems Actuator Based Reconfigurable Printed Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A polarization reconfigurable patch antenna is disclosed. The antenna includes a feed element, a patch antenna element electrically connected to the feed element, and at least one microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator, with a partial connection to the patch antenna element along an edge of the patch antenna element. The polarization of the antenna can be switched between circular polarization and linear polarization through action of the at least one MEMS actuator.

  20. Design-oriented aeroservoelastic optimization of strain-actuated aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Timothy W.

    An integrated design-oriented aeroservoelastic optimization capability for strain-actuated aircraft is presented. This capability is called SMART and it encompasses a suite of computer applications created for conceptual and preliminary design of aircraft augmented with "smart" actuation technologies. The SMART suite of applications includes: (1) a dedicated pre-processor for vehicle geometry, material, actuator, mechanism, and sensor layout; (2) a dedicated finite element automesher for conventional and strain-actuated flight vehicles; (3) integration of structural dynamics with a state of the art commercial unsteady aerodynamics code (ZAERO) via automated pre- and post-processors; (4) a database architecture for analyzing multiple designs and flight conditions; and (5) automated open- and closed-loop aeroservoelastic (ASE) model preparation. The analysis techniques used as the basis for SMART are suitable (within the range of application of linear theory) for modeling real flight vehicles with real large-scale structural, aerodynamic, and control systems. These techniques include: (6) dedicated linear finite element infrastructure for modeling conventional and strain-actuated (temperature and voltage induced) flight structures; (7) dedicated static and dynamic finite element solvers; (8) state space stability analysis for coupled aeroservoelastic systems; (9) computational tools for LQR controller design; and (10) analysis tools for the calculation of random response of linear systems to random inputs. SMART can compute: (11) static aeroelastic deformations and stresses in trimmed maneuvering elastic airplanes; (12) open-loop aeroelastic poles; (13) closed-loop (control by LQR) aeroservoelastic poles; (14) gust response (random gusts) of the open-loop and closed-loop aeroservoelastic system, and, also, when aerodynamic loads are not present; and (15) deformation and stresses of passive or actively-controlled structures subject to dynamic and static loads. To

  1. The aerodynamic cost of flight in bats--comparing theory with measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Busse, Rhea; Waldman, Rye M.; Swartz, Sharon M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2012-11-01

    Aerodynamic theory has long been used to predict the aerodynamic power required for animal flight. However, even though the actuator disk model does not account for the flapping motion of a wing, it is used for lack of any better model. The question remains: how close are these predictions to reality? We designed a study to compare predicted aerodynamic power to measured power from the kinetic energy contained in the wake shed behind a bat flying in a wind tunnel. A high-accuracy displaced light-sheet stereo PIV system was used in the Trefftz plane to capture the wake behind four bats flown over a range of flight speeds (1-6m/s). The total power in the wake was computed from the wake vorticity and these estimates were compared with the power predicted using Pennycuick's model for bird flight as well as estimates derived from measurements of the metabolic cost of flight, previously acquired from the same individuals.

  2. Thin-disk piezoceramic ultrasonic motor. Part I: design and performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuh Liang; Yen, Chi Yung; Ouyang, Minsun

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain the knowledge and experience in the design of thin-disk piezoceramic-driving ultrasonic actuator dedicated. In this paper, the design and construction of an innovative ultrasonic actuator is developed as a stator, which is a composite structure consisting of piezoceramic (PZT) membrane bonded on a metal sheet. Such a concentric PZT structure possesses the electrical and mechanical coupling characteristics in flexural wave. The driving ability of the actuator comes from the mechanical vibration of extension and shrinkage of a metal sheet due to the converse piezoelectric effect, corresponding to the frequency of a single-phase AC power. By applying the constraints on the specific geometry positions on the metal sheet, the various behaviors of flexural waves have been at the different directions. The rotor is impelled by the actuator with rotational speeds of 600 rpm in maximum using a friction-contact mechanism. Very high actuating and braking abilities are obtained. This simple and inexpensive structure of actuator demonstrates that the mechanical design of actuator and rotor could be done separately and flexibly according to the requirements for various applications. And, its running accuracy and positioning precision are described in Part II.A closed loop servo positioning control i.e. sliding mode control (SMC) is used to compensate automatically for nonlinearly mechanical behaviors such as dry friction, ultrasonic vibrating, slip-stick phenomena. Additionally, SMC scheme has been successfully applied to position tracking to prove the excellent robust performance in noise rejection. PMID:12853080

  3. Multiwavelength search for protoplanetary disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Schmidt-Kaler, Theodor

    1994-01-01

    Infrared emission of circumstellar dust was observed for almost one hundred T Tauri stars. This dust is interpreted to be part of a protoplanetary disk orbiting the central star. T Tauri stars are young stellar objects and evolve into solar type stars. Planets are believed to form in these disks. The spectral energy distribution of a disk depends on its temperature profile. Different disk regions emit at different wavelengths. The disk-star boundary layer is hot and emits H(alpha) radiation. Inner disk regions at around 1 AU with a temperature of a few hundred Kelvin can be probed in near infrared wavelength regimes. Outer disk regions at around 100 AU distance from the star are colder and emit far infrared and sub-millimeter radiation. Also, X-ray emission from the stellar surface can reveal information on disk properties. Emission from the stellar surface and the boundary layer may be shielded by circumstellar gas and dust. T Tauri stars with low H(alpha) emission, i.e. no boundary layer, show stronger X-ray emission than classical T Tauri stars, because the inner disk regions of weak emission-line T Tauri stars may be clear of material. In this paper, first ROSAT all sky survey results on the X-ray emission of T Tauri stars and correlations between X-ray luminosity and properties of T Tauri disks are presented. Due to atmospheric absorption, X-ray and most infrared observations cannot be carried out on Earth, but from Earth orbiting satellites (e.g. IRAS, ROSAT, ISO) or from lunar based observatories, which would have special advantages such as a stable environment.

  4. Berkeley Disk Resource Manager

    2004-02-27

    The Berkeley Disk Resource Manager (B-DRM) is a middleware component whose function is to provide dynamic space allocation and file management of a shared disk system on the Grid. It provides space allocation and dynamic information on storage availability for the planning and execution of Grid jobs. The B-DRM manages two types of resources: space and files. Vi1en managing space, the B-DRM allocates space to the requesting client based on a default space quota, Thenmore » managing files, the B-DRM allocates space for files, invokes file transfer services to move files into the space, pins files for a certain lifetime, releases files upon the client’s request, and uses file replacement policies to optimize the use of the shared space. The B-DRM is designed to provide effective sharing of files, by monitoring the activity of shared files, and making dynamic decisions on which files to replace when space is needed. In addition, the B-DRM performs automatic garbage collection of unused files when space is needed by removing selected files that were released by the client or whose lifetime has expired. The BDRM supports requests to get multiple files in a single call, manages a queue of the requested files, brings in as many files as the space quota permits, and continues to reuse the space when files are released to stream files to the client until the entire request is satisfied. Similarly, the B-DRM supports requests to put multiple files into its space, streaming files into the allocated space and reusing the space if necessary.« less

  5. RAID 7 disk array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Lloyd

    1993-01-01

    Each RAID level reflects a different design architecture. Associated with each is a backdrop of imposed limitations, as well as possibilities which may be exploited within the architectural constraints of that level. There are three unique features that differentiate RAID 7 from all other levels. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to usage of I/O data paths. Each I/O drive (includes all data and one parity drives) as well as each host interface (there may be multiple host interfaces) has independent control and data paths. This means that each can be accessed completely, independently, of the other. This is facilitated by a separate device cache for each device/interface as well. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to device hierarchy and data bus utilization. Each drive and each interface is connected to a high speed data bus controlled by the embedded operating system to make independent transfers to and from central cache. RAID 7 is asynchronous with respect to the operation of an embedded real time process oriented operating system. This means that exclusive and independent of the host, or multiple host paths, the embedded OS manages all I/O transfers asynchronously across the data and parity drives. A key factor to consider is that of the RAID 7's ability to anticipate and match host I/O usage patterns. This yields the following benefits over RAID's built around micro-code based architectures. RAID 7 appears to the host as a normally connected Big Fast Disk (BFD). RAID 7 appears, from the perspective of the individual disk devices, to minimize the total number of accesses and optimize read/write transfer requests. RAID 7 smoothly integrates the random demands of independent users with the principles of spatial and temporal locality. This optimizes small, large, and time sequenced I/O requests which results in users having an I/O performance which approaches performance to that of main memory.

  6. Berkeley Disk Resource Manager

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alex; Gu, Junmin

    2004-02-27

    The Berkeley Disk Resource Manager (B-DRM) is a middleware component whose function is to provide dynamic space allocation and file management of a shared disk system on the Grid. It provides space allocation and dynamic information on storage availability for the planning and execution of Grid jobs. The B-DRM manages two types of resources: space and files. Vi1en managing space, the B-DRM allocates space to the requesting client based on a default space quota, Then managing files, the B-DRM allocates space for files, invokes file transfer services to move files into the space, pins files for a certain lifetime, releases files upon the client’s request, and uses file replacement policies to optimize the use of the shared space. The B-DRM is designed to provide effective sharing of files, by monitoring the activity of shared files, and making dynamic decisions on which files to replace when space is needed. In addition, the B-DRM performs automatic garbage collection of unused files when space is needed by removing selected files that were released by the client or whose lifetime has expired. The BDRM supports requests to get multiple files in a single call, manages a queue of the requested files, brings in as many files as the space quota permits, and continues to reuse the space when files are released to stream files to the client until the entire request is satisfied. Similarly, the B-DRM supports requests to put multiple files into its space, streaming files into the allocated space and reusing the space if necessary.

  7. Large stroke actuators for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, B.; Kubby, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we review the use of a 3-dimensional MEMS fabrication process to prototype long stroke (>10 μm) actuators as are required for use in future adaptive optics systems in astronomy and vision science. The Electrochemical Fabrication (EFAB TM) process that was used creates metal micro-structures by electroplating multiple, independently patterned layers. The process has the design freedom of rapid prototyping where multiple patterned layers are stacked to build structures with virtually any desired geometry, but in contrast has much greater precision, the capability for batch fabrication and provides parts in engineering materials such as nickel. The design freedom enabled by this process has been used to make both parallel plate and comb drive actuator deformable mirror designs that can have large vertical heights of up to 1 mm. As the thickness of the sacrificial layers used to release the actuator is specified by the designer, rather than by constraints of the fabrication process, the design of large-stroke actuators is straightforward and does not require any new process development. Since the number of material layers in the EFAB TM process is also specified by the designer it has been possible to gang multiple parallel plate actuators together to decrease the voltage required for long-stroke actuators.

  8. Actuators For A Segmented Mirror Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, George

    1983-11-01

    The active control of segmented mirrors requires actuators to move the segments in response to perturbations. Each segment of the University of California Ten Meter Telescope has three of its six rigid-body degrees of freedom actively controlled; piston and tilt about two axes. The system design requires the actuator to carry a load that varies as the telescope moves from zenith to horizon. The maximum load is one third of the segment mass, about 150kg. The system design also needs actuator adjustment resolution less than 20nm over a range of 3mm with a 2µm/sec response rate. Actuators which satisfy these requirements have been designed, built, and tested. A torque motor turns a screw shaft whose axial load is taken by a roller thrust bearing. Simultaneously the screw drives a roller nut to position the mirror segment. The roller screw converts rotary to linear motion with nanometer smoothness over a large dynamic range. A stick-slip behavior in the thrust bearing makes the mechanical system non-linear for small motions. Each actuator has a microprocessor-controlled servo loop and the servo loop algorithm compensates for this non-linear behavior. The actuator design and servo loop algorithm are described and the results of servo loop performance tests are given.

  9. Actuators for a segmented mirror control system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, George

    1984-01-01

    The active control of segmented mirrors requires actuators to move the segments in response to perturbations. Each segment of the University of California Ten Meter Telescope has three of its six rigid-body degrees of freedom actively controlled; piston and tilt about two axes. The system design requires the actuator to carry a load that varies as the telescope moves from zenith to horizon. The maximum load is one third of the segment mass, about 150kg. The system design also needs actuator adjustment resolution less than 20nm over a range of 3mm with a 2 m/sec response rate. Actuators which satisfy these requirements have been designed, built, and tested. A torque motor turns a screw shaft whose axial load is taken by a roller thrust bearing. Simultaneously the screw drives a roller nut to position the mirror segment. The roller screw converts rotary to linear motion with nanometer smoothness over a large dynamic range. A stick-slip behavior in the thrust bearing makes the mechanical system non-linear for small motions. Each actuator has a microprocessor-controlled servo loop and the servo loop algorithm compensates for this non-linear behavior. The actuator design and servo loop algorithm are described and the results of servo loop performance tests are given.

  10. Dielectric Elastomer Actuated Systems and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The system of the present invention includes an actuator having at least two electrodes, an elastomeric dielectric film disposed between the two electrodes, and a frame attached to the elastomeric dielectric film. The frame provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The displacement range is preferably the stroke of the actuator. The displacement range can be about 5 mm and greater. Further, the frame can include a plurality of configurations, for example, at least a rigid members coupled to a flexible member wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. In preferred embodiments, the rigid member can be, but is not limited to, curved beams, parallel beams, rods and plates. In a preferred embodiment the actuator can further include a passive element disposed between two flexible members such as, for example, links to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. Further, the actuator can include a plurality of layers of the elastomeric dielectric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of different materials such as, for example, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  11. Networked Rectenna Array for Smart Material Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Golembiewski, Walter T.; Song, Kyo D.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of microwave-driven smart material actuators is envisioned as the best option to alleviate the complexity associated with hard-wired control circuitry. Networked rectenna patch array receives and converts microwave power into a DC power for an array of smart actuators. To use microwave power effectively, the concept of a power allocation and distribution (PAD) circuit is adopted for networking a rectenna/actuator patch array. The PAD circuit is imbedded into a single embodiment of rectenna and actuator array. The thin-film microcircuit embodiment of PAD circuit adds insignificant amount of rigidity to membrane flexibility. Preliminary design and fabrication of PAD circuitry that consists of a few nodal elements were made for laboratory testing. The networked actuators were tested to correlate the network coupling effect, power allocation and distribution, and response time. The features of preliminary design are 16-channel computer control of actuators by a PCI board and the compensator for a power failure or leakage of one or more rectennas.

  12. Sweeping Jet Actuator in a Quiescent Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti; Melton, Latunia P.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a detailed analysis of a sweeping jet (fluidic oscillator) actuator. The sweeping jet actuator promises to be a viable flow control actuator candidate due to its simple, no moving part structure and its high momentum, spatially oscillating flow output. Hot-wire anemometer and particle image velocimetry measurements were carried out with an emphasis on understanding the actuator flow field in a quiescent environment. The time averaged, fluctuating, and instantaneous velocity measurements are provided. A modified actuator concept that incorporates high-speed solenoid valves to control the frequency of oscillation enabled phase averaged measurements of the oscillating jet. These measurements reveal that in a given oscillation cycle, the oscillating jet spends more time on each of the Coanda surfaces. In addition, the modified actuator generates four different types of flow fields, namely: a non oscillating downward jet, a non oscillating upward jet, a non oscillating straight jet, and an oscillating jet. The switching from an upward jet to a downward jet is accomplished by providing a single pulse from the solenoid valve. Once the flow is switched, the flow stays there until another pulse is received. The oscillating jet is compared with a non oscillating straight jet, which is a typical planar turbulent jet. The results indicate that the oscillating jet has a higher (5 times) spreading rate, more flow entrainment, and higher velocity fluctuations (equal to the mean velocity).

  13. Double nanoplate-based NEMS under hydrostatic and electrostatic actuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Hosseini, S. H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Presented herein is a comprehensive investigation on the nonlinear vibration behavior of nanoplate-based nano electromechanical systems (NEMS) under hydrostatic and electrostatic actuations based on nonlocal elasticity and Gurtin-Murdoch theory. Using nonlinear strain-displacement relations, the geometrical nonlinearity is modeled. Based on Kelvin-Voigt model, the influence of the viscoelastic coefficient is also discussed. Nonlocal plate theory and Hamilton's principle are utilized for deriving the governing equations. Furthermore, the differential quadrature method (DQM) is employed to compute the nonlinear frequency. In addition, pull-in voltage and hydrostatic pressure are considered by comparing the results obtained from nanoplates made of two different materials including aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si). Finally, the influences of important parameters including the small scale, thickness of the nanoplate, center gap and Winkler coefficient in the actuated nanoplate are thoroughly studied. The plots for the ratio of nonlinear-to-linear frequencies against thickness, maximum transverse amplitude and non-dimensional center gap of nanoplate are also presented.

  14. Accretion of solid materials onto circumplanetary disks from protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Maruta, Akito; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the accretion of solid materials onto circumplanetary disks from heliocentric orbits rotating in protoplanetary disks, which is a key process for the formation of regular satellite systems. In the late stage of the gas-capturing phase of giant planet formation, the accreting gas from protoplanetary disks forms circumplanetary disks. Since the accretion flow toward the circumplanetary disks affects the particle motion through gas drag force, we use hydrodynamic simulation data for the gas drag term to calculate the motion of solid materials. We consider a wide range of size for the solid particles (10{sup –2}-10{sup 6} m), and find that the accretion efficiency of the solid particles peaks around 10 m sized particles because energy dissipation of drag with circum-planetary disk gas in this size regime is most effective. The efficiency for particles larger than 10 m becomes lower because gas drag becomes less effective. For particles smaller than 10 m, the efficiency is lower because the particles are strongly coupled with the background gas flow, which prevents particles from accretion. We also find that the distance from the planet where the particles are captured by the circumplanetary disks is in a narrow range and well described as a function of the particle size.

  15. Electrically actuated multiple store launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Frank P.; Travor, Bruce W.

    1991-12-01

    This invention comprises a multi-store, electrical pulse initiated launcher that fits into, and is electrically connected with a transporting vehicle and that contains sequentially stacked assemblies. An electrical pulse from the transporting vehicle causes a resistor with the least value to transfer the electric sufficient gas pressure to force the store out of the launcher. The present invention discloses an electrically-actuated, multi-store dispenser wherein an initial electrical charge ignites gas cartridges causing sequential launching of stores from their tandem position inside a launch container. In some environments, it is desirable to dispense multiple stores from a launch vehicle, for instance sonobuoys, in dense patterns. Due to physical limitations of space in the dispensing vehicle, an effort was made to miniaturize the active components inside the store and therefore reduce the overall outer dimensions thereof. Once the size of the store was reduced, in order to meet the demands of the denser patterns, the inside of the individual launch containers were modified to allow each to hold and dispense more than one store. This new type of launch container, in addition to maintaining the size requirement dictated by the transporting vehicle, is operated by the vehicle's electrical system.

  16. High-pressure microhydraulic actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mosier, Bruce P [San Francisco, CA; Crocker, Robert W [Fremont, CA; Patel, Kamlesh D [Dublin, CA

    2008-06-10

    Electrokinetic ("EK") pumps convert electric to mechanical work when an electric field exerts a body force on ions in the Debye layer of a fluid in a packed bed, which then viscously drags the fluid. Porous silica and polymer monoliths (2.5-mm O.D., and 6-mm to 10-mm length) having a narrow pore size distribution have been developed that are capable of large pressure gradients (250-500 psi/mm) when large electric fields (1000-1500 V/cm) are applied. Flowrates up to 200 .mu.L/min and delivery pressures up to 1200 psi have been demonstrated. Forces up to 5 lb-force at 0.5 mm/s (12 mW) have been demonstrated with a battery-powered DC-DC converter. Hydraulic power of 17 mW (900 psi@ 180 uL/min) has been demonstrated with wall-powered high voltage supplies. The force and stroke delivered by an actuator utilizing an EK pump are shown to exceed the output of solenoids, stepper motors, and DC motors of similar size, despite the low thermodynamic efficiency.

  17. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1994-10-25

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw. 10 figs.

  18. Low backlash direct drive actuator

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1994-01-01

    A low backlash direct drive actuator is described which comprises a motor such as a stepper motor having at least 200 steps per revolution; a two part hub assembly comprising a drive hub coaxially attached to the shaft of the motor and having a plurality of drive pins; a driven hub having a plurality of bores in one end thereof in alignment with the drive pins in the drive hub and a threaded shaft coaxially mounted in an opposite end of the driven hub; and a housing having a central bore therein into which are fitted the drive hub and driven hub, the housing having a motor mount on one end thereof to which is mounted the stepper motor, and a closed end portion with a threaded opening therein coaxial with the central bore in the housing and receiving therein the threaded shaft attached to the driven hub. Limit switches mounted to the housing cooperate with an enlarged lip on the driven hub to limit the lateral travel of the driven hub in the housing, which also acts to limit the lateral travel of the threaded shaft which functions as a lead screw.

  19. Fully redundant mechanical release actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, Melvin H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for performing a mechanical release function exhibiting low shock. This system includes two pyrotechnic detents fixed mounted in opposing axial alignment within a cylindrical housing having two mechanical bellows. Two mechanical bellow assemblies, each having one end hermetically bonded to the housing and the other to the respective actuator pin extending from either end of the housing, ensure that all outgassing and contamination from the operation of the pyrotechnic devices will be contained within the housing and bellows. The pin on one end of the assembly is fixed mounted and supported, via a bolt or ball-and-socket joint so that when the charge corresponding to that pin ignites, the entire assembly will exhibit rectilinear movement, including the opposing pin providing the unlatching motion. The release detent pin is supported by a linear bearing and when its corresponding pyrotechnic charge ignites the pin is retracted within the housing producing the same unlatching motion without movement of the entire assembly, thus providing complete mechanical, electrical and pyrotechnic redundancy for the unlatching pin.

  20. Lightweight Exoskeletons with Controllable Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mavrodis, Constantinos; Melli-Huber, Juan; Fisch, Avi (Alan)

    2004-01-01

    A proposed class of lightweight exoskeletal electromechanical systems would include electrically controllable actuators that would generate torques and forces that, depending on specific applications, would resist and/or assist wearers movements. The proposed systems would be successors to relatively heavy, bulky, and less capable human-strength-amplifying exoskeletal electromechanical systems that have been subjects of research during the past four decades. The proposed systems could be useful in diverse applications in which there are needs for systems that could be donned or doffed easily, that would exert little effect when idle, and that could be activated on demand: examples of such applications include (1) providing controlled movement and/or resistance to movement for physical exercise and (2) augmenting wearers strengths in the performance of military, law-enforcement, and industrial tasks. An exoskeleton according to the proposal would include adjustable lightweight graphite/epoxy struts and would be attached to the wearer's body by belts made of hook-and-pile material. At selected rotary and linear joints, the exoskeleton would be fitted, variously, with lightweight, low-power-consumption rotary and linear brakes, clutches, and motors. The exoskeleton would also be equipped with electronic circuitry for monitoring, control, and possibly communication with external electronic circuits that would perform additional monitoring and control functions.